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PROJECT BEHAVIOR Research Proposal For Assessing Post Alcohol & Tobacco Bill Behavior March 2007

CEYLON TOBACCO COMPANY


By
Tania Leanage Racheal Joseph Rishfa Anjalie Perera Ruwindi Jayawickrema Hashika Hewawasam LETSC22 JORAD42 RIFAD71 PEAKD11 JARSD61 HEHDD63

Prepared For

Table of Contents 1.0 Overview.............................................................................................3


1.1 History of Company...............................................................................................................3 1.2 Present Situation....................................................................................................................3 1.3 Current Activities...................................................................................................................4 1.4 Situation leading to Market Research....................................................................................4

2.0 Literature - Secondary Data Report....................................................5 3.0 Gauging the impacts & consumer behavior after the implementation of the Alcohol & Tobacco bill..................................................................8
3.1 The Management decision problem.......................................................................................9 3.2 Market Research problem......................................................................................................9 3.3 Research Objectives.............................................................................................................10

4.0 Research Design / Methodology.......................................................11


4.1 Data Collection Method: Questionnaire..............................................................................11 4.1.1 Questionnaire Construction..........................................................................................11 4.1.2 Prerequisites For A Respondent To Be Eligible...........................................................11 4.1.3 Time, Length, Administration, and Distribution of the Questionnaire.........................12 4.2 Sampling Method.................................................................................................................12 4.4 Analytical Method...............................................................................................................13

5.0 Time Frame.......................................................................................14 6.0 Limitations of the study ................................................................15 7.0 References.........................................................................................17 8.0 Appendix...........................................................................................18
8.1 Questionnaire ......................................................................................................................18 8.2 NATA Bill...........................................................................................................................26

1.0 Overview
1.1 History of Company

Ceylon Tobacco Company Limited (CTC) is popularly recognized, as one of the leading companies in Sri Lanka.The Company is a member of the British American Tobacco Group, UK. CTC is 80 years old this year. The company directly or indirectly employs 400,000 people. It is the countrys sole manufacturer of cigarettes and its dynamic approach to business has earned a prominent place amongst the nations highest performers. Apart from tobacco, it has interests in insurance and in the export of houseplants and foliage to Europe and Japan. Through many years of doing business in Sri Lanka, CTC has been successful in effectively fending off competition, resulting in a quasi monopoly situation. More than 90% of the countrys Fast Moving Consumer Goods (FMCG) trade is involved with the sale of cigarettes.

1.2 Present Situation


Presently CTC has two major brands John Player Gold Leaf (JPGL) & Viceroy (Former Bristol). JPGL is the single most dominant brand in the market with current share reaching well over 60%. JPGL already on a strong growth momentum (19% growth in 2005 vs. 2004), which was further accelerated by migration of Bristol to Viceroy that triggered additional up trading in 2006. With rapid broad-basing, key issue facing the brand is dilution of the consumer profile (JPGL profile becoming SEC C which means down market centric: 48% in 2006 vs. 34% in 2004) which is impacting the international rating of the brand. With growing importance of JPGL in the portfolio, it is imperative that equity of the brand is strengthened through continuous injection of new ideas/innovations. The company is designing activity to appeal to the top end JPGL smokers and at the same time aspiring the bottom end JPGL franchise.

Currently JPGL shipment share is over 50% and is a mass brand within the CTC portfolio. Hence, the company believes that there is an opportunity to provide choice to consumers within this segment. This together with BATs emphasis on global drive brands indicated that Pall Mall was the ideal brand to perform the identified role. In order to strengthen its portfolio CTC has decided to launch Pall Mall in the mainstream segment, 2007.Role of Pall Mall would be to offer choice in the key value driving segment via a truly international alternative to JPGL.

Amidst all these changes to be taken place presently the issue of the NATA bill is also a burning question for CTC. Therefore a clear direction as to how consumer behaviour is changing is also a main topic discussion presently.

1.3 Current Activities


Currently CTC is preparing for the launch of their latest brand Paul Mall cigarettes in June this year. They recently launched Dunhill cigarettes for the first time in Srilanka. CTC is also involved in corporate social responsibility with a project titled SALT, sloping agricultural land technology. SALT will help some of the farmers who had once supplied the company with tobacco.

1.4 Situation leading to Market Research


With the increased and constant activities of pressure groups and the government, the Tobacco industry of the world in general is facing various problems. From advertising methods to sales, Sri Lankan market also shows changes that have been inevitable with policy changes and also due to activists programs. The government in the past has implemented various tobacco prevention strategies. Which mainly consisted of high tax on cigarettes. However, although the duty on tobacco in Sri Lanka is relatively high cigarettes still remains affordable for the consumer. The latest government policy to prevent smoking has been the implementation of the National Alchoho,Tobacco Act (NATA BILL). The main contributing factor of the bill is to reduce the incidence of smoking by prohibiting smoking in public and enclosed areas.

The Tobacco & Alcohol Bill came into effect from 1st of December 2006.We are carrying out a market research for the company to help them gauge consumer behavior following the NATA Bill. The research will focus on the impact caused by the National Tobacco and Alcohol Bill and its implications on the cigarette sales, buying and usage habits of smokers as well as consumer awareness regarding the bill. We hope to help the company make smarter business and marketing plans to tackle the effects of the NATA Bill through our research proposal.

2.0 Literature - Secondary Data Report


Liquor and tobacco sales drop after the new Act in Sri Lanka
Thursday, December 21, 2006, 13:39 GMT, ColomboPage News Desk, Sri Lanka.

After the enactment of the tobacco and alcohol act since the 1st of December 2006, there as been a drastic fall in liquor and cigarette sales in sri lanka. According to Nimal Siripala de silva minister of health and nutrition sales of spirits have fallen by 30% and cigarettes by 70%. A man who was accused of smoking in Colombo Hulftsdorp Courts premises was fined Rs 500 on each charge and ordered two weeks imprisonment in default for two charges, smoking in public place and committing contempt of court. The Minister of health stated that the tobacco and alcohol companies have been pressing the government to relax these tough laws against liquor and smoking, and also he says that the government is not afraid to carry on with the bill.

Analysis This article shows the effect the NATA bill has on the purchase patterns of the consumers of liquor and cigarettes. And the attitude of the public, government and organization.

Wide support for Tobacco and Alcohol Authority proposal


http://www.dailynews.lk/2006/01/04/news02.htm by Chamikara Weerasinghe Many leading religious dignitaries, human rights organizations and civil society organizations yesterday were ready to support the proposal to establish a National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol. A Private Members Motion with regard to this has been submitted to Parliament by Ven. Dr. Omalpe Sobitha Thera of JHU. The bill states that it seeks to limit tobacco and alcohol advertising to minimize their harmful effects on children and the younger generation. The National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol will have a legal mandate to control the drug and alcohol problem. The Lawyers for Human Rights and Development has announced at a press conference held in Colombo that they would give full support to the Bill. The Officials of the Sri Lanka Temperance Council, Swarna Hansa Foundation, and Dharmavijaya Foundation also stated their support to the proposed Act. Ven. Executive Director of the Lawyers for Human Rights, Dr. Kalyananda Thriranagama said that the Act was seeking to protect children from the drugs other unethical issues. "It seeks to restrict the use of advertisements to sell alcoholic beverages and cigarettes," he said. "It is by means of false propaganda that these breweries and tobacco companies sell their stuff. Someone has to take the initiative to stop their operations before it can become a cancer," he said. "Alcohol and tobacco kill a person slowly and it is on the principle that no one can compel others to commit suicide that we have committed ourselves to support the Act," he added. Ven. Sobhitha Thera said the country and its leaders have a responsibility to create a healthy society and tobacco and alcohol disturb the system. "By having a National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol we may be able to regulate things for the better, " said the thera. According to the panel 83 percent of Sri Lankan tobacco was in the hands of foreign traders and it was then who had been earning funds through this business at a time when smoking has declined in European countries. They found that 12 petitions have been filed in the Supreme Court against the proposed bill by tobacco and alcohol retailers, producers and importers. Among the whole population of Sri Lanka thirty percent of Sri Lankans smokes and 17,000 of them die every year owing to smoking-related diseases.

Analysis: This article looks at the various view pints of the bill and implementation and carrying out the bill forward.

More support for Authority on tobacco, alcohol Sunday, 8 January 2006 http://www.sundayobserver.lk/2006/01/08/new26.html
Swarna Hansa Foundation, which has been playing a key role in transforming the conventional passive anti smoking campaign into an active and effective anti tobacco campaign says that divergent to the tobacco industry's argument that tobacco contributes largely to the National Income in this country, it actually squeezes out huge sum of money from the people of this country. The Ceylon Tobacco Company (CTC) is a subsidiary of British American Tobacco, and 93 percent of CTC earnings are sent to its Mother Company in U.K. As a brokerage fee tax is paid to the government for permitting the CTC to exploit this country its land and people. It is actually one of the main causes for the perpetuating poverty, in this country, says from the Foundation. Ten breweries and tobacco manufacturing Companies filed cases in the Supreme Court challenging the Bill on the grounds that it would violate their freedom of expression and free choice and right to engage in a fair trade of ones' own choice. The Swarna Hansa Foundation filed papers at the Supreme Court in support of the bill. Analysis; In this article they talk about the support the government is getting for the NATA bill from Swama Hansa in opposition to CTC.

3.0 Gauging the impacts & consumer behavior after the implementation of the Alcohol & Tobacco bill
With the NATA bill being in effect since 1st of December 2006 market dynamics have perceivably changed significantly.

The effect & description of the NATA bill is as follows:

Omalphe Sobitha, a Buddhist monk representing the pro-Sinhalese Buddhist National Heritage Party (JHU), tabled a bill in Sri Lankan parliament to control the sales of tobacco & alcohol The bill was immediately challenged in court by organizations representing the powerful tobacco & alcohol industries, which provide over 15% of government tax revenues, on the grounds that it violated freedom of expression & free choice & the right to engage in a fair trade. This legislation will provide for the setting up of the statutory body, which would regulate the sale of cigarettes & alcohol in the country. The main aim is to ban the sale of cigarettes & alcohol products in supermarkets. The Tobacco & Alcohol Act No 27 of 2006, was put into effect n December by Sri Lankas national authority on tobacco & alcohol. The new authority is set up under the ministry of Health Care & Nutrition with the objective of implementing the tobacco & alcohol act by advising the government on the implementation of a national policy on tobacco & alcohol products & encouraging & helping the public to achieve proper health through media & community based programmes

Implementation of the Tobacco & Alcohol Bill. (2006,December 06). Daily news

These changes need to be tracked down in order to help decision making in appropriate action to support consumers where needed for CTC. Also to see how it has affected the smoking behavior of people.

3.1 The Management decision problem


Need of vital feedback from consumers about perceptions, attitude & reactions towards the newly introduced alcohol & tobacco bill. Must obtain critical information on changes in consumer behavior towards cigarette usage after the bill was put into effect.

3.2 Market Research problem


Has consumer average daily consumption of cigarettes changed 7 if so, in what ways? And what are the causes? Have people quit smoking, if yes, what is the root cause? Awareness & comprehension on the alcohol & tobacco bill Level of comprehension about the bill

3.3 Research Objectives


Understand consumer perception & reactions towards the newly introduced NATA bill & obtain vital information on changes in consumer behavior towards tobacco usage through the following information areas:

Average daily consumption of cigarettes (gone down, up or remained the same)

If changed, what are the reasons?

Quitting (Have people quit smoking)

If yes, reasons to do so

Alcohol & tobacco bill awareness & comprehension

Awareness about the bill

Level of comprehension

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4.0 Research Design / Methodology


4.1 Data Collection Method: Questionnaire
4.1.1 Questionnaire Construction Initial information requirements given by CTC in the research brief were taken into consideration before the questionnaire structuring process. This information included the following. Initial qualification criteria/screening data for a respondent to be eligible to participate, such as age requirement, occupational disqualifications, daily smokers. Necessary socio economic grids & relevant terms for use in the questionnaire. Nata regulations and comprehension statements to be evaluated.

Questionnaire was then constructed using a logical flow and tested by mock interviews to gauge the length and practicality of the questionnaire. 4.1.2 Prerequisites For A Respondent To Be Eligible The respondent must be a male Age should be a minimum of 21 years to a maximum of 64 He must not work in journalism, market research, tobacco, advertising, and any type of media work. He must smoke at least one cigarette a day Must be residing in the Colombo district

These prerequisites were also provided by CTC.

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4.1.3 Time, Length, Administration, and Distribution of the Questionnaire Questionnaire is made up of 12 main questions and 5 demography related questions with a total of 17 questions. An interviewer either face-to-face or telephonic does questionnaire administration based on the respondents preference. Place and time of interview is again based on the respondents wish. Approximate time of completion varies among respondents; average time to successfully complete one questionnaire varies from 10 to 15 minutes. This is an approximation. Distribution of questionnaires is done through team members with a total of 100 questionnaires to be completed for analysis.

4.2 Sampling Method


Target population limited to adult male smokers ages 21 to 64 in the Colombo district, which amounts to 162,300 approximately. (Source department of census & statistics, & daily smoker numbers from CTC). Sample size is 100. And sampling technique is random however; the research is conducted only among the smokers, which means the sample is a random sample of smokers.

4.3 Measurement Instrument


Questionnaire is designed to measure a mixture of smoking behavior & NATA bill awareness & comprehension. Variables include agree/disagree, yes/no, & averages for consumption of cigarettes,

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Objectives
Age Screening Job Screening Daily Smoker Screening Daily Consumption Change In Consumption Due To Nata If Changed, New Consumption Quitting Perception Quitting Reasons NATA Awareness NATA Comprehension Smoking Occasions

Question
Q1 Q3 Q4 Q5 Q6 Q7 Q8 Q9 Q10 Q11 Q12

Scale used
1-11 1-7 Y/N 1-8 & variable for exact amount Y/N 1-8 & variable for exact amount Y/N 1 or 2 Y/N Agree/Disagree 1-3

Mathematical properties
Single code Single code Single code Single code & variable Single code Single code & variable Single code Single code Single code Multi code Single code

4.4 Analytical Method


Data will be coded and transferred to form a SPSS database, and then data will be analyzed by several breaks to get meaningful data, for example how many are aware of the NATA bill by age. Results are expected to provide CTC with the level of awareness of NATA, comprehension of facts in the NATA, any change in smoking behavior related to quitting perception & consumption etc, with regard to total smoker base in Colombo.

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5.0 Time Frame


TIME FRAME 21st March PROGRESS Two group members had a meeting with Mr.Janakan Ramalingam, Manager consumer insights and discussed management problems the company has. After much thought and discussion we decided to do our market research project on the recently imposed National Alcohol Tobacco Act and how it has impacted CTC. We received a brief from CTC stating what they expected from our research project. Group meeting was held to analyze the brief given to us by CTC. We prepared a brief proposal. Proposal was completed and mailed to CTC. Received reply from CTC stating a few changes they think need to be made. We edited are brief proposal and mailed it back for approval. Approval was granted by CTC. Group meeting was held. All information gathered by group members related to the NATA bill was discussed. We decided to spend the next week days gathering more information from journal articles, newspapers and the internet required for final proposal. Group members gathered information required for the preparation of the final proposal. Progress meeting was held with our lecturer Mr. Sanjeewa to discuss the progress weve made so far. Group meeting held to discuss questionnaire construction. Group met Mr.Charitha Sirimanna, Research executive at Lanka Market Research Bureau to get more insight into questionnaire development. Questionnaire construction began. 9th April Questionnaire was completed and ready for pretest. Pretest was done on 5 respondents and no significant errors were reported.

22nd March 23rd March 25th March 26th March

29th March

30th March 4th April 5th April 6th April 7th April

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10th April 11th April

100 questionnaires were printed and each group member was responsible for completing 17 questionnaires by the 21st of April. Group meeting called to discuss proposal. All information collected was analyzed and structure of proposal discussed. Each member took over different components of the proposal Rachael Joseph Tania Leanage Limitations of the study Research Design/Methodology Time Frame Chart Overview

Rishfa - Literature Search Hashika Hewawasam (report on secondary data) Ruwindi Jayawickrema Anajalie Perera Problem Definition Overview

18th March

Group meeting held to coordinate all components, prepare references and appendix. Final Proposal completed.

6.0 Limitations of the study


There were many limitations in our study that hinder the obtaining of accurate results. It is necessary to bring this to your attention so that in the future an improved research can be launched which will bring more accurate results. In order to collect information regarding consumer perception and their reaction towards the bill, we conducted interviews and sent out questionnaires. Sampling errors: These occur when estimates are derived from a sample, estimating a population characteristic by looking at only one portion of the population rather than the entire population. The Ceylon Tobacco Company has strict rules and regulations against using females for their

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surveys and research. Since this segment of the population is excluded , results would not be accurate. Even if the questionnaires and instructions are similar, there would be differences in the estimated from each sample. It is important to develop an efficient sampling plan where available information is used to choose a sample design and estimation procedure. The method of sampling, or sample design, can greatly affect the size of the sampling error. The greater the sample size , the smaller the sampling error A non-sampling error is an error that results solely from the manner in which the observations are made. Non-sampling errors can occur because of problems in coverage, response, nonresponse, data processing, estimation and analysis. In the case of interviews, no two interviewers are alike and the same person may provide different answers to different interviewers. The manner in which a question is formulated can also result in inaccurate responses. Individuals tend to provide false answers to particular questions. Respondents might also give incorrect answers to impress the interviewer. This type of error is the most difficult to prevent because it results from out right deceit on the part of the respondent. Some may be offended by personal questions. Sensitive questions may not be answered. Questionnaires should be structured carefully so as to reduce the respondent error. Lack of time may contribute to insufficient or incomplete data being collected.

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7.0 References

1.CTC Company Portfolio 2.ADIC, Tobacco Profile 2003, 2005 http://www.adicsrilanka.org/article_files/tobacco_profile.pdf 3.Chamikara Weerasinghe, Daily News, Wide support for Tobacco and Alcohol Authority proposal http://www.dailynews.lk/2006/01/04/news02.htm 4.Colombo Page, Liquor and tobacco sales drop after the new Act in Sri Lanka http://www.colombopage.com/archive/December21133951SL.html 5.Lakmini Rodrigo, Daily News, Tobacco and Alcohol bill implementation soon http://www.dailynews.lk/2006/06/12/news25.asp 6.Kalinga Seneviratne, HEALTH: Tobacco Bill, a Pipe of Peace in Sri Lanka http://www.ipsnews.net/news.asp?idnews=32074 7.Sunday Observer, More support for Authority on tobacco, alcohol, Sunday, 8 January 2006 http://www.sundayobserver.lk/2006/01/08/new26.html 8.Webster, M. (1985). Webster`s ninth new collegiate dictionary. Meriam - Webster Inc. 9.Patton, M.Q. (1990). Qualitative evaluation and research methods. SAGE Publications. Newbury Park London New Delhi 10.Seneviratne, K.(2006,February 8).HEALTH: Tobacco Bill, a pipe of peace in Sri Lanka. Inter Press Service

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8.0 Appendix
8.1 Questionnaire

PROJECT BEHAVIOR GAUGING SMOKING BEHAVIOR POST NATA BILL


Disclaimer: We are students of ACBT, currently doing this research project for CTC as a part of our undergraduate course. In this regard we would like to ask you a few questions on you smoking behavior. Please be assured that your answers together with the other respondents would be collected together and analyzed as a whole and in complete confidentiality. This means that neither yours nor any other respondents identity would be revealed to CTC or ACBT. Thank you for taking part in this survey. Name of Respondent: Telephone:

Q1.

To start with, can you tell me how old are you? In which of these age categories do you fall?

READ OUT LIST. AGE Under 18 18 - 20 21 - 24 25 - 34 35 - 39 40 - 44 45 - 49 50 - 54 55 - 59 60 - 64 65 + WRITE IN EXACT AGE CODE 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 __________ GO TO CLOSE

Q2

CLOSE

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Q2. Can you please show me your National Identity Card ? Or birth year?

CODE Yes (NIC) No (Birth Year) 1 2

WRITE IN NO:

GO TO Q3

Q3.

Do you or any of your close relatives work in any of the following trades or professions?

READ OUT LIST TRADES/PROFESSIONS Banking Journalism/TV/Radio Reporting Market Research Advertising Sale/Manufacture of beer or spirits Sale/Manufacture of Tobacco products Any Other CODE 1 4 5 6 2 7 3 GO TO Q4 TERMINATE INTERVIEW Q4 Q4

Q4. Do you normally smoke/ use, at least one Manufactured Cigarette a day? DAILY SMOKER YES NO MANUFACTURED CIGARETTES Q5 TERMINATE INTERVIEW

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Q5.

How many manufactured cigarettes do you normally smoke a day?

AVERAGE DAILY CONSUMPTION Less than 5 cigarettes a day 6 - 10 cigarettes a day 11 - 15 cigarettes a day 16 - 20 cigarettes a day 21 - 30 cigarettes a day 31 - 40 cigarettes a day 41 - 50 cigarettes a day More than 50 cigarettes a day WRITE IN EXACT NUMBER Q6.

MANUFACTURED CIGARETTES

GO TO

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 __________

Q6

After the recently passed alcohol and tobacco bill has your daily consumption of cigarettes changed in anyway?

CONSUMPTION CHANGED YES NO Q7.

GO TO Q7 Q8

What is your new daily consumption of cigarettes a day? MANUFACTURED CIGARETTES GO TO

AVERAGE DAILY CONSUMPTION Less than 5 cigarettes a day 6 - 10 cigarettes a day 11 - 15 cigarettes a day 16 - 20 cigarettes a day 21 - 30 cigarettes a day 31 - 40 cigarettes a day 41 - 50 cigarettes a day More than 50 cigarettes a day WRITE IN EXACT NUMBER

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 __________

Q8

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Q8.

Recently have you thought about quitting smoking? QUITTING YES NO GO TO Q9 Q10

Q9.

What is the main reason for thinking about quitting? (Let the respondent mention the main reason do not prompt him, after his mention code appropriately) QUITTING Because of NATA Bill Other CODE 1 2 GO TO Q10

Q10.

Are you aware of the rules and regulations of the recently passed alcohol & tobacco bill? AWARENESS YES NO GO TO Q11 GO TO DEMOGRAPHICS

Q11.

I am now going to ask you a few statements, as I read out each one could you please tell me if you agree or disagree with the statement? AGREE 1 1 1 1 1 1 DISAGREE 2 2 2 2 2 2 GO TO

STATEMENTS You can smoke on the roads You can smoke inside restaurants/hotels/clubs The minimum age requirement to smoke is 18 You can smoke in bus halts/Train stations/airports The minimum age requirement to smoke is 21 You can smoke in public gatherings

Q12

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Q12.

Because of the NATA bill has you occasions of smoking changed in anyway, this means if you used to smoke two to three times a day, how is it now, has it gone up or gone down or remained the same? SMOKING OCCASIONS Gone up Gone down Its the same CODE 1 2 3 GO TO DEMOGRAPHICS

DEMOGRAPHICS OCCUPATION Ask in detail. If retired ask for last occupation.

Occupation of Respondent: ________________________________________________________________ _ Place of Work :

________________________________________________________________ ___ If not employed ask reason for unemployment: __________________________________________________

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Unskilled Worker Skilled Worker (Blue) Skilled Worker (White) Small Trader/ Shop Owner/ Self Employed Clerk/ Salesman Supervisor Junior Executive Professional/Senior Executive Businessman/Industrialist 1- 4 Employees 5 10 Employees 10+ Employees Agricultural Worker Farmer / squatter Farmer / Land Owner <1/2 acre - 2 acres 2 5 acres 5+ acres Retired Unemployed Student Other EDUCATION Education Illiterate Up to Grade 5 Grade 6 9 Up to Grade O/L GCE O/L Passed GCE A/L GCE A/L Passed Graduate/Post Graduate Professional Qualification

RESPONDEN T 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Respondent 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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OCCUPATION OF RESPONDENT

ILLITERATE 1

RESPONDENTS LEVEL OF EDUCATION GRADE 5 GRADE GCE O/L GRADUATE/ 6-9 GCE A/L PROFESSIONAL 2 3 4/ 5/ 6/ 7 8/ 9

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13

14 15 16 17 18

Unskilled worker Skilled worker 1 (Blue) Skilled worker 2 (White) Small Trader/ Small Businessman/ SE Clerk/ Salesman Supervisor Junior Executive Professional/ Senior Executive Businessman/ Industrialist Number of Emp. 1-4 Number of Emp. 5-10 Number of Emp. 10+ Agricultural Worker Tenant Cultivator Farmer/ Owning land / Land Owner < 1/2 acre < 1/2 2 2-5 5+ acre Student

(E2) 8 (E2) 8 (E1) 7 (E2) 8 (E1) 7 (C) 5 (B1) 3 (E2) 8 (E2) 8

(E2) 8 (E1) 7 (D) 6 (E1) 7 (D) 6 (C) 5 (C) 5 (B1) 3 (D) 6 (B2) 4 (B1) 3 (E2) 8 (E2) 8

(E1) 7 (D) 6 (C) 5 (D) 6 (C) 5 (B2) 4 (B2) 4 (B1) 3 (C) 5 (B1) 3 (A2) 2 (E1) 7 (E1) 7

(D) 6 (C) 5 (B2) 4 (C) 5 (B2) 4 (B1) 3 (B1) 3 (A2) 2 (B2) 4 (A2) 2 (A1) 1 (D) 6 (D) 6

(B2) 4 (B1) 3 (B2) 4 (B1) 3 (A2) 2 (A2) 2 (A1) 1 (B1) 3 (A1) 1 (A1) 1 (C) 5

(E2) 8 (E2) 8 (E1) 7 (C) 5 (E2) 5

(E2) 8 (E1) 7 (D) 6 (B2) 4 (D) 4

(E1) 7 (D) 6 (C) 5 (B1) 3 (B1) 3

(D) 6 (C) 5 (B2) 4 (A2) 2 (A2) 2

(C) 5 (B2) 4 (B1) 3 (A1) 1 (A1) 1

SOCIO ECONOMIC CLASS (SEC WRITE FROM GRID ABOVE): RELIGION Code 1 2 3 4

Hindu Muslim Christian Buddhist

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MARITAL STATUS Code 1 2 3 4

Single Married Separated/Divorced Widower INCOME

Can you please tell me what is your monthly personal income? MPI 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Rs. 301 Rs. 501 Rs. 751 Rs. 1,001 Rs. 1,501 Rs. 2,001 Rs. 2,501 Rs. 3,001 Rs .4,001 Rs. 6,001 Rs. 8,001 Rs. 10,001 Rs. 12,001 Rs. 15,001 Rs. 17,001 Rs. 19,001 Rs. 21,001 Rs. 23,001 Rs. 25000 + EXACT AMOUNT

500 750 1,000 1,500 2,000 2,500 3,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 15,000 17,000 19,000 21,000 23,000 25,000

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8.2 NATA Bill

PARLIAMENT OF THE DEMOCRATIC SOCIALIST REPUBLIC OF SRI LANKA


NATIONAL AUTHORITY ON TOBACCO & ALCOHOL A BILL Presented by the Minister of Healthcare and Nutrition on 26th May, 2006 to provide for the establishment of the National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol for the purpose of identifying the policy on protecting public health ; for the elimination of tobacco and alcohol related harm through the assessment and monitoring of the production, marketing and consumption of tobacco products and alcohol products ; to include provision discouraging persons especially children from smoking or consuming alcohol, by curtailing their access to tobacco products and alcohol products ; and for matters connected therewith or incidental thereto. PRINTED AT THE DEPARTMENT OF GOVERNMENT PRINTING, SRI LANKA TO BE PURCHASED AT THE GOVERNMENT PUBLICATIONS BUREAU, COLOMBO 1

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National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol


L. D. O. 2/2005 AN ACT TO PROVIDE FOR THE ESTABLISHMENT OF THE NATIONAL AUTHORITY ON TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL FOR THE PURPOSE OF IDENTIFYING THE POLICY ON PROTECTING PUBLIC HEALTH ; FOR THE ELIMINATION OF TOBACCO AND ALCOHOL RELATED HARM THROUGH THE ASSESSMENT AND MONITORING OF THE PRODUCTION, MARKETING AND CONSUMPTION OF TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND ALCOHOL PRODUCTS ; TO INCLUDE PROVISION DISCOURAGING PERSONS ESPECIALLY CHILDREN FROM SMOKING OR CONSUMING ALCOHOL, BY CURTAILING THEIR ACCESS TO TOBACCO PRODUCTS AND ALCOHOL PRODUCTS ; AND FOR MATTERS CONNECTED THEREWITH OR INCIDENTAL THERETO : BE it enacted by the Parliament of the Democratic Socialist Republic of Sri Lanka as follows : 1. This Act may be cited as the National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol Act, No. of 2006 and shall come into operation on such date as the Minister may, appoint by Order published in the Gazette. Different dates may be appointed in respect of different provisions of this Act. PART I 2. (1) There shall be established an Authority which shall be called the National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol (hereinafter in this Act referred to as the Authority). (2) The Authority shall, by the name assigned to it by subsection (1) be a body corporate and shall have perpetual succession and a common seal and may sue and be sued in such name. 3. (1) The Authority shall consist of the following members appointed by the Minister (a) an officer, not below the rank of a Senior Assistant Secretary, of the Ministry of the Minister in charge of the subject of Health, nominated by that Minister ;

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22 National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol


41. Every manufacturer and every importer of a tobacco product shall, at such intervals and in accordance with such requirements, as may be prescribed, in consultation with the Approved Analyst conduct a test for the constituents of each brand of tobacco product manufactured or imported, as for the case may be, by such manufacturer or importer and for the respective quantities of those constituents, and shall cause the results of such tests to be sent to the Authority. 42. Where any person appears, or is produced, before a Court accused or suspected of committing an offence under subsection (1) of section 151, or subsection (1A) of section 151, or subsection (2) of section 151 of the Motor Traffic Act, the court may, notwithstanding anything to the contrary in such law, suspend the driving licence issued to such person under the Motor Traffic Act until the conclusion of the trial of such offence; and if after trial such person is convicted of such offence may suspend such driving licence for such further period as may be determined by the court having regard to all the circumstances of the case. 43. Where in any prosecution instituted under this Act, any question arises as to whether any article is a tobacco product or is an alcohol product or as to the constituents of a tobacco product or an alcohol product, a Certificate purporting to be under the hand of the Approved Analyst, to the effect that the article referred to in the Certificate is a tobacco product or any alcohol product or as to the constituents of the tobacco product or any alcohol product referred to in the Certificate, shall be admissible in evidence without proof of signature and shall be prima facie evidence of the facts stated therein. 44. Every person who (a) fails to furnish any return or information in compliance with any requirement imposed on him under this Act; (b) knowingly makes any false statement in any return or information furnished by him; Provision relating to Motor Traffic Act. Evidence. Miscellaneous offences. Tests for

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National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol


(c) being a member, officer or servant of the Authority discloses any information obtained by him in or in connection with the exercise of his powers or the discharge of his functions under this Act, to any person for any purpose other than a purpose for which he is authorized to disclose such information by this Act; (d) contravenes the provisions of this Act or any regulation made thereunder, or fails to comply with any direction given to him by the Authority, shall be guilty of an offence under this Act. (2) Every person who commits an offence under this Act for which no punishment is expressly provided for shall on conviction after trial before a Magistrate, be liable to a fine not exceeding two thousand rupees or to imprisonment for a period not exceeding six months or to both such fine and imprisonment. (3) Where an offence under this Act is committed by a body of persons, then (a) if that body of persons is a body corporate, every director or officer of that body corporate; or (b) if that body of persons is a firm, every partner of that firm, shall be deemed to be guilty of that offence : Provided however, that a director or an officer of such body corporate or partner of such firm shall not be deemed to be guilty of such offence if he proves that such offence was committed without his knowledge or that he used all due diligence to prevent the commission of such offence. (4) An officer or servant authorized in writing by the Authority shall be deemed to be a public officer within the meaning of section 136 of the Code of Criminal Procedure Act, No. 15 of 1979, for the purpose of instituting proceedings in respect of offences under this Act.

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National Authority on Tobacco and Alcohol


45. In the event of any inconsistency between the Sinhala and Tamil texts of this Act, the Sinhala text shall prevail. 46. In this Act unless the context otherwise requires alcohol product means a beverage containing a volume of four and one half (4.5) per centum or more of alcohol; Chairman means the Chairman of the Authority appointed under section 8 ; local authority means any Municipal Council, Urban Council or Pradeshiya Sabha and includes any authority created or established by or under any law to exercise perform and discharge, powers, duties and functions corresponding to or similar to the powers duties and functions exercised, performed and discharged by any such Council or Sabha ; National Dangerous Drugs Control Board means the National Dangerous Drugs Control Board established by the National Dangerous Drugs Control Board Act, No. 11 of 1984; Provincial Council means a Provincial Council established under Chapter XVIIA of the Constitution ; tar means the raw anhydrous nicotine free condensate of smoke ; tobacco product means any product manufactured wholly or partly from tobacco and intended to be Sinhala text to prevail in case of inconsistency. Interpretation.

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