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WORKERS GUILD ORGANIZING

Empowering the Labor Force from Below

An Integration Paper on Community Organization Concentration


(SW 280 & SW 281)

By: Regine D. Peaflor, RSW

TABLE OF CONTENTS
I: II: Executive Summary.. 4 Introduction.... 5 A. B. C. D. Rationale Objective of the Study Significance of the Study Scope & Limitations

III: Review of Related Literature. 6 IV. Methodology. 8 V. The Framework.... 9 VI. Project Concept: Workers Guild 11 A. General Objective B. Specific Objectives C. Description of the Project D. Functions of Workers Guild E. Social Enterprise Component of the Workers Guild F. Main Features of Workers Guild G. Economic Sustainability Model H. Organizing Sustainability Model I. Potential Partners from the Business Sectors J. Expected Benefits of the Guild Members VII. The Organizing Experiences.. VIII. Other Significant Accomplishments. IX. Findings. X. Contribution to Social Work Body of Knowledge.. XI. Conclusion.. XII. Recommendation.. XIII. References.... XIV. Appendices... C.O Photos Semestral Plan (SY 2008-2009) Success Stories The agency (ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation) List of Trainees and Employment Status List of Partner Companies and Training Institutions Minutes of community meetings Qualification Guidelines in selecting applicants for technical training Interview tool in selecting applicants for technical training Proposal Letter Template for Companies Conforme Slip for Companies Letter of Endorsement Template MOA Draft 18 23 25 26 27 28 29 30

A. B. C. D. E. F. G. H. I. J. K. L. M.

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N. Training Contract Sample (Masonry & Carpentry) O. TESDA Scholarship Certificate Sample

ABBREVIATION/DEFINITION

Bayan-refers to ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation, Inc. Buklod-refers to the group of micro-finance clients of ABS-CBN Bayan C.O-Community Organizing CCT- Center for community Transformation DMCI- D.M Consunji, Inc. (construction company) DOLE-Department of Labor and Employment GM-Guild Master HELP-Health, Employment and Livelihood Program HQA-Highly Qualified Applicants KSA-Knowledge, Skills and Attitude LGU-Local Government Unit NCR-National Capital Region NSO-National Statistics Office OJT-On-the-Job Training PAR-Portfolio At Risk RSW-Registered Social Worker RTO- Regional Training Officer SEDO- Social and Entrepreneurial Development Officer SED-Social Enterprise Development SW-Social Work TESDA- Technical Education and Skills Development Authority VMG-Vision, Mission, Goal WG-Workers Guild

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I.

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

Through the years, C.O continuously redefines its meaning and direction as the socioeconomic and political climate changes. Social workers who strive to re-invent themselves in a changing time and in a changing society must strategically re-position to be able to create a bigger impact in the communities they served. This paper is an attempt to test the proposed framework in addressing the unemployment issue which affects about six (6) million Filipinos. The SW fieldworker used collaboration as a strategy to get support from various training institutions, business organizations, companies/industries, church-based organizations, government agencies, civic organizations, non-government organizations, local/international labor groups in order to achieve the desired goal (increase employment rate). One of the most important elements in collaborative framework is the organizing component which refers to workers guild organizing for the purpose of providing employment opportunities for the target clients thru the creation and development of social enterprises which will function as the community-based employment center. Its social mission is to ensure job continuity among its members whether direct employment with companies or selfemployment as a group by providing labor services/products to client companies in a form of sub-contracting projects to construction, food (catering services) and other industries. Eventually, these workers guilds shall be known by its excellent craftsmanship. Companies, corporations and industries shall patronize workers from the guilds due to its reputation as highly skilled and good attitude towards work that differentiates them from the rest of the workforce. As organized labor group, they will have the bargaining power to negotiate with companies. This paper also discusses the partial process of actual community organizing experience of the SW fieldworker in the context of collaboration framework which taught her to go beyond the traditional way of thinking upon realizing the significance of her role as the collaborator of stakeholders. She performed multi-disciplinar roles in examining the nature and dynamics of the issue on unemployment to fully understand and effectively respond to it while maintaining her distinction as a professional helper (social worker). One of the significant learning of SW fieldworker in addressing the unemployment issue is adopting an industry- driven approach. Analyzing the dynamics of employment market, the power to hire people is in the hands of employers who have specific qualifications and standards. To meet those standards, the jobseekers/unemployed should possess those skills to be able to increase the probability to get hired. The role of the social worker is equipped the jobseekers/unemployed with necessary skills by tapping resources (training scholarship,
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reputable training center and potential employers). Throughout the process, the organizing component comes naturallyfrom social preparatory stage e.i. consultation on both parties, the grassroots and the business communities including other stakeholders; skills mapping; action planning; implementation; evaluation of the project and so on

II. INTRODUCTION

A.

Rationale

Millions of people across the world lost their jobs due to the global economic crisis. According
to current statistics, 65 million Filipinos lived less than US$ 1 a day. As of February 2009, about 60, 000 Filipino workers from various industry sectors has been laid-off. The Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) projected that unemployment rate will increase from 7.30% to 10%. With 56.4 million labor force, it means that almost 6 million workers will be unemployed this year (2009). Various programs and services were done by government and non-government organizations to address the poverty issue however, these efforts were not enough. The absence of genuine participation of grassroots is missing thus, dependency continually exists. In the context of ABS-CBN Bayan, micro-finance program was been a major tool for poverty alleviation for more than a decade however, majority of its clients remained poor due to improper use of loans, hand to mouth existence which swallowed the capital and eventually lead to bankruptcy. These clients were stuck in a vicious cycle of debts whose family members are unemployed and dependent on their small businesses. Since ninety five percent (95%) of these clients are women who carried a great burden of household chores and economic activity, the idea of helping their family members (husband, employable offspring and relatives) emerged thru employment assistance and technical training program. Bayan believes that if two or more family members are earning, their lives will improved and eventually take them out of poverty. A year after the implementation of employment assistance program, Bayan realized that its work never come to an end due to contractualization (4-6 months work policy). Former clients went back at least a month prior to the expiration of their contracts. Furthermore, the issue on job continuity remains unsolved. Thus, the idea of workers guild organizing was conceptualized to ensure continuous employment for its members through alternative source of income by establishing social enterprises which will eventually serve as the community based employment center.

B.

Objectives of the Study

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This study aims to test the viability of workers guild project concept and the effectivity of its framework (collaboration). It also aims to evaluate the said concept and framework, identify the loop holes and come up with recommendations for improvement. The second objective of this study is to develop SW Fieldworkers skills in community organization management and social advocacy on the issue on unemployment through technical trainings, conferences, interpersonal and mass media.

C.

Significance of the Study

Once the proposed framework is proven effective, it will serve as a model for various development organizations, government and likeminded institutions to address social issues affecting peoples lives. This study will also guide social workers and development managers to exhaust existing resources in the community using the proposed framework of collaboration and strategically re-positioning her/himself to create a greater impact. For the unemployed/underemployed and informal workers, this paper will encourage them to organize themselves formally and eventually become a community-based employment center. For the companies/industries, the concept of workers guild will be beneficial to them as their constant source of highly qualified applicants for their projects to be delivered on time. D.

Scope and Limitations

This study focus on the effectivity of collaboration framework, highlighting the workers guild organizing as a strategy in addressing the issues on unemployment which includes several components such as technical training, mobilization of partners for employment and attempts for fund sourcing. Since community organizing requires an element of time, this study covers the partial C.O processes specifically on the formation of the Workers Guild and the establishment of their social enterprises as a community based employment center. However, since this project has been institutionalized within the organization (ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation), the continuity is not a problem. Hopefully, the establishment of social enterprises will be covered in the next two semesters of SY 2009-2010 for thesis writing.

III. REVIEW OF RELATED LITERATURE

COMMUNITY ORGANIZING (C.O)


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In the Philippines, Community Organizing has been widely used by social development organizations, government agencies, church-based organizations and other likeminded institutions in implementing various forms of development programs since 1970s. Through the years, C.O continuously redefines its meaning and direction as the socio-economic and political climate change. The bottom line of C.O is to meet both ends-- between needs and resources. In the context of unemployment/underemployment issue, the jobseeker and the employer have to meet in order to satisfy both needs (job for the jobseeker to earn a living and skill/manpower for the employer to run his/her business which eventually turns into profit). However, prior to employment, there are set of standards/qualifications that must satisfy e.i. salary/benefits for jobseeker and skill/knowledge/attitude required by the employer. In case of dissatisfaction from either of the parties, transaction is cancelled. More often, its the jobseekers that lost the opportunity and victimized by injustice of employers. The three elements of C.O come in during this process, specifically education that will liberate them from the oppression of employers. They must understand the dynamics of hiring (employer preferences, dos & donts of interviewing, common questions asks during the interview, proper resume writing, etc.), reflecting on their strengths and weaknesses, technical training if needed to increase their credential to be hired, and do something to reach the goal to be employed or self-employed individually or as a group. The second element of C.O which is the formation of peoples organization. The jobseekers must organize themselves and continually go through a series of technical training until they are considered HQA (Highly Qualified Applicant). If they possess such skills, good attitude, knowledge and being organized, they have the power to negotiate and demand salary to the employer. Studying the issue of power and control, its always the companies who have the power to decide whom they will hire and dictate the salary. To reverse the pyramid, the jobseekers must be skilled, knowledgeable, possessed good attitude towards work and with collective power being an organized labor group; they can demand a higher salary specifically for subcontract job. The third element of C.O is the mobilization of resources. In this case, the jobseekers themselves with their respective KSA (Knowledge, Skills and Attitude) are the greatest resourcesKSA is their business that they offer to the companies. Given the above illustration, C.O defines as both a process and a method of raising peoples awareness about the reality; moving them to action to form organizations and mobilizing their resources to respond to their immediate and long term needs (Prof. Tayag & Prof. Tungpalan. Theory & Practice of Community Organizing. UP Open University, pp. 4).

COLLABORATION THEORY Unemployment/underemployment is a complex issue that needs to be addressed through the spirit of cooperation among the concerned groups (stakeholders). It requires a lot but it will accomplish a lot If services are not available, social worker should create one to meet the needs of the clients. (Generalist Social Work) The role of social worker is to link these clients
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(unemployed/underemployed and informal sectors) to a network of services in the community. (Sheafor & Morales). Initiating collaboration requires credible collaborator to build trust among stakeholders. Once trust is missing, it will hardly accomplish its goal. Furthermore, trends in social problems and professional practice virtually impossible to serve clients effectively without collaborating with professionals from various disciplines or other entities. (Bronstein, Laura R. 2003) Bruner also added that collaboration is an effective interpersonal process that facilitates the achievement of goals that cannot be reached when individual professionals act on their own. Collaboration is defined as process of participation through which people, groups and organizations work together to achieve the desired result. The goal of community collaboration is to bring the stakeholders gather together in an atmosphere of support to systematically solve existing and emerging problems that could not be solved by one group alone. (Bergstrom, Arno, etal. 1995. Collaboration Framework: Addressing Community Capacity. National Network for Collaboration. Washington University, USA).

COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (CED) Community Economic Development complements collaboration and social enterprise development. CED is an action taken locally by community to provide economic opportunities and improve social conditions in a sustainable way. Its often use to address the unemployment, poverty, job loss, environmental degradation and loss of community control. SOCIAL ENTERPRISE DEVELOPMENT (SED) Social Enterprises are considered as the third sector of economy, its a partnership between government agencies, companies/corporations, non-government organizations. Its a social driven organization which trade in goods or services for a social purpose. The initial stage which is the Environmental Scanning and Opportunity Assessment has been done by the SW Fieldworker. These include studying the dynamics of the business, evaluation of potential and actual demand of services per industry (construction, hotel, restaurant, and building maintenance) versus the existing skills in Bayan communities and its partners. The second until the sixth stages mentioned in the project concept will be implemented soon.

IV. METHODOLOGY

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For data gathering, the SW fieldworker used informal interviews with key-informants particularly the SEDO and Branch Managers assigned in the target area. Internet surfing was also used to gather available data needed for the study specifically on the current trends, statistics and dynamics related to unemployment issues. The use of public documents from DOLE, POEA, NSO, LGU, TESDA was also explored. Consultation, informal talks, focus group discussion and meetings with community leaders, peoples organization (ABS-CBN Bayan Buklod members), civic organization, business organization, government agencies, training institutions and companies/industries were also done to fully understand the entire issue on unemployment. One-on-One discussion and inputs from agency supervisor, Dr. Eduardo A. Morato, Jr. and Faculty supervisor, Prof. Jerry Leones was also very helpful in this study specifically in developing the framework, project concept on Workers Guild Organizing and project implementation.

V. THE FRAMEWORK

This framework illustrates the combined forces of various sectors in addressing a complex issue on unemployment. Bayan and CCT (Center for Community Transformation) shall be the collaborators of these stakeholders. Aside from the untapped media power, both organizations gained their outstanding credibility and proven tract records in the field of development work. Bayan and CCT also have widespread tentacles among grassroots servicing many communities for their microfinance, livelihood, training, health, etc. which represent the labor sector of the framework. Bayan and CCT also have access to various corporations/companies ready and willing to absorb trainees, this represents the employment side of the framework. Lastly, Bayan and CCT could access government funds and Training Institutions.

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The stakeholders have mutual benefits and have something to contribute for the collaboration. The success of the program is anchored on its partnership with these likeminded institutions like: 1. THE COMMUNITIES OF UNEMPLOYED/UNDEREMPLOYED

This refers to the main beneficiaries of the program mainly come from the communities where Bayan, CCT and partner institutions/organizations operates. It also refers to jobseekers organized according to skills or location (skill or area based organizing). Once it is organized, it shall be called as Workers Guilda craftsmans association of employable individuals who are skilled, credible, with entrepreneurial mindset and conscious of its members welfare. 2. THE CORPORATIONS/COMPANIES It refers to business establishments that carry industrial enterprises, invest their capital and the employees who contribute their labor. People work together in corporations to produce value and generate income. People rely on corporations for employment, for their goods and services, for economic growth and social development. The corporations/companies are one of the most important components in the collaboration work due to its ability to absorb or provide employment for the target beneficiaries (jobseekers). It shall also provide inputs in crafting or developing training modules suited to their standard and specific skills requirements for their workers. Another possible contribution of corporations/companies is to subsidize tailored-fit training programs to meet its manpower requirements for the completion of their projects based on the given period of time.

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In return, these corporations/companies shall gain maximum benefit to access with highly qualified and organized labor force. Secondly, training expenses might be filed as tax deduction from its taxable income. Third, it enhances the companys positive social image in reaching out the needy people. Finally, this collaboration work enables company to save and maximize resources (time, money, manpower, etc.) to the fullest. 3. TRAINING INSTITUTIONS AND THE ACADEME Served as the training ground for unemployed/underemployed that provides quality trainings (soft or hard) suited to the demand of job market. Tailored fit training focused on specific useful competencies designed to ensure higher employment rate among its graduates. Dual Training System (DTS) may be adopted to achieve maximum learning among trainees and produce quality graduates. DTS encourage close coordination between the Training Center and the participating company to provide trainees with substantial learning experience and opportunities. Training institutions may subsidize tuition fee, provide value added services such as initial screening of applicants, employment assistance, free dormitory and meals, values formation session, etc. The academe might provide technical inputs in crafting or developing effective and more responsive programs. 4. THE GOVERNMENT AND FUNDERS Government agencies and interested donors shall provide funds for training like tuition fee, tools/equipments, uniforms and other resources needed for program implementation. The LGUs (Local Government Units) might provide additional manpower back-up for the mobilization/screening, profiling, organizing of workers, monitoring of program recipients and most especially in urging companies/industries to absorb qualified members of Workers Guild for employment. The LGUs might lend public facilities such as barangay hall, covered court, chairs, tables, use of electricity/water, etc. that are necessary for the program implementation.

VI. THE PROJECT CONCEPT: WORKERS GUILD ORGANIZING


Empowering the Labor Force from Below

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Workers Guild General Objective


To create and develop sustainable social enterprises or community based employment centers, managed and owned by the Workers Guild to serve the interest of its members and their families.

Workers Guilds Specific Objectives


To organize the informal labor sector according to skills category or area to render services/products to client companies as alternative employment; To equip the informal labor sector with necessary skills (organizational management/development, business management, basic finance/accounting, negotiation and marketing skills, etc.) to manage their organization and social enterprises; To provide continuous training and upgrading of skills suited to the demand of job market (local and international) for them (informal labor groups/individuals) to be more effective, credible, marketable and differentiated members of the workforce; To facilitate employment or self-employment options in coordination with various companies/industries, business organizations and likeminded institutions; To provide support system where guild members could access social services (loan & savings, burial, medical assistance, etc.)

Description of the Project


Workers Guild is a craftsmans association/organization of employable individuals with the following characteristics:

Highly skilled, credible and competitive workers With Entrepreneurial mind-set With Social Goal (technical skilling and upgrading, accountable to its members, contribution to local community) Social Ownership (autonomous organization with governance and ownership structure based on participation by stakeholders)

The Workers Guilds are categorized into five major sub-clusters namely: 1. Builders Guild composed of carpenters, masons, plumbers, painters, electricians, pipefitters and other construction related skills
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2. Culinary Guild composed of chefs, kitchen staff, food attendants, waiters/waitress, bartenders and baristas 3. Home Makers Guild composed of housekeepers, chamber maids, laundress, charwomen, etc. 4. Building Maintenance Guild composed of janitors, security guards, repairmen, gardeners 5. Beauty and Wellness composed of masseurs, facial therapist, beauticians, hair stylist/cutters, manicurist.

Functions of Workers Guild


Initially, ABS-CBN Bayan and Center for Community Transformation shall facilitate the organizing activities, technical training, employment assistance and other services. Eventually, the technology will be transferred to the Workers Guilds Masters/Leaders and its members until such time that they are capable of managing their organization and provide services to their members.

1. Community-Based Employment Center, a social enterprise component


Once the guilds acquired its legal identity, it shall operate or act as a community-based employment center that will serve and advance its members interests. These guilds will contract services or place jobs with industry players needing skillful manpower. It will also function as recruitment and placement agencies, charging corresponding fees to its target customers to sustain its operational costs. 2. Training Center The guilds will provide technical trainings to equip and enhance the skills of its members in coordination with various training institutions and industries applying the dual training system. Eventually, the Guilds might establish its own training school servicing its members and its community. Trainings such as capability building, organizational management/development, business management, basic finance/accounting, negotiation and marketing skills, etc. will be provided to equip the guilds in managing their organization and social enterprises. Soft skills are equality important with hard skills that will differentiates Guild members from the rest of the ordinary workers in the labor market. Thus, trainings such as good stewardship, leadership, work ethics, values/character formation sessions, effective communication, conflict management and other topics that would help the Guild members will be conducted. Prior to the issuance of recommendation letter, Guild members or job seekers must take crash-course for pre-employment. It contains workshop on the causes and effects of unemployment, beating the obstacles of unemployment, resume writing tips, preparing oneself for actual interview, dos & donts of interviewing, personality development, checklist for job hunting and many other topics.

3. Damayan Center
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A certain contribution from Guild members that will be used for medical, burial or any kind of assistance will be allotted to In case of crisis among Guild members and their immediate families, specific assistance will be extended to them by the organization. workers guild might might turn to their organization Providing services for its members such as medical or burial assistance in coordination with government and private institutions

Loan assistance that may used for skills training, tool kit, uniform, safety paraphernalia, assessment exam, medical/psychological exam, document processing, transportation, food /lodging and other job related expenses Guild organizing and Capability building

Main Features of Workers Guild


a) Target beneficiaries Credible, trainable and employable, at least 18 years old and above, physically and mentally able, with high inclination in chosen vocation (skills training) or business, determined to finish the duration of training, at least high school graduate (for vocational training), male or female. The immediate family members of Bayan & CCT micro-finance clients are the first priority. Referrals from partner organizations/companies/agencies are second priority and walk-ins are the third priority.

b) Target Client Companies/Potential Partners

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JOB MARKET CATEGORY

No. of Establishments w/n Metro Manila 11, 139

CATEGORY (Workers Guild)

NEEDED MANPOWER Skills

PROJECTE D NEEDS (2006-2010) Source: DOLE 281, 040

Restaurants Coffee Shops Bakeries Hotels Premier Condo Premier Subdivisions Resorts

Culinary Guild 685 343 200 46 21 Housekeepers Guild Facilities & Maintenance Guild Customer Services Guild

Cook; Chefs; Food Attendants; Kitchen Crews; Waiters; Bartenders; Bakers Maintenance Staff; chamber maids; home attendants; laundress; custodians; room/bellboys; Sales Clerks; Sales Agents; Promodizers; Cashiers; Receptionist Carpenters; Masons; Welders; Plumbers; Electricians; Tinsmiths Sales Agents, Medical Transcriptionist, IT Masseurs/Masseuse ; Facial therapist; Make-up artists; manicurist midwife; nursing assistant; medical transcriptionist; fitness instructors

92, 112

Malls & Commercial Establishments

58

394, 400 (Source: SM)

Construction Corp. Private Developers Business Outsourcing Companies Massage Parlor Spa Clinics Beauty Salons Hospitals Process

307 1, 113 217

Handymans Guild

112, 200 (estimate) 735, 500

Customer Services Guild Beauty Wellness Guild &

183 282 174

8, 245

c) Target Area of Coverage The priority areas for project implementation are cities located in National Capital Region and eventually expand to Metro Iloilo, Cebu and Davao. These are progressive areas where economic activities are concentrated, high presence of business/commercial establishments, hotels, restaurants, premier condominiums/subdivisions, therefore the probability of success in these areas is higher. d) Possible Project Sponsor/Funder

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Government Agencies such as TESDA, LGUs, Congress, DOLE Training Centers/Schools/Universities Individual & Corporate Donors Others

e.) Social Enterprise Component Stage 1: Social Preparation Stage This stage includes area selection; initial assessment of the community situation and needs, industry analysis, external & internal assessment; preparation/equipping of Bayan/CCT staffs (training/seminars on community organizing and development interviewing, etc.); consultation meetings with target clients/beneficiaries, potential leaders; courtesy call; exploratory meetings with government agencies, industries/companies, etc., Stage 2: Skills Training, Leadership Development and Capability Building Commitment of the Workers Guild leaders is very crucial to ensure the cohesiveness/strength of their organization. This stage includes education (i.e: basic accounting, organizational management, negotiation with companies, etc.), conscientization activities core group formation and developing leadership skills. Stage 3: Organizational Development and Management Appropriate organizational mechanisms must be established hand in hand with leadership development. This stage includes setting-up the organization, committee formation, group mobilization, assessment and planning sessions Stage 4: Consolidation and Expansion In this stage, Workers Guild members are responsible for the recruitment of new members based on the criteria set by the organization. This is also where Workers Guilds are formed into federation. Activities such as project development and management, establishing linkages with other groups and agencies, continuous evaluation of the organizing experience NOTE: Different stages may overlap. Results of each stage influence the content and methods of the next stage.

f.) Project Delivery System Bayan-HELP Unit & CCT shall be the leading unit in organizing workers guilds, screening of applicants, coordination with various companies, training institutions, LGUs, etc. for project implementation.

There are at least four sub-units that will manage the entire framework:
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1. The Community Development Unit

Conduct skills and community profiling per area assignment; Identify highly qualified or potential members and leaders of Workers Guild in coordination with SEDOs, Community Leaders and key informants; Conduct orientation of applicants/potential guild members Initially screen and recommend candidates for skills training, capability building and possible job placement; Conduct home visitation, consultation meetings and planning with target clients, background checking if necessary; Responsible for the formation and development of workers guilds Serve as junior consultant for the formation and development of social enterprises owned by the workers guild; Submit list of highly qualified applicants/potential guild members to HELP unit for validation;

2. The Training Unit


Serve as the gate-keeper from final selection/endorsement of applicants for training, OJT of graduates/potential guild members, Employment/SelfEmployment and tapping potential sponsors and partners Recommend final list of applicants/potential guild members to various training institutions for skills training Assist Trainees for the completion of requirements if needed Monitor Trainings and submit report to Bayan/CCT Managers Provide capability training opportunities for workers guild members in coordination with potential partners

3. The Employment Unit Coordinate with target companies for OJT, employment or self-employment opportunities Responsible for monitoring of graduates/workers guild members in coordination with Micro-finance Operations Department 4. The Resource Management Unit Tap resources and potential partners Conceptualize and Develop income generating activities e) Desired Results/Outcomes

Organized labor sector (Workers Guilds) in Bayan/CCT communities (NCR Branches) with the following characteristics: o Highly skilled, competent and credible workers o Bargaining power to negotiate with corporations and industries Additional family income means increased in the ability of Bayan clients to eat (3) three times a day; increased ability to pay monthly bills such as electricity, water and

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house rental; increased ability to send their children to school, buy clothing, medicine and other basic needs.

Growing skills (as stated in table 1 of page 2) and businesses of Bayan families and communities It is expected to have an additional income of at least Php 9, 230 (minimum wage) per month for the local employment and higher wage (double or more) for those who will be employed abroad Integrated report (organizing experiences learning/insights, recommendations)

f. Measurement of Desired Results/Outcomes (July 2008.- March 2009) At least 250 unemployed are trained in various skills At least 3 workers guild initially organized At least 75% of the total trainees/potential guild members able to acquire certificate of competency from TESDA or other accreditation body At least 55% of the total trainees obtained OJT or Employment and SelfEmployment Improved family income by 50% among Bayan micro-finance members whos family members availed skills training program At least 20 companies/business organizations agreed to accommodate Workers Guild members for employment or self-employment

ECONOMIC SUSTAINABILTY MODEL

Training Sponsorship- Interested funder/donors may sponsor a training program Administrative Fee will be collected from companies to cover the administrative costs Referral Fee for every successful placement shall be charge to employers/companies needing manpower skills for their projects; Placement Fee- Not more than 20% of the total monthly income will be collected from successful applicants/guild members

A certain percentage from the total income of Workers Guild will go to Bayan/CCT to cover the overhead expenses on program implementation. A certain percentage from the net income derived from this enterprise will be used for training, capability building, skills upgrading/assessment, service/product marketing and other activities/projects that may serve the best interests of its members. The remaining surplus might be distributed to its members quarterly or yearly depending on the policy which may set by the group.

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ORGANIZING SUSTAINABILITY MODEL Christianity and other religions remain organized for thousands of years because of the need for the salvation of their souls (eternal life after physical death). Communism also remains strong because of their ideology that sustains them A fanatic Muslim believer would commit terrorism attack even if it causes his life in the name of Allah. The above illustrations are typical examples of sustainable organizing. Using the above model in the context of unemployment, unemployed people should do the same to sustain life. They must work to meet their basic needs such as food, shelter, clothing, and education. The social workers role is to help these unemployed to understand their problem, identify the hindering factors that keep them unemployed and assist them find solutions to itThe workers guild shall be the venue where unemployed people come together to attain a certain goal--- to get employed (self-employed or be employed in companies). Education and training shall be the eye opener for the target clients. Once they understand and embrace the ownership of the Guilds and get benefits from their membership, it will serve as their blood to sustain they organization. The following benefits may include employment assistance, training scholarship, employment loan access, continuous technical skilling enhancement, internship or On-the-Job Training, access to social benefits thru referrals, value formation or character building sessions, micro-venture opportunities for self-employment.

VII. THE ORGANIZING EXPERIENCE

1.

AREA SELECTION

The SW fieldworker selected Taguig and the depressed area of Makati adjacent to it as the pilot area for workers guild organizing due to the presence of Bayans micro-finance program which have higher PAR rate, the strategic locations where the project site and training center of the partner company (DMCI) is situated and deployment area of graduates after the training. The presence of CCT micro-finance program in Taguig and being the most receptive Branch of Bayan within NCR also contributed to the decision of selecting the area.

2.

COMMUNITY ENTRY AND SOCIAL INVESTIGATION

Bayan and CCTs micro-finance program became the entry point of the SW fieldworker. Seven (7) communities from Taguig and Makati namely Brgy. Tipas, Lower and Upper Bicutan, Western Bicutan, Tanyag, Signal Village, Napindan, and Brgy. Rizal Makati were visited.
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In coordination with the Regional and Branch Manager including the SEDOs and RTO, the SW field worker arranged the schedules for community emersion and consultation meetings. Orientation of guides (Bayan/CCT staff) was also conducted prior to the activity. Logistics such as company vehicle, venue, chairs, tables, projector, laptop computer and materials and activity flow were prepared. A. Summary Output of Consultation Meetings with Buklod leaders and members The SW fieldworker facilitated the consultation meetings with the following outputs: Buklod leaders and members identified poverty as the main problem/issue in the community Based on the analysis and actual experiences of the group, one of the root causes of poverty is unemployment/underemployment The SW fieldworker captured the groups interests on the discussion of unemployment/underemployment using the cause and effect analysis. The group realized that unemployment/underemployment were due to lack of education, insufficient skills, negative attitude among job seekers, inability to sell oneself during the interview, company preferences (age, sex, civil status, height, physical appearance, religion, etc.) or standards, limited or insufficient money to finance transportation, food, documentation requirements for job hunting, padreno system (backer), lack of access/information to existing job vacancies, lack of moral support from the family and many other reasons. To address the barriers in acquiring a job, the group proposed solutions to conquer the said barriers by asking assistance to the proper authorities including ABS-CBN Bayan/CCT to assist them, their family members, relatives and friends who are unemployed/underemployed From there, the SW fieldworker informed the group how ABS-CBN Bayan/CCT could be a help Job brokering, job information access and other forms of employment assistance was proposed to addressed the issue The SW fieldworker informed the group regarding with the current programs and services of ABS-CBN Bayan/CCT in relation to training and employment assistance including the success stories of some graduates of technical trainings (welding, culinary and finishing course for call center agents). She also informed the group about the upcoming trainings on carpentry and masonry in partnership with DMCI (construction company) and TESDA. Qualification guidelines was also discussed The group agreed to mobilize their family members and relative for the said training and job opportunity. However, some of the members concerns were low educational attainment and age bracket that disqualifies their family members and relatives Schedule of initial, final screening was announced. SEDOs were designated to gather the list of qualified applicants to be submitted to SW fieldworker.
PLEASE SEE APPENDICES: MINUTES OF MEETINGS

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B.1. The Screening Process The screening process was divided into three levels; the initial screening was conducted by the SEDOs and field officers of CCT in the communities. The pre-final screening was conducted by the SW fieldworker in Branch Office (Taguig) assisted by the Regional Training Officer and Branch Manager. The final screening was conducted in a panel interview composed of SW field worker, Branch/Regional Manager and DMCIs HR personnel. After which, the panelist deliberated the result of final interview. Through the rigid process of screening, only 30% passed the interview and exam. Successful applicants were required to undergo medical test to prove that they are fit to work in a construction site. Another 5% failed in medical exam, most of the reasons were due to tuberculosis which also shocked the applicant knowing that he suffer from the said disease. B.2. Interview tool & Aptitude Exam It was developed by the SW fieldworker with the help of Bayan HR Consultant. It is designed to test the applicants work habits, how he value work and workmanship. Behavioral pattern from the past experiences of the applicants will give the interviewer an idea of assessing them whether they are inclined for construction work. The aptitude test was administered by DMCI HR personnel as the final basis for selection.
PLEASE SEE APPENDICES: INTERVIEW TOOL

C. The Training: Masonry & Carpentry C. 1. Course Design Carpentry and masonry is designed to enhance the knowledge, desirable attitudes and skills of masons & carpenters in accordance to industry standards. Masonry covers specialized competencies such as lay brick/block for structure, plaster concrete/masonry surface and install pre-cast baluster and handrails. For Carpentry, it covers the competencies required on stake-out building lines, fabricate frameworks, install framing works, architectural ceiling/wall/sheets/panels and floor finishes and fabricate/install door/window jambs and panels in operating. C.2. Launching Ceremony Launching ceremony was conducted prior to the implementation of carpentry and masonry training attended by TESDA NCR Director, CCT Program Manager and selected staff, DMCI Training Director and staff, Bayan Regional Manager, Branch Manager, NCR-South Regional Training Officer, Bayan selected staff, Buklod leader of Taguig, Guests from AMG- Skilled
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Hands Technical College (President and Managers for Training and Employment) and the most important people of the event were the trainees themselves. The SW fieldworker served as the master of ceremony. C.3 Trainees A total of 30 trainees (15 carpentry & 15 masonry) were able to go through the rigid training at DMCI training Center, Brgy. Ususan, Taguig. Training tools, uniform and transportation/food allowance for the first two weeks of training were provided by Bayan through training and employment loan payable within six months with 2% interest rate, payment effectivity is a month after trainees acquired a job. Monitoring of trainees was done every other week for the period of two months through company visitation in a construction site. Three trainees dropped due to some other reasons (sickness/death/hospitalization of family members). C.4 Assessment/Trade Test After the training, two sets of assessment/trade tests were done. Internal assessment of DMCI and TESDA assessment as mandatory requirement of PGMA Scholarship. For the Masonry group, out of 13 graduates, 12 passed in DMCI assessment as helper level and 12 got the national certificate of competency level-1 from TESDA. While the Carpentry group: out of 14 graduates, 13 passed DMCI assessment as helper level and 13 got national certificate leve-1 from TESDA. C.5 Deployment Initially, DMCI allotted the 10 vacant slots for carpentry however, only 5 graduates were able to get employed due to some problems on communication lines (cellular phones of trainees were inaccessible, some ignored the calls). Masonry group are still waiting for job post. Other possible employment is construction companies of PCA members which will be discussed on the 2nd week of April with PCA Executive Director. D. Problems Encountered Among the common problems were tardiness and absenteeism of trainees, delayed release of training allowance from DMCI (75% of the daily minimum wage) and other negative attitude of some trainees towards work, none issuance of training module for trainees. To address the issues, the SW field worker facilitated the dialogue between the trainees and the DMCI. The cause and effect analysis were used as a tool to analyze the said issues that allowed the trainees and DMCI personnel understand each other. At the end of the session, all issues were settled. PLEASE SEE APPENDICES: Minutes of meeting One of the observations of the SW fieldworker was that: the attitude of trainees is greatly influence by their master trainors (foremen). Comparing the masonry and carpentry group, the trainees behaved differently. The masonry group displayed negativism and a sort of bitterness while the carpentry group displayed contentment. The SW fieldworker further investigated thru
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informal talks with the trainees and master trainors. She found out that both master trainors treated their trainees differently. The masonry master trainor perceived his trainees as hardheaded and slow learners while the carpentry master trainor treated his trainees with respect as a result he was loved and respected by his trainees which the SW fieldworker observed. Availability of job vacancy as committed by the partner company (DMCI) was delayed. However, job options will be explored by SW field worker and her team after the holy week. 3. INITIAL ORGANIZING EFFORTS FOR THE TRAINEES/GRADUATES Consultation meetings were done by the SW fieldworker concerning on the possibility to organize the graduates of carpentry and masonry into one guild. As a result of consultation, the graduates expressed their willingness to form a guild for employment purposes. Temporary leaders whom they Guild Masters (GM) were chosen to execute the initial plan for recruitment, training and employment. PLEASE SEE APPENDICES: CARPENTRY & MASONRY GUILD Attempts to organize the culinary graduates were also done. They called their group as FrendChef. Their proposed project was catering service and restaurant for them to have an additional income while some of them are employed.

4.

THE INTEGRATED ORGANIZING EFFORT OF COLLABORATION Based on the collaborative framework in relation to community organizing, the SW Fieldworker performed several organizing compartments. First, the organizing of the unemployed as the focus of intervention. Second, the organizing of companies and industries which played a very significant role in employing the unemployed. Third, the organizing of training institutions to equipped the unemployed with necessary skills and lastly, the organizing and mobilization of likeminded institutions from government, private sectors, local/international trade unions, NGOs and civic organization. All of the above elements are equally important to attain the common goaladdress the unemployment issues. The absence of any of the stakeholder will weaken or affect the collaboration effort.

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VIII. OTHER TRAININGS AND SIGNIFICANT ACCOMPLISHMENTS

Technical trainings of various skills in partnership with several training institutions were conducted within the two semesters as indicated below:

TECHNICAL TRAINING 1.Welding

Partner Training Center AMG-Skilled Hands Technical College, Bulacan DMCI Training Center, Taguig ABS-CBN Bayan Academy Mobile Truck of Bayan Academy

OUTPUT 52 HQA

OUTCOME 52 grad.; 95% passing rate -TESDA 26 graduated 100% passing rateTESDA

REMARKS Processing requirements for EMPLOYMENT 8 employed; others still on job hunting OJT

2.Carpentry & Masonry 3.Culinary (BASE) 4.Baking & Pastries 5.Finishing Course for Call Center

30 HQA 52 HQA

50 Qualified 100% graduated; Some Job hunting surpassed TESDA Assessment ON-GOING TRAINING

TUCP College, 19 HQA Diliman, Quezon City 27

6.Housekeeping Asian Touch Intl. Training Center, Epana Manila 7. Security Services

ON-GOING TRAINING

JetSquad Training, 50 HQA Diliman Quezon City from partners

Guaranteed by Security Training Starts on April Agencies 20

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PARTNERSHIP BUILDING SW Fieldworker gained support and created a web of contacts /partners from various sectors (NGOs, business companies & associations, Trade Union , government agencies , LGUs, church-based organizations and international org./ILO) A total of fifty one companies and organizations from different sectors expressed their willing to support the Workers Guild Project. Please see appendices: LIST OF PARTNER COMPANIES
INDUSTRY Construction Hotel Restaurant Security Services BUSINESS ORGANIZATION TRAINING CENTERS GOVERNMENT SECTOR NGOs CIVIC ORGANIZATION LABOR ORGANIZATION TOTAL No. of Partnership Built 3 8 15 5 2 5 7 3 1 2 51

TOTAL NUMBER OF EMPLOYED CLIENTS A total of 72 graduates of technical training got employed in various companies. The recent graduates are still undergoing OJT as part of the course requirement.
PLEASE SEE APPENDICES: LIST OF GRADUATES & EMPLOYMENT STATUS

PROFESSIONAL/PERSONAL IMPROVEMENTS Increased the level of self-confidence (dealing with businessmen/CEOs of various companies/orgs, govt. authorities, intl. orgs., grassroots) Improved communication skills (oral & written) and leadership skill Gained negotiation skill (target clients & companies/agencies) Widened connections Increased level of nationalism thru policy development

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IX. FINDINGS

In the context of collaboration work, in line with the principle of community mobilization, people act on the basis of interests. This was proven effective due to the following results:

A. B.

Target clients (unemployed) magnetized by the scholarship training and job opportunities because its FREE and relevant to their needs. The companies/business organizations were attracted in gaining access to qualified workers for FREE. This means savings in terms of time, manpower, overhead expense in hiring that leads to higher PROFIT. While enjoying the benefit of increasing its profit, it also builds its credibility in partnering with credible organization from different sectors. C. The Training Institutions interest is the increasing number of enrollment which also means PROFIT. As profit oriented, positive social image is also very important in building its credibility and recognition in the society in partnering with credible organizations from different sectors. D. The Government Agencies, Funders and NGOs were motivated because their interest is to address unemployment for efficient use of funds, maximize their budget, manpower and other resources which mean increase savings on their part thus, WORTHWHILE SOCIAL INVESTMENT. The above reasons made the SW Fieldworker to use the language of stakeholders, act and think like them to penetrate their territory and win their support for the benefit of unemployed people. Occasionally, she transforms herself and played multi-roles while maintaining her distinct role as a social workerrepresenting her organization as the collaborator of stakeholders. One of the strengths of this collaboration framework is the credibility and media factor of the collaborator (ABS-CBN Bayan and CCT) that lubricated the process to come together. This was expressed by the majority of the stakeholders from the business sector, government, training institutions and even the grassroots. The danger of which, is the inability of collaborator to meet the expectations of stakeholders. For the formation of workers guilds, there are difficulties in organizing them even though they are situated within similar cities. Transportation expense, economic and household activities hindered them to attend meeting/planning session. Another factor is the absence of intensive groundwork of SW fieldworker due to her multiple roles and activities as collaborator of stakeholders aside from her administrative jobs and being in a work-study scheme program. The scope of this framework is too huge for one person trying to balance everything on it.

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X. CONTRIBUTION TO SOCIAL WORK BODY OF KNOWLEDGE


Social Work evolved from the borrowed knowledge of sociology, psychology and other social sciences fields. Through the years, it developed its distinction from other disciplines while it continue to grow due to the changing time, situation, place, issues/concerns, people group and other components. In the context of collaborative framework in addressing the issue on unemployment, the Social Workers should go beyond the traditional way of thinking. She/He should not remain romanticizing community organizing work and forget the other aspect of that makes the whole picture of the issue. She/he must also perceive the issue/problem in the light of other disciplines to fully understand the totality and nature of it. She/He cannot be an exclusively conventional social worker but an innovative one, performing transdisciplinal roles while maintaining her/his professional identity. As she/he performs the organizing work as her/his specialized field, she also performs other roles. Like an economist and a businessman/woman, she/he is studying the job market dynamics to be able to penetrate and push the agenda of her/his clients (unemployed) while thinking on the sustainability of the project through ex-deals or mutual benefits of stakeholders. Like a politician, she/he is balancing the powers of contending forces between the jobseekers and potential employers to a win-win situation. The jobseekers need a stable job and the employers need quality workers but what made her distinct from other discipline is that, she/he upholds social justice. Like an educator, she/he educates the stakeholders in understanding the totality of the issue affecting them, provide a venue where stakeholders could discuss the issue and find solutions on it. The above arguments are supported by CO principle which states that the Social Worker should act like her/his clients dress/think like them and use their language (business/government language and jargons). In the context of collaboration work, specifically in dealing with partner institutions, they are also considered as the big Cs-- Clients, Customers and Constituents whom refers to the totality of collaboration components. Initiating collaboration entails processes or steps which is generic to stakeholders (companies, business organization, training institutions, government agencies, civic organization, local and international labor unions, etc.). Based on the SW Fieldworkers experience, these steps may guide the starter collaborators in building partnership: 1. Identification of potential partners Enlisting groups or individuals from various sectors that may help for the attainment of the desired goal. This might be done through internet surfing, tapping public documents/data from government agencies, obtaining data from business organizations, consultation with supervisor or knowledgeable people 2. Ground working Studying the nature of target partners, analyzing the core mandate or VMG, programs and services, understanding the mindsets and background of focal persons to be met, examining the strength and weaknesses of target partner and more importantly their interest or gains for the proposed collaboration work. 3. Penetration
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The letter of intent for potential partners must be written in a way that will capture their interest. Start with a powerful statement and end with a bang or in a noble appeal. To expect an immediate response, gains from collaboration work must be indicated in the letter. Follow-ups through phone calls and scheduling of an exploratory meeting should be done. Prior to the exploratory meeting, the proponent/collaborator should prepare her/his game plan (discussion flow and attractive gains for collaboration) to win their support. The exploratory meeting should be done in a convenient place with a relaxing ambiance. The proponent/collaborator should be warmth and accommodating, establish rapport thru informal talks, complement the potential partner (appreciating her/his time, nice attire, etc.), small talks on the goodness or accomplishments of her/his organization, make sure to prepare something to drink or eat. More importantly, stay focus on the objective of the activity with the end in mind to win support. During the proper exploratory meeting, allow each party to talk about the programs and services. From there, identify areas of cooperation and propose the project concept (example: workers guild project concept). Synthesize the discussion highlighting the areas of cooperation and suggest the formation of technical working group. 4. MOA Draft Assuming that the technical working group finished its tasks, the memorandum of agreement will be drafted and reviewed by both parties. 5. MOA Signing This document shall be the basis of cooperation from both parties that makes the partnership official.

6. Program Implementation and Monitoring


7. Evaluation

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XI. CONCLUSION

Unemployment is not just a concern of Social Work profession but also a concern of other disciplines (economics, business management, sociology, politics, education, etc.). This issue is so complex that also needs complex strategy to effectively address. In dealing with complex issue, a complex strategy is also needed. As Ka Lito Manalili said, Social workers should look at the issue in the light of her/his clients optic to be able to understand and effectively respond/address to it. Therefore, I say: In the context of collaboration work, Social Workers should have multiple eyes to be able to see beyond what the traditional social work could see, not just in the perspective of its target clients (unemployed) but also in different point of view from other disciplines which possessed expertise to share and be able to come up an effective an holistic intervention.

XII. RECOMMENDATION
1. College (CSWCD) Consider an additional subject or require at least two cognates for social work graduate students to expand their knowledge and understanding of issues/problems in the light of other related disciplines. This will allow them to respond creatively and effectively on the social issues that they encounter and about to encounter. This subject may include selfmastery (learning how to think, how to feel, how to discern/intuit, how to do), economics, public administration and the like.

2. Agency (ABS-CBN Bayan Foundation)


Since the SW field worker is done with her academic requirement, the work load on organizing of the workers guilds cannot be rely on her. The agency should hire a professional organizer preferably social worker, community development graduate or any social science graduate with organizing work experience the implementation of Workers Guild Organizing.

3. Project (Workers Guild Organizing)


The previous organizing efforts for workers guild should be reactivated. For the succeeding targeting of clients, the organizer might shift target from zero skill/knowledge potential clients to basic/advanced skills in their respective trades. The organizer should prioritize the existing group of informal workers with expertise in their respective crafts (carpentry, masonry, welding, culinary, etc.). This will allow the
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organizer to save resources because all she/he needs to do is to formalize these informal workers who already exists for a quite sometime, link them to potential employers/corporations to render service/products and build their capability in running their organization (Guilds). Unlike individual potential clients who have zero skills/knowledge would take time to screen them, train for technical skilling and years to organize them. Stakeholders summit is highly recommended to come up with a unified Vision, Mission and Goal--- setting direction and focus, defining the relationship of collaborators, outcomes, defining measures/benchmarks/impacts, communication channeling, systems & procedures and leveraging new resources.

XIII. REFERRENCES
Aull, Ashley, Carre Francoise, Herranz, Jr., Joaquin, Keegan, Rebeeca, Seavy Dorie, and Vickers Carlha. 2003. Alternative Job Brokering: Addressing Labor Marker Disadvantages, Improving the Temp Experience, and Enhancing Job Opportunities. Report on the National Study of Alternative Staffing Services to the Ford Foundation. Campbridge, MA: Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study, Harvard University and Boston, MA: Center for Social Policy, University of Massachusettes Boston, USA Bergstrom, Arno, etal. 1995. Collaboration Framework: Addressing Community Capacity. National Network for Collaboration. Washington University, USA Carneigie, Dale.1981. How to Win Friends & Influence People. Pocket books, a division of Simon & Schuster, Inc., New York, USA Osborne, David and Gaebler, Ted.1993. Reinventing Government: How The Entrepreneurial Spirit is Transforming the Public Sector. Plum Penguin Books, New York, USA Tayag, Benilda B. and Tungpalan, Ma. Theresa V. 1997. Theory and Practice of Community Organizing, UP Open University. College of Social Work and Community Development, University of the Phillipnes, Diliman Morato, Jr., Eduardo A. 1989. Strategic Intervention for Development Managers, Volume 1. Asian Institute of Management, Makati Philippines. Morato, Jr., Eduardo A. 1994. Social Entrepreneurship and Enterprise Development Asian Institute of Management, Makati Philippines. http://www.wikipedia.free encyclopedia

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APPENDICES

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