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Iron Maiden

The Complete Guide

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Contents
Articles
Overview
Iron Maiden 1 1 16 16 24 24 33 38 44 48 50 56 56 62 65 66 74 75 77 78 79 80 80 94 94 98 101 108 112

Members
List of Iron Maiden band members

Current members
Bruce Dickinson Steve Harris Dave Murray Adrian Smith Janick Gers Nicko McBrain

Former members
Blaze Bayley Clive Burr Paul Day Paul Di'Anno Michael Kenney Tony Moore Terry Rance Doug Sampson Thunderstick

Discography
Iron Maiden discography

Studio albums
Iron Maiden Killers The Number of the Beast Piece of Mind Powerslave

Somewhere in Time Seventh Son of a Seventh Son No Prayer for the Dying Fear of the Dark The X Factor Virtual XI Brave New World Dance of Death A Matter of Life and Death The Final Frontier

116 122 125 129 132 135 138 142 145 150 154 154 159 162 164 167 170 173 176 178 180 183 186 186 190 193 196 198 201 204 204 206 208 210 212

Live albums
Live After Death Maiden England A Real Live One A Real Dead One A Real Live Dead One Live at Donington Rock in Rio The BBC Archives Beast over Hammersmith Death on the Road Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack

Compilation albums
Best of the Beast Ed Hunter Edward the Great Best of the 'B' Sides The Essential Iron Maiden Somewhere Back in Time

Extended plays
The Soundhouse Tapes Live!! +one Maiden Japan No More Lies

Box sets

The First Ten Years Eddie's Head Eddie's Archive

212 215 221 223 223 226 228 231 233 235 240 245 247 250 252 254 256 258 262 265 267 269 272 275 277 279 281 284 287 289 291 294 296 298 301 303 305

Singles
"Running Free" "Santuary" "Women in Uniform" "Twilight Zone" "Purgatory" "Run to the Hills" "The Number of the Beast" "Flight of Icarus" "The Trooper" "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Aces High" "Wasted Years" "Stranger in a Strange Land" "Can I Play with Madness" "The Evil That Men Do" "The Clairvoyant" "Infinite Dreams" "Holy Smoke" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "From Here to Eternity" "Wasting Love" "Fear of the Dark" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "Man on the Edge" "Lord of the Flies" "Virus" "The Angel and the Gambler" "Futureal" "The Wicker Man" "Out of the Silent Planet" "Wildest Dreams" "Rainmaker"

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" "Different World" "El Dorado"

307 309 313 315 315 321 327 328 330 331 332 332 333 334 336 339 341 342 343 344 345 349 350 351 352 353 354 355 355 357 358 360 363 365 367 369

Songs
List of Iron Maiden songs "Alexander the Great" "Brave New World" "Charlotte the Harlot" "Cross-Eyed Mary" "Die With Your Boots On" "I Got the Fire" "Invasion" "Iron Maiden" "The Longest Day" "Moonchild" "Paschendale" "Phantom of the Opera" "Prowler" "Remember Tomorrow" "Revelations" "Roll Over Vic Vella" "Strange World" "To Tame a Land" "Total Eclipse" "Transylvania" "Where Eagles Dare" "Wrathchild"

Videography
Live at the Rainbow Video Pieces Behind the Iron Curtain Live After Death 12 Wasted Years The First Ten Years: The Videos Donington Live 1992 Raising Hell

Rock in Rio Visions of the Beast The Early Days Iron Maiden: Flight 666

372 375 377 381 386 386 390 393 397 404 409 416 418 423 428 432 435 441 445 447 451 454 457 461 466 474 477 477 480 482 485 487 489 491 491

Tours
List of Iron Maiden concert tours Iron Maiden Tour Killer World Tour The Beast on the Road World Piece Tour World Slavery Tour Somewhere on Tour 7th Tour of a 7th Tour No Prayer on the Road Fear of the Dark Tour Real Live Tour The X Factour Virtual XI World Tour The Ed Hunter Tour Brave New World Tour Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour Dance of Death World Tour Eddie Rips Up the World Tour A Matter of Life and Death Tour Somewhere Back in Time World Tour The Final Frontier World Tour

Other tours
Metal for Muthas Tour British Steel Tour Unmasked Tour World Wide Blitz Tour Blackout Tour Special Forces Tour

Related articles
Anton Gustafsson tolkar Iron Maiden

Martin Birch Chemical Wedding Dr. Disaster Eddie the Head The Entire Population of Hackney Gogmagog The Iron Maidens List of awards and nominations received by Iron Maiden Anton Maiden Music in tribute of Iron Maiden Psycho Motel Derek Riggs Samson Sanctuary Records Group Kevin Shirley Rod Smallwood Andy Taylor Urchin

492 495 498 498 504 507 508 515 520 521 532 534 536 538 542 543 544 545

References
Article Sources and Contributors Image Sources, Licenses and Contributors 548 559

Article Licenses
License 564

Overview
Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden

Iron Maiden performing at 2008's Somewhere Back in Time World Tour. From left to right: Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris, Dave Murray, Janick Gers Background information Origin Genres Years active Labels Associated acts Website Leyton, London, England Heavy metal 1975present EMI, Universal, Sanctuary, Epic, Columbia, Portrait, Capitol Urchin, Gogmagog, Samson, Psycho Motel, The Entire Population of Hackney Official website Members Bruce Dickinson Dave Murray Janick Gers Adrian Smith Steve Harris Nicko McBrain Formermembers Blaze Bayley Clive Burr Paul Day Paul Di'Anno Dennis Stratton Doug Sampson Dennis Wilcock
[1]

Iron Maiden are an English heavy metal band from Leyton in east London, formed in 1975. The band are directed by founder, bassist and songwriter Steve Harris. Since their inception, the group has released a collective total of thirty albums: fourteen studio albums; seven live albums; four EPs; and five compilations. Pioneers of the New Wave of British Heavy Metal, Iron Maiden achieved success during the early 1980s and, after several lineup changes, the band went on to release a series of platinum and gold albums. These include the US

Iron Maiden platinum-selling landmarks The Number of the Beast in 1982, Piece of Mind in 1983, Powerslave in 1984, the acclaimed live album Live After Death in 1985, Somewhere in Time in 1986, and Seventh Son of a Seventh Son in 1988. Their second most recent studio effort, A Matter of Life and Death, was released in 2006 and peaked at number nine on the Billboard 200 and at number 4 in the UK and is also one of the few rock albums to be certified platinum in India. Their newest album, The Final Frontier, will be released on August 16, 2010.[2] As one of the most successful heavy metal bands in history, Iron Maiden have sold over 75 million records under EMI and a total of over 100 million records worldwide with almost no radio or television support.[3] [4] [5] [6] The band won the Ivor Novello Award for international achievement in 2002,[7] and were also inducted into the Hollywood RockWalk in Sunset Boulevard, Los Angeles, California during their United States tour in 2005. As of October 2009, the band has played just over 2000 live shows during their career. For the past 30 years, the band has been supported by their famous mascot, "Eddie the Head", who has appeared on almost all of their album and single covers, as well their live shows.

History
Early years (19751978)
Iron Maiden was formed on Christmas Day 1975, by bassist Steve Harris, shortly after he left his previous group, Smiler. Harris attributes the band name to a movie adaptation of The Man in the Iron Mask from the novel by Alexandre Dumas, which he saw around that time, and so the group was named after the iron maiden torture device.[8] Steve Harris and guitarist Dave Murray remain the longest-standing members of Iron Maiden. Original vocalist Paul Day was fired as he lacked "energy or charisma onstage".[9] He was replaced by Dennis Wilcock, a Kiss fan who utilised fire, make-up and fake blood during live performances. Wilcock's friend Dave Murray was invited to join, to the frustration of guitarists Dave Sullivan and Terry Rance.[10] This fueled Harris to temporarily disunite the band in 1976,[10] though the group reformed soon after with Murray as the sole guitarist. Iron Maiden recruited another guitarist in 1977, Bob Sawyer, who caused a rift between Murray and Wilcock, prompting Harris to fire both Murray and Sawyer.[11] A poor gig at the Bridgehouse in November 1977, with a makeshift line-up including Tony Moore on keyboards, Terry Wapram on guitar, and drummer Barry Purkis resulted in Harris firing the entire band.[12] Dave Murray was reinstated and Doug Sampson was hired as drummer. Wilcock then formed the band V1 with former Maiden guitarist Terry Wapram.

Rise to fame (19781981)


A chance meeting at the Red Lion pub in Leytonstone evolved into a successful audition for vocalist Paul Di'Anno. Steve Harris has stated, "There's sort of a quality in Paul's voice, a raspiness in his voice, or whatever you want to call it, that just gave it this great edge."[13] Iron Maiden had been playing for three years, but had never recorded any of their music. On New Year's Eve 1978, the band recorded a demo,[14] The Soundhouse Tapes. Featuring only four songs, the band sold all five thousand copies within weeks.[15] One track found on the demo, "Prowler", went to number one on Neal Kay's Heavy Metal Soundhouse charts in Sounds magazine.[15] Their first appearance on an album was on the compilation Metal for Muthas (released on 15 February 1980) with two early versions of "Sanctuary" and "Wrathchild".

Iron Maiden

3 From late 1977 to 1978, Murray was the sole guitarist in the band until Paul Cairns joined in 1979. Shortly before going into the studio, Cairns left the band. Several other guitarists were hired temporarily until the band finally chose Dennis Stratton. Initially, the band wanted to hire Dave Murray's childhood friend Adrian Smith, but Smith was busy with his own band, Urchin.[16] Drummer Doug Sampson was also replaced by Clive Burr (who was brought into the band by Stratton). In December 1979, the band landed a major record deal with EMI.[17]

Iron Maiden's eponymous 1980 release, Iron Maiden, made number 4 in the UK Albums Chart in its first week of release,[18] and the group became one of the leading proponents of the New Wave of British The Soundhouse Tapes Heavy Metal movement.[19] In addition to the title track, the album includes other early favourites such as "Running Free", "Transylvania", "Phantom of the Opera", and "Sanctuary" which was not on the original UK release but made the U.S. release and subsequent re-releases. The band played a headline tour of the UK then went on to open for Kiss on their 1980 Unmasked Tour's European leg. Iron Maiden also supported Judas Priest on select dates. After the Kiss tour, Dennis Stratton was dismissed from the band as a result of creative and personal differences.[20] Stratton was replaced by Adrian Smith in October 1980. In 1981, Maiden released their second album, titled Killers. This new album contained many tracks that had been written prior to the release of the debut album, but were considered surplus. With songs already created well in advance during tour, only two new tracks were written for the album: "Prodigal Son" and "Murders in the Rue Morgue"[21] (the title was taken from the short story by Edgar Allan Poe).

Success (19811986)
By 1981, Paul Di'Anno was demonstrating increasingly self-destructive behaviour, particularly through alleged drug usage, although Di'Anno himself denies the charge.[22] His performances began to suffer, just as the band was beginning to achieve major success in America. At the end of 1981 the band dismissed Di'Anno and sought a new vocalist. Bruce Dickinson, previously of Samson, auditioned for Iron Maiden in September 1981 and joined the band soon afterwards. He then went out on the road with the band on a small headlining tour. In anticipation of the band's forthcoming album, the band played "Children of the Damned", "Run to the Hills", "22 Acacia Avenue" and "The Prisoner" at select venues, introducing fans to the sound that the band was progressing towards. Dickinson's recorded debut with Iron Maiden was 1982's The Number of the Beast, an album that claimed the band their first ever UK Albums Chart #1 record[23] and additionally became a Top Ten hit in Nicko McBrain has been Iron Maiden's drummer many other countries.[24] For the second time the band went on a world since 1982 tour, visiting the United States, Canada, Japan, Australia, UK and Germany. The new line up, with Bruce Dickinson on vocals, was effectively introduced to the British public at large - by headlining the Reading Rock festival, on Saturday night over the August Bank Holiday 1982. A new and hugely successful chapter in Iron Maiden's future was cemented.

Iron Maiden The Number of the Beast tour's U.S. leg proved controversial when an American conservative political lobbying group claimed Iron Maiden was Satanic because of the new album's title track.[24] The band members' attempts to stop the criticism failed. A group of Christian activists destroyed Iron Maiden records (along with those of Ozzy Osbourne) as a protest against the band. Dickinson at the time was still having legal difficulties with Samson's management, and was not permitted to add his name to any of the songwriting credits. However, he was still able to lend "creative influence" to many of the songs. In a Guitar Legends interview he claims he contributed to the overall themes of "Children of the Damned", "The Prisoner" and "Run to the Hills". In December 1982, drummer Clive Burr ended his association with the band due to personal and tour schedule problems. He was replaced by Nicko McBrain, previously of French band Trust. Soon afterwards, the band journeyed for the first time to The Bahamas to record the first of three consecutive albums at Compass Point Studios, and during 1983 released Piece of Mind, which reached the #3 spot in the UK, and was the band's debut at the North American charts, with a #70 at the Billboard 200.[25] Piece of Mind includes the successful singles "Flight of Icarus" and "The Trooper". Soon after the success of Piece of Mind, the band released Powerslave on 9 September 1984. The album featured fan favourites "2 Minutes to Midnight", "Aces High", and "Rime of The Ancient Mariner",[26] the latter based on Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem of the same name and running over 13 minutes long. The tour following the album, dubbed the World Slavery Tour, was the band's largest to date and consisted of 193 shows over 13 months. This was one of the largest tours in music history - playing to 3,500,000 people over the course of 13 months.[27] Many shows were played back-to-back in the same city, such as in Long Beach, California ( 4 consecutive sold out shows to summary audience of 54 000 fans), where most of the recordings were made for their subsequent live release Live After Death which has since become one of the best selling metal live albums and is often regarded by critics and fans as the one of the best hard rock/heavy metal live albums ever. Iron Maiden also co-headlined (with Queen) the Rock In Rio festival, where they performed to an estimated crowd of 300,000 festivalgoers.[6] This tour was physically gruelling for the band and they took a 6-month vacation when it ended. This was the first vacation in the band's history, including even canceling a proposed supporting tour for the new live album.[28]

Experimentation (19861989)
Returning from their vacation, the band adopted a different style for their 1986 studio album, entitled Somewhere in Time. This was not a concept album, though it was themed loosely around the idea of time travel and associated themes - history, the passage of time, and long journeys. It featured, for the first time in the band's history, synthesised bass and guitars to add textures and layers to the sound.[29] Though considered different from the norm of Maiden sounds, it charted well across the world, particularly with the single "Wasted Years". The experimentation evident on Somewhere in Time continued and was apparent on their next album, entitled Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, which was released in 1988. Adding to Iron Maiden's experimentation, it was a concept album featuring a story about a mythical child who possessed clairvoyant powers. For the first time, the band used keyboards on a recording, as opposed to guitar synthesisers on the previous release. Critics claimed this produced a more accessible release.[30] It became the band's second album to hit #1 in the UK charts. During the Donington Park Festival on August 20, 1988, attendance was placed as 107,000; the biggest crowd attendance in the festival's history. Other performances in the festival include Kiss, David Lee Roth, Megadeth, Guns N' Roses and Helloween.[31] In 1990, to end Iron Maiden's first ten years of releasing singles, they released The First Ten Years, a series of ten CDs and double 12" vinyls. Between 24 February and 28 April 1990, the individual parts were released one-by-one, each containing two of Iron Maiden's singles, including the B-sides.

Iron Maiden

Upheaval (19891994)
In 1989, after touring with Iron Maiden, guitarist Adrian Smith released a solo album with his band ASAP entitled Silver and Gold. During this break in 1989, vocalist Bruce Dickinson began work on a solo album with former Gillan guitarist Janick Gers, releasing Tattooed Millionaire in 1990. Soon afterward, Iron Maiden regrouped to work on a new album, Adrian Smith left the band due to a lack of enthusiasm. Janick Gers, having worked on Bruce Dickinson's solo project, was chosen to replace Smith and became the first new team member in seven years. The album, No Prayer for the Dying, was released during October 1990.[32] The band obtained their first (and to date, only) UK Singles Chart number one successful single with "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter", originally recorded by Dickinson for the soundtrack to A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child. It was released on 24 December 1990, and was one of the first records to be released on several different formats with different B-sides. The single holds the record for being the fastest release to reach number one and then lose any chart rating again over the following couple of weeks.[33] Dickinson performed a solo tour in 1991 before returning to studio work with Iron Maiden for the album Fear of the Dark. Released in 1992, the album was noticeably longer (due to this being Iron Maiden's first album recorded for CD rather than LP) and had several songs which became fan favourites, such as the title track and "Afraid to Shoot Strangers". The disc also featured "Wasting Love", one of the band's softer songs, and the #2 single "Be Quick or Be Dead". The album featured the first songwriting by Gers, and no collaboration at all between Harris and Dickinson on songs. The extensive worldwide tour that followed, included their first ever Latin American leg (after a single concert during the World Slavery Tour), and a being the headline act of "Monsters of Rock Festival" in seven European countries. Iron Maiden's second performance at Donington Park, gathering near to 80,000 festivalgoers, originated the album and video release Live at Donington.[34] In 1993, Bruce Dickinson left the band to further pursue his solo career but agreed to remain for a farewell tour and two live albums (later re-released in one package). The first, A Real Live One, featured songs from 1986 to 1992, and was released in March 1993. The second, A Real Dead One, featured songs from 1975 to 1984, and was released after Dickinson had left the band. He played his farewell show with Iron Maiden on 28 August 1993. The show was filmed, broadcast by the BBC, and released on video under the name Raising Hell.

Blaze era (19941999)


In 1994, the band auditioned hundreds of vocalists, both famous and unknown before choosing Blaze Bayley, formerly of the band Wolfsbane. Bayley had a different vocal style from his predecessor, which ultimately received a mixed reception among fans.[35] After a two year hiatus (and three year hiatus from recording - a record for the band at the time) Iron Maiden returned in 1995. Releasing The X Factor, the band had their lowest chart position since 1981 for an album in the UK (debuting at number 8). The album included the 11-minute epic "Sign of the Cross", the band's longest song since "Rime of the Ancient Mariner". It also included "Man on the Edge", based on the movie Falling Down and "Lord of the Flies", based on the novel of the same name. The band toured for the rest of 1995 and 1996, playing for the first time in Israel and South Africa,[36] before stopping to release The Best of the Beast. The band's first compilation, it included a new single, "Virus". The band returned to the studio for Virtual XI, released in 1998. Chart scores of the album were the band's lowest to date,[37] failing to score one million worldwide sales for the first time in Iron Maiden's history. At the same time, Steve Harris assisted in remastering the entire discography of Iron Maiden up to Live at Donington (which was given a mainstream release for the first time) and released the set.

Iron Maiden

Ed Hunter, Brave New World, Dance of Death (19992005)


In February 1999, Bayley left the band by mutual consent. At the same time, the band surprised their fans when they announced that both Bruce Dickinson and guitarist Adrian Smith were rejoining the band, and that Janick Gers would remain. Iron Maiden now had three guitarists and a hugely successful reunion tour, The Ed Hunter Tour. This tour also supported the band's newly released greatest hits Ed Hunter, which also contained a computer game of the same name starring the band's mascot.

Iron Maiden during The Ed Hunter Tour.

Iron Maiden's first studio release after the reunion with Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith came in the form of 2000's Brave New World. Thematic influences continued with "The Wicker Man" based on the 1973 British cult film of the same name and "Brave New World" title taken from the Aldous Huxley novel of the same name. The world tour that followed consisted of well over 100 dates and culminated on 19 January 2001 in a show at the Rock in Rio festival in Brazil, where Iron Maiden played to an audience of around 250, 000.[38] This performance was recorded and released on CD and DVD in March 2002 under the name Rock in Rio. Following their Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour in summer 2003, Iron Maiden released Dance of Death. The release of this, their thirteenth studio album, was met by critical and commercial success worldwide. Some critics also felt that this release matched up to their earlier efforts such as Piece Of Mind and The Number Of The Beast, including their darker imagery rather than the more upbeat reunion album. As usual, historical and literary influences continued, "Montsegur" in particular being about the Cathar stronghold conquered in 1244 and "Paschendale" relating to a significant battle during World War I. The supporting tour for this album, named Dance of Death World Tour was another landmark for the band, as they played to over 750,000 fans during 50 dates over a period of 4 months in 2003-04. This included sold out dates in South America, Europe, North America and Japan. Their performance at Westfalenhalle in Dortmund, Germany, as part of the supporting tour, was recorded and released in August 2005 as a live album and DVD, entitled Death on the Road. In 2005, the band announced a tour to commemorate the 25th anniversary of the release of their first album, Iron Maiden, and the 30th anniversary of their formation. The tour also was in support of the 2004 DVD entitled The Early Days and as such during the tour they only played material from their first four albums. As part of the celebration of their early days, the "Number of the Beast" single was re-released and went straight to number 3 in the UK Chart. The Early Days World Tour included many stadium headline dates and festivals including their historic performance at the Ullevi Stadium in Sweden, playing to almost 60,000 fans. This concert was also broadcast on satellite television all over Europe to over 60 million viewers. Iron Maiden's last Ozzfest performance on the 20th of August 2005 at the Hyundai Pavilion, was at Glen Helen in San Bernardino, CA to almost 50 000 people. The band completed this tour by headlining the Reading and Leeds weekend festivals on the 26th[39] 28 August - two shows to combined number of people estimated 130 000, and Ireland 31st August to almost 40 000 fans at RDS Stadium.[40] For the second time, the band played a charity show for former drummer Clive Burr's Clive Burr MS Trust Fund charity.

Iron Maiden

A Matter Of Life And Death (2005early 2007)


In Autumn 2006, Iron Maiden released A Matter of Life and Death. While the album is not a concept album,[41] war and religion are recurring themes in the lyrics throughout, as well as in the album's artwork. A successful tour followed, during which they played the new album in its entirety; though response to this was mixed.[42] [43] Iron Maiden recorded a live session at Abbey Road Studios for Live from Abbey Road in December 2006. Their performance was screened in an episode alongside sessions with Natasha Bedingfield and Gipsy Kings in March 2007 on Channel 4 (UK) and June 2007 on the Sundance Channel (USA).[44] In November 2006, Iron Maiden and manager Rod Smallwood announced that they were to end their 27-year-old relationship with Sanctuary Music and were to start a new company named Phantom Music Management. No other significant changes were made. The second part of the "A Matter of Life and Death" tour was dubbed "A Matter of the Beast" to celebrate the 25th anniversary of The Number of the Beast album, and included appearances at several major festivals worldwide.[45] The band announced plans to play five songs from A Matter of Life and Death and five from The Number of the Beast as part of their set but in fact played only four songs from The Number of the Beast. They played in the Middle East for the first time at the annual Dubai Desert Rock Festival in 2007 playing to 20,000 fans. They made their first appearance in India with a concert in Bangalore aptly called Eddfest, playing to over 45,000 people at the Bangalore Palace Grounds. This event marked the first time any major heavy metal band toured the Indian sub-continent. The band went on to play a string of European dates, including open air festival performances and mostly stadium-sized gigs. In England, they headlined the Download Festival at Donington Park for the fourth time in their career. The show attracted a record breaking number of attendees, estimated as near to 80,000 die-hard festival-goers despite higher ticket and camp-place prices than in recent years.[46] On the 24 June they ended the tour with a performance at London's Brixton Academy in aid of The Clive Burr MS Trust fund.

Somewhere Back in Time World Tour, Flight 666, The Final Frontier (2007-present)
On 5 September 2007, the band announced their Somewhere Back in Time World Tour,[47] which ties in with the DVD release of their Live After Death album. The setlist for the tour consisted of successes from the 1980s, with a specific emphasis on the Powerslave era for set design. The tour started in Mumbai, India on 1 February 2008 where the band played to an audience of almost 30,000. The first part of the tour consisted of 24 concerts in 21 cities, travelling over 50, 000 miles in the band's own chartered airplane "Ed Force One".[48] They played their first ever concerts in Costa Rica and Colombia and their first Vocalist Bruce Dickinson during A Matter Of Australian shows since 1992. On 12 May, the band released a new Life And Death World Tour. compilation album, titled Somewhere Back in Time. It includes a selection of tracks from their 1980 eponymous debut to 1988's Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, including several live versions from Live After Death. With the sole UK headline show at Twickenham Stadium, this tour also marked the first ever stadium headlining show in the UK by the band.[49] A final part of the tour took place in February and March 2009,[50] including the band's first ever appearance in Peru and Ecuador, and their first performances in New Zealand for 16 years.[51] The band also played their third show within a span of 2 years in India, at the Rock In India 2009 festival to a crowd of 20,000. The final leg of the tour ended in Florida on April 2 after which the band took a break from touring. On 20 January 2009, the band announced that they were to release a full-length documentary film in select cinemas on 21 April. Titled Iron Maiden: Flight 666, the movie was filmed during the first part of the "Somewhere Back In Time" tour between February and March 2008. Flight 666 is co-produced by Banger Productions and was released

Iron Maiden by Universal Music Group in the U.S. and EMI Records in the rest of the world.[52] During a Rock Radio interview promoting Flight 666, Nicko McBrain revealed that Iron Maiden had booked studio time for early 2010 and would be likely to be touring again late that year or the year after.[53] At the 2009 BRIT Awards the band won the award for best live act.[54] During their live presentation in So Paulo, on 15 March 2009, Bruce announced on stage that the show was the biggest of their career. In fact, the crowd of 100,000 people was Iron Maiden's all-time biggest attendance for a solo show, without other bands. The attendance was bigger than Chile's show (almost 60,000 fans), according to the organisers.[55] Nicko McBrain stated in a interview for Rock Radio that the new Iron Maiden album will be finished in 2010, and that a tour will follow in the late 2010 or 2011.[56] On 2 November 2009, Janick Gers confirmed to BBC News that the band already had new material written and would head to Paris, France, to start composing and rehearsing the bulk for the new album. The band took time off for Christmas and New Year's Eve before recording the new album in January, with Kevin Shirley producing.[57] In another interview with heavy metal DJ Eddie Trunk, drummer Nicko McBrain confirmed that the band had finished writing eight songs for the new album which he claimed would probably be released in 2011.[58] In December 2009 Iron Maiden announced that they would headline a string of festivals in the Summer of 2010: Sonisphere Festivals in the United Kingdom,[59] Sweden, and Finland;[60] Wacken Open Air in Germany;[61] the Festival d't de Qubec in Canada.[62] They will also play at the Bergenhus Fortress in Norway in August and in Udine in Italy.[63] On March 4, 2010, the new album title was announced as The Final Frontier[2] , along with North American and European tour dates for summer 2010. On April 6, 2010, Kevin Shirley announced that he had completed the mixing process of The Final Frontier: "In this last month I have finished all the vocals and tracking and mixed the new Iron Maiden album, The Final Frontier - in my studio."[64] On June 8, 2010, the cover art, track listing, and release date of the new album were announced. The Final Frontier will be released on August 16, 2010. The first single was also revealed to be entitled El Dorado. This song, the second of the album, was made available for free download along with the album's details.[65]

Image and legacy


Iron Maiden were ranked #24 in VH1's "100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock".[66] The band were ranked fourth on MTV's "Top 10 Greatest Heavy Metal Bands of All Time".[67] Iron Maiden were named as the third best heavy metal band of all time on VH1 Classic: Top 20 Metal Bands.[68] The band also won the Ivor Novello Award for international achievement in 2002.[7] The band was also inducted into the Hollywood RockWalk during their tour in the United States during 2005. Iron Maiden frequently use the slogan "Up the Irons" in their disc liner notes, and the phrase can also be seen on several t-shirts Janick Gers and Steve Harris. officially licensed by the band. "The Irons" has been used to refer to the London football club, West Ham United, of which founder Steve Harris is a fan. Fans of Iron Maiden have been known to use the phrase as a greeting or sign-off to other Iron Maiden fans.

Iron Maiden

Iron Maiden's mascot, Eddie, is a perennial fixture in the band's science fiction and horror-influenced album cover art, as well as in live shows. Eddie was drawn by Derek Riggs until 1992, although there have been various versions by numerous artists including Melvyn Grant. Eddie is also featured in a first-person shooter video game from the band, Ed Hunter, as well as numerous books, graphic comics and band-related merchandise. In 2008, Kerrang! released an album, entitled Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden, composed of Iron Maiden cover songs played by artists such as Metallica, Machine Head, Dream Dave Murray and Adrian Smith. Theater, Trivium, Coheed and Cambria, Avenged Sevenfold, and others who were influenced by Iron Maiden throughout their careers. Well over a half-dozen other Iron Maiden tribute albums (each featuring various artists) exist, including a piano tribute, an electro tribute, a black metal tribute and a hip-hop tribute. Iron Maiden songs have been featured in the soundtracks of several video games, including Carmageddon 2, Grand Theft Auto: Vice City, Grand Theft Auto: Episodes From Liberty City, Grand Theft Auto IV: The Lost and Damned, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 4, SSX on Tour and Madden NFL 10.[69] Their music also appears in the Guitar Hero and Rock Band series of rhythmic video games. Iron Maiden songs have also appeared on the films Phenomena (called "Creepers" in the U.S.), and Murder by Numbers; while MTV's animated duo Beavis and Butthead have commented favorably on Iron Maiden multiple times. The band's name is named prominently (and repeated several times) in the songs "Teenage Dirtbag" by Wheatus and "Back to the 80's" by Danish dance-pop band Aqua. Punk rock band NOFX released a song titled "Eddie, Bruce, and Paul" on their 2009 album Coaster. This track tells the story of Iron Maiden, and is performed in the style of their early work. Weezer mentions them in the song "Heart Songs" from their 2008 self-titled "Red" album. The verse goes: "Iron Maiden, Judas Priest, and Slayer taught me how to shred..." The Sum 41 song "Fat Lip" contains the line "Heavy metal and mullets it's how we were raised, Maiden and Priest were the gods that we praised" Iron Maiden's music also helped Jesper Strmblad of In Flames to pioneer the melodic death metal genre, stating that he had wanted to combine death metal with the melodic guitar sounds of Iron Maiden.[70]

Claims of occult references


In 1982, the band released one of their most popular, controversial and acclaimed albums, The Number Of The Beast. This led to Christian groups, particularly in the United States, branding the band as Satanic and unholy. Smashing and burning the band's albums in bonfires became common. In the 1990s the band was banned from performing in Chile for the same reasons (due to the influence of religious figures over the government). However, contrary to this belief, the band is not Satanic nor does it believe in the occult. According to the band the devil imagery which is linked with the band due to a few songs and their album covers is not connected with their religious beliefs and is not the focus of their music. In an interview included on Iron Maiden's DVD The Early Days, Steve Harris set the record straight by saying that he is not a Satanist. Possibly due to these controversies, the band's later albums moved away from those themes to notably less controversial ones, such as film and literature (the album Piece of Mind and songs like "The Prisoner", which was based on the British television serial of the same name, "The Wicker Man" and "To Tame a Land", based on the novel Dune), wars and world conflicts ("The Trooper", "Aces High" and "2 Minutes to Midnight"); historical themes ("Alexander the Great" from Somewhere in Time and "Run to the Hills") and even human fears and emotions

Iron Maiden ("Hallowed Be Thy Name", "Fear of the Dark", and the album A Matter of Life and Death).

10

Influences
Iron Maiden's influences include Queen,[3] Black Sabbath,[71] AC/DC, Motrhead, Judas Priest, Led Zeppelin, Cream, The Who, Rush, Thin Lizzy, Styx, UFO, King Crimson, Deep Purple, Rainbow, Triumph, Uriah Heep,[72] Wishbone Ash,[73] Pink Floyd, ELP, Genesis, Yes, and Jethro Tull.[71]

Special charter
In October 2007, Iron Maiden commissioned an Astraeus 757 as transport for their 'Somewhere Back in Time' tour in 2008.[74] Lead singer Bruce Dickinson piloted the aircraft, "Ed Force One," since he is also a commercial airline pilot for Astraeus. The aircraft was converted into a combi configuration, repainted with a special Iron Maiden livery, had a list of all The Iron Maiden band's jet, an Astraeus Boeing 757-200 in special Iron Maiden the places where the band was going to livery. (2008) present in the tour Somewhere Back in Time' and was used in this scheme until 28 May 2008 for commercial flights as well as use by Iron Maiden.[74] The same aircraft (G-OJIB) was used again on the second leg of the Somewhere Back in Time tour in 2009. It plays a major role on the award-winning documentary Iron Maiden: Flight 666 which was released in movie theatres in 42 countries in April 2009 and appeared on DVD and Blu-Ray formats in the US in June 2009. Iron Maiden: Flight 666 debuted on British television on 4 March 2010 at 11:00pm on BBC4 as part of Heavy Metal Britannia.[74]

Awards
BRIT Awards 2009: Best British Live Act Iron Maiden 2002: International Achievement Iron Maiden 2004: Yleisnestys (Finland) - Vuoden ulkomainen artisti (Foreign artist of the year) Iron Maiden 2008: Yleisnestys (Finland) - Vuoden ulkomainen artisti (Foreign artist of the year) Iron Maiden Kerrang! Awards 2005:Kerrang! Hall of Fame Iron Maiden Metal Hammer Awards 2004: Best U.K. Live Act Iron Maiden 2008: Best U.K. Band Iron Maiden 2008: Icon Award Eddie the Head 2009: Best U.K. Band - Iron Maiden 2009: Best U.K. Live Act Iron Maiden 2009: Golden Gods Award Iron Maiden

2006: Best Heavy Metal Album A Matter of Life and Death 2009: 24 Beats Per Second Flight 666

Iron Maiden Classic Rock Roll of Honour Awards 2006: Album Of The Year - "A Matter Of Life And Death" Iron Maiden 2006: Vip Award Special - Rod Smallwood Iron Maiden 2009: Band of the year - Iron Maiden BBC Heavy Metal World Cup 2009: The Winner: Iron Maiden - Greatest Metal Band Of All Time[75] 2010: DVD of the Year: Iron Maiden "Flight 666" (2009)Sam Dunn, Scott McFydden [76]

11

Discography
Studio albums Iron Maiden (1980) Killers (1981) The Number of the Beast (1982) Piece of Mind (1983) Powerslave (1984) Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Fear of the Dark (1992) The X Factor (1995) Virtual XI (1998) Brave New World (2000) Dance of Death (2003) A Matter of Life and Death (2006) The Final Frontier (2010)

Band members
Current members Bruce Dickinson lead vocals (19811993, 1999present) Dave Murray guitar (1976present) Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals (19801990, 1999present) Janick Gers guitar (1990present) Steve Harris bass, backing vocals, studio keyboards (1975present) Nicko McBrain drums, percussion (1982present) Live members Michael Kenney keyboards (1986present)

Former members Doug Sampson drums, percussion (19771979) Dennis Stratton guitars, backing vocals (19791980) Paul Di'Anno lead vocals (19781981) Clive Burr drums, percussion (19801982) Blaze Bayley lead vocals (19941998) Dennis Wilcock - lead vocals (19761977) Paul Day - lead vocals (19751976)

Concert tours

Iron Maiden

12

Duration

Concert tour Vocals Bass S. Harris

Lineups Guitars D. Murray D. Stratton A. Smith B. Dickinson Drums C. Burr

Dates

Feb 1980

Metal for Muthas Tour

P. Di'Anno

11 75 140 187

Apr 1980-Dec 1980 Iron Maiden Tour Feb 1981Dec 1981 Killers World Tour Feb 1982Dec 1982 The Beast On The Road May 1983Dec 1983 World Piece Tour

N. McBrain

142

Aug 1984Jul 1985 World Slavery Tour Sep 1986May 1987 Somewhere on Tour

193 157

Apr 1988Dec 1988 Seventh Tour of a Seventh Tour Sep 1990Sep 1991 No Prayer on the Road Jun 1992Nov 1992 Fear of the Dark Tour Mar 1993Aug 1993 Real Live Tour J. Gers

101 118 68 45

Sep 1995Sep 1996 The X Factour Apr 1998Dec 1998 Virtual XI World Tour Jul 1999Oct 1999 Jun 2000Jan 2001 May 2003Aug 2003 The Ed Hunter Tour Brave New World Tour Give Me Ed... 'til I'm Dead Tour

B. Bayley

138 87

B. Dickinson

A. Smith

30 92 56

Oct 2003Feb 2004 Dance Of Death World Tour May 2005Sep 2005 Eddie Rips Up The World Tour

53 45

Oct 2006Jun 2007 A Matter of Life and Death Tour Feb 2008Apr 2009 Somewhere Back in Time World Tour Jun 2010-Aug 2010 The Final Frontier World Tour

58 91

36*

See also
Best selling music artists Music in tribute of Iron Maiden The Iron Maidens List of Iron Maiden songs

References
[1] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com [2] IRON MAIDEN announce new studio album 'THE FINAL FRONTIER' and North American Tour (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1184) [3] "Iron Maiden Bio" (http:/ / www. epicheroes. com/ index. php?main_page=index& cPath=13_97& zenid=gfvqg9tpu6tifea7p2gbb2bje5). December 2009. . [4] "Iron Maiden Bio" (http:/ / www. absoluteradio. co. uk/ music/ artists/ iron_maiden/ biography/ ). 02.12.2009. .

Iron Maiden
[5] "Iron Maiden Bio" (http:/ / www. articleclick. com/ Article/ Iron-Maiden-Biography-And-Top-10-Songs/ 984823). 2009. . [6] "Iron Maiden Timeline" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=14). IronMaiden.com. 2009-10-13. . [7] "Iron Maiden honoured with Ivor Novello award" (http:/ / www. sanctuarygroup. com/ index. php?page=1& l1=1& l2=2& l3=0& getArticleId=9) (Official Website). Sanctuary Group. 18 September 2002. . Retrieved 11 October 2006. [8] Barton, Geoff (27 October 1970). "BLOOD AND IRON: HM from the punky East End and nothing to do with Margaret Thatcher, sez Deaf Barton" (http:/ / www. nwobhm. com/ maiden. htm). Sounds magazine. NWOBHM.com. . Retrieved 8 October 2006. [9] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.32. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [10] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.33. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [11] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.46. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [12] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.50. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [13] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.53. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [14] Fuentes Rodrguez, Csar (2005). Iron Maiden: El Viaje De La Doncella. p.17. ISBN84-933891-2-9. (Spanish) [15] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. pp.104105. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [16] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. pp.163164. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [17] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.108. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [18] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.143. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [19] Fuentes Rodrguez, Csar (2005). Iron Maiden: El Viaje De La Doncella. pp.1921. ISBN84-933891-2-9. (Spanish) [20] Hinchcliffe, Jon (27 October 1999). "Dennis Stratton Interview: October 1999" (http:/ / www. praying-mantis. com/ mantis/ dennis99. shtml). Praying-Mantis.com. . Retrieved 8 October 2006. [21] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.183. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [22] "PAUL DI'ANNO Compares STEVE HARRIS To ADOLF HITLER, Says IRON MAIDEN Is 'F**king Boring'" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=121158). June 2, 2009. . Retrieved 29 October 2009. [23] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.227. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [24] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.228. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [25] "Piece of Mind" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ charts/ billboard-200#/ album/ iron-maiden/ piece-of-mind/ 9073). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.. . Retrieved 2009-08-01. [26] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.244. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [27] Stenning, Paul (2006). Iron Maiden: 30 Years of the Beast The Complete Unauthorised Biography. Chrome Dreams. p.102. ISBN1-84240-361-3. [28] Stenning, Paul (2006). Iron Maiden: 30 Years of the Beast The Complete Unauthorised Biography. Chrome Dreams. p.104. ISBN1-84240-361-3. [29] Greg Prato (2008). "Somewhere in Time - Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:sxcm963o3ep5~T0). allmusic. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [30] Adrian Denning. "Album reviews - Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. adriandenning. co. uk/ maiden. html). adriandenning.co.uk. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [31] "Doningto9 - Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. ukrockfestivals. com/ donington-1988. html). Donington 1988. . Retrieved 12 October 2009. [32] "No Prayer for the Dying" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:fyez9757krrt). Allmusic. . Retrieved 14 January 2009. [33] "The Official UK Charts Company: All the Number 1's" (http:/ / www. theofficialcharts. com/ zoom. php?id=656). Official UK Charts Company. 2008. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [34] "Live At The Donington" (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0352442/ ). IMBD. 2008. . Retrieved 14 October 2009. [35] "Iron Maiden CD reviews" (http:/ / www. roughedge. com/ cdreviews/ i/ ironmaiden. htm#bravetbj). Rough Edge Reviews. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [36] "The X Factour" (http:/ / en. wikipedia. org/ wiki/ The_X_Factour). Wikipedia.org. . [37] "Virtual XI" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=22& p2_articleid=318). IronMaiden.com. 2008. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [38] Fuentes Rodrguez, Csar (2005) (in Spanish). Iron Maiden: El Viaje De La Doncella. ISBN84-933891-2-9. [39] Williams, Scott (31 August 2005). "Iron Maiden Reading 2005 Review" (http:/ / www. efestivals. co. uk/ festivals/ reading/ 2005/ review-ironmaiden. shtml). EFestivals.com. . Retrieved 11 October 2006. [40] "Iron Maiden rise above Osbourne's drama at Leeds" (http:/ / www. nme. com/ news/ 113509. htm) (Official Website). NME. 2005. . Retrieved 11 October 2006. [41] "IRON MAIDEN Drummer, Guitarist Talk About New Album" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=54636). Blabbermouth. 5 July 2006. . Retrieved 17 September 2006. [42] Vincentelli, Elisabeth (31 December 2006). "Whole Albums in Concert" (http:/ / www. nytimes. com/ 2006/ 12/ 31/ arts/ music/ 31vinc. html?pagewanted=print). New York Times. . Retrieved 1 January 2009. [43] "Dickinson and his veteran boys can still rock..." (http:/ / moreresults. factiva. com/ results/ index/ index. aspx?ref=EVETIM0020061214e2ce00004). Evening Times. . Retrieved 1 January 2009.

13

Iron Maiden
[44] "More4: Live from Abbey Road" (http:/ / www. channel4. com/ more4/ shows/ a/ abbeyroad/ index. html). Channel 4. 2007. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [45] "Tour Listing" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=15). IronMaiden.com. 2007. . Retrieved 11 August 2007. [46] "Tour Preview" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=433). IronMaiden.com. 2007. . Retrieved 8 August 2007. [47] "World Tour 08" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=664) (Announcement). IronMaiden.com. . Retrieved 1 November 2007. [48] "Ed Force One" (http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ articles/ ed-force-one. html). Maiden-World.com. 20 December 2007. . Retrieved 9 August 2008. [49] "Iron Maiden live at Twickenham" (http:/ / www. thrashhits. com/ 2008/ 07/ live-iron-maiden-london-twickenham-stadium-5-july-2008/ ). Thrash Hits. 28 July 2007. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [50] "IRON MAIDEN FLY HIGH AGAIN FOR THE FINAL LEG OF THEIR 'SOMEWHERE BACK IN TIME WORLD TOUR'" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1019). IronMaiden.com. . Retrieved 6 December 2008. [51] "Iron Maiden to perform in Lima March 2009" (http:/ / www. livinginperu. com/ news/ 7988). Living In Peru. . Retrieved 6 December 2008. [52] "Iron Maiden: The Movie" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1058). Iron Maiden.com. . Retrieved 21 January 2009. [53] "Rock Radio :: Nicko: Maiden have booked studio time" (http:/ / www. rockradio. co. uk/ rock-news/ nicko-maiden-have-booked-studio-time/ v38r73fs/ ). Rock Radio. 22 April 2009. . Retrieved 22 April 2009. [54] "Brit Award" (http:/ / www. brits. co. uk/ winners/ british-live-act/ ). Brits.co.uk. . [55] "Iron Maiden does biggest show of career in So Paulo in portuguese" (http:/ / musica. terra. com. br/ interna/ 0,,OI3636296-EI1267,00-Iron+ Maiden+ faz+ maior+ show+ da+ carreira+ em+ SP. html). Terra.com.br. 16 March 2009. . [56] "Nicko: Maiden have booked studio time" (http:/ / www. rockradio. co. uk/ rock-news/ nicko-maiden-have-booked-studio-time/ v38r73fs/ ). Rock Radio. . Retrieved 2009-11-04. [57] "Rolling Stone Wood wins rock gong" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 2/ hi/ 8338887. stm). BBC. 2009-11-03. . Retrieved 2009-11-27. [58] IRON MAIDEN - Eight Songs Written For New Album, Heading Into The Studio Soon (http:/ / www. bravewords. com/ news/ 129393) [59] Iron Maiden to headline Sonisphere U.K. next summer (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1170) [60] Maiden announce headlining Sonisphere Festivals in Sweden and Finland next summer (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1171) [61] Iron Maiden return to Wacken in 2010! (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1174) [62] "Fiche artiste :: Festival d't de Qubec" (http:/ / www. infofestival. com/ index. php?lang=fr& page=artiste& id=4058). Infofestival.com. . Retrieved 2010-06-30. [63] Iron Maiden returns to Bergen, August 2010! (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1172) [64] Page of Mind (http:/ / pageofmind. wordpress. com/ 2010/ 04/ 07/ kevin-shirley-confirma-fim-das-mixagens/ ) [65] "Iron Maiden: conhea capa, tracklist e faixa de novo lbum - Novidades (Notcia)" (http:/ / whiplash. net/ materias/ news_862/ 109319-ironmaiden. html?utm_source=feedburner& utm_medium=twitter& utm_campaign=Feed:+ feedburner/ iSMr+ (WHIPLASH. NET+ -+ Rock+ e+ Heavy+ Metal)& utm_content=Twitter). Whiplash.net. . Retrieved 2010-06-30. [66] "100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock" (http:/ / www. vh1. com/ shows/ dyn/ the_greatest/ 62187/ episode_wildcard. jhtml?wildcard=/ shows/ dynamic/ includes/ wildcards/ the_greatest/ hardrock_list_full. jhtml& event_id=862768& ;start=61) (Official Website). VH1. . Retrieved 7 October 2006. [67] "The Greatest Metal Bands of All Time" (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ bands/ m/ metal/ greatest_metal_bands/ 071406/ index5. jhtml) (Official Website). MTV. 2006. . Retrieved 7 October 2006. [68] "Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. vh1. com/ artists/ az/ iron_maiden/ artist. jhtml). VH1.com. 2008. . Retrieved 12 October 2008. [69] "Madden 10? More like Maiden 10! Game Soundtrack Revealed" (http:/ / www. metalinsider. net/ video-games/ madden-10-more-like-maiden-10-game-soundtrack-revealed). Metal Insider. 2009-07-27. . Retrieved 2009-11-04. [70] Metal Update Interview with Jesper Strmblad (http:/ / www. metalupdate. com/ interviewflames. html) [71] "IRON MAIDEN Bassist Talks About His Technique And Influences" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=27275). Blabbermouth.net. . Retrieved 2008-04-25. [72] The History Of Iron Maiden - Pt. 1: The Early Days. [DVD]. Sony. 2004-11-23. [73] Iron Maiden Guitar Tab Edition. Alfred Publishing Company. ISBN978-0769260198. [74] "Retrieved 16 November 2007" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=682). Ironmaiden.com. 2007-10-31. . Retrieved 2009-11-04. [75] "Iron Maiden Profile" (http:/ / www. metalhammer. co. uk/ uncategorized/ heavy-metal-world-cup-and-the-winner-is/ ). Metal Hammer. 2009-11-13. . [76] "Iron Maiden Juno Award" (http:/ / www. junoawards. ca/ ). Juno Award. 2010-04-19. .

14

Iron Maiden

15

Literature
Fuentes Rodrguez, Csar (2005). Iron Maiden: El Viaje De La Doncella. ISBN84-933891-2-9. (Spanish) Gamba, Marco; Visintini, Nicola (2000). Iron Maiden Companion (1st ed.). Moving Media & Arts. Iron Maiden (past and present band and management). (1996). Twelve Wasted Years. [VHS]. UK: Sanctuary Group. OCLC23531749 ASIN:6301092643 Iron Maiden (past and present band and management). (2004). Iron Maiden The Early Years. [DVD]. UK: Sanctuary Group. ASIN B0006B29Z2 Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (second ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. ISBN1-86074-287-4. Stenning, Paul (2006). Iron Maiden: 30 Years of the Beast The Complete Unauthorised Biography. Chrome Dreams. ISBN1-84240-361-3.

External links
Official website (http://www.ironmaiden.com)

16

Members
List of Iron Maiden band members
Iron Maiden

Iron Maiden live in Barcelona, 30 November 2006. (l-r) Steve Harris, Dave Murray, Janick Gers, and Adrian Smith. Background information Genres Years active Heavy metal 1975present Members Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Dave Murray Adrian Smith Janick Gers Nicko McBrain Formermembers Paul Di'Anno Blaze Bayley Clive Burr Dennis Stratton Doug Sampson

Iron Maiden are a British heavy metal band formed in 1975 by bassist Steve Harris. After several lineup changes, they settled on vocalist Paul Di'Anno, guitarist Dave Murray and drummer Doug Sampson. The band released an EP as a four piece, before hiring guitarist Dennis Stratton in 1979. Drummer Clive Burr replaced Sampson and the band released their self-titled debut album in 1980. Later that year, Stratton was replaced by guitarist Adrian Smith, due to musical and personal differences. During the tour supporting their sophomore effort, Di'Anno was fired from the band, due to excessive cocaine abuse. Vocalist Bruce Dickinson, who had just left his previous band auditioned for Iron Maiden in September 1981 and joined shortly afterwards. After the release of their third album, drummer Nicko McBrain replaced Burr, who left due to personal and tour schedule problems. This is considered by many as their quintessential lineup,[1] with which they released a series of high-impact works.[2] In 1990, prior to the recordings of their eight studio album, Smith left the band due to lack of enthusiasm with the musical direction it was taking. Janick Gers, an old friend of Dickinson who played on his debut solo album, became the new guitarist. This formation recorded one more album before Dickinson departed in 1993, in order to further

List of Iron Maiden band members pursue his solo career. Maiden auditioned hundreds of vocalists, before settling on Blaze Bayley. After releasing two studio albums, Bayley departed from the band by mutual consent, due to creative differences. In 1999, Dickinson and Smith rejoined Iron Maiden, which has since become a six-piece band, with three studio albums released by this lineup.

17

Current members
Bruce Dickinson Active: 19811993, 1999present Instruments: vocals and guitar in early days of Iron Maiden. Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases from The Number of the Beast (1982) to Live at Donington (1993 live), then from Brave New World (2000) to present Steve Harris Active: 1975present Instruments: bass and backing vocals Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases Dave Murray Active: 1976present Instruments: guitars Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases Adrian Smith Active: 19801990, 1999present Instruments: guitars and backing vocals Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases from Killers (1981) to Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988), then from Brave New World (2000) to present Janick Gers Active: 1990present Instruments: guitars Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases from No Prayer for the Dying (1990) to present Nicko McBrain Active: 1982present Instruments: drums Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases from Piece of Mind (1983) to present

List of Iron Maiden band members

18

The current members of Iron Maiden

Bruce Dickinson Lead singer

List of Iron Maiden band members

19

Steve Harris Bass

Dave Murray Guitars

List of Iron Maiden band members

20

Adrian Smith Guitars

Janick Gers Guitars

List of Iron Maiden band members

21

Nicko McBrain Drums

Former members
Doug Sampson Active: 19771979 Instruments: drums Release contributions: The Soundhouse Tapes (1979 demo), The BBC Archives (four songs from 1979) Paul Di'Anno Active: 19781981 Instruments: vocals Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases from The Soundhouse Tapes (1979 demo) to Maiden Japan (1981 live) Clive Burr Active: 19791982 Instruments: drums Release contributions: all Iron Maiden releases from Iron Maiden (1980) to The Number of the Beast (1982) Dennis Stratton Active: 19791980 Instruments: guitars and backing vocals Release contributions: Iron Maiden (1980), Live!! +one (1980 live) Blaze Bayley Active: 19941999 Instruments: vocals Release contributions: The X Factor (1995), Virtual XI (1998)

List of Iron Maiden band members

22

The former members of Iron Maiden

Paul Di'Anno

Blaze Bayley

Dennis Stratton

List of Iron Maiden band members

23

Other members
Active Name Instrument Vocals Guitars Notes Paul Day was Maiden's original lead vocalist, being later fired as he lacked "energy or charisma onstage". Sullivan and Rance disagreed on Dave Murray's entrance in the band. Steve Harris then temporarily [3] disbanded Iron Maiden, reforming it with Murray as the sole guitarist. Matthews was the band's original drummer, who performed until vocalist Wilcock persuaded Harris to "clean house". Iron Maiden's second singer, who used special effects onstage, like fake blood, pyrotechnics, and face paint. He left the band after an argument with guitarist Dave Murray. Sawyer was always trying to upstage Murray, which lead into a confrontation with Harris, and a [4] subsequent expulsion. Thunderstick's stint in the band was left notoriously short, due to him being incapable of playing properly while intoxicated.

197576 Paul Day Dave Sullivan Terry Rance 197577 Ron Matthews

Drums

197677 Dennis Wilcock Bob Sawyer

Vocals

Guitars

1977

"Thunderstick" Drums

Terry Wapram Tony Moore 1979 Kent Ewing Paul Cairns Paul Todd Dave Mac Tony Parsons

Guitars Keyboards Guitars Moore moved to London to begin rehearsals with the band in 1977, but left shortly afterwards.

Parsons appeared on The BBC Archives album, performing on four tracks.

References
[1] Prato, Greg. "Piece of Mind > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:fifqxq85ldte~T10). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 3 November 2008. [2] "The Greatest Metal Bands of All Time" (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ bands/ m/ metal/ greatest_metal_bands/ 071406/ index5. jhtml). MTV News. MTV Networks. . Retrieved 8 November 2008. [3] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorised Biography (2nd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.33. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [4] "Early Iron Maiden band members" (http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ dna/ h2g2/ alabaster/ A252280). h2g2. BBC. . Retrieved 2008-12-19.

24

Current members
Bruce Dickinson
Bruce Dickinson

Bruce Dickinson performing live at Somewhere Back in Time World Tour in Costa Rica, February 26, 2008. Background information Birth name Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Labels Associated acts Website Paul Bruce Dickinson August 7, 1958 Worksop, Nottinghamshire, England Heavy metal, hard rock Musician, songwriter, author, pilot Vocals, guitar, drums 1976-present EMI, Sanctuary Samson, Iron Maiden, Tribe of Gypsies www.screamforme.com
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Paul Bruce Dickinson (born 7 August 1958) is a British singer, airline pilot, radio show host, fencer, author, and songwriter best known as the vocalist of the heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Dickinson performed for some local bands including Styx (not the American band of the same name) in 1976, Speed, (19771978), and Shots in early 1979. He then joined hard rock band Samson later in 1979, where he gained some popularity. In this band he went by the name of "Bruce Bruce." He left Samson in 1981, citing musical differences. Shortly afterwards, in 1981, Dickinson was hired as Iron Maiden's new vocalist, debuting for that band with the 1982 album The Number of the Beast.[2] During his time in that band, they issued a series of high impact releases,[3] resulting in Dickinson gaining worldwide fame, and becoming one of the most acclaimed heavy metal vocalists of all time.[4] Dickinson quit Iron Maiden in 1993 in order to pursue his solo career, being replaced by Blaze Bayley. Dickinson's solo work ranged a wide variety of heavy metal and rock styles. Dickinson rejoined Maiden in 1999 along with guitarist Adrian Smith. Since then, Dickinson has only released one more solo album, Tyranny of Souls. He is the older cousin of Rob Dickinson, lead singer of British alternative rock band Catherine Wheel. In his personal life, he is known for his criticism of drug use.[5]

Bruce Dickinson

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Childhood
Paul Bruce Dickinson was born in the small mining town of Worksop, Nottinghamshire. His mother Sonia worked part-time in a shoe shop and his father Bruce was a mechanic in the army. Dickinson's birth hurried the young couple into marriage. Initially, he was brought up by his grandparents; his grandfather was a coal-face worker at the local colliery and his grandmother was a housewife. This is referred to in his song "Born In '58" from the album Tattooed Millionaire. Dickinson started school at Manton Primary. Soon afterwards, when he was six, his parents moved from Worksop to Sheffield and he consequently had to go to a new school, Manor Top, which Dickinson disliked. After six months, his parents decided to move him out to a small private school called Sharrow Vale Junior. Of this period, he recalled "I grew up in an environment where it struck me that the world was never gonna do me any favours. And I had very few close friends, because we were always moving. I think that's partly why I grew up feeling like such an outsider. I didn't have an unhappy childhood, but it was unconventional, to say the least". He also has a younger sister named Helen who was born in 1963. He tried to isolate himself from her as much as he could when he was young, supposedly out of spite because she, unlike him, was a planned pregnancy and birth. Dickinson's first musical experience was dancing in his grandparents' front room to Chubby Checker's "The Twist". The first record Dickinson recalls owning was The Beatles single "She Loves You" which he managed to persuade his granddad to buy him. "I was only four or five but I really loved that scene, The Beatles and Gerry & The Pacemakers. ... I noticed they had B-sides, and that sometimes I liked them even more than the A-sides. That was when I first began noticing the difference between 'good' music and 'bad'." He believes that this marked the beginning of him thinking like a musician. He tried to play an acoustic guitar belonging to his parents, but it blistered his fingers. By this time, Dickinson's parents were earning a good living from selling estate. A lot of Dickinson's childhood was spent living on a building site, until his parents bought a boarding house where his father sold second-hand cars off a forecourt. The income from their business success gave them the opportunity to give Dickinsonthen 13 years olda boarding school education and they chose Oundle, a public school in Northamptonshire. Dickinson enjoyed being away from home. "I didn't particularly enjoy being with my parents, so I saw it as an escape. I think it was because I hadn't built any real attachment to them when I was very, very young." At Oundle, however, Dickinson was picked on and routinely bullied by the older boys of Sidney House, the boarding house that he belonged to. His interests at Oundle were often military. He co-founded the school wargames society with Mike Jordan, and he rose to a position of some power in the Combined Cadet Force. Oundle was also where Dickinson became attracted to heavy rock. He has said :"I was 13 when I first heard Deep Purple's In Rock album, and it just blew me away! I heard this thing coming out of someone's room one day, and I went in and said 'Whoa! What's that?' And they just looked at me disdainfully and went 'It's "Child in Time" by Deep Purple. Don't you know anything?' But I was too amazed to care. The first album I ever bought was Deep Purple in Rock, all scratched to fuck, but I thought it was great." Dickinson obtained bongo drums from the music room and practiced. Dickinson remembers trying to learn "Let It Be". Other than this tinkering though, he never learned an instrument at school, and as far as his contemporaries can recall, he could not read music. Any technical musical skills that Dickinson now possesses were acquired after his stay at Oundle. In an episode of BBC2's Seven Ages of Rock, Dickinson said in interview that, like Sinatra's "My Way", Iron Maiden's "Run to the Hills" was based on "rising sixths". Whether or not his illustration was correct, it has to be said that Dickinson knew nothing about rising sixths when he left Oundle. Dickinson was later expelled from Oundle for urinating in the headmaster's dinner. Neil Ashford, his co-urinator, was rusticated; that is, sent home for the rest of the term rather than being permanently excluded from the school, on the grounds that the contribution to the headmaster's peas had been Dickinson's idea. Returning home to Sheffield in 1976, Dickinson enrolled at a local Catholic comprehensive school, although not a practising Catholic himself.

Bruce Dickinson In the summer of 1976, he joined his first band. He had overheard two other pupils talking about their band and that they needed a singer. Dickinson volunteered to do the vocals. They rehearsed in the drummer's father's garage and the band were impressed by Dickinson's singing. It was at this point Dickinson decided to buy a microphone. The first gig Dickinson's new band did was at the Broadfield Tavern pub in Sheffield. Originally called "Paradox," the band changed name upon Dickinson's suggestion, to "Styx", unaware of the American act with the same name. They made local newspaper headlines when a steel worker was awoken by their performance. Of the incident, it was said: "He bottled the guitarist and chucked the drums off-stage." Soon after, the band split up.

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University
After leaving his school Dickinson didn't really know what he wanted to do. He joined the Territorial Army for six months, which he did not enjoy. As army life was not what he wanted, he applied for a place at University. He had met the minimum grades for getting in and read history at Queen Mary College, in London's East End. His parents wanted him in the army, but he told them that he wanted to get a degree first. "That was what they wanted to hear so that was my cover story. When I got down there I started immediately finding and playing in bands." In college, Dickinson got involved in the Entertainments Committee. "One day you'd be a roadie for The Jam, the next you'd be putting up the Stonehenge backdrop for Hawkwind or whatever." In 1977, Dickinson met a guy called Paul "Noddy" White. He was a multi-instrumentalist and he had a PA and other equipment. Dickinson suggested that, along with drummer Steve Jones, they form a band together. This would eventually evolve into the band "Speed", described by Dickinson as sounding like a 'crossover between Judas Priest and The Stranglers with a Hammond organ on top of it.' Dickinson recalled: "It had nothing to do with taking speed, we were a completely drug-free band, we just used to play everything ridiculously fast. Like speed metal, but ten years too early." Dickinson was the vocalist and occasionally played guitar. "I got Noddy to give me guitar lessons and I ... started writing stuff straight away. He showed me three chords and I'd write stuff just from those three chords." Speed didn't last long, but it encouraged Dickinson to continue to work to be a musician. Dickinson spotted an ad in Melody Maker with the caption "Singer wanted for recording project". Since he had never been near a recording studio he replied immediately. He "wailed, wolfed, hollered and made noises" onto a tape and with it went a note that read; "By the way, if you think the singing's crap, there's some John Cleese stuff recorded on the other side you might find amusing." They liked what they heard and Dickinson came down to the studio. The band was called "Shots" and were formed by two brothers, Phil and Doug Siviter. They were amazed by Dickinson's vocal abilities and they started talking about what music they liked. "I started saying Ian Gillan, Ian Anderson, Arthur Brown, and Doug goes, 'That's it! Fucking Arthur Brown, man! Sometimes your voice is a dead ringer for Arthur! We've got to form a band.' This guy's got a studio and he wants to form a band with me! I was like 'Yes'." A song "Dracula" from this session can be heard as the closing track on The Best of Bruce Dickinson, disc two. According to Dickinson, this song is first thing he ever recorded. Dickinson played pubs with Shots on a regular basis. One particular night, Dickinson suddenly stopped in the middle of a song and started interviewing a man in the audience, heckling for not paying enough attention. He got such a good response he started doing it every night until it became a regular routine. "Suddenly everybody was paying attention, cause they might be next. The first time I did it, afterwards the landlord of the pub was like 'Great show, lads, see you next week'. So we started sort of building this bit into the show. And that was when I first started to get the hang of, just not being a singer, but being a frontman, too." The next step in Dickinson's career was taken in a pub called the Prince of Wales in Gravesend, Kent, where Shots were playing regularly. One night, Barry Graham ("Thunderstick") and Paul Samson paid a visit. The legend says that Thunderstick, who was there in his every day guise, became the victim of Dickinson's gimmick. "He looked a bit weird so I did a spiel on it". Obviously impressed with his stage-act, Thunderstick and Samson talked with Shots after the performance. A couple of weeks later, Samson called and asked him if he was willing to join their band, Samson. Dickinson was interested since this meant he could play larger gigs in London. Dickinson wanted to "do

Bruce Dickinson things with a bit of a weird edge to it." By then, Shots had almost become a heavy metal comedy act; the show had completely taken over the music.

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Samson: 19791981
In my navet I thought people who were in rock 'n' roll bands were great artists, and it was a huge shock to the system to realise that they weren't, that they didn't even aspire to be, really. Some of them did, maybe, but some of them, like Samson, were very frightened of the idea. Bruce Dickinson.[6] In a gig by hard rock band Samson at Bishop's Stortford, Dickinson came onstage and performed one of their songs, "Rock Me Baby".[7] He was offered the job as the band's vocalist immediately.[7] They released their debut album, Survivors, in 1979 on an independent label. Dickinson did not appear on the original version, as it had been completed two months before he joined them.[6] During his time in Samson, he went by the name "Bruce Bruce", derived from Monty Python's Bruces sketch.[6] The other band members knew they had improved things by hiring Dickinson, but it took some time for the fans to "catch up".[7] Dickinson was shocked after finding out that all rock performers were not as great artists as he had thought them to be.[6] Most of them, like Samson, didn't think of popularity, but just "to have a good drink, a good shag, and take some drugs". It was very difficult for him to relate to that kind of living.[6] He had smoked before, but in Samson it was more like a habit. Dickinson had to smoke joints in order to communicate with other band members. He called it, "the price that had to be paid", as it was a step towards his goalbeing a rock n' roll singer. The band released two more albums with Dickinson - Head On and Shock Tactics. However, after Samson encountered numerous difficulties, Dickinson departed in 1981.

Iron Maiden
Beginnings: 19811993
Maiden worked to a time table. A table that wasn't absolute but it had to be stuck to. "Now you'll write for six weeks, now you'll make a record for three months, now you're rehearsing for two weeks, now you'll tour for eight months." It was organized like that and that seemed to suit the style of writing of the band. Bruce Dickinson at Gino, Stockholm.[8] Dickinson auditioned for Iron Maiden in September 1981, singing a version of "Remember Tomorrow", from their self-titled debut album, to which the band members answered "Hey... you got the job".[9] Maiden had a strict and organized routine that suited the band's writing style, which Dickinson described as a "time table".[8] After a few gigs, Maiden started writing new material for their third album, The Number of the Beast, released in 1982. In the wake of Samson's contractual problems, Dickinson couldn't be credited on the songs.[6] He called it a "moral contribution", referring to the fact that the contribution that he had made to the songs was equal to those of the other band members.[6] The album was a major success, topping the UK charts,[10] The band embarked on a supporting tour around the globe. On the following albums, 1983's Piece of Mind and 1984's Powerslave, Steve Harris's song-writing monopoly was pushed aside in favour of other members' ideas.[6] Dickinson contributed a number of songs, including the singles "Flight of Icarus" and "2 Minutes to Midnight".[11] During the World Slavery Tour, as part of the new theatrical elements, Dickinson wore a feathered mask during "Powerslave".[6] This was the band's longest-lasting tour to date, where Harris and Dickinson thought of going home mid-tour, due to the high number of dates.[12] The band took a six-month break, which Dickinson spent practicing fencing.[6] Maiden started writing for a new album, Somewhere in Time. Dickinson was unhappy with the synthesised bass and guitars and progressive rock-influenced [13] style, and had no writing credits.[6] Following the subsequent tour, Maiden started working on the next album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, which followed its predecessor's approach,[13] and became their second effort to top the UK charts.[10] After the subsequent tour in 1988, they decided to take a year off.[6]

Bruce Dickinson

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During the pre-production of the next album, Adrian Smith left Iron Maiden, and was replaced by Janick Gers. The band embarked on a mini tour during the summer, to introduce the new guitarist. Maiden's eighth studio album, 1990's No Prayer for the Dying, had a raw sound that didn't "hold up well", compared to past efforts.[14] The album featured Dickinson's "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter", originally composed for a film soundtrack, which despite receiving a Golden Raspberry Award for worst "original" song in 1989, it became the band's first single to top the UK singles chart.[10] By 1992, Harris had set up a studio of his own and the new album, Fear of the Dark, was recorded there.[6] This effort's overall sound received a better treatment than No Prayer for the Bruce Dickinson performing with Iron Maiden in Paris, France, 1 July 2008. Dying.[15] Dickinson said this was the first time they [6] attempted to recapture something from the past. Dickinson left Iron Maiden after a farewell tour in 1993, to concentrate on his solo career.[6] His last performance with the band was filmed by the BBC and released as a live video, Raising Hell.

Return: 1999present
Along with Adrian Smith, Dickinson rejoined Iron Maiden in 1999 with Janick Gers remaining in the band, and they embarked on a small tour. Afterwards, they set about recording Brave New World, their first studio album with Dickinson since 1992. The supporting tour culminated with a performance at the Rock in Rio festival. In 2003 they released Dance of Death. During a 2005 tour, Sharon Osbourne accused Dickinson of disrespecting the Ozzfest at the band's last Ozzfest performance. She repeatedly turned off the P.A. system, and chanted "Ozzy! Ozzy!". Some members of the audience threw eggs at the band, to which Dickinson replied it was a premeditated assault organised by insiders.[16] In an interview for Rhythm, a UK drum based magazine, Nicko McBrain stated that this incident inspired Dickinson to write the song These Colours Don't Run for Maiden's next album, stating: "When Bruce brought that to the table, he said 'I've got this song called 'These Colours Don't Run' and we all just laughed at him, saying, 'Yeah right, and where did that come from then?'." In 2006, Maiden released their newest effort, A Matter of Life and Death and embarked on the tour. In 2008, they held the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour. Months later, Dickinson talked about the band's plans to compose a new album to come out in 2010, now known to be titled "The Final Frontier".

Solo career
In early 1989, Zomba asked Dickinson to do a track for the movie A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child,[17] with a budget, a studio, and a producer, Chris Tsangarides. Dickinson took up the opportunity and called an old friend of his, former Gillan guitarist, Janick Gers. Shortly after meeting up, they had "Bring Your Daughter to the Slaughter" ready for the studio. The song was composed with the assistance of bassist Andy Carr, and drummer Fabio del Rio. Later that year, Dickinson participed on a re-recording of Deep Purple's "Smoke on the Water", as part of the humanitarian effort Rock Aid Armenia.[18] His intention now was to release a solo album. His solo debut, Tattooed Millionaire, was written and recorded within weeks, and released in May 1990. Backed by the band Skin, Bruce Dickinson, with Mr. Bean, made a cover version of Alice Cooper's "Elected", which was used in 1992 for Comic Relief,[19] and five years later, on Bean Soundtrack.[20]

Bruce Dickinson For his second solo effort, Balls to Picasso, Dickinson received the collaboration of American producer, Keith Olsen. Unhappy with the results, Dickinson started working with Tribe of Gypsies guitarist Roy Z, to improve Olsen's work.[8] The album was recorded with Tribe of Gypsies as the backing band,[8] and was released in 1994. That same year, Dickinson recorded a cover version of "Sabbath Bloody Sabbath" with the band Godspeed for Black Sabbath's tribute album Nativity in Black.[21] Tribe of Gypsies departed to continue with their work and Dickinson tracked down another band. Now his new writing partner was Alex Dickson.[8] After the supporting tour finished, he started working on a new album, Skunkworks. Dickinson decided the band would be called that, but abandoned the idea to keep his name on the release.[22] Due to musical differences, the "Skunkworks" entity ceased to be when the tour ended. After a short period of inactivity, Dickinson once again teamed up with Roy Z and Tribe of Gypsies to record his next album, Accident of Birth. Adrian Smith was asked to guest and remained later as a full-time member.[23] The album marked a return to heavy metal for Dickinson; being a much heavier album than Iron Maiden's, with a less progressive influence.[23] Follow-up, The Chemical Wedding, was a semi-concept album on alchemy.[24] It drew inspiration from William Blake's writings, with songs such as, "Book of Thel", having the same title of some of his poems, and the artwork featuring one of his paintings.[24] The record was even more successful than its predecessor, with engaging lyrics and powerful songs. Dickinson recorded a cover version of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody", with Montserrat Caball,[25] almost ten years after her duet album with Freddie Mercury. Scream for Me Brazil was a live album that documented a show recorded in So Paulo in 1999, during the supporting tour. In February 1999, Dickinson, along with Smith returned to Iron Maiden. Dickinson performed vocals on the song, "Into the Black Hole", for Ayreon's Universal Migrator Part 2: Flight of the Migrator.[26] Later that year, he collaborated with Judas Priest's front-man, Rob Halford, recording, "The One You Love to Hate", for Halford's debut, Resurrection.[27] In late 2001, was released a compilation album, titled The Best of Bruce Dickinson. This work also included a limited edition disc of rarities and two new songs. His latest album, Tyranny of Souls was released in May 2005. This time the songwriting was all split between Roy Z and Dickinson.[28] Many songs were composed by Roy sending recordings of riffs to Dickinson, while he was on tour with Maiden.[28] In June 21, 2005, Dickinson's complete solo discography was re-released, featuring bonus discs with rare and remastered tracks. That same year, Dickinson contributed in the song, "Beast in the Light", from Tribuzy's album, Execution, and a subsequent live album.[29] In 2006, was released a three-DVD package, Anthology, containing concerts from his career, promo videos and footage from his work on Samson.

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Other work
Dickinson's interests include literature, writing, fencing (at which he has competed internationally, and has founded a fencing equipment company under the brand name "Duellist"[30] ), railway technology and aviation. Due to the wide variety of Dickinson's pursuits, the Winter 2009 edition of Intelligent Life named him as a living example of a polymath.

Aviation
Dickinson holds a commercial pilot's licence, and regularly flies Boeing 757 charter jets for the UK charter airline Astraeus where he is employed as a Captain.[31] He was taught to fly by British Airways commercial pilot Captain Phil Dales. In mid-2006, Dickinson flew about 200 UK citizens home from Bruce Dickinson in a flight suit Lebanon during the Israel/Hezbollah conflict.[32] On 12 February 2007, Dickinson was given permission to fly Rangers F.C. to Israel for their UEFA Cup game against Hapoel Tel Aviv.

Bruce Dickinson Dickinson asked if he could pilot this flight as soon as he found Astraeus had the contract for it. After the collapse of XL Airways UK in September 2008 he piloted an Iceland Express aeroplane and flew home 180 stranded holiday makers from Egypt, as well as a Boeing 757 with a group of British RAF pilots from Afghanistan. "A lot of them recognised him because they are Maiden fans, but he was there in his professional capacity as a pilot," says an RAF spokesman. For their 2008-2009 Somewhere Back in Time World Tour, Iron Maiden chartered a Boeing 757 and had it specially converted to carry equipment for their concerts. Dickinson himself piloted the plane, dubbed "Ed Force One".

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Radio and TV
Dickinson presented Bruce Dickinson's Friday Rock Show on BBC radio station 6 Music from 2002-2010. Jean-Jacques Burnel, bassist with The Stranglers, took over the presenting duties while Dickinson toured the US with Iron Maiden. In March 2010, the BBC announced that, after over eight years, Dickinson's show was to be axed.[33] His final broadcast was on May 28 2010, with the regular format abandoned in favour of a personal and musical tribute to the recently deceased Ronnie James Dio. Dickinson also scorned the BBC executives for the cancellation, playing the Johnny Paycheck version of Take This Job and Shove It. [34] He has recently taken the helm of BBC Radio 2 serial Masters of Rock. He also presented the 5-part historical TV series about aviation, Flying Heavy Metal, which was shown on the Discovery Channel, and later on Discovery Turbo in the UK. He was also a guest on an episode of the Military Channel'sThe Greatest Eve, where he drove a Russian T-34 tank. The most recent television programme he has presented was a show on spontaneous human combustion for Sky One called Inside Spontaneous Human Combustion with Bruce Dickinson, in which he investigates the phenomenon of this occurrence by enlisting the help of several experts and performing various experiments to determine its possible cause.

Writing
Plotting it out was the doddle. It came from a series of mad conversations, actually, that all gestated together along with some Sherlock Holmes, some Biggles and Penthouse, and out it came. Bruce Dickinson commenting on Lord Iffy.[35] During a 1986-1987 Iron Maiden tour, and in the wake of a divorce, Dickinson started writing his first book. He spent sleepless night trying to give birth to the main character, Lord Iffy Boatrace. Iffy was an English landlord, whose problems were always related to the lack of money and quested a wealthy life.[35] The book, The Adventures of Lord Iffy Boatrace (ISBN 0-283-06043-3), was released in 1990 and sold more than 30,000 copies almost immediately. Due to the high demand, the publisher, Sidgwick & Jackson, asked Dickinson to produce a sequel, which became 1992's The Missionary Position [35] (ISBN 0-283-06092-1). Dickinson has also turned his hand to scriptwriting, having written a film script entitled Chemical Wedding which has been made into a film starring Simon Callow, in which Dickinson played a few small cameo roles and composed the soundtrack. Dickinson has also appeared twice in The Paradise Club, a BBC series.

Singing style
Dickinson never received a formal vocal training, but still possessed a wide vocal range which was trademarked by his quasi-operatic tenor. He was given the nickname "The Air Raid Siren" because when he joined Iron Maiden and recording his first album The Number of the Beast, their sound engineer Martin Birch wanted to get the right sound for the first four lines of the title song, and forced Dickinson to sing them over and over again for hours, until Dickinson grew so frustrated that he let out a tremendous scream originally not written in the song, but found to be so fitting by the band that they kept it as part of the intro. In reality, this scream soon became one of the things that the song is most recognized for. The note has not been replicated live in the orginal pitch since the early days. Dickinson's singing varied notably in the 1990s in the recording of albums such as No Prayer for the Dying, Fear of the Dark and his first solo work Tattooed Millionaire, making use of a much more raspy and unpolished sound,

Bruce Dickinson befitting of the stripped down style of the albums. Since returning to Iron Maiden in 1999, his singing style has returned to much like it was in the 1980s with Iron Maiden, though soft and reflective passages have been incorporated with the familiar operatic wail to suit the more progressive direction of Iron Maiden since the reunion. His voice has also lowered with age, making him a dramatic tenor in opera terms.

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Discography
Iron Maiden 1982: The Number of the Beast 1983: Piece of Mind 1984: Powerslave 1986: Somewhere in Time 1988: Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1990: No Prayer for the Dying 1992: Fear of the Dark 2000: Brave New World 2003: Dance of Death 2006: A Matter of Life and Death 2010: The Final Frontier Bruce Dickinson 1990: Tattooed Millionaire 1994: Balls to Picasso 1996: Skunkworks 1997: Accident of Birth 1998: The Chemical Wedding 2005: Tyranny of Souls 1979: Survivors * 1980: Head On 1981: Shock Tactics 1990: Live at Reading 1981

Samson

* Dickinson appeared on the album's re-issue only, as it had been originally completed before he joined the band.

External links
Bruce Dickinson's official website [1] Bruce Dickinson [36] at MySpace

References
[1] http:/ / www. screamforme. com/ [2] Prato, Greg. "The Number of the Beast > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:difqxq85ldte). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 3 November 2008. [3] "The Greatest Metal Bands of All Time" (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ bands/ m/ metal/ greatest_metal_bands/ 071406/ index5. jhtml). MTV News. MTV Networks. . Retrieved 8 November 2008. [4] Prato, Greg. "Bruce Dickinson Biography" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=11:kifixqe5ld6e~T10). Allmusic. . Retrieved 2008-11-30. [5] "Bruce Dickinson - Dickinson: Drugs Were Hard To Avoid" (http:/ / www. contactmusic. com/ new/ xmlfeed. nsf/ story/ dickinson. -drugs-were-hard-to-avoid). contactmusic. . Retrieved 2003-12-15. [6] "The Bruce Dickinson biography" (http:/ / www. bookofhours. net/ bdwbn/ bio. htm). Book of Hours. . Retrieved November 12, 2008. [7] "Samson Biography-sing365" (http:/ / www. sing365. com/ music/ lyric. nsf/ Samson-Biography/ C74A429BD38D32F848256D75002F88E0). . Retrieved 2009-05-28. [8] "A Conversation with Bruce Dickinson" (http:/ / www. bookofhours. net/ bdwbn/ ginoklar. htm). BookOfHours. 1996-04-28. . Retrieved 2008-12-12. [9] "Remember Tomorrow (Rock am Ring)" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=K_EtFiP6RYY& fmt=18). YouTube. 2005-06-05. . Retrieved 2008-12-02. [10] "UK Top 40 Chart Archive, British Singles & Album Charts" (http:/ / www. everyhit. co. uk/ ). everyHit.com. . Retrieved 2008-12-16. [11] Prato, Greg. "Piece of Mind > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:fifqxq85ldte~T10). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-12-19. [12] Stenning, Paul (2006). Iron Maiden: 30 Years of the Beast. Chrome Dreams. p.104. ISBN 1-84240-361-3. [13] Prato, Greg. "Somewhere in Time > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:kifqxq85ldte~T10). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-11-13. [14] Prato, Greg. "No Prayer for the Dying > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:wifqxq85ldte~T00). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-12-13. [15] Prato, Greg. "Fear of the Dark > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:0cfexqu5ldde~T00). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-12-16.

Bruce Dickinson
[16] "Iron Maiden Pelted With Eggs At Final Ozzfest Performance" (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ news/ articles/ 1508028/ 20050822/ iron_maiden. jhtml?headlines=true). MTV. 2005-08-22. . Retrieved 2008-12-06. [17] "A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child (Soundtrack)" (http:/ / nightmareonelmstreetfilms. com/ nightmare5soundtrack. html). Nightmare on Elm Street Films. . Retrieved 2008-12-17. [18] "Smoke On The Water - Rock Aid Armenia" (http:/ / www. progarchives. com/ album. asp?id=15789). ProgArchives.com. . Retrieved 2008-12-17. [19] "Mr. Bean & Smear Campaign - (I Want To Be) Elected" (http:/ / www. discogs. com/ release/ 813210). Discogs. . Retrieved 2008-12-17. [20] "Bean (1997) - Soundtracks" (http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0118689/ soundtrack). Internet Movie Database. . Retrieved 2008-12-18. [21] Parisien, Roch. "Nativity in Black: Tribute to Black Sabbath > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:gifoxqthldse~T10). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-12-17. [22] "A phonecall from London..." (http:/ / www. bookofhours. net/ bdwbn/ teleklar. htm). Book of Hours. 1997-04-27. . Retrieved 2008-12-15. [23] Stagno, Mike. "Bruce Dickinson - Accident of Birth" (http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=10626). Sputnikmusic. . Retrieved 2008-12-23. [24] "A chat with Bruce Dickinson" (http:/ / www. bookofhours. net/ bdwbn/ globklar. htm). Book of Hours. 1998-10-31. . Retrieved 2008-12-17. [25] "Friends for Life > Overview" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:3vftxqujld0e~T00). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-12-13. [26] "The Universal Migrator - part 2" (http:/ / www. arjenlucassen. com/ ayreon/ ay_interview_09. html). ArjenLucassen.com Ltd.. 2000-07-01. . Retrieved 2008-12-06. [27] Adams, Bret. "Resurrection > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:0jfwxqqkldde~T00). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-12-13. [28] "The Roy Z well-being network" (http:/ / www. bookofhours. net/ bdwbn/ royint2005. htm). Book of Hours. 2005-06-23. . Retrieved 2008-12-24. [29] "Tribuzy: 'Execution - Live Reunion' artwork posted online" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=72445). Blabbermouth. 2007-05-13. . Retrieved 2008-12-14. [30] "The Duellist History" (http:/ / www. duellist. com/ cgi-bin/ fencing. cgi?page=About-Us. html). . Retrieved 2007-04-09. [31] Warwick, Graham (2007-12-23). "Astraeus unveils 'heavy metal' 757 for Iron Maiden tour" (http:/ / www. flightglobal. com/ articles/ 2007/ 12/ 23/ 220533/ picture-astraeus-unveils-heavy-metal-757-for-iron-maiden-tour. html). Flight Global. . Retrieved 2007-12-24. [32] Retrieved July 17, 2009; KNAC Bruce Dickinson Rescuer (http:/ / www. knac. com/ article. asp?ArticleID=4798) [33] Plunkett, John (2010-03-10). "BBC 6 Music drops Bruce Dickinson as Radio 2 cuts back on Mark Radcliffe" (http:/ / www. guardian. co. uk/ media/ 2010/ mar/ 10/ bbc-6-music-bruce-dickinson). London: The Guardian. . Retrieved 2010-03-11. [34] http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ programmes/ b00sj689 [35] "Bruce - The Author" (http:/ / www. brucefans. com/ bruce-the-author/ ). BruceFans. . Retrieved 2008-12-06. [36] http:/ / www. myspace. com/ brucedickinson

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Steve Harris

33

Steve Harris
Steve Harris

Steve Harris performing in Mansfield, Massachusetts, 20 June 2008 Background information Birth name Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Labels Associated acts Stephen Percy Harris 12 March 1956 Leytonstone, London, England Heavy metal, hard rock Musician, songwriter Bass, keyboards, vocals 1971 present EMI Iron Maiden, Smiler, Gypsy's Kiss Notableinstruments Fender Precision Bass

Stephen Percy "Steve" Harris (born 12 March 1956) is an English musician, best known for revolutionizing the bass guitar in the metal genre and as the bassist, band leader, primary songwriter and only constant member of the band Iron Maiden (although Dave Murray has played with the group since 1976). In addition, he plays keyboards, and sings backing vocals. He founded the band as a teenager in 1975. He and Dave Murray are the only members of the band to have appeared on all of the band's albums, and as Murray left the band for a few months prior to the first album to join Urchin, Harris is the only member to have remained in the band throughout its duration. He used to work as an architectural draftsman in the East End of London but gave up his job upon forming Iron Maiden. During the mid 1970s he was a youth team footballer for West Ham United. He still is a talented amateur football player and often has the crest of West Ham on his bass,[1] [2] and he has stated his first ambition in life before music was to become a professional footballer.[3]

Steve Harris

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Career
Originally Harris wanted to play drums or be a professional football player; however, he did not have much space for a drum kit in his house, so he started to play bass and write songs. Harris is a self-taught bass player[2] . His first bass was a copy of a Fender Precision Bass that cost him 40 when he was 17 years old. He went on to use a signature Lado "Unicorn" model and an early 1970s Fender Precision with RotoSound strings. Harris' first band was named Influence then Gypsy's Kiss featuring Bob Verscoyle (Lead Vocals) Dave Smith (Guitar) and Drummer Paul Sears. Harris and Sears later joined Smiler, of which all the band members were several years older than he was. He ended up leaving, as the members of the band made it clear that they did not care for a bassist who leapt around the stage and wrote songs, also his songs were too complicated for the band members, with the result that they did not want to play them. Sears was later fired due in no small way to his "hellraising lifestyle." After Smiler, Harris went on to create Iron Maiden, getting the name from seeing an iron maiden, a type of torture instrument, in the movie The Man in the Iron Mask. Harris is Maiden's principal composer and lyricist. His song writing typically showcases his trademark galloping bass patterns and features long songs with epic lyrics that feature many tempo changes. Harris frequently writes lyrics about mythology, history or topics inspired from books and films. Harris is often considered among the best and most influential heavy metal bassists.[4] He is most known for his "galloping" playing style - usually an eighth note followed by two sixteenth notes at fast tempo (e.g., "The Trooper") or eighth note triplets which he plays with two fingers. Before playing, Harris often chalks his fingers, to make these fast patterns easier to play, as shown on the bonus DVD for the A Matter of Life and Death album. Besides this he is very adventurous on the bass and plays intricate accompaniment in many of Maiden's songs. He also uses power chords, which are unusual on bass, on several songs. Harris has also stated that he never uses a pick and that he never warms up before a show. He plays a specially-painted bass guitar which has been featured on every Iron Maiden album. The guitar has gone through four colour changes since construction. Originally white, then black, it was then changed to blue sparkle, then white with claret and blue pinstriping and the West Ham Utd crest.

Equipment
Harris has been seen with different bass guitars during his career, mostly Fender P-Basses. This list may not contain every bass, and most of them are retired, and the first ones in this list are from his earliest days from his career as a musician. Fender Precision Bass Copy: White, white pickguard, maple neck. Fender '70s Jazz Bass: Sunburst w. tortoise pickguard, rosewood fretboard. Fender '70s Precision Bass: Pearl White w/ West Ham crest and blue/red pinstriping (formerly white, then black, then blue sparkle), mirror pickguard (formerly black), maple neck. Fender '70s Precision Bass: Blue / silver crackle finish (formerly white, then red sparkle), mirror pickguard (formerly black), maple neck. Fender 1959 Precision Bass: Chess finish (formerly fiesta red or 'salmon pink' as described by Steve in a 1992-era Bass Player magazine), mirror pickguard (formerly gold anodized), maple fretboard (formerly rosewood). Ibanez Roadster Bass: Black, maple neck (White pickups). Ibanez Roadster Bass: Black, maple neck (Black pickups). Danelectro Longhorn Bass: White, rosewood fretboard. Fender '80s Precision Bass: Red, mirror pickguard (formerly black), maple neck. Fender '80s Precision Bass: Red, black pickguard, maple neck. Fender '80s Precision Bass: Red, black pickguard, rosewood fretboard.

Steve Harris Lado Steve Harris Signature Unicorn Bass: Blue w. Unicorn graphic, rosewood fretboard. The bass has no tone control and Harris taps his head or body to cue the technician for treble or bass adjustments. Lado Super Falcon Bass: Blue w. Falcon graphic, rosewood fretboard. (He's been using two such basses, one being a proto-type and was delivered back to Lado.) Unknown brand: Natural, rosewood fretboard. Unknown brand, possibly a "small luthier" bass: Golden, rosewood fretboard. Fender '80s Precision Bass: Black, white pickguard, maple neck. Ovation Acoustic Bass: Black, rosewood fretboard. Fender Steve Harris Signature Precision Bass: Blue, wine-red pickguard, maple neck. Guild Acoustic Bass: Black, rosewood fretboard. Fender Special Precision Bass: Sunburst, white pickguard, rosewood fretboard. Fender Special Precision Bass: Black, golden pickguard, maple neck. Washburn Force 40: Black with red lining. Shortly after Bruce returned to the band, he appeared with this bass in some photos. According to an interview by Bass Magazine (in Japan), he uses this bass only for exercise. Steve uses his own signature RotoSound SH77 flatwound bass strings. Broken-in flatwound strings are not typically associated with Steve's bright sound; however, to retain brightness, Steve changes his strings on a daily basis while touring and recording. Amplification: Pre-Amp: Custom-made 'Alectron'. This is a rackmountable virtual clone of a vintage Hi-Watt Solid State 200 amp (rare) and has been the center of Steve's bass rig since the early 1980s. Compressor: Vintage DBX 160 Power Amp: Custom-made rackmountable by C-Audio. Exact specifications are unknown. Switching: Custom-made rackmount unit built by Pete Cornish. Provides loops and mute for tuning, etc. Cabinets: Quantity 8 Marshall 4x12 straight cabinets loaded with Electro-Voice EVM12L drivers (32 speakers total). Spare: Trace-Elliot GP12SMX serves as spare pre-amp.

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Other musical talents


In addition to bass playing and writing music/lyrics for Iron Maiden, Steve Harris has taken on numerous other roles to support the running of the band such as: music production/mixing music video directing/editing live music video directing/editing keyboards backing vocals string/bass synthesisers

Steve Harris has been Iron Maiden's principal keyboardist (other than at live shows and on a few songs where the work has been done by Michael Kenney who doubles as his bass technician) since keyboards were first used by the band on the album Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. Though since that album keyboards have played less of a role in Iron Maiden (usually), the complexity and speed of the playing has increased as Harris has improved. Initially he was not even credited for it in the band credits, just the album ones. For the album Somewhere in Time, Harris made his first experimentation with synthesised sounds, playing the bass synth (later on the Seventh Son of a Seventh Son album referred to as 'string synth'). He has also done so on subsequent albums, although it has not featured as much as it did on Somewhere in Time because of the band's less synthesised sounds and also the use of keyboards.

Steve Harris Steve Harris is also known for playing an increasing role in mixing Iron Maiden's albums as well as producing them, and has done the work himself since Fear of the Dark. Harris also directs and edits many of the band's music videos, particularly live ones. He also owns a farm with music recording facilities. Harris' land has been used to write Maiden's albums on numerous occasions; it was also used to film the music video for the song Holy Smoke. Harris has also contributed backing vocals on Iron Maiden records and concerts since the band's inception, though he is not always credited on the sleeves.

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Trivia
Given that Harris had been the centre of attention in Maiden's early gigs the addition of Bruce Dickinson to the band's line-up originally caused small scuffles between the two as they both wanted to be at the centre of the stage. Bruce mentioned in The Early Days documentary that Harris occasionally elbowed him away, and he returned the favour by causing Harris to trip on his extra-long microphone stand. His eldest daughter, Lauren Harris, is also a singer and has released her debut album, Calm Before the Storm. She supported Iron Maiden on their A Matter of Life and Death tour as well as the Somewhere Back In Time World Tour.[5] His son, George Harris plays lead guitar in a band called Burn In Reason ([6]) who take a heavy influence from Iron Maiden, and also from bands such as Killswitch Engage, Atreyu, Funeral for a Friend and Underoath. In 2001, Fender issued the Steve Harris Signature Precision Bass. This instrument featured a basswood body coloured in lake placid blue with a satin-finished maple neck, claret-mirror pickguard (i.e. West Ham United colors), Badass II Bridge, and Seymour Duncan Basslines SPB-3 pickups. This model was discontinued after a very limited run. In 2009, Fender issued a new version of the Steve Harris Precision Bass. This new model more faithfully recreates the actual bass Steve has used throughout his career with Iron Maiden. This is as the bass appeared on (among others) the World Slavery Tour. It has an alder body in royal blue (darker than the lake placid blue of the 2001 signature), gloss-finished maple fretboard, a chrome mirror pickguard, Badass II Bridge, and the Seymour Duncan SPB-1 pickup Harris actually uses; whereas the 2001 signature model featured an SPB-3 (also known as the Quarter Pound). Rotosound currently produce a set of Steve Harris signature Flatwound bass strings that are 50 - 110 gauge Rotosound 77's. He is the father of six children. He has three daughters (Lauren, Kerry and Faye) and one son (George) with former wife Lorraine and another son (Stanley) and another daughter (Maisie) with current partner Emma. Harris often mentions in interviews his three beloved Manx cats, Edward (named after the mascot of the band), Petal, and Moufdi (after a childhood friend).

Discography
1980: Iron Maiden 1981: Killers 1982: The Number of the Beast 1983: Piece of Mind 1984: Powerslave 1986: Somewhere in Time 1988: Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1990: No Prayer for the Dying 1992: Fear of the Dark

1995: The X Factor 1998: Virtual XI

Steve Harris 2000: Brave New World 2003: Dance of Death 2006: A Matter of Life and Death 2010: The Final Frontier

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Discography
2008: Calm Before the Storm

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] Iron Maiden Interview (http:/ / www. hardradio. com/ shockwaves/ maiden1. html) Iron Maiden Official Website (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=14) Run to the Hills: An Iron Maiden Biography Ranked "best bassist ever" in Classic Rock magazine, January 2000 Iron Maiden Official Website - Lauren Harris joins Euro tour (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=287) http:/ / www. myspace. com/ burninreason

Dave Murray

38

Dave Murray
Dave Murray

Dave Murray live in San Jos 26 February 2008 Background information Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Labels 23 December 1956 Edmonton, London, England Heavy metal, hard rock Musician, songwriter Guitar 1975 present EMI

Associated acts Iron Maiden, Urchin, Stone Free, Electric Gas, Legend, The Stuff, Evil Ways Notableinstruments Fender Stratocaster, Gibson SG

David Michael "Dave" Murray (born 23 December 1956)[1] is an English guitarist and songwriter best known as one of the original members of the heavy metal band Iron Maiden. He joined the band just two months after their inception in 1975.

Career
As a boy, Murray was a fanatical football player and fan, as well as a keen cricketer. But his family was poor his father was disabled and his mother worked part-time as a cleaner and the family never settled anywhere long enough for Murray to establish himself on any of the schools' teams he could have played for. By his reckoning, he had been to a dozen different schools by the time he left for good at the age of 16. Murray developed an interest in rock music when he was 15 after hearing Voodoo Child by Jimi Hendrix on the radio. From then on, everything changed. He got his first guitar and would practice along with records up to seven hours a day. He formed his first band, a trio called Stone Free which also included Adrian Smith (Guitar/Vocals) who later became a member of Iron Maiden. From there, Murray played with a number of different bands before meeting Steve Harris and joined Iron Maiden for the first time in 1976. He briefly left the band following an argument with then vocalist Dennis Wilcock. Murray again teamed with Adrian Smith in a band called Urchin. During this short tenure with the band, Murray recorded one single titled "She's A Roller". Following the single, Murray left Urchin and returned to Iron Maiden, replacing Terry Wapram. Wilcock left the band shortly after Murray's return.

Dave Murray Murray managed to briefly hold down a 9 - 5 job working for the then GLC (Greater London Council).He worked as a Store keeper in the Housing Dept.Based around in the Woodberry Down Estate ,Frampton Park Estate and Geldeston Rd ,Clapton area of North East London. His Boss Ronny Petit expressed his concerns about Dave giving up a good steady job to tour Japan with Iron Maiden. Murray's solo guitar style throughout his career has been mainly of the Legato variety. Examples of this can be heard in Maiden songs such as "Phantom of the Opera", "Lightning Strikes Twice", through to their 2006 studio release A Matter of Life and Death. Murray is noted for having naturally strong fingers and he frequently uses hammer-ons and pull-offs. He has also written songs for the band, though he is less prolific than other band members. Murray usually forgoes lyric writing to another bandmate and concentrates on the musical elements of songwriting. He mainly co-writes songs with another member of Iron Maiden, with the song "Charlotte the Harlot" being the only composition credited solely to him. Murray is seen by many as the most modest, humble, down-to-earth member of the band. "It's my upbringing. When you start out with nothing, you don't expect much from life. For all this to happen to me - well, it's like a dream, really". Murray and Steve Harris are the only members of Iron Maiden to have appeared on every one of the band's albums.

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Equipment
Throughout his career, Murray has used and endorsed Marshall amplifiers almost exclusively, other than on the 'Somewhere in Time' and 'Seventh Son...' albums and their respective tours, when he instead used Gallien Krueger amps. He has used Fender Stratocaster guitars almost exclusively as well. His black 1957/63 (the body is from a '63 and the neck is from a '57) Stratocaster, previously owned by the late Free guitarist Paul Kossoff, was used from circa 1976-1990. It was used as a model by Fender to manufacture an Artist Signature model since 2009 - http:/ / www. fender. com/ products/ / search. php?partno=0118802806. The original now resides in a glass case at his home. Murray has occasionally performed with various Dean, Gibson, Ibanez, ESP and Jackson electrics as well. As for acoustic guitar performances, Murray has used Gibson Hummingbird acoustic guitars live for the song 'Journeyman', and on the 'Somewhere Back In Time' tour for the intro to 'Moonchild'. He also used a Gibson Chet Atkins solid body acoustic on the 'Fear of the Dark' tour for the song 'Wasting Love'. Murray used his 1957/63 Strat (equipped with DiMarzio Super Distortion and PAF humbucking pickups) extensively, retiring it at the end of the 'Seventh Son...' tour in 1988, when he switched to Jackson guitars.

Guitars
Since returning to Fender in 1995, following several years from 1986 - 1993 when he endorsed ESP and Jackson, Murray has had several variations of the Stratocaster made for him by Fender. The first was the prototype for what was to become the Hot Rod Re-Issue series, which were Japanese made and featured either a 50's style maple fingerboard version, or '60's style slab rosewood fingerboard. These models featured Floyd Rose Original tremolos and a custom wound DiMarzio humbucker in the bridge position, and two hot single coils in the middle and neck positions. Murray tended to use a candy apple red HRR60's Strat on the 'Fear of the Dark' tour for the songs 'The Evil That Men Do' and 'Can i Play With Madness' which can be seen on The 1992 Donington live video.

Dave Murray 1990 - 1992 Murray's main guitar during this period was a candy apple red Jackson Strat-style guitar with black scratchplate and Seymour Duncan JB Trembuckers in the bridge and neck positions, and a Classic Stack humbucker in middle position. This guitar had chrome hardware, a Kahler Steeler tremolo system, and was used as a backup from 1992 to 1999. This guitar can be seen in the 'Holy Smoke' video, on almost every song in the Donington '92 live video, on the song 'The Clairvoyant' on the 'Raising Hell' video, and first show of the 'Ed Hunter' tour (2 Minutes To Midnight, Stranger In A Strange Land). During this time he also used a similarly spec'd Jackson which was white with a white scratchplate. This guitar had white Dimarzio pickups at first, but the neck humbucker was changed during the 'Fear of the Dark' tour to a black Seymour Duncan for unknown reasons. 1993 - 1999 On the 'X Factor', 'Virtual XI' and 'Ed Hunter' tours, Murray's main instruments were: -1 White Strat with white scratchplate, ebony fingerboard, 3 Seymour Duncan Hot Rails pickups, and a Floyd Rose original tremolo. All hardware is black on this guitar. - 1 White Strat with a black scratchplate, ebony fingerboard (vintage-style thin fingerboard with the truss rod inserted through the rear of the neck, which has a walnut skunk stripe running along the back of the neck), HSH configuration with dual black Seymour Duncan JB Trembucker humbucking pickups and a white Fender Texas Special single-coil pickup in the middle position (Seymour Duncan used to make a neck calibrated JB, they stopped as the Jazz Neck humbucker is essentially exactly the same pickup), Floyd Rose Original, all hardware is black on this guitar. - 1 White Strat, black scratchplate, ebony fingerboard (again with vintage-style thin fingerboard and a walnut skunk stripe running along the back of the neck) HSH configuration with dual Seymour Duncan Custom humbucking pickups with zebra bobbins and a white Fender Fat 50s single-coil pickup in the middle, again all hardware is black. That strat. was his main guitar on Raising Hell video. This guitar can be also seen on early shows of Ed Hunter tour before being replaced with 2 fender strats with Hot rails. Since 2000 Brave New World tour 2 Fender Custom Shop Custom Classic Stratocasters, both spec'd exactly the same with Floyd Rose locking tremolo systems, 1-piece maple neck/fingerboard with 22 jumbo frets, vintage Kluson tuners and three Seymour Duncan Hot Rails humbucking pickups (HHH configuration) with 5-way switching mounted on a pearloid scratchplate - 1 Vintage White and one Black. The black one has had the white bridge position Hot Rails changed to a black one during the 'Give Me Ed Till I'm Dead' tour (the original pickup died and was replaced with the 1st Hot Rails available, which just happened to be a black pickup). There was also another black Custom Classic Stratocaster with the same specs as the first black guitar, fitted with a mirror pickguard and black plastic parts, which was used as a template for the limited edition Iron Maiden Stratocaster made by Fender Japan in 2001 (this guitar was only made in small production runs and for the 1 year only). Give Me 'Ed...Till I'm Dead tour In addition to the two two main Strat's from the previous tour, Murray used a Wayne 3-Tone Sunburst Stratocaster with maple neck, Floyd Rose locking tremolo system, three Seymour Duncan Hot Rails humbucking pickups with 5-way switching and white pickguard. Used on the songs '22 Acacia Avenue', 'The Clairvoyant', and 'Wildest Dreams'. Wayne also produced for Murray a black version of the same guitar which was used in the recording of the 'Dance of Death' album. Wayne were keen to produce a Dave Murray signature model, and went as far as advertising it on their website as 'coming soon'. However it never came to fruition.

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Dave Murray Dance of Death tour Since the 'Dance of Death' tour, Murray's main guitar has been a 2-Tone Sunburst Strat with a 21-fret rosewood fingerboard. This guitar looks like it could well be an early '80's guitar with the Floyd Rose retro fitted later, or the neck has come from an early '80's guitar been retro fitted onto a new body. The headstock is distinctive in that it has the thick set early '80's gold Fender logo, but small Stratocaster logo placing it somewhere after 1982 when Fender re-introduced the smaller headstock but still used the bigger gold Fender and Stratocaster logos, they changed soon after to the thick gold logo with small Stratocaster logo, and before 1986/87 when they changed to a thick silver Fender logo and started producing US Strats with 22 frets as standard. It also has a string tree for the E and B strings, which is made redundant by the string retaining bar behind the locking nut. This guitar also has a trio of Seymour Duncan Hot Rails humbuckers and a white pearloid pickguard. Somewhere Back in Time 2008/2009 Tour Main Sunburst Strat, Black and Vintage White Strats as backups (all 3 with SD Hot Rails) for the 2008 leg. For the 2009 leg: Main Sunburst Strat, Vintage White as backup for it (the Vintage White Strat was not used on any of gigs but seen on guitar stand on photos in FC Magazine) and Fender (American) Dave Murray (Artist signature) Stratocaster, which is actually different to the regular Artist Series version available as it shares many of the features found on the Japanese-made HST-57DM "tribute series" models - such as the Floyd Rose locking system - as opposed to the more 'accurate vintage replica' of the Kossoff-owned Strat which it is based. Final Frontier 2010/2011 Tour Main Black Strat (from 1999, the one with black Hot rail in bridge position), with Sunburst Strat (which was used on first shows as main guitar), Vintage White Strat, Floyd Rose Signature Strat and Gibson Traditional 2010 Desert Burst Les Paul as backups. Various Strats have been ruined onstage over the years. Many were Squier models, however the last one destroyed on the group's 2007 Download Festival appearance was a Mexican Fender Floyd Rose Strat which was one of two (both white) which were literally wrecked every night and re-built before the next show. There was also a Mexican Fender Floyd Rose Strat used on the early days tour (also white) which was not quite destroyed and was auctioned off for the Clive Burr MS Trust Fund after the final date of the tour at Hammersmith.

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Guitar Specs
Ernie Ball Strings - custom gauge .009, .011, .014, .024, .032, .042, Seymour Duncan Hot Rails single coil sized humbucking pickups with dual blade coils "Original" Floyd Rose Locking Tremolo Systems His Artist Signature model features a soft "V"-shaped maple neck with satin back and sports a humbucker/single-coil/humbucker (HSH) configuration - DiMarzio Super Distortion DP100 (bridge), American Vintage '57/'62 (middle), DiMarzio PAF DP-103 (neck) - with 3-way switching and American Vintage hardware. The Japanese-made "Tribute" version of the guitar (HST-57DM) features an "Original" Floyd Rose double-locking tremolo system, dual DiMarzio Super Distortion DP100 humbucking pickups (bridge/neck), a Fender Texas Special single-coil pickup in the middle position, a 5-way pickup selector and an oval neck profile The original black '57 Stratocaster has similar features to his Artist Series Model

Dave Murray

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Amplifiers
2 x Marshall 1960B Straight Cabinet / 4x12 300-Watt Loaded with Celestion 12" G12T 75 Watt Speakers[2] 3 x Marshall JCM 2000 DSL tube heads (rack gear plugs into power amp section via FX loop) Marshall 9200 Rack Power Amp (as backup for main heads)

Units and tuners


Korg DRT1 Digital Tuner Peterson VSam Virtual Strobe Tuner Shure U4D UHF Wireless Unit Dunlop DCR-1SR Rack CryBaby Wah Custom-Built Pete Cornish Routing and Power Supply Units Marshall JMP-1 Valve Midi Preamp Marshall JFX-1 Effect Unit Rocktron All-Access Foot Controller Fulltone Deja-Vibe Pedal Fulltone Clyde Standard Wah Pedal TC Electronics GForce Effect Unit

Reference: Colin Price - DM Guitar Technician

Personal life
In his spare time, Murray is an avid golfer as seen in the Rock in Rio DVD. Murray and his wife Tamar have one daughter named Tasha (born 1991) When not on tour, Murray resides in Hawai'i.

Discography
Iron Maiden 1980: Iron Maiden 1981: Killers 1981: Maiden Japan 1982: The Number of the Beast 1983: Piece of Mind 1984: Powerslave 1986: Somewhere in Time 1988: Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1990: No Prayer for the Dying 1992: Fear of the Dark 1995: The X Factor 1998: Virtual XI 2000: Brave New World 2003: Dance of Death 2006: A Matter of Life and Death 2010: The Final Frontier

Guest appearances Hear 'n Aid (1985) "Stars" Nicko McBrain (1991) - "Rhythm Of The Beast"

Dave Murray Psycho Motel (1997) "With You Again"

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References
[1] Remastered discography of Iron Maiden, by EMI in 1998 [2] per Dave Murray of Iron Maiden (http:/ / guitargeek. com/ rigview/ 353/ ) guitargeek.com

Adrian Smith

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Adrian Smith
Adrian Smith

Background information Birth name Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Labels Associated acts Website Adrian Frederik Smith 27 February 1957 Hackney, east London, England Heavy metal, progressive rock, hard rock Musician, songwriter Guitar, Vocals, Bass, Guitar synth. 1975 - present EMI Urchin, Iron Maiden, The Entire Population of Hackney, ASAP, The Untouchables, Psycho Motel, Bruce Dickinson, Kai Hansen, Michael Kiske
http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com

Notableinstruments Jackson Adrian Smith Dinky Gibson SG Lado Earth Ibanez Destroyer Fender Stratocaster Gibson Explorer Hamer Standard

Adrian Frederik Smith (born 27 February 1957) is an English guitarist and one of three guitarists/songwriters in the English band Iron Maiden. He also performs backing vocals on some songs, along with Steve Harris.

Biography
While at school, Smith befriended Dave Murray and the pair formed the band Urchin with Smith taking the roles of lead singer and lead guitarist. Smith had bought his first guitar from Murray, a Woolworths' Top 20, for "five quid" (later he painted it silver and sold it again for "12 quid", as he states in the Early Days DVD). Murray left Urchin to join Iron Maiden, the new band of another local musician, Steve Harris. Smith continued to front Urchin, with limited success, until joining Maiden in early 1980 for the Killers album (released in 1981), replacing Dennis Stratton. Smith first wrote songs for Maiden on the 1982 album The Number of the Beast, and was the band's secondary songwriter from then on (often in co-operation with Bruce Dickinson). Smith and Dave Murray combined playing dual lead guitars helping to forge the trademark sound of Iron Maiden. Some notable lead duets are "The

Adrian Smith Duellists", "2 Minutes to Midnight", "The Trooper", "Alexander the Great" and "Rime of the Ancient Mariner". Notable Smith solos include "Wasted Years", "Stranger in a Strange Land" and "The Wicker Man". Smith also has a brother named Scott Hale, famed for his lead guitar skills in the 80s band GLAM. Smith released a solo LP with the band ASAP (Adrian Smith And Project) titled Silver and Gold in 1989. Following its release, Smith departed from Iron Maiden in 1990 when recordings for the No Prayer for the Dying album were about to start, and was replaced by Janick Gers. After releasing the experimental Somewhere in Time and Seventh Son of a Seventh Son albums, Steve Harris had decided to take the band back to a more traditional hard rock direction which can clearly be heard on the No Prayer for the Dying album. This album featured one last Smith song co-penned with Bruce Dickinson titled "Hooks in You". Bruce Dickinson's comment on Smith: "When he left the band in 1990, I think everybody was a bit surprised at how much we missed him and certainly, I dont think anybody had realized how much the fans would miss him - big time. I wouldnt have rejoined Iron Maiden if he wasnt in the band. I just dont think it would have been complete without Adrian, and now, its great having three guitarists." In 1996, Smith joined forces with former Helloween vocalist, Michael Kiske on Kiske's solo album Instant Clarity. He plays guitar on portions of the album in addition to co-writing some of the songs. Later, Smith formed his alternative rock-influenced band Psycho Motel. This band was a progression from an earlier music project of his called The Untouchables, which featured former members of ASAP as well as former The Cult bassist Jamie Stewart. The band recorded two albums, State of Mind (1996) and Welcome to the World (1997). Smith would also play on Bruce Dickinson's Accident of Birth and The Chemical Wedding albums. The influence of this more progressive direction, as well as Smith's heavier rhythm guitar playing, is apparent since his return to Iron Maiden. On 22 August 1992 Smith made a brief appearance onstage with Maiden to play "Running Free" during the Castle Donington 'Monsters Of Rock' Festival. In 1999, Smith re-joined Iron Maiden for the "Ed Hunter tour", a series of concerts in support of the video game of the same name. Since then, Iron Maiden with Smith have released 3 studio albums, Brave New World in 2000, Dance of Death in 2003 and A Matter of Life and Death in 2006. He remains with the band to this day. He also sometimes makes charity appearances for cancer awareness/patient rights activism organization The Maiden Flight, of which his wife is a member.

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Personal life
In his spare time, Smith loves fishing, as can be seen on the Rock In Rio DVD. Smith and his wife Nathalie have three children, son Dylan Smith (born in 1989) and twin daughters Natasha Smith and Brittany Smith (born in 1991).

Singing style
Ever since joining Maiden in 1981, Smith has provided back-up vocals for the band, but took the lead vocals for his solo bands (Urchin, A.S.A.P., Psycho Motel). His actual singing voice in Maiden is rarely heard although he sang lead on the track Reach Out, the B-Side to the single "Wasted Years", with Bruce Dickinson singing back-up. Smith has a relaxed vocal style with a slight raspiness very reminiscent of young Joe Cocker and Paul Carrack. His voice type could be considered a baritone.

Adrian Smith

46

Equipment
Guitars
Smith currently prefers to use his Jackson signature 'San Dimas' Dinky, although he has used a variety of guitars over his career including several different Dean models, various Jackson models including the Randy Rhoads, Fender Stratocasters (including three Fender Floyd Rose Classic Stratocasters; one of these stratocasters had a roland MIDI pickup installed), Gibson Les Pauls, Gibson Explorers, Gibson SGs, an Ibanez Destroyer and Lado Guitars. On the A Matter of Life and Death DVD, he says the first decent guitar he bought was a Gibson Les Paul Goldtop which he paid 235 for when he was 17. He's still using it and says, "it's still probably the best guitar I've got". As of August 2007, Adrian Smith endorses Jackson Guitars, his first guitar company endorsement in over fifteen years. With Jackson he has an Adrian Smith San Dimas DK model.[1] . Prior to his endorsement, he can also be seen using other Jackson guitars, such as a King V during his time in Bruce Dickinson's solo band, before he went to Fender guitars. Effects, controllers and processors Dunlop Uni-vibe Wah Controller Yamaha MFC10 Midi Foot Controller Digitech Whammy Pedal Ibanez TS-9 Tube Screamer Mike Hill B.I.S. Isolation hole

Amplifiers
Two 300-Watt Marshall 1960A Angled-Front 8x12 Cabs loaded with 75-Watt Celestion G12-T75 Speakers Two Marshall 30th Anniversary 6100LM 100-Watt All-Tube Heads (No Longer In Production) One 1961 William Henderson Atom Amplifier

Units and tuners


Shure U4 Wireless Receiver Whirlwind Multi-Selector 4-Channel Selector Dunlop DCR-1SR Rack Wah Peavey Tubefex Tube Preamp & Multi-Fx Unit

Reference: Guitar World December 2006

Discography
Urchin
Black Leather Fantasy (1977) She's A Roller (1977) Urchin (2004)- Best of/Compilation

Iron Maiden
Killers (1981) The Number of the Beast (1982) Piece of Mind (1983) Powerslave (1984)

Adrian Smith Live After Death (1985) Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) Brave New World (2000) BBC Archives (2002) Beast Over Hammersmith (2002) Rock in Rio (2002) Dance of Death (2003) Death on the Road (2005) A Matter of Life and Death (2006) Flight 666 (2009) The Final Frontier (2010)

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A.S.A.P.
Silver and Gold (1989)

Psycho Motel
State of Mind (1996) Welcome to the World (1997)

Bruce Dickinson
Accident of Birth (1997) The Chemical Wedding (1998) Scream for Me Brazil (1999)

Guest appearances
Earthshaker (1983) - Earthshaker - wrote and "gave" them "Dark Angel", he does not actually appear on this album. Hear 'n Aid (1985) "Stars" Rock Aid Armenia The Earthquake Album (1989) "Smoke on the Water" Iron Maiden - Live at Donington (1993) - "Running Free" Michael Kiske Instant Clarity (1996) "The Calling", "New Horizons" Humanary Stew: A Tribute to Alice Cooper (1998) "Black Widow" "Various Artists" (2005) - Welcome to Nightmare: An All-Star to Alice "James Ford of Collateral Damage, 1980

References
[1] GuitarGearHeads - Jackson and Legendary Iron Maiden Guitarist Adrian Smith, Collaborate and Design Signature San Dimas Dinky Guitar (http:/ / www. guitargearheads. com/ modules/ news/ article. php?storyid=560)

Janick Gers

48

Janick Gers
Janick Gers

Janick Gers at The Fields of Rock festival Background information Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Labels 27 January 1957 Hartlepool, England Heavy metal, hard rock, Progressive rock Musician, songwriter, Guitar 1975 - present EMI

Associated acts White Spirit, Gillan, Gogmagog, Bruce Dickinson, Fish, Iron Maiden Notableinstruments Fender Stratocaster

Janick Robert Gers (pronounced /jnk rz/) (born 27 January 1957, Hartlepool, England) is one of three current guitarists in the English Heavy metal band Iron Maiden,[1] and a songwriter for the band. Janick lives in Yarm, Teesside. His father, Bolesaw, was an officer of the Polish Navy.

Career
Gers was the lead guitarist of the band White Spirit before joining Gillan, a group formed by former Deep Purple vocalist Ian Gillan.[2] After Gillan disbanded, he joined Gogmagog which included former Iron Maiden vocalist Paul Di'Anno and drummer Clive Burr. Gers also performed with other artists including former Marillion vocalist Fish. In 1990, he played guitar on the first solo album of Iron Maiden vocalist Bruce Dickinson, Tattooed Millionaire. In March 1990, during the recording of the album, he was asked to join Iron Maiden in place of departing Adrian Smith.[2] He has remained with the band ever since, even after Smith rejoined the band in 1999. Gers' playing style uses heavy distortion and is noted for having a very raw tone. He prefers staccato picking instead of playing legato using hammer-ons and pull-offs. Gers is also left-handed although he plays guitar right-handed; as seen at the Rock In Rio DVD signing autographs. Gers' main influences are Ritchie Blackmore, Jeff Beck and Irish blues guitarist Rory Gallagher. He is noted for his energetic stage presence. He can often be seen bouncing up and down and occasionally does tricks with his guitar, such as spinning it around his body while playing, or throwing it into the air, catching it. He also has a daughter called Sian Gers who attends Conyers in Yarm.

Janick Gers According to the Flight 666 movie, Gers has a university degree in sociology, though it is unknown if this is because he ever planned on a lasting career in something other than music.

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Musical equipment
Gers is a long-time proponent of the Fender Stratocaster. His Stratocasters are typically black or white with rosewood fingerboards. He uses Seymour Duncan JB Jr.(currently) or Hot Rails (early 1990s) pickups. His favourite guitar over the years has been a black Fender Stratocaster, equipped with JB Jr. pickups.[3] Gers uses four different Fender Stratocasters and also a Gibson Chet Atkins semi-acoustic model for songs such as "Dance of Death". Like his bandmate Dave Murray, Gers currently uses the Marshall JMP-1 preamp through a Marshall 9200 (discontinued) poweramp. He uses Ernie Ball Regular Slinky Nickel-wound guitar strings. He does not use the B strings, however, so the strings go 10-10-17-26-36-46.

Discography
Iron Maiden 1990: No Prayer for the Dying 1992: Fear of the Dark 1995: The X Factor 1998: Virtual XI 2000: Brave New World 2003: Dance of Death 2006: A Matter of Life and Death 2009: Flight 666 2010: The Final Frontier White Spirit 1980: White Spirit

Gillan 1981: Double Trouble 1982: Magic

Gogmagog 1985: I Will Be There EP

Fish 1990: Vigil in a Wilderness of Mirrors

Bruce Dickinson 1990: Tattooed Millionaire

Ian Gillan 2006: Gillan's Inn

External links
Iron Maiden's official website [4]

References
[1] Weber, Barry. "Biography: Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=11:3ifyxqe5ldae~T1). AMG. . Retrieved 17 May 2010. [2] Tobler, John (1992). NME Rock 'N' Roll Years (1st ed.). London: Reed International Books Ltd. p.468. CN 5585. [3] Seymourduncan.com (http:/ / www. seymourduncan. com/ artists/ featured_artists/ 52) [4] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/

Nicko McBrain

50

Nicko McBrain
Nicko McBrain

McBrain during a concert in Barcelona 30 November 2006. Background information Birth name Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Michael Henry McBrain 5 June 1952 Hackney, London, England Heavy metal, hard rock, blues-rock, progressive rock Musician Drums, percussion 1975 present

Associated acts Iron Maiden, Pat Travers, Streetwalkers, Trust, The Entire Population of Hackney Notableinstruments Paiste 22" Signature Reflector Bell Ride "Powerslave" Vic Firth "Nicko McBrain" Signature Sticks

Michael Henry "Nicko" McBrain (born June 5, 1952) is an English musician, best known as the drummer for Iron Maiden, which he joined in 1982. The nickname 'Nicko' originated from when the keyboard player Billy Day introduced him as "My Italian drummer, his names 'Nicko'". McBrain himself states that as a child he had a stuffed animal (bear) named "Nicholas" that he always carried with him so much so that his parents began calling him Nicky also.[1] Only when he may have been in trouble was he called by his given name. McBrain is credited as being an early pioneer of the heavy metal sound[2] and passes his experience on through drum clinics. McBrain is frequently included in top drummer league tables and rankings as a result of his very influential and skillful performances in studio and on stage. Recently, he has been ranked at No. 18 in Rhythm Magazine's 50 Greatest Drummers Of All Time [3] . Known for his affable joking personality, eagerness for interviews and public appearances, McBrain is considered by his bandmates as Iron Maiden's spokeperson.

Biography
McBrain joined the band Streetwalkers in 1975 and recorded with them[4] [5] before moving on to drum for Pat Travers[6] and later Trust. In the early 1980s he became the drummer for McKitty and it was with this band that he first met Iron Maiden bassist and founder Steve Harris. Trust supported Iron Maiden on the Number of the Beast world tour in 1982. On this same tour, not only did McBrain star as the Devil in "The Number Of The Beast" music video, but also stood in for Maiden drummer Clive Burr at a live show in Belgium. He officially joined Iron Maiden

Nicko McBrain in December 1982. McBrain's first album with Iron Maiden was Piece of Mind in 1983. In response to questions from Maiden fans[7] , McBrain highlighted that it was 'not a coincidence' that Piece Of Mind had many references to brains and minds, after he, with the surname McBrain, had recently joined the band. McBrain has stated on recordings for the Paiste website while promoting his signature drum sticks, that he first wanted to learn drums at a young age after watching a performance of Joe Morello, which immediately led him to play drums with kitchen utensils and pots, to the dislike of his father. After studying engineering at City & Guilds (which his father had wanted him to complete), he was able to pursue drumming at a professional level.

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Drumming style
McBrain's drumming is an important factor in the Iron Maiden sound and was felt immediately on Piece of Mind. As described in detail on the band's 2008 'Live After Death DVD', the notorious opening track of "Where Eagles Dare" famously displays McBrain's ability to use the single drum pedal very quickly, plus his rapid tom fills. This song has since been explained in the drummer's numerous clinics, and is considered very complex and masterful.[8] [9] On this same video documentary, McBrain's drum technician notes that, on the World Slavery Tour, drummers such as Tommy Lee called McBrain an 'octopus' after witnessing the way in which the drummer's stamina gives him the ability to use all of his signature large drum kit in shows[10] . McBrain often employs the back end of his left hand drum stick to get more aggressive sound of the snare drum. He is able to play a variety of styles, with time signatures such as the 7/8 riff which follows the second chorus of "Alexander the Great". The 7/4 riff on the song "Brighter Than a Thousand Suns" and the 14/8 riff that follows the second chorus on the song "The Longest Day" are other examples of his versatility. He is known not to use a double bass pedal (in 2008's Live After Death DVD, Bruce Dickinson says that Nicko considered double pedals as 'undrummerish'). Instead, he prefers to employ a fast, bare foot technique using a single pedal, as seen in the Flight 666 video on "Rime Of The Ancient Mariner (Part 1)" at the 5:18 mark, and emphasized in the song "The Evil That Men Do".[11] It is for these reasons that Steve Harris remarked that "...he can play all kinds of music. Drummers from other bands sit round the back of him to see what hes doing, but hes got his kit set so he doesn't even look at what he's hitting half the time"[12] After McBrain joined the band in 1982, Harris also noted how much easier playing with McBrain was for a songwriter.[13] His drumkit's array is notoriously high, almost completely concealing him when playing live. This display allows bigger drums and cymbals to be placed within reach; he also places the snare drum higher and closer to the rest of the drumset, facing towards him; this allows him to have the bass drum closer to the hi-hat, giving him a more relaxed sitting posture.

Equipment
McBrain currently uses Premier drums and Paiste cymbals (Bruce Dickinson mentioned, in the song "Sanctuary" on the "A Real Dead One" Album, that they do not pay him enough to play Paiste cymbals). Previously he had been endorsed by Sonor drums and switched to Premier in the early 1990s when Sonor were sold. For A Matter of Life and Death he used his Ludwig metal shell LM 402 snare drum which was purchased in 1975, making it the oldest drum in his kit. Nicko has been a long-time user of the Ludwig Speed King pedal, but since the middle of the '90s he uses a 1993 DW 5000 Turbo Single Chain and a newer DW 5000 Hi-hat stand. He endorses Vic Firth signature drum sticks, also using them for his own drumming.

Nicko McBrain Tour Kit (2008) Premier Elite Drums with custom finish 6x6" Tom 8x8" Tom 10x10" Tom 12x12" Tom 13x13" Tom 14x14" Tom 15x15" Tom 16x16" Tom 18x16" Floor Tom 24x18" Gen-X Bass Drum 14x6.5" Ludwig LM402 Snare Drum The puppet Sooty dressed as a Pharaoh in representation of the Somewhere Back in Time Tour.

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Drumheads Remo Coated Ambassadors (tom batter heads), Ebony Ambassadors (resonant tom heads), Coated Emperor X (snare), Fiberskyn 3 (bass) Cymbals by Paiste [14] 15" Signature Reflector Heavy Full Crash (custom) 19" Signature Reflector Heavy Full Crash 16" Signature Reflector Heavy Full Crash 20" Signature Reflector Heavy Full Crash 18" Signature Reflector Heavy Full Crash 14" Signature Heavy Hi-Hat (Reflector Finish) (custom) 13" Formula 602 Heavy Bell (discontinued) 22" Signature Reflector Bell Ride "Powerslave" 17" RUDE Crash/Ride 20" Signature Crash (prototype) 22" Signature Reflector Heavy Full Crash 20" Signature Reflector Heavy China (custom) 40" Symphonic Gong (Custom Brilliant Finish)

Sticks Vic Firth with"Nicko McBrain" Signature. 16x0.595inches[15] McBrain's drum kit and cymbals do not bear the standard Premier and Paiste logos. They are labelled with the brand name using the Iron Maiden logo font.

Nicko McBrain

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Personal life
McBrain converted to Christianity in 1999 after an experience in the Spanish River Church, near his Boca Raton, Florida home. His wife Rebecca had been asking him to attend with her, and upon entering the church, McBrain soon found himself crying as he experienced a "calling". Recounting the tale, he said "I just sat there thinking, 'I didn't drink last nightwhy can't I stand?' I had this love affair with Jesus going on in my heart."[16] [17] In an interview, McBrain was asked if he felt it was appropriate to be a member of Iron Maiden in light of his Christian views. He responded by saying, When you become a Christian, you dont become sinless. The idea is to sin less. Were all sinners. Were never going to be clean till the day the good Lord is standing in front and judgment comes. But to me, I try to live my life. I do fall off, and occasionally I fall off hard and I have to get down on my knees and beg forgiveness. So its not an easy ride, and its not professed to be either. He was also asked if he shared his religious views with his band mates, and if so, how they felt about it. McBrain responded, Weve had some incredibly deep conversations amongst each of us. I cant say to you that Im trying to convert all these guys in my band to be Christians. Im leading them on my route, and if they choose to follow what Gods plan is in the Bible, thats up to them. I say to them all, you know, look, in my belief, at the moment, if you turn to your saviour Jesus Christ, Ill have eternal life in Heaven with you! We dont talk about it every time we get together, but weve had some interesting conversations over the years. [18] McBrain also has a pilot's license, for which he has a twin engine rating.[19] He is a close friend of the well-known Swedish singer-songwriter Lasse Berghagen. McBrain has two sons: Nicholas (born 1983) and Justin (born 1992).

Films and fan rapport


He has filmed several short videos for the band's official website, also the Paiste Cymbal website and keeps a diary when the band is on tour. These diaries reveal his endearing sense of humour and affection for his fans. As heard on the introduction of the Iron Maiden line-up on "Moonchild" on Flight 666 - The Original Soundtrack, McBrain receives the perennial chant of 'Nicko! Nicko!' when announced, something that is emulated in many shows, illustrating the popularity of the drummer as a musician and a character.[20]

Trivia
His favourite Iron Maiden albums are Powerslave, Brave New World and A Matter Of Life And Death. McBrain is a keen golfer, and in fact he was invited to speak to the European Ryder Cup team by captain Nick Faldo in July 2008. He frequently plays the drums during Maiden downtime both in his drum clinics and his McBrain Damage band. He also formed a side project band called 7x70 with Dan Spitz from Anthrax, but it is unknown if they are still active. On the No More Lies EP, he contributes to the lyrics. McBrain is an oenophile, and often discusses wine varietals in interviews. He currently manages New York metal band Voices of Extreme (or V.O.X). McBrain has also appeared as a guest on the children's television show Sooty and Sweep, where he was asked by Soo to "play something funky, Nicko." In reference to his appearance on the show, McBrain's drum kit is decorated with a Sooty puppet, which is often dressed accordingly with the band's corresponding tours.[21] Before being Iron Maiden's drummer, McBrain was the Devil on "The Number of the Beast" videoclip and Beast On The Road tour. He also appeared as the blue-faced Grim Reaper in the music video for "Flight of Icarus", off of the album Piece of Mind, his official debut with the band musically. On 'Rock Radio' in 2009, McBrain stated that his Vic Firth sticks, entitled 'Nicko Boomer McBrain', were called so not because of his hard hitting drumming but because of 'passing-wind'.[22]

Nicko McBrain Nicko says he is the sexiest member of Iron Maiden and they put him behind the drums to avoid distracting the audience.[23] In 2009 he opened a restaurant called Rock N Roll Ribs in Coral Springs, Florida. He played at its grand opening.[24]

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Discography
Streetwalkers Downtown Flyers (1975) Red Card (1976) Pat Travers Makin' Magic (1977) Putting It Straight (1977) Trust Marche ou Crve (Original French Release)/Savage (English Language Version) (1981) Iron Maiden Piece of Mind (1983) Powerslave (1984) Live After Death (1985) Live Album Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Fear Of The Dark (1992) Live at Donington (1992) Live Album A Real Live One (1993) Live Album A Real Dead One (1993) Live Album The X Factor (1995) Virtual XI (1998) Brave New World (2000) Rock in Rio (2002) Live Album Dance of Death (2003) Death on the Road (2005) Live Album A Matter of Life and Death (2006) Flight 666 - The Original Soundtrack (2009) Live Album The Final Frontier (2010)

Nicko McBrain

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References
[1] http:/ / www. discoogle. com/ wiki/ Mcbrain,_Nicko [2] Budofsky, Adam;Heusel, Michele; Dawson, Michael Ray and Parillo, Michael. The Drummer. Hal Leonard Corporation. p.99. [3] http:/ / www. musicradar. com/ news/ drums/ 50-greatest-drummers-of-all-time-part-2-225815/ 8#content [4] "Nicko McBrain credits" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& searchlink=NICKO). allmusic.com. . Retrieved 2009-05-23. [5] Wall, Mick. Iron Maiden: run to the hills : the official biography. Sanctuary. p.256. [6] "Nicko McBrain" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& searchlink=NICKO). allmusic.com. . Retrieved 2009-05-23. [7] http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwarticles& show=25 [8] http:/ / www. the-top-tens. com/ items/ nicko-mcbrain-22254. asp [9] http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=O0P2sEEu8dk& feature=related [10] Live After Death 2008 (2-Disc DVD-EMI) [11] http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=CBbHaC632jg& feature=PlayList& p=804255DE4A2A7945& index=0 [12] "Nicko McBrain" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=14& p2_articleid=334). ironmaiden.com. . Retrieved 2009-06-02. [13] 'Band' interactive sub section of the Enhanced CD-ROM Piece Of Mind (1998 re-master edition) [14] "Nicko McBrain's cymbals" (http:/ / www. paiste. com/ e/ endorser_det. php?page=setup& endorserid=1309). paiste.com. . Retrieved 2008-03-14. [15] "Vic Firth Signature Artist: Nicko McBrain" (http:/ / www. vicfirth. com/ artists/ nicko_mcbrain. html). vicfirth.com. . Retrieved 2008-09-06. [16] "Nicko McBrain" (http:/ / www. godscare. net/ witness/ Iron Maiden. htm). godscare.net. . Retrieved 2009-06-02. [17] WCA News (March and April 2001). "Cracking Through a Heart of Iron" (http:/ / www. willowcreek. com/ news/ story. asp?id=WN02022001). . Retrieved 2009-06-02. [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] http:/ / www. canada. com/ topics/ entertainment/ story. html?id=41753537-c41f-4f04-9c43-99def58956ef& k=3874 http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwarticles& show=25 Flight 666: The Soundtrack http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=jtd2rGbCEdk "Nicko McBrain on Maiden Day" (http:/ / www. rockradio. co. uk/ player/ listen-again/ t5bj3cam/ listen-310/ ). . http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=ajD1duxKSuE http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=xwPwmw8Kn2A

Budofsky, Adam;Heusel, Michele; Dawson, Michael Ray and Parillo, Michael. The Drummer. Hal Leonard Corporation (2006). ISBN 9781423405672. Wall, Mick. IRON Maiden: run to the hills : the official biography. Sanctuary Publishing (1999). ISBN 9781860746666

External links
Profile on official Iron Maiden website (http://www.ironmaiden.com/index.php?categoryid=14& p2_articleid=334)

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Former members
Blaze Bayley
Blaze Bayley

Background information Birth name Born Genres Occupations Years active Labels Bayley Alexander Cooke 29 May 1963 Birmingham, England Heavy metal, hard rock Singer-songwriter, musician 1984-present Blaze Bayley Recordings

Associated acts Blaze Bayley, Wolfsbane, Iron Maiden, Rise To Addiction, Sons of Seasons Website Official band website
[1]

Blaze Bayley (born Bayley Alexander Cooke,[2] 29 May 1963, Birmingham, England) is an English singer and songwriter. He is currently the lead vocalist of his self-titled band, Blaze Bayley, who formed in 1999. The band has released 5 studio albums (3 of them under the original band name of simply "Blaze") and 2 live albums, their latest being Promise and Terror. He is also the lead singer of Wolfsbane from 1984 to 1994, and again from 2010, and Iron Maiden from 1994 to 1999.

Career
Wolfsbane and Iron Maiden (1984-1999)
Blaze Bayley started his musical career as the lead vocalist of Tamworth heavy metal/hard rock band Wolfsbane, upon their formation in 1984. When Bruce Dickinson departed fellow English heavy metal band Iron Maiden in 1993, Bayley was chosen as his replacement in 1994 after hundreds of auditions. His depature from Wolfsbane led to their disbandment later on that year. After a bad motorcycle accident caused by losing control and clipping his knee on a catseye in the road, which put him out of action for a year, his first album with Maiden was The X Factor, released in 1995. Bayley went on to tour with the band in support of the album. Another Iron Maiden album with Bayley on vocals, Virtual XI was released in 1998.

Blaze Bayley The two Iron Maiden albums released during Bayley's time in the band did not chart as well as that to which the band were accustomed. The X Factor peaked at #8 on the UK Albums Chart and Virtual XI hit only #16, both being the lowest charting Maiden studio albums since Killers was released in 1981, which peaked at #12. Some of this comparative commercial failure could be attributed to fans disliking Blaze's singing style and tours being cut short due to Bayley's frequent sickness. In February 1999, when Iron Maiden announced that vocalist Bruce Dickinson was returning to the band, Bayley departed by mutual consent, and he remains on good terms with his former bandmates. Iron Maiden occasionally performed songs from the two Maiden albums featuring Bayley, including "Man on the Edge" and "Futureal", which he co-wrote, though no Bayley era songs have been on the band's set list since 2003. Likewise, Bayley has performed Iron Maiden songs originally recorded by the Dickinson and Paul Di'Anno led line-ups at some concerts. In 2007, Wolfsbane reformed for a one-off performance, with Bayley again taking up vocal and frontman duties. They supported The Wildhearts on a short UK tour in December 2007.

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Self Titled Band (1999-present)


Following Blaze Bayley's departure from Iron Maiden in 1999, he formed his own band, Blaze, in March that year. Bayley recruited guitarist Steve Wray, guitarist John Slater, bassist Rob Naylor, and drummer Jeff Singer, and signed a deal with German label SPV, releasing the band's debut studio album in 2000, Silicon Messiah. The album was followed up by Tenth Dimension in 2002 and the band's first live album in 2003, As Live As It Gets. After recording the live album, Jeff Singer announced he was leaving the band. Three months later, Rob Naylor was also leaving. Session drummer Phil Greenhouse and bassist Wayne Banks were hired for the rest of the Tenth Dimension tour until permanent replacements could be found. Guitarist Jason Banks was drafted in for a few gigs at the end of 2003 to cover for John Slater. At the end of 2003, Blaze began writing material for their third studio album, Blood & Belief. Phil Greenhouse was replaced on drums by Jason Bowld for recording and Dave Knight for touring. The band began to tour for the album shortly after it was released in 2004, but were set back again by the news that John Slater could not perform a large section of the tour. Despite rejoining the band later in the year, Slater eventually left the band in September with Steve Wray to form the band Rise To Addiction. Bassist Wayne Banks and drummer Dave Knight left the band to join the Robin Gibb band in September 2004. Blaze performed a number of shows in 2004 and 2005 with the lineup of Bayley, guitarist Oliver Palotai, guitarist Luca Princiotta, bassist Nick Douglas, and drummer Daniel Lble. The two guitarists were eventually kept on as full members. The band's lineup shifted once again when Lble quit to join German power metal band Helloween early in 2005 and when Douglas returned to another German heavy metal band, Doro. The two were replaced by unknown German musicians Daniel Schild and Christian Ammann respectively. With the new line up, Blaze began to work on a fourth studio album for a release in 2007, but in January that year it was announced the entire line-up parted ways with Bayley. Following the lineup change, Bayley opted to rename the band under his name, Blaze Bayley. In February 2007, Blaze Bayley added guitarists Nick Bermudez and Rich Newport, bassist Dave Bermudez, and drummer Rico Banderra to the band and recorded the live DVD album Alive in Poland, released later on that year. Bayley announced that Rich Newport had left the band to pursue a career as a guitar teacher later on that year, and Jay Walsh would replace him onstage for the remainder of the tour. Bayley also announced the addition of drummer Lawrence Paterson, formerly of British metal bands Chokehold and Shadowkeep. In July 2008, Blaze Bayley released their fourth studio album, The Man Who Would Not Die. The album also contained the band's first single,

Blaze Bayley "Robot", despite only being available digitally. It is sometimes regarded as a mini-compilation as it includes many bonus tracks. Recently, the band recorded another DVD live at Z7, The Night That Will Not Die, which was released in March 2009. Blaze Bayley announced that the band started recording for their new album on September 28, 2009. It is scheduled to come out the next year. A contest was taken place at the band's forum where the two first people who guessed the title of the new album will receive a free signed copy of it. The title was revealed to be Promise and Terror a few days later. The album Promise and Terror was released on the 1st Feb 2010. Professional reviews have generally been very positive about the album. On Feb 6th 2010 Blaze Bayley started their 2010 world tour in Dudley UK. They will then spend the next months playing the UK, France, Italy, Germany before leaving for the South American leg of the tour. They will then return to Europe later in the year. There is some talk about a U.S.A. tour as well as tours in Japan and other Asian countries. It has just been reported that Larry Paterson, the drummer for the band, has just left due to personal and professional reasons, although none were specified. Their manager, Anna, announced her departure from the band as well. She claimed that the band's idea of where to go next and her's were not in the same direction.

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Singing style
It has been claimed that one of the reasons for Bayley's lukewarm reception from Iron Maiden fans was that he possessed a vocal range lower than either of his predecessors. This made it difficult for him to perform certain songs in the key in which they were originally written and Iron Maiden was used to playing them. "Run to the Hills," one of Iron Maiden's most popular tracks, was omitted from live shows as a result of this, as it features the E above high C (E5). On his albums with Blaze, Bayley's voice was noted for its improvement, which could be due, in part, to having musicians who more closely fit his singing style and the absence of Bayley's former respiratory allergy that caused him trouble during live performances. Blaze Bayley has a relatively low vocal range and is considered a Bass-Baritone (lower than that of Paul Di'anno). In songs such as "Stare at the Sun", "Sign of the Cross", or "Hallowed Be Thy Name" live, his voice would cover the range from F at the bottom of the bass clef (F2) to A above middle C (A4), but only infrequently descends beyond the C below middle C (C3).. His lowest recorded note on a studio album during his time with Iron Maiden was the E above low C (E2) in the song "Sign of the Cross", and his highest note featured in the studio version of an Iron Maiden song was the B above middle C (B4) in Iron Maiden's cover of The Who's "My Generation", and in the harmonies of the song "Virus". However, during live performances, Bayley would be forced to try to replicate some of the high passages originally executed by Bruce Dickinson's tenor voice, which could get as high as the E above high C (E5) on popular songs like "The Trooper". Though Bayley often would not match all these notes as they were done on their respective studio albums, he would sometimes manage to strain his voice during live performances enough to get as high as the D above high C (D5).

Blaze Bayley

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Blaze Bayley band members


Current line up
Blaze Bayley- Vocals (March 1999present) David Bermudez - Bass (March 2007present) Nico Bermudez - Guitar (March 2007present) Jay Walsh - Guitar (November 2007present) Claudio Tirincanti - Drums (May 2010present) touring musician

Former members
Steve Wray - guitars (March 1999-September 2004) John Slater - guitars (March 1999-September 2004) Rob Naylor - bass (March 1999-April 2003) Jeff Singer - drums (March 1999-January 2003) Jason Banks - guitars (October 2003-January 2004) Luca Princiotta - guitars (October 2004-January 2007) Oliver Palotai - guitars (October 2004-January 2007) Rich Newport - guitars (March-November 2007) Wayne Banks - bass (April 2003-September 2004) - touring/session musician Nick Douglas - bass (October 2004-December 2005) - touring musician Christian Ammann - bass (December 2005-January 2007) Phil Greenhouse - drums (January-December 2003) - touring musician Jason Bowld - drums (January-September 2004) - session musician Dave Knight - drums (December 2003-September 2004) touring musician Daniel Lble - drums (October 2004-December 2005) - touring musician Daniel Schild - drums (December 2005-January 2007) Rico Banderra - drums (November 2006-May 2007) Lawrence "Larry" Paterson - drums (November 2007May 2010)

Discography
Wolfsbane
Live Fast, Die Fast (1989) All Hell's Breaking Loose Down at Little Kathy Wilson's Place (1990) Down Fall The Good Guys (1991) Massive Noise Injection (1993) Wolfsbane (1994) Lifestyles of the Broke and Obscure (2001) Howling Mad Shithead - The Best of Wolfsbane (2010) tba (2011)

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Iron Maiden
The X Factor (1995) Best of the Beast (1996) Virtual XI (1998)

Blaze Bayley
Studio albums Silicon Messiah (2000) Tenth Dimension (2002) Blood & Belief (2004) The Man Who Would Not Die (2008) Promise and Terror (2010)

Live albums As Live As It Gets (2003) The Night That Will Not Die (2009) Compilation albums Best of (2008, available only through the band's official website) Singles "Robot" (2008, available only through the band's official website) Note: Promotional videos were released for the Blood and Belief song "Hollow Head" and the Silicon Messiah song "Ghost in the Machine", but these were originally only made available to fan club members. Later on, the video for "Silicon Messiah" was put on to the second disc of a limited edition of Tenth Dimension along with an EPK titled Inside the Tenth Dimension. The video of "Hollow Head" was only made available worldwide in 2007 and can be found on the Alive in Poland DVD under the "Extras" menu. The video of "Robot" was also released in February 2009. DVDs Alive in Poland (2007) The Night That Will Not Die (2009) Guest appearances Cerebral Fix - Bastards (1991, Vocals on "Smash it up") Armageddon over Wacken Live 2004 (CD, 2005, with Doro) Doro - 20 Years A Warrior Soul (2006, sharing vocals on "Bad Blood" & "All we are") SoulSpell Metal Opera - The Labyrinth of Truths (CD, tba)

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Audio samples
"Sign of the Cross" Listen - Blaze Bayley singing on the opening track from Iron Maiden's The X Factor album.

Personal
On 14 February 2007, Bayley married Debbie Hartland, his long-time girlfriend, on the island of Gran Canaria.[3] On 6 July 2008, Hartland suffered a cerebral hemorrhage and was hospitalised.[4] She died on 27 September 2008, after having suffered a stroke two days before.[5]

External links
Official band website [1] Official band MySpace page [6] Official Wolfsbane website [7] Official Iron Maiden website [4]

References
[1] http:/ / www. blazebayley. net/ [2] Newton, Todd (2007-04-02). "BlastingZone.com: Interview with Blaze Bayley" (http:/ / www. blasting-zone. com/ BlazeBayley1. htm). . Retrieved 2007-04-10. [3] Planetblaze.com (http:/ / www. planetblaze. com/ oblivion/ hellisjustapath/ blogs/ index. php?blog=3& title=title& more=1& c=1& tb=1& pb=1) [4] Blabbermouth.net - BLAZE BAYLEY Says His Wife Is 'In A Coma That Could Last Days, Weeks Or Even Months' - July 24, 2008 (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=101518) [5] Planet Blaze - News (http:/ / www. planetblaze. com/ 2k8/ page/ news. htm) [6] http:/ / www. myspace. com/ blazebayley [7] http:/ / www. wolfsbanehms. com/

Clive Burr

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Clive Burr
Clive Burr
Birth name Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Clive Burr 8 March 1957 East Ham, London, England Heavy metal, hard rock Musician, songwriter Drums, percussion 1978-present

Associated acts Iron Maiden, Samson, Alcatrazz, Praying Mantis, Gogmagog, Trust, Elixir, Desperado

Clive Burr (born 8 March 1957, East Ham, east London) is a British drummer, best known as a member of Iron Maiden from 1980 to 1982.[1] [2] Previously a member of Samson, Burr joined Iron Maiden in 1979. An acquaintance of then-Iron Maiden guitarist Dennis Stratton, Burr played on their first three records: Iron Maiden, Killers and their breakthrough release The Number of the Beast. Burr left the band in 1982 due to Iron Maiden's tour schedule and personal problems. He was replaced by the band's current drummer, Nicko McBrain. Burr co-wrote one song on The Number of the Beast, "Gangland", and another song, "Total Eclipse", that was cut from the album and showed up as the b-side of the "Run to the Hills" single, and later on the Number Of The Beast remastered CD re-release. After leaving Iron Maiden, Burr briefly played in the French group Trust, thus switching places with McBrain, and briefly with the American band Alcatrazz. Burr was featured in the short-lived NWOBHM supergroup Gogmagog which also included ex-Iron Maiden vocalist Paul Di'Anno and future Maiden guitarist Janick Gers. He also had a band known as Clive Burr's Escape (later known as Stratus), featuring former Praying Mantis members, which disbanded after releasing one album. Burr then joined Dee Snider in his post-Twisted Sister outfit Desperado, which was never fully realized due to a falling out with the band's record company. Burr performed with British bands Elixir and Praying Mantis in the 1990s, but did not become a member of either. Burr has since been diagnosed with Multiple sclerosis, the treatment of which left him deeply in debt. Iron Maiden staged a series of charity concerts and were involved in the founding of the Clive Burr MS Trust Fund. Burr now uses a wheelchair because of the MS. Burr is now patron of the charity Clive Aid, a charity formed in 2004. Clive Aid has since continued to raise awareness and funds for various Cancer and Multiple Sclerosis (MS) programs around the world through the staging of rock events.[3] Clive attends many of these events. Official Site of Clive Aid [4] Burr's signature white drum kit was donated to the Hard Rock Cafe in London in 2005.

Clive Burr

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Equipment
Clive used Ludwig drums and Paiste Cymbals on the first two Maiden albums. His most recognised kit was his 1982 custom Tama kit used on the "Beast on the Road Tour"; depth=diameter "square" tom sizes: Drums by Tama 08 08 Tom 10 10 Tom 12 12 Tom 13 13 Tom 16 16 Floor Tom 18 16 Floor Tom 22 16 Bass Drum 14x6.5 (Ludwig Black Beauty Snare) 4 Octobans Tama Camco Pedals

Drumheads Remo Pinstripe Paiste Cymbals 17" RUDE Crash 18" 2002 Medium 19" 2002 Medium 20" 2002 Medium 21" RUDE Crash 16" RUDE Crash 20" Sound Creation Dark Ride 20" 2002 Heavy Ride 14" Formula 602 Ex. Heavy Hi-Hats 22" 2002 China Type 20" 2002 China Type

Ludwig kits: Burr had 2 Ludwig Maple drum sets; the earlier in an off-white color, the later in white cortex. His 2nd kit used the same sizes as his Tama, minus the gong drum and octobans. His 1st Ludwig kit, which he usually played without bottom heads, had the same sizes as his second, but without the 8" tom, and a 14" added after the 13".

Discography
With Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden (1980) Killers (1981) The Number of the Beast (1982)

With Trust
Trust (1983) Mans Trap (1984) The Best of (1997)

Clive Burr

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With Stratus (previously Escape)


Throwing Shapes (1984)

With Gogmagog
I Will Be There EP (1985)

With Elixir
Lethal potion (1990) Sovereign Remedy (2004)

With Desperado
Desperado (1991) Bloodied, But Unbowed (1996)

With Praying Mantis


Captured Alive in Tokyo City (1996) Demorabilia (1999) (compilation, contains demos of Clive Burr's Escape)

External links
Official Site of Clive Aid [4]

References
[1] Allmusic performance credits (http:/ / allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& searchlink=CLIVE|BURR& sql=11:hvfpxql5ldhe~T4) [2] "Iron Maiden: Run to the Hills : The Official Biography", Mick Wall, Sanctuary Publishing, 1999, ISBN 1860746667, 9781860746666, pg. 132 (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=drufAAAAMAAJ& q=clive+ burr& dq=clive+ burr& ei=yHMPS9eqMZecyATpk_iSDQ) [3] http:/ / www. cliveaid. com/ Official Site of Clive Aid [4] http:/ / www. cliveaid. com/

Paul Day

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Paul Day
Paul Day
Background information Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active 19 April 1956 Heavy metal, Hard Rock Musician, Vocalist Vocals 1975present

Associated acts Iron Maiden, More, Sweet, Wildfire

Paul Mario Day (born 19 April 1956, Whitechapel, East London) was the original lead vocalist of Iron Maiden from 1975 to 1976. He later formed a band called More that played at the Donington Monsters of Rock Festival in 1981.[1] He was lead singer of Wildfire in 1983 to 1984. He recorded a live album at the Marquee Club in London as lead singer of The Sweet in 1986. On Iron Maiden's Early Days DVD it was mentioned that Day had a good voice but was sacked because he didn't have enough stage-charisma. He was replaced by Dennis Wilcock, who compensated for his lack of vocal prowess with on-stage theatrics in the style of Kiss. Paul Day now lives in Australia (since 1986), he sings with two bands in Newcastle, Australia called Defaced. He sings and writes for Crimson Lake, an unsigned hard rock band.

External links
Paul Mario Day's Site [2] History of Wildfire [3]

References
[1] Rivadavia, Eduardo. "Biography: More" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=11:w9fwxq85ld0e~T1). AMG. . Retrieved 7 May 2010. [2] http:/ / www. paulmarioday. com/ [3] http:/ / www. mausoleum-records. com/ artist/ wildfire. htm

Paul Di'Anno

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Paul Di'Anno
Paul Di'Anno

Background information Birth name Born Genres Occupations Instruments Years active Paul Andrews 17 May 1958 Chingford, London, England Heavy metal, hard rock, punk rock Musician, songwriter Vocals 1978 present

Associated acts Iron Maiden, Fear, Battlezone, Gogmagog, Killers Website Official website
[1]

Paul Andrews (born 17 May 1958, in Chingford, London),[2] [3] better known as Paul Di'Anno, is an English singer best known as the first vocalist to record with the iconic heavy metal band Iron Maiden, from 1978 to 1981. In his post-Maiden career, Di'Anno has issued numerous albums over the years, as both a solo artist and as a member of such bands as Gogmagog, Di'Anno's Battlezone, Praying Mantis, and Killers. In the mid-1990s, rumours began to surface that Di'Anno might be rejoining Iron Maiden (after the exit of Bruce Dickinson in 1993), but the speculation proved to be false, with former Wolfsbane vocalist Blaze Bayley joining Iron Maiden, before reuniting with Dickinson in 1999. In 2001, Di'Anno moved to So Paulo, Brazil. As of that time he was still playing music. He released his solo album, Living Dead, in 2006. Paul has had several businesses outside of the music industry including an internet cafe and a hotel/restaurant in England, which he has now sold. He currently lives in Salisbury, Wiltshire, England.[4] All 3 albums by Battlezone have recently been re-released as a box set under the title of The Fight Goes On. Di'Anno is currently recording a new solo album with Paulo Turin,[5] the guitarist who worked on Feel My Pain and Nomad. The album is being produced by Dieter Roth in his own studio in Germany.

Career
Iron Maiden (19781981)
Di'Anno grew up in England spending his teenage years singing in various rock bands and working as a butcher and chef. He became the band's singer after the departure of the very unpredictable Dennis Wilcock who had pressured Iron Maiden founder and bassist Steve Harris into firing every member of Iron Maiden (including Dave Murray) before becoming fed up himself. According to Iron Maiden's The Early Days DVD he was introduced into the band by drummer Doug Sampson, an old friend of Steve's from his days in Smiler. Their first audition with Rod

Paul Di'Anno Smallwood reputedly failed when Paul was arrested for showing off his pocket-knife in public. 1980's self-titled release quickly became acknowledged as a classic of its genre, as the band merged punk's energy with metal's riffs and progressive rock complexity, serving as the blueprint for such future genres as thrash metal and speed metal. 1981 saw the release of their second album, Killers, as well as a stopgap live EP, Maiden Japan. After having cancelled gigs due to Di'Anno's inability and, at times, lack of desire to perform, which has been put down to cocaine abuse and heavy drinking, Iron Maiden decided that to progress they would have to find a singer capable of withstanding the rigours of being on tour. They found a replacement in former Samson frontman Bruce Dickinson. In 1981 he left Iron Maiden after a meeting between him and the band and its manager Rod Smallwood. In Di'Anno's words: "It's like having Mussolini and Adolf Hitler run your band. Because it is Rod Smallwood and Steve Harris and that's it. There can't be anyone else and my character is too strong for that so me an' Steve was always fighting".[4]

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Di'Anno (19831985)
Di'Anno was the first project by Paul Di'Anno after he was fired from Iron Maiden. This group was originally called Lonewolf but after certain disagreements with a group already called Lone Wolf, they changed their name and ended up recording only one album under the simple moniker of Di'Anno. On the tour Paul refused to play any Iron Maiden songs (much to the dismay of the crowd), playing only their own songs and a few other covers (most notably Van Halen's version of the Kinks' "You Really Got Me," and "Please Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood"). After little success, the six-piece band disbanded shortly after they were done touring. The only other items available from this band are a single of "Heartuser," a single Japanese release of "Flaming Heart" and a Sweden-only VHS release called Live at the Palace (now available on DVD as Di'Anno Live From London). During this performance, the band played an unreleased song entitled "Spiritual Guidance," which Paul told the audience would be on the band's forthcoming new album. This album was never recorded, leading some fans of the Di'Anno project to speculate that there may yet be more material from 19841985 lying around somewhere. Last known line-up Paul Di'Anno - lead vocals Lee Slater - guitars, vocals P.J. Ward - guitars, vocals Kevin Browne - bass, vocals Mark Venables - keyboards, vocals

Gogmagog (1985)
In 1985, Di'Anno was to work on a project with a number of hired musicians. The group, called "Gogmagog" (see the Biblical book Ezekiel 38:1-2), was put together by DJ and record producer Jonathan King. Gogmagog was a rock opera project. King brought in Di'Anno , drummer Clive Burr, guitarists Janick Gers and Pete Willis along with Neil Murray on bass. Russ Ballard was hired to write some songs and a 3 track EP called "I Will Be There" was recorded. However, the EP was not released until after the group had disbanded. The three songs are only demos to be part of an album in which many more songs were written but never recorded.

Battlezone (19851989, 1998)


After the break up of his self-titled band, Di'Anno formed Strike whilst in America with drummer Bob Falck (who had used the name Sid Falck while playing drums in Overkill) and guitarist John Hurley. The project was eventually named Battlezone, after a name straight from a comic book[6] , upon the vocalist's return to Britain in 1985.[7] Paul had previously known Battlezone guitarists John Wiggins and John Hurley from bands such as "Deep Machine" and "Iron Cross".[6]

Paul Di'Anno The band's initial line-up comprised Di'Anno, guitarists Hurley and Darren Aldridge, bassist Laurence Kessler and Adam Parsons on drums. The latter had gone under the stage name A.D. Dynamite whilst in "Aunt May". However, Parsons left shortly after to form the London based Glam troupe "Belladonna" and Falck reappeared on the scene in time to record the band's first album Fighting Back. 1986 also saw the enrollment of former Lonewolf and Tokyo Blade guitarist John Wiggins. Battlezone performed a club tour of America in 1987 to promote the dbut Fighting Back, but musical differences, arguments and physical fights within the band led to the departure of John Hurley and Bob Falck after the first tour. According to Di'Anno's book "The Beast", Hurley had become an "egomaniac" and the drummer Falck a "liability", so they were thrown out the band. As Hurley and Flack had been responsible for the writing of "Fighting Back" in its entirety, there were concerns about this move. Their places were taken by ex-Persian Risk members Graham Bath and Steve Hopgood respectively following the tour's completion. The second album to be released was entitled Children of Madness and achieved considerable commercial success. It featured a track entitled "Metal Tears" which is about a guy who was unable to have a steady relationship and built a female robot who he subsequently fell in love with. The original idea came from a book titled "Clone".[8] However, the track received criticism from the media for being very similar to a track (entitled "London") on Queensryche's Rage for Order album. Guitarist Graham Bath, who had been recruited to play second guitar, wasn't enthusiastic about touring, so he was fired from the band. Peter West, the bassist, recommended a replacement Alf Batz, who joined just in time to go to New York for the video shoot."[8] The video for "I Don't Wanna Know" was played in rotation on MTV in the US. Drugs and infighting again put a strain on the band. Towards the end of the final tour, most members had quit leaving Di'Anno to complete the tour with a backing band in order to fulfill his contract. Subsequently, American guitarist Randy Scott, along with Dave Harman on guitar and Eddie Davidson on bass, signed up with Battlezone. However, the band were without proper management and disbanded shortly after. Following the break up of Battlezone, Di'Anno and Hopgood formed power metal band "Killers" releasing four albums. Hurley would later form glam rock band "L.O. Girls" and release the "Twelve Bore Honeymoon" single in 1990 and "Just Can't Say I Love You" in 1993. During 1990 Di'Anno fronted Praying Mantis for a tour of Japan which was recorded for the subsequent Live At Last album release with ex-Iron Maiden guitarist Dennis Stratton. Wiggins joined a reformed Tokyo Blade in 1995. By 1998 Di'Anno had resurrected the name Battlezone. Joining him were Wiggins and fellow ex-Tokyo Blade members bassist Colin Riggs and drummer Marc Angel. Second guitars were supplied by Paulo Turin. This line up cut the Feel My Pain album, released by the fledgling "Zoom Club" label. Working titles for the album included "Spoon Face" and "Smack", both containing references to heroin use. The album had a heavier edge compared to the first two Battlezone albums. The band undertook a sell out Brazilian tour in January 1998 with erstwhile Killers colleagues bassist Gavin Cooper and guitarist Nick Burr joined him on this South American tour. The band toured Brazil in the same year playing a three week tour to sold out audiences up to 6000 fans a night. Being brought back down to earth Battlezone upon their return home put on a gig at the Walthamstow Royal Standard with an audience of only a hundred or so and a gig at JB's Dudley in the West Midlands attracting fewer than a dozen fans. A live track from the Walthamstow gig later appeared on a compilation of all three Battlezone albums, entitled Cessation of Hostilities. Ex-Battlezone bassist Gavin Cooper joined Lionsheart in December 2004, then moved onto Statetrooper in May 2005. The bassist subsequently joined the ranks of Magnum singer Bob Catley's solo band for UK dates in April 2006. In mid-2008, a Battlezone compilation entitled The Fight Goes On was released as on the Phantom Sound & Vision label as a 3 CD box set featuring all 3 Battlezone studio albums. Last known line-up Paul DiAnno - Vocals

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Paul Di'Anno Johnny "Bravo" Wiggins - Guitars Paulo Turin - Guitars Colin Riggs - Bass Mark Angel - Drums

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Former/past member(s) John Hurley - Guitars Graham Bath - Guitars Alf Batz - Guitars Randy Scott - Guitars Dave Harman - Guitars Peter Vester - Bass Eddie Davidson - Bass Bob "Sid" Falck - Drums Steve Hopgood - Drums

Praying Mantis (1990)


After being dropped by BMG, Praying Mantis disbanded. Then, in a Spinal Tap-ish twist of fate, Paul DiAnno called Dennis Stratton in 1989 about the Japanese wanting to a ten-year anniversary of the New Wave Of British Heavy Metal. The band found themselves enjoying a renaissance in Tokyo, Japan, prompting a reformation and tour in April 1990, which yielded the Live at Last LP.[9]

Killers (19901997, 20012003)


Killers was formed back in 1990 or in 1991. Cliff Evans was living in New York with the manager of Fastway. Steve Hopgood, who played in Battlezone with Paul previously, called him and outlined his plans for a new band. Paul flew over to New York from L.A. where they formed a band. Within a few days, they had hired John Gallagher (from Raven) to play bass on a short-term basis and an American, Ray De Tone, on second guitar. Shortly afterward, a live album called Assault on South America was recorded, featuring a number of Iron Maiden and Battlezone tracks and covers of "We Will Rock You" and "Smoke on the Water". This was recorded primarily for the South American market, as a South American "money guy" was involved who was interested in backing a tour in the region.[10] "Recorded in Brazil, Argentina and Venezuela in Summer of 1993" is splashed on the back cover. However, according to John Gallagher, the South American tour fell thorough so the entire album was recorded on a mobile recording truck in New York.[11] Later, a Canada-based record company called Magnetic Air Productions was to issue a pirate (bootleg) release worldwide, under a different cover, with no royalties being paid to the band. Killers then played a showcase for several major record companies including Virgin, EMI, Sony and BMG. Representatives flew into New York from all over the world to see Killers play. They played only Iron Maiden songs because the band hadn't written any material. Maiden songs played included "Phantom of the Opera" and "Wrathchild" which evidently impressed a BMG representative enough to give the band a $250,000 contract. BMG were unaware that these songs had been recorded previously. Once Killers had the record deal they started to write the first album entitled Murder One. The band moved to Binghamton, where they stayed in a motel in which the owner had a set up rehearsal studio. The album was written in about in two weeks. It took only a further month to get it recorded. Drums were subsequently recorded in Vermont in half a day. The album was given finishing touches at The Powerstation in New York. After the release of Murder One, Paul married an English girl whom he flew in to New York. Drugs and alcohol took their toll and the marriage quickly fell apart. Paul left New York and moved in with his new American girlfriend in LA. A fight between him and his new girlfriend involving a knife alerted the attention of the police, who

Paul Di'Anno came into the apartment and arrested him for spousal abuse, cocaine possession and firearms offenses. After a court appearance, he was sentenced to 4 months in the L.A. County Jail. It was here that Paul began writing songs for the next Killers album and posting them over to the UK, where the band were now living. Paul returned to the UK after being deported. It was here that the band was signed to Bleeding Hearts records located in Newcastle where they recorded their second studio album. It was entitled Menace to Society after a comment made by the L.A. Judge. However, with a Pantera-like style it was poorly received by many critics with the exception of Metal Hammer magazine in Germany who voted it as the "Best New Album" for that year. By 2003, Paul and Cliff were to tour as the only original members of Killers remaining. Paul then hired new musicians whom he remembered from touring in Germany and Austria. Marcus Thurston was to join the band as second guitarist, Darayus Kaye took over bass duties and Pete Newdeck on drums. Steve had to retire as he developed tinnitus in his ears. The guitarist Graham Bath damaged his hands from playing so much over the years and developed arthritis.[12] According to Di'Anno he had wanted Clive Burr (ex-Iron Maiden) to drum but he couldn't get to rehearsals in time. However, later on Burr was to become severely ill from Multiple Sclerosis. Last known line-up Paul Di'Anno - Vocals (Di'Anno, ex-Battlezone, ex-Gogmagog (UK), ex-Iron Maiden) Cliff Evans - Guitars (Chicken Shack, Headfirst, Tank) Graham Bath - Guitars (Persian Risk, Sphinx) Brad Weiseman - Bass Steve Hopgood - Drums (ex-Battlezone, ex-Chinatown, ex-Jagged Edge, Persian Risk, Shy, Tank, Wild) Former/past member(s) John Gallagher - Bass (19911992) (Raven) Ray Ditone - Guitars (19911992) Nick Burr - Guitars (1992) (ex-Battlezone, ex-Idol Rich, ex-Tyrant, now Bad Back Band) Gavin Cooper - Bass (19921994) (ex-Battlezone)

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Nomad /Di'Anno 19992001, 20032008)


Following the demise of the new Battlezone unit put together in 1998, Di'Anno teamed up with expat Brazilian guitarist Paulo Turin and lived in So Paulo during 2000. A new band was created initially under the banner of "Nomad" and featured an all Brazilian line up. It was economically and logistically preferable for Di'Anno to live in Brazil during this period to tour South America and release a self-produced album pleasing to that particular market. The album was distributed by Perris Records. However, complete worldwide distribution was not achieved. The album was repackaged and released as The Living Dead. The package included a DVD video for the title track. This was recorded in the East London Docks and directed by Swedish director Mats Lundberg, who went to London to work on the concept with Di'Anno's manager Lea Hart. All of the special effects were added in Sweden and the story line was based on the lyrics and message of the song. Few previously released live Iron Maiden tracks were also added to the CD.[13]

RockFellas and the Future (2008 onward)


Late 2008, Di'anno relocated to the southeast of Brazil and toured with a new band/project named ROCKFELLAS with 3 Brazilian musicians: Jean Dolabella (drummer) ex-Diesel/Udora/now in Sepultura, Marco (guitarrist) ex-Charlie Brown Jr/now in TH6 and Canisso of Raimundos/ex-Rodox, playing rock & roll and metal classics. There, he was nicknamed "Paulo Baiano" ("Paulo" = Paul in portuguese, Baiano = Who was born in Bahia) During 2010 Australia and New Zealand will be treated To a 30th Anniversary Tour celebrating Iron Maidens Debut Album performed in its Entirety.

Paul Di'Anno

71

The Beast
Di'Anno has released a autobiography titled The Beast (ISBN 1-904034-03-9) and has allegedly had interludes with various drugs. The book includes a chapter of stories and comments regarding Di'Anno from former bandmates including Dennis Stratton, John Wiggins and Steve Hopgood.

Singing style
In comparison to his successor in Iron Maiden, Di'Anno is remembered for having a more "punk" sound to his singing, in part because he began his singing career in punk band the Paedophiles. Though Di'Anno was able to hit high-notes, he does not typically sing in Dickinson's trademark high tenor range. He usually sang with a raspy and rougher sound, although he was capable of singing with a purer voice as demonstrated by slower numbers like Remember Tomorrow, Strange World and Prodigal Son. Later in his career Di'Anno's style, along with his music, became darker and more aggressive.

Religion
Di'Anno's religious affiliation is made uncertain by his own words; he has given interviews that contradict each other on this subject, perhaps as a practical joke. A sign that he is in fact an atheist is that he has a tattoo on the back of his head that says "666" and "GOD = SUCKER".[14] According to his autobiography, he converted to Islam in the 1990s after reading the Holy Qur'an. However he has subsequently reversed that position: I think religion kills everybody. I dont believe in it. ... No, my father was a Muslim, I must admit. But I dont give a fuck.[15] In later interviews Di'Anno clarifies that he never was a true Muslim, that he never stopped drinking, but tried to become a better person by applying some of the Muslim philosophies to his life. Again according to his autobiography, he has claimed to be Muslim, Catholic, Jewish and even Aborigine.

Band Timeline
Note: List excludes Di'Anno's many guest appearances on tribute albums. Iron Maiden (19781981) Di'Anno (19831985) Gogmagog (1985) Paul Di'Anno's Battlezone (19861989) Praying Mantis (1990) Killers a.k.a. Paul Di'Anno's Killers a.k.a. Paul Di' Anno & Killers (19901997) The Original Iron Men (19951996) Paul Di'Anno (1997) Paul Di'Anno's Battlezone (19971998) The Almighty Inbredz (1999) Paul Di'Anno (19992000) Di' Anno (2000) Paul Di'Anno's Killers a.k.a. Paul Di' Anno & Killers (20012003) Paul Di'Anno (20032005) Paul Di'Anno & Children of the Damned (2002present) Paul Di' Anno & The Phantoms of the Opera (2005present)

Paul Di'Anno

72

Discography
with Iron Maiden
The Soundhouse Tapes (1979) Live!! +one (1980) Iron Maiden (1980) Killers (1981) Maiden Japan (also known as Heavy Metal Army) (1981)

with Di'Anno
Di'anno, 1984 "Flaming Heart", 1984 "Heartuser", 1984 Nomad, 2000

Solo
The World's First Iron Man, 1997 As Hard As Iron, 1997 Beyond the Maiden (The Best Of), 1999 The Masters, 1999 The Living Dead, (a re-release of Nomad with bonus tracks), 2006 The Maiden Years - The Classics 2006 Iron Maiden Days and Evil Nights 2007

with Battlezone
Fighting Back, 1986 Children of Madness, 1987 Warchild, 1988 Feel My Pain, 1998 Cessation of Hostilities, 2001 The Fight Goes On, 2008

with Killers
Murder One, 1992 Menace to Society, 1994 Live, 1997 New Live & Rare, 1998 Killers Live at the Whiskey, 2001 Screaming Blue Murder - The Very Best of Paul Di'Anno's Killers, 2002

Paul Di'Anno

73

with Gogmagog
I Will Be There EP, 1985

with Dennis Stratton


The Original Iron Men (1995) The Original Iron Men 2 (1996) As Hard As Iron (1996)

with Praying Mantis & Paul Di'Anno, Dennis Stratton


Live At Last (1991)

Other projects and compilations featuring Paul Di'Anno


Metal for Muthas, 1980 (with Iron Maiden) All Stars NWOBHM, 1990 True Brits, 1993 True Brits 2, 1994 True Brits 3, 1995 Killer Voices, 1995 Metal Monsters, 1996 Metal Christmas a.k.a The 21st Century Rock Christmas Album, 1996 The Almighty Inbredz, 1999 Classic Rock, Classic Rockers, 2002 "Tribute to Van Halen," 2006

Featured in the Portuguese Heavy metal band "Attick Demons" album in the song "Atlantis" 2010

External links
Paul's Official website [1] Official [[MySpace [16]] page] Interview at RockSomething [17] Interview with Di'Anno discussing Islam in Egyptian Magazine [18]

References
[1] http:/ / www. pauldianno. com [2] http:/ / www. metal-archives. com/ more. php?id=25 [3] "El legendario vocalista britnico Paul Di'Anno arribar hoy al Central" (http:/ / www. larepublica. com. uy/ cultura/ 307876-el-legendario-vocalista-britanico-paul-dianno-arribara-hoy-al-central). Uruguay: La Republica. 20 April 2008. . Retrieved 8 June 2010. [4] http:/ / www. metal-rules. com/ interviews/ dianno. htm [5] http:/ / www. pauloturin. com/ [6] Di'Anno interview with Chris Welch [7] http:/ / www. musicmight. com/ artist/ united+ kingdom/ london/ battlezone1 [8] Di'Anno interview by Andre Verhuysen, Metal Hammer [9] http:/ / www. praying-mantis. com/ mantis/ dennis99. shtml [10] Rock Detector Interview - Paul Di'Anno (http:/ / www. rockdetector. com/ interviews/ artist,7238. sm;jsessionid=AECA375F47267D829857A37FAFFCC3CF) [11] John Gallagher Interview (http:/ / www. kickedintheface. com/ interviews/ Raven_1. htm) [12] http:/ / metal-rules. com/ interviews/ dianno. htm [13] http:/ / www. themetalweb. com/ pauldiannointerview2. html

Paul Di'Anno
[14] [15] [16] [17] [18] http:/ / www. maidennorway. com/ index. php/ Paul-Di-Anno-interview-April-26th-2006. html http:/ / maidennorway. com/ content/ view/ 107/ 82/ http:/ / www. myspace. com/ diannothebeast http:/ / www. rocksomething. com/ features/ featurePaulDianno. htm http:/ / www. egypttoday. com/ article. aspx?ArticleID=6612

74

Michael Kenney
Michael Kenney is the live keyboard player for the British band Iron Maiden as well as Steve Harris's bass technician. Kenney shared keyboard duties with Steve Harris in studio from 1988's Seventh Son of a Seventh Son until 1995's The X Factor, when Steve took over all keyboard duties in studio from Virtual XI onwards. Since then, Kenney performs these parts only during live performances. His playing can be heard on the studio albums No Prayer for the Dying, Fear of the Dark, The X Factor, the live albums, Live at Donington, A Real Live One, A Real Dead One, Rock in Rio, Death on the Road and DVDs Maiden England, Donington, Rock In Rio and Death on the Road. Kenney was in the Eddie mask in Maiden's first video, Women in Uniform. He also appears as guest keyboardist on the DVD portion of Route 666 by The Iron Maidens, the "World's Only Female Tribute to Iron Maiden."

Discography
Iron Maiden
Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) Maiden England (1988) No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Fear of the Dark (1993) Live at Donington (1993) A Real Live One (1993) A Real Dead One (1993) The X Factor (1995) Rock in Rio (2001) Death on the Road (2005) Iron Maiden: Flight 666 (2009)

The Iron Maidens


The Iron Maidens: World's Only Female Tribute to Iron Maiden (2006 Japan release) "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" (Live) Route 666 (2007) DVD Portion

External links
Michael Kenney's Official MySpace [1] roadcrewlive/michaelkenney [2]

Michael Kenney

75

References
[1] http:/ / www. myspace. com/ kenneymusic [2] http:/ / www. darrellmillar. com/ rclmichaelkenney. htm

Tony Moore
Tony Moore (born Antony Moore, 11 October 1958 in Bristol) is an English singer/songwriter, musician, radio presenter and music promoter. He was also one of the early members of Iron Maiden. He first became famous in 1986 as keyboard player with the band Cutting Crew, and in 1997 he founded The Kashmir Klub to showcase live music in London.

Musical career
Iron Maiden
Tony Moore's background in the music industry has been eclectic and diverse. The first band he joined in 1977 was (the then unknown) Iron Maiden. A fan of Progressive rock, Moore was working in the Hi-Fi department of Debenhams store in Bristol, and had just bought a small Korg synthesiser when he saw an advertisement in the Melody Maker for a keyboard player for a London band. This turned out to be Iron Maiden. He contacted Steve Harris, and even though their music was not the kind of thing Moore had played or really listened to before, he auditioned and was invited to join the band. He moved to London to begin rehearsals. At that time members of the band all had day jobs and rehearsed once or twice a week. As this was the height of the Pop rock era, their first gig with the new line-up was at a pub called The Bridgehouse in Canning Town. In Moore's own words[1] : "The whole gig was a bit of a blur (as live performances often are). The adrenaline, the nerves, the concentration all played their part to produce a misty memory of the event. However, I think it is right to say, everyone felt there was something fundamentally not right in what was happening. For my part, I felt that the whole show felt a little pub rock and amateurish, I didn't think that my contribution was actually enhancing the band. In many ways it was an important bad gig. I think that, had the gig gone well, we may have struggled on with that lineup when, in hindsight, it was so obviously wrong. The following weeks produced a sense of unrest within the band and a feeling that things were unspoken and resentments and frustrations were being surpressed [sic] just below the surface. I remember the last rehearsal I had with the group, in a railway arch midway between Elephant and Castle and Blackfriars Bridge, where things seemed strained and un-natural. I think I realised at that point, that the band didn't really need a keyboard player. No matter how much I liked and respected Steve's dream, and passion and energy, I didn't seem to fit in." Moore left soon afterwards, and joked later that he left because he believed Iron Maiden would never make it. He then began working with Brian James (from The Damned) releasing a single on RADAR records and touring in support to Black Sabbath and The Stranglers before moving on to join a progressive rock band called England. In the early 1980s he formed his own group called Radio Java and made an album at Abbey Road Studios that spawned a number one hit single in the Netherlands before disbanding after the label closed down.

Tony Moore

76

Cutting Crew
In 1986 Moore was invited to play keyboards with a new band called Cutting Crew who went on to have a world wide hit with "(I Just) Died In Your Arms Tonight". For two more years he toured the world and recorded with the band, at which point he signed a solo deal with a small independent label in London. He released one single to critical acclaim (including airplay from Bob Harris) before joining forces with Argentine singer/songwriter Marie Claire D'ubaldo. He co-wrote and co-produced tracks for her debut album on Polydor records that sold over 250,000 worldwide.

A Song For Europe


In 2001, Moore performed his own composition, That's My Love in the A Song For Europe contest, hoping to represent the UK in the Eurovision Song Contest. He finished 2nd in the competition, behind Lindsay Dracass. He wrote other songs for the contest in earlier years.

Perfect & Beautiful


In 2005, after several years concentrating on club management, Moore resumed his solo musical career and began recording his own material independently. He announced his intention to produce an album, with almost no budget, no major record company backing and only 9 days to record, mix and master the final product. This resulted in a 13 track solo album entitled Perfect and Beautiful, recorded at Sphere Studios in London, released in July 2005.

The later years


In March 2006 he toured America, performing in Nashville, Austin, Los Angeles and New York and has continued to perform live on his return to the UK in April 2006. More recently Moore has been touring acoustically in pubs all over the Home Counties. He also performs regularly at The Bedford and The Regal Room in London. Early in 2008, Moore became the regular presenter of a one hour live show called "Lets Talk Music" for the Maltese television station One TV . Broadcast every Thursday night at 8.35 pm (Maltese time), it features a panel of music professionals who discuss different aspects of the music business and answer questions from the audience, together with live performances by celebrity guests. He also has a regular Thursday morning preview slot on the show "One Breakfast".[2]

Club management
In 1997 he established the The Kashmir Klub in London. The formula of providing an excellent sound system, sourcing the best of emerging and established artists, hosting the show - like live TV - and getting everyone to perform in an acoustic and "back to basics" format, quickly made it into one of the most important live music venues in London. Over its seven year history Moore introduced debut London performances from Damien Rice, Tom Baxter, Lucie Silvas, and KT Tunstall as well as unannounced sets from Sheryl Crow, Dave Stewart, Fleetwood Mac, Nik Kershaw, Rick Astley and many more. The Kashmir closed in 2003 after the building was closed for re-development. In July 2003 he took over the management of music nights at The Bedford in Balham, creating a similar live music venue, with an emphasis on emerging talent as well as established acts. In 2004 it won Best Pub in the country, it has twice won the best pub and club award as well as the Evening Standard pub of the year. Moore was one of the first promoters to pioneer the use of the internet and the regular live performances at The Bedford are freely available to all four nights a week, via a dedicated webcam and chatroom. From 20032005 Tony Moore also co-presented an overnight show on BBC London 94.9fm where he brought live music guests into the studio and championed the cause of new talent.

Tony Moore In 2004 he was made the sole Inductee into the MMF (Music Managers Forum) Roll of Honour for outstanding contribution to the British Music Industry. In 2006 he started to collaborate with Quirky Motion on the weekly Bedford Bandstand music program, which he presents. Each show seeks to bring a new artist to a wider audience. These episodes are freely available both as a podcast and on YouTube.[3] Tony Moore opened an additional live acoustic venue, The Regal Room, in December 2006, based at The Distillers, 64, Fulham Palace Road, Hammersmith, London. Showcasing up and coming artists, this is run along the same lines as the Kashmir Klub and The Bedford, with free entry and live webcasts.[4]

77

External links
[5] Official Homepage [3] Bedford Bandstand (which Tony Presents) [6] Biography from City Showcase 2004

References
[1] quoted from the blog on his official Myspace site (http:/ / www. myspace. com/ tonymoore4music) [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] http:/ / www. one. com. mt/ index. php?id=69 http:/ / www. bedfordbandstand. com/ http:/ / www. myspace. com/ theregalroom http:/ / www. tony-moore. com/ http:/ / www. cityshowcase. co. uk/ index. php?section=BiosDetail& BioID=ugt5ky8JPM& ListID=awNKPRJFSe

Terry Rance
Terry Rance was one of the original guitarists for one of the most influential heavy metal bands, Iron Maiden. He left the band in 1976, one year after the band's formation. He was replaced by Bob Sawyer. In 2006, the original twin-lead Iron Maiden guitar lineup - Rance and Dave Sullivan - were named as executive managers of the Maiden-themed bar and grill, Eddie's Bar, located in Santa Barbara de Nexe in Portugals Algarve.

Doug Sampson

78

Doug Sampson
Doug Sampson
Instruments Drums Associated acts Iron Maiden

Doug Sampson (born June 30, 1957 in Hackney, East London) was the third drummer for Iron Maiden.[1] He was in the band from 1977 to 1979. Prior to joining Maiden, Sampson was a member of one of Steve Harris' previous groups, which was called Smiler 1974-75. He was one of the four members of the band to sign a record contract with EMI. However, shortly after he fell ill due to the rigours of touring. He was replaced by Clive Burr shortly before the recording of the self-titled first Iron Maiden album. Sampson appears on the legendary demo Soundhouse Tapes as well as the song "Burning Ambition" from the very first Iron Maiden single Running Free. He should not be confused with Paul Samson from the band Samson, which also had as members several people who were also in Iron Maiden, including Bruce Dickinson, Clive Burr, and Thunderstick.

References
[1] Weber, Barry. "Biography: Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=11:3ifyxqe5ldae~T1). AMG. . Retrieved 8 May 2010.

Thunderstick

79

Thunderstick
Thunderstick (aka Barry Graham or Barry Purkis) was a drummer for the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden briefly in 1977. He was later in the band Samson.[1] He wore a mask onstage much like a professional wrestler and sometimes played inside a cage. His stint in Maiden was left notoriously short due to him being incapable of playing properly while intoxicated (at one show he actually fell asleep during a song). In rare occurrence his face was seen when he performed the main-role in the B-Movie Biceps of Steel, featuring his band at the time Samson. In the film his brother-in-law performed as Thunderstick in his stead.

External links
Official Thunderstick Website [2]

References
[1] Huey, Steve. "Biography: Samson" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=11:aifrxqr5ldke~T1). Allmusic. . Retrieved 13 June 2010. [2] http:/ / www. thunderstick. co. uk/

80

Discography
Iron Maiden discography
Iron Maidendiscography

Iron Maiden performing live in Paris during the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour in 2008 Releases Studio albums Live albums Compilation albums Extended plays Singles Video albums Music videos Box sets 15 9 5 4 39 17 36 3

Iron Maiden is a British heavy metal band founded in 1975 by bassist and only original member, Steve Harris. The band has released fifteen studio albums, as well as numerous live albums, compilations, EPs, singles, video albums, music videos, and box sets. After several auditions and lineup changes, they settled on vocalist Paul Di'Anno, guitarists Dave Murray and Dennis Stratton and drummer Clive Burr. They released their self-titled debut album in 1980; quickly becoming one of the leading proponents of the NWOBHM movement.[1] Guitarist Adrian Smith replaced Stratton, and a "consistent highlight", Killers, was released in 1981.[2] Later that year, vocalist Bruce Dickinson replaced Paul Di'Anno, marking the beginning of a series of top-ten high-impact releases.[3] They issued "the 1982 masterpiece", The Number of the Beast,[4] becoming the band's first release to top the UK charts, and receive a platinum certification by the Recording Industry Association of America. Drummer Nicko McBrain replaced Clive Burr,[5] and the band released Piece of Mind in 1983, followed by a "true heavy metal achievement", 1984's Powerslave.[6] Iron Maiden broadened their sound with the use of guitar synthesizers in 1986's Somewhere in Time.[7] Their following concept album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, was released in 1988, and also topped the UK charts. The lineup remained unchanged until Adrian Smith left the band during the pre-production of their last gold-certified album in the US, 1990's No Prayer for the Dying; he was replaced by Janick Gers. Their last number one album in the UK, Fear of the Dark, was released in 1992. The following year, Dickinson departed from the band.[8] His replacement, Blaze Bayley, debuted in 1995 with The X Factor, "a lackluster" album that marked a decline on the band's career.[9] The diminished fan interest in 1998 with Virtual XI prompted Bayley's departure.[10]

Iron Maiden discography Dickinson and Smith returned to the band in 1999, and a new album, Brave New World, was issued in 2000. Three years later, Dance of Death was released, which marked "a triumphant return" to success.[11] In 2006 they released "a more elaborate and meandering" album, A Matter of Life and Death,[12] which received, along with their two previous albums, a gold certification by the BPI. On 25 May 2009, the band released Flight 666, a video which covers the first leg of the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour; it reached number 1 in over 20 countries.[13] As the most successful heavy metal band of all time, Iron Maiden have sold more than 80millionalbums worldwide.[14]

81

Studio albums
Year Album details
UK

Peak chart positions


AUT CAN FIN GER JPN NOR SWE SWI [15] [16] [17] [18] [19] [20] [21] [22] [23] [24] US

Certifications (sales thresholds)

1980 Iron Maiden Released: 14 April 1980 Label: EMI (EMC 3330) Format: CD, CS, LP

36

[25] UK: Platinum [26] CAN: Platinum [27] GER: Gold [28] UK: Gold [29] US: Gold [26] CAN: Platinum [27] GER: Gold [30] SWE: Gold

1981 Killers Released: 2 February 1981 Label: EMI (EMC 3357) Format: CD, CS, LP, 8 Track

12

20

19

11

78

1982 The Number of the Beast Released: 29 March 1982 Label: EMI (EMC 3400) Format: CD, CS, LP, 8 Track

11 [31]

13

[33] 33 UK: Platinum [32] [29] US: Platinum CAN: 3x [26] Platinum [27] GER: Gold 14 [35] UK: Platinum [29] US: Platinum CAN: 2 [26] Platinum [27] GER: Gold [37] UK: Gold [29] US: Platinum CAN: 2 [26] Platinum [27] GER: Gold [39] UK: Gold [29] US: Platinum [26] CAN: Platinum [27] GER: Gold [41] UK: Gold [29] US: Platinum [26] CAN: Platinum [27] GER: Gold [43] UK: Gold [29] US: Gold [26] CAN: Platinum

1983 Piece of Mind Released: 16 May 1983 Label: EMI (EMA 800) Format: CD, CS, LP

10

10 [34]

1984 Powerslave Released: 3 September 1984 Label: EMI (POWER 1) Format: CD, CS, LP

15

21 [36]

10

21

1986 Somewhere in Time Released: 29 September 1986 Label: EMI (EMC 3512) Format: CD, CS, LP

10

15 [38]

22

11

1988 Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Released: 11 April 1988 Label: EMI (EMD 1006) Format: CD, CS, LP

11 [40]

39

12

1990 No Prayer for the Dying Released: 1 October 1990 Label: EMI (EMD 1017) Format: CD, CS, LP

19

27 [42]

16

11

17

Iron Maiden discography


[45] UK: Gold [26] CAN: Gold

82
1 8 5 11 6 8 5 12

1992 Fear of the Dark Released: 11 May 1992 Label: EMI (EMD 1032) Format: CD, CS, LP

12 [44]

1995 The X Factor Released: 2 October 1995 Label: EMI (724383581924) Format: CD, CS, LP

19

16

17

25

27

147

1998 Virtual XI Released: 23 March 1998 Label: EMI (724349391529) Format: CD, CS, LP

16

24

60 [46]

16

19

28

16

39

124

2000 Brave New World Released: 29 May 2000 Label: EMI (724352660520) Format: CD, CS, LP

10

23 [47]

13

39

[48] UK: Gold [49] BRA: Gold [26] CAN: Gold [50] SWE: Gold [51] UK: Gold [49] BRA: Gold [27] GER: Gold [52] SWE: Gold [53] ARG: Gold [54] UK: Gold [49] BRA: Gold [26] CAN: Gold [55] SWE: Gold

2003 Dance of Death Released: 8 September 2003 Label: EMI (724359301020) Format: CD, CS, LP

11

18

2006 A Matter of Life and Death Released: 28 August 2006 Label: EMI (094637233122) Format: CD, CS, LP

11

2010 The Final Frontier To be released: 16 August 2010 Label: EMI Format: CD, CS, LP [56]

"" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.

Live albums
Year Album details Peak chart positions
UK AUT FIN GER JPN NLD NOR SWE SWI US

Certifications

[15] [16] [18] [19] [20] [57] [21] 1985 Live After Death Released: 14 October 1985 Label: EMI (EMC 267) Format: CD, CS, LP 2 13

[22] [23] [24] 8 26 19 [58] UK: Gold [29] US: Platinum CAN: 2 [26] Platinum [30] SWE: Gold

Iron Maiden discography

83
3 11 25 29 45 30 25 106

1993 A Real Live One Released: 22 March 1993 Label: EMI (077778145622) Format: CD, CS, LP

A Real Dead One Released: 18 October 1993 Label: EMI (077778924821) Format: CD, CS, LP

12

50

16

97

14

37

140

Live at Donington Released: 8 November 1993 Label: EMI (724382751120) Format: CD, CS, LP

23

39

2002 Rock in Rio Released: 25 March 2002 Label: EMI (724353864309) Format: CD, CS, LP

15

17

13

43

43

14

14

17

186 BRA: Gold[49]

The BBC Archives Released: 4 November 2002 Label: EMI Format: ?

Beast over Hammersmith Released: 4 November 2002 Label: EMI Format: ?

2005 Death on the Road Released: 30 August 2005 Label: EMI (094633657427) Format: CD, LP

22

23

17

106

39

12

17

UK: Silver

[59]

2009 Flight 666 Released: 25 May 2009 Label: EMI Format: CD, LP

15

36

14

50

22

25

24

34

"" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.

Compilation albums

Iron Maiden discography

84

Year

Album details

Peak chart positions


UK AUT BEL FIN GER JPN NLD NZ SWE US

Certifications

[15] [16] [60] [18] [19] [20] [57] [61] [22] [24] 1996 Best of the Beast Released: 24 September 1996 Label: EMI (724385319228) Format: CD, CS, LP 27 69 43 16 41 28 8 42 26 25 37 11 [62] UK: Gold [49] BRA: Gold [63] SWE: Platinum [53] ARG: Platinum

1999 Ed Hunter Released: 25 May 1999 Label: Sanctuary (C2K 63726) Format: CD

2002 Edward the Great Released: 5 November 2002 Label: EMI (724354310324) Format: CD, CS

57

46

34

242

16

[64] UK: Gold [26] CAN: Gold [52] SWE: Gold

2005 The Essential Iron Maiden Released: 5 July 2005 Label: Sanctuary (C2K 92832) Format: CD

2008 Somewhere Back in Time Released: 12 May 2008 Label: EMI (2147072) Format: CD, LP

14

26

19

10

84

39

74

24

58

"" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.

Extended plays
Year Album details Notes The original 7-inch vinyl's initial 5,000 unit pressing, sold out in less than a week. [65]

1979 The Soundhouse Tapes Released: 9 November 1979 Label: Rock Hard (ROK 1) Format: 7-inch, CD

1980 Live!! +one Released: November 1980 Label: EMI (0622600481) Format: CS, LP This was the last Iron Maiden record to feature vocalist Paul Di'anno. [66]

1981 Maiden Japan Released: 14 September 1981 Label: EMI (12EMI 5219) Format: 12-inch, CS

2004 No More Lies Released: 29 March 2004 Label: EMI (CDEM 636) Format: CD

Iron Maiden discography

85

Singles
Year Song Peak chart positions
UK FIN FRA GER IRL ITA NLD NOR SWE SWI

Album

[15] [18] [67] [68] [69] [70] [71] [21] 1980 "Running Free" "Sanctuary" "Women in Uniform" 1981 "Twilight Zone" "Purgatory" 1982 "Run to the Hills" "The Number of the Beast" 1983 "Flight of Icarus" "The Trooper" 1984 "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Aces High" 1985 "Running Free (live)" "Run to the Hills (live)" 1986 "Wasted Years" "Stranger in a Strange Land" 1988 "Can I Play with Madness" "The Evil That Men Do" "The Clairvoyant" 1989 "Infinite Dreams (live)" 1990 "Holy Smoke" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 1992 "Be Quick or Be Dead" "From Here to Eternity" "Wasting Love" 1993 "Fear of the Dark (live)" "Hallowed Be Thy Name (live)" 1995 "Man on the Edge" 1996 "Lord of the Flies" "Virus" 1998 "The Angel and the Gambler" "Futureal" 2000 "The Wicker Man" "Out of the Silent Planet" 2002 "Run to the Hills (live)" 34 29 35 31 52 7 18 11 12 11 20 19 26 18 22 3 5 6 6 3 1 70 23 16 19 14 12 10 29 12 18 11 18 3 4 7 6 4 6 14 4 7

[22] [23] 12 23 20 19

Iron Maiden

Non-album single Killers

The Number of the Beast

Piece of Mind

Powerslave

Live After Death

Somewhere in Time

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son

No Prayer for the Dying

2 21 5 9 10 16 18 9 20 9

1 3 3 11 13 5

33 39 72 73

32 61 38 66 55

10 27 17 16

3 10 6

48 52 45 87 60

3 18 9 15

15 23 31 29 5 35 28

15 83 75

Fear of the Dark

A Real Live One A Real Dead One The X Factor

Best of the Beast Virtual XI

Brave New World

Rock in Rio

Iron Maiden discography

86
6 13 3 1 3 1 1 57 71 70 99 27 36 39 40 19 18 4 13 3 45 98 5 9 4 35 1 52 68 94 74 The Final Frontier A Matter of Life and Death Dance of Death

2003 "Wildest Dreams" "Rainmaker" 2006 "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" "Different World" 2010 "El Dorado"

"" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.

Video albums
Year Video details
UK AUS

Peak chart positions


GER NOR ESP SWI FIN [19] NLD [72] POR [73] [23] US

Certifications

1981 Live at the Rainbow Released: May 1981 Label: PMI (MVR 9900182) Format: VHS

1983 Video Pieces Released: 23 July 1983 Label: PMI (MVS 9900022) Format: LD, VHS

1984 Behind the Iron Curtain Released: 23 October 1984 Label: PMI (MVR 9900392) Format: VHS

16 [74]

US: Gold

[29]

1985 Live After Death Released: 15 October 1985 Label: PMI (MVM 9910942) Format: VHS

3 [75]

CAN: 2 Platinum [29] US: Platinum

[26]

1987 12 Wasted Years Released: October 1987 Label: PMI (MVN 9911522) Format: VHS

10 [76]

US: Gold

[29]

1989 Maiden England Released: 8 November 1989 Label: PMI (MVN 9911953) Format: VHS

6 [77]

[26] CAN: Gold [29] US: Gold

1990 The First Ten Years Released: November 1990 Label: PMI (MVN 9912463) Format: VHS

CAN: Gold

[26]

1992 From There to Eternity Released: October 1992 Label: SMV (19V49132) Format: VHS

7 [78]

Iron Maiden discography


[53]

87

1993 Donington Live 1992 Released: 10 November 1993 Label: PMI (MVN 4911563) Format: VHS

ARG: Platinum

1994 Raising Hell Released: May 1994 Label: PMI (MVN 4912643) Format: VHS

15 [79]

2001 The Number of the Beast Released: 4 December 2001 Label: Eagle Vision (EREDV 229) Format: DVD, VHS, UMD

AUS: Gold

[80]

2002 Rock in Rio Released: 16 July 2002 Label: Sanctuary (SVE 5001) Format: DVD, VHS, UMD

1 [81]

3 [82]

3 2 [83] [84]

2 [85]

[86] AUS: Gold [26] CAN: 2 Platinum [27] GER: Gold [29] US: Platinum [53] ARG: Platinum [90] UK: Platinum [80] AUS: Platinum [26] CAN: 3 Platinum [27] GER: Gold [29] US: 2 Platinum [94] UK: Gold [80] AUS: Gold [26] CAN: Platinum [29] US: Platinum [53] ARG: Platinum AUS: Gold [80]

2003 Visions of the Beast Released: 2 June 2003 Label: EMI (4904039) Format: DVD

9 [87]

1 [88]

41

5 [89]

2004 The Early Days Released: 1 November 2004 Label: EMI (5443179) Format: DVD

3 [91]

32 [92]

1 [93]

76

23 [93]

12 1 [93] [93]

2006 Death on the Road Released: 6 February 2006 Label: EMI (3514709) Format: DVD

1 [95]

3 [96]

1 [97]

62

78

14 [98]

2008 Live After Death Released: 4 February 2008 Label: EMI (3795229) Format: DVD

1 1 1 1 [99] [100] [99] [99]

[102] 2 1 1 2 UK: Gold [99] [99] [99] [101] [103] AUS: Gold [27] GER: Gold [29] US: Platinum 2 2 1 1 [104] AUS: Platinum [29] US: Platinum CAN: 6x Platinum

2009 Flight 666 Released: 25 May 2009 Label: EMI Format: Blu-ray, DVD

"" denotes releases that did not chart or were not released in that country.

Music videos

Iron Maiden discography

88

Year

Title

Director(s) Doug Smith Dave Hillier David Mallet

[105]

1980 "Women in Uniform" 1981 "Wrathchild" 1982 "Run to the Hills" "The Number of the Beast" 1983 "Flight of Icarus" "The Trooper" 1984 "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Aces High" 1986 "Wasted Years" "Stranger in a Strange Land" 1988 "Can I Play with Madness" "The Evil That Men Do" "The Clairvoyant" 1989 "Infinite Dreams" 1990 "Holy Smoke" "Tailgunner" "Bring Your Daughter to the Slaughter" 1992 "Be Quick or Be Dead" "From Here to Eternity" "Wasting Love" 1993 "Fear of the Dark" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 1995 "Man on the Edge" 1996 "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" "Lord of the Flies" "Virus" 1998 "The Angel and the Gambler" "Futureal" 2000 "The Wicker Man" "Out of the Silent Planet" "Brave New World" 2003 "Wildest Dreams" "Rainmaker" 2004 "No More Lies" 2006 "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" "Different World"

Jim Yukich

Tony Halton Jim Yukich

Julian Caidan Julian Doyle Toby Philips, Steve Harris Julian Caiden, Steve Harris Steve Harris

Wing Ko Ralph Ziman Samuel Bayer

Wing Ko Steve Lazarus, Steve Harris

Simon Hilton Steve Lazarus Dean Karr David Pattenden, Trevor Thompson Dean Karr Howard Greenhalgh [106] [107]

[108] Mathew Amos

Howard Greenhalgh

[109]

Iron Maiden discography

89

Box sets
Year Box set details Notes This ten-disc box set, was released to commemorate the band's tenth anniversary. Each reissue combines two singles (as an EP), and a commentary from the drummer [110] Nicko McBrain, entitled "Listen With Nicko!".

1990 The First Ten Years Released: 12 February 1990 Label: EMI (CDIRN 110) Format: 12-inch, CD

1998 Eddie's Head

The limited-edition box set contains all 12 of the original band's remastered, enhanced Released: 1 December 1998 CDs Label: EMI (7243-4-97999-0-5) (complete with full lyrics, artwork, photos, and multimedia sections, plus non-LP singles [111] Format: CD added as bonus tracks where appropriate). Featuring three double discs, this limited-edition box set contains 77 remastered rare [112] Released: 5 November 2002 recordings, and most of it previously unreleased on any format. Label: EMI (7243-5-41277-2-4) Format: CD

2002 Eddie's Archive

External links
Iron Maiden's official website [4] Media related to Iron Maiden at Wikimedia Commons

References
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Iron Maiden discography


[70] "Iron Maiden > Discography Singles" (http:/ / italiancharts. com/ search. asp?cat=s& search=Iron+ Maiden). Italian charts portal. italiancharts.com. . Retrieved 3 October 2008. [71] "Discografie Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. dutchcharts. nl/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden) (in Dutch). Dutch charts portal. dutchcharts.nl. . Retrieved 3 October 2008. [72] "Iron Maiden - VG-lista" (http:/ / lista. vg. no/ artist_info. php?ArtistOp=show& artistId=446) (in Norwegian). VG Nett. Verdens Gang AS. . Retrieved 2008-11-27. [73] "Search for: Iron Maiden > Albums" (http:/ / spanishcharts. com/ search. asp?search=Iron+ Maiden& cat=a). Spanish charts portal. spanishcharts.com. . Retrieved 21 November 2008. [74] "Top Music Video - Behind the Iron Curtain" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3004442& cdi=6199098& cid=08/ 31/ 1985). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1985-08-31. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [75] "Top Music Video - Live After Death" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3005008& cdi=6231354& cid=05/ 24/ 1986). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1986-05-24. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [76] "Top Music Video - 12 Wasted Years" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3007743& cdi=6384067& cid=10/ 29/ 1988). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1988-10-28. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [77] "Top Music Video - Maiden England" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3009842& cdi=6498324& cid=10/ 27/ 1990). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1990-10-27. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [78] "Top Music Video - From There to Eternity" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3012811& cdi=6646476& cid=08/ 29/ 1992). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1992-08-29. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [79] "Top Music Video - Raising Hell" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3017409& cdi=6834060& cid=06/ 04/ 1994). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1994-06-04. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [80] "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2007 DVD" (http:/ / www. aria. com. au/ pages/ httpwww. aria. com. aupagesARIACharts-Accreditations-2007DVD. htm). Australian Recording Industry Association. . Retrieved 2008-11-03. [81] "Iron Maiden's "Rock in Rio" DVD/VHS Tops UK Charts" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=4259). Blabbermouth. Roadrunner Records. 19 June 2002. . Retrieved 22 November 2008. [82] "DVD Chart" (http:/ / pandora. nla. gov. au/ pan/ 23790/ 20020627-0000/ www. aria. com. au/ Issue643. pdf) (PDF). ARIA Report (ARIA) (643): 19. 24 June 2002. . Retrieved 2008-11-25. [83] "Suomen virallinen lista - DVD" (http:/ / pop. yle. fi/ lista/ musa_dvd?id=2002) (in Finnish). YLE Pop. YLE. 2004. . Retrieved 2008-12-06. [84] "Iron Maiden "Rock in Rio" on German DVD/VHS Charts" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=4375). Blabbermouth. Roadrunner Records. 25 June 2002. . Retrieved 22 November 2008. [85] "Top Music Video - Rock in Rio" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3046755& cdi=7901359& cid=09/ 07/ 2002). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 2002-09-07. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [86] "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2004 DVD" (http:/ / www. aria. com. au/ pages/ aria-charts-accreditations-dvd-2004. htm). Australian Recording Industry Association. . Retrieved 2008-11-03. [87] "DVD Chart" (http:/ / pandora. nla. gov. au/ pan/ 23790/ 20030707-0000/ Issue697. pdf) (PDF). ARIA Report (ARIA) (697): 19. 30 June 2003. . Retrieved 25 November 2008. [88] "Suomen virallinen lista - DVD" (http:/ / pop. yle. fi/ lista/ musa_dvd?id=2070) (in Finnish). YLE Pop. YLE. 2004. . Retrieved 2008-12-06. [89] "Top Music Video - Visions of the Beast" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3050442& cdi=8030236& cid=08/ 02/ 2003). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 2003-08-03. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [90] "Certified Awards - Iron Maiden: Visions of the Beast" (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ platinum/ platinumright. asp?rq=search_plat& r_id=32064). British Phonographic Industry. 2005-02-18. . Retrieved 2008-08-31. [91] "Iron Maiden: 'Early Days' DVD Enters U.K. Chart at No. 3" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=28898). Blabbermouth. Roadrunner Records. 7 November 2004. . Retrieved 21 November 2008. [92] "DVD Chart" (http:/ / pandora. nla. gov. au/ pan/ 23790/ 20041220-0000/ ISSUE769. pdf) (PDF). ARIA Report (ARIA) (769): 22. 22 November 2004. . Retrieved 25 November 2008. [93] "Iron Maiden: 'Early Years' DVD European Chart Positions Updated" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=29085). Blabbermouth. Roadrunner Records. 11 November 2004. . Retrieved 21 November 2008. [94] "Certified Awards - Iron Maiden: The Early Days" (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ platinum/ platinumright. asp?rq=search_plat& r_id=32059). British Phonographic Industry. 2004-11-01. . Retrieved 2008-10-04. [95] "Iron Maiden, Whitesnake Top U.K.'s Music DVD Chart" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=48273). Blabbermouth. Roadrunner Records. 13 February 2006. . Retrieved 21 November 2008.

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Iron Maiden discography


[96] "DVD Chart" (http:/ / pandora. nla. gov. au/ pan/ 23790/ 20060410-0000/ issue833. pdf) (PDF). ARIA Report (ARIA) (833): 20. 20 February 2006. . Retrieved 25 November 2008. [97] "Suomen virallinen lista - DVD" (http:/ / pop. yle. fi/ lista/ musa_dvd?id=2609) (in Finnish). YLE. 2006. . Retrieved 2008-12-06. [98] "Top Music Video - Death on the Road" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3082273& cdi=9192042& cid=02/ 17/ 2007). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 2007-02-17. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [99] "Iron Maiden: 'Live After Death' European Chart Positions Revealed" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=90561). Blabbermouth. Roadrunner Records. 12 February 2008. . Retrieved 21 November 2008. [100] "Music DVD Chart" (http:/ / pandora. nla. gov. au/ pan/ 23790/ 20080220-0000/ issue937. pdf) (PDF). ARIA Report (ARIA) (937): 25. 11 February 2008. . Retrieved 25 November 2008. [101] "Top Music Video - Live After Death" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=388& cfgn=Videos& cfn=Top+ Music+ Video& ci=3091801& cdi=9676540& cid=02/ 23/ 2008). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 2008-02-23. . Retrieved 2008-11-05. [102] "Certified Awards - Iron Maiden: Live After Death" (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ platinum/ platinumright. asp?rq=search_plat& r_id=33200). British Phonographic Industry. 2008-06-06. . Retrieved 2008-10-04. [103] "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2008 DVD" (http:/ / www. aria. com. au/ pages/ httpwww. aria. com. aupageshttpwww. aria. com. aupagesARIACharts-Accreditations-2008DVD_000. htm). Australian Recording Industry Association. . Retrieved 2008-11-03. [104] "Accreditations - 2009 DVD" (http:/ / www. aria. com. au/ pages/ httpwww. aria. com. aupageshttpwww. aria. com. aupageshttpwww. aria. com. aupagesARIACharts-_000. htm). ARIA Charts. Australian Recording Industry Association. . Retrieved 20 June 2009. [105] Visions of the Beast. [DVD]. London, England: EMI. [106] (2003) Album notes for Wildest Dreams by Iron Maiden [DVD single]. EMI (724349080096). [107] (2003) Album notes for Rainmaker by Iron Maiden [DVD single]. EMI (724359911397). [108] (2004) Album notes for No More Lies: Dance of Death Souvenir EP by Iron Maiden [CD]. EMI (CDEM 636). [109] (2006) Album notes for Different World by Iron Maiden [DVD single]. EMI (DVDEM 714). [110] Rivadavia, Eduardo. "Run to the Hills EP > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:0vfexqqhldje~T10). Allmusic. Macrovision Corporation. . Retrieved 2008-11-18. [111] Thomas Erlewine, Stephen. "Eddie's Head > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:dnfoxqejldse~T10). Allmusic. . Retrieved 2008-11-07. [112] Henderson, Alex. "Eddie's Archive > Review" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:09foxqealdde~T10). Allmusic. . Retrieved 2008-11-07.

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94

Studio albums
Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released April 14, 1980 (UK) Summer 1980 (U.S.)
[1]

Recorded February 1980, at Kingsway Studios, London Genre Length Label Heavy metal 40:39 EMI

Producer Will Malone Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[2]

Iron Maiden chronology The Soundhouse Tapes (1979) Iron Maiden (1980) Live!! +one (1980)

Alternative cover

1998 reissue cover

''Iron Maiden''

95
Singles from Iron Maiden
1. 2.

"Running Free"
Released: 8 February 1980

"Sanctuary"
Released: 23 May 1980

Iron Maiden, released on April 14, 1980, is the debut album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released by EMI in the UK, reaching number 4 in the UK album charts. The album was released a few months later in the U.S. originally on Harvest/Capitol Records and subsequently Sanctuary Records/Columbia Records and included the song "Sanctuary", which had been released in the UK only as a single, added to the track listing. In 1998, just like all other pre-X Factor albums, the album was re-released, and "Sanctuary" was added in all territories. Of all the songs in this album, "Phantom of the Opera," "Running Free," "Sanctuary" and "Iron Maiden" remain on the set lists of nearly all of the band's concert tours, with the latter used to introduce a giant representation of the band's mascot Eddie from the back of the stage. Four songs from the album: "Prowler", "Remember Tomorrow", "Running Free" and "Iron Maiden" were covered for the 2008 tribute album Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine. Every song on this album except 'Strange World' has since been recorded by the Dickinson-fronted line-up of the band, either on live albums, on studio B-Sides, or both.

History
This was the only album produced by Will Malone, who lacked interest in the project and allowed the band to produce most of the album themselves. The band (especially Steve Harris) criticised the quality of the production, but many fans like the raw, almost punk-like sound to the songs. This was also the only studio album for guitarist Dennis Stratton, who left a short time after the album was released. He was replaced by Adrian Smith. "Transylvania" is a well known instrumental piece by the band which was composed by founder and bassist Steve Harris. The song was covered by Iced Earth on the album Horror Show. "Strange World" tells of a dystopian society, where people never grow old. Amongst other things the narrator (singer) laments how "smiling faces [are] ever so rare". Meanwhile, "Charlotte the Harlot" is the first of four Iron Maiden songs which make reference to the fictional prostitute 'Charlotte'. The 7-minute epic "Phantom of the Opera" remains a fan favourite, and is still performed at many Maiden concerts, while live performances of "Iron Maiden" often signal the entrance of band mascot Eddie onto the stage. "Running Free" was released as a single on February 23rd, 1980, and reached number 34 in the UK singles chart. The band also performed the song entirely live on the UK TV show Top Of The Pops. The usual tradition was for artists to lip-synch, and Maiden were the first band to perform their song without lip-synching on the show since The Who in 1972. The "Sanctuary" single was released on June 7th, and charted at number 29. Manager Rod Smallwood's management company was named after the song. The 1998 re-release has, besides the addition of the previously mentioned song "Sanctuary", a different cover than the original release. The picture is the same, except that it's redrawn. However, on recent advertising-posters and the Iron Maiden website, the original cover is once again shown. Metal For Muthas Tour and Europe 80 was the tour supporting the album Iron Maiden.

''Iron Maiden''

96

Track listing
Original UK release No. Title 1. "Prowler" Writer(s) Steve Harris Length 3:55 5:27 3:17 7:20 4:05 5:45 4:12 3:35

2. "Remember Tomorrow" Harris, Paul Di'Anno 3. "Running Free" Harris, Di'Anno

4. "Phantom of the Opera" Harris 5. "Transylvania" 6. "Strange World" 7. "Charlotte the Harlot" 8. "Iron Maiden" Harris Harris Dave Murray Harris

Original US release No. Title 1. "Prowler" Writer(s) Harris Length 3:55 5:27 3:17 7:20 4:05 5:45 3:14

2. "Remember Tomorrow" Di'Anno, Harris 3. "Running Free" Di'Anno, Harris

4. "Phantom of the Opera" Harris 5. "Transylvania" 6. "Strange World" 7. "Sanctuary" Harris Harris Di'Anno, Murray, Harris Murray Harris

8. "Charlotte the Harlot" 9. "Iron Maiden"

4:10 3:31

Remastered release
Original US release No. Title 1. "Prowler" 2. "Sanctuary" Writer(s) Harris Di'Anno, Murray, Harris Length 3:55 3:14

3. "Remember Tomorrow" Di'Anno, Harris 4. "Running Free" Di'Anno, Harris

5:27 3:17 7:08 4:19 5:30 4:12 3:35

5. "Phantom of the Opera" Harris 6. "Transylvania" 7. "Strange World" 8. "Charlotte the Harlot" 9. "Iron Maiden" Harris Harris Murray Harris

''Iron Maiden'' On the 1998 re-release, the fade out of "Transylvania" and the intro to "Strange World" were put at the end of "Transylvania", originally both the beginning of "Strange World".

97

1995 reissue bonus disc


No. Title 1. "Sanctuary" Writer(s) Di'Anno, Murray, Harris Harris Harris Length 3:14

2. "Burning Ambition" 3. "Drifter" (live)

2:42 6:04 3:14

4. "I've Got the Fire" (live Montrose cover) Ronnie Montrose

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Dennis Stratton guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr drums

Certifications
Country Canada Certification Sales/shipments Platinum [3] 100,000 300,000

United Kingdom Platinum[4]

References
[1] Newspaper article from February 2, 1980 (http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ pictures/ bootlegs/ 1979-80/ 1980-02-02_news. jpg). Retrieved August 5, 2008 [2] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=Auzarqjmbojta [3] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007. [4] BPI Database (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ platinum/ platinumright. asp?rq=search_plat& r_id=18833). Retrieved August 23, 2008.

''Killers''

98

Killers
Killers

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released February 2, 1981 (UK) June, 1981 (US)

Recorded Battery Studios, London, November 1980 January 1981 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 41:18 EMI

Producer Martin "Headmaster" Birch Professional reviews


Allmusic Sputnikmusic

link [2] link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Live!! +one (1980) Killers (1981) Maiden Japan (1981)

Singles from Killers


1. 2.

"Twilight Zone"
Released: 2 March 1981

"Purgatory"
Released: 15 June 1981

Killers is the second album by English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on February 2, 1981 in the UK, and June, 1981 in the US. The album was the first of their albums to feature guitarist Adrian Smith, and the last to feature vocalist Paul Di'Anno, who was fired from the band mid-tour due to problems with alcohol and cocaine. This was also the first Iron Maiden album produced by veteran producer Martin Birch who went on to produce their next eight albums before retiring after Fear of the Dark in 1992. Being the most popular song on the album, "Wrathchild" has been on the set lists of nearly all of the band's concert tours. The song was covered in 2005 by the female tribute The Iron Maidens on their 2007 album Route 666 and again in 2008 by Gallows on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine.[3] The song Wrathchild was also featured in the PlayStation 2 game Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks the 80s.

''Killers''

99

History
The album is an unusual one in that it features two instrumentals and was written almost exclusively by Steve Harris with only minor assistance from the rest of the band. Only the title track and "Twilight Zone" received additional writing credits. All of the songs, with the exception of "Murders in the Rue Morgue" and "Prodigal Son," were written before the release of their debut album (they could not fit all of them on one album, and the songs were later re-recorded anyway to feature Adrian Smith); an early version of "Wrathchild" was featured on the Metal for Muthas compilation. The U.S. edition, which came out a few months after its UK release, was initially released on Harvest Records/Capitol Records and subsequently on Sanctuary Records/Columbia Records. "Twilight Zone" was also added to the album. The song "Murders in the Rue Morgue" is based on the story of the same name by Edgar Allan Poe. "Rue Morgue" is the name of a fictitious street in Paris, it translates in English as "Mortuary Street". However, the only reference to the story in the song is when two girls are found dead. Killers World Tour was the tour supporting the album. This tour would feature the band's first ever concert in America.

Track listing
Original UK release No. Title Writer(s) Length 1:46 2:54 4:18 3:22 3:06 3:53 5:01 6:11 3:20 4:48

1. "The Ides of March" (instrumental) Steve Harris 2. "Wrathchild" 3. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" 4. "Another Life" 5. "Genghis Khan" (instrumental) 6. "Innocent Exile" 7. "Killers" 8. "Prodigal Son" 9. "Purgatory" 10. "Drifter" Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris Paul Di'Anno, Harris Harris Harris Harris

Original U.S. release No. Title Writer(s) Length 1:46 2:54 4:18 3:22 3:06 3:53 5:01 2:33

1. "The Ides of March" (instrumental) Harris 2. "Wrathchild" 3. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" 4. "Another Life" 5. "Genghis Khan" (instrumental) 6. "Innocent Exile" 7. "Killers" 8. "Twilight Zone" Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris Di'Anno, Harris Dave Murray, Harris

''Killers''

100
9. "Prodigal Son" 10. "Purgatory" 11. "Drifter" Harris Harris Harris 6:11 3:20 4:48

1998 Remastered release No. Title Writer(s) Length 1:46 2:54 4:18 3:22 3:06 3:53 5:01 6:11 3:20 2:33 4:48

1. "The Ides of March" (instrumental) Harris 2. "Wrathchild" 3. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" 4. "Another Life" 5. "Genghis Khan" (instrumental) 6. "Innocent Exile" 7. "Killers" 8. "Prodigal Son" 9. "Purgatory" 10. "Twilight Zone" 11. "Drifter" Harris Harris Harris Harris Harris Di'Anno, Harris Harris Harris Murray, Harris Harris

1995 reissue bonus disc No. Title Writer(s) Length 3:07 2:38

1. "Women in Uniform" (originally by the Skyhooks) Greg Macainsh 2. "Invasion" 3. "Phantom of the Opera" (live) 4. "Running Free" (live) 5. "Remember Tomorrow" (live) 6. "Wrathchild" (live) 7. "Killers" (live) 8. "Innocent Exile" (live) Harris Harris Di'Anno, Harris Di'Anno, Harris Harris Di'Anno, Harris Harris

5:29

An older cassette version was also released which contained "Women in Uniform" on side two. The live versions on the reissue are taken from the album Maiden Japan.

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr drums

''Killers''

101

Additional personnel
Dennis Stratton - guitar on "Women in Uniform", "Invasion", and "Phantom of the Opera" Martin "Headmaster" Birch producer, engineer, "bullier" Nigel Hewitt second engineer Rod Smallwood band manager Derek Riggs cover illustration

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=Ayeh1z8bajyvj [2] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=937 [3] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html)

The Number of the Beast


The Number of the Beast

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 29 March 1982 Battery Studios 1981 January 1982 Heavy metal 45:20 EMI (EMC 3400) Martin Birch Iron Maiden chronology Killers (1981) The Number of the Beast (1982) Piece of Mind (1983)

Singles from The Number of the Beast


1. 2.

"Run to the Hills"


Released: 12 February 1982

"The Number of the Beast"


Released: 26 April 1982

''The Number of the Beast'' The Number of the Beast is the third studio album by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The album was released on March 29, 1982 through EMI and on its sister label Capitol on the Harvest imprint in the US originally before it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia in the US. This was the debut of vocalist Bruce Dickinson in Iron Maiden. It has been cited as one of the most influential heavy metal albums of all time, and is widely acknowledged as one of the best and most iconic albums of the genre. The Number of the Beast also cemented Iron Maiden as one of "the biggest metal bands on the planet". Of all the songs in the album, "The Number of the Beast", "Run to the Hills" and "Hallowed Be Thy Name" remain on the set lists of nearly all of the band's concert tours, with the latter two often used to close a show. All three songs have been released as singles in various forms. The album is also Iron Maiden's highest selling album worldwide with over 14 million sales estimated. The Beast on the Road was the tour supporting the album.

102

History
The Number of the Beast marked Bruce Dickinson's debut with the band. Since this album (and its tour, Beast on the Road), "The Beast" has become something of a nickname for the band and possibly Eddie, as suggested by albums such as Best of the Beast (which featured a 'best of Eddie' mural on the cover), Beast over Hammersmith, and the DVD Visions of the Beast. This album is the only one to feature songwriting by drummer Clive Burr. This is one of several reasons why the album was so different from previous ones other than the obvious change in lead singer. It was the first album with writing by Adrian Smith (see below track listing for details), and the first to feature writing by the 'new' Steve Harris (his older style had been written for different musicians, and in a different time) - the entire writing system was different. However, it is one of the few albums not to feature a Dave Murray song, and the first album not to feature an instrumental.

Writing Credits
According to several interviews with Bruce Dickinson, he was very involved in the writing of some of the tracks on the album. Because of contractual issues with his previous band Samson, Dickinson couldn't be credited for the writing. Dickinson mentions in particular the tracks "Children of the Damned", "The Prisoner" and "Run to the Hills".[1]

Reception
Professional ratings Review scores
Source BBC Music Sputnikmusic Allmusic Rolling Stone Rating (favourable) [2] [3] [4]

It was widely panned by mainstream media upon its release, including Rolling Stone, who claimed that it "blusters along aimlessly, proving again that bad music is hell." [5]

''The Number of the Beast'' It was also panned by social conservatives, especially in America. Due to its title, Iron Maiden was called a "Satanic band" in the US. Their Beast on the Road tour was marred by boycotts and protests. However, it was well received by Iron Maiden fans and is considered to be one of their best albums. All Music Guide, in its official review of the album -written by Steve Huey-, stated: "The Number of the Beast is quite simply one of the best heavy metal albums ever released". The album was ranked number 17 on Guitar World's list of the 100 Greatest Guitar Albums of All Time.[6] In 2000 Q magazine placed the album at number 100 in its list of the 100 Greatest British Albums Ever, and a year later the same magazine named it as one of the 50 Heaviest Albums Of All Time.[7] In 2006, Q magazine placed the album at #40 in its list of "40 Best Albums of the '80s".[8] The BBC made a documentary of this album in their Classic Albums series. IGN named it the third greatest heavy metal album of all time.[9] Metal-Rules.com named this the second greatest heavy metal album of all time.[10] The album is also a part of EMI's "Albums That Shaped Rock History" series.

103

Album artwork
The album was also the centre of controversy, particularly in America, due to the lyrics of the title track and the cover art depicting Satan being controlled by Eddie. This cover art was originally intended for an earlier single, "Purgatory", but the band felt the cover was too high of caliber for just a single and a less complex image was used for the single instead. The title track, "Number of the Beast", was said not be a satanic song but was actually instead inspired by bass player Steve Harris's nightmare about being trapped in Hell, triggered after watching Damien: Omen II. The album's cover art has been parodied several times - by crossover thrash band Stormtroopers of Death for the cover art of their 1999 album Bigger Than the Devil, and on a T-shirt by underground New York Hip Hop Label Uncle Howie Records.[11] Streetwear brand Diamond Supply Co. parodied the album cover for a shirt in their line. Nick Tershay, founder of Diamond is reported as having had to pay $50,000 due to the parody being too close to the original art work. The original 1982 artwork includes a light blue sky in the background; this was a mistake by the printers of the album cover, and was later rectified and became black when the album was remastered for compact disc in 1998.

Lyrical themes
While the title track was thought by many to mean that Iron Maiden were Satanists, in fact the song was inspired by a nightmare bassist Steve Harris had, triggered by watching the film Damien: Omen II late at night. While he was quite scared of the Satanic images he saw in his nightmare, he also felt them amusing, and after that, he obtained the idea for the song, and also for the title of the album. "Children of the Damned" is based on the films Village of the Damned and Children of the Damned, which in turn were adapted from the novel The Midwich Cuckoos by John Wyndham. On a recent "Bruce Dickinson Rock Show" on BBC Radio 6, Dickinson told Ronnie James Dio that Children of the Damned was inspired by Black Sabbath's "Children of the Sea". "The Prisoner" was inspired by the British TV show of the same name, and features dialogue from its title sequence. Rod Smallwood had to telephone Patrick McGoohan to ask permission to use the dialogue for the song. According to witnesses the usually calm Smallwood was completely star struck during the conversation. McGoohan was reported to have said "What did you say the name was? Iron Maiden? Do it." Iron Maiden later made another song based on the series, "Back in the Village" from Powerslave. "22 Acacia Avenue" is the second song in the "Charlotte the Harlot" saga. The title track opens with a spoken introduction which draws heavily from the King James Version of Revelation 13:18, and is apparently inspired by Tam o' Shanter by Robert Burns. Barry Clayton is the name of the actor who

''The Number of the Beast'' speaks those opening lines on the album.

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Classic Albums
The making of the album was released as a video on December 4, 2001 through Eagle Visions, as part of the documentary series, Classic Albums. The video was directed by Tim Kirkby and featured cuts from the title track, "Children of the Damned", "Run to the Hills", and "The Prisoner". In addition, extended interviews and live footage of "Hallowed Be Thy Name" recorded during the band's performance at the Rock in Rio festival in 2001 were included. The video reached number 9 on the Norwegian DVD Charts,[12] and was certifed Gold by the Australian Recording Industry Association.[13] It was released in DVD, VHS and UMD formats, and featured subtitles in six different languages, Dutch, German, Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, and French.

Appearance in media

On October 24, 2002, progressive metal outfit Dream Theater played the original album in its entirety at La Mutualite in Paris, France. The performance was recorded and has been released through the band's YtseJam Records label.

The cover for DVD, Classic Albums: The Number of the Beast.

"Run To The Hills" was covered on the all-star tribute album Numbers From The Beast, featuring vocalist Robin McAuley, guitarists Michael Schenker and Pete Fletcher, bassist Tony Franklin, and drummer Brian Tichy. The version slightly varied from the original, in terms of guitars, when Schenker added small solos. "Children of the Damned" was covered by Sebastian Bach of Skid Row fame. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" & "The Number Of The Beast" was covered by Iced Earth on their album, Tribute To The Gods. Machine Head also covered it on the Maiden Heaven: A Tribute To Iron Maiden tribute album released by Kerrang! magazine in 2008. It was also covered by Cradle of Filth. The album has also been used in several video games - "Run To The Hills" is featured on SSX On Tour as the opening theme, and a cover version is a track in Rock Band in which it is the only song on the disk listed as an 'Impossible' song for all the instruments. In addition, the master tracks of the songs "The Number of the Beast", "Run to the Hills" and "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (the latter being a live recording found on Flight 666) were made downloadable to Rock Band as part of a 12 pack on June 8, 2009. In Guitar Hero III, the hit song "The Number of the Beast" was featured.

Reissues
The album was reissued in 1995 with bonus tracks, "Total Eclipse" and a live version of "Remember Tomorrow", which had been previously released as the b-sides of the album's two singles. The album reissue incorrectly includes Paul Di'Anno in the song-writing credits for "Total Eclipse", which had actually been written by Harris, Murray, and Burr. In addition, the liner notes claim this version of "Remember Tomorrow" was recorded live in Milan, Italy, during Bruce Dickinson's first performances with the band in 1981. However, it is the same recording included on Maiden Japan except that with Dickinson's vocals overdubbed over Di'Anno's original performance.[14] It was also released as an enhanced CD version in 1998 which included photos, band history and the music videos for the songs "The Number of the Beast" and "Run to the Hills".

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Track listing
Original track listing No. Title 1. "Invaders" 2. "Children of the Damned" 3. "The Prisoner" 4. "22 Acacia Avenue" Writer(s) Steve Harris Harris Adrian Smith, Harris Smith, Harris Length 3:24 4:35 6:03 6:36 4:50 3:54 3:49 7:11

5. "The Number of the Beast" Harris 6. "Run to the Hills" 7. "Gangland" 8. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" Harris Smith, Clive Burr Harris

1995 reissue bonus disc[I] No. Title 1. "Total Eclipse" 2. "Remember Tomorrow" (live) Writer(s) Harris, Dave Murray, Burr Paul Di'Anno, Harris Length 4:25 5:29

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson lead vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass, backing vocals Clive Burr drums, percussion Martin Birch producer, engineer Rod Smallwood manager Derek Riggs illustration Ross Halfin photography Denis O'Regan photography

Chart performance
The Number of the Beast was released on March 29, 1982, and quickly became a commercial success around the world.[15] It was the band's first effort to top the UK charts, and enter the Billboard 200at number 150, peaking at #33 and it went Gold. The album reached the top 10 in Austria and Sweden, and hit number 11 and 13 in Canada and Norway respectively. It was awarded platinum by the British Phonographic Industry (BPI), and received a gold certification by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA) on October 4, 1983. Although the album failed to chart in Germany, it was certified gold ten years later, and received a 3 platinum award in Canada for sales exceeding 300,000 units. Two songs were released as singles, "Run to the Hills" and the title track, which debuted in the United Kingdom at number 7their highest chart position at the time and number 18 respectively. Both songs entered the singles chart in Ireland in the same order at number 16 and 19.

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Album

Singles
Single "Run to the Hills" Chart (1982) UK Singles Chart Position 7 [16] [17] [16] [17]

Irish Singles Chart "The Number of the Beast" UK Singles Chart Irish Singles Chart

16 18 19

Country Austria Canada

Chart (1982) 3 Austria Top 40 Canadian Albums Chart

Position 3 [18] [19]

Certification 3 [20] Platinum Gold [21] Platinum Platinum [24] [26]

11

Germany Norway Sweden United Kingdom United States

Media Control Charts VG-lista Sverigetopplistan UK Albums Chart Billboard 200

13 7 1 [22]

[23] [16] [25]

33

References
Classic Albums: Iron Maiden - The Number of the Beast [27]. [DVD Documentary]. Eagle Visions. 2001-12-04. Retrieved 2008-12-27.
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] Living Legends Music Bio on Bruce Dickinson (http:/ / livinglegendsmusic. com/ library. php?personID=583) BBC Music Review (http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ music/ release/ gqw6/ ) Sputnikmusic Review (http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=221) Allmusic Review (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=A37d8vwdva92k) http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ artists/ ironmaiden/ albums/ album/ 142131/ review/ 6210063/ the_number_of_the_beast Guitar World (October 2006). Guitar World's 100 Greatest Guitar Albums of All Time (http:/ / rateyourmusic. com/ list/ Boggs1027/ guitar_worlds_100_greatest_guitar_albums_of_all_time). [7] Q magazine (July 2001). Q's 50 Heaviest Albums of All Time (http:/ / www. rocklistmusic. co. uk/ qlistspage2. html#50 Heaviest). pp. 86. [8] Q August 2006, Issue 241 [9] Spence D. and Ed T. "Top 25 Metal Albums" (http:/ / music. ign. com/ articles/ 755/ 755929p7. html). IGN. . Retrieved 2009-01-17. [10] "The Top 100 Heavy Metal Albums" (http:/ / metal-rules. com/ polls/ index. php?id=6). Metal-Rules.com. September 2003. . Retrieved 2009-01-17. [11] Non Phixion (https:/ / www. shopbenchmark. net/ site/ nonphixion) [12] "Iron Maiden - VG-lista" (http:/ / lista. vg. no/ artist_info. php?ArtistOp=show& artistId=446) (in Norwegian). VG Nett. Verdens Gang AS. . Retrieved 2008-11-27. [13] "ARIA Charts - Accreditations - 2007 DVD" (http:/ / www. aria. com. au/ pages/ httpwww. aria. com. aupagesARIACharts-Accreditations-2007DVD. htm). Australian Recording Industry Association. . Retrieved 2008-11-03. [14] http:/ / ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=single08_notb/ commentary08_notb& lang=eng& link=singles [15] Wall, Mick; Ling, Dave (2001). Iron Maiden, the Authorized Biography (2nd ed.). Sanctuary Publishing. p.228. ISBN1-86074-287-4. [16] "UK Top 40 Chart Archive, British Singles & Album Charts" (http:/ / www. everyhit. co. uk/ ). everyHit.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-06. [17] "Search the charts" (http:/ / www. irishcharts. ie/ search/ placement). The Irish Charts. IRMA. . Retrieved 3 October 2008. [18] "Discographie Iron Maiden" (http:/ / austriancharts. at/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden) (in German). austriancharts.at. . Retrieved 2008-07-06.

''The Number of the Beast''


[19] "Top 50 Albums" (http:/ / www. collectionscanada. gc. ca/ rpm/ 028020-119. 01-e. php?& file_num=nlc008388. 6528& volume=36& issue=15& issue_dt=May 22 1982& type=1& interval=24& PHPSESSID=v2a76h62to0aart05gg0u3agj2). RPM (Library and Archives Canada) 36 (15). 22 May 1982. . Retrieved 31 August 2008. [20] "CRIA Searchable Database" (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ cert_db_search. php). Canadian Recording Industry Association. . Retrieved 30 March 2008. [21] "Gold/Platin-Datenbank" (http:/ / www. musikindustrie. de/ gold_platin_datenbank/ ?action=1& strSuche=The+ Number+ of+ the+ Beast) (in German). Bundesverband Musikindustrie. . Retrieved 28 September 2008. [22] "Discography Iron Maiden" (http:/ / norwegiancharts. com/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden). norwegiancharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [23] "Discography Iron Maiden" (http:/ / swedishcharts. com/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden). swedishcharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [24] "Certified Awards - Iron Maiden: The Number of the Beast" (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ platinum/ platinumright. asp?rq=search_plat& r_id=30461). British Phonographic Industry. 2002-11-01. . Retrieved 2008-08-31. [25] "The Billboard 200 - The Number of the Beast" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ esearch/ chart_display. jsp?cfi=305& cfgn=Albums& cfn=The+ Billboard+ 200& ci=3000035& cdi=6002144& cid=11/ 05/ 1983). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. 1983-11-05. . Retrieved 2008-10-30. [26] "RIAA Searchable database Gold and Platinum" (http:/ / riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?resultpage=1& table=SEARCH_RESULTS& action=& title=& artist=Iron Maiden& format=& debutLP=& category=& sex=& releaseDate=& requestNo=& type=& level=& label=& company=& certificationDate=& awardDescription=& catalogNo=& aSex=& rec_id=& charField=& gold=& platinum=& multiPlat=& level2=& certDate=& album=& id=& after=& before=& startMonth=1& endMonth=1& startYear=1958& endYear=2008& sort=Artist& perPage=25). Recording Industry Association of America. . Retrieved 30 March 2008. [27] http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0409827/

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''Piece of Mind''

108

Piece of Mind
Piece of Mind

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released May 16, 1983

Recorded Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas, January - March 1983 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 45:50 EMI

Producer Martin Birch Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology The Number of the Beast (1982) Piece of Mind (1983) Powerslave (1984)

Singles from Piece of Mind


1. 2.

"Flight of Icarus"
Released: 11 April 1983

"The Trooper"
Released: 20 June 1983

Piece of Mind is the fourth studio album by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was originally released in 1983 (see 1983 in music) on EMI, and on Capitol in the US; it was reissued later on Sanctuary/Columbia Records. It was the first album to feature drummer Nicko McBrain, who had recently left the Paris-based band Trust. The album ranked 21 on IGN's list of the top 25 metal albums.[2] In 1983, Kerrang! magazine published a poll of the greatest metal albums of all time, with Piece Of Mind ranking number 1, and with The Number of the Beast at number 2.[3] [4] Along with Iron Maiden's follow up studio album Powerslave, Piece of Mind is the band's second highest selling albums, with estimated sales in excess of 13.5 million worldwide. In 1989, Steve Harris announced that Piece Of Mind was the 'best studio album' Iron Maiden had recorded[5] . Until 2000's Brave New World[6] , this album was Bruce Dickinson's favorite album.

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Background
Lyrically, the album reflected the group's interest in books and film. For example, To Tame a Land is based on Frank Herbert's science fiction novel Dune. The Trooper is inspired by Tennyson's Charge of the Light Brigade. Still Life is inspired by fantasy/horror writer Clark Ashton Smith's pre-World War II short story Genius Loci. Other inspirations include Where Eagles Dare, a film by Brian G. Hutton, and screenplay & novel by Alistair MacLean; Quest for Fire, based on the film by Jean-Jacques Annaud; the writer G. K. Chesterton who is quoted at the beginning of Revelations, and Sun and Steel, based on Japanese writer Mishima's eponymous essay about samurai legend Miyamoto Musashi. More exotic influences include Greek mythology, albeit slightly altered for Flight of Icarus. Aleister Crowley influenced a good piece of the remaining lyrics of Revelations, which was written by Dickinson. This is the first of four Iron Maiden albums that were not named after a song featured on the album itself (though the words "peace of mind" appear prominently in the album's sixth song, Still Life). In its earliest phase the album was named Food for Thought but was changed so it would suit the artwork more. The name of the last track was meant to be titled Dune, but Frank Herbert, who disliked heavy rock bands, denied permission to use his book's name and thus a new name had to be chosen. Included in the liner notes is a slightly altered version of a passage from the Book of Revelation. As printed in the liner notes, it reads: And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more Death. Neither sorrow, nor crying. Neither shall there be any more brain; for the former things are passed away. The actual text (from Chapter 21, Verse 4) is nearly identical, except that it says "neither shall there be any more pain..." . This change could be seen as a reference to the album's name, or the removal of Eddie's brain on the cover, or to drummer Nicko McBrain's inception into the band for this album. World Piece Tour was the tour supporting the album.

Hidden message
At the beginning of the sixth track, Still Life, the band included a hidden message which could only be understood by playing the album backwards. This was a joke and an intended swing back at the critics who had accused Maiden of being satanic. The backwards-message features Nicko McBrain mimicking Idi Amin (or rather mimicking John Bird mimicking Idi Amin) uttering the following phrase "What ho said the t'ing with the three "bonce", do not meddle with things you don't understand...", followed by a belch. The phrase itself is taken from the satirical album The Collected Broadcasts of Idi Amin by Bird and Alan Coren. "What ho" and "What ho said the t'ing" are phrases that also crop up regularly on McBrain's "Listen With Nicko!" tracks from the First Ten Years collection.

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Where Eagles Dare" 2. "Revelations" 3. "Flight of Icarus" Writer(s) Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Dickinson, Adrian Smith Length 6:10 6:48 3:51

4. "Die With Your Boots On" Dickinson, Smith, Harris 5. "The Trooper" 6. "Still Life" 7. "Quest for Fire" 8. "Sun and Steel" Harris Dave Murray, Harris Harris Dickinson, Smith

5:28 4:15 4:53 3:41 3:26

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110
9. "To Tame a Land" Harris 7:27

1995 reissue bonus CD No. Title 10. "I Got the Fire" (Montrose cover) Writer(s) Ronnie Montrose Length 3:53 3:55

11. "Cross-Eyed Mary" (Jethro Tull cover) Ian Anderson

Cover versions
Two songs were covered for the 2008 tribute album Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden; The Trooper by Coheed and Cambria and To Tame a Land by Dream Theater.

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1983 UK Albums Chart U.S. Pop Albums U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 3 14 70 [7]

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart U.S. Mainstream Rock Tracks "The Trooper" UK Singles Chart U.S. Mainstream Rock Tracks 1990 "Flight of Icarus" UK Singles Chart Position 11 8 12 28 7 "The First Ten Years" "Death on the Road" Album "Piece of Mind"

1983 "Flight of Icarus"

2005 "The Trooper" (live) Canadian Singles Chart Greece Spain Sweden Switzerland

5 9 1 5 61

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Certifications
Country Certification US UK Canada 1x Platinum 1x Platinum [8] [9] Sales/shipments Year 1,000,000+ 300,000+ 200,000+ 1986 1995 2006

2x [10] Platinum

Germany Gold Finland Spain Gold Gold

250,000+ 25,000+ 50,000+

1996 1990 1983

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:sxcm968o3ep5 IGN: Top 25 Metal Albums (http:/ / music. ign. com/ articles/ 755/ 755929p2. html) http:/ / www. rocknworld. com/ legends/ im/ index. shtml http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwalbums http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=pyCXHC37kt0 (at the 4.10 min mark) "Maiden's Back, With Familiar Voice" (http:/ / books. google. com. br/ books?id=8A4EAAAAMBAJ& pg=PA12#v=onepage& q=& f=false). Billboard 112 (17): 12. 2000-04-22. . Retrieved 2010-04-15. [7] "Piece of Miind" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ charts/ billboard-200#/ album/ iron-maiden/ piece-of-mind/ 9073). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc.. . Retrieved 2009-08-01. [8] "RIAA Gold & Platinum database-Piece of Mind" (http:/ / www. riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?resultpage=1& table=SEARCH_RESULTS& action=& title=piece of mind& artist=iron maiden& format=& debutLP=& category=& sex=& releaseDate=& requestNo=& type=& level=& label=& company=& certificationDate=& awardDescription=& catalogNo=& aSex=& rec_id=& charField=& gold=& platinum=& multiPlat=& level2=& certDate=& album=& id=& after=& before=& startMonth=1& endMonth=1& startYear=1958& endYear=2009& sort=Artist& perPage=25). . Retrieved February 23, 2009. [9] "BPI sales certifications-Piece of Mind" (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ platinum/ platinumright. asp?rq=search_plat& r_id=18830). . Retrieved February 23, 2009. [10] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007.

''Powerslave''

112

Powerslave
Powerslave

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released 3 September, 1984

Recorded Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas, 1983July 1984 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 50:57 EMI

Producer Martin Birch Professional reviews


Allmusic link [2] Sputnikmusic link [3] Metalunderground.com link [4] Metal Storm (10.0/10.0) link Iron Maiden chronology Piece of Mind (1983) Powerslave (1984) Live After Death (1985)

[1]

Singles from Powerslave


1. 2.

"2 Minutes to Midnight"


Released: 6 August 1984

"Aces High"
Released: 22 October 1984

Powerslave is the fifth studio album by the English heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on September 2, 1984 on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). It is notable for its Egyptian theme displayed in the album art, as well in the title track's musical style. It contains a musical re-telling of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's "Rime of the Ancient Mariner", which uses pieces of the original poem as lyrics. Furthermore, it is the longest song Iron Maiden have ever recorded, at a length of 13 minutes and 34 seconds. The album is also notable amongst the band's albums as being the first to feature the same lineup as the previous one. As of 2010, this is the last of the band's albums to contain an instrumental track: "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)."

''Powerslave'' "2 Minutes to Midnight" and "Aces High" were released as singles, the former being a staple in nearly all of the band's concert tours. World Slavery Tour was the tour supporting the album. The lyrics to "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" are mainly influenced from Samuel Taylor Coleridge's poem of the same name, and directly quote two passages from the poem, the former including the famous lines of 'Water, water everywhere - nor any drop to drink'.[5] The song can be divided into three phases, the first subscribing to the quintessential 'galloping' metal, the second (around 5 minutes in) being simple and quiet yet dark, and the final stage returning to an upbeat instrumental, and lastly repeating the initial tune. Often played in set lists from its release, the "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" is a very popular and highly-regarded song from the band.[6] During the 'Somewhere Back In Time World Tour', Dave Murray, Bruce Dickinson and Steve Harris cited the song as their favourite to play.[7]

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Background
According to Iron Maiden's DVD Live After Death, the recording of the album took place in the Bahamas in 1984, in the same way its predecessor, Piece Of Mind, was in early 1983. After weeks of drinking and partying on the island, which singer Bruce Dickinson recalls in the video of consisting of 'lethal' Banana Daiquiris[8] , the band set about recording the songs. Steve Harris recalled how, under time pressure, the song 'Rime Of the Ancient Mariner' was written in a short period of time. The video to '2 Minutes to Midnight' was apparently filmed close to where Bruce lived as a student, and illustrated the rate at which computers in the '80s were taking over the world. Once finished, the band began the infamous 'World Slavery Tour', beginning in Europe and ending in California, USA in late 1985. It was the first time a heavy metal band had taken a full set behind the Iron Curtain into Poland, a landmark achievement at the time. The tour continued into South America for the first time where they play to an estimated audience of 300,000 fans at the inaugural Rock In Rio as special guests to the band Queen. The 'Live After Death' album and video, recorded over 4 gigs at Long Beach Arena in LA, are released and respectively go to Nos. 2 and 1 in the UK charts. In total, the tour was 11 months long and touched 26 countries. Powerslave debuted at No. 2 in the UK charts, as a result of their record companies (EMI)'s very first 'Now....That's What l Call Music' pop compilation. According to both Nicko McBrain and Adrian Smith, 'Powerslave' began making Iron Maiden famous 'very fast, very quickly'[9] , as, in South America, hundreds of fans waited outside hotels and restaurants for the band.

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Aces High" 2. "2 Minutes to Midnight" Writer(s) Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith Length 4:32 6:04 4:15 4:06 6:07 5:03 7:12 13:37

3. "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" (Instrumental) Harris 4. "Flash of the Blade" 5. "The Duellists" 6. "Back in the Village" 7. "Powerslave" 8. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" Dickinson Harris Dickinson, Smith Dickinson Harris

On the 1998 re-release, due to a misplaced track mark, the intro to the title track "Powerslave" was added to the end of the previous track, "Back in the Village", making the former track five minutes and twenty seconds long, and the latter track six minutes and forty-eight seconds long.

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Bonus disc (1995 reissue) No. Title Writer(s) Length 4:57 6:42 4:53

1. "Rainbow's Gold" (Beckett cover) Terry Slesser, Kenny Mountain 2. "Mission From 'Arry" 3. "King of Twilight" (Nektar cover) 4. "The Number of the Beast" (live) Harris, Nicko McBrain Nektar

Harris

4:57

Subsequent releases
The 1995 re-release contains a bonus disc, which contains the b-sides of the original singles. It was re-released in 1998 with an extra multimedia section, which featured the music videos for "Aces High" and "2 Minutes to Midnight". The tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden, released by Kerrang! magazine, features covers of two songs from this album: "2 Minutes to Midnight" by Glamour Of The Kill and "Flash of the Blade" by Avenged Sevenfold.[10] The title track, "2 Minutes to Midnight", and a live version of "Aces High" are available as downloads for the Rock Band video game as of June 9, 2009. Children of Bodom and Arch Enemy have covered the song "Aces High".

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson lead vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

with Martin Birch - producer, engineer Frank Gibson assistant engineer George Marino mastering Simon Heyworth remastering Derek Riggs artwork, design, sleeve design, sleeve idea, sleeve illustration Rod Smallwood design, sleeve design, sleeve idea Ross Halfin photography Moshe Brakha photography

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Additional notes
Catalogue (1984 LP) EMI 1-12321, (1984 CD) Capitol C2-46045, (1998 CD) EMI 96920

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1984 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 2 21

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart U.S. Mainstream Rock Tracks UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart Position 11 25 20 11 "The First Ten Years" Album "Powerslave"

1984 "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Aces High" 1990 "2 Minutes to Midnight"

Certifications
Country Canada Certification 2 [11] Platinum Gold [12] Sales/shipments 200,000+

Germany

100,000+ 100,000+ 1,000,000+

United Kingdom Gold[13] United States Platinum [14]

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:myez9757krrt http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=199 http:/ / www. metalunderground. com/ reviews/ details. cfm?releaseid=2339 http:/ / www. metalstorm. net/ pub/ review. php?review_id=244 "Rime Of the Ancient Mariner" (http:/ / www. lyricsfreak. com/ i/ iron+ maiden/ rime+ of+ the+ ancient+ mariner_20068045. html). Lyrics Freak. . Retrieved 13 August 2009. [6] Miller, John J. (15 September 2004). "Powerslave!" (http:/ / www. nationalreview. com/ miller/ miller200409150615. asp). National Review Online. . Retrieved 2009-08-13. [7] Scot McFadyen, Sam Dunn (directors). (2009). Iron Maiden: Flight 666. [documentary]. EMI. [8] 'Live After Death' - History Of Iron Maiden Part 2 [9] 'Live After Death' - History Of Iron Maiden Part 2 [10] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html) [11] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007. [12] IFPI Germany database (http:/ / www. musikindustrie. de/ gold_platin_datenbank/ ?action=1& strSuche=Powerslave). Retrieved December 29, 2008.

''Powerslave''
[13] BPI certification database (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ ). Retrieved December 29, 2008. [14] RIAA searchable database (http:/ / riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?table=SEARCH_RESULTS). Retrieved December 29, 2008.

116

Somewhere in Time
Somewhere In Time

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released 29 September 1986

Recorded Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas and Wisseloord Studios, Hilversum, Netherlands, 1986 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 51:24 EMI

Producer Martin Birch Professional reviews


Allmusic Sputnikmusic

link [2] link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Live After Death (1985) Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988)

Singles from Somewhere in Time


1. 2.

"Wasted Years"
Released: 6 September 1986

"Stranger in a Strange Land"


Released: 22 November 1986

Somewhere in Time is the sixth studio album by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on 29 September 1986 on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). The studio follow-up to the hugely successful Powerslave/Live After Death pair, it was the first Iron Maiden album to feature guitar synthesizers. Bruce Dickinson's song material was refused in favour of the songs of guitarist Adrian Smith, who wrote the bulk of the songs identified with the album (including the singles "Wasted Years" and "Stranger in a Strange Land"). While many of the songs from Somewhere in Time have all but disappeared (and some like, "The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner" being only played once) from the band's live shows over the years, "Wasted Years" and

''Somewhere in Time'' "Heaven Can Wait" have been consistent mainstays of the band's live setlist. Performances of "Heaven Can Wait" have featured a group of local fans and celebrities invited onstage to sing along during the song's middle section. The album also marked a change for Iron Maiden, as it was their first album to introduce synth, although this style was expanded upon in their next album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. This is also their first studio album not to be released a year after their previous one. The band has never released a studio album a year after the previous again as of 2010. The band began to put more time into writing and recording their albums as well as touring for an extensive time after the release of Powerslave. The 2008 tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine features covers of two songs from this album: "Wasted Years" by Devildriver and "Caught Somewhere in Time" by Madina Lake.[3] Somewhere On Tour was the tour supporting the album.

117

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Caught Somewhere in Time" 2. "Wasted Years" 3. "Sea of Madness" 4. "Heaven Can Wait" Writer(s) Steve Harris Adrian Smith Smith Harris Length 7:26 5:08 5:42 7:21 6:31 5:44 4:56

5. "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" Harris 6. "Stranger in a Strange Land" 7. "Dj Vu" Smith Dave Murray, Harris Harris

8. "Alexander the Great"

8:36

1995 reissue bonus CD No. Title 1. "Reach Out" 2. "Juanita" (Originally by Marshall Fury) Writer(s) Dave Colwell Steve Barnacle, Derek O'Neil Length 3:31 3:47 3:35 5:07

3. "Sheriff of Huddersfield" (Based on an old Urchin song called "Life in the City") Iron Maiden 4. "That Girl" Merv Goldsworthy, Pete Jupp, Andy Barnett

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar, guitar synth Adrian Smith guitar, guitar synth, backing vocals, lead vocals on "Reach Out" Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals, bass synth Nicko McBrain drums

''Somewhere in Time''

118

Production
Martin Birch producer, engineer, mixing, tape operator Albert Boekholt engineer, assistant engineer Ronald Prent engineer, assistant engineer

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1986 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 3 11

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart Position 18 Album "Somewhere in Time"

1986 "Wasted Years"

"Stranger in a Strange Land" UK Singles Chart 1990 "Wasted Years" UK Singles Chart

22

"Somewhere in Time"

"The First Ten Years"

Album cover trivia


The cover for Somewhere in Time displays a cyborg-enhanced Eddie in a futuristic, Blade Runner-type environment. Much like the visual richness of the cover of Powerslave, the wrap-around album cover holds a plethora of references to earlier Iron Maiden albums and songs. The cover was originally created for use as the cover to the authorized biography of the band, Running Free by Garry Bushell and Ross Halfin and therefore made many references such as: The street sign on the corner where Eddie is standing says Acacia (partially obscured), a reference to the song 22 Acacia Avenue from The Number of the Beast album Below "Acacia" is a poster of Eddie from the first album. The torn poster below "Acacia" is the one that appears on the Sanctuary and Women in Uniform singles. Eddie appearing in a similar posture as on the Killers album cover. His victim is killed with a futuristic weapon, as opposed to the axe seen on the Killers cover. While this is undoubtly a reference with the cover of Killers, there is also a significant reference with the cover of the album "Nightflight" (1981) of the band Budgie. On it stands a birdman holding almost the same futuristic weapon and posing as Eddie. Also a futuristic aircraft in the background is not missing. This is no coincidense because that album cover was also drawn by Derek Riggs. It is known that Budgie had its influences on Iron Maiden, were Iron Maiden at least covered one of Budgie's songs "I cant see my feelings", on their "From Here To Eternity" Single. A banner with the words, "This is a very boring painting" is displayed backwards within the lobby of the Bradbury Towers Hotels International. This can be seen to the left of Eddie's right leg. In the very center, just above the "Department" ad and behind the cable going to the cyborg's weapon, there is a small vertical ad with red glyphs. The text of this ad is Russian, it is " ", [Menya Rvyot] - "I'm vomiting", which also literally translates as "It's tearing me up", depending on the context.

''Somewhere in Time'' An Eye of Horus neon sign at the top of a building, a reference to the song "Powerslave". Below Eddie, there is a model in the department store window. Some fans believe this is former Maiden singer, Paul Di'Anno. On the bridge separating the two buildings is a digital clock that says: 23:58. This refers to Iron Maiden's song "2 Minutes to Midnight" Under Eddie's left leg there is a trash can attached to a post. This is the same trash can that can be seen attached to a lamppost in the background on the cover of the album Iron Maiden. References on the back include: A clock reading 23:58 ("2 Minutes to Midnight"). Below the clock there is a sign that reads "Phantom Opera House" in reference to the song "Phantom of the Opera" from the first Iron Maiden album. Just below the "Phantom Opera House", a writing in very small characters says "Bollocks again & again". This is one of illustrator Derek Riggs' in-jokes, as the word "Bollocks" was hidden in a similar fashion on his previous album cover for Iron Maiden, Powerslave. On the left side, the "Aces High Bar" ("Aces High" song). Above the "Aces High Bar", flies a Spitfire-shaped plane. (Spitfires are referenced in "Aces High") Just below the "Aces High Bar" sign, there is a neon sign representing a plane, apparently in battle, formed by two glasses of stemware. To the left of the "Aces High Bar", there are four letters in yellow and green. These are Hebrew letters spelling out the name of God, namely ,Jehovah/Yahweh (really it is not read, as it is not known exactly how, and, usually, the word ,Adonai - the Lord, is pronounced on its place in Jewish religious practices). Below the "Aces High Bar", is a sign that says "Sand Dune" ("To Tame A Land" song, based on a novel "Dune"). Pyramids in the background (Powerslave cover, also another reference to Blade Runner). Among the pyramids, a grim reaper. (Similar to the grim reaper that appears on the cover of "The Trooper"). The marquee for the Movie Theater reads Blade Runner, the film which is the obvious inspiration for the futuristic scene. It also reads "Live After Death", the name of the live album released in 1985. The cinema is named "Phillip K. Dick Cinema", named after the author of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the book on which the movie Blade Runner was based. More Blade Runner references include "Dekkers Department Stores" and a "Tyrell Corp" sign. In the background can be seen "Bradbury Towers" (a likely reference to the Blade Runner prominent Bradbury Building) and The Million Dollar Movie Theater, both located in Los Angeles. It could also be a reference to science fiction author Ray Bradbury To the right of the clock is a neon sign that reads "Ancient Mariner Seafood Restaurant", a reference to the song "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" from the Powerslave album. On the bottom left hand side of the cover is "The Ruskin Arms", famous for being one of the first venues performed at by Iron Maiden. On the second floor of the "Ruskin Arms" building is a woman sitting in a red lit room which is a reference to "Charlotte", a repeated theme in Iron Maiden songs. Just above "The Ruskin Arms", there is a neon sign that reads "RAINBOW", another famous venue for Iron Maiden. Above and to the left of the "Rainbow" sign is a neon sign reading "L'AMOURS Beer Gardens", a reference to the "L'Amours" rock venue Iron Maiden once played in Brooklyn, New York. On the roof of the same building is a police telephone box; this is likely a reference to the time-traveling TARDIS of the BBC TV series Doctor Who. The TARDIS is featured on the cover of the Maiden single "Wasted Years". Above the Bradbury Towers neon sign is Icarus in flames falling from the sky, in the same style of the cover for the band's 1983 single "Flight of Icarus". It also bears a resemblance to the logo for Swan Song Records, a label founded by Led Zeppelin.

119

''Somewhere in Time'' On the walkway above the clock is an electronic sign that says "LATEST RESULTS.......WEST HAM 7........ARSENAL 3", a nod to bass guitarist Steve Harris who is a West Ham supporter, a team known as the "Hammers". At the right edge below, just near the band, there is another Russian ad - , "KEFIR", which means "yoghurt". Just above the Russian ad for "KEFIR" there is the street sign for "Upton Park" - this is where West Ham United F.C. play their home games. In the band group, Bruce Dickinson is carrying a brain, the main symbol from the Piece of Mind album. There is a sign that says Gypsy's Kiss which was the first band Steve Harris ever played with. On the right side, above "Bradbury Towers" sign, there is a Japanese ad " ." This refers to a notable Japanese philosopher, economist and critic, Akira Asada. Right of the pyramids there is a sign where "Long Beach Arena" is written. The Live After Death album was mostly recorded at Long Beach Arena. The neon sign above the band reads "Maggies Revenge" and refers to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, and also references the cover of the Sanctuary and Women in Uniform singles. One of the buildings is labeled "Asimov Foundation", a reference to the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov. A character wearing a large cloak stands above the walkway's right side. He has been identified as Batman by The Iron Maiden FAQ [4], but is actually more reminiscent of Erik, the Phantom of the Opera - another reference to the Iron Maiden song inspired by the character. The cat from Live After Death is on the sidewalk, behind Eddie. Just below the cloaked character and just above the "Latest Results" is the bracket that held Eddie's skull together from the "Piece of Mind" album on, including this album. The windows of the Ruskin Arms Hotel, at the far left, are similar to those on the cover of Killers. In the top left hand corner, in the sky just behind the clouds, is a spaceship. This could be a reference to Steve Harris's favourite band UFO. Derek Riggs' artistic signature symbol can be found on Eddie's chest. In the bottom right hand corner all five members of the band are standing in a line. Bruce Dickinson is holding a brain, a reference to Piece of Mind, and Nicko is wearing aviator goggles (he had a pilot's license by this time, long before Bruce Dickinson) and a t-shirt that says "Iron What?". Dave Murray's t-shirt says "Irons 1". To the right of the "Long Beach Arena" sign, there is a sign that says "Hammerjacks", a night club and concert hall in Baltimore, MD, frequented by the band. The night club closed in 1994; the concert hall is still open however. Below the Hammerjacks sign, there is a sign that says "Tehe's Bar", which is where the choir vocals in the middle of "Heaven Can Wait" were recorded. To the left of the clock is a sign that says "Herbert Ails" a reference to author Frank Herbert who wouldn't let the band use the title of his book "Dune" as a song title. To the left of the Hammerjacks sign, there is a sign that says "TEXAS RECORDS AND TAPES". The band have stated several times that some of their favourite American venues to play are in Texas. Beneath the Phantom Opera House sign, there is a sign that reads "EMI REC.". Iron Maiden's international records have all been released on the EMI label.

120

''Somewhere in Time''

121

Ed Hunter
In the Iron Maiden computer game Ed Hunter, one of the levels has the player walk through the scene depicted on the Somewhere In Time album cover while eliminating enemies.

Additional notes
Catalogue: (LP) Capitol 12524, (CD) Capitol C2-46341

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:sxcm963o3ep5~T0 http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=220 Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html) http:/ / www. faqs. org/ faqs/ music/ iron-maiden-faq/

''Seventh Son of a Seventh Son''

122

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son


Seventh Son of a Seventh Son

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released 11 April 1988

Recorded Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany, during 1987 - March 1988 Genre Length Label Heavy Metal, Progressive metal 43:50 EMI

Producer Martin Birch Professional reviews


Allmusic Kerrang! Sputnikmusic -

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[1] [2]

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Iron Maiden chronology Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) No Prayer for the Dying (1990)

Singles from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son


1. 2. 3. 4.

"Can I Play with Madness"


Released: 20 March 1988

"The Evil That Men Do"


Released: 1 August 1988

"The Clairvoyant"
Released: 7 November 1988

"Infinite Dreams (live)"


Released: 6 November 1989

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son is a concept album by heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released in 1988 as the band's seventh studio album on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). It is the first Iron Maiden album ever to have keyboards wich is played by Michael Kenney. Along with The Number of the Beast and later Fear of the Dark the album charted no.1 on the UK charts.

''Seventh Son of a Seventh Son''

123

History
Seventh Son of a Seventh Son was the last Iron Maiden album to feature guitarist Adrian Smith until the album Brave New World in 2000 (he did write a song that Bruce Dickinson finished for the next album, No Prayer for the Dying, titled "Hooks in You", a loose tie-in to the Charlotte the Harlot saga). "The Clairvoyant" was the first song written for the album. According to Steve Harris, the song's lyrics were inspired by the death of psychic Doris Stokes, saying "if she were really clairvoyant, if she were really able to see the future, wouldn't she have been able to forsee her own death?" At least five of the album's songs ("Moonchild", "Infinite Dreams", "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son", "The Prophecy" and "The Clairvoyant") can be directly related to a main lyrical storyline inspired by the folklore concept. Lyrically, the album centers around some main philosophical ideas: good vs. evil, mysticism, prophetic vision, reincarnation and afterlife. Almost all the album includes direct or indirect references to questions regarding to these concepts and poetically refers the answers. Stylistically, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son develops the sounds first heard on Somewhere in Time (1986), and continues the band's lyrical exploration of topics related to mysticism, power, and the occult. The album debuted at #1 in UK charts (their only since The Number of the Beast) as well as #12 in the U.S, while the singles "Can I Play with Madness", "The Evil That Men Do", "The Clairvoyant (live)" and "Infinite Dreams (live)" reached #3, #5, #6 and #6 positions, respectively. Of all the songs in the album, "The Evil That Men Do", "The Clairvoyant" and "Can I Play with Madness" remained on the set lists of nearly all of the band's concert tours subsequently following the 7th Tour of a 7th Tour.

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Moonchild" 2. "Infinite Dreams" 3. "Can I Play with Madness" 4. "The Evil That Men Do" Writer(s) Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith Steve Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris Length 5:39 6:09 3:31 4:34 9:53 5:05 4:27 4:42

5. "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" Harris 6. "The Prophecy" 7. "The Clairvoyant" 8. "Only the Good Die Young" Dave Murray, Harris Harris Dickinson, Harris

1995 Reissue Bonus CD No. Title 1. "Black Bart Blues" 2. "Massacre" 3. "Prowler 88" 4. "Charlotte the Harlot 88" 5. "Infinite Dreams" (live) 6. "The Clairvoyant" (live) 7. "The Prisoner" (live) Writer(s) Dickinson, Harris Brian Downey, Phil Lynott, Scott Gorham Harris Murray Length 6:41 2:53 4:07 4:11

Harris Harris Smith, Harris

6:03 4:27 6:09

''Seventh Son of a Seventh Son''

124
Paul Di'Anno, Harris Murray, Harris 5:03 4:38

8. "Killers" (live) 9. "Still Life" (live)

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals, guitar synth Steve Harris - bass, keyboards, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums, percussion

with Michael Kenney - additional keyboards

Production
Martin Birch producer, engineer, mixing, tape operator Albert Boekholt engineer, assistant engineer Ronald Prent engineer, assistant engineer George Marino mastering engineer

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1988 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 1 12

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart Sweden "The Clairvoyant" UK Singles Chart Position 3 Album "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son"

1988 "Can I Play With Madness" "The Evil That Men Do"

"The Clairvoyant"

1989 "Infinite Dreams"

1990 "Can I Play With Madness"

10

"The First Ten Years"

12 11

''Seventh Son of a Seventh Son''

125

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:impzefrkhgf8 [2] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=2262

No Prayer for the Dying


No Prayer for the Dying

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 1 October, 1990 Barnyard Studios, Essex, England, June - September 1990 Heavy metal 44:25 EMI Martin Birch Professional reviews

Allmusic Sputnikmusic

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[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Fear of the Dark (1992)

Alternative cover

Remastered cover Singles from No Prayer for the Dying

''No Prayer for the Dying''

126

1. 2.

"Holy Smoke"
Released: 10 September 1990

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"


Released: 24 December 1990

No Prayer for the Dying is the eighth studio album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the first album recorded following the departure of guitarist Adrian Smith who left the band during the pre-production phase of the album. Smith does have one co-writing credit on this album, for "Hooks in You". The album ushered in a change of vocal style for Bruce Dickinson from the operatic sound of the '80s to a raspier way of singing. No Prayer for the Dying also produced Maiden's only number one single to date, "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter", originally written and recorded by Dickinson alone for the A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child movie soundtrack. The version that appears on No Prayer for the Dying was rerecorded by the band as a whole. "Holy Smoke" and "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" were released as singles, with the latter reaching the #1 position in the UK charts. The album was also the first to feature guitarist Janick Gers, replacing guitarist Adrian Smith. Gers had previously assisted Dickinson in the recording of his first solo-album, Tattooed Millionaire, and had also worked with Fish and Ian Gillan, among others. No Prayer for the Dying is the only Iron Maiden studio album to date without a song exceeding six minutes in length. The album was also the band's first for Epic Records in the US after the band left Capitol Records but remained with EMI for all territories outside the US. Despite promising initial U.S sales, the album did not sell as well as previous Iron Maiden albums, being the first not to turn Platinum in the U.S. Following Bruce Dickinson's departure from Iron Maiden in 1993, songs from No Prayer for the Dying have been largely ignored at live performances. Only "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" has survived in concerts since, but it was only included on a nightly basis in setlists from May-July 2003.

Album cover
No Prayer for the Dying was the first album not to feature a wrap-around cover since 1984's Powerslave. It also does not follow the continuity of previous album covers, as Eddie no longer exhibits his lobotomy or cyborg enhancements. It can be assumed that the character required a reboot in order to return him to his original look. The events depicted on this album could also be viewed as a prequel; considering the age of the lamp that the grave-digger holds in his right hand, it could be assumed that the events took place in either the late 19th Century or early 20th Century. Two versions of the cover exist. The original 1990 version has Eddie bursting from his grave and grabbing the grave-digger by the neck. The cover was altered for the 1998 re-release. In this version the grave-digger is absent. The original cover can still be seen on the disc's label, however. Additionally an inscription was added to the plaque on the tomb, which reads "After the Daylight, The Night of Pain, That is not Dead, Which Can Rise Again." The picture disc LP shows Eddie firing a weapon made of four machine guns (a reference to the album's opening track, "Tailgunner"). It has the original cover on side 2. No Prayer On The Road was the tour supporting the album.

''No Prayer for the Dying''

127

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Tailgunner" Writer(s) Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris Dickinson, Harris Harris Dickinson, Dave Murray Murray, Harris Harris Dickinson, Harris Dickinson, Adrian Smith Dickinson Harris Length 4:15

2. "Holy Smoke" 3. "No Prayer for the Dying" 4. "Public Enema Number One" 5. "Fates Warning" 6. "The Assassin" 7. "Run Silent Run Deep" 8. "Hooks in You" 9. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 10. "Mother Russia"

3:49 4:23 4:13 4:12 4:37 4:34 4:08 4:45 5:31

11. "Listen With Nicko! Part VI" (Hidden Track on US Version) Nicko McBrain

1995 Reissue Bonus CD No. Title 1. "All in Your Mind" (Stray cover) 2. "Kill Me Ce Soir" (Golden Earring cover) 3. "I'm a Mover" (Free cover) Writer(s) Del Bromham George Kooymans, Barry Hay, John Fenton Paul Rodgers, Andy Fraser Length 4:31 6:17 3:29 2:42

4. "Communication Breakdown" (Led Zeppelin cover) Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones, John Bonham

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney keyboards

''No Prayer for the Dying''

128

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1990 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 2 17

Singles
Year 1990 "Holy Smoke" Single Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart Position 3 Album "No Prayer for the Dying"

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:fyez9757krrt [2] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=3085

''Fear of the Dark''

129

Fear of the Dark


Fear of the Dark

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer May 11, 1992 1991 - April 1992 Heavy metal 58:29 EMI Martin Birch Professional reviews

Allmusic Sputnikmusic

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[1]

Iron Maiden chronology No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Fear of the Dark (1992) A Real Live One (1993)

Singles from Fear of the Dark


1. 2. 3. 4.

"Be Quick or Be Dead"


Released: 13 April 1992

"From Here to Eternity"


Released: 29 June 1992

"Wasting Love"
Released: September 1992

"Fear of the Dark (live)"


Released: 1 March 1993

Fear of the Dark is the ninth studio album released by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It topped the UK albums chart. Released on 11 May 1992, it was the final studio album to feature Bruce Dickinson as lead vocalist who left the band following the album's support tour to pursue a solo career. He was succeeded by Blaze Bayley, formerly of Wolfsbane, for two studio albums until Dickinson returned to Iron Maiden for the 2000 release of Brave New World.

''Fear of the Dark''

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History
The album cover of Fear of the Dark was the first Iron Maiden album cover not to be designed by artist Derek Riggs. In an interview with MTV, Bruce Dickinson said they had asked three different artists to design a cover, and they then picked the best one. Melvyn Grant's illustration was chosen over the one Riggs submitted. Melvyn Grant has since drawn two more album covers for Iron Maiden, and the cover for their single "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" makes him the second most-used artist for Eddie after Riggs. The album's musical style showed some experimentation with "Be Quick or Be Dead", a speed metal song released as the album's first single, and "Wasting Love", the group's sole power ballad. The Gulf War track "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" was the band's most political song since "2 Minutes to Midnight". The album featured first time songwriting credits for Janick Gers and featured more keyboard work than the previous album. Only two songs from the album, the title track, and "Afraid to Shoot Strangers", would survive on tours past 1993. "Fear of the Dark" became a popular live track and was the only song played on the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour not from the 1980s. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" became a frequent addition on setlists during Blaze Bayley's tenure with Iron Maiden. Both critics and fans saw the album as a stale offering from an increasingly tired band. Dickinson's commitment to the band was in question and the inclusion of a ballad left veteran fans disillusioned. Much mocked was Harris' "Weekend Warrior," which was viewed as an outdated view on 80's football hooliganism. The line "what you gonna do on Monday?" came in for much abuse. Metal Hammer criticised the lyrics on such tracks as 'The Apparition' and 'The Fugitive', but said the guitar solos redeemed the otherwise mediocre songs. "Be Quick or Be Dead," "From Here to Eternity," "Wasting Love," and a live version of the title track were released as singles. Fear Of The Dark Tour was the tour supporting the album.

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" 2. "From Here to Eternity" Writer(s) Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers Steve Harris Length 3:24 3:38 6:56 5:35 4:40 5:50 4:54 3:37 3:54 3:08 5:39 7:18

3. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" Harris 4. "Fear Is the Key" 5. "Childhood's End" 6. "Wasting Love" 7. "The Fugitive" 8. "Chains of Misery" 9. "The Apparition" 10. "Judas Be My Guide" 11. "Weekend Warrior" 12. "Fear of the Dark" Dickinson, Gers Harris Dickinson, Gers Harris Dickinson, Dave Murray Harris, Gers Dickinson, Murray Harris, Gers Harris

''Fear of the Dark''

131

1995 reissue bonus CD No. Title 1. "Nodding Donkey Blues" 2. "Space Station No. 5" (Montrose cover) Writer(s) Dickinson, Gers, Harris, Nicko McBrain Sammy Hagar, Ronnie Montrose Length 3:18 11:58 4:48 3:50 4:23 3:58 3:44

3. "Roll Over Vic Vella" (parody of Chuck Berry's "Roll over Beethoven") Chuck Berry 4. "I Can't See My Feelings" (Budgie cover) 5. "No Prayer for the Dying" (live) 6. "Public Enema Number One" (live) 7. "Hooks in You" (live) Tony Bourge, Burke Shelley Harris Dickinson, Murray Dickinson, Adrian Smith

"Space Station No. 5" Contains a hidden track entitled "Bayswatter Ain't a Bad Place To Be"

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney keyboards

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1992 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 1 12

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart Sweden "From Here to Eternity" UK Singles Chart 1993 "Fear of the Dark" (live) UK Singles Chart Position 2 Album "Fear of the Dark"

1992 "Be Quick or Be Dead"

15 21

"A Real Live One"

''Fear of the Dark''

132

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:crm8b5x4tsqh [2] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=1172

The X Factor
The X Factor

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released October 2, 1995

Recorded Barnyard Studios, Essex, England, About 1994 - August 1995 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 71:02 EMI

Producer Steve Harris and Nigel Green Professional reviews


Allmusic Kerrang! Sputnikmusic

link

[1] [2]

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Iron Maiden chronology Live at Donington (1993) The X Factor (1995) Best of the Beast (1996)

Singles from The X Factor


1. 2.

"Man on the Edge"


Released: 25 September 1995

"Lord of the Flies"


Released: April 1996

The X Factor is the tenth studio album by Iron Maiden, released in 1995. It is the band's first album to include Blaze Bayley, formerly of Wolfsbane, as vocalist, replacing Bruce Dickinson who left the band following their previous tour to pursue a solo career. The album title came about in the early part of the recording. According to producer Nigel Green: "We all felt that the way things were progressing - the songs, Blaze's new involvement, the sound, the commitment - the new album really would have that extra quality, that bit of magic, that X Factor. This

''The X Factor'' became the working title for the album and we liked it, so we kept it. It is also very apt as this is our tenth studio album and "X" can bring up many images." Supporting the album was the X Factour tour. Much like the tour for their following album, Virtual XI, it was cut short after Blaze suffered a violent allergic reaction to certain elements used on the stages where the band performed[3] . The X-Factor's cover art depicts the operation which left Eddie's head broken (first seen on the Piece of Mind album cover) and was created by Hugh Syme. In some releases, the cover was replaced with a less graphic alternative, showing Eddie from a distance, with the original artwork on the back of the booklet. The idea to bring Iron Maiden's longtime mascot Eddie into 'real form' came from band guitarist Dave Murray, up to that point having always been an animated caricature. This is the second album (Piece of Mind being the first) that did not have a title track on it, as well as the first album to not feature the album title in any of the song lyrics. This album is also unusual for the band in that it produced several band compositions that did not make it onto the album. "Justice of The Peace" and "Judgement Day" would turn up on the Best of the 'B' Sides collection and the Eddie's Archive box set, but "I Live My Way" would not. All three were released at the time of the album as B-sides. Though originally harshly criticized by many Iron Maiden fans for the difference in musical style than previous albums, the album has seen renewed interest in recent years. One possible reason is the rise in popularity of Blaze Bayley's solo project Blaze, which has gained popularity due to Blaze Bayleys curing of a throat allergy that impaired his singing live on the album.

133

Song details
"Man on the Edge" and "Lord of the Flies" were released as singles. Both of these songs, and "Sign of the Cross," remained in Maiden set lists following Bruce Dickinson's return. Live versions of these songs can be found on the single for "The Wicker Man" and the live albums Death on the Road and Rock in Rio respectively. "The Edge of Darkness" is based on Joseph Conrad's novella Heart of Darkness (which also spawned the 1979 movie, Apocalypse Now), "Man on the Edge" is based on the 1993 movie, Falling Down and Lord of the Flies is based on the novel of the same name. Sign of the Cross is based on a man suffering through the Spanish Inquisition and is Iron Maiden's second longest song at more than 11 minutes long, the longest being Rime of the Ancient Mariner at 13 minutes {See Powerslave} Live versions of "Blood on the World's Hands" and "The Aftermath" can be found in Best of the B'Sides compilation album. Though this is constantly debated, the album is loosely woven into a depressing theme of a soldier whose life had been ruined. This can be attributed to a rough patch Steve Harris was going through at the time and can be heard in the slow intros and depressing lyrics of many of the songs. {See 2 A.M and The Aftermath}

Track listing

''The X Factor''

134

No. Title 1. "Sign of the Cross" 2. "Lord of the Flies" 3. "Man on the Edge" 4. "Fortunes of War" 5. "Look for the Truth"

Writer(s) Harris Harris, Gers Bayley, Gers Harris Harris, Bayley, Gers Harris, Bayley, Gers Harris

Length 11:17 5:03 4:13 7:23 5:10

6. "The Aftermath"

6:20

7. "Judgement of Heaven"

5:12 5:57 6:39

8. "Blood on the World's Hands" Harris 9. "The Edge of Darkness" Harris, Bayley, Gers Harris, Bayley, Gers Harris, Gers

10. "2 A.M."

5:37

11. "The Unbeliever"

8:10

Credits
Blaze Bayley - vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney keyboards The Xpresion Choir - gregorian chant on "Sign of the Cross"

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:5sr67ul080jj [2] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=1198 [3] "The X Factour Commentary" (http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=tour10_xfactor/ tour10_xfactor& lang=eng& link=tours). . Retrieved 2009-03-15.

''Virtual XI''

135

Virtual XI
Virtual XI

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released March 23, 1998

Recorded Barnyard Studios, Essex, England, 1997 - February 1998 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 53:06 EMI

Producer Steve Harris, Nigel Green Professional reviews


Allmusic Sputnikmusic

link [2] link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Best of the Beast (1996) Virtual XI (1998) Ed Hunter (1999)

Singles from Virtual XI


1. 2.

"The Angel and the Gambler"


Released: 9 March 1998

"Futureal"
Released: 28 September 1998

Virtual XI (pronounced: Virtual Eleven) is the 11th studio album by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The album was released on March 23, 1998. It was the second and final Iron Maiden album recorded with vocalist Blaze Bayley. The album is slightly unusual in the Iron Maiden catalogue for its extensive keyboard use. For this album all the keyboard parts were performed by band founder/bassist Steve Harris whereas on previous albums the keyboard parts were handled by session musician Michael Kenney. The album also had a reduced song-writing input from Janick Gers compared to the previous Iron Maiden albums since he joined the band in 1990. The album cover and tour tied in with two extra-musical events: The band played football games alongside their tour (the album title relates in part to the eleven players on a football team), and the Iron Maiden videogame Ed Hunter provided much of the album art. This is the third album by Maiden that was not named after a song on the album (similarly to Piece of Mind and the previous album). The limited edition of the CD came with a lenticular cover. This is the first album to feature the

''Virtual XI'' modified logo. Just like the tour of The X Factor album, the tour for this album was cut short when Bayley suffered from an allergic reaction caused by certain elements used on the stage. As of April 2009 Virtual XI had sold 84,987 copies in the United States and more than 1,050,000 worldwide according to Billboard. It is the poorest selling album of the band's career.

136

Songs
The songs on the album vary greatly thematically. "Futureal" and "When Two Worlds Collide" both appear to hold futuristic themes, while relating to lyricist Blaze Bayley's accommodating to a different lifestyle after joining a major musical group; "The Angel and the Gambler" deals someone who won't be dissuaded from taking risks; "Lightning Strikes Twice" deals with not rejecting something just because it's improbable; "The Clansman" tells of the Scots' battle for independence in medieval Britain, with a "freedom!" chorus that echoes Braveheart; "The Educated Fool" deals with having the increased responsibility of maturity without having all the answers; "Don't Look to the Eyes of a Stranger" is inspired by Steve Harris's observation of the dangers of the world now that he's a parent; "Como Estais Amigos" is a tribute to the soldiers on both sides in the Falklands War[3] and marked the first and as of 2008 only time the closing track on an Iron Maiden album was not a Steve Harris composition. Many fans felt that tracks like "The Angel and the Gambler" and "Don't Look to the Eyes of a Stranger" were over-long, which was the basis of much of the criticism aimed at the album. For example, the chorus line in "The Angel and the Gambler" ("Don't you think I'm a saviour, don't you think I could save you, don't you think I could save your life?") is repeated 22 times. "The Angel and the Gambler" and "Futureal" were released as singles. After Bruce Dickinson came back to the band, Iron Maiden continued to play both "Futureal" and "The Clansman" in concert. While "Futureal" only was performed live in 1999, "The Clansman" would become a popular live track on all tours through 2003. Live versions of both songs with Dickinson on vocals can be found on "The Wicker Man" single and the Rock in Rio album, respectively. The track "The Clansman" has been sampled by singer Brandy in her song "I Tried".

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Futureal" 2. "The Angel and the Gambler" 3. "Lightning Strikes Twice" 4. "The Clansman" 5. "When Two Worlds Collide" 6. "The Educated Fool" Writer(s) Blaze Bayley, Steve Harris Harris Dave Murray, Harris Harris Bayley, Murray, Harris Harris Length 2:55 9:52 4:50 8:59 6:17 6:44 8:03 5:30

7. "Don't Look to the Eyes of a Stranger" Harris 8. "Como Estais Amigos" Bayley, Janick Gers

The song "Como Estais Amigos" was composed in Argentina by Blaze Bayley and Janick Gers (It is dedicated to those who fell during the conflict that involved the United Kingdom and Argentina over the control of the Falkland Islands) and is the first of two Iron Maiden Albums to have a song with a non-English title (the second being The Final Frontier song El Dorado), although covers of Marshall Fury's Juanita and Golden Earring's Kill Me Ce Soir were covered as B-Sides on Stranger in a Strange Land and Holy Smoke respectively, and as such feature in Eddie's Archive on Best of the 'B' Sides.

''Virtual XI''

137

Credits
Blaze Bayley - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Janick Gers - guitar Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals, keyboards Nicko McBrain - drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:iwfjzfgoeh7k~T1 [2] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=4255 [3] "Steve Harris Quote from Japanese liner notes" (http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ url=album11_vxi/ commentary11_vxi& lang=eng& link=albums#track8). . Retrieved 2007-03-23.

''Brave New World''

138

Brave New World


Brave New World

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label May 29, 2000
[1]

Summer 1999 - April 2000 Guillaume Tell Studios, Paris Heavy metal 66:57 EMI Sony (U.S.) Portrait Records (U.S.) Steve Harris and Kevin Shirley Professional reviews

Producer

Allmusic Kerrang! Sputnikmusic

link

[2] [3]

link

Iron Maiden chronology Ed Hunter (1999) Brave New World (2000) Rock in Rio (2002)

Singles from Brave New World


1. 2.

"The Wicker Man"


Released: April 2000

"Out of the Silent Planet"


Released: 23 October 2000

Brave New World is the twelfth studio album by Iron Maiden, released on 30 May 2000 (see 2000 in music). It marked the return of longtime lead singer Bruce Dickinson (who left in 1993) and guitarist Adrian Smith (who left in 1990) to the band. It was also the band's first studio recording with three guitar players, as Janick Gers stayed with the band after Smith's return. The album art and title song are references to the novel of the same name written by Aldous Huxley. The upper half of the album art was done by Derek Riggs, and is the last new artwork done by Riggs to be used on an Iron Maiden release. The bottom half was done by digital artist Steve Stone. Similarly, the line 'Brave new world' is repeated in

''Brave New World'' the pre-chorus in an earlier song by the band, "Stranger in a Strange Land", from Somewhere In Time. Vocalist Bruce Dickinson calls this his favorite album, replacing Piece of Mind. The songs "The Wicker Man" and "Out of the Silent Planet" were both released as singles. "The Wicker Man" was released in the U.S as a promo single with extra vocals in the chorus. Brave New World Tour was the tour supporting the album. During the tour, the show in Rock in Rio was released as a live album. Brave New World peaked at the seventh spot of the United Kingdom charts, and has since been certified Gold.[4] In the United States, it debuted at 39th of the Billboard 200,[5] and sold over 307,000 copies.[6]

139

Songs and composition


Most of the songs were written before The Ed Hunter Tour, and after that tour was finished were recorded in Paris. It was the first time the band recorded live at the studio.[7] "The Nomad", "Dream of Mirrors", and "The Mercenary" were originally written for Virtual XI, according to Adrian Smith in an interview. He said there was a fourth song, but he didn't know which one it was and that Steve Harris did not remember either. Apparently, former singer Blaze Bayley also co-wrote "Dream of Mirrors", but wasn't credited. Brave New World was the only song from the album played for the Dance of Death World Tour, the next tour supporting a studio release. No songs from the album were played during the 'A Matter of Life and Death Tour', but for the Final Frontier World Tour, whose setlist consists mostly of songs from post-reunion albums, 'The Wicker Man', 'Ghost of the Navigator', the title track, and 'Blood Brothers' have reappeared on the setlist. [8] This album also features hints of the progressive direction Iron Maiden will pursue in the future, with less emphasis on riff-driven music. The song "Brave New World" was covered in 2008 by Ghostlines on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine. [9] Two of the songs, "The Nomad" and "The Thin Line Between Love and Hate", were never played live . At the end of the song "The Thin Line Between Love and Hate", there's a recording of a small conversation at the studio. Nicko: "Awww, I fucking missed it" (referring to the cymbal he was supposed to hit at the end) Steve Harris (on the talkback microphone, laughing): "We'll keep that on tape." (laughter from the band) Steve: "Fucking missed it" (more laughter)

Track listing

''Brave New World''

140

No. Title 1. "The Wicker Man" 2. "Ghost of the Navigator" 3. "Brave New World" 4. "Blood Brothers" 5. "The Mercenary" 6. "Dream of Mirrors" 7. "The Fallen Angel" 8. "The Nomad" 9. "Out of the Silent Planet"

Writer(s) Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris Dickinson, Janick Gers, Harris Dickinson, Dave Murray, Harris Harris Gers, Harris Gers, Harris Smith, Harris Murray, Harris Dickinson, Gers, Harris

Length 4:35 6:50 6:18 7:14 4:42 9:21 4:00 9:06 6:25 8:26

10. "The Thin Line Between Love and Hate" Murray, Harris

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Janick Gers - guitar Steve Harris - bass, backing vocals, keyboards Nicko McBrain - drums

Production
Producers: Steve Harris, Kevin "Caveman" Shirley Engineers: Denis Caribaux, Kevin "Caveman" Shirley Mixing: Kevin "Caveman" Shirley Mastering: George Marino A&R: James Diener, John Kalodner Assistants: Nicholas Meyer, Rory Romano

Charts
Album
Year Chart Position 39 7 [5]

2000 Billboard 200 2000 UK Albums Chart

[10]

2000 Billboard Top Internet Albums 13

''Brave New World''

141

Singles
Year Single Chart Canadian Singles Chart Mainstream Rock [5] Tracks UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart Position 4 19

2000 "The Wicker Man" 2000 "The Wicker Man"

2000 "The Wicker Man" 2000 "Out of the Silent Planet"

9 20

Certifications
Country Brazil Canada Poland Sweden Certification Sales Gold Gold Gold Gold [11] [12] [13] [14] 50,000+ 50,000+ 35,000+ 20,000+ 100,000+

United Kingdom Gold[4]

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] Iron Maiden Official Website - Brave New World (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=22& p2_articleid=320) http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:5087gjur26ix http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=1857 BPI (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ certifiedawards/ search. aspx) "Artist Chart History - Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ retrieve_chart_history. do?model. chartFormatGroupName=Albums& model. vnuArtistId=4887& model. vnuAlbumId=792220). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [6] "Iron Men" (http:/ / books. google. com/ books?id=8hIEAAAAMBAJ& pg=PA51). Billboard 120 (20): 51. 2008-05-17. . Retrieved 2010-01-01. [7] "Maiden's Back, With Familiar Voice" (http:/ / books. google. com. br/ books?id=8A4EAAAAMBAJ& pg=PA12#v=onepage& q=& f=false). Billboard 112 (17): 12. 2000-04-22. . Retrieved 2010-01-01. [8] Blabbermouth.net - Interview with Adrian Smith (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=26808) [9] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html) [10] "UK Top 40 Chart Archive, British Singles & Album Charts" (http:/ / www. everyhit. co. uk/ ). everyHit.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-06. [11] ABPD (http:/ / www. abpd. org. br/ certificados_interna. asp?sArtista=Iron) [12] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007. [13] ZPAV gold certification list (http:/ / www. zpav. pl/ plyty. asp?page=zlote& lang=en). Retrieved December 29, 2008. [14] Swedish Album Chart (http:/ / www. sverigetopplistan. se/ )

''Dance of Death''

142

Dance of Death
Dance of Death

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released September 2, 2003 (Japan) September 8, 2003 (worldwide)

Recorded Sarm West Studios, London during November/December 2002 August 2003 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 67:59 EMI

Producer Steve Harris, Kevin Shirley Professional reviews


Allmusic link [2] Sputnikmusic link [3] PopMatters (favorable) link [4] BBC (favorable) link Iron Maiden chronology Rock in Rio (2002) Dance of Death (2003) The Essential Iron Maiden (2005)

[1]

Singles from Dance of Death


1. 2.

"Wildest Dreams"
Released: 1 September 2003

"Rainmaker"
Released: 24 November 2003

Dance of Death is Iron Maiden's thirteenth studio album, released first in Japan on September 2 and rest of the world on September 8, 2003. This album marks the first participation in songwriting by Nicko McBrain, who co-wrote the song "New Frontier" and also is the first (and so far only) time that all members of the band get a songwriting credit. It is sometimes mistakenly said that Steve Harris performed all the keyboard parts on the album because no credit is given to usual collaborator Michael Kenney, but this is actually due to an oversight in the printing of the album booklet (no instrument credits are given to any of the full band members either). The band's usual message in every album (a variation on the line "Up the Irons!") is absent too.

''Dance of Death'' The Dance of Death World Tour was the tour supporting the album. Dance of Death once again brought costumes to Maiden's stage show. During "Dance of Death," Bruce Dickinson would wear theatrical masks and a cape while moving around the stage; at the end he would dress as the Grim Reaper for the final chorus. During the song "Paschendale", Dickinson would sometimes wear a traditional British Infantryman suit as worn during World War I and act out his death onstage during the song. The title of the album refers to the late-medieval allegory on the universality of death: no matter one's station in life, the dance of death unites all. This philosophy is more commonly known as Danse Macabre.

143

Songs
The song "Montsgur" was inspired by Bruce Dickinson's holiday stay near Montsgur, the last stronghold of the Cathars conquered by the Albigensian Crusade in 1244. The lyrics include verse As we kill them all so God will know his own, referring to a well-known quote of the papal legate before the massacre of thousands in Bziers in 1209. It also mentions "Templar believers," as it is frequent popular belief today that there was some link between Knights Templar, Cathars and Montsgur. The song "Paschendale" is about The Battle of Passchendaele in the First World War. "Journeyman" is Iron Maiden's first fully acoustic song in over 20 years. According to Bruce Dickinson, before playing the song on the Death on the Road live album, the song is about "the whole process of song writing and being a musician," though the lyrics seem to be more focused on appreciating life while you have it. Other lyrical themes are current events in the world ("Face in the Sand" and "Age of Innocence"), religion ("No More Lies", "Montsgur"), and realizing yourself ("Wildest Dreams," "Rainmaker," "Journeyman"). The title track features lyrics in a more classic storytelling vein, being about a man who experiences the Danse Macabre and has many similarities to both the poem Tam o' Shanter and "The Number of the Beast". The album is also notable for its heavy Celtic influences in the guitar melodies, especially the title track, "No More Lies," and "Montsgur."

Cover art
The computer-generated cover art for the album was provided by David Patchett, but he asked to be removed from the credits because he was not satisfied with the result. The version used was actually a prototype provided by Patchett, but the band decided to use it in its incomplete form. Upon close inspection, one can note several of errors: The character on the far right looking out of the picture appears to have a broken neck. The white dog is standing on the snake underneath it. The baby's foot is cutting into the dog and appears more to be suspended in mid-air than sitting on a wolf. The small child character at the front on the left is standing on the other characters foot. The character doing a back-flip on the left of Eddie has a dislocated shoulder, his left hand is also against his right arm instead of on the floor and the back-flipping character's right leg is dislocated.[5]

Track listing

''Dance of Death''

144

No. Title 1. "Wildest Dreams" 2. "Rainmaker"

Writer(s) Adrian Smith, Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray, Harris Steve Harris Dickinson, Janick Gers, Harris Gers, Harris Dickinson, Gers, Harris

Length 3:52 3:48

3. "No More Lies" 4. "Montsgur" 5. "Dance of Death" 6. "Gates of Tomorrow" 7. "New Frontier" 8. "Paschendale" 9. "Face in the Sand" 10. "Age of Innocence" 11. "Journeyman"

7:22 5:50 8:36 5:12

Dickinson, Smith, Nicko McBrain Smith, Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris Murray, Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris

5:04 8:28 6:31 6:10 7:07

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney - Keyboards

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:refozfg3eh2k~T1 http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=77 http:/ / www. popmatters. com/ pm/ review/ ironmaiden-dance/ http:/ / www. bbc. co. uk/ music/ release/ 34f9/ Dance of Death Cover Mistakes (http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ articles/ dance-of-death-cover-mistakes. html)

''A Matter of Life and Death''

145

A Matter of Life and Death


A Matter of Life and Death

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 28 August 2006
[1]

September 2005 - July 2006 at Sarm West Studios, London Heavy metal 71:54 EMI Kevin Shirley Professional reviews

Allmusic Kerrang! Metal Hammer Sputnik Music

link

[2]

link

[3]

Iron Maiden chronology Death on the Road (2005) A Matter of Life and Death (2006) Somewhere Back in Time - The Best of: 1980-1989 (2008)

Singles from A Matter of Life and Death


1. 2.

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg"


Released: 14 August 2006

"Different World"
Released: 14 November 2006

A Matter of Life and Death is the fourteenth studio album by English heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released on 25 August 2006 in Italy and in Finland, 28 August worldwide, and 5 September 2006 in the United States, Canada and Japan. It is the first heavy metal album to debut at #4 in India, and made it to #2 in the Indian charts. It is also one of the few rock/metal albums to go platinum in India. It is the first album in Iron Maiden's career to enter the U.S. Billboard charts in the top 10 and the third album where Steve Harris has had a song writing credit on every track, and has seen significant chart success in many other countries.[4] While the album is not a concept album,[5] war and religion are recurring themes in the lyrics throughout the album, as well as in the album's artwork. The title is also linked with the war theme, as it shared with a 1946 film whose primary character is a WWII Royal Air Force pilot, though singer Bruce Dickinson has stated that the title and dark

''A Matter of Life and Death'' lyrical themes came partly from the band members' childhood experiences having grown up in the Cold War era amid common fears of imminent destruction and war. A Matter of Life and Death Tour was the tour supporting the album.

146

Overview
The band, still consisting of the same lineup as their previous two studio albums (making it the second most stable lineup; see Powerslave), started to write the songs near the end of 2005 after their hugely successful appearances in the U.S. and Europe. By the end of the year, the songs were completed and they began rehearsing at Sarm West Studios in London. At 72 minutes, A Matter of Life and Death is the band's second longest album, exceeding 1995's The X Factor by approximately one minute, and exceeded by 2010's The Final Frontier by aproximately four minutes. Continuing the progressive direction seen since the band's 2000 reunion with Dickinson and guitarist Adrian Smith, A Matter of Life and Death puts emphasis on creating atmospheres befitting the darker lyrical themes and long sprawling epics with changes in tempo and dynamics, in contrast to the catchy, riff-driven music of the band's early days. This darker direction of the lyrical viewpoint can even be seen in the shorter songs "Different World" and "The Pilgrim". In order to provide a more "live" sound, the album was not mastered.[6] Producer Kevin Shirley said, "Spoke to 'Arry on Friday, who has decided against mastering the Iron Maiden album... It means that you will get to hear the new album exactly as it sounded in the studio, no added EQ, compression, analog widening, etc., and I must say, I am pretty happy with the end result." This is the band's fourth studio album not to share its name with a song, following Piece of Mind, The X Factor and Virtual XI. The album cover was created by Tim Bradstreet, an American artist, best known for his work on the Hellblazer and Punisher comics. During their North American, Japanese and European tours, the band performed the entire album in full. They announced after the show at Earl's Court, London on December 23, 2006, that the album would never be played in its entirety again.

Critical response
The album was met with positive reviews. Metal Hammer rated the album 10/10 and stated that "Iron Maiden have utterly surpassed themselves", Kerrang! rated it 5/5 and said "Another [Iron] Maiden classic... Keeps what longtime fans loved about the band alive." Classic Rock also awarded it Album of the Year, and the band won an award voted by Classic Rock readers, for the album. Rolling Stone gave the album 3 stars out of 5, finding the music and lyrics "relevant." However, the magazine also claims that "the songs now march where they once galloped", implying that the band is "aging gracefully".[7]

Single details
The first single to be released from the album was "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg". It was released on 14 August 2006. On 10 August 2006, "Different World" was put on the official website for everyone to hear. The following day "Brighter than a Thousand Suns" was also put on the official site for public streaming. "Different World" was the second single released from the album.[8] It has already been receiving airplay on many rock radio stations. The song also features an animated video, similar to that of "Wildest Dreams".

''A Matter of Life and Death''

147

DVD documentary
In addition to the standard CD release, A Matter of Life and Death was also released in a limited edition version which contains a bonus DVD. The DVD, which has a total runtime of nearly one hour, contains a half-hour documentary, plus videos and photos all shot whilst the band were making the album. The documentary "The Making of A Matter of Life and Death", directed by Matthew Amos (director of The Early Days and Death on the Road DVD documentaries), features candid video footage shot largely by Kevin Shirley himself during the recording of the album giving a behind-the-scenes look at life in the studio. The bonus DVD also features the full video promo for "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg", and a special intimate filming of the band recording "Different World" in the studio. The album is also available as a limited edition double picture disc vinyl in gatefold sleeve, and as a digital download.

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Different World" 2. "These Colours Don't Run" 3. "Brighter Than a Thousand Suns" 4. "The Pilgrim" 5. "The Longest Day" 6. "Out of the Shadows" Lyrics Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Music Adrian Smith, Harris Smith, Harris Length 4:17 6:52 8:44 5:07 7:48 5:36 7:21 9:24 7:23 9:22

Dickinson, Harris Smith, Harris Harris Dickinson Dickinson Janick Gers, Harris Smith, Harris Dickinson, Harris Dave Murray, Harris Harris Smith, Harris Gers, Harris

7. "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" Harris 8. "For the Greater Good of God" 9. "Lord of Light" 10. "The Legacy" Harris Dickinson Harris

Bonus track (iTunes store edition)


No. Title 11. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (Radio 1 'Legends' Session) Lyrics Music Length Harris Harris 7:11

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar and backing vocals, guitar synth on "Brighter than a Thousand Suns" Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals, keyboard Nicko McBrain drums Kevin Shirley - producer

''A Matter of Life and Death''

148

Charting positions
The album sold over 220,000 copies worldwide on its first day of release and sold over 500,000 copies worldwide in 3 days. By the end of the first week of release, A Matter of Life and Death had sold over a million copies worldwide. It entered at no. 4 in the world album chart, no. 1 in ten countries, no. 4 in the UK charts, no. 2 in Canada, no. 4 in India , and for the first time entered the U.S. top 10 at no. 9 with sales of over 56,000. The album went gold in Finland in its first week.[9] This gold record became Maiden's 8th from Finland. An update on Iron Maiden's official website states that "In just the first week the new album has shipped over a million copies worldwide and impacted on the charts pretty well everywhere in the world". In doing so it has charted in the top 20 in 34 countries worldwide.
Chart India Canadian Album Charts German Album Charts UK Album Charts U.S. Billboard 200 Position #2 #2 #1 #4 #9

U.S. Billboard Top Rock Albums #4 Switzerland Chile Spain Finland Greece Brazil Italy Turkey Sweden Ireland Slovenia Serbia Croatia Hungary Czech Republic Norway Poland UAE #2 #3 #4 #1 #1 #1 #1 #2 #1 #5 #1 #1 #1 #2 #1 #2 #1 #5

Certifications

''A Matter of Life and Death''

149

Country Brazil Canada

Certification Sales Gold Gold [10] [11] 50,000+ 50,000+ 100,000+ 40,000+ 30,000+ 30,000+ 10,000+ 10,000+ 15,000+

United Kingdom Gold[12] India Finland Sweden Greece Italy Switzerland 2 Platinum Platinum Gold Gold Gold Gold

References
[1] "IRON MAIDEN announce special album format" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ article. php?section=1& subsection=1& article_=& article_id=1340). ironmaiden.com. 2006-08-03. . Retrieved 2006-10-29. [2] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:aeozefbk5gf8 [3] http:/ / www. sputnikmusic. com/ album. php?albumid=11335 [4] "A Matter of Life and Death kills the charts worldwide!" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ article. php?section=1& subsection=1& article_type=& article_id=1359). ironmaiden.com. 2006-09-11. . Retrieved 2006-09-17. [5] "IRON MAIDEN Drummer, Guitarist Talk About New Album" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=54636). Blabbermouth. 2006-07-05. . Retrieved 2006-09-17. [6] http:/ / www. cavemanproductions. com/ jul2k6. htm [7] "Rolling Stone Review" (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ artists/ ironmaiden/ albums/ album/ 11368913/ review/ 11544784/ a_matter_of_life_and_death). Rolling Stone. 2007-05-03. . [8] Billboard.com - Discography - Iron Maiden - Different World [3 Track Single] (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ discography/ index. jsp?pid=4887& aid=811196) [9] "Iron Maiden kotimaisten myyntilistojen krjess" (http:/ / www. mtv3. fi/ viihde/ uutiset/ musiikki. shtml/ 466223?iron_maiden). MTV3 Finland. 2006-08-31. . Retrieved 2006-09-17. [10] ABPD searchable database (http:/ / www. abpd. org. br/ certificados_interna. asp). Retrieved December 29, 2008. [11] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007. [12] BPI searchable database (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ ). Retrieved December 29, 2008.

''The Final Frontier''

150

The Final Frontier


The Final Frontier

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released August 16, 2010

Recorded 2010 at Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas The Cave Studios, Malibu, California Genre Length Label Heavy metal 76:35 EMI

Producer Kevin Shirley Iron Maiden chronology Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack (2009) The Final Frontier (2010)

Singles from The Final Frontier


1.

"El Dorado"
Released: June 8, 2010

The Final Frontier is British heavy metal band Iron Maiden's upcoming fifteenth studio album, set for release on August 16, 2010[1] . At 76 minutes and 35 seconds, it is the band's longest studio album to date. It will be their first album since the release of A Matter of Life and Death in 2006, the longest gap to date between two consecutive Iron Maiden studio albums. The North American leg of their tour in support of the album started in Dallas, Texas on June 9[2] , with a European tour beginning in Dublin on July 30, and further dates to be announced.[3] Melvyn Grant, a long-time contributor to the band's artwork, created the cover art for the album.[4]

''The Final Frontier''

151

Overview
On April 22, 2009, during a Rock Radio interview promoting Iron Maiden: Flight 666, Nicko McBrain revealed that Iron Maiden had booked studio time for early 2010.[5] On March 4, 2010, the album title was announced as The Final Frontier, along with North American and European tour dates for summer 2010.[6] On June 5, the band's official website opened to a countdown screen which counted down to 12:01 am (UTC) on June 8.[7] At the end of the countdown, the expected announcement revealed the album artwork, release date, and track listing, as well as providing a free download of the track El Dorado.[4]

Production
On November 2, 2009, Janick Gers confirmed to BBC News that the band already had new material written and would head to Paris, France, to start composing and rehearsing the bulk for the new album. The band took time off for Christmas and New Year's Eve before recording the new album in January, with Kevin Shirley producing.[8] In another interview with heavy metal DJ Eddie Trunk, drummer Nicko McBrain confirmed that the band had finished writing eight songs for the new album which he claimed would probably be released in 2011.[9] On April 6, producer Kevin Shirley told Blabbermouth.net that he had completed mixing the new album.[10] On May 6, Shirley commented on the final stages of the album's production:[11] "Bruce Dickinson flew in for a few days and sang all his parts before flying off to the four corners of the globe and Steve Harris (musician)Steve Harris stayed behind to finish the record with me. He's pretty hands-on like that. Adrian Smith dropped in from time to time to hear stuff, and like in any band, not everyone has the same end result in mind, but we get there." Regarding the band's return to Compass Point Studios, where they had previously recorded in the 1980s, vocalist Bruce Dickinson remarked: The studio had the same vibe and it was exactly as it had been in 1983, nothing had changed! Even down to the broken shutter in the corner... same carpet... everything... It was really quite spooky. But we felt very relaxed in such a familiar and well-trodden environment and I think this shows in the playing and the atmosphere of the album.

Songs
El Dorado, the album's first single, was released as a free digital download on June 7. In a July 1 interview with Billboard.com, guitarist Dave Murray discussed the song "When the Wild Wind Blows", the band's third longest song to date, after "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" and "Sign of the Cross".[12] : "The rhythm's a little bit different from what we've done before, and there's lots of melodies... It's a big song. We learned it in sections just because it was such a complex arrangement, but it sounds quite natural."

Track listing

''The Final Frontier''

152

No. Title 1. "Satellite 15... The Final Frontier" 2. "El Dorado" 3. "Mother of Mercy" 4. "Coming Home" 5. "The Alchemist" 6. "Isle of Avalon" 7. "Starblind" 8. "The Talisman" 9. "The Man Who Would Be King" 10. "When the Wild Wind Blows" Total length:

Music

Length 8:40

Dickinson, Smith, Harris

6:49 5:20 5:52 4:29 9:06 7:48 9:03 8:28 10:59 76:35

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Janick Gers - guitar Steve Harris - bass, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums, percussion

with Kevin Shirley - production Melvyn Grant - artwork

External links
Official website [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1184 [2] Press Release from Live Nation North America (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1183) [3] Iron Maiden confirm DUBLIN, IRELAND concert - fanclub presale starts Tuesday (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1193) [4] "MAIDEN ANNOUNCE RELEASE DATE, ARTWORK AND TRACKLISTING FOR NEW ALBUM THE FINAL FRONTIER TOUR STARTS THIS WEEK" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ thebigbang_2. html). Iron Maiden official website. 7 June 2010. . Retrieved 8 June 2010. [5] "Rock Radio :: Nicko: Maiden have booked studio time" (http:/ / www. rockradio. co. uk/ rock-news/ nicko-maiden-have-booked-studio-time/ v38r73fs/ ). Rock Radio. 22 April 2009. . Retrieved 22 April 2009. [6] "IRON MAIDEN announce new studio album 'THE FINAL FRONTIER' and North American Tour" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1184). Iron Maiden official website. 4 March 2010. . Retrieved 8 June 2010. [7] "IRON MAIDEN Launches Mystery Countdown" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=141140). Blabbermouth.net. 5 June 2010. . Retrieved 7 June 2010. [8] "Rolling Stone Wood wins rock gong" (http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 2/ hi/ 8338887. stm). BBC. 2009-11-03. . Retrieved 2009-11-27. [9] IRON MAIDEN - Eight Songs Written For New Album, Heading Into The Studio Soon (http:/ / www. bravewords. com/ news/ 129393) [10] "Producer KEVIN SHIRLEY Completes Mixing New IRON MAIDEN Album" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=138057). Blabbermouth.net. 6 April 2010. . Retrieved 6 April 2010.

''The Final Frontier''


[11] "Producer KEVIN SHIRLEY: 'IRON MAIDEN Are The Best Band In The World To Work For' - May 6, 2010" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=139675). Blabbermouth.net. 6 May 2010. . Retrieved 6 May 2010. [12] "Iron Maiden Explores 'The Final Frontier'" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ news#/ news/ iron-maiden-explores-the-final-frontier-1004101855. story). Billboard.com. 1 July 2010. . Retrieved 2 July 2010.

153

154

Live albums
Live After Death
Live After Death

Live album by Iron Maiden Released October 14, 1985

Recorded October 8, 9, 10 and 12 1984, and March 1417, 1985 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 1:11:57 EMI Professional reviews

Allmusic Kerrang!

link October 1985

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Powerslave (1984) Live After Death (1985) Somewhere in Time (1986)

Singles from Live After Death


1. 2.

"Running Free (live)"


Released: 13 September 1985

"Run to the Hills (live)"


Released: 2 December 1985

Live After Death is a live album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on October 14, 1985 on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). It was recorded during the band's World Slavery Tour. The album was instrumental in establishing the band as an extraordinary live band and is regarded as one of the best live albums ever recorded.

''Live After Death''

155

Cover art
The cover art was done by Derek Riggs, and pictures the band's mascot, Eddie rising from a grave. On that grave is a tombstone with a quote from the fantasy and horror fiction author H. P. Lovecraft's The Nameless City: "That is not dead which can eternal lie Yet with strange aeons even death may die." The proper quote is actually "And with strange..." instead of "Yet with strange...". A similar version of this phrase is used in Metallica's song "The Thing That Should Not Be" from the Master of Puppets album. See also: the Necronomicon. Also engraved onto the headstone is what appears to be Eddie's full name, "Edward T H--", the remainder of his supposed surname obscured by a clump of sod. The cover depicts Eddie as he is seen on covers before Number of the Beast (with long hair) though he is also bound by metal cuffs connected by an electrical surge, as seen in Powerslave merchandise, and also the metal headgear from his Piece of Mind lobotomy. The back cover also shows Death in the clouds above the destroyed city. This is the fourth cover where its figure can be seen (the first being "Twilight Zone", the second being "The Trooper" and the third being the back of Powerslave. The fifth time is the back of Somewhere in Time. Though the reaper is also portrayed by Eddie himself on Dance of Death and Death on the Road). Near Eddie's grave there's also a black cat with a circle made of light over its head. At the cat's left, there is a tombstone written "Here lies Derek Riggs". In 2007 The National Entertainment Collectibles Association released an action figure diorama of the album cover. It is the third in the series. Other available figures are based on Somewhere in Time, Phantom of the Opera and Piece of Mind.

Intro
The intro before "Aces High" is a part of the We shall fight on the beaches speech made by Winston Churchill in the House of Commons on June 4, 1940. (Churchill re-recorded the speech the original speech in the House of Commons was not recorded.): "... We shall go on to the end, we shall fight in France, we shall fight on the seas and oceans, we shall fight with growing confidence and growing strength in the air, we shall defend our Island, whatever the cost may be, we shall fight on the beaches, we shall fight on the landing grounds, we shall fight in the fields and in the streets, we shall fight in the hills; we shall never surrender ..." It was later used for their Ed Hunter Tour and Somewhere Back In Time World Tour.

Critical reception
Live After Death was well received by the music press. Allmusic's Greg Prato described it as "one of heavy metal's best live albums". PopMatters critic Adrien Begrand mentioned that Live After Death was one of "the greatest live album in heavy metal history".[2] Alastair Ridell of Kerrang! said it's "possibly the greatest live album of all time"[3]

Track listing
The first 13 tracks (12 songs and the intro) were recorded at the Long Beach Arena in Long Beach, California on March 1417 1985. The last 5 songs were recorded earlier on the same tour, at the Hammersmith Odeon (now known as the Hammersmith Apollo) in London on October 8, 9, 10 and 12 1984. On the original double LP version, the songs from Long Beach are on the first three sides, whereas the songs recorded in London ("Wrathchild", "Children of the Damned", "22 Acacia Avenue", "Die With Your Boots On" and "Phantom of the Opera") were on side four.

''Live After Death'' The initial CD version (released in December, 1985) of this album includes everything that the first three sides of the LP version contain. The fourth side was not included on the original release, due to capacity problems. Also, "Running Free" is shortened from about 8:43 on vinyl to about 3:16 on the CD by eliminating the crowd interaction. There are also only 12 tracks, as the intro to track 1, "Aces High" is actually just included with the track itself. The 1998 remastered re-release has the unedited version, and includes a second CD with the tracks that were previously missing. It should be noted that the 1995 re-release also has an extra CD, but that had the b-sides from the singles on it. Also, this re-release was not remastered.
CD 1 - Recorded At Long Beach Arena, Los Angeles - March 17th 1985 No. Title 1. "Intro: Churchill's Speech" 2. "Aces High" 3. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 4. "The Trooper" 5. "Revelations" 6. "Flight of Icarus" Writer(s) Winston Churchill Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith Harris Dickinson Dickinson, Smith Length 0:49 4:39 6:03 4:31 6:11 3:27 13:18 7:13 4:53 7:21 4:20 3:54 8:43

156

7. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" Harris 8. "Powerslave" 9. "The Number of the Beast" 10. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 11. "Iron Maiden" 12. "Run to the Hills" 13. "Running Free" Dickinson Harris Harris Harris Harris Paul Di'Anno, Harris

CD 2 (1998 release) No. Title 1. "Wrathchild" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 8, 1984) 2. "22 Acacia Avenue" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 1984) 3. "Children of the Damned" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 10, 1984) Writer(s) Harris Smith, Harris Harris Length 3:07 6:19 4:37 5:13 7:23

4. "Die With Your Boots On" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 10, 1984) Dickinson, Smith, Harris 5. "Phantom of the Opera" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 1984) Harris

Bonus CD (1995 release) [I] No. Title 1. "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 1984) 2. "Sanctuary" (Recorded At Long Beach Arena, Los Angeles - March 17, 1985) Writer(s) Harris Di'Anno, Dave Murray, Harris Length 4:14 4:40

3. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" (Recorded At Hammersmith Odeon, London - October 12, 1984) Harris

4:32

I Iron Maiden' entire discography from the self-titled debut album to 1992's Fear of the Dark, was re-released as limited editions with bonus CD
in 1995.

''Live After Death''

157

Companion Video
The Live After Death video was also recorded at the Long Beach Arena, but on a different night. It contains almost the entire gig, complete with intro and encore, and closes with "Sanctuary", which was not on the LP or original CD release of the album. A live version of "Sanctuary" recorded at the Long Beach shows was included on a bonus disk packaged with the 1995 reissue, this disk also includes "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" and "Murders in the Rue Morgue" from the Hammersmith shows. Originally it was intended to use the London shows for the album, and the Long Beach shows for the video, but the Long Beach shows were better.

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals, guitar on "Revelations" Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

Chart positions
Chart (1985) UK Albums Chart [4] [5] Position 2 8 13

Swedish Albums Chart Norwegian Albums [6] Chart US Billboard 200 [7]

19 26

Swiss Albums Chart

[8]

The album also charted at #16 in New Zealand, and at #67 in Mexico.[9]

Singles
Year Single Chart United Kingdom Position 19 26 9

1985 "Running Free"

1985 "Run to the Hills" United Kingdom 1990 "Running Free" United Kingdom

Certifications

''Live After Death''

158

Country Canada

Certification 2 [10] Platinum

Sales 200,000+

United Kingdom Gold[11] United States Platinum [12]

100,000+ 1,000,000+

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:2x65mps39fco http:/ / www. popmatters. com/ pm/ review/ iron-maiden-live-after-death-dvd http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=758 "UK Top 40 Chart Archive, British Singles & Album Charts" (http:/ / www. everyhit. co. uk/ ). everyHit.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-06. "Discography Iron Maiden" (http:/ / swedishcharts. com/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden). swedishcharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [6] "Discography Iron Maiden" (http:/ / norwegiancharts. com/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden). norwegiancharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [7] "Artist Chart History - Iron Maiden" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ retrieve_chart_history. do?model. chartFormatGroupName=Albums& model. vnuArtistId=4887& model. vnuAlbumId=792220). Billboard. Nielsen Business Media, Inc. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [8] "Discography Iron Maiden" (http:/ / swisscharts. com/ showinterpret. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden). swisscharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-07-07. [9] mexicancharts.com (http:/ / mexicancharts. com/ showitem. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden& titel=Live+ After+ Death& cat=a) [10] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007. [11] BPI certification search tool (http:/ / www. bpi. co. uk/ ). Retrieved December 28, 2008. [12] RIAA certifications (http:/ / riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?table=SEARCH_RESULTS). Retrieved December 28, 2008.

''Maiden England''

159

Maiden England
Maiden England

Video by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Director Producer National Exhibition Centre, on November 2728, 1988 Heavy metal 95:00 PMI Steve Harris Martin Birch Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden video chronology 12 Wasted Years (1987) Maiden England (1989) The First Ten Years: The Videos (1990)

Maiden England is a live video by the band Iron Maiden during their Seventh Son of a Seventh Son world tour, which was dubbed Seventh Tour of a Seventh Tour. It was recorded at the Birmingham, England NEC on 27 and 28 November 1988, released as a video (VHS) in 1989 and as a limited edition video/CD package in 1994. The CD in this package was missing two songs that were on the video ("Can I Play with Madness" and "Hallowed Be Thy Name"), due to space limitations. It was directed and edited by Steve Harris, Iron Maiden founder and bassist. On September 5, 2007, it was announced through the official Iron Maiden website [2], that there would be a DVD-version of the concert, to be released in 2008. As of 2010 it has not been released and there has been no further official announcement concerning a DVD-version of Maiden England.

''Maiden England''

160

VHS track listing


1. "Moonchild" 2. "The Evil That Men Do" 3. "The Prisoner" 4. "Still Life" 5. "Die with Your Boots On" 6. "Infinite Dreams" 7. "Killers" 8. "Can I Play with Madness" 9. "Heaven Can Wait" 10. "Wasted Years" 11. "The Clairvoyant" 12. "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" 13. "The Number of the Beast" 14. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 15. "Iron Maiden"

CD track listing
1. "Moonchild" 2. "The Evil That Men Do" 3. "The Prisoner" 4. "Still Life" 5. "Die With Your Boots On" 6. "Infinite Dreams" 7. "Killers" 8. "Heaven Can Wait" 9. "Wasted Years" 10. "The Clairvoyant" 11. "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" 12. "The Number of the Beast" 13. "Iron Maiden"

Credits
Bruce Dickinson - Lead Vocals Dave Murray - Lead & Rhythm Guitars, Adrian Smith - Lead & Rhythm Guitars, Backing Vocals, Steve Harris - Bass Guitar, Backing Vocals Nicko McBrain - Drums

''Maiden England''

161

External links
Maiden England [3] at the Internet Movie Database

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:gnfoxqt5ldke~T10 [2] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=664 [3] http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0352443/

''A Real Live One''

162

A Real Live One


A Real Live One

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label 22 March 1993 1992 Heavy metal 59:11 EMI Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Fear of the Dark (1992) A Real Live One (1993) A Real Dead One (1993)

Singles from A Real Live One


1.

"Fear of the Dark (live)"


Released: 1 March 1993

A Real Live One is a live album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released in March 1993. Despite this being a live album, it does not represent a single full concert. Instead, it was recorded at 9 different venues in Europe on the Fear of the Dark World Tour. This album features songs from the Somewhere in Time (1986) through Fear of the Dark (1992) eras, while A Real Dead One only contains songs from the pre-Somewhere in Time albums. When Iron Maiden re-released all their albums in 1998, this album was combined with A Real Dead One to form the 2-disc A Real Live Dead One. The album cover was made by longtime Iron Maiden cover artist Derek Riggs, who was notably absent on the Fear of the Dark album. "Fear of the Dark" was released as a single.

''A Real Live One''

163

Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris, except where noted. 1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers) Recorded at Monsters Of Rock 1992, Donington Park, Donington, England, August 22nd 1992. It wasn't recorded at Super Rock 92, Mannheim, Germany, August 15th 1992. 2. "From Here to Eternity" Recorded at The Valbyhallen, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25th 1992 3. "Can I Play with Madness" (Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Harris) Recorded at The Brabanthallen, Den Bosch, the Netherlands, September 2nd 1992 4. "Wasting Love" (Dickinson, Gers) Recorded at La Grande Halle de La Villette, Paris, France, September 5th 1992 5. "Tailgunner" (Dickinson, Harris) Recorded at La Patinoire de Malley, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 4th 1992 6. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) Recorded at Forest National, Brussels, Belgium, August 17th 1992 7. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" Recorded at The Globe, Stockholm, Sweden, August 29th 1992 8. "Bring Your Daughter...to the Slaughter" (Dickinson) Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 9. "Heaven Can Wait" Recorded at unknown place and date, possibly at Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992. It wasn't recorded at Monsters Of Rock, Reggio Emilia, Italy, September 12th 1992 10. "The Clairvoyant" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 11. "Fear of the Dark" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney - keyboard

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:68r928vr058a

''A Real Dead One''

164

A Real Dead One


A Real Dead One

Live album by Iron Maiden Released October 18, 1993

Recorded Various dates from the European 1992 tour and from the 1993 tour Genre Heavy metal Length Label 59:40 EMI

Producer Steve Harris Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology A Real Live One (1993) A Real Dead One (1993) A Real Live Dead One (1993)

Singles from A Real Dead One


1.

"Hallowed Be Thy Name (live)"


Released: 4 October 1993

A Real Dead One is a live album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, recorded in 1992/93 at concerts across Europe, and released on October 25, 1993. This album features songs from the very beginning of the band's career (1975) through the Powerslave era (1984), while counterpart A Real Live One only contains songs from the post-Powerslave albums. When Iron Maiden re-released all their albums in 1998, this album was combined with A Real Live One to form the 2-disc A Real Live Dead One. The album cover was made by longtime Iron Maiden cover artist Derek Riggs, and depicts Eddie as a disc jockey in Hell, playing old Maiden tunes. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" was released as a live single. On the Billboard Music Charts, "Hallowed Be Thy Name" hit number 50 on the Mainstream Rock chart.

''A Real Dead One''

165

Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris, except where noted. 1. "The Number of the Beast" Recorded at the Valby Halle, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25th 1992 2. "The Trooper" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 3. "Prowler" Recorded at the Palaghiaccio, Rome, Italy, April 30th 1993 4. "Transylvania" Recorded at Grugahalle, Essen, Germany, April 17th 1993 5. "Remember Tomorrow" (Paul Di'Anno, Harris) Recorded at Grugahalle, Essen, Germany, April 17th 1993 6. "Where Eagles Dare" Recorded at unknown place and date, possibly at Grugahalle, Essen, Germany, April 17th 1993. It wasn't recorded at the Rijnhal, Arnheim, Holland, April 9th 1993 7. "Sanctuary" (Di'Anno, Dave Murray, Harris) Recorded at La Patinoire De Malley, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 4th 1992. It wasn't recorded at La Patinoire Du Littoral, Neuchtel, May 27th 1993 8. "Running Free" (Di'Anno, Harris) Recorded at La Patinoire De Malley, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 4th 1992. It wasn't recorded at La Patinoire Du Littoral, Neuchtel, May 27th 1993. Running Free wasn't even played at this show. 9. "Run to the Hills" Recorded at The Vtkovice Sports Hall, Ostrava, Czech Republic, April 5th 1993. Possibly wrong date and place, too. 10. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) Recorded at La Grande Halle De La Villette, Paris, September 5th 1992. It wasn't recorded at L'lyse Montmartre, Paris, April 10th 1993. 2 Minutes To Midnight wasn't even played at this show. 11. "Iron Maiden" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 12. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" Recorded at The Olympic Arena, Moscow, Russia, June 2nd or 3rd 1993. It wasn't recorded at the June 4th show, as for the bootleg of this show has a different version of the song. Also, it's said it was recorded at the Valby Halle, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25th 1992

''A Real Dead One''

166

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney - keyboard

External links
A Real Dead One [2] at MusicBrainz

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:7b9yxdgb8oly [2] http:/ / musicbrainz. org/ release/ 22433efe-e021-4263-8f6c-bcc3ba088e03. html

''A Real Live Dead One''

167

A Real Live Dead One


A Real Live Dead One

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label September 22, 1998 1992-93 Heavy metal 118:51 EMI Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology A Real Dead One (1993) A Real Live Dead One (1993) Live at Donington (1993)

A Real Live Dead One is a live album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released in 1998. Despite this being a live album, it does not represent a single full concert. Instead, it was recorded at different venues across Europe just before and on the Fear of the Dark World Tour. This album is a compilation of A Real Dead One and A Real Live One, which were re-released with all the other Iron Maiden albums in 1998. Real Live Tour was the tour supporting the album.

''A Real Live Dead One''

168

Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris, except where noted.

Disc 1 (Dead One)


1. "The Number of the Beast" Recorded at the Valby Halle, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25th 1992 2. "The Trooper" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 3. "Prowler" Recorded at the Palaghiaccio, Rome, Italy, April 30th 1993 4. "Transylvania" Recorded at Grugahalle, Essen, Germany, April 17th 1993 5. "Remember Tomorrow" (Paul Di'Anno, Harris) Recorded at Grugahalle, Essen, Germany, April 17th 1993 6. "Where Eagles Dare" Recorded at unknown place and date, possibly at Grugahalle, Essen, Germany, April 17th 1993. It wasn't recorded at the Rijnhal, Arnheim, Holland, April 9th 1993 7. "Sanctuary" (Di'Anno, Dave Murray, Harris) Recorded at La Patinoire De Malley, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 4th 1992. It wasn't recorded at La Patinoire Du Littoral, Neuchtel, May 27th 1993 8. "Running Free" (Di'Anno, Harris) Recorded at La Patinoire De Malley, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 4th 1992. It wasn't recorded at La Patinoire Du Littoral, Neuchtel, May 27th 1993. Running Free wasn't even played at this show. 9. "Run to the Hills" Recorded at The Vtkovice Sports Hall, Ostrava, Czech Republic, April 5th 1993. Possibly wrong date and place, too. 10. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) Recorded at La Grande Halle De La Villette, Paris, September 5th 1992. It wasn't recorded at L'lyse Montmartre, Paris, April 10th 1993. 2 Minutes To Midnight wasn't even played at this show. 11. "Iron Maiden" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 12. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" Recorded at The Olympic Arena, Moscow, Russia, June 2nd or 3rd 1993. It wasn't recorded at the June 4th show, as for the bootleg of this show has a different version of the song. Also, it's said it was recorded at the Valby Halle, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25th 1992

''A Real Live Dead One''

169

Disc 2 (Live One)


1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers) Recorded at Monsters Of Rock 1992, Donington Park, Donington, England, August 22nd 1992. It wasn't recorded at Super Rock 92, Mannheim, Germany, August 15th 1992. 2. "From Here to Eternity" Recorded at The Valbyhallen, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25th 1992 3. "Can I Play with Madness" (Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Harris) Recorded at The Brabanthallen, Den Bosch, the Netherlands, September 2nd 1992 4. "Wasting Love" (Dickinson, Gers) Recorded at La Grande Halle de La Villette, Paris, France, September 5th 1992 5. "Tailgunner" (Dickinson, Harris) Recorded at La Patinoire de Malley, Lausanne, Switzerland, September 4th 1992 6. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) Recorded at Forest National, Brussels, Belgium, August 17th 1992 7. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" Recorded at The Globe, Stockholm, Sweden, August 29th 1992 8. "Bring Your Daughter...to the Slaughter" (Dickinson) Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 9. "Heaven Can Wait" Recorded at unknown place and date, possibly at Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992. It wasn't recorded at Monsters Of Rock, Reggio Emilia, Italy, September 12th 1992 10. "The Clairvoyant" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992 11. "Fear of the Dark" Recorded at Helsinki Ice Hall, Helsinki, Finland, August 27th 1992

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums

with Michael Kenney - keyboard

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& token=& sql=10:3o320r8ay48c

''Live at Donington''

170

Live at Donington
This refers to the live album by Iron Maiden. For other uses, see Live at Donington.

Live at Donington

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 8 November 1993 (U.K.) October 1998 (U.S.) 22 August 1992 Heavy metal 1:52:15 EMI Steve Harris Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology A Real Live Dead One (1993) Live at Donington (1993) The X Factor (1995)

Alternate Cover

Alternate Cover

Live at Donington was the recording of the Iron Maiden's second headlining appearance at the Monsters of Rock festival at Castle Donington on August 22, 1992 during the Fear of the Dark Tour in front of a crowd of almost 80,000. It was originally only released as a limited edition triple vinyl set, but became a regular part of the band's CD catalogue with the 1998 reissues.

''Live at Donington'' Former guitarist Adrian Smith joins the band on this version of "Running Free". The 1998 reissue of this album has different artwork. Instead of the white cover with the logo, they put the original concert poster by Mark Wilkinson on the front cover. Also, the track list was spread out differently, to make room for a multimedia section on disc 2.

171

Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris except where noted.

Original
Disc one 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers) - 3:53 "The Number of the Beast" - 4:53 "Wrathchild" - 2:54 "From Here to Eternity" - 4:44 "Can I Play with Madness" (Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Harris) - 3:33 "Wasting Love" (Dickinson, Gers) - 5:36

7. "Tailgunner" (Dickinson, Harris) - 4:07 8. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) - 7:51 9. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" - 6:59 10. "Fear of the Dark" - 7:08 Disc two 1. "Bring Your Daughter...to the Slaughter" (Dickinson) - 6:12 2. "The Clairvoyant" - 4:21 3. "Heaven Can Wait" - 7:20 4. "Run to the Hills" - 4:16 5. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Dickinson, Smith) - 5:42 6. "Iron Maiden" - 8:14 7. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" - 7:28 8. "The Trooper" - 3:53 9. "Sanctuary" (Paul Di'Anno, Dave Murray, Harris) - 5:18 10. "Running Free" (Di'Anno, Harris) - 7:56

Reissued
Disc one 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Dickinson, Gers) "The Number of the Beast" "Wrathchild" "From Here to Eternity" "Can I Play with Madness" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) "Wasting Love" (Dickinson, Gers) "Tailgunner" (Dickinson, Harris)

8. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 9. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" 10. "Fear of the Dark"

''Live at Donington'' 11. 12. 13. 14. "Bring Your Daughter...to the Slaughter" (Dickinson) "The Clairvoyant" "Heaven Can Wait" "Run to the Hills"

172

Disc two 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Dickinson, Smith) "Iron Maiden" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "The Trooper" "Sanctuary" (Di'Anno, Murray, Harris) "Running Free" (Di'Anno, Harris)

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums with Michael Kenney - keyboard Adrian Smith - guitar on "Running Free"

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:os520roat48i

''Rock in Rio''

173

Rock in Rio
Rock in Rio

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label March 25, 2002 January 19, 2001 Heavy Metal 1:56:00 EMI Sony (U.S.) Portrait Records (U.S.) Kevin Shirley Professional reviews

Producer

Allmusic Kerrang!

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Brave New World (2000) Rock In Rio (2002) Edward the Great (2002)

Rock In Rio is a live album recorded in Brazil by Iron Maiden in 2001. Here they faced their second largest ever crowd - 250,000 people - the first being their 1985 Rock In Rio performance to a crowd of 400,000, and with the relatively recent return of lead singer Bruce Dickinson and guitarist Adrian Smith to the band, they recorded their fifth live album. It features many of their best known tracks, including the eponymous "Iron Maiden" and "Run to the Hills" coupled with some of their "comeback" tracks, such as "The Wicker Man" and "Brave New World." Less popular songs were also performed, such as Bruce Dickinson's versions of the Blaze Bayley-era songs "Sign of the Cross" and "The Clansman". A video version is also available on DVD.

''Rock in Rio''

174

Track listing
Disc 1
1. "Intro (Arthur's Farewell)" (Jerry Goldsmith) 1:55 2. "The Wicker Man" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 4:41 3. "Ghost of the Navigator" (Dickinson, Janick Gers, Harris) 6:48 4. "Brave New World" (Dickinson, Dave Murray, Harris) 6:06 5. "Wrathchild" (Harris) 3:25 6. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Dickinson, Smith) 6:26 7. "Blood Brothers" (Harris) 7:15 8. "Sign of the Cross" (Harris) 10:49 9. "The Mercenary" (Gers, Harris) 4:42 10. "The Trooper" (Harris) 4:34

Disc 2
1. "Dream of Mirrors" (Gers, Harris) 9:38 2. "The Clansman" (Harris) 9:19 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:40 "Fear of the Dark" (Harris) 7:40 "Iron Maiden" (Harris) 5:51 "The Number of the Beast" (Harris) 5:00 "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (Harris) 7:23 "Sanctuary" (Paul Di'Anno, Murray, Harris) 5:17 "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 4:52

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Janick Gers - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums Michael Kenney - live keyboards

Certifications

''Rock in Rio''

175

Country

Certification Sales 40,000+ 50,000+ 100,000+

Argentina Platinum[2] Brazil Germany Gold Gold [3] [4]

External links
Rock In Rio: Commentary [5] Rock in Rio Lyrics [6]

References
[1] http:/ / allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& token=& sql=10:hnfuxql0ldse [2] CAPIF certification search (http:/ / www. capif. org. ar/ Default. asp?PerDesde_MM=0& PerDesde_AA=0& PerHasta_MM=0& PerHasta_AA=0& interprete=iron+ maiden& album=& LanDesde_MM=0& LanDesde_AA=0& LanHasta_MM=0& LanHasta_AA=0& Galardon=O& Tipo=0& ACCION2=+ Buscar+ & ACCION=Buscar& CO=5& CODOP=ESOP). Retrieved December 28, 2008. [3] ABPD album certifications (http:/ / www. abpd. org. br/ certificados_interna. asp). Retrieved December 28, 2008. [4] IFPI Germany gold/platinum database (http:/ / www. musikindustrie. de/ gold_platin_datenbank/ ?action=1& strSuche=Rock+ in+ Rio). Retrieved December 29, 2008. [5] http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=album12b_rir/ commentary12b_rir& lang=eng& link=albums [6] http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ lyrics/ rock_in_rio. html

''The BBC Archives''

176

The BBC Archives


BBC Archives

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer November 4, 2002 1979-1988 Heavy metal 1:48:18 EMI Tony Wilson Iron Maiden chronology Edward the Great (2002) Eddie's Archive (2002) Dance of Death (2003)

BBC Archives is a live album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on November 4, 2002. It is a collection of live shows that Iron Maiden recorded between the years 1979-1988. BBC Archives contains 3 live shows and one studio recording. The album was released in 2002 as a part of Eddie's Archive.

Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris, except where noted.

Disc one
Friday Rock Show Session (1979) 1. 2. 3. 4. "Iron Maiden" 3:45 "Running Free" (Paul Di'Anno, Harris) 3:10 "Transylvania" 4:03 "Sanctuary" (Di'Anno, Dave Murray, Harris) 3:45 Paul Di'Anno: vocals Dave Murray: guitar Tony Parsons :guitar Steve Harris: bass Doug Sampson: drums

''The BBC Archives'' Reading Festival (1982) 1. "Wrathchild" 3:31 2. "Run to the Hills" 5:36 3. "Children of the Damned" 4:48 4. "The Number of the Beast" 5:29 5. "22 Acacia Avenue" (Adrian Smith, Harris) 6:36 6. "Transylvania" 6:20 7. "The Prisoner" (Smith, Harris) 5:50 8. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 7:37 9. "Phantom of the Opera" 7:02 10. "Iron Maiden" 4:57 Bruce Dickinson: vocals Dave Murray: guitar Adrian Smith: guitar Steve Harris: bass Clive Burr: drums

177

Disc two
Reading Festival (1980) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Prowler" 4:26 "Remember Tomorrow" (Di'Anno, Harris) 6:00 "Killers" 4:43 "Running Free" 3:52 "Transylvania" 4:49 "Iron Maiden" 4:56 Paul Di'Anno: vocals Dave Murray: guitar Dennis Stratton: guitar Steve Harris: bass Clive Burr: drums

Monsters of Rock Festival Donington (1988) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Moonchild" (Bruce Dickinson, Smith) 5:44 "Wrathchild" 3:00 "Infinite Dreams" 5:52 "The Trooper" 4:04 "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" 10:27 "The Number of the Beast" 4:42 "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 7:10 "Iron Maiden" 6:01

Bruce Dickinson: vocals Dave Murray: guitar Adrian Smith: guitar Steve Harris: bass Nicko McBrain: drums

''Beast over Hammersmith''

178

Beast over Hammersmith


Beast over Hammersmith

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer 4 November 2002 20 March 1982 Heavy metal 1:35:31 EMI Doug Hall Steve Harris Iron Maiden chronology The BBC Archives (2002) Beast over Hammersmith (2002) Best of the B'Sides (2002)

Beast over Hammersmith is a live album by the British Heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on November 4, 2002. It is a live album recorded during The Beast On The Road tour in the famous Hammersmith Odeon. Beast Over Hammersmith was released 20 years after it was recorded, in 2002 as a part of Eddie's Archive - a limited edition casket. This live album is the last recording of drummer Clive Burr who would be replaced by current drummer Nicko McBrain. Even though this album contains material from The Number of the Beast, this album was actually recorded before the release of The Number of the Beast. An abridged video version of the concert is included on disc 1 of The Early Days DVD.

''Beast over Hammersmith''

179

Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris, except where noted.

Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" 4:32 "Wrathchild" 3:31 "Run to the Hills" 4:19 "Children of the Damned" 4:39 "The Number of the Beast" 5:07 "Another Life" 3:45 "Killers" (Paul Di'Anno, Harris) 5:47 "22 Acacia Avenue" (Adrian Smith, Harris) 6:55 "Total Eclipse" (Dave Murray, Harris, Clive Burr) 4:14

Disc two
1. "Transylvania" 5:50 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "The Prisoner" (Smith, Harris) 5:49 "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 7:31 "Phantom of the Opera" 6:53 "Iron Maiden" 4:21 "Sanctuary" (Di'Anno, Murray, Harris) 4:12 "Drifter" 9:19 "Running Free" (Di'Anno, Harris) 3:44 "Prowler" 5:00

Credits
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr - drums

''Death on the Road''

180

Death on the Road


Death on the Road

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded 30 August 2005 Westfallenhalle Arena, Dortmund, Germany 24 November 2003 Heavy metal 1:34:17 EMI Kevin Shirley / Steve Harris Professional reviews

Genre Length Label Producer

Allmusic Rock Something

link [2] link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology The Essential Iron Maiden (2005) Death on the Road (2005) A Matter of Life and Death (2006)

Death on the Road is a live CD, LP, and DVD released by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden on August 30, 2005 (CD & LP version), respectively on February 6, 2006 (DVD version). It contains songs which were performed at Westfalenhalle, Dortmund, Germany, on 24 November 2003 during the band's Dance of Death Tour (20032005). During the first week after the album's release, it entered the national charts in several countries; Finland (no. 6), Sweden (no. 7), Norway (no. 12), France (no. 14), Italy (no. 17), Switzerland (no. 17), Spain (no. 18), United Kingdom (no. 22), Ireland (no. 27),the Netherlands (no. 39), India (no.29) [3] . The DVD was released on February 6, 2006. It is a 3 DVD set, with the first DVD being the concert in 5.1 Digital audio, the second DVD being the concert in stereo, and the third DVD being special features, including the documentary listed below, and all promo videos from the Dance of Death album. Reportedly, the first DVD of the set is faulty in many cases, as two of the three guitar tracks' volume being tuned down, specifically Dave Murray's track. The DVD set features a full 70-minute documentary directed by Matthew Amos charting the album's creation and the subsequent preparations for the following tour. The feature length program includes candid and personal footage of the band during the recording and writing of the album, which is the first time it's ever been filmed.

''Death on the Road'' The DVD set also features a 45 minute documentary called "Life On The Road" and a 30 minute documentary called "The Fans". In 2005 when Edward the Great was re-released the recording of "Fear of the Dark" from this album was included. The cover was by Melvyn Grant, and on the carriage are the words 'Edward and Son Undertakers', a reference to Eddie.

181

Track listing
CD Track listing
All songs written by Steve Harris, except where noted. Disc one 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Wildest Dreams" (Adrian Smith, Harris) 4:51 "Wrathchild" 2:49 "Can I Play with Madness" (Bruce Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 3:30 "The Trooper" 4:12 "Dance of Death" (Janick Gers, Harris) 9:23 "Rainmaker" (Dickinson, Dave Murray, Harris) 4:01 "Brave New World" (Dickinson, Murray, Harris) 6:09 "Paschendale" (Smith, Harris) 10:17 "Lord of the Flies" (Gers, Harris) 5:06

Disc two 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "No More Lies" 7:49 "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 7:31 "Fear of the Dark" 7:28 "Iron Maiden" 4:50 "Journeyman" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 7:02 "The Number of the Beast" 4:57 "Run to the Hills" 4:26

Vinyl Track listing


Disc one Side A 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Wildest Dreams" 4:51 "Wrathchild" 2:49 "Can I Play with Madness" 3:30 "The Trooper" 4:12 "Dance of Death" 9:23

''Death on the Road'' Side B 1. 2. 3. 4. "Rainmaker" 4:01 "Brave New World" 6:09 "Paschendale" 10:17 "Lord of the Flies" 5:06

182

Disc two Side A 1. "No More Lies" 7:49 2. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 7:31 3. "Fear of the Dark" 7:28 Side B 1. 2. 3. 4. "Iron Maiden" 4:50 "Journeyman" 7:02 "The Number of the Beast" 4:57 "Run to the Hills" 4:26

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Janick Gers - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums

with Michael Kenney - keyboard

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:qkuk6jo471y0 [2] http:/ / rocksomething. com/ reviews/ reviewIronMaidenDOTR. htm [3] Blabbermouth's Official Website, "IRON MAIDEN: More 'Death on the Road' First-Week Chart Positions Revealed", 8 September 2006, at Blabbermouth.net (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=41417); last accessed October 13, 2006.

''Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack''

183

Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack


Flight 666 - The Original Soundtrack

Live album by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label May 22, 2009 (United Kingdom) June 9, 2009 (United States) February 1 - March 16, 2008 during the first leg of the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour across various cities in India, Japan, Australia, North and South America Heavy metal 1:41:39 EMI Universal Music (United States) Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Somewhere Back in Time - The Best of: 1980 1989 (2008) Flight 666 - The Original Soundtrack (2009) The Final Frontier (2010)

Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack is a live album released by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden on May 22, 2009 in the United Kingdom and on June 9, 2009 in the United States to coincide with the release of the band's documentary and live DVD Iron Maiden: Flight 666 on the same day. It contains live performances of songs from various venues throughout the first leg of the band's Somewhere Back in Time World Tour.[2] The second disk is almost completely based on shows in Latin America, except for the last track "Hallowed Be Thy Name", played in Canada. The material on the discs were edited together to sound like 2 complete sets of music

Track listing
Disc 1

''Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack''

184

No. Title 1. "Churchill's Speech" (as in Live After Death, in 1985)

Writer(s) Winston Churchill

Concert Mumbai, India, Bandra-Kurla Complex; February 1, 2008 Mumbai, India, Bandra-Kurla Complex; February 1, 2008 Melbourne, Australia, Rod Laver Arena; February 7, 2008 Sydney, Australia, Acer Arena; February 9, 2008 Tokyo, Japan, Tokyo Messe Hall; February 16, 2008 Monterrey, Mexico, Arena Monterrey; February 22, 2008 Los Angeles, USA, The Forum; February 19, 2008 Mexico City, Mexico, Foro Sol Stadium; February 24, 2008 New Jersey, USA, Izod Center; March 14, 2008

Length 0:43

2. "Aces High" (from Powerslave, in 1984)

Steve Harris

4:49

3. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (from Powerslave, in 1984)

Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson Dickinson

5:57

4. "Revelations" (from Piece of Mind, in 1983)

6:28

5. "The Trooper" (from Piece of Mind, in 1983)

Harris

4:01

6. "Wasted Years" (from Somewhere in Time, in 1986)

Smith

5:07

7. "The Number of the Beast" (from The Number of the Beast, in 1982) 8. "Can I Play with Madness" (from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, in 1988) 9. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (from Powerslave, in 1984)

Harris

5:07

Harris, Smith, Dickinson

3:36

Harris

13:41

Disc 2
No. Title 1. "Powerslave" (from Powerslave, in 1984) Writer(s) Dickinson Concert San Jos, Costa Rica, Saprissa Stadium; February 26, 2008 So Paulo, Brazil, Palmeiras Stadium; March 2, 2008 Bogot, Colombia, Simn Bolvar Park; February 28, 2008 Buenos Aires, Argentina, Ferrocaril Oeste Stadium; March 7, 2008 Santiago, Chile, Pista Atletica; March 9, 2008 San Juan, Puerto Rico, Coliseo De Puerto Rico; March 12, 2008 Curitiba, Brazil, Pedreira Paulo Leminski; March 4, 2008 Toronto, Canada, Air Canada Centre; March 16, 2008 Length 7:28

2. "Heaven Can Wait" (from Somewhere in Time, in 1986) 3. "Run to the Hills" (from The Number of the Beast, in 1982) 4. "Fear of the Dark" (from Fear of the Dark, in 1992)

Harris Harris

7:36 3:59

Harris

7:32

5. "Iron Maiden" (from Iron Maiden, in 1980) 6. "Moonchild" (from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, in 1988) 7. "The Clairvoyant" (from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son, in 1988) 8. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (from The Number of the Beast, in 1982)

Harris Dickinson, Smith Harris

5:26 7:29

4:38

Harris

7:52

''Flight 666 The Original Soundtrack''

185

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - Lead vocals Steve Harris - Bass, Backing vocals Dave Murray - Guitar, Acoustic guitar on "Moonchild" Adrian Smith - Guitar, Backing vocals Janick Gers - Guitar Nicko McBrain - Drums

with Michael Kenney - Keyboards

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:fxfixze0ldde [2] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1125

186

Compilation albums
Best of the Beast
Best of the Beast

Greatest hits by Iron Maiden Released September 24, 1996

Recorded 19791996 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 77:45 (single disc) 150 minutes (2-disc issue) Raw CD

Producer Martin Birch, Nigel Green, Steve Harris, Iron Maiden, Will Malone Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology The X Factor (1995) Best of the Beast (1996) Virtual XI (1998)

Singles from Best of the Beast


1.

"Virus"
Released: 2 September 1996

Best of the Beast was Iron Maiden's first "best of" album, released in 1996 in three formats: a 34 track (four disc) vinyl, a 27 track (two disc) CD, a 16 track (single disc) CD and minidiscMD. The track listings are mainly Maiden's greatest hits (singles) and most well-known songs from 1980-1995 albums, but it also includes a new single, entitled Virus. A live version of "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" was also on this album. The audio was from the Live video filmed during The X Factour (world tour to promote The X Factor album) - originally this song featured the band's previous vocalist Bruce Dickinson. The two-CD version contained two songs from the band's 1979 demo tape The Soundhouse Tapes ("Iron Maiden" and "Strange World," of which the latter one was previously unreleased). The 4-disc vinyl pressing is quite rare and

''Best of the Beast'' has increased in value steadily over the years in music stores and on online auction sites. The standard edition's value has not changed much although the Japanese pressings continue to rise in value. The Best Of The Beast has long since been out of print and has been "replaced" by Edward the Great in most countries as a 'best of' for the band. The cover art was by Derek Riggs, who designed most of Iron Maiden's album covers. It is an amalgamation of his most famous works with the band - it features Eddie from the Piece of Mind, Powerslave, Somewhere in Time and No Prayer for the Dying eras as well as "The Trooper", Live After Death and a redesign of the Killers album cover.

187

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "The Number of the Beast" "Can I Play With Madness" "Fear of the Dark" (Live) "Run to the Hills" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 6. "The Evil That Men Do" 7. "Aces High" 8. "Be Quick or Be Dead" 9. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 10. "Man on the Edge" 11. "Virus" 12. "Running Free" (Live) 13. "Wasted Years" 14. "The Clairvoyant" 15. "The Trooper" 16. "Hallowed Be Thy Name"

Release notes Tracks 1, 4 & 16 taken from The Number of the Beast (1982) Track 15 taken from Piece of Mind (1983) Tracks 7 & 9 taken from Powerslave (1984) Track 12 taken from Live After Death (1985) Track 13 taken from Somewhere in Time (1986) Tracks 2, 6 & 14 taken from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) Track 5 taken from No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Track 8 taken from Fear of the Dark (1992) Track 3 taken from A Real Live One (1993) Track 10 taken from The X Factor (1995) Track 11 was a new track recorded for this compilation (1996)

Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Virus" "Sign of the Cross" "Man on the Edge" "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" (Live) "Be Quick or Be Dead" "Fear of the Dark" (Live) "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 8. "Holy Smoke" 9. "The Clairvoyant" 10. "Can I Play with Madness" 11. "The Evil that Men Do" 12. "Heaven Can Wait" 13. "Wasted Years"

Release notes Disc one Track 1 was a new track recorded for this compilation (1996) Tracks 2 & 3 taken from The X Factor (1995) Track 4 was a previously unreleased live recording from 1995 Track 5 taken from Fear of the Dark (1992) Track 6 taken from A Real Live One (1993) Tracks 7 & 8 taken from No Prayer for the Dying (1990) Tracks 9 - 11 taken from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) Tracks 12 & 13 taken from Somewhere in Time (1986)

Disc two Tracks 1 & 2 taken from Live After Death (1985) Tracks 3 & 4 taken from Powerslave (1984) Tracks 5 & 6 taken from Piece of Mind (1983) Tracks 7 - 9 taken from The Number of the Beast (1982) Track 10 taken from Killers (1981) Tracks 11 & 12 taken from Iron Maiden (1980) Track 14 taken from The Soundhouse Tapes (1979) Track 13 was a previously unreleased out-take from The Soundhouse Tapes

''Best of the Beast''

188

Disc two
1. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (Live) 2. "Running Free" (Live) 3. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 4. "Aces High" 5. "Where Eagles Dare" 6. "The Trooper" 7. "The Number of the Beast" 8. "Run to the Hills" 9. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 10. "Wrathchild" 11. "Phantom of the Opera" 12. "Sanctuary" 13. "Strange World" 14. "Iron Maiden"

Disc one
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Virus" "Sign of the Cross" "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" (Live) "Man on the Edge" "Be Quick Or Be Dead" "Fear of the Dark" (Live) "Holy Smoke" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"

Release notes Disc one Track 1 was a new track recorded for this compilation (1996) Tracks 2 & 4 taken from The X Factor (1995) Track 3 was a previously unreleased live recording from 1995 Track 5 taken from Fear of the Dark (1992) Track 6 taken from A Real Live One (1993) Tracks 7 & 8 taken from No Prayer for the Dying (1990)

Disc two Tracks 1 - 4 taken from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) Tracks 5 & 6 taken from Somewhere in Time (1986) Track 7 taken from Powerslave (1984) Track 8 taken from Live After Death (1985)

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" "Can I Play with Madness" "The Evil that Men Do" "The Clairvoyant" "Heaven Can Wait" "Wasted Years" "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Running Free" (Live)

Disc three Track 1 taken from Live After Death (1985) Track 2 taken from Powerslave (1984) Tracks 3 & 4 taken from Piece of Mind (1983) Tracks 5, 7 - 9 taken from The Number of the Beast (1982) Track 6 was a previously unreleased live recording from 1982

Disc four

''Best of the Beast''

189

Disc three
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (Live) "Aces High" "Where Eagles Dare" "The Trooper" "The Number of the Beast" "Revelations" (Live) "The Prisoner" "Run to the Hills" "Hallowed Be Thy Name"

Disc four
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Wrathchild" "Killers" "Remember Tomorrow" "Phantom of the Opera" "Sanctuary" "Prowler" "Invasion" "Strange World" "Iron Maiden"

Tracks 1 & 2 taken from Killers (1981) Tracks 3 - 5 taken from Iron Maiden (1980) Tracks 6, 7 & 9 taken from The Soundhouse Tapes (1979) Track 8 was a previously unreleased out-take from The Soundhouse Tapes

"The Number of the Beast" "Can I Play With Madness" "Fear of the Dark" (Live) "Run to the Hills" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "The Evil That Men Do" "Aces High" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Man on the Edge" "Virus" "Running Free" (Live) "Wasted Years" "The Clairvoyant" "The Trooper" "Hallowed Be Thy Name"

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:g6520r4at48b~T1

''Ed Hunter''

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Ed Hunter
Ed Hunter

Compilation album & video game by Iron Maiden & Synthetic Dimensions respectively Released Recorded Genre Length Label July 1999 1980 - 1998 Heavy metal 1:43:34 EMI Iron Maiden chronology Virtual XI (1998) Ed Hunter (1999) Brave New World (2000)

Ed Hunter, a rail shooter video game, was released in 1999, and is based on and accompanied by Iron Maiden's music. The game objective consists of rescuing the mascot of Iron Maiden, Eddie, from a prison while passing through game settings evocative of the albums. Music from the band completes the game's customizable soundtrack. The game passes through various levels, starting in a street, then to a mental institution, then into hell itself, and then into other various locations. The locations are from the covers of previous Iron Maiden records. The gameplay itself consists of shooting the appearing enemies with the mouse cursor. The game travels on "a track" and the player has no control over movement apart from occasionally choosing the route he will take through the levels. The player can select which tracks play in the background of which levels. The package includes 3 CDs. The first CD contains 14 songs, the second CD contains 6 songs and the installation program for the game, and the third CD contains the game data. The soundtrack allegedly consists of the top 20 songs voted for by Iron Maiden fans on Maiden's official website. The US version has a hidden bonus track of a new recording of "Wrathchild" with Bruce Dickinson on lead vocals, which subsequently received radio play. This track was not present in the initial US pressing of the game, but on runs that featured a sticker on the shrinkwrap stating that the track was included. A sticker on the compilation album Best of the Beast originally announced the upcoming release of this game as "Melt, Eddie's own state-of-the-art 3D game". The Ed Hunter Tour was the tour supporting the album.

''Ed Hunter''

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Levels
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. London's East End The Shady Pines Asylum The Pits of Hell The Graveyard The Pharaoh's Tomb Blade Runner Futureal Finale

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Iron Maiden (Live)" 2. "The Trooper" 3. "The Number Of The Beast" 4. "Wrathchild" 5. "Futureal" 6. "Fear Of The Dark" 7. "Be Quick or Be Dead" 8. "2 Minutes To Midnight" 9. "Man On The Edge" 10. "Aces High" 11. "The Evil That Men Do" 12. "Wasted Years" 13. "Powerslave" 14. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 15. "Wrathchild (1999 Version)" - hidden track on the US version

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Run To The Hills" "The Clansman" "Phantom Of The Opera" "Killers" "Stranger In A Strange Land" "Tailgunner"

''Ed Hunter''

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External links
Ed Hunter FAQ, Patches & Manual [1] Synthetic Dimensions [2]

References
[1] http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ edhunter. html [2] http:/ / www. syndime. com/

''Edward the Great''

193

Edward the Great


Edward the Great

Greatest hits by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label November 5, 2002 1982 - 2001 Heavy metal 74:04 EMI Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Rock in Rio (2002) Edward the Great (2002) Eddie's Archive (2002)

Edward the Great was Iron Maiden's third "best-of album" (counting their 1999 video game Ed Hunter which came with a 20 track best of CD with songs chosen by the fans), and was released on November 5, 2002 along with the massive Eddie's Archive box set, as a way to introduce new fans to Maiden. However, many older fans complained about the lack of exclusive or rare material on it. Another complaint of many was that the album lacked material from the first two Iron Maiden albums, Iron Maiden and Killers which featured Paul Di'Anno on vocals. In 2005, a revised edition was released in Europe, Asia and South-America, with a slightly different tracklist. This "updated" version was to coincide with the release of The Essential Iron Maiden compilation that was released in North America. The revised edition features some songs from the Dance of Death album, and a different live version of "Fear of the Dark". The new version also adds the song "Brave New World" from the album of the same name. The booklet includes a new foreword by Iron Maiden manager Rod Smallwood, whereas the original version has a foreword by founding member Steve Harris. The album cover does not differentiate between the two other than the tracklisting - some shops still sell old stock of the original. In some cases, record distributors accidentally released the revised 2005 version CD with the old track list still on the album sleeve, although this mistake has since been corrected.

''Edward the Great''

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Track listing
Original Track Listing (from 2002)
Original track listing No. Title 1. "Run to the Hills" 2. "The Number of the Beast" 3. "Flight of Icarus" 4. "The Trooper" 5. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 6. "Wasted Years" 7. "Can I Play with Madness" Writer(s) Steve Harris Harris Original album The Number of the Beast The Number of the Beast Length 3:55 4:52 3:52 4:11 6:00 5:06 3:31

Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith Piece of Mind Harris Dickinson, Smith Smith Dickinson, Smith, Harris Piece of Mind Powerslave Somewhere in Time Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Seventh Son of a Seventh Son No Prayer for the Dying No Prayer for the Dying

8. "The Evil That Men Do"

Dickinson, Smith, Harris

4:34

9. "The Clairvoyant"

Harris

4:27

10. "Infinite Dreams"

Harris

6:10

11. "Holy Smoke" 12. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 13. "Man on the Edge" 14. "Futureal" 15. "The Wicker Man" 16. "Fear of the Dark" (live) Total length:

Dickinson, Harris Dickinson

3:48 4:44

Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers Bayley, Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris Harris

The X Factor Virtual XI Brave New World Rock in Rio

4:12 2:55 4:34 8:04 1:14:55

Revised Track Listing (from 2005)


Revised track listing No. Title 1. "Run to the Hills" 2. "The Number of the Beast" 3. "The Trooper" 4. "Flight of Icarus" 5. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 6. "Wasted Years" 7. "Can I Play with Madness" Writer(s) Harris Harris Harris Dickinson, Smith Dickinson, Smith Smith Dickinson, Smith, Harris Original album The Number of the Beast The Number of the Beast Piece of Mind Piece of Mind Powerslave Somewhere in Time Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Length 3:55 4:52 4:11 3:52 6:00 5:06 3:31

8. "The Evil That Men Do"

Dickinson, Smith, Harris

4:34

''Edward the Great''

195
Dickinson No Prayer for the Dying 4:44

9. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" 10. "Man on the Edge" 11. "Futureal" 12. "The Wicker Man" 13. "Brave New World" 14. "Wildest Dreams" 15. "Rainmaker" 16. "Fear of the Dark" (live) Total length:

Bayley, Gers Bayley, Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris

The X Factor Virtual XI Brave New World

4:12 2:55 4:34 6:18 3:52 3:48 7:28 1:13:52

Dickinson, Dave Murray, Harris Brave New World Smith, Harris Dickinson, Murray, Harris Harris Dance of Death Dance of Death Death on the Road

Certifications
Country Certification Sales/shipments Canada Gold [2] 50,000

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:lif1zfd3ehok~T1 [2] CRIA Gold & Platinum certifications for October 2006 (http:/ / www. cria. ca/ gold/ 1006_g. php). Retrieved July 25, 2007.

''Best of the 'B' Sides''

196

Best of the 'B' Sides


Best of the 'B' Sides

Compilation album by Iron Maiden Released Genre Length November 4, 2002 Heavy metal 2:14:10 Iron Maiden chronology Beast Over Hammersmith (2002) Best of the 'B' Sides (2002) The BBC Archives (2002)

Best of the 'B' Sides is a compilation of b-sides by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on November 4, 2002. Best of the 'B' Sides is a collection of b-sides that were recorded by the band over the years. All tracks are remastered in line with the 1998 Remastered CDs, and all included tracks from 1979-1989 replace their original CD appearances on The First Ten Years set in 1990. It does not include non album singles, such as "Women In Uniform", "Virus", B Sides that had appeared on the remastered albums, the B Side "I Live My Way" or a number of live tracks. However the compilation is widely regarded as a thorough compilation, covering 20 years of B Sides. Best of the 'B' Sides was released in 2002 as a part of Eddie's Archive.

Track listing
CD one
1. "Burning Ambition" 2:42 2. "Drifter (Live)" 6:03 3. "Invasion" 2:39 4. "Remember Tomorrow (Live)" 5:28 5. "I've Got the Fire" (Ronnie Montrose; Montrose cover) 2:39 6. "Cross-Eyed Mary" (Ian Anderson; Jethro Tull cover) 3:56 7. "Rainbow's Gold" (Beckett cover) 4:59 8. "King of Twilight" (Nektar cover) 4:53 9. "Reach Out" (Dave Colwell); lead vocals sung by Adrian Smith 3:33 10. "That Girl" (Andy Barnett, Goldsworth, Jupp; FM cover) 5:05 11. "Juanita" (Steve Barnacle, Derek O'Neil; Marshall Fury cover) 3:47 12. "The Sheriff of Huddersfield" 3:35

''Best of the 'B' Sides'' 13. "Black Bart Blues" 6:41 14. "Prowler '88" 4:09 15. "Charlotte the Harlot '88" 4:13

197

CD two
1. "All in Your Mind" (Del Bromham; Stray cover) 4:31 2. "Kill Me Ce Soir"(George Kooymans, Barry Hay, John Fenton; Golden Earring cover) 6:17 3. "I'm a Mover" (Andy Fraser, Paul Rodgers; Free cover) 3:29 4. "Communication Breakdown" (John Bonham, John Paul Jones, Jimmy Page; Led Zeppelin cover) 2:42 5. "Nodding Donkey Blues" (B-Side to "Be Quick or Be Dead") 3:17 6. "Space Station No. 5" (Ronnie Montrose; Montrose cover) 3:47 7. "I Can't See My Feelings" (Budgie cover) 3:50 8. "Roll over Vic Vella" (Chuck Berry cover with different lyrics) 4:48 9. "Justice of the Peace" 3:33 10. "Judgement Day" 4:04 11. "My Generation" (Pete Townshend; The Who cover) 3:37 12. "Doctor Doctor" (Michael Schenker, Phil Mogg; UFO cover) 4:50 13. 14. 15. 16. "Blood on the Worlds Hands (Live)" 6:07 "The Aftermath (Live)" 6:45 "Futureal (Live)" 3:01 "Wasted Years (Live)" 5:00

''The Essential Iron Maiden''

198

The Essential Iron Maiden


The Essential Iron Maiden

Greatest hits by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer July 5, 2005 1980 - 2003 Heavy metal 2:27:21 Sanctuary/Columbia Martin Birch Nigel Green Steve Harris Will Malone Kevin Shirley Professional reviews

Allmusic link [2] Pitchfork Media (7.5/10) link Iron Maiden chronology Dance of Death (2003) The Essential Iron Maiden (2005) Death on the Road (2005)

[1]

The Essential Iron Maiden is the fourth greatest hits compilation by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on July 5, 2005. Released exclusively in North America, it is part of Sony Music Entertainment's The Essential series. Contrary to other releases from this series, the track listing is presented in reverse-chronological order (i.e., the latest studio-recorded songs appear first).

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Track listing
Disc one
1. "Paschendale" (Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 8:26 From Dance of Death (2003) 2. "Rainmaker" (Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray, Harris) 3:48 From Dance of Death (2003) 3. "The Wicker Man" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:35 From Brave New World (2000) 4. "Brave New World" (Dickinson, Murray, Harris) 6:18 From Brave New World (2000) 5. "Futureal" (Blaze Bayley, Harris) 2:56 From Virtual XI (1998) 6. "The Clansman" (Harris) 8:59 From Virtual XI (1998) 7. "Sign of the Cross" (Harris) 11:16 From The X Factor (1995) 8. "Man on the Edge" (Bayley, Janick Gers) 4:11 From The X Factor (1995) 9. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Dickinson, Gers) 3:23 From Fear of the Dark (1992) 10. "Fear of the Dark" (live) (Harris) 7:52 From Rock in Rio (2002); originally from Fear of the Dark (1992) 11. "Holy Smoke" (Dickinson, Harris) 3:47 From No Prayer for the Dying (1990) 12. "Bring Your Daughter...To the Slaughter" (Dickinson) 4:43 From No Prayer for the Dying (1990) 13. "The Clairvoyant" (Harris) 4:26 From Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988)

Disc two
1. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:34 From Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) 2. "Wasted Years" (Smith) 5:06 From Somewhere in Time (1986) 3. "Heaven Can Wait" (Harris) 7:20 From Somewhere in Time (1986) 4. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Dickinson, Smith) 6:00 From Powerslave (1984) 5. "Aces High" (Harris) 4:29 From Powerslave (1984) 6. "Flight of Icarus" (Dickinson, Smith) 3:51 From Piece of Mind (1983)

''The Essential Iron Maiden'' 7. "The Trooper" (Harris) 4:12 From Piece of Mind (1983) 8. "The Number of the Beast" (Harris) 4:52 From The Number of the Beast (1982) 9. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 3:54 From The Number of the Beast (1982) 10. "Wrathchild" (Harris) 2:55 From Killers (1981) 11. "Killers" (Di'Anno, Harris) 5:01 From Killers (1981) 12. "Phantom of the Opera" (Harris) 7:06 From Iron Maiden (1980) 13. "Running Free" (live)(Di'Anno, Harris) 8:44 From Live After Death (1985); originally from Iron Maiden (1980) 14. "Iron Maiden" (live) (Harris) 4:54 From Death On The Road (2005); originally from Iron Maiden (1980)

200

Credits
Paul Di'Anno - Vocals (Disc 2- Tracks 10-12) Bruce Dickinson - Vocals (Disc 1-Tracks 1-4, 9-13; Disc 2-Tracks 1-9, 13-14) Blaze Bayley - Vocals (Disc 1- Tracks 5-8) Dave Murray - Guitar (All Tracks) Dennis Stratton - Guitar (Disc 2- Track 12) Adrian Smith - Guitar (Disc 1- Tracks 1-4,13; Disc 2- 1-11; 13-14) Janick Gers - Guitar (Disc 1- Tracks 1-12) Steve Harris - Bass, Producer (All Tracks) Clive Burr - Drums (Disc 2- Tracks 8-12) Nicko McBrain - Drums (Disc 1- All Tracks; Disc 2 Tracks 1-7; 13-14)

with Martin Birch - Producer Simon Fowler - Photography Lonn Friend - Liner Notes Nigel Green - Producer Michael Kenney - Keyboards Will Malone - Producer Dimo Safari - Cover Photo Kevin Shirley - Producer, Engineer, Mastering, Mixing Howie Weinberg - Mastering

''The Essential Iron Maiden''

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References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:u0j97ia5g7xr~T1 [2] http:/ / www. pitchforkmedia. com/ article/ record_review/ 18786-the-essential

Somewhere Back in Time


Somewhere Back in Time - The Best of: 1980 - 1989

Greatest hits by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer May 12, 2008 1980-1989 Heavy metal 1:10:53 EMI Universal Music Group (U.S.) Various Professional reviews

Allmusic Kerrang! Metal Hammer

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology A Matter of Life and Death (2006) Somewhere Back in Time - The Best of: 1980 1989 (2008) Flight 666 - The Original Soundtrack (2009)

Somewhere Back in Time - The Best of: 1980 - 1989 is a best of album by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, containing a selection of songs from the first seven Iron Maiden albums. It was released in conjunction with the band's Somewhere Back In Time World Tour to allow new fans to listen to a selection of the band's material that was played on the tour. The album cover features the Pharaoh Eddie monument from Powerslave and Cyborg Eddie from Somewhere in Time. In addition, the Iron Maiden logo is colored blue with a gold outline - the same colours used on the cover of Seventh Son of a Seventh Son.

''Somewhere Back in Time''

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Track listing
1. "Churchill's Speech" - 0.50 2. "Aces High (Live)" (Steve Harris) - 4.36 from Live After Death; Originally from Powerslave 3. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) - 6.00 From Powerslave 4. "The Trooper" (Harris) - 4.11 From Piece of Mind 5. "Wasted Years" (Smith) - 5.06 From Somewhere in Time 6. "Children of the Damned" (Harris) - 4.35 From The Number of the Beast 7. "The Number of the Beast (Harris) - 4.53 From The Number of the Beast 8. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) - 3.53 From The Number of the Beast 9. "Phantom of the Opera" (Live) (Harris) - 7.21 From Live After Death; Originally from Iron Maiden 10. "The Evil That Men Do" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) - 4.34 From Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 11. "Wrathchild" (Live) (Harris) - 3.07 From Live After Death; Originally from Killers 12. "Can I Play with Madness?" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) - 3.31 From Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 13. "Powerslave" (Dickinson) - 6.47 From Powerslave 14. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (Harris) - 7.12 From The Number of the Beast 15. "Iron Maiden" (Live) (Harris) - 4.50 From Live After Death; Originally from Iron Maiden

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar Dave Murray - guitars Adrian Smith - guitars Nicko McBrain - drums except tracks 6, 7, 8, 14 Clive Burr - drums on tracks 6, 7, 8, 14

with Michael Kenney - keyboards on tracks 10 and 12

''Somewhere Back in Time''

203

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:anfuxzwjldje

204

Extended plays
The Soundhouse Tapes
The Soundhouse Tapes

EP by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label 9 November 1979 31 December 1978 Heavy metal 11:28 Rock Hard Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology The Soundhouse Tapes (1979) Iron Maiden (1980)

The Soundhouse Tapes is an EP by Iron Maiden. The Soundhouse Tapes are the very first recordings of Iron Maiden. Released on 9 November 1979, it features three songs taken from the demo tape Spaceward. The songs were recorded by the band on New Year's Eve 1978/79. The three tracks - "Prowler", "Invasion" and "Iron Maiden" appear in rougher form than they would later be heard on the first Iron Maiden album and subsequent singles. The fourth song from the demo - "Strange World" - would also be rerecorded for Iron Maiden. The song was not included in The Soundhouse Tapes because the band was not happy with the recording quality. A demo of Transylvania, presumably from the same recording sessions (or at least the same era), has been floating around on the internet for some time as well. The EP was extremely successful, selling all 5,000 copies of its initial pressing by mail order in less than a week. To impress more, the band claimed to have sold 15,000 copies. The Soundhouse Tapes has been bootlegged several times, as well as being re-released by the band in full on the 4 LP vinyl version of the Best of the Beast box set, and spread over singles and the two CD version released around the same time. The Soundhouse Tapes' title was taken from The Soundhouse club. This was a heavy metal disco run primarily out of the Prince of Wales pub in Kingsbury, North West London by NWOBHM pioneer Neal Kay. Iron Maiden would

''The Soundhouse Tapes'' play regular gigs at The Soundhouse and the venue was instrumental in gaining the band a wider following. It is the only Iron Maiden record to feature the band as a four piece (with Dave Murray as its only guitarist). In 2002, when the band reissued its catalogue, they held a special promotion in which a fan could collect proofs of purchase from the remasters and send them in along with shipping and handling to receive a CD of these recordings (this is, to date, the only time the Soundhouse Tapes recordings have (officially) been released on CD.) Swedish prog metal band Opeth released a live album in 2007 called The Roundhouse Tapes in homage to this title.

205

Track listing
All songs written and composed by Steve Harris.
No. Title 1. "Iron Maiden" 2. "Invasion" 3. "Prowler" Length 4:01

3:07 4:20

Credits
Paul Di'Anno - Vocals Dave Murray - guitar Steve Harris - bass guitar Doug Sampson - drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:lwf3zf0heh4k

''Live!! +one''

206

Live!! +one
Live!! +one

EP (live) by Iron Maiden Released November 1980 (Japan) 1984 (Greece)

Recorded 4 July 1980 at the Marquee Club in London Genre Label Producer Heavy metal EMI Doug Hall Iron Maiden chronology Iron Maiden (1980) Live!! +one (1980) Killers (1981)

Live!! +one is a live EP that was initially released only in Japan on November 1980 by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. All the tracks were recorded live at the Marquee Club in London on 4 July 1980. The recordings of "Sanctuary" and "Drifter" available on this EP cannot be found anywhere else whilst the other tracks can be found as b-sides. In 1984 the EP was released in Greece with an expanded tracklist but only "I've Got the Fire" was recorded at the Marquee Club. The other added tracks were taken from the Maiden Japan EP and "Prowler" was taken from the band's self-titled debut album.

Track listing
Japanese release

''Live!! +one''

207

Side one No. Title 1. "Sanctuary" (live) Writer(s) Paul Di'Anno, Dave Murray, Steve Harris Length 4:22 7:12

2. "Phantom of the Opera" (live) Harris

Side two No. Title 1. "Drifter" (live) Writer(s) Harris Length 8:16 3:07

2. "Women in Uniform" (Skyhooks cover) Greg Macainsh

Greek release
Side one No. Title 1. "Drifter" (live) 2. "Phantom of the Opera" (live) Writer(s) Length Harris Harris 8:16 7:12 3:07 4:04

3. "Women in Uniform" (Skyhooks cover) Macainsh 4. "Innocent Exile" (live) Harris

Side two No. Title 1. "Sanctuary" (live) Writer(s) Di'Anno, Murray, Harris Harris Di'Anno, Harris Di'Anno, Harris Ronnie Montrose Length 4:22

2. "Prowler" 3. "Running Free" (live) 4. "Remember Tomorrow" (live) 5. "I Got the Fire" (live Montrose cover)

3:55 2:47 5:43 3:14

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno lead vocals Dave Murray guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar, backing vocals Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr drums

''Maiden Japan''

208

Maiden Japan
Maiden Japan

EP by Iron Maiden Released August 1981

Recorded May 23, 1981 at Kosei Nenkin Hall, (Nagoya), Japan Genre Label Heavy metal EMI

Producer Iron Maiden, Doug Hall Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Killers (1981) Maiden Japan (1981) The Number of the Beast (1982)

Alternate cover

Alternate "Venezuelan" cover

Maiden Japan, also known as Heavy Metal Army, is a live EP by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The title is a pun of Deep Purple's live album Made in Japan. There are at least two different versions of this EP; all tracks were recorded in Kosei Nenkin Hall in Nagoya on May 23, 1981. It was lead singer Paul Di'Anno's final recording with the band, and features a maximum of 5 tracks. The original Japanese pressing features only 4 tracks and the record speed is 45RPM. It was never the band's intention to release this album, but the Japanese wanted a live album.

''Maiden Japan''

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Cover Art
The original cover, of which only approximately 25,000 were produced in Venezuela, depicted the band's mascot, Eddie, holding the decapitated head of singer Paul Di'Anno[2] . The replacement cover was done on very short notice after Iron Maiden's manager, Rod Smallwood, received a proof for review, and became agitated at Di'Anno's depiction because the band was looking to replace him.

Bootleg of full recording


In November 2008, after 27 years, the complete audience recording of the Nagoya gig finally surfaced on a Japanese 2CD bootleg released by Tarantura. It confirmed that "Running Free" was played twice that night, and that the setlist included 18 songs for a total duration of about 93 minutes (one of the longest gigs played by Di'Anno with Iron Maiden).

Track listing
Standard edition
1. "Running Free" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris) 2. "Remember Tomorrow" (Di'Anno, Harris) 3. "Killers" (Di'Anno, Harris) 4. "Innocent Exile" (Harris)

US, Canada, Argentina, Australia, New Zealand, and Brazil editions


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Running Free" (Di'Anno, Harris) "Remember Tomorrow" (Di'Anno, Harris) "Wrathchild" (Harris) "Killers" (Di'Anno, Harris) "Innocent Exile" (Harris)

Credits
Paul Di'Anno - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass, backing vocals Clive Burr - drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:impzefbkhgf8 [2] Popoff, Martin (2006). Run For Cover: The Art Of Derek Riggs (http:/ / www. derekriggs. com/ ). Aardvark Publishing. p.40. ISBN1-4276-0538-6. .

''No More Lies''

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No More Lies
No More Lies Dance of Death Souvenir EP
EP by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Producer March 29, 2004 2003 Heavy metal 35:42 EMI Kevin Shirley, Steve Harris Iron Maiden chronology Eddie's Archive (2002) No More Lies - Dance of Death Souvenir EP (2003) Dance of Death (2003)

No More Lies - Dance of Death Souvenir EP is a studio EP by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It was released on March 29, 2004. This EP was released as a "thank you" to fans, and came in a special box, which also contains a special sweatband. Besides the studio version of "No More Lies" (originally on the 2003 album Dance of Death), it also contains two alternate versions of songs from the Dance of Death album: an orchestral version of "Paschendale", and an electric version of "Journeyman" (the original version of the song, unlike the acoustic album version). The EP also contains a hidden bonus track, a version of the song "Age of Innocence", with drummer Nicko McBrain's attempt at singing.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. "No More Lies" (Steve Harris) 7:21 "Paschendale" (orchestral version) (Adrian Smith, Harris) 8:27 "Journeyman" (electric version) (Bruce Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 7:06 "Age of Innocence (How Old?)" (hidden bonus track) (Dave Murray, Harris) 6:33

Chart positions

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Chart (2004)

Peak position 3 [1] [2] [3] [4]

Finnish Albums Chart French Albums Chart Italian Albums Chart Swiss Albums Chart

70 10 93

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Janick Gers - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums, vocals

References
[1] "Finnish charts portal - Search for: Iron Maiden > Song" (http:/ / finnishcharts. com/ search. asp?cat=s& search=Iron+ Maiden). finnishcharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-11-07. [2] "Les charts franais - Recherche pour: Iron Maiden > Chanson" (http:/ / lescharts. com/ search. asp?search=Iron+ Maiden& cat=s) (in French). lescharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-11-07. [3] "Italian charts portal - Search for: Iron Maiden > Song" (http:/ / italiancharts. com/ search. asp?search=Iron+ Maiden& cat=s). italiancharts.com. . Retrieved 2008-11-07. [4] "Hitparade sterreich - Suche nach: Iron Maiden > Song" (http:/ / hitparade. ch/ search. asp?search=Iron+ Maiden& cat=s) (in German). hitparade.ch. . Retrieved 2008-11-07.

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Box sets
The First Ten Years
The First Ten Years is a series of 10 cds and double 12" singles by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released between February 24 and April 28, 1990, to commemorate Iron Maiden's first ten years of releasing singles. Each cd/double 12" contains two of Iron Maiden's singles, including the b-sides. In addition, each contained a bonus track, a part in the "Listen With Nicko" series, in which drummer Nicko McBrain tells about the songs on the discs, in his own humorous way. Each part in the series included a special voucher. Ten vouchers could be exchanged by mail order for a limited edition box in which to store the CDs or records. Although the individual discs are nowadays still fairly easy to come by, the boxes are a bit harder to find. Iron Maiden also released The First Ten Years: The Videos on VHS videotape and laserdisc. It contains 16 videoclips the band had made up to that point.
The First Ten Years

The First Ten Years part I


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Running Free" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris) "Burning Ambition" (Harris) "Sanctuary" (Iron Maiden) "Drifter (live)" (Harris) "I've Got the Fire (live)" (Ronnie Montrose) "Listen With Nicko! Part I" (Nicko McBrain)

The First Ten Years part II


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Women in Uniform" (Greg Macainsh) "Invasion" (Harris) "Phantom of the Opera (live)" (Harris) "Twilight Zone" (Harris, Dave Murray) "Wrathchild" (Harris) "Listen With Nicko! Part II" (McBrain)

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The First Ten Years part III


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Purgatory" (Harris) "Genghis Khan" (Harris) "Running Free" (live at The Kosei Nenkin Hall, Nagoya, Japan 5-23-81) (Harris, Di'Anno) "Remember Tomorrow" (live at The Kosei Nenkin Hall, Nagoya, Japan 5-23-81) (Harris, Di'Anno) "Killers" (live at The Kosei Nenkin Hall, Nagoya, Japan 5-23-81) (Harris, Di'Anno) "Innocent Exile" (live at The Kosei Nenkin Hall, Nagoya, Japan 5-23-81) (Harris) "Listen With Nicko! Part III" (McBrain)

The First Ten Years part IV


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) "Total Eclipse" (Harris, Murray, Clive Burr) "The Number of the Beast" (Harris) "Remember Tomorrow (live)" (Harris, Di'Anno) "Listen With Nicko! Part IV" (McBrain)

The First Ten Years part V


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Flight of Icarus" (Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson) "I've Got The Fire" (Montrose) "The Trooper" (Harris) "Cross-Eyed Mary" (Ian Anderson; Jethro Tull cover) "Listen With Nicko! Part V" (McBrain)

The First Ten Years part VI


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Smith, Dickinson) "Rainbow's Gold" (Slesser, Mountain) "Mission From 'Arry" (Harris, McBrain) "Aces High" (Harris) "King of Twilight" (Nektar) "The Number of the Beast (live)" (Harris) "Listen With Nicko! Part VI" (McBrain)

The First Ten Years part VII


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Running Free (live)" (Harris) "Sanctuary (live)" (Iron Maiden) "Murders In The Rue Morgue (live)" (Harris) "Run to the Hills (live)" (Harris) "Phantom of the Opera (live)" (Harris) "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra) (live)" (Harris) "Listen With Nicko! Part VII" (McBrain)

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The First Ten Years part VIII


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Wasted Years" (Smith) "Reach Out" (Dave Colwell) "Sheriff Of Huddersfield" (Iron Maiden) "Stranger in a Strange Land" (Smith) "That Girl" (Andy Barnett, Goldsworth, Jupp) "Juanita" (Steve Barnacle, Derek O'Neil) "Listen With Nicko! Part VIII" (McBrain)

The First Ten Years part IX


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Can I Play with Madness" (Smith, Dickinson, Harris) "Black Bart Blues" (Harris, Dickinson) "Massacre" (Phil Lynott, Scott Gorham, Brian Downey) "The Evil That Men Do" (Smith, Dickinson, Harris) "Prowler 88" (Harris) "Charlotte the Harlot 88" (Murray)

7. "Listen With Nicko! Part IX" (McBrain)

The First Ten Years part X


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "The Clairvoyant (live)" (Harris) "The Prisoner (live)" (Smith, Harris) "Heaven Can Wait (live)" (Harris) "Infinite Dreams (live)" (Harris) "Killers (live)" (Di'Anno, Harris) "Still Life (live)" (Murray, Harris) "Listen With Nicko! Part X" (McBrain)

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Eddie's Head
Eddie's Head

Box set by Iron Maiden Released Dec 1, 1998 Label Raw Power Records

Professional reviews

Allmusic:

[1]

Eddie's Head is a box set by Iron Maiden, in the shape of the head of their mascot, Eddie and containing their first 12 albums remastered, from Iron Maiden to Live at Donington, each with bonus multimedia material, plus a limited In Profile CD. The spine of each CD has a part of the original cover art for Iron Maiden.

Track listing
Disk: 1 (Iron Maiden)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Prowler" (Steve Harris) 3:56 "Sanctuary" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris, Dave Murray) 3:16 "Remember Tomorrow" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris) 5:28 "Running Free" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris) 3:17 "Phantom of the Opera" (Steve Harris) 7:07 "Transylvania" (Steve Harris) 4:19 "Strange World" (Steve Harris) 5:32 "Charlotte the Harlot" (Dave Murray) 4:12 "Iron Maiden" (Steve Harris) 3:38

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Disk: 2 (Killers)
1. "The Ides of March" (Harris) 1:45 2. "Wrathchild" (Harris) 2:54 3. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" (Harris) 4:19 4. "Another Life" (Harris) 3:22 5. "Genghis Khan" (Harris) 3:06 6. "Innocent Exile" (Harris) 3:53 7. "Killers" (Di'Anno, Harris) 5:01 8. "Prodigal Son" (Harris) 6:11 9. "Purgatory" (Harris) 3:21 10. "Twilight Zone" (Harris, Murray) 2:34 11. "Drifter" (Harris) 4:48 El Dorado

Disk: 3 (The Number of the Beast)


1. "Invaders" (Steve Harris) 3:24 2. "Children of the Damned" (Harris) 4:35 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "The Prisoner" (Adrian Smith, Harris) 6:04 "22 Acacia Avenue" (Smith) 6:37 "The Number of the Beast" (Harris) 4:48 "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 3:54 "Gangland" (Smith, Clive Burr) 3:48 "Total Eclipse" (Harris, Dave Murray, Burr) - 4:25 "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (Harris) 7:14

Disk: 4 (Piece of Mind)


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Where Eagles Dare" (Steve Harris) 6:10 "Revelations" (Bruce Dickinson) 6:48 "Flight of Icarus" (Adrian Smith, Dickinson) 3:51 "Die With Your Boots On" (Smith, Dickinson, Harris) 5:28 "The Trooper" (Harris) 4:10 "Still Life" (Dave Murray, Harris) 4:53 "Quest for Fire" (Harris) 3:41 "Sun and Steel" (Dickinson, Smith) 3:26 "To Tame a Land" (Harris) 7:27

Disk: 5 (Powerslave)
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Aces High" (Steve Harris) 4:29 "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) 5:59 "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" (Instrumental) (Harris) 4:12 "Flash of the Blade" (Dickinson) 4:02 "The Duellists" (Harris) 6:06 "Back in the Village" (Dickinson, Smith) 5:20

7. "Powerslave" (Dickinson) 6:47 8. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" (Harris) 13:34

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Disk: 6 (Live After Death)


1. "Intro: Churchill's Speech" 1:32 2. "Aces High" 4:14 3. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 5:16 4. "The Trooper" 4:07 5. "Revelations" 5:59 6. "Flight of Icarus" 3:30 7. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" 14:06 8. "Powerslave" 6:54 9. "The Number of the Beast" 4:49 10. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 7:14 11. "Iron Maiden" 4:02 12. "Run to the Hills" 3:50 13. "Running Free" 4:08

Disk: 7 (Live After Death)


1. "Wrathchild" 2:58 2. 3. 4. 5. "22 Acacia Avenue" 4:58 "Children of the Damned" 4:21 "Die With Your Boots On" 5:39 "Phantom of the Opera" 7:01

Disk: 8 (Somewhere in Time)


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Caught Somewhere in Time" (Steve Harris) 7:25 "Wasted Years" (Adrian Smith) 5:07 "Sea of Madness" (Smith) 5:42 "Heaven Can Wait" (Harris) 7:21 "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" (Harris) 6:31 "Stranger in a Strange Land" (Smith) 5:44 "Dj Vu" (Harris, Dave Murray) 4:56 "Alexander the Great" (Harris) 8:37

Disk: 9 (Seventh Son of a Seventh Son)


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. "Moonchild" (Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson) 5:39 "Infinite Dreams" (Steve Harris) 6:09 "Can I Play with Madness" (Smith, Dickinson, Harris) 3:31 "The Evil That Men Do" (Smith, Dickinson, Harris) 4:34 "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" (Harris) 9:53 "The Prophecy" (Dave Murray, Harris) 5:05 "The Clairvoyant" (Harris) 4:27 "Only the Good Die Young" (Harris, Dickinson) 4:41

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Disk: 10 (No Prayer for the Dying)


1. "Tailgunner" (Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris) 4:15 2. "Holy Smoke" (Dickinson, Harris) 3:49 3. "No Prayer for the Dying" (Harris) 4:23 4. "Public Enema Number One" (Dickinson, Dave Murray) 4:13 5. "Fates Warning" (Harris, Murray) 4:12 6. "The Assassin" (Harris) 4:35 7. "Run Silent Run Deep" (Dickinson, Harris) 4:35 8. "Hooks in You" (Dickinson, Adrian Smith) 4:08 9. "Bring Your Daughter...To the Slaughter" (Dickinson) 4:45 10. "Mother Russia" (Harris) 5:32

Disk: 11 (Fear of the Dark)


1. 2. 3. 4. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers) 3:24 "From Here to Eternity" (Steve Harris) 3:38 "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" (Harris) 6:56 "Fear is the Key" (Dickinson, Gers) 5:35

5. "Childhood's End" (Harris) 4:40 6. "Wasting Love" (Dickinson, Gers) 5:50 7. "The Fugitive" (Harris) 4:54 8. "Chains of Misery" (Dave Murray, Dickinson) 3:37 9. "The Apparition" (Harris, Gers) 3:54 10. "Judas Be My Guide" (Dickinson, Murray) 3:08 11. "Weekend Warrior" (Harris, Gers) 5:39 12. "Fear of the Dark" (Harris) 7:18

Disk: 12 (A Real Dead One)


1. "Number of the Beast" 2. "Trooper" 3. "Prowler" 4. "Transylvania" 5. "Remember Tomorrow" 6. "Where Eagles Dare" 7. "Sanctuary" 8. "Running Free" 9. "Run to the Hills" 10. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 11. "Iron Maiden" 12. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" was up

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Disk: 13 (A Real Live One)


1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" 2. "From Here to Eternity" 3. "Can I Play with Madness" 4. "Wasting Love" 5. "Tailgunner" 6. "Evil That Men Do" 7. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" 8. "Bring Your Daughter.. To the Slaughter" 9. "Heaven Can Wait" 10. "The Clairvoyant" 11. "Fear of the Dark"

Disk: 14 (Live at Donington)


1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" 2. "Number of the Beast" 3. "Wrathchild" 4. "From Here to Eternity" 5. "Can I Play with Madness" 6. "Wasting Love" 7. "Tailgunner" 8. "Evil That Men Do" 9. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" 10. "Fear of the Dark" 11. "Bring Your Daughter.. To the Slaughter" 12. "Clairvoyant" 13. "Heaven Can Wait" 14. "Run to the Hills" why do you go to wiki pedia its all flies - i know! they should eat shit. they have listed "live after death" twice, when one should be "life after death" they are fuckin retards.

Disk: 16 (In Profile)


Written and narrated by Mike Hurst. Features excerpts of various songs, and interviews with Steve Harris, Dave Murray, Rod Smallwood and Blaze Bayley. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Pt. 1: Early Maiden Days" "Pt. 2: Groundwork" "Pt. 3: Ascendancy" "Pt. 4: Supremacy" "Pt. 5: Legends"

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Personnel
Blaze Bayley - vocals (disk 16) Martin Birch producer, engineer, mixing (disks 2-11) Albert Boekholt assistant engineer Clive Burr drums (disks 1-3) Sean Burrows assistant engineer George Chin photography Paul Di'Anno vocals (disks 1-2) Bruce Dickinson vocals (disks 3-15) Robert Ellis photography Paul Foster executive producer Simon Fowler photography Janick Gers guitar (disks 10-15) Frank Gibson assistant engineer Hugh Gilmour art direction, reissue design Nigel Green engineer Ross Halfin photography Denis Haliburton assistant engineer Steve Harris bass, vocals, (disks 1-15) producer, mixing (disks 11-15) Simon Heyworth remastering Mike Hurst narrator, liner notes (disk 16) Guido Karp photography Michael Kenney keyboards (disks 12-15) Martin Levan engineer Will Malone producer (disk 1) George Marino mastering Nicko McBrain - drums (disks 4-15) Mick McKenna engineer, assistant engineer Tony Mottram photography Dave Murray guitar (disks 1-15) Denis O'Regan photography Ronald Prent assistant engineer Derek Riggs cover illustration, sleeve design, sleeve idea (disks 1-15) Gus Shaw mastering Rod Smallwood photography, concept, sleeve design, sleeve idea Adrian Smith guitar, vocals (disks 2-9, 15) Dennis Stratton guitar, vocals (disk 1) Stephane "The Vardengrip" Wissner engineer Roger Woodhead executive producer Tim Young mastering

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References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:dnfoxqejldse

Eddie's Archive
Eddie's Archive

Box set by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label 16 November 2002 November 14, 1979 - 1999 Heavy metal 6:17:59 EMI Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Edward the Great (2002) Eddie's Archive (2002) Dance of Death (2003)

Eddie's Archive is a box set by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on 16 November 2002. The box, an embossed metal casket featuring the face of mascot Eddie, contains three double CDs, the Iron Maiden family tree and a shot glass. The family tree is an updated version of the family tree that originally came with A Real Dead One in 1993. Eddie's Archive was originally released as a limited edition, and the family tree was numbered. However, due to large demand, it was later re-released. For this re-release, the color of the inlay was changed from blue to red, and the family tree was not numbered.

''Eddie's Archive''

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Contents
1. The BBC Archives 2. Beast over Hammersmith 3. Best of the B'Sides

External links
Commentary on Eddie's Archive [2] Information on the Maiden Re-Issues [3]

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:4e6cmpnk9f2o~T1 [2] http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=album12d_archive/ commentary12d_archive& lang=eng& link=albums [3] http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ articles/ reissues. html

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Singles
"Running Free"
"Running Free"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden B-side 1980 single "Burning Ambition" 1985 live single "Sanctuary", "Murders in the Rue Morgue (live)" 8 February 1980 September 13, 1985 January 1980 (Running Free); December 1979 (Burning Ambition - Produced by Guy Edwards as a 4-piece band just prior to hiring Dennis Stratton & Clive Burr) Hard rock, heavy metal 3:16 3:28 EMI Steve Harris Paul Di'Anno Iron Maiden singles chronology "Running Free" (1980) "Sanctuary" (1980)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"Running Free"

224

"Aces High" (1984)

"Running Free (live)" (1985) 1985 live single

"Run to the Hills (live)" (1985)

1985 live single cover

"Running Free" was the first single released by Iron Maiden. It was released on the 8th of February 1980 on the 7" 45 rpm vinyl record format. It was written by Steve Harris and Paul Di'Anno. The song appears as the third track on the band's debut album Iron Maiden (and the fourth track on the 1998 re-release of he album). The song is about a troubled 16-year-old boy who runs away on a pick up truck, ends up in a Los Angeles jail and picks up a woman from a bar. The song is known to be one of the band's more traditional rock numbers and is still played at Maiden gigs today with the band members individually named by the lead singer during the long bass-solo. The single's cover art is also famously known as the first official appearance of the band's mascot Eddie. However in the cover-art his face is obscured because the band didn't want to unveil their mascot until the album's release. On the cover is a young metal-head , who strikingly resembles a young Bruce Dickinson. This should not be considered deliberate, as Dickinson had nothing to do with the band until some time after this. There are also several band names spray painted on the wall behind the boy in the picture, which may be some of the band's influences. The B-side "Burning Ambition" is one of Harris' earliest compositions written around the time he was in Gypsy's Kiss. The guitar solo in this song is played by Dave Murray. It is the only commercially released recording by Maiden to feature the band's former drummer Doug Sampson (he was featured in Maiden's demo Soundhouse Tapes) who was replaced by Clive Burr for the band's first album. The song has never been released on any album but was featured on the Best of the B'Sides in the Eddie's Archive Boxset as well as being featured as one of the background tunes on the The Early Days DVD documentary. In 1985, a live version of the song was released as the first single from the album Live After Death (Maiden's twelfth single).

"Running Free"

225

Track listing
1980 single
1. "Running Free" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris) - 3:16 2. "Burning Ambition" (Harris) - 2:42

1985 live single


1. "Running Free" (Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris) 3:28 2. "Sanctuary (live)" (Iron Maiden) 4:41 3. "Murders In The Rue Morgue (live)" (Steve Harris)- 4:33

Personnel
1980 single
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar & backing vocals on "Running Free" only Steve Harris - bass guitar & backing vocals Clive Burr - drums on "Running Free" only Doug Sampson - drums on "Burning Ambition" only

1985 live single


Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Santuary"

226

"Santuary"
"Sanctuary"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) 23 May 1980 Vinyl record(7")(12") 1980 Heavy metal 3:13 EMI Steve Harris Paul Di'Anno Dave Murray Will Malone Iron Maiden singles chronology "Running Free" (1980) "Sanctuary" (1980) "Women in Uniform" (1980)

Producer

"Sanctuary" is the second single released by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The single was released on 23 May 1980. The song was included in the US release of their debut album Iron Maiden but it was not included in the UK/European release. However, when the album was re-released in 1998 the song was added to the UK release. The cover art shows the band's mascot, Eddie having just murdered the Prime Minister of the time, Margaret Thatcher. This image, though intended as a lighthearted play on her nickname as the "Iron Lady", managed to cause a minor stir in local newspapers (though this was nothing compared with the reaction to one of their future albums). On most copies of the original single, Thatcher's eyes were covered by a black box because the image was considered offensive. Copies without this box are extremely rare, however are not to be confused with The First Ten Years 12" rerelease, which no longer features the black box. When Derek Riggs was asked about the artwork during "The First Ten Years" documentary, he said that he'd originally drawn the cover featuring Eddie murdering another woman, inspired by the line in the song "I never killed a woman before but I know how it feels", but when he took the art to the band they asked him to change it to include Margaret Thatcher. Of the incident, he said, "they wanted me to make it look like Margaret Thatcher, because she was called the Iron Maiden, but I didn't even have a photograph of the woman!" He wound up having to contact Margaret Thatcher's Public Relations people, who then

"Santuary" sent him a photo of her. "Sanctuary" was originally released in both 7" and 12" 45rpm vinyl formats. The 12" included Prowler as an extra song on the A-side. The b-side includes a live version of the song "Drifter" and a live version of Montrose's "I've Got the Fire", from their 1974 album Paper Money. "Drifter" includes the usual crowd interaction part where the audience is invited to follow the lead singer as he chants "Yo Yo Yo", parodying The Police song "Walking on the Moon" Both of the songs were recorded live at the Marquee Club in London on 3 April 1980. On "Sanctuary", the first guitar solo is played by Dennis Stratton followed by a guitar solo by Dave Murray. On both the live versions of "Drifter" and "I've Got the Fire", the first guitar solo is played by Murray while the second is played by Stratton. On live performances of the song, the band would always slip in the opening guitar riff of Queen's "Keep Yourself Alive" on the final portion of the instrumental section. During more modern performances, guitarist Janick Gers will normally create a large amount of guitar feedback and noise on his guitar before playing the riff. In live versions, singer Bruce Dickinson will sing a long "Yeah!" after the first verse. An alternate recording of the song was featured on the NWOBHM Metal for Muthas compilation.

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Track listing
1. "Sanctuary" (Harris, Di'Anno, Murray) - 3:14 2. "Drifter (Live at the Marquee, London 1980)" (Harris) - 6:03 3. "I've Got the Fire (Live at the Marquee, London 1980)" (Ronnie Montrose; Montrose cover) - 3:14

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr - drums

"Women in Uniform"

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"Women in Uniform"
"Women in Uniform"

Singleby Skyhooks from the album Guilty Until Proven Insane B-side "Don't Take Yur Lurex To The Laundromat" "Do The Hook" 1978 1978 Heavy metal 4:21 Mushroom Records Greg Macainsh Skyhooks singles chronology "Party to End All Parties" (1977) "Women in Uniform" (1978) "Megalomania" (1978)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"Women in Uniform" is a 1978 song originally recorded by the Australian band Skyhooks; it was written by the band's bass player, Greg Macainsh. It appeared on their fourth album, Guilty Until Proven Insane, and was a top 10 single in Australia.[1] The single was released in Australia both in a 7" and 12" format with the non-LP B-sides "Don't Take Yur Lurex To The Laundromat" and "Do The Hook". The international version of the single contaned "BBBBBBBBBBBBBBoogie" from the Guilty Until Proven Insane album.

"Women in Uniform"

229

Track listing
1. "Women in Uniform" (Macainsh) 2. "Don't Take Yur Lurex To The Laundromat" 3. "Do The Hook"

Iron Maiden version


"Women in Uniform"

Singleby Iron Maiden B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) "Invasion" "Phantom of the Opera" 27 October 1980 1980 Heavy metal 2:58 EMI Greg Macainsh

Iron Maiden singles chronology "Sanctuary" (1980) "Women in Uniform" (1980) "Twilight Zone" (1981)

Iron Maiden's cover of the Skyhooks' song "Women in Uniform" was the third single by the band, and their last recorded work to feature guitarist Dennis Stratton. It was released on October 17, 1980 and is not featured on any of the band's albums. The band, in particular Steve Harris have routinely mentioned their dislike of their version of this song, stating that it was not in their style. As a result, its only appearance on CD is as part of The First Ten Years series and a rare 1995 2CD issue of Killers, meaning that the song does not appear remastered. However its B-Side, Invasion appears remastered on the Best Of The B-Sides compilation. "Women in Uniform" would also be the basis of the band's first music-video, directed by Doug Smith and filmed at the Rainbow (London). "Women in Uniform" was included on an 11-track pressing of the Killers album as track number 8. This was available at some point in the United Kingdom and Australia. The United States 11-track pressing had the single "Twilight Zone" instead. Most copies of the album have neither song. "Women in Uniform" was the band's first-ever promotional video, which also introduced Eddie in a physical form. According to an interview found on The Early Days DVD, in the scene where Eddie gets up on the hospital bed, the man wearing the mask suffered a cut on his forehead after hitting the camera face-first. The actress Leslie Ash can be

"Women in Uniform" seen in the video - she is the blonde nurse seen @ 0:52 in the video. The single cover features an image of Margaret Thatcher with a Sterling submachine gun, preparing to attack Eddie. This was a joke done in response to the infamous Sanctuary cover, that featured Eddie killing Thatcher. The B-Side of the single, Invasion, is a re-recorded version of a song that originally appeared on The Soundhouse Tapes and also features on Best Of The B-Sides.

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Track listing
1. "Women in Uniform" (Macainsh; Skyhooks cover) 3:11 2. "Invasion" (Harris) 2:39 3. "Phantom of the Opera" Live at the Marquee, London 1980)" (Harris) 7:12

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Dennis Stratton guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals

Clive Burr drums

Other cover versions


The Whitlams performed this song at the 1998 ARIA Awards and released a limited edition single the following year, which also included "High Ground" and "1999".

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=11:hpfuxq95ldae~T1

"Twilight Zone"

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"Twilight Zone"
"Twilight Zone"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Killers Released Format Recorded Genre Length Writer(s) 2nd March 1981 vinyl record (7") (12") 1980 Heavy metal 2:33 Steve Harris Dave Murray Iron Maiden singles chronology "Women in Uniform" (1980) "Twilight Zone" (1981) "Purgatory" (1981)

"Twilight Zone" was the fourth single by Iron Maiden. It was released on March 2, 1981. The song was also released in the United States as part of the album Killers, however the British release did not include the song. When the album was re-released in the UK in 1998 the song was added to the tracklist. The lyrics tell of a mournful spirit who "Can't take no shape or form" and has his spirit trapped the between this world and Purgatory, referring to it as the Twilight Zone. The spirit has been dead for 3 years. He desires to make his presence known to a woman he is presumably haunting, but is unable to. He looks forward to her death, and even implies he wishes to hasten her demise in order to have company in the afterlife. Interestingly, on the cover painting, the picture of Eddie on top of the dresser is addressed "To Charlotte", seemingly making the young lady in the painting the eponymous prostitute from the song "Charlotte the Harlot". This single has been notably released on a blood red and a clear 45 r.p.m (7") Single, that has now become a rather rare collectible.

"Twilight Zone"

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The Red Vinyl. The same recording can be found on clear vinyl, as well as standard black vinyl.

Track listing
1. "Twilight Zone" (Harris, Murray) 2. "Wrathchild" (Harris)

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr drums

"Purgatory"

233

"Purgatory"
"Purgatory"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Killers Released Format Recorded Genre Length Writer(s) June 15, 1981 vinyl record (7") 1980 Heavy metal, speed metal 3:20 Steve Harris

Iron Maiden singles chronology "Twilight Zone" (1981) "Purgatory" (1981) "Run to the Hills" (1982)

"Purgatory" is Iron Maiden's fifth single and only single from the Killers album (Twilight Zone was not on the original European release of the album). This song is a remake of a very early Iron Maiden song originally called "Floating" which they used to play live during 1976 to 1977. According to current drummer Nicko McBrain, "Purgatory" is a faster re-arrangement of the original. This was the band's last single with Paul Di'Anno. "Purgatory" was one of the band's least successful singles and failed to break into the Top 50 in the UK charts. This may relate to the fact that this was their only single released with both a- and b-side already available on album in the same form. An interesting fact about this single is that the original cover art was withdrawn. The band had felt that it was of too high a caliber for just a single and requested a less complex cover be prepared in its place. The withdrawn cover later resurfaced as The Number of the Beast album. Ironically, the cover of this single has probably become more well known than any other Maiden cover as it is very often featured on merchandise despite the relative obscurity of the single. Purgatory is the first of three Maiden single-covers to feature Riggs' depiction of the devil. On the cover of the Run to the Hills single he does battle with Eddie and on the single cover of The Number of the Beast his decapitated head is displayed by Eddie.

"Purgatory"

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Track listing
1. "Purgatory" (Harris) 2. "Genghis Khan" (Harris)

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr drums

"Run to the Hills"

235

"Run to the Hills"


"Run to the Hills"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The Number of the Beast & Live After Death B-side 1982 single "Total Eclipse" 1985 live single "Phantom of the Opera (live)", "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" 2002 live single Part 1 "22, Acacia Avenue (live)", "The Prisoner (live)", "Run to the Hills (Camp Chaos video)" Part 2 "Children of the Damned (live)", "Total Eclipse (live)", "Run to the Hills (video)" 12 February 1982 2 December 1985 11 March 2002

Released

Recorded 1981 March 1985 19 January 2001 Genre Length Heavy metal 3:50 3:54 4:59 EMI

Label

Writer(s) Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Purgatory" (1981) "Run to the Hills" (1982) "The Number of the Beast" (1982)

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"Running Free (live)" (1985)

"Run to the Hills (live)" (1985)

"Wasted Years" (1986)

"Out of the Silent Planet" (2000)

"Run "Wildest to the Dreams" Hills (2003) (live)" (2002) The Number of the Beast track listing

"The Number of the Beast" (5)

"Run to the Hills" (6)

"Gangland" (7)

1985 live single

1985 live single cover 2002 live single

Cover of part 2 of 2002 live single (with Bruce Dickinson as Eddie)

"Run to the Hills" is Iron Maiden's sixth single and the first single from their 1982 album The Number of the Beast. The song talks about the forced expulsion of Native Americans to the western United States, presumably during the presidency of Andrew Jackson when the moves were enforced by the U.S. Army ("soldier blue in the barren wastes"). It may also possibly be about the Sioux Wars, when Lakota land in the Dakotas was forcibly taken over by the U.S. Army ("We fought him hard, we fought him well, out on the Plains, we gave him hell.) ("Riding through dust clouds and barren wastes, galloping hard on the Plains.") It was written by Steve Harris, bassist and founder of the band. It remains as one of the band's most popular songs.

Release
The song was released as a single on February 12, 1982, as a prelude to the album. This would be the first single released by the band to feature current vocalist Bruce Dickinson. On the B-side was a song called "Total Eclipse", which would not be on the initial version of the album. However, the band later regretted this decision, as they thought the song was too good to be only a B-side. "Total Eclipse" was added to the Number of the Beast album when it was re-released in 1998.

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Cover art
The single is the second of three single-covers featuring Riggs' depiction of Satan. He debuted on the single-cover of "Purgatory" and his decapitated head is featured on the single-cover for "The Number of the Beast".

Other releases
In 1985, "Run to the Hills" was released again as the band's 13th single, now in a live version, taken from the live album Live After Death. However, the single cover-art displayed Iron Maiden's mascot Eddie playing an organ, a setting that is often associated with "Phantom of the Opera". Live versions of "Phantom of the Opera" and "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" were the B-sides. In early 2002 "Run to the Hills" was again released as a single, and once again in a live version. This time it was the original studio version again, but with live recordings as B-sides. The single was released to raise money for the Clive Burr MS Trust Fund, to help former Iron Maiden drummer Clive Burr, who is suffering from multiple sclerosis. In March 2002, Iron Maiden played three shows at the Brixton Academy in London to raise money for this trust fund, and the single was released around the same time. Two versions of this single exist, with different B-sides.

Video
"Run to the Hills" was released as a video in the early 1980s, which was later remade in the late 90s/early 2000s. The first video consisted of the band performing, interspersed with comical footage featuring Indians from the 1923 James Parrott film Uncovered Wagon. The later video removed all the old film footage and replaced it with Flash animation of Cyborg Eddie (from the Stranger in a Strange Land cover) in a sci-fi Wild West setting, animated by Camp Chaos.

Accolades
"Run to the Hills" ranked #27 on VH1's 40 Greatest Metal Songs [1] and in 2009 it was named the 14th greatest hard rock song of all time by VH1.[2]

Other media
The song is featured in the game SSX On Tour as the title's main theme. A cover version of the song is also featured in the music video game Rock Band, and is considered as the hardest track to play in the game as a band because of the fills on the guitar, and overall endurance demanded to play the song on drums. A master recording of this track was released on June 9, 2009 for the Wii and Xbox 360, and June 11, 2009 for Playstation 3. The song is also playable in the music video game Rock Revolution. It is featured in GTA IV:The Lost and the Damned as a radio song.

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Cover versions
An all-star cover version of the song is found on the tribute album Numbers from the Beast, featuring Robin McAuley on vocals, Michael Schenker and Pete Fletcher on guitars, Tony Franklin on bass and Brian Tichy (Derek Sherinian, B'z) on drums. This version follows the original scheme of the song, but varies in terms of guitar solos. Schenker has also added small solos in places where there originally are no solos. The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens recorded the song on their self-titled debut album. A cover version of the song appears as a playable track in the music video game Rock Band. It is defined as the game's hardest song overall, being rated "Impossible" for every instrument and for a band as a whole. The original version eventually became DLC the following 2 years. Former Babes in Toyland singer and guitarist Kat Bjelland's new band Katastrophy Wife covered on their Heart on EP in 2007. The song was covered in 2008 by Sign on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine.[3] On their album Garage Inc, Metallica parody the opening of the song at the end of Last Caress/Green Hell, playing it extremely out of key during the fadeout. The Swedish lounge metal genre band Hellsongs included a cover version on their 2008 album 'Hymns in the key of 666'. The Icelandic band Baggaltur used the song as a base for their 2003 christmas song, Gleileg Jl.[4] In 2009, the eventual Swedish Idol 2009 series winner Erik Grnwall sang it during the live shows and released it the last week of 2009 and had a minor hit with it in the Swedish Single Chart December 2009 and January 2010 topping at #23.[5] Progressive Metal band Dream Theater covered the song and the entire The Number Of The Beast as a bootleg album.

Track listing
1982 12" maxi (Europe: EMI 1C K 052-07 604 Z) 1. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 3:51 2. "Total Eclipse" (Dave Murray, Harris, Clive Burr) 4:24 1982 7" single (UK: EMI 5263, UK: EMIP 5263 [picture disc], Germany: EMI 1A 006-07604, Netherlands: EMI 1A 006-07604) 1. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 3:50 2. "Total Eclipse" (Dave Murray, Harris, Clive Burr) 4:28 1985 12" single (UK: EMI 12EMI 5542, UK: 12EMIP 5542 [picture disc]) 1. "Run to the Hills with Hiar" [live] (Harris) 3:54 2. "Phantom of the Opera" [live] (Harris) 7:20 3. "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" [live] (Harris) 4:14 1985 7" single (UK: EMI EMI 5542) 1. "Run to the Hills with Hiar" [live] (Harris) 3:54 2. "Phantom of the Opera" [live] (Harris) 7:20 2002 7" limted single (Europe: EMI EM 612) 1. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 3:50 2. "Total Eclipse" [Live '82] (Dave Murray, Harris, Clive Burr) 4:28 2002 CD single
The Limited Edition Red Single

"Run to the Hills" Part I (UK: EMI CDEM 612/7243 5 50623 0 7) This version of the single contains the studio version of the song "Run to the Hills", while the b-sides were recorded live at the Reading Festival, on August 28, 1982. It also includes the Camp Chaos version of the "Run to the Hills" music video. 1. 2. 3. 4. "Run to the Hills" (Harris) 3:50 "22 Acacia Avenue" [live] (Adrian Smith, Harris) 6:33 "The Prisoner" [live] (Smith, Harris) 5:55 "Run to the Hills" [Camp Chaos video] (Harris) Part II (UK: EMI CDEM 612/7243 5 50623 0 7) This version of the single contains a live version of the song "Run to the Hills", which is the same as on the Rock in Rio live album. The b-sides for the second version were recorded at the Hammersmith Odeon in London on March 20, 1982. The live video of "Run to the Hills" is also from the Rock in Rio live album. The cover features Eddie wearing the clothes worn by Bruce Dickinson on the Rock in Rio show. 1. "Run to the Hills" [live] (Harris) 4:59 2. "Children of the Damned" [live] (Smith, Harris) 4:32 3. "Total Eclipse" [live] (Dave Murray, Harris, Clive Burr) 3:57 4. "Run to the Hills" [live video]

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References
[1] "VH1 40 Greatest Metal Songs", 14 May 2006, VH1 Channel, reported by VH1.com (http:/ / www. vh1. com/ shows/ dyn/ the_greatest/ 103446/ episode_this_list. jhtml); last accessed September 10, 2006. [2] "spreadit.org music" (http:/ / music. spreadit. org/ vh1-top-100-hard-rock-songs/ ). . Retrieved February 7, 2009. [3] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html) [4] Jlalag Baggalts 2003 (http:/ / baggalutur. is/ jol/ 2003. php) [5] Swedish Top 60 Singles Chart 1 January 2010 (http:/ / swedishcharts. com/ archiv. asp?sparte=s& jahr=2010& monat=01& tag=01& todo=show)

"The Number of the Beast"

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"The Number of the Beast"


"The Number of the Beast"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The Number of the Beast Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) April 26, 1982 vinyl record (7") (12") 1981 Heavy metal 4:49 EMI Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Run to the Hills" (1982) "The Number of the Beast" (1982) "Flight of Icarus" (1983)

"Rainmaker" (2003)

"The Number of the Beast" (live) (2005)

"The Trooper" (live) (2006)

The Number of the Beast track listing "22 Acacia Avenue" (4) "The Number of the Beast" (5) "Run to the Hills" (6)

"The Number of the Beast" is Iron Maiden's seventh single and the second single from Iron Maiden's 1982 album of the same name. The song is inspired by both a nightmare bandleader and bassist Steve Harris had after watching the movie Damien: Omen II, and the storyline of the poem Tam o' Shanter. "The Number of The Beast" is one of Iron Maiden's greatest hits, and is almost always performed during concert. It reached 18 in the UK charts. The track is known for its very long, high-pitched and guttural wail by Bruce Dickinson at the end of the intro. In the documentary on the album of the same name, as part of the Classic Albums series by the BBC, Dickinson said this

"The Number of the Beast" was due to producer Martin Birch forcing Dickinson to sing the first four lines for several hours, over and over again. The frustration of this culminated in this wail, the pitch of which Dickinson often failed to re-create live since the early days. The song may perhaps be considered their signature song. The band had asked the famous horror film actor Vincent Price to read the intro text. However, according to Dickinson, Price refused to do it for anything less than 25,000. They had heard of someone who read ghost stories at Capital Radio and got him to do it. The man was a theatre actor named Barry Clayton who had no interest in Maiden, but they asked him to put on a Vincent Price kind of voice. The opening phrase is taken directly from the Book of Revelation: "Woe to you O earth and sea for the Devil sends the beast with wrath because he knows the time is short" in Chapter 12, Verse 12; "Let him who hath understanding reckon the number of the beast for it is a human number/its number is six hundred and sixty six," in Chapter 13, Verse 18.

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Single
The single's cover is the last of three singles to feature Riggs' depiction of Satan, which debuted on the cover of the Purgatory single. The cover of The Number of the Beast is the aftermath to the cover of the Run to the Hills single where Eddie and Satan are depicted in battle. The single was also released in a very rare red, pictured below, and even more rare picture disc vinyl.

The red vinyl.

Music video
The original music video featured the band performing the song, interspersed with clips from various horror films including Godzilla, War of the Colossal Beast, the Crimson Ghost film serial, How to Make a Monster, and The Angry Red Planet. The Crimson Ghost - used as a logo by The Misfits - also appears early in the video, and there is another reference to The Misfits later in the video, when the monster from The Angry Red Planet appears (The Misfits used the monster on the cover of their album Walk Among Us). Also featured are Nosferatu and The Devil Rides Out (film). In the middle of the guitar solo, a dancing couple wearing cards marked "6" on their costumes appear on stage. As the male dancer spins his female partner around, the female dancer suddenly appears (via editing) wearing a wolf mask and furry gloves. They later appear, holding up their number signs to the camera, in

"The Number of the Beast" close-up shots, with the third "Six" being held up by the female dancer while wearing her wolf mask. Eddie also makes an appearance towards the end of the video, as a large scale version of him walks across the stage to join the band. An alternate version of the video exists where the film clips are omitted and the video is basically just the band's performance (although the dancing couple still appear). A later video (available on the Visions of the Beast DVD), animated by Camp Chaos, replaced the film clips and the dancing couple with Flash animation of Bruce (acting as a priest) and Eddie re-enacting scenes from The Exorcist.

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Legacy
The song made it in at #7 on VH1's 40 Greatest Metal Songs[1] . "The Number of the Beast" was ranked #6 in Martin Popoff's book "The Top 500 Heavy Metal Songs of All Time". Popoff put together this book by requesting thousands of metal fans, musicians, and journalists to send in their favourite heavy metal songs. Almost 18,000 individual votes were tallied and entered into a database from which the final rankings were derived.[2] In January 2005, a new and updated version was released. It features live video renditions of "Number of the Beast" and "Hallowed Be Thy Name" that have never been officially released before. It has since been covered by Iced Earth, Saints in Hell, Avulsed, Breed 77, Sinergy, Powderfinger, Zwan (whose version was used for the soundtrack of the cult film Spun), The Iron Maidens and many other bands. The song is also featured on The String Quartet Tribute to Iron Maiden. This song was featured on the video game Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 4 and is playable in Guitar Hero III: Legends of Rock as a master track. It is also available in Rock Band as a downloadable song, albeit a cover version. The master, however, became available for Rock Band on June 9, 2009, as part of the Iron Maiden pack.

Controversy
The song, being the title number for the 1982 album was a prominent target of critics in the USA during a time when Maiden were accused of being a Satanic group. Much of the controversy is believed to have originated due to the prominence of the number 666 in the song's repeating chorus. The controversy was so intense, that the Chilean government barred the band from performing in Chile during the tour. Maiden took a swing at their critics in the follow-up album Piece of Mind which features a backmasked message in the beginning of the song Still Life which, when played backwards translates as a very drunk Nicko McBrain doing an impression of Idi Amin Dada (stating "What ho said the t'ing with the three "bonce", do not meddle with things you don't understand"), followed by a belch. When the music video was first shown on MTV, Eddie's appearance at the end was edited out after complaints from frightened viewers.[3]

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Track listing 1982 7" Vinyl EMI 5287


1. "The Number of the Beast" 2. "Remember Tomorrow" (Live) Also on red or clear vinyl EMI 5287 Also on 12" 1A K052-1076386 Also on cassette EMI TC IM3

2005 track listing CD EMS 666


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "The Number of the Beast" (original 1982 studio version) (Steve Harris) "The Number of the Beast" (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 1921, 2002) (Steve Harris) "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 1921, 2002) (Steve Harris) VIDEO - "The Number of the Beast" (original 1982 studio version) (Steve Harris) VIDEO - "The Number of the Beast" (live 2002) (Steve Harris)

2005 track listing 7" Red Vinyl EM 666


1. "The Number of the Beast" (original 1982 studio version) (Steve Harris) 2. "The Number of the Beast" (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 1921, 2002) (Steve Harris) Also on 12" Picture Disc 12EM 666 1. "The Number of the Beast" (original 1982 studio version) (Steve Harris) 2. "The Number of the Beast" (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 1921, 2002) (Steve Harris) 3. "Remember Tomorrow"

Trivia
Although the liner notes claim the version of 'Remember Tomorrow' on this single was recorded live in Milan, Italy during 1981 it is actually the same recording included on 'Maiden Japan' except with Bruce Dickinson's vocals overdubbed over Paul Di'anno's original performance.[4] The song can be heard in the movie Murder by Numbers. The song is played while Ryan Gosling is driving by school and waving the devil horns at a school girl.

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray lead guitar Adrian Smith lead guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr drums Nicko McBrain - drums (live)

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References
[1] "VH1 40 Greatest Metal Songs", 14 May 2006, VH1 Channel, reported by VH1.com (http:/ / www. vh1. com/ shows/ dyn/ the_greatest/ 103446/ episode_this_list. jhtml); last accessed 2006-09-10. [2] "The Top 500 Heavy Metal Songs of All Time" (http:/ / www. martinpopoff. com/ html/ 500songs. html). [3] http:/ / stason. org/ TULARC/ music-bands/ iron-maiden/ 29-Various-significant-dates-in-IRON-MAIDEN-history-part3. html [4] http:/ / ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=single08_notb/ commentary08_notb& lang=eng& link=singles

"Flight of Icarus"

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"Flight of Icarus"
"Flight of Icarus"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Piece of Mind B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) "I've Got the Fire" 11 April 1983 1983 Heavy metal 3:49 EMI Adrian Smith Bruce Dickinson Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Number of the Beast" (1982) "Flight of Icarus" (1983) "The Trooper" (1983)

"Flight of Icarus" is a 1983 song by Iron Maiden. It is the band's eighth single and the first from the album, Piece of Mind. It was the first single by Iron Maiden that was released in the United States. It was also one of the few Iron Maiden singles to receive much airplay in the U.S., peaking at number 8 on the Billboard Top Album Tracks chart The highest position of any Iron Maiden single in the US[1] . In the UK, "Flight of Icarus" reached number eleven on the UK Singles Chart. This song was played frequently during the World Piece Tour and the World Slavery Tour, but has since been dropped from the band's setlists.

Overview
The song is loosely based on the ancient Greek myth of Icarus who was imprisoned with his father Daedalus in the Labyrinth on Crete. In an attempt to escape the pair fabricated wings from feathers and wax so they could fly away. Unfortunately Icarus, not heeding the advice of his father, flew too close to the Sun, melting the wax that held the feathers and thus fell to his death in the sea. Vocalist Bruce Dickinson admits that he had modified the original tale to make it an allegory of teenage rebellion against adult authority, which caused the death of Icarus in this case. The single cover, in something of a parody of the original myth, portrays a winged Eddie killing Icarus with a flamethrower. Icarus resembles the figure in Evening: Fall of Day, by William Rimmer, which was used as a label logo by Led Zeppelin. The death of the figure on this single cover is a reference to Led Zeppelin's break-up a few

"Flight of Icarus" years before. [2] Bassist Steve Harris feels that the studio version should have been played faster, so they play it faster live, claiming "This little extra touch gives it a bit more fire". The first solo in "Flight of Icarus" is played by Dave Murray whilst the second solo is played by Adrian Smith. The ending solo is played by Dave Murray. The song can also be found as a cover version on the tribute album Numbers from the Beast featuring Ripper Owens on vocals, Doug Aldrich on guitars, Jimmy Bain on bass, and Simon Wright on drums. This version follows the basic configuration of the original composition but departs in terms of the form of the guitar solo.

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Music video
The video for this track was directed by Jim Yukich and was filmed in the Bahamas at Compass Point Studios (where the album was recorded) as the band played a staged recording session of the track. Also, drummer Nicko McBrain appeared as a blue faced grim reaper. Also, producer Martin Birch had a cameo in the clip as his face morphed with Maiden mascot Eddie. A newer edit of the video features Flash animation by Camp Chaos spliced between the original footage, replacing McBrain and Birch's acting scenes and some of the '80s-style visual effects. The animation depicts Icarus fleeing away from a winged Eddie (as seen on the album cover).

Track listing
1. "Flight of Icarus" (Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson) - 3:49 2. "I've Got the Fire" (Ronnie Montrose; Montrose cover) - 3:53 "I've Got the Fire" is a cover of the song "I Got the Fire" from the Montrose album Paper Money in 1974. This is, in fact, the second time the song has appeared as a B-side. It first appeared as a B-side to the "Sanctuary" single. However, instead of a live recording, this is a proper studio production.

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& searchlink=IRON|MIADEN& sql=11:3ifyxqe5ldae~T51 [2] http:/ / www. derekriggs. com/ riggsart/ Pages/ maiden. dir/ 12. html

"The Trooper"

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"The Trooper"
"The Trooper"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Piece of Mind B-side Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) Producer 1983 single "Cross-Eyed Mary" 20 June 1983 15 August 2005 7" and 12" vinyl CD single 1983 30 August 2005 Heavy metal 4:10 4:12 EMI Steve Harris Martin Birch Iron Maiden singles chronology "Flight of Icarus" (1983) "The Trooper" (1983) "2 Minutes to Midnight" (1984)

"The Number of the Beast (live)" (2005)

"The Trooper (live)" (2005)

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" (2006)

"The Trooper" is a song written by Iron Maiden bass player Steve Harris. It is Iron Maiden's ninth single, and the second from their 1983 album Piece of Mind. The single was released on June 20, 1983. The song is about the Battle of Balaclava in 1854 during the Crimean War, and is at least partially based upon Alfred Lord Tennyson's poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade", taking the viewpoint of one of the slain troopers, who, in the cover art, is perceived as a bald Eddie. Many Iron Maiden songs are based on books or movies; this seems to be a running theme in the band's work, especially songs written by Steve Harris.

"The Trooper" To this day, it is considered one of the band's best songs, and often when performed live Bruce Dickinson wears a replica army jacket and holds an enormous Union Flag. Sometimes, before playing the song live, Bruce Dickinson will read parts of the Tennyson's poem as an introduction. The poem was later referenced by Iron Maiden again in the song "Paschendale" from their 2003 album Dance of Death. This song was also one of only a few songs to get much radio airplay and to be a commercial hit in the US, thus peaking at # 28 on the US Mainstream Rock charts. The main song rhythm is very suggestive of horses galloping, to mirror the lyrical theme of the charge of the light brigade. What is also interesting is the dual lead fill between verses, this has the two guitarists, Dave Murray and Adrian Smith, later replaced by Janick Gers, playing a diatonically harmonized lead fill, this gives the filler more depth. Since Smith's return in the band, the three guitarists play in 3-part harmony. The first solo is performed by Adrian Smith and by Janick Gers live from 1990 to 1999. Since 1999, they perform it together in harmony. The second one is played by Dave Murray and it also seems to have changed over the years.

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Track listings
1983 single
1. "The Trooper" (Harris) 4:10 2. "Cross-Eyed Mary" (Ian Anderson, Jethro Tull cover) 3:55

2005 re-release CD
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "The Trooper" (live from Death on the Road) (Steve Harris) 4:12 "The Trooper" (original studio version) (Harris) 4:10 "Prowler" (recorded live in Reykjavk, Iceland, on 7 June 2005) (Harris) 4:24 "Another Life" (recorded live in Reykjavk, Iceland, on 7 June 2005) (Harris) "Murders in the Rue Morgue" (recorded live in Reykjavk, Iceland, on 7 June 2005) (Harris) "The Trooper" (live video of main track) (Harris) 4:12 "The Trooper" (original promo video) (Harris) 4:10

2005 re-release 7" Blue Vinyl


1. "The Trooper" (live from Death on the Road) (Steve Harris) 4:12 2. "Another Life" (recorded live in Reykjavk, Iceland, on 7 June 2005) (Harris)

Cover versions
Finnish metal band Sentenced recorded this song on The Trooper (EP) in 1994. Nightwish used the intro of the song to end Wishmaster in the End of an Era concert. Dutch metal band Blind Justice recorded a cover of this song on their In Equilibrium EP in 1994, featuring violin and saxophone. American death metal band Vital Remains covered this song on their 1998 tribute album Call To Irons: A Tribute To Iron Maiden. The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens recorded a cover version of the song on their 2006 self-titled debut album. Their 2007 CD/DVD release Route 666 features Motrhead guitarist Phil Campbell joining the band on a live version of the song. The Iron Maidens also released a dance remix of the song on their 2008 EP The Root of All Evil. An all-star cover of the song is in Numbers from the Beast, featuring Lemmy on vocals, Phil Campbell and Rocky George on guitars, Chuck Wright on bass, and Chris Slade on drums. Apart from differences in guitar solos and vocal patterns, this version follows Harris' original composition.

"The Trooper" German heavy metal band Rage have also covered the song on the tribute album A Tribute to the Beast. A cover of the song by Japanese band Onmyo-Za can also be heard as a Japanese bonus track on the same album. A version of the song is available by indie band Steaming Toolie. The song was covered in 2008 by Coheed and Cambria on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine, as well as during their Neverender tour. They are known to occasionally cover it at live shows. Power metal band Iced Earth often uses the intro riff of the song to finish their live performance of their song "Violate". Swedish band Hellsongs recorded a folk-styled version of the track on their 2008 album Hymns in the Key of 666. Ska punk band Thumper recorded a version of the song on the compilation Metalliska. Norwegian power metal band Highland Glory covered the song on their 2005 album Forever Endeavour. The Protomen are known to occasionally cover it at live shows. The band Radio Cult released a cover of the song on their album "Grooves From The Grave" in 2008.

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In popular culture
A cover version of the song is featured in the Xbox 360 version of the music video game Guitar Hero II. The original version is featured in Guitar Hero: Smash Hits, and as downloadable content for the Rock Band series. The song is mentioned in the novel World War Z, by Max Brooks. In the novel, the song is used by the United States Army as their "Primary Enticement Mechanism" played on loudspeakers to lure zombies within shooting range, and boost the morale of soldiers while inducing them into a combat mood. The song has been the subject of numerous remixes and 'mash-ups', including being mixed with 'The Monkeys' [1] .

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

References
[1] http:/ / audioporncentral. com/ 2009/ 07/ world-premiere-dj-schmolli-the-trooper-believer. html

"2 Minutes to Midnight"

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"2 Minutes to Midnight"


"2 Minutes to Midnight"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Powerslave B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) Producer "Rainbow's Gold" "Mission from 'Arry" 6 August 1984 1984 Heavy metal 5:59 EMI Adrian Smith Bruce Dickinson Martin Birch Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Trooper" (1983) "2 Minutes to Midnight" (1984) "Aces High" (1984)

"2 Minutes to Midnight" is a song by British band Iron Maiden. The song was released as the band's tenth single and second track from their fifth album Powerslave. The single was released on August 6, 1984 and rose to number 11 in the UK Singles Chart and number 25 on Billboard Top Album Tracks. The song was written by Adrian Smith and Bruce Dickinson. The song has references to the Doomsday Clock, the symbolic clock used by the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists. In September 1953 the clock reached 23:58, the closest the clock ever got to midnight. This occurred when the United States and Soviet Union tested H-bombs within nine months of one another. The first guitar solo is played by Dave Murray followed by a guitar solo played by Adrian Smith. The first B-side is a cover of British progressive rock band Beckett's "Rainbow's Gold". Another B-side, titled "Mission from 'Arry", is a recording of an argument between bassist Steve Harris and drummer Nicko McBrain. The argument happened after a show in Allentown, Pennsylvania during the band's World Piece Tour, and occurred due to a misunderstanding on stage between the two due to technical issues with Harris' bass, which had led to McBrain's drum solo going wrong. Vocalist Bruce Dickinson was recording the argument with a concealed tape recorder. Because Harris' bass wasn't working, he asked a light rigger to tell McBrain to extend

"2 Minutes to Midnight" the solo. Rather than following proper procedure, the man started shouting to McBrain. Angry that he messed up his solo, McBrain had a confrontation with the man (it is unclear if anything physical happened) that Harris felt was unnecessary. Allegedly the argument had calmed down before Dickinson started recording it and riled the two men up again by asking Nicko what he would have wanted the man to do had he been trying to tell him that the lighting truss above his drum kit was about to fall down, to which he replied "Well, I guess someone would've had to pull me out the fucking way or I'm dead!" The video of the song is featured on the 2003 video collection Visions of the Beast. On the bonus disc of the 2008 DVD release of Live After Death, Bruce Dickinson said of the scene in the video of the soldiers in the apartment, "They came to us with the location and said, 'We've got the perfect location. It's this dingy, grotty East End tenement on the Isle of Dogs. It's all boarded up and there's cat piss everywhere and it's just really foul'. And I looked at this thing and I'm like 'That's Roffy House, on the Isle of Dogs. I used to live there!'" The song was covered 2008 by Glamour Of The Kill on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine. [1] It was also covered in 2005 by the all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens on their self-titled debut album. The song has been included in a handful of videogames: As downloadable content in Rock Band, and in the video game Guitar Hero 5, albeit heavily censored. It was also included in the soundtrack of Grand Theft Auto: Vice City in the in-game radio station V-Rock.

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Track listing
1. "2 Minutes to Midnight" (Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson) 6:04 2. "Rainbow's Gold" (Beckett cover) 4:57 3. "Mission from 'Arry" 6:43

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums

Charts
UK Singles Chart #11 US Top Album Tracks #25

References
[1] "Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed!" (http:/ / www. webcitation. org/ 5iSsl7lON). Archived from the original (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html) on 2009-07-22. . Retrieved 2009-07-01.

"Aces High"

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"Aces High"
"Aces High"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Powerslave B-side "King of Twilight" (Nektar cover) "The Number of the Beast" (live) October 22, 1984 7" and 12" vinyl 1984 Heavy metal, speed metal 4:31 EMI Steve Harris Martin Birch Iron Maiden singles chronology "2 Minutes to Midnight" (1984) "Aces High" (1984) "Running Free (live)" (1985)

Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) Producer

"Aces High" is a song written by Steve Harris. It is Iron Maiden's eleventh single and the second from the 1984 studio album Powerslave. The song tells the story of a British RAF pilot fighting against the German Luftwaffe during the Battle of Britain (1940), the first battle to be completely fought in the skies of the UK. The song topped at number 20 on the UK Singles Chart. Aces High is one of Iron Maiden's most popular songs, and has been covered numerous times, by bands including Arch Enemy and Children of Bodom. It was released as a single over a month after Powerslave came out. It was featured on the video game: Madden 2010 as part of the game's soundtrack. The first B-side is a cover of Nektar's "King of Twilight", from their 1972 album A Tab in the Ocean.

"Aces High"

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Track listing
1. "Aces High" (Steve Harris) - 4:31 2. "King of Twilight" (Nektar cover) - 4:54 3. "The Number of the Beast (Live At Westfalenhalle, Dortmund - December 18th 1983)" (Harris) - 4:57

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums

References
Aces High - original video on Youtube (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4Sam5omG0v0)

"Wasted Years"

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"Wasted Years"
"Wasted Years"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Somewhere in Time B-side Released Genre Length Label Writer(s) "Reach Out", "Sheriff of Huddersfield" 6 September 1986 Heavy metal 5:07 EMI Adrian Smith Iron Maiden singles chronology "Run to the Hills (live)" (1985) "Wasted Years" (1986) "Stranger in a Strange Land" (1986)

"Wasted Years" is the fourteenth single released by Iron Maiden and the first from their Somewhere in Time album. Released in 1986, it was the first single to be written by guitarist Adrian Smith alone. It reached number 18 in the UK charts. The cover depicts Eddie's point of view as he flies a spaceship chasing the Doctor's TARDIS. A similar Doctor Who reference can be seen on the back of the Somewhere in Time case, where the Doctor's TARDIS is parked on a rooftop. The music video, which is mostly in black and white, features images and footage of the band's everyday activities off-stage, as well as clips from previous music videos. The B-side "Reach Out" was sung by Adrian Smith, with Bruce Dickinson singing backing vocals. Adrian also played bass and guitar on the song. This song was performed live by Nicko McBrain and Adrian Smith's jam band who called themselves The Entire Population of Hackney. The demential song "Sheriff of Huddersfield" is about Iron Maiden manager Rod Smallwood's decision to move to Los Angeles and buy a house in the Hollywood hills. Apparently he had trouble adjusting to the new lifestyle in LA and often complained to the band about it. Interestingly Rod Smallwood was unaware of the song until it was released on the single (the band had kept it secret). The song opens with the spoken line "We're on a mission from Rod", a parody of the tagline for The Blues Brothers. Later, a similar comedy piece mocking Smallwood was released as an unlisted untitled B-side ("Space Station No. 5"'s epilogue) in the Be Quick or Be Dead single. It's the only song on Somewhere In Time that features no synthesizers.

"Wasted Years"

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Track listing
1. "Wasted Years" (Adrian Smith) 5:06 2. "Reach Out" (Dave Colwell) 3:31 3. "Sheriff of Huddersfield" (Iron Maiden) 3:35

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals (Lead Vocals and bass on "Reach Out") Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Stranger in a Strange Land"

256

"Stranger in a Strange Land"


"Stranger in a Strange Land"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Somewhere in Time B-side Released Genre Length Label Writer(s) "That Girl" "Juanita" 22 November 1986 Heavy metal 5:45 EMI Adrian Smith Iron Maiden singles chronology "Wasted Years" (1986) "Stranger in a Strange Land" (1986) "Can I Play with Madness" (1988)

"Stranger in a Strange Land" is the second single by Iron Maiden from their 1986 album Somewhere in Time. The song is unrelated to Robert A. Heinlein's novel by the same name. The lyrics are about an Arctic explorer who dies and is frozen in the ice. After a hundred years his body is found preserved by other people exploring there. Adrian Smith was inspired to write about this song after talking to an explorer who had had a similar experience of discovering a frozen body. The guitar solo in "Stranger in a Strange Land" is played by Adrian Smith. The song is one of only three Iron Maiden songs to fade out, the other being "The Prophecy" from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son and "Women in Uniform", a single included on some pressings of Killers. The lyrics "no brave new world" will inspire their 2000 studio release, "Brave New World". Eddie's appearance on the single cover is a homage to the Clint Eastwood character "The Man With No Name". This version of Eddie would later be used in the Camp Chaos music video for Run to the Hills. The B-sides to this single, "That Girl" and "Juanita", came from two bands that Adrian Smith's friend, Andy Barnett, played with. They were played during The Entire Population of Hackney secret gig on 19 December 1985 and this is probably where the idea came from to play them as B-sides, especially with Adrian's large presence on this single and the Somewhere in Time album. The first guitar solo in "That Girl" is played by Dave Murray while the ending guitar solo is played by Adrian Smith.

"Stranger in a Strange Land"

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Cover details
In the top-right corner of the cover (slightly right of Eddie's lit match), the time on the clock appears as "11:58". This is a reference to a previous Iron Maiden single, "2 Minutes to Midnight". Several cards can be seen falling from the table. One, (orange background, next to red colored card) contains a picture of the Grim Reaper, like that on the Trooper cover. Just under one of the stacks of cards, on the edge of the table, Derek Riggs' signature can be seen. In the music video for a later song, "The Angel and the Gambler" (from Virtual XI), then-singer Blaze Bayley dressed up like this Eddie.

Track listing
1. "Stranger in a Strange Land" (Adrian Smith) 5:45 2. "That Girl" (Merv Goldsworthy, Pete Jupp, Andy Barnett) 5:04 3. "Juanita" (Steve Barnacle, Derek O'Neil; Marshall Fury cover) 3:47

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Can I Play with Madness"

258

"Can I Play with Madness"


"Can I Play with Madness"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Seventh Son of a Seventh Son B-side Released Format "Black Bart Blues" "Massacre" March 20, 1988 CD Single Vinyl record Picture disc (cut-to-shape) 1987 Heavy metal 3:30 EMI Adrian Smith Bruce Dickinson Steve Harris Martin Birch Iron Maiden singles chronology "Stranger in a Strange Land" (1986) "Can I Play with Madness" (1988) "The Evil That Men Do" (1988)

Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Producer

"Can I Play with Madness" was the sixteenth single released by Iron Maiden. Released in 1988, it is the first single from the Seventh Son of a Seventh Son album and hit number 3 in the UK charts. The song is about a young man who wants to learn the future from an old prophet with a crystal ball. The young man thinks he is going mad and seeks the old prophet to help him cope with his visions/nightmares. The prophet's advice is ignored by the young man and they become angry with each other. The song was originally a ballad named "On the Wings of Eagles", written by Adrian Smith.

"Can I Play with Madness"

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Music video
The video of the song was set at Tintern Abbey and features Graham Chapman; this would be one of his last appearances on television before his death in October 1989 of cancer. In the video, Chapman plays an irritable art instructor who criticizes a young student for drawing Iron Maiden mascot Eddie rather than sketching the abbey ruins. The teacher discovers an underground lab and finally encounters an animated version of Eddie, who leers and reaches out to him from inside a refrigerator. The band appears on a TV screen showing live footage of a concert. Adrian Smith is shown playing left-handed, suggesting a reversed image.

Track listings
7" single

Australia: EMI 2071 Canada: Capitol B-44154 EEC: EMI 006 20 2459 7 France: EMI 2024597 Ireland: EMI EM 49 Italy: EMI 2024597 Spain: EMI 006 20 2459 7 UK: EMI EM 49, with black, white or silver labels, copies marked with a red sticker included a free transfer. USA: Capitol P-B-44154 (Promo), Capitol B-44154

1. "Can I Play with Madness" (Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris) 3:30 2. "Black Bart Blues" (Harris, Dickinson) 6:41
Japan: EMI PRP-1278 (Promo)

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 2. "Prowler '88"


Mexico: EMI SEC-550 (Promo)

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 2. "The Evil That Men Do"

12" Maxi Single



Argentina: EMI 6075 Australia: EMI ED 341 France: EMI K 060 20 2460 6 Greece: EMI 052 2024606 EEC: EMI 20 2460 6 Italy: EMI 14 2024606 Portugal: EMI 20 2460 6 Spain: EMI 052 20 2460 6 UK: EMI 12EM 49, with black or white labels

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 3:30 2. "Black Bart Blues" 6:41 3. "Massacre" (Phil Lynott, Scott Gorham, Brian Downey) 2:54

"Can I Play with Madness"

260

Shaped picture disc



UK: EMI EMP 49 USA: Capitol V-15375

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 3:30 2. "Black Bart Blues" 6:41 3. "Massacre" 2:54

3" CD Single

Japan: EMI XP10-2009

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 3:30 2. "Black Bart Blues" 6:41

CD Single

UK: EMI CDEM 49 USA: Capitol B-44154

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 3:30 2. "Black Bart Blues" 6:41 3. "Massacre" 2:54

Cassette Single

Argentina: EMI 16075 "Puedo Jugar con la Locura"

1. "Can I Play with Madness" 3:30 2. "Black Bart Blues" 6:41 3. "Massacre" 2:54

Cassette Single

USA: Capitol 4XPRO-79325 (Promo)

1. "Can I Play With Madness" (Looped 3x)

B-sides
"Black Bart Blues" is about the suit of armour that rode in the back lounge of Iron Maiden's tour buses (named Black Bart). Bruce Dickinson tells that he, his bandmates and their tour manager were driving in a Ford Thunderbird through Florida in 1983, when they passed a gas station with three suits of armour standing outside. So Bruce stopped the car and went to buy one of the three suits of armour that were on sale. The song's lyrics detail a rather infamous story in which a girl stumbled onto the band's tour bus and struck a deal with one of the band members that she'd give them oral sex in exchange for alcohol. "Massacre" is a cover of the Thin Lizzy song that comes from their Johnny the Fox album. The song's subject, the Charge of the Light Brigade, was also the subject of an earlier Iron Maiden song, "The Trooper".

"Can I Play with Madness"

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Other uses
The song was used by Sony in advertisements for their line of HD-compatible television sets and DVD players. It is also used by Sony in the UK in the bumpers for their sponsorship of ITV's Formula One coverage. The song also featured in the UK version of Now That's What I Call Music 12 in 1988.

Chart performance
Chart (1988) Peak position [1] [2] 14 4 12 23 3

Dutch Top 40

Norwegian Singles Chart Swedish Singles Chart Swiss Singles Chart UK Singles Chart

[3]

[4]

[5]

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals, guitar solos in "Can I Play With Madness" and "Massacre" Steve Harris - bass guitar, keyboards, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums

References
[1] "De Nederlandse Top 40, week 19, 1988" (http:/ / www. radio538. nl/ web/ show/ id=44685/ chartid=5828). . Retrieved November 20, 2008. [2] "norwegiancharts.com" (http:/ / norwegiancharts. com/ showitem. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden& titel=Can+ I+ Play+ With+ Madness& cat=s). . Retrieved November 20, 2008. [3] "swedishcharts.com" (http:/ / swedishcharts. com/ showitem. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden& titel=Can+ I+ Play+ With+ Madness& cat=s). . Retrieved November 20, 2008. [4] "hitparade.ch" (http:/ / hitparade. ch/ showitem. asp?interpret=Iron+ Maiden& titel=Can+ I+ Play+ With+ Madness& cat=s). . Retrieved November 20, 2008. [5] "everyhit.com search results" (http:/ / www. everyhit. com). . Retrieved November 20, 2008.

"The Evil That Men Do"

262

"The Evil That Men Do"


"The Evil That Men Do"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Seventh Son of a Seventh Son B-side Released Format "Prowler '88" "Charlotte the Harlot '88" August 1, 1988 CD Single Vinyl record Picture disc (cut-to-shape) 1987 Heavy metal 4:33 EMI Adrian Smith Bruce Dickinson Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Can I Play with Madness" (1988) "The Evil That Men Do" (1988) "The Clairvoyant" (1988)

Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"The Evil That Men Do" was released in 1988 by Iron Maiden. It is the band's seventeenth single and the second from their Seventh Son of a Seventh Son album. The single debuted at number six in the UK charts and quickly rose to number five . The single's B-sides are re-recordings of "Prowler" and "Charlotte the Harlot" which appear as tracks number one and seven/eight respectively on the band's debut album Iron Maiden. The title of the song is taken from Marcus Antonius's speech while addressing the crowd of Romans after Caesar's murder (Act 3, scene 2, "The Forum") in William Shakespeare's Julius Caesar: "The evil that men do lives after them; The good is oft interred with their bones." Bruce Dickinson may sometimes repeat this before playing the song, but in reverse (as he did in Rock in Rio). However, the poetic lyrics of the song are unrelated to this. The guitar solo in "The Evil That Men Do" is played by Adrian Smith while the guitar solo in "Prowler '88" is played by Dave Murray. In "Charlotte the Harlot '88", the first guitar solo is played by Dave Murray followed by Adrian Smith. The music video was filmed at The Forum in Inglewood, CA, during the Seventh Tour of a Seventh Tour in 1988.

"The Evil That Men Do"

263

Track listing
1. "The Evil That Men Do" (Smith, Dickinson, Harris) 4:33 2. "Prowler '88" (Harris) 4:07 3. "Charlotte the Harlot '88" (Dave Murray) 4:11

Covers
An all-star cover of the song can be found on the tribute album Numbers from the Beast which features Fozzy frontman and WWE wrestler Chris Jericho on vocals, Paul Gilbert and Bob Kulick on guitar, Mike Inez on bass, and Brent Fitz on drums. It follows the basic layout of the song, but varies in terms of guitar solos and vocal harmonics. Symphonic metal band After Forever covered the song on their Exordium EP. A cover featuring two vocals can be found on the tribute album Slave to the Power: The Iron Maiden Tribute The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens covered the song on their 2008 EP The Root of All Evil. Swedish black metal band Naglfar covered the song on the Regain Records reissue of their album Vittra.

Versions
Songs The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 Country & Year Germany 1988 Catalog Number Format

EMI 006 20 2751 7 Single 7" Single 7" Black Labels Single 7" Silver Labels Single 7" Gatefold Sleeve Single 7"

Japan Promo 1988 EMI PRP-1315 UK 1988 UK 1988 UK 1988 EMI EM 64 EMI EM 64 EMI EMG 64

The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88 The Evil that Men Do / Prowler '88 / Charlotte the Harlot '88

EEC 1988

EMI K60 20 2773 6 Maxi Single 12"

Greece 1988

EMI 052 2027736

Maxi Single 12"

Italy 1988

EMI 14 2027736

Maxi Single 12"

Portugal 1988

EMI 2027736

Maxi Single 12"

UK 1988

EMI 12 EM 64

Maxi Single 12"

UK 1988 Japan 1988

EMI EMP 64 EMI CDE12-5740

Shaped Picture Disc CD Single

UK 1988

EMI CDEM 64

CD Single

"The Evil That Men Do"

264

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"The Clairvoyant"

265

"The Clairvoyant"
"The Clairvoyant"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Seventh Son of a Seventh Son B-side Released Genre Length Label Writer(s) "The Prisoner (live)" "Heaven Can Wait (live)" 7 November 1988 Heavy metal 4:27 EMI Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Evil That Men Do" (1988) "The Clairvoyant (song) "Infinite Dreams (live)" (1989)

"The Clairvoyant" was released in 1988 (see 1988 in music) by Iron Maiden. It is the band's nineteenth single and the third from their Seventh Son of a Seventh Son album. The single debuted at number six in the UK charts. It contains three live performances from Maiden's 1988 headlining performance at the Monsters of Rock festival in Donington Park. The promotional video for the song, although set to the studio version, features live clips from the Donington performance. The song starts in the first person, from the main character's point of view. Later, it's in the third person, after she's dead. According to Steve Harris, the song was inspired by the death of psychic Doris Stokes, and his wondering that if she were truly able to see the future, wouldn't she have been able to forsee her own death? This single was also released as a clear vinyl.

"The Clairvoyant"

266

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. "The Clairvoyant" (Harris) 4:16 "The Clairvoyant" (live) (Harris) 4:27 "The Prisoner" (live) (Harris) 6:08 "Heaven Can Wait" (live) (Harris) 7:08

Versions
Songs The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) Country & Year Germany 1988 UK 1988 UK 1988 UK 1988 Catalog Number EMI 006-20 3927 7 EMI EM 79 EMI EM 79 EMI EMS 79 Single 7" Black Labels Single 7" Silver Labels Single 7" Poster Sleeve Clear Vinyl Single 7" Format

The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) / Heaven Can Wait (Live) The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) / Heaven Can Wait (Live) The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) / Heaven Can Wait (Live) The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner The Clairvoyant / The Prisoner (Live) / Heaven Can Wait (Live)

EEC 1988

EMI K 060 20 3048 6 Maxi Single 12"

UK 1988

EMI 12 EM 79

Maxi Single 12"

UK 1988

EMI 12EMG 79

Maxi Single 12" Gatefold Sleeve

UK 1988 UK 1988 UK 1988

EMI EMP 79 EMI EMP 79 EMI CDEM 79

Shaped Picture Disc 7" Uncut Picture Disc 12" CD Single

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Infinite Dreams"

267

"Infinite Dreams"
"Infinite Dreams (live)"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Seventh Son of a Seventh Son & Maiden England B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) Producer "Killers (live)" "Still Life (live)" 6 November 1989 27 November 1988 Heavy metal 6:04 EMI Records Steve Harris Martin Birch Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Clairvoyant" (1988) "Infinite Dreams (live)" (1989) "Holy Smoke" (1990)

"Infinite Dreams" is a live single released in 1989 by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It is the only single to be released from a home video, 1988's Maiden England. The performance was recorded in Birmingham, England in November 1988 towards the end of the massive world tour to support the album where the song originally appeared, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. It is the final single to feature Adrian Smith for an entire decade. The song is about how the character of the song sees disturbing visions about afterlife and other mystic things in his dreams, but is scared about if he will ever be able wake up again. It starts with a soft guitar solo, which is then joined by Bruce Dickinson's singing as well as the rest of the band. The song starts out quite peaceful, but gets progressively heavier towards the songs climax and the following final verse. All three tracks on the single can be found on the Maiden England VHS and CD collections.

"Infinite Dreams"

268

Track listing
1. "Infinite Dreams (live)" (Steve Harris, Adrian Smith) 6:04 2. "Killers (live)" (Harris, Paul Di'Anno) 5:03 3. "Still Life (live)" (Harris, Dave Murray) 4:37

Versions
Songs Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) Country & Year Catalog Number UK 1989 UK 1989 EMI EMS 117 EMI EM 117 EMI 12 EM 117 Format Black Labels Single 7" Silver Labels Single 7" Maxi Single 12"

Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) / Still Life (Live) UK 1989 Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) / Still Life (Live) UK 1989 Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) UK 1989 UK 1989

EMI 12 EMP 117 Maxi Single Poster Sleeve 12" EMI EMP 117 EMI EMP 117 EMI CDEM 117 EMI TCM 117 Shaped Picture Disk 7" Uncut Picture Disc 12" CD Single Cassette Single

Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) / Still Life (Live) UK 1989 Infinite Dreams (Live) / Killers (Live) UK 1989

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Holy Smoke"

269

"Holy Smoke"
"Holy Smoke"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album No Prayer for the Dying B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) "All In Your Mind" "Kill Me Ce Soir" 10 September 1990 Summer 1990 Heavy metal 3:50 EMI Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Iron Maiden singles chronology "Infinite Dreams" (live) (1989) "Holy Smoke" (1990) "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" (1990)

"Holy Smoke" is Iron Maiden's 21st single and the first to feature guitarist Janick Gers, who joined the band in mid-1990. It was released just weeks before the album, No Prayer for the Dying, and climbed to number three on the UK Singles Chart. The song deals with the many Televangelist scandals that took place in the United States in the late 1980s, including mentions of "Jimmy the Reptile" (a reference to Jimmy Swaggart), "The TV Queen" (a possible reference to Tammy Faye Bakker), Noah, and "plenty of bad preachers for the Devil to stoke." Contrary to what some believe, however, this song is not aimed at the Christian religion itself, but rather the people that abuse it to make gains for themselves. This is one of the very few Iron Maiden songs with profanity in the lyrics (for example, "I've lived in filth/I've lived in sin/and I still smell cleaner than the shit you're in"), which is replaced by gunshot sounds in censored versions. The song is atypical for the band standards, being short and straight. It features a common pop-rock song structure with intro, verse, chorus, verse, chorus, solo, verse and ending with another chorus. The guitar solos are very fiery making use of artificial harmonics, sweep picking, tapping and wild bends. The first solo is played by Janick and second one is played by Dave Murray. The band took a humorous approach for the video of the song, as the band members are filmed on Steve Harris's farm (who directed the video), playing football and driving a tractor, while everything happens in bright daylight.

"Holy Smoke" There are similarities with Deep Purple's Perfect Strangers video, from 1984. Bruce Dickinson is bouncing in a turnip field and wearing a pink T-shirt. The band's producer, Martin Birch, can also be seen on the video, wearing a kind of sadomasochist costume. The video was directed by Harris himself. Harris's daughter Lauren, who was around five years old at the time, also appeared towards the end of the video. The B-sides are covers of Stray's "All in Your Mind" and "Kill Me Ce Soir" originally performed by Golden Earring.

270

Track listing
1. "Holy Smoke" (Harris, Dickinson) 3:50 2. "All in Your Mind" (Bromham; Stray cover) 4:31 3. "Kill Me Ce Soir" (Kooymans, Hay, John Fenton; Golden Earring cover) 6:17

Versions
Songs Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind Country & Year Australia 1990 France 1990 Germany 1990 Catalog Number EMI 2477-7 EMI 2040287 EMI 006 0 204028 7 EMI 06 20 4028 7 EMI EM 153 EMI EM 153 Single 7" Single 7" Single 7" Format

Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind

Italy 1990 UK 1990 UK 1990

Single 7" Black Labels Single 7" Silver Labels Single 7" Maxi Single Maxi Single Maxi Single 12" + Poster 12" Picture Disc Single 12" CD Single CD Single CD Single CD Single Cassette Single Cassette Single

Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir EEC 1990 (German Label) EMI 060-20 4028 6 Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir Italy 1990 Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir UK 1990 EMI 14 20 4028 6 EMI 12 EMP 153

Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir UK 1990 Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir Japan Promo 1990 Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir Japan 1990 Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind / Kill me Ce Soir UK 1990 Holy Smoke Holy Smoke / All in Your Mind Holy Smoke / All in your Mind USA Promo 1990 Australia 1990 UK 1990

EMI EMP 153 EMI TOCP-6449 EMI TOCP-6449 EMI CDEM 153 Epic ESK 2194 EMI TC-2477-4 EMI TCM 153

"Holy Smoke"

271

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"

272

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"


"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album No Prayer for the Dying B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) "I'm a Mover" "Communication Breakdown" 24 December 1990 Summer 1990 Heavy metal 4:44 EMI Bruce Dickinson Iron Maiden singles chronology "Holy Smoke" (1990) "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter (1990) "Be Quick or Be Dead" (1992)

Alternate cover

Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter is the second single from the album No Prayer for the Dying, Iron Maiden's first full-length album in over two years (following the 1988 release Seventh Son of a Seventh Son). The song was originally recorded and released by Bruce Dickinson on the soundtrack album to the movie A Nightmare on Elm Street 5: The Dream Child. The original version of the song can now be found on disc 2 of The Best of Bruce Dickinson. It is the only UK number 1 Iron Maiden have ever had. When Dickinson recorded with Iron Maiden in the autumn of 1990 following a two year hiatus, the band recorded their own version of the song, which became the first Iron Maiden single to reach #1 on the UK charts. The single

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" also received the dubious honour of a Golden Raspberry Award for "Worst Original Song" of 1989. It is also interesting to note that this song was recorded in the Rolling Stones Mobile Studio. The B-side features cover versions of songs by Free and Led Zeppelin, respectively. The promo video clip for the song features footage from the 1960 film "The City of the Dead" (also known as "Horror Hotel"), starring Christopher Lee. Dickinson once explained what the song meant and how it related to the Nightmare on Elm Street films: "Here I tried to sum up what I thought Nightmare On Elm Street movies are really about, and it's all about adolescent fear of period pains. That's what I think it is - deep down. When a young girl first gets her period she bleeds and it happens at night, and so she is afraid to go to sleep and it's a very terrifying time for her, sexually as well, and Nightmare On Elm Street targets that fear. The real slaughter in the Freddie movies is when she loses her virginity. That is the rather nasty thought behind it all, but that's what makes those kind of movies frightening." Despite this, the song's lyrics are still the subject of much speculation and debate among fans, some of whom say the lyrics contain multiple references to anal sex and/or groupies. The song was the only track from No Prayer for the Dying to survive on tours after Bruce Dickinson left Iron Maiden in 1993. More recently however it is rarely aired live; aside from notable appearances in the early summer of 2003.

273

Track listing
1. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" (Bruce Dickinson) 4:44 2. "I'm a Mover" (Free cover) 3:21 3. "Communication Breakdown" (Led Zeppelin cover) 2:41

Versions
Songs Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover Country & Year Australia 1990 EEC 1990 UK 1990 Catalog Number EMI 2552-7 EMI 204171 7 EMI EMS 171 EMI 060 20 4171 6 Format Single 7" Single 7" Single 7" Maxi Single 12" Maxi Single 12" Picture Disc 7" Picture Disc 12" CD Single CD Single CD Single CD Single

Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown EEC 1990

Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown UK 1990

EMI 12 EMP 171

Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover

UK 1990

EMI EMPD 171 EMI 12 EMPD 171 EMI CDEM 171

Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown UK 1990 Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown Holland 1990

Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown Japan Promo 1990 EMI TOCP-6572 Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown Japan 1990 Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown UK 1990 Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover/Communication Breakdown USA Promo 1990 Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter/I'm a Mover UK 1990 EMI TOCP-6572 EMI EMS 171

EMI Epic ESK 4007 CD Single EMI TCEM 171 Cassette Single

"Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter"

274

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Be Quick or Be Dead"

275

"Be Quick or Be Dead"


"Be Quick or Be Dead"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Fear of the Dark B-side "Nodding Donkey Blues" "Space Station #5" "Bayswater Ain't a Bad Place to Be" 13 April 1992 1992 Heavy metal, Speed metal 3:25 EMI Bruce Dickinson Janick Gers Iron Maiden singles chronology "Bring Your Daughter...to the Slaughter" (1990) "Be Quick or Be Dead" (1992) "From Here to Eternity" (1992)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"Be Quick or Be Dead" is the first single from the Iron Maiden album Fear of the Dark, released in 1992. The song is about several political scandals taking place at the time of its release, including the Robert Maxwell banking scandal, European stock market crashes, and the BCCI case. It was released a month prior to the album and reached #2 on the UK singles chart. It is characterised for its heavy guitar riff, that has influences of thrash and speed metal. The B-side features two official songs and one hidden track, including an original blues number ("Nodding Donkey Blues") and Montrose cover ("Space Station No. 5"), and the unlisted "Bayswater Ain't a Bad Place to Be". The last is a spoken word comedy piece by Bruce Dickinson (along with acoustic guitar accompaniment from Janick Gers) in which he imitates and makes fun of Maiden manager Rod Smallwood. A similar mockery of Smallwood was released before, as a B-side titled "Sheriff of Huddersfield", which was available in the Wasted Years single.

"Be Quick or Be Dead"

276

Song structure
The song begins with the drums, then the other instruments join and play the main guitar riff, which was written by Janick Gers and is in G minor scale, as most of the song. The riff is played repeatedly until Bruce Dickinson joins with the lyrics. Through the verse, the guitars and bass play mainly G. Then there is a pre-chorus that is played in C and then the chorus, which features a guitar riff similar to the one of the intro and Bruce singing "Be Quick or Be Dead" repeatedly. Then the post chorus is played in G and F by the guitars as Dickinson sings "See what's ruling all our lives. See who's pulling strings".

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. "Be Quick or Be Dead" (Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers) 3:25 "Nodding Donkey Blues" (Iron Maiden) 3:18 "Space Station #5" (Ronnie Montrose; Montrose cover) 3:47 "Bayswater Ain't a Bad Place to Be" (Dickinson, Gers) 8:05 (unlisted) (UK release only)

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"From Here to Eternity"

277

"From Here to Eternity"


"From Here to Eternity"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Fear of the Dark B-side "I Can't See My Feelings" "Roll Over Vic Vella" "No Prayer For The Dying (live)" "Public Enema Number One (live)" 29 June 1992 1992 Heavy metal 3:37 EMI Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Be Quick or Be Dead" (1992) "From Here to Eternity" (1992) "Wasting Love" (1992)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"From Here to Eternity" is the second single from the Iron Maiden album Fear of the Dark, released in 1992. The song is the fourth and most recent song in the ongoing saga of "Charlotte the Harlot" (other songs include "Charlotte the Harlot," "22 Acacia Avenue," and "Hooks in You", although the status of the last song is a point of debate among fans since it doesn't actually mention "Charlotte", just "the keys to a view at number 22"). The songs tells the tale of Charlotte going on a fateful motorcycle ride with the Devil. This is the first studio single to not feature Eddie in the artwork - second overall, after the live version of "Running Free" - using a picture of the song's music video instead. The single was released in several formats: a 7" cut to shape picture disc with Budgie's "I Can't See My Feelings" on the B-side, a 7" etched disc with "From Here to Eternity" and "Roll Over Vic Vella" on one side and an image etched into the other, a 12" single with fold-out sleeve with "Roll Over Vic Vella" and a live version of "No Prayer For The Dying" as b-sides, and several cd-single versions with all previously mentioned songs and a live version of "Public Enema Number One". It charted and peaked at #21 on the UK Singles Chart. The cover of Chuck Berry's "Roll Over Beethoven" features spoken intro and outro pieces by longtime Iron Maiden roadie and friend Vic Vella.

"From Here to Eternity"

278

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "From Here to Eternity" (Steve Harris) 3:37 "I Can't See My Feelings" (Budgie cover) 3:50 "Roll over Vic Vella" (Chuck Berry cover with different lyrics) 4:48 "No Prayer for the Dying" (live) (Harris) 4:24 "Public Enema Number One" (live) (Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray) 3:57

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Wasting Love"

279

"Wasting Love"
"Wasting Love"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Fear of the Dark B-side "Tailgunner (live)" "Holy Smoke (live)" "The Assassin (live)" September 1992 1992 Heavy metal 5:50 EMI Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers Iron Maiden singles chronology "From Here to Eternity" (1992) "Wasting Love" (1992) "Fear of the Dark (live)" (1993)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"Wasting Love" is the third single from the Iron Maiden album Fear of the Dark, released in 1992. This song represents Iron Maiden's first and currently only power ballad released as a single to date. The single was only officially released in The Netherlands, although two different one-track promotional CDs exist, and were sent to U.S. radio stations. "Wasting Love" was the first Iron Maiden single that was not released on vinyl. The B-side features three live tracks recorded at London's Wembley Arena on December 17, 1990, on the tour to support the No Prayer for the Dying album. The single cover is the third Iron Maiden single not to feature the band's iconic mascot Eddie on the front cover (the previous examples being "Running Free (live)" and "From Here to Eternity"). The cover photo alludes to the music video, which portrays a man tattooing the names of women all over his body.

"Wasting Love"

280

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. "Wasting Love" (Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers) 4:55 "Tailgunner (live)" (Steve Harris, Bruce Dickinson) 4:05 "Holy Smoke (live)" (Dickinson, Harris) 3:35 "The Assassin (live)" (Harris) 4:25

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

References
Marco Gamba; Nicola Visintini (2001). Iron Maiden Companion. Moving Media & Arts. ISBN3-931624-87-0. Covered by 80 Rock Tribute Group - Son of Jorel's Tribute to 80s Rock (2003)

"Fear of the Dark"

281

"Fear of the Dark"


"Fear of the Dark (live)"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Fear Of The Dark & A Real Live One B-side "Bring Your Daughter...To the Slaughter (live)" "Hooks in You (live)" March 1, 1993 1992 Heavy metal 7:11 EMI Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology Wasting Love (1992) Fear of the Dark (live) (1993) Hallowed Be Thy Name (live) (1993)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"Fear of the Dark" is a song written by Steve Harris, bass player and main songwriter for Iron Maiden, as the title track to Iron Maiden's 1992 album Fear of the Dark. This is the only song from the Fear of the Dark album to still be played in concerts today, although "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" was often played live until 1998. The single "Fear of the Dark (live)" is the 26th single released by the band. This live version of the song (as well as the live version of "Bring Your Daughter...To the Slaughter") is taken from the live album A Real Live One. The single reached number 5 in the UK charts. The live version of "Hooks in You" was recorded at the Wembley Arena, London, UK on the 17th of December 1990. When Iron Maiden plays this song live the crowd sings along and is sometimes even louder than the band itself. A good example is the performance at Rock In Rio when a crowd of 250,000 people sang during the intro, before and after the guitar solo. Another exceptional occasion occurred in Helsinki, Finland in the band's 1992 concert, which was held indoors with an enthusiastic crowd (although much less in quantity than in the aforementioned Rio concert) chanting along the songs melody especially during the beginning of the song, creating what was described later as almost religious atmosphere. The special feeling was also noticed by the band and consequently Fear of the Dark from the Helsinki concert was included in their Real Live One album. During the song, the enthusiastic response by the audience is met with apparent satisfaction by lead singer Bruce Dickinson, who constantly lets the audience sing parts of the songs alone.

"Fear of the Dark" The song has been covered by German a cappella metal band van Canto on their album Hero, as well as the Italian metal band Graveworm on their 2001 album Scourge of Malice, by the also Italian death metal band Infernal Poetry on their 2005 album Beholding the Unpure and by the Finnish band Sturm und Drang as the bonus track on their 2008 album Rock 'n Roll Children. Fear of the Dark is well-known at live concerts, because often Iron Maiden fans will sing along during the chorus, for a powerful effect. The song was also covered by Fightstar for kerrang's Maiden Heaven. The Flight 666 version of the song was released as downloadable content for the Rock Band video game series on June 9, 2009.

282

Track listing
1. "Fear of the Dark (live)" (Steve Harris) 7:11 2. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter (live)" (Bruce Dickinson) 5:17 3. "Hooks in You (live)" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) 4:06

Formats
1. 3 track CD digipack 2. 2 track 7" vinyl posterbag 3. 2 track cut-to-shape vinyl picture disc

Covers
Graveworm, for their 2001 album Scourge of Malice[1] (usually incorrectly attributed to Cradle of Filth). Colombian gothic metal band Ethereal, for their Shroud of Flesh album[2] . Alternative rock band Fightstar performed a cover of the song for the Kerrang! "Maiden Heaven" tribute album,. It was performed by Chuck Billy, Craig Goldy, Ricky Phillips, and Mikkey Dee for the tribute album Numbers from the Beast. German Band Blind Guardian. Doro Pesch performed with Blaze Bayley on a Classical live version in 2004 at Wacken Open Air with strings and acoustic guitars.[3] Venezuelan Serata Folk Metal band ArtSonica[4] . Justice at Summer Breeze Open Air 2007. Pentagram (only live)[5] . Brazilian rock band Gthaka[6] . Italian Metal / Rock band Terni played the song live as Acoustic Cover. Finnish band Children of Bodom is commonly, and incorrectly, attributed to a cover of the song by Graveworm. Italian Techno Duo DJ Activator and Francesco Zeta covered the song 2008 as a Hardstyle version and released it as a single in Italy.[7] . The Finnish Metal/Rock band Sturm Und Drang Performed a cover of this song on their 2008 release "Rock N' Roll Children" as a bonus track [8]

"Fear of the Dark"

283

Personnel
Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] [7] [8] Encyclopaedia Metallum - Graveworm (Ita) - Scourge of Malice (http:/ / www. metal-archives. com/ release. php?id=8895) Encyclopaedia Metallum - Ethereal (Col) - Shroud of Flesh (http:/ / www. metal-archives. com/ release. php?id=30490) Blaze Bayley and Doro Pesch - Fear of the Dark (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=dq-7lrZsu1Q) ArtSonica - Fear of the Dark (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=ZVdPmWtxGsc& feature=related) Pentagram - Fear Of The Dark (Live in Izmir) (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=tp0IbkDwvtQ) Gthaka - Fear Of The Dark (Iron Maiden Cover) (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=SSk8PS0aj2I) DJ Activator - Fear of the Dark (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=VjcOs_ShaSw) Sturm Und Drang - Fear of the Dark (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=nSCHDT9s2kI)

"Hallowed Be Thy Name"

284

"Hallowed Be Thy Name"


"Hallowed Be Thy Name (live)"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The Number of the Beast & A Real Dead One B-side "The Trooper (live)" "Wasted Years (live)" "Wrathchild (live)" October 4, 1993 Picture Disc Heavy metal 7:51
[1]

Released Format Genre Length Label Writer(s)

EMI Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology

"Fear of the Dark (live)" (1993)

"Hallowed Be Thy Name (live)" (1993)

"Man on the Edge" (1995)

"Hallowed Be Thy Name" is a song written by Steve Harris for the 1982 Iron Maiden album The Number of The Beast. The song describes a man's thoughts just before being sent to the gallows. He begins to feel terror and realizes he really is afraid of dying, despite claims that he's not ("tears flow, but why am I crying?/after all, I'm not afraid of dying/don't I believe that there never is an end?"). At the end of the vocal section, the man gets executed; this is followed by a long instrumental section, culminating in his ambiguous final words, "Hallowed be thy name". When the album "Number of the Beast" was profiled on VH1's Classic Albums, Steve Harris said the song was about "having faith, whether it be in religion or whatever, but could that faith fail you at the last second when you need it most?" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" begins with a slow tempo and builds up later in the song. Bruce Dickinson showcases his wide vocal range and power at both slow and fast tempo. This song is considered one of Iron Maiden's classics, and is a staple at live concerts. The first guitar solo is played by Dave Murray, and the second by Adrian Smith. Since Smith left the band and was replaced by Janick Gers, Gers has played Smith's solo, even after Smith returned to the band. All the solos vary from concert to concert. During many live performances, one of the guitarists, normally Janick Gers or Dave Murray, will make a large amount of guitar feedback or force the whammy bar on their guitar

"Hallowed Be Thy Name" high up respectivley to create a very high pitched sounds. The cover of the live version recorded in 1993 depicts Bruce Dickinson being impaled from behind by Eddie, in the form of Satan. The same idea of Eddie killing the departing vocalist had previously been used on the cover of the Venezuelan release of Maiden Japan (with him holding the severed head of Paul Di'Anno). This theme was also used during Bruce Dickinson's farewell performance, during the Raising Hell concert, where horror Illusionist Simon Drake, after seemingly killing Dickinson in an iron maiden torture device, gets impaled by Eddie. The song has also been released as a live single from the 1993 album "A Real Dead One" and on The Best of the Beast, and has become a live staple for Iron Maiden. The band recorded a newer version of this track in 2006 and it was used as a b-sides on the "Different World" single. Iron Maiden also recorded this song as part of EMI's television series 'Live from Abbey Road'. This single was also released as a red 45 rpm (7") vinyl. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" was named the greatest metal song of all time by Digital Dream Door on "100 Greatest Metal Songs".[2]

285

In popular culture
A live version of the song was released as downloadable content in the video game Rock Band 2 on June 9, 2009.

Single track listing


1. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (recorded live in Moscow, Russia, on June 2nd or 3rd 1993) (Harris) 7:26. The bootleg from the June 4th show contains a different version of this one. Also, it's said it was recorded at Valby Halle, Copenhagen, Denmark, August 25, 1992. 2. "The Trooper" (recorded live in Helsinki, Finland, on August 27, 1992) (Harris) 3:53 3. "Wasted Years" (recorded live in Bremen, Germany, on April 16, 1993) (Smith) 4:42 4. "Wrathchild" (recorded live in Helsinki, Finland, on August 27, 1992) (Harris) 2:57

Formats
1. CD Single 2. 7" vinyl Posterbag 3. 12" vinyl Picture Disk

Covers
The song was covered in the following years: 1995 - by Ceremonial Oath 1996 - by Solitude Aeturnus 1998 - by Cradle of Filth 2001 - by Silent Eye 2002 - by Iced Earth 2002 - by Dream Theater 2005 - by The Iron Maidens 2006 - by Take Cover 2007 - by Brown Brigade

2008 - by Machine Head (Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden)

"Hallowed Be Thy Name"

286

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith - guitar (album version) Janick Gers guitar (live single version) Steve Harris bass guitar Clive Burr drums (album version) Nicko McBrain - drums (live single version)

References
[1] http:/ / www. google. com/ products/ catalog?q=A+ Real+ Dead+ One& hl=en& cid=13232189273787782374& sa=title& os=contents [2] http:/ / digitaldreamdoor. nutsie. com/ pages/ best_metal-songs. html

"Man on the Edge"

287

"Man on the Edge"


"Man on the Edge"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The X Factor B-side "The Edge of Darkness" "Judgement Day" "Justice of the Peace" "I Live My Way" "Blaze Bayley Interview" 25 September 1995 CD single 12" picture disc Heavy metal, speed metal 4:11 EMI Blaze Bayley Janick Gers Iron Maiden singles chronology "Hallowed Be Thy Name (live)" (1993) "Man on the Edge" (1995) "Lord of the Flies" (1996)

Released Format Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"Man on the Edge" is a single from the Iron Maiden album The X Factor. It was released in 1995. The song is based on the film Falling Down starring Michael Douglas. It was the first single the band released with Blaze Bayley on vocals. In addition to an interview with Bayley and another track from The X Factor, the single features three originals that did not make the album's final cut. It is one of two Blaze Bayley era songs to make it onto the Edward the Great compilation, along with Futureal, as well as one of three to make it onto Best of the Beast along with Sign of the Cross and Virus. Iron Maiden frequently played this song during the Ed Hunter tour in 1999, making it one of 5 Bayley era songs to survive in concerts after his departure (The others being Lord of the Flies, Sign of the Cross, Futureal, and The Clansman). A live version of this song from 1999 is featured on the 2000 single release of The Wicker Man, with Bruce Dickinson on vocals.

"Man on the Edge" There were three videos made for this song. One is filmed on location at Masada, Israel, the second is a more cinematic video of the band performing as a man throws himself off a building, and the third is a 'sneak-peek' promo video consisting only of clips of 'pratfalls' from black and white silent movies was used for promotional purposes prior to release. This third version appears as an 'Easter Egg' on the 'Visions of the Beast' DVD. The song was featured in the video game Carmageddon 2.

288

Track listing
CD 1
1. 2. 3. 4. "Man on the Edge" (Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers) 4:13 "The Edge of Darkness" (Steve Harris, Bayley, Gers) 6:39 "Judgement Day" (Bayley, Gers) 4:06 "Blaze Bayley Interview, Part I" 5:41

CD 2
1. "Man on the Edge" (Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers) 4:13 2. "The Edge of Darkness" (Steve Harris, Bayley, Gers) 6:39 3. "Justice of the Peace" (Harris, Dave Murray) 3:33 4. "Blaze Bayley Interview, Part II" 5:56

12" disc
1. "Man on the Edge" (Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers) 4:13 2. "The Edge of Darkness" (Steve Harris, Bayley, Gers) 6:39 3. "I Live My Way" (Harris, Bayley, Gers) - 3:48

Personnel
Blaze Bayley vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Lord of the Flies"

289

"Lord of the Flies"


"Lord of the Flies"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The X Factor B-side Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) "My Generation" "Doctor Doctor" April 1996 1995 Heavy metal 5:04 EMI Steve Harris Janick Gers

Iron Maiden singles chronology "Man on the Edge" (1995) "Lord of the Flies" (1996) "Virus" (1996)

"Lord of the Flies" is an Iron Maiden single and second track album on their 1995 album The X Factor. The song is based on the book and film of the same name. The single was only released outside of the UK. Additional tracks on the single include covers from UFO and The Who. Iron Maiden frequently performed this song live during their Dance of Death tour from 20032004, making it one of only 5 Bayley era songs to survive in concerts after his departure (The others being Man on the Edge, Sign of the Cross, Futureal, and The Clansman). One such performance of this song is included on Iron Maiden's 2005 live album "Death on the Road". The guitar solo in Lord of the Flies is played by Janick Gers.

"Lord of the Flies"

290

Track listing
1. "Lord of the Flies" (Steve Harris, Janick Gers) 5:04 2. "My Generation" (The Who cover) 3:38 3. "Doctor Doctor" (UFO cover) 4:50

Personnel
Blaze Bayley vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Virus"

291

"Virus"
"Virus"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The Best of the Beast B-side "My Generation" "Doctor Doctor" "Prowler" "Invasion" "Sanctuary" "Wrathchild" 2 September 1996 Summer 1996 Heavy metal 6:14 3:54 (short version) EMI Iron Maiden singles chronology "Lord of the Flies" (1996) "Virus" (1996) "The Angel and the Gambler" (1998)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label

"Virus"

292

Alternate cover

Alternate cover

"Virus" is a single from Iron Maiden, released in 1996. It is the first single since 1980's "Women in Uniform" 'that does not appear on any official Iron Maiden studio album. It was, however, featured as a brand new track on the band's first ever career retrospective 1996's double-disc The Best of the Beast. It is the only Iron Maiden song to be credited to both of the band's guitarists. It has yet to be performed in Iron Maiden concerts featuring Bruce Dickinson on vocals. Along with "Sign of the Cross" from The X Factor, and "The Clansman" from Virtual XI, Virus is widely considered one of the best Iron Maiden songs with Blaze Bayley as the frontman. In order to celebrate the band's 21 years, the single was released in three different formats. The first format features the same B-sides as the Lord of the Flies single from 1996, which included covers from The Who and UFO. The second features songs from the 1979 compilation album Metal for Muthas, which marks the only studio recordings to feature former guitarist Tony Parsons. The third features two songs from Maiden's legendary 1978 demo recordings, The Soundhouse Tapes. On the EP Slow Riot for New Zer Kanada by Post-rock group Godspeed You! Black Emperor, the track "Blaise Bailey Finnegan III" features the eponymous vox pop performer reciting a poem made from the lyrics from "Virus", written by Blaze Bailey (no relation). The intro riff was re-used by Bristol-based trio Kosheen for their song I Want It All from their 2001 album Resist.

Track listing
CD 1
1. "Virus (Short Version)" (Blaze Bayley, Dave Murray, Janick Gers, Steve Harris) - 3:54 2. "My Generation" (The Who cover) - 3:38 3. "Doctor Doctor" (UFO cover) - 4:50

CD 2
1. "Virus" (Blaze Bayley, Dave Murray, Janick Gers, Steve Harris) - 6:14 2. "Sanctuary" (from the 1979 compilation album Metal for Muthas) - 3:34 3. "Wrathchild" (from the 1979 compilation album Metal for Muthas) - 3:07

"Virus"

293

12" disc
1. "Virus" (Blaze Bayley, Dave Murray, Janick Gers, Steve Harris) - 6:14 2. "Prowler" (from the 1978 demo The Soundhouse Tapes) - 4:20 3. "Invasion" (from the 1978 demo The Soundhouse Tapes) - 3:07

Promotional CD for radio stations


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Virus" - 3:53 "Man on the Edge" - 4:11 "Afraid to Shoot Strangers (Live) - 6:48 "2 Minutes to Midnight" - 6:02 "The Trooper" - 4:13 "The Number of the Beast" - 4:52 "Wrathchild" - 2:54 "Strange World" - 5:22 "Iron Maiden" - 4:01

Personnel
"Virus", "My Generation", "Doctor Doctor" Blaze Bayley vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Prowler", "Invasion" Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Doug Sampson drums

"Sanctuary", "Wrathchild" Paul Di'Anno vocals Dave Murray guitar Tony Parsons - guitar Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Doug Sampson drums

External links
Song Commentary [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=single30_virus/ commentary30a_virus1& lang=eng& link=singles

"The Angel and the Gambler"

294

"The Angel and the Gambler"


"The Angel and the Gambler"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Virtual XI B-side Part 1 "Blood on the World's Hands (live)" "Afraid to Shoot Strangers (video)" Part 2 "The Aftermath (live)" "Man on the Edge (video)" March 9, 1998 CD single Picture disc Heavy metal 9:51 (Part 1) 6:01 (Part 2) EMI Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Virus" (1996) "The Angel and the Gambler" (1998) "Futureal" (1998)

Released Format Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Alternate cover

"The Angel and the Gambler" is a single from the Iron Maiden album Virtual XI, released in 1998. It was released two weeks before Virtual XI hit stores. It is the first Iron Maiden single to feature a video as a B-side ("Afraid to Shoot Strangers" live footage from Israel, but the audio is actually from Kren, Gothemburg, November 1, 1995). The single also includes two audio tracks recorded live at the Kren, Gothemburg, on November 1, 1995, at The X

"The Angel and the Gambler" Factour, in support of The X-Factor. The CD single was released in two parts. Part 1 contains a poster, with the "Virtual XI Fixture List 1998" on one side and the band posing in Maiden football gear with some of their favourite players on the other side. Part 2 contains three double-sided cards with the musicians posing in Maiden football gear. Part 2 also has a shortened version of "The Angel and the Gambler". To support the single with more airplay, the band also released a music video, which featured the shortened version of the song. In an almost Star Wars fashion, the video features an entirely computer-generated world filled with aliens of varying quality. The concept for the video, particularly Blaze walking in to the bar with a brown hat and a long jacket were taken from concept art designed for the Somewhere in Time album, specifically the single "Stranger in a Strange Land". The song itself is controversial amongst fans and often criticized for being overlong and repetitive, with the main chorus repeated, in all, 22 times. The music-video version is considerably shorter, a little over three minutes.

295

Track listing
Part 1
1. "The Angel and the Gambler" (Steve Harris) 9:51 2. "Blood on the World's Hands (Live) 3. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers (live video)" (Harris) 6:52

Part 2
1. "The Angel and the Gambler (shortened version)" (Harris) 6:01 2. "The Aftermath (Live at Kren, Gothemburg, November 1st 1995)" (Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers, Harris) 6:41 3. "Man on the Edge (video)" (Bayley, Gers) 4:11

Personnel
Blaze Bayley vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Futureal"

296

"Futureal"
"Futureal"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Virtual XI B-side "The Evil That Men Do (live)" "Man on the Edge (live)" "The Angel and the Gambler" (video) 28 September 1998 1997 Heavy metal, speed metal 3:00 EMI Steve Harris Blaze Bayley Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Angel and the Gambler" (1998) "Futureal" (1998) "The Wicker Man" (2000)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Alternate cover

"Futureal" is a single from the Iron Maiden album Virtual XI, released in 1998. Just months after this single was released, vocalist Blaze Bayley would part ways with Iron Maiden. The song was voted as one of the most popular Iron Maiden songs of all time in a fan poll taken during the making of the Ed Hunter album and video game. It is one of two Blaze Bayley era songs to make it onto the Edward the Great compilation, along with "Man on the Edge". The cover of the single is also notable for depicting band mascot Eddie, in CG form, as the cyborg form he had on Somewhere in Time.

"Futureal" Iron Maiden frequently played this song during the Ed Hunter tour in 1999, making it one of five Bayley era songs to survive in concerts after his departure. A 1999 recording of this song appears on the band's next single release, "The Wicker Man". During live performances on the Ed Hunter tour a giant robot Eddie appeared from backstage and "battled" members of the band.

297

Track listing
1. "Futureal" (Steve Harris, Blaze Bayley) 2:59 2. "The Evil That Men Do (Live at Kren, Gothemburg, November 1st 1995)" (Harris, Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) 4:20 3. "Man on the Edge (Live at Kren, Gothemburg, November 1st 1995)" (Janick Gers, Bayley) 4:09 4. "The Angel and the Gambler (video)" (Harris) 9:51

Personnel
Blaze Bayley vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"The Wicker Man"

298

"The Wicker Man"


"The Wicker Man"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Brave New World B-side Standard edition "Futureal (live)" "Man on the Edge (live)" Limited edition "Man on the Edge (live)" "Powerslave (live)" "Killers (live)" "Futureal (live)" April 2000 CD single 1999-2000 Heavy metal 4:35 EMI Adrian Smith Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Iron Maiden singles chronology "Futureal" (1998) "The Wicker Man" (2000) "Out of the Silent Planet" (2000)

Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Alternate cover

Limited edition Cover

"The Wicker Man"

299

"The Wicker Man" is a song by Iron Maiden, released as the first single from their album Brave New World in April 2000. It was co-written by Adrian Smith, Bruce Dickinson and Steve Harris. It was co-produced by Kevin Shirley and Harris. The title is inspired by the British cult film of the same name. The song should not be confused with "Wicker Man" from Dickinson's solo career, the lyrics of which are more closely themed around the film. The latter song can be found on the 2 disc edition of The Best of Bruce Dickinson. The radio version of the song differs from the album track, with the chorus' first line "Your time will come" followed by the line, "Thy will be done", and the third line followed by another "Thy will be done". The last line is followed by "Don't turn, don't run." This is the case for every chorus except for the third chorus in which the third line is followed by "I'll be the one" and the fourth line is followed by "Burn on the sun." This version is considered extremely rare. The single's cover art was by Mark Wilkinson, after a piece by the famed artist Derek Riggs was rejected. This was the last piece Riggs would create for Iron Maiden (until a piece for 2007s These Colours Don't Run), reasoning that they were too hard to work with[1] . This art work was used for the picture vinyl disc and various minor pressings.[2] 2001 the song was nominated for a Grammy Award in the category "Best Metal Performance" but lost to "Elite" by Deftones.

Track listing
Standard edition
1. 2. 3. 4. "The Wicker Man" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 4:35 "Futureal (Live at Helsinki Icehall - September 15th 1999)" (Blaze Bayley, Harris) 2:58 "Man on the Edge (Live at Filaforum, Milano - September 23rd 1999)" (Bayley, Janick Gers) 4:37 "The Wicker Man (video)" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:35

Limited edition
A limited edition of "The Wicker Man" was also released. The limited edition contained 2 CDs and a double-faced poster, as well as a selection of live songs recorded during the Ed Hunter Tour. The European release of the single also contained a beermat. Disc one 1. 2. 3. 4. "The Wicker Man" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:35 "Man on the Edge (Live at Filaforum, Milano - September 23rd 1999)" (Bayley, Gers) 4:37 "Powerslave" (Live at Palau Olimpico, Barcelona - September 25th 1999) (Dickinson) 7:11 "The Wicker Man (video)" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:35

Disc two 1. 2. 3. 4. "The Wicker Man" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:35 "Futureal (Live at Helsinki Icehall - September 15th 1999)" (Bayley, Harris) 2:58 "Killers (Live at Ahoy, Rotterdam - September 10th 1999)" (Paul Di'Anno, Harris) 4:28 "Futureal (live video)" (Bayley, Harris) 2:58

"The Wicker Man"

300

Picture vinyl disc


This edition of the single has two different artworks on both sides of the record. Side one 1. "The Wicker Man" (Dickinson, Smith, Harris) 4:35 Side two 1. "Powerslave" (Live at Palau Olimpico, Barcelona - September 25th 1999) (Dickinson) 7:11 2. "Killers (Live at Ahoy, Rotterdam - September 10th 1999)" (Paul Di'Anno, Harris) 4:28

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals

Nicko McBrain drums

References
[1] The Wicker Man Rejected Artwork (http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ articles/ wickerman-rejected. html) [2] The Iron Maiden Commentary (http:/ / maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=single33_wickerman/ wickermark& lang=eng& link=singles)

"Out of the Silent Planet"

301

"Out of the Silent Planet"


"Out of the Silent Planet"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Brave New World B-side "Wasted Years" (live) "Aces High" (live) "Out of the Silent Planet" (video) October 23, 2000 1999/2000 Heavy metal 6:25 EMI Janick Gers, Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Out of the Silent Planet" (2000) "Run to the Hills (live)" (2002)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

"The Wicker Man" (2000)

Alternate cover

"Out of the Silent Planet" is a single from the Iron Maiden album Brave New World, released in 2000. The single features two live tracks from the 1999 Ed Hunter tour, which featured the band reunited with guitarist Adrian Smith and vocalist Bruce Dickinson, as well as the promotional video for "Out of the Silent Planet." Cover art was by Mark Wilkinson. According to interviews with band members, the song was primarily influenced by the science fiction movie Forbidden Planet. (In addition, the name "Out Of The Silent Planet" is an obvious reference to the 1938 C.S. Lewis science fiction novel by the same title.) It's a peculiarity in that despite being one of only 2 singles from the album, this was not played on the majority of the accompanying world tour - only in a few encores in South America and the Brixton Academy concerts.

"Out of the Silent Planet" The music video is a recording of the band's European leg of their Brave New World Tour.

302

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. "Out of the Silent Planet" (Janick Gers, Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris) 4:10 "Wasted Years" (Live At Filaforum, Milano - September 23, 1999) (Adrian Smith) 5:07 "Aces High" (Live At Plaza Del Toros, Madrid - September 26, 1999) (Steve Harris) 5:24 "Out of the Silent Planet (video)" (Steve Harris) 4:10

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Wildest Dreams"

303

"Wildest Dreams"
"Wildest Dreams"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Dance of Death B-side "Pass the Jam" "Blood Brothers (orchestral mix)" September 1, 2003 2003 Heavy metal 3:49 EMI Adrian Smith Steve Harris Iron Maiden singles chronology "Run to the Hills (live)" (2002) "Wildest Dreams" (2003) "Rainmaker" (2003)

Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Alternate cover

"Wildest Dreams" is a single from Iron Maiden's 13th studio album, Dance of Death, released in 2003. The band began performing the song in concert before the album was released. The single also includes an improvisational jam from the Dance of Death sessions The music video is a computer animated short, where the band members drive around a desolate planet and into the mouth of Eddie (as depicted on the CD single cover).[1]

"Wildest Dreams" At the beginning of the song, drummer Nicko McBrain can be heard counting off in an American accent. The guitar solo in Wildest Dreams is played by Adrian Smith.

304

Track listing
CD
1. "Wildest Dreams" (Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 3:49 2. "Pass the Jam" 8:20

DVD
1. 2. 3. 4. "Wildest Dreams" (promo video) (Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 3:49 "The Nomad (rock mix)" (Murray, Harris) "Blood Brothers (rock mix)" (Harris) "Dance of Death Behind the Scenes" (video)

7" Green Vinyl


1. "Wildest Dreams" (Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 3:49 2. "Pass the Jam" 8:20

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

References
[1] YouTube - Iron Maiden - "Wildest Dreams" (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=ipyjwp2bVgM)

"Rainmaker"

305

"Rainmaker"
"Rainmaker"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album Dance of Death B-side "Dance of Death (orchestral version)" "More Tea Vicar" 24 November 2003 Heavy metal 3:48 EMI Dave Murray Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Steve Harris Kevin Shirley Iron Maiden singles chronology "Wildest Dreams" (2003) "Rainmaker" (2003) "The Number of the Beast (live)" (2005)

Released Genre Length Label Writer(s)

Producer

"Rainmaker" is the 37th single released by Iron Maiden. It is the second single from their 13th studio album Dance of Death. The song was largely written by long-time guitarist Dave Murray. The rainmaker concept was started by vocalist Bruce Dickinson who one day said in the rehearsal studio that the intro riff made him think about raindrops. The song has no connection with the 1995 novel written by John Grisham of the same name. The guitar solo on "Rainmaker" is played by Dave Murray. The cover is a still taken from the music video directed by Howard Greenhalgh. This single also contains a double-sided poster. "More Tea Vicar" is a recording of a jam session (similar to "Pass the Jam") with Bruce Dickinson trying his hand at rapping.

"Rainmaker"

306

Track listing
CD
1. "Rainmaker" (Dave Murray, Steve Harris, Bruce Dickinson) 3:48 2. "Dance of Death (orchestral version)" (Janick Gers, Harris) 8:36 3. "More Tea Vicar" 4:40

Japanese CD Version
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. "Rainmaker" (Dave Murray, Steve Harris, Bruce Dickinson) 3:48 "Dance of Death (orchestral version)" (Janick Gers, Harris) 8:36 "More Tea Vicar" 4:40 "The Wicker Man (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 19th-21st 2002)" - 4:38 "Children of the Damned (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 19th-21st 2002)" - 5:02

CD Extras: 1. "Rainmaker" (Video) - 3:50 2. "Wildest Dreams" (Video) - 3:39

DVD
1. 2. 3. 4. "Rainmaker" (video) (Dave Murray, Steve Harris, Bruce Dickinson) 3:48 "The Wicker Man (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 19th-21st 2002)" (Smith, Harris, Dickinson) "Children of the Damned (Live at Brixton Academy, London - March 19th-21st 2002)" (Harris) "Rainmaker Video The Making of"

7" Vinyl
1. Rainmaker 2. Dance of Death (orchestral version)

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

External links
Rainmaker: Commentary [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=album13_dod/ commentary13_dod& lang=eng& link=albums#track2

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg"

307

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg"


"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album A Matter of Life and Death B-side Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer(s) Producer Hallowed Be Thy Name (CD) 14 August 2006 CD, 10" clear vinyl disc Sarm West Studios, London in 2006 Heavy metal 7:21 Columbia Records, EMI Europe Dave Murray, Steve Harris Kevin Shirley Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Trooper (live)" (2005) "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" (2006) "Different World" (2006)

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" is a song by Iron Maiden from their 14th studio album A Matter of Life and Death. The song is the leading single from the album, released on 14 August 2006. The CD single comes with a B-side of "Hallowed Be Thy Name" from the BBC Radio 1 Legends Session. Due to the overall length of the two songs, the single was not eligible for chart inclusion in the UK. The single was also released on 10" clear vinyl single, which includes BBC Sessions versions of "The Trooper" and "Run to the Hills" on the B-side.[1] Although both the sleeve and the labels of the 10" vinyl state that it should be played at 33.3 RPM, this is actually incorrect. The correct playing speed is 45 RPM. A promotional version of the single was released on 14 August 2006, featuring the full version and a shorter version called "edited version" in the US promo CD and "rock club mix" in the UK promo CD (both versions are identical). The single was not allowed to have a place in the UK charts because the overall music time on the CD exceeded the time limit for it to be classed as a single.[2] On 17 July 2006, a music video for the song was uploaded on the band's official website. It had initially been released only for paying fan club members, but it was leaked within minutes and viewed by many fans who posted

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" the link on various Iron Maiden discussion forums. The video displays them performing in the studio along with classic photos and clips of the band over their lengthy career.

308

Track listing
2 track CD
1. "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" (Dave Murray, Steve Harris) 7:21 2. "Hallowed Be Thy Name (Radio 1 'Legends' Session)" (Harris) 7:13

10" clear vinyl disc


1. "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" (Murray, Harris) 7:21 2. "The Trooper (Radio 1 'Legends' Session)" (Harris) 3:59 3. "Run to the Hills (Radio 1 'Legends' Session)" (Harris) 3:56

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar, backing vocals Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

External links
Music video (stream) [3]

References
[1] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ article. php?section=1& subsection=1& article_type=& article_id=1339 [2] http:/ / www. getreadytorock. com/ reviews/ single_reviews0806. htm [3] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ article. php?section=1& subsection=1& article_type=& article_id=1324

"Different World"

309

"Different World"
"Different World"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album A Matter of Life and Death B-side US CD single "Hallowed Be Thy Name (Radio 1 Legends Session)", "The Trooper (Radio 1 Legends Session)" European CD single "Iron Maiden (live)" European DVD single "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg (live)", "Hocus Pocus (Focus cover)" European 7" picture disc "Fear of the Dark (live)" November 14, 2006 (US) December 26, 2006 (UK) CD, DVD, 7" picture disc

Released Format

Recorded Sarm West Studios, London in 2006 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 4:17 EMI / Sanctuary Records

Writer(s) Adrian Smith, Steve Harris Producer Kevin Shirley Iron Maiden singles chronology "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" (2006) "Different World" (2006) "El Dorado" (2010)

"Different World"

310

Alternate cover

DVD single cover Alternate cover

7" single

"Different World" is the first track from English heavy metal band Iron Maiden's 2006 album A Matter of Life and Death. The song is the band's thirty-fifth single, and is also the second single from the album, released on 14 November 2006 in the United States, and 26 December 2006 in Europe. The song has been stated by the band to be a tribute to Thin Lizzy due to the low sounding melodies sung by Bruce Dickinson that are reminiscent of those Phil Lynott would sing. The song is featured in the skateboarding video game Tony Hawk's Downhill Jam. The all-female tribute band, The Iron Maidens, recorded an acoustic cover of the song on their 2008 EP The Root of All Evil.

Music video
Two music videos of "Different World" were released. In the first, a computer animated version of Dickinson is watching a factory of drones reorganizing test tubes. When one appears with a purple liquid in it, he takes the tube and runs. He is chased by more drones across an extremely high-up walkway, before leaping off the platform, and later through a garbage disposal chute. He exits the chute at high speed, and tries to grab hold of it but eventually falls. He lands on a zeppelin, and is grabbed by a drone. The drone carries him through the air before crashing into the ground, after which Bruce runs through the city to a woman who shows him a different world. In this vision, a young version of Bruce (who looks more like him than the older one) takes the test tube and throws it at the screen. The vision explodes and a giant Eddie stands up and begins to destroy the city. The camera zooms out, and a larger Eddie is revealed to be holding the planet, and throws it at the screen, ending the video.[1] The second version features the band recording the song in studio 1 of Sarm Studios, West London, UK. Portions of this video appear on the first version.[2]

"Different World"

311

Track listings
US CD single 1. "Different World" (Adrian Smith, Steve Harris) 4:15 2. "Hallowed Be Thy Name (Radio 1 'Legends' Session)" (Harris) 7:13 3. "The Trooper (Radio 1 'Legends' Session)" (Harris) 3:56 Digital single The interview with Steve Harris was only available if pre-ordered before December 26, 2006 through the Iron Maiden website [3]. 1. "Different World" (Recorded live in Aalborg on the A Matter of Life and Death tour, November 9, 2006) (Smith, Harris) 4:15 2. Interview with Steve Harris on A Matter of Life and Death 10:38 European CD single 1. "Different World" (Smith, Harris) 4:15 2. "Iron Maiden" (Recorded live in Copenhagen on the A Matter of Life and Death tour, November 10, 2006) (Harris) 5:40 European DVD single 1. "Different World" (Smith, Harris) 4:15 2. "The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" (Recorded live in Copenhagen on the A Matter of Life and Death tour, November 10, 2006) (Dave Murray, Harris) 7:44 3. "Hocus Pocus" (Focus cover) 5:33 European 7" picture disc 1. "Different World" (Smith, Harris) 4:15 2. "Fear of the Dark" (Recorded live in Copenhagen on the A Matter of Life and Death tour, November 10, 2006) (Harris) 7:45

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

Charts

"Different World"

312

Chart (2006)

Peak position 1 3 8

Finnish Singles Chart UK Singles Chart U.S. Billboard Hot Mainstream Rock Tracks

External links
Music video (stream) [4]

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] YouTube - Iron Maiden - Different World (Animated Version) (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=X7PPxYZG8Lo) YouTube - Iron Maiden - Different World (http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=EgLuMQnnBKs) http:/ / ironmaiden. com http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ article. php?section=1& subsection=1& article_type=& article_id=1376

"El Dorado"

313

"El Dorado"
"El Dorado"

Singleby Iron Maiden from the album The Final Frontier Released Format June 8, 2010 Digital download

Recorded Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas in 2010 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 6:49 EMI

Writer(s) Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris [1] Producer Kevin Shirley Iron Maiden singles chronology "Different World" (2006) "El Dorado" (2010)

"El Dorado" is the second track from British band Iron Maiden's upcoming album The Final Frontier. The song is the band's thirty-sixth single, and the first from the album. It was made available as a free download on the band's official site at 00:01 on June 8, 2010 (UTC), one day before the album's supporting tour began.[2] The cover art was created by Anthony Dry and is based on the covers of the EC Comics published by William Gaines that were popular in the 1950's. Regarding the early online release of the song, vocalist Bruce Dickinson explains: El Dorado is a preview of the The Final Frontierforthcoming studio album. As we will be including it in the set of our The Final Frontier World TourFinal Frontier World Tour, we thought it would be great to thank all our fans and get them into The Final Frontier mood by giving them this song up front of the tour and album release. In the June 9 edition of Kerrang!, Dickinson explained the meaning of the song[1] : "[El Dorado] has a cynical lyric about Late-2000s recessionthe economic crap that's been happening. It seemed a bit like a perfect storm; people were borrowing money like crazy. I thought, 'This is really going to screw people up' and sure enough, we're all in deep doo-doo! And that's what El Dorado is about, it's about selling somebody the myth that 'El Dorado#MetaphorThe streets are paved with gold' and them asking, 'Where do I sign up?'."

"El Dorado"

314

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson lead vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

References
[1] http:/ / files. homepagemodules. de/ b210833/ f11745263t510912p7384449n2. jpg [2] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ thebigbang_2. html

315

Songs
List of Iron Maiden songs
This is a comprehensive list of songs by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The band have released fourteen studio albums, as well as numerous live albums, demos, singles, and video albums. This list does not contain live versions or remixes.

Original songs
Title "2 A.M." "2 Minutes to Midnight" "22 Acacia Avenue" "Aces High" "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" "Age of Innocence" "Alexander the Great" "Another Life" "Back in the Village" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "Blood Brothers" "Blood on the World's Hands" "Brave New World" "Brighter Than a Thousand Suns" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "Can I Play with Madness" Release The X Factor Powerslave The Number of the Beast Powerslave Fear of the Dark Dance of Death Somewhere in Time Killers Powerslave Fear of the Dark Brave New World The X Factor Brave New World A Matter of Life and Death No Prayer for the Dying Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Somewhere in Time Fear of the Dark Iron Maiden Fear of the Dark The Number of the Beast The Final Frontier Virtual XI Dance of Death Somewhere in Time Piece of Mind A Matter of Life and Death Year Composer(s)

1995 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1984 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith 1982 Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1984 Steve Harris 1992 Steve Harris 2003 Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1986 Steve Harris 1981 Steve Harris 1984 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith 1992 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers 2000 Steve Harris 1995 Steve Harris 2000 Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray, Steve Harris 2006 Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris, Adrian Smith 1990 Bruce Dickinson 1988 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris

"Caught Somewhere in Time" "Chains of Misery" "Charlotte the Harlot" "Childhood's End" "Children of the Damned" "Coming Home" "Como Estais Amigos" "Dance of Death" "Dj Vu" "Die With Your Boots On" "Different World"

1986 Steve Harris 1992 Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray 1980 Dave Murray 1992 Steve Harris 1982 Steve Harris 2010 1998 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers 2003 Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1986 Steve Harris 1983 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 2006 Steve Harris, Adrian Smith

List of Iron Maiden songs

316
Virtual XI Brave New World Killers The Final Frontier Dance of Death No Prayer for the Dying Fear of the Dark Fear of the Dark Powerslave Piece of Mind A Matter of Life and Death The X Factor Fear of the Dark Virtual XI The Number of the Beast Dance of Death Killers Brave New World The Number of the Beast Somewhere in Time No Prayer for the Dying No Prayer for the Dying Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Killers The Number of the Beast Iron Maiden The Final Frontier Dance of Death Fear of the Dark The X Factor Killers Virtual XI The X Factor A Matter of Life and Death The X Factor Powerslave The X Factor Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1998 Steve Harris 2000 Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1981 Steve Harris 2010 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 2003 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1990 Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1992 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers 1992 Steve Harris 1984 Bruce Dickinson 1983 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith 2006 Steve Harris 1995 Steve Harris 1992 Steve Harris 1998 Blaze Bayley, Steve Harris 1982 Adrian Smith, Clive Burr 2003 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1981 Steve Harris (instrumental) 2000 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1982 Steve Harris 1986 Steve Harris 1990 Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris 1990 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith 1988 Steve Harris

"Don't Look to the Eyes of a Stranger" "Dream of Mirrors" "Drifter" "El Dorado" "Face in the Sand" "Fates Warning" "Fear is the Key" "Fear of the Dark" "Flash of the Blade" "Flight of Icarus" "For the Greater Good of God" "Fortunes of War" "From Here to Eternity" "Futureal" "Gangland" "Gates of Tomorrow" "Genghis Khan" "Ghost of the Navigator" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "Heaven Can Wait" "Holy Smoke" "Hooks in You" "Infinite Dreams"

"Innocent Exile" "Invaders" "Iron Maiden" "Isle of Avalon" "Journeyman" "Judas Be My Guide" "Judgement of Heaven" "Killers" "Lightning Strikes Twice" "Look for the Truth" "Lord of Light" "Lord of the Flies" "Losfer Words (Big 'Orra)" "Man on the Edge" "Moonchild"

1981 Steve Harris 1982 Steve Harris 1980 Steve Harris 2010 2003 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1992 Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray 1995 Steve Harris 1981 Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris 1998 Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1995 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 2006 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1995 Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1984 Steve Harris (instrumental) 1995 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers 1988 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith

List of Iron Maiden songs

317
The Final Frontier No Prayer for the Dying Dance of Death Killers Dance of Death Dance of Death No Prayer for the Dying Seventh Son of a Seventh Son A Matter of Life and Death Brave New World Dance of Death Iron Maiden Powerslave Killers Iron Maiden No Prayer for the Dying Killers Piece of Mind Dance of Death Iron Maiden Piece of Mind Powerslave No Prayer for the Dying The Number of the Beast Iron Maiden Iron Maiden The Final Frontier Somewhere in Time Seventh Son of a Seventh Son The X Factor The Final Frontier Piece of Mind Iron Maiden Somewhere in Time Piece of Mind No Prayer for the Dying The X Factor The Final Frontier 2010 1990 Steve Harris 2003 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1981 Steve Harris 2003 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Nicko McBrain 2003 Steve Harris 1990 Steve Harris 1988 Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris

"Mother of Mercy" "Mother Russia" "Montsgur" "Murders in the Rue Morgue" "New Frontier" "No More Lies" "No Prayer for the Dying" "Only the Good Die Young"

"Out of the Shadows" "Out of the Silent Planet" "Paschendale" "Phantom of the Opera" "Powerslave" "Prodigal Son" "Prowler" "Public Enema Number One" "Purgatory" "Quest for Fire" "Rainmaker" "Remember Tomorrow" "Revelations" "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" "Run Silent Run Deep" "Run to the Hills" "Running Free" "Sanctuary" "Satellite 15... The Final Frontier" "Sea of Madness" "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son"

2006 Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris 2000 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 2003 Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1980 Steve Harris 1984 Bruce Dickinson 1981 Steve Harris 1980 Steve Harris 1990 Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray 1981 Steve Harris 1983 Steve Harris 2003 Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1980 Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris 1983 Bruce Dickinson 1984 Steve Harris 1990 Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris 1982 Steve Harris 1980 Paul Di'Anno, Steve Harris 1980 Steve Harris 2010 1986 Adrian Smith 1988 Steve Harris

"Sign of the Cross" "Starblind" "Still Life" "Strange World" "Stranger in a Strange Land" "Sun and Steel" "Tailgunner" "The Aftermath" "The Alchemist"

1995 Steve Harris 2010 1983 Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1980 Steve Harris 1986 Adrian Smith 1983 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith 1990 Bruce Dickinson, Steve Harris 1995 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 2010

List of Iron Maiden songs

318
Virtual XI Fear of the Dark No Prayer for the Dying Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Virtual XI Powerslave The X Factor Virtual XI Seventh Son of a Seventh Son Brave New World Fear of the Dark Killers A Matter of Life and Death 1998 Steve Harris 1992 Steve Harris, Janick Gers 1990 Steve Harris 1988 Steve Harris

"The Angel and the Gambler" "The Apparition" "The Assassin" "The Clairvoyant"

"The Clansman" "The Duellists" "The Edge of Darkness" "The Educated Fool" "The Evil That Men Do"

1998 Steve Harris 1984 Steve Harris 1995 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1998 Steve Harris 1988 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris

"The Fallen Angel" "The Fugitive" "The Ides of March" "The Legacy"

2000 Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1992 Steve Harris 1981 Steve Harris 2006 Steve Harris, Janick Gers 1986 Steve Harris 2006 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 2010 2000 Janick Gers, Steve Harris 2000 Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1982 Steve Harris 2006 Steve Harris, Janick Gers 1982 Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1988 Dave Murray, Steve Harris

"The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" Somewhere in Time "The Longest Day" "The Man Who Would Be King" "The Mercenary" "The Nomad" "The Number of the Beast" "The Pilgrim" "The Prisoner" "The Prophecy" A Matter of Life and Death The Final Frontier Brave New World Brave New World The Number of the Beast A Matter of Life and Death The Number of the Beast Seventh Son of a Seventh Son A Matter of Life and Death The Final Frontier Brave New World Piece of Mind The X Factor Brave New World A Matter of Life and Death Piece of Mind The Number of the Beast Iron Maiden Killers Best of the Beast Somewhere in Time Fear of the Dark Fear of the Dark

"The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg" "The Talisman" "The Thin Line Between Love & Hate" "The Trooper" "The Unbeliever" "The Wicker Man" "These Colours Don't Run" "To Tame a Land" "Total Eclipse" "Transylvania" "Twilight Zone" "Virus" "Wasted Years" "Wasting Love" "Weekend Warrior"

2006 Steve Harris, Dave Murray 2010 2000 Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1983 Steve Harris 1995 Janick Gers, Steve Harris 2000 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 2006 Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1983 Steve Harris 1982 Dave Murray, Steve Harris, Clive Burr 1980 Steve Harris (instrumental) 1981 Steve Harris, Dave Murray 1996 Blaze Bayley, Dave Murray, Janick Gers, Steve Harris 1986 Adrian Smith 1992 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers 1992 Steve Harris, Janick Gers

List of Iron Maiden songs

319
Virtual XI Piece of Mind The Final Frontier Dance of Death Killers 1998 Blaze Bayley, Dave Murray, Steve Harris 1983 Steve Harris 2010 2003 Adrian Smith, Steve Harris 1981 Steve Harris

"When Two Worlds Collide" "Where Eagles Dare" "While the Wild Wind Blows" "Wildest Dreams" "Wrathchild"

Other songs
Title Release Year Original composer(s)

"Bayswater Ain't a Bad Place to Be" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "Black Bart Blues" "Burning Ambition" "I Live My Way" "Invasion" "Judgement Day" "Justice of the Peace" "Mission From 'Arry" "More Tea Vicar" "Nodding Donkey Blues" "Pass the Jam" "Sheriff of Huddersfield"

1992 Bruce Dickinson, Janick Gers

"Can I Play with Madness" 1986 Steve Harris, Bruce Dickinson "Running Free" "Man on the Edge" "Women in Uniform" "Man on the Edge" "Man on the Edge" "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Rainmaker" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "Wildest Dreams" "Wasted Years" 1980 Steve Harris 1995 Steve Harris, Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers 1980 Steve Harris 1995 Blaze Bayley, Janick Gers 1995 Steve Harris, Dave Murray 1984 Iron Maiden 2003 Iron Maiden 1992 Iron Maiden 2003 Iron Maiden 1986 Iron Maiden

Cover versions
Title "All in Your Mind" "Holy Smoke" Release Year Original composer(s)

1990 Del Bromham (Stray) 1990 Bonham, Jones, Page (Led Zeppelin)

"Communication Breakdown" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "Cross-Eyed Mary" "Doctor Doctor" "Hocus Pocus" "I Can't See My Feelings" "I'm a Mover" "The Trooper" "Lord of the Flies" "Different World" "From Here to Eternity" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "Sanctuary" "Stranger in a Strange Land" "Holy Smoke" "Aces High" "Can I Play with Madness" "Lord of the Flies"

1983 Ian Anderson (Jethro Tull) 1996 Michael Schenker, Phil Mogg (UFO) 2006 Jan Akkerman, Thijs van Leer (Focus) 1992 Tony Bourge, Burke Shelley (Budgie) 1990 Andy Fraser, Paul Rodgers (Free)

[1] "I've Got the Fire" "Juanita" "Kill Me Ce Soir" "King of Twilight" "Massacre" "My Generation"

1980 Ronnie Montrose (Montrose) 1986 Barnacle, O'Neil (Marshall Fury) 1990 Kooymans, Hay, Fenton (Golden Earring) 1984 Nektar 1988 Downey, Gorham, Lynott (Thin Lizzy) 1996 Pete Townshend (The Who)

List of Iron Maiden songs

320
"2 Minutes to Midnight" "Wasted Years" "From Here to Eternity" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "Stranger in a Strange Land" "Women in Uniform" 1984 Terry Slesser, Kenny Mountain (Beckett) 1986 Dave Colwell (Entire Population of Hackney) 1992 Chuck Berry 1992 Ronnie Montrose (Montrose) 1986 Barnett, Colwell (Entire Population of Hackney) 1980 Greg Macainsh (Skyhooks)

"Rainbow's Gold" "Reach Out" "Roll Over Vic Vella" "Space Station #5" "That Girl" "Women in Uniform"

References
[1] "I've Got the Fire" was recorded live at the Marquee Club in London, during the band's 1980 tour and included as a b-side on "Sanctuary". It was featured later on "Flight of Icarus".

"Alexander the Great"

321

"Alexander the Great"


Somewhere In Time

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released 29 September 1986

Recorded Compass Point Studios, Nassau, Bahamas and Wisseloord Studios, Hilversum, Netherlands, 1986 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 51:24 EMI

Producer Martin Birch Professional reviews


Allmusic Sputnikmusic

link [2] link

[1]

Iron Maiden chronology Live After Death (1985) Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988)

Singles from Somewhere in Time


1. 2.

"Wasted Years"
Released: 6 September 1986

"Stranger in a Strange Land"


Released: 22 November 1986

Somewhere in Time is the sixth studio album by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released on 29 September 1986 on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). The studio follow-up to the hugely successful Powerslave/Live After Death pair, it was the first Iron Maiden album to feature guitar synthesizers. Bruce Dickinson's song material was refused in favour of the songs of guitarist Adrian Smith, who wrote the bulk of the songs identified with the album (including the singles "Wasted Years" and "Stranger in a Strange Land"). While many of the songs from Somewhere in Time have all but disappeared (and some like, "The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner" being only played once) from the band's live shows over the years, "Wasted Years" and "Heaven Can Wait" have been consistent mainstays of the band's live setlist. Performances of "Heaven Can Wait" have featured a group of local fans and celebrities invited onstage to sing along during the song's middle section.

"Alexander the Great" The album also marked a change for Iron Maiden, as it was their first album to introduce synth, although this style was expanded upon in their next album, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son. This is also their first studio album not to be released a year after their previous one. The band has never released a studio album a year after the previous again as of 2010. The band began to put more time into writing and recording their albums as well as touring for an extensive time after the release of Powerslave. The 2008 tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine features covers of two songs from this album: "Wasted Years" by Devildriver and "Caught Somewhere in Time" by Madina Lake.[1] Somewhere On Tour was the tour supporting the album.

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Track listing
No. Title 1. "Caught Somewhere in Time" 2. "Wasted Years" 3. "Sea of Madness" 4. "Heaven Can Wait" Writer(s) Steve Harris Adrian Smith Smith Harris Length 7:26 5:08 5:42 7:21 6:31 5:44 4:56

5. "The Loneliness of the Long Distance Runner" Harris 6. "Stranger in a Strange Land" 7. "Dj Vu" Smith Dave Murray, Harris Harris

8. "Alexander the Great"

8:36

1995 reissue bonus CD No. Title 1. "Reach Out" 2. "Juanita" (Originally by Marshall Fury) Writer(s) Dave Colwell Steve Barnacle, Derek O'Neil Length 3:31 3:47 3:35 5:07

3. "Sheriff of Huddersfield" (Based on an old Urchin song called "Life in the City") Iron Maiden 4. "That Girl" Merv Goldsworthy, Pete Jupp, Andy Barnett

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar, guitar synth Adrian Smith guitar, guitar synth, backing vocals, lead vocals on "Reach Out" Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals, bass synth Nicko McBrain drums

"Alexander the Great"

323

Production
Martin Birch producer, engineer, mixing, tape operator Albert Boekholt engineer, assistant engineer Ronald Prent engineer, assistant engineer

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1986 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 3 11

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart Position 18 Album "Somewhere in Time"

1986 "Wasted Years"

"Stranger in a Strange Land" UK Singles Chart 1990 "Wasted Years" UK Singles Chart

22

"Somewhere in Time"

"The First Ten Years"

Album cover trivia


The cover for Somewhere in Time displays a cyborg-enhanced Eddie in a futuristic, Blade Runner-type environment. Much like the visual richness of the cover of Powerslave, the wrap-around album cover holds a plethora of references to earlier Iron Maiden albums and songs. The cover was originally created for use as the cover to the authorized biography of the band, Running Free by Garry Bushell and Ross Halfin and therefore made many references such as: The street sign on the corner where Eddie is standing says Acacia (partially obscured), a reference to the song 22 Acacia Avenue from The Number of the Beast album Below "Acacia" is a poster of Eddie from the first album. The torn poster below "Acacia" is the one that appears on the Sanctuary and Women in Uniform singles. Eddie appearing in a similar posture as on the Killers album cover. His victim is killed with a futuristic weapon, as opposed to the axe seen on the Killers cover. While this is undoubtly a reference with the cover of Killers, there is also a significant reference with the cover of the album "Nightflight" (1981) of the band Budgie. On it stands a birdman holding almost the same futuristic weapon and posing as Eddie. Also a futuristic aircraft in the background is not missing. This is no coincidense because that album cover was also drawn by Derek Riggs. It is known that Budgie had its influences on Iron Maiden, were Iron Maiden at least covered one of Budgie's songs "I cant see my feelings", on their "From Here To Eternity" Single. A banner with the words, "This is a very boring painting" is displayed backwards within the lobby of the Bradbury Towers Hotels International. This can be seen to the left of Eddie's right leg. In the very center, just above the "Department" ad and behind the cable going to the cyborg's weapon, there is a small vertical ad with red glyphs. The text of this ad is Russian, it is " ", [Menya Rvyot] - "I'm vomiting", which also literally translates as "It's tearing me up", depending on the context.

"Alexander the Great" An Eye of Horus neon sign at the top of a building, a reference to the song "Powerslave". Below Eddie, there is a model in the department store window. Some fans believe this is former Maiden singer, Paul Di'Anno. On the bridge separating the two buildings is a digital clock that says: 23:58. This refers to Iron Maiden's song "2 Minutes to Midnight" Under Eddie's left leg there is a trash can attached to a post. This is the same trash can that can be seen attached to a lamppost in the background on the cover of the album Iron Maiden. References on the back include: A clock reading 23:58 ("2 Minutes to Midnight"). Below the clock there is a sign that reads "Phantom Opera House" in reference to the song "Phantom of the Opera" from the first Iron Maiden album. Just below the "Phantom Opera House", a writing in very small characters says "Bollocks again & again". This is one of illustrator Derek Riggs' in-jokes, as the word "Bollocks" was hidden in a similar fashion on his previous album cover for Iron Maiden, Powerslave. On the left side, the "Aces High Bar" ("Aces High" song). Above the "Aces High Bar", flies a Spitfire-shaped plane. (Spitfires are referenced in "Aces High") Just below the "Aces High Bar" sign, there is a neon sign representing a plane, apparently in battle, formed by two glasses of stemware. To the left of the "Aces High Bar", there are four letters in yellow and green. These are Hebrew letters spelling out the name of God, namely ,Jehovah/Yahweh (really it is not read, as it is not known exactly how, and, usually, the word ,Adonai - the Lord, is pronounced on its place in Jewish religious practices). Below the "Aces High Bar", is a sign that says "Sand Dune" ("To Tame A Land" song, based on a novel "Dune"). Pyramids in the background (Powerslave cover, also another reference to Blade Runner). Among the pyramids, a grim reaper. (Similar to the grim reaper that appears on the cover of "The Trooper"). The marquee for the Movie Theater reads Blade Runner, the film which is the obvious inspiration for the futuristic scene. It also reads "Live After Death", the name of the live album released in 1985. The cinema is named "Phillip K. Dick Cinema", named after the author of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, the book on which the movie Blade Runner was based. More Blade Runner references include "Dekkers Department Stores" and a "Tyrell Corp" sign. In the background can be seen "Bradbury Towers" (a likely reference to the Blade Runner prominent Bradbury Building) and The Million Dollar Movie Theater, both located in Los Angeles. It could also be a reference to science fiction author Ray Bradbury To the right of the clock is a neon sign that reads "Ancient Mariner Seafood Restaurant", a reference to the song "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" from the Powerslave album. On the bottom left hand side of the cover is "The Ruskin Arms", famous for being one of the first venues performed at by Iron Maiden. On the second floor of the "Ruskin Arms" building is a woman sitting in a red lit room which is a reference to "Charlotte", a repeated theme in Iron Maiden songs. Just above "The Ruskin Arms", there is a neon sign that reads "RAINBOW", another famous venue for Iron Maiden. Above and to the left of the "Rainbow" sign is a neon sign reading "L'AMOURS Beer Gardens", a reference to the "L'Amours" rock venue Iron Maiden once played in Brooklyn, New York. On the roof of the same building is a police telephone box; this is likely a reference to the time-traveling TARDIS of the BBC TV series Doctor Who. The TARDIS is featured on the cover of the Maiden single "Wasted Years". Above the Bradbury Towers neon sign is Icarus in flames falling from the sky, in the same style of the cover for the band's 1983 single "Flight of Icarus". It also bears a resemblance to the logo for Swan Song Records, a label founded by Led Zeppelin.

324

"Alexander the Great" On the walkway above the clock is an electronic sign that says "LATEST RESULTS.......WEST HAM 7........ARSENAL 3", a nod to bass guitarist Steve Harris who is a West Ham supporter, a team known as the "Hammers". At the right edge below, just near the band, there is another Russian ad - , "KEFIR", which means "yoghurt". Just above the Russian ad for "KEFIR" there is the street sign for "Upton Park" - this is where West Ham United F.C. play their home games. In the band group, Bruce Dickinson is carrying a brain, the main symbol from the Piece of Mind album. There is a sign that says Gypsy's Kiss which was the first band Steve Harris ever played with. On the right side, above "Bradbury Towers" sign, there is a Japanese ad " ." This refers to a notable Japanese philosopher, economist and critic, Akira Asada. Right of the pyramids there is a sign where "Long Beach Arena" is written. The Live After Death album was mostly recorded at Long Beach Arena. The neon sign above the band reads "Maggies Revenge" and refers to British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher, and also references the cover of the Sanctuary and Women in Uniform singles. One of the buildings is labeled "Asimov Foundation", a reference to the Foundation series by Isaac Asimov. A character wearing a large cloak stands above the walkway's right side. He has been identified as Batman by The Iron Maiden FAQ [4], but is actually more reminiscent of Erik, the Phantom of the Opera - another reference to the Iron Maiden song inspired by the character. The cat from Live After Death is on the sidewalk, behind Eddie. Just below the cloaked character and just above the "Latest Results" is the bracket that held Eddie's skull together from the "Piece of Mind" album on, including this album. The windows of the Ruskin Arms Hotel, at the far left, are similar to those on the cover of Killers. In the top left hand corner, in the sky just behind the clouds, is a spaceship. This could be a reference to Steve Harris's favourite band UFO. Derek Riggs' artistic signature symbol can be found on Eddie's chest. In the bottom right hand corner all five members of the band are standing in a line. Bruce Dickinson is holding a brain, a reference to Piece of Mind, and Nicko is wearing aviator goggles (he had a pilot's license by this time, long before Bruce Dickinson) and a t-shirt that says "Iron What?". Dave Murray's t-shirt says "Irons 1". To the right of the "Long Beach Arena" sign, there is a sign that says "Hammerjacks", a night club and concert hall in Baltimore, MD, frequented by the band. The night club closed in 1994; the concert hall is still open however. Below the Hammerjacks sign, there is a sign that says "Tehe's Bar", which is where the choir vocals in the middle of "Heaven Can Wait" were recorded. To the left of the clock is a sign that says "Herbert Ails" a reference to author Frank Herbert who wouldn't let the band use the title of his book "Dune" as a song title. To the left of the Hammerjacks sign, there is a sign that says "TEXAS RECORDS AND TAPES". The band have stated several times that some of their favourite American venues to play are in Texas. Beneath the Phantom Opera House sign, there is a sign that reads "EMI REC.". Iron Maiden's international records have all been released on the EMI label.

325

"Alexander the Great"

326

Ed Hunter
In the Iron Maiden computer game Ed Hunter, one of the levels has the player walk through the scene depicted on the Somewhere In Time album cover while eliminating enemies.

Additional notes
Catalogue: (LP) Capitol 12524, (CD) Capitol C2-46341

References
[1] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html)

"Brave New World"

327

"Brave New World"


"Brave New World"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Brave New World Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer 29 May 2000 (in Brave New World) Guillaume Tell Studios, Paris Heavy metal 6:19 EMI (UK) Capitol Records Steve Harris, Bruce Dickinson, Dave Murray Kevin Shirley

"Brave New World" is a song by British Heavy Metal band Iron Maiden. It is the title track on the album by the same name and has been performed live on the Brave New World Tour, Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour, Dance of Death World Tour and the The Final Frontier World Tour. It is based on the novel of the same name written by Aldous Huxley. It Was the first track written by the band since the return of Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith. Today it's considered to be one of Iron Maiden's best known tracks. It was featured on the re-released version of Edward The Great and the album The Essential Iron Maiden. It can also be heard live on two albums, Rock in Rio and Death on the Road. The Hard Rock band "Ghostlines" covered the song on the tribute album, Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine.

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"Charlotte the Harlot"

328

"Charlotte the Harlot"


"Charlotte the Harlot"
Song by Iron Maiden Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer April 14, 1980 CD Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal 4:12 EMI / Capitol Records Dave Murray

"Charlotte the Harlot" is the name of a song and a character who features in four tracks by the heavy metal group Iron Maiden.

Song appearances
On the self titled Iron Maiden Charlotte made her debut appearance in the song "Charlotte the Harlot", composed by guitarist Dave Murray. Her second song was "22 Acacia Avenue" from The Number of the Beast (this time composed by Steve Harris and Adrian Smith). The title refers to the residence of Charlotte the Harlot and is a clear sequel where Charlotte is convinced to end her prostitution. The header for the lyrics in the album booklet state 'the continuing saga of Charlotte the Harlot'. "Hooks in You" from No Prayer for the Dying is usually considered the third Charlotte song. However Charlotte is never referenced, but instead that the narrator has "the keys to view at Number 22". It is worth noting that Adrian Smith, who co-wrote the song with Bruce Dickinson, had been having problems with the style the band was changing to after the 'Somewhere in Time' and 'Seventh Son of a Seventh Son' albums and may deliberately have been going over themes from older songs to change this. "From Here to Eternity" from Fear of the Dark concerns a Charlotte being seduced by a man and his motorcycle. The lyrics of this song could be interpreted to imply that Charlotte dies, and this may be Harris wiping the slate clean. (Composed by Steve Harris). While the latter two songs are clearly intended to reference the former two, they do not form any sort of clear narrative with them. The third one at least sticks to the concept of Charlotte being a prostitute, but the end of '22 Acacia Avenue' has the narrator demanding Charlotte end her life of prostitution and claims, "you're coming with me." It is likely Charlotte's adventures will not continue, due to the style of Maiden's music changing from this point onwards, and due to the fact Charlotte likely "died" in 'From Here to Eternity' (where she is mentioned by name). Charlotte is allegedly depicted on the cover of the single Twilight Zone, in which a picture of Eddie is addressed to her. In an interview, Steve Harris was asked "Is there a real Charlotte?" and answered "sort of", before changing the subject.[1] However, when asked, Paul Di'Anno said the following: "Yep, it's true. Her real name is High Hill Lil and shes basically an old prostitute. Well, actually she was more of a slut, ha ha! I mean, if you turned up to her house with some booze or some speed you were more or less guaranteed a lay. She was a legend in Walthamstow, everyone knew her... She was about 45 but a real rock out bitch... Shed take any guy from 15 upwards, ha ha! The song says that she lived on Acacia Avenue but it's actually Markhouse Road, just before you go into Leyton 'cause

"Charlotte the Harlot" that's the area where I lived."[2]

329

References
[1] Iron Maiden - Guitar Recorded Versions, Hal Leonard, ISBN 0-89524-190-0 [2] The Iron Maiden Commentary: http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=album01_ironmaiden/ commentary01_ironmaiden& lang=eng& link=albums#track8

"Cross-Eyed Mary"

330

"Cross-Eyed Mary"
"Cross-Eyed Mary"
Song by Jethro Tull from the album Aqualung Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer March 19, 1971 December 1970 - February 1971 at Island Studios, London Progressive rock, hard rock 4:06 Reprise(original US) Chrysalis/Capitol (US re-issue) Ian Anderson Ian Anderson and Terry Ellis Aqualung track listing "Aqualung" (1) "Cross-Eyed Mary" (2) "Cheap Day Return" (3)

"Cross-Eyed Mary" is a song by the English progressive rock band Jethro Tull from their album Aqualung (1971). The song is about "Cross-Eyed Mary", a schoolgirl prostitute[1] who prefers the company of "leching greys" over her schoolmates. It was intended as a companion piece to "Aqualung", a piece on the same album about a homeless man. Indeed, the Aqualung character is given a cameo in "Cross-Eyed Mary". The song has been covered by Elf, Iron Maiden [2] (see Piece of Mind, "The Trooper", The First Ten Years and Best of the B'Sides), and also by Clutch for the Sucking the '70s compilation.

References
[1] Ian Anderson interview, Disc and Music Echo, 20th March 1971. (http:/ / www. cupofwonder. com/ aqua2. html#crosseyed) [2] Encyclopaedia Metallum - Iron Maiden - Piece of Mind (http:/ / www. metal-archives. com/ release. php?id=76)

"Die With Your Boots On"

331

"Die With Your Boots On"


"Die With Your Boots On"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Piece of Mind Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer May 16, 1983 1983 Heavy metal 5:28 EMI Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith, Steve Harris Martin Birch Piece of Mind track listing "Flight of Icarus" (3) "Die With Your Boots On" (4) "The Trooper" (5)

"Die With Your Boots On" is the fourth track on the album Piece of Mind by British Heavy Metal band, Iron Maiden. It was written by guitarist Adrian Smith, vocalist Bruce Dickinson and bassist Steve Harris. The song's main theme is about prophecies and predictions and the impact they can have on people. It is one of the very few songs in which Smith and Harris's voices can be heard singing separately from Dickinson's. They can be heard during the chorus, after each time Dickinson sings the line, "if you're gonna die...", Smith and Harris repeat the line after him. Sonata Arctica covered this song for their Orientation EP. In their version of the song all vocals are done by their lead vocalist, Tony Kakko. There is however still a small vocal contribution to the song by the other members, they sing the Wooowooohooo part together. The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens recorded a cover of the song on their 2007 EP Route 666. Sonata Arcticas version was also used in the album A Tribute To The Beast, a tribute album to Iron Maiden, where 16 different bands covered 16 different Iron Maiden songs. There is a song of the same name by Toby Keith.

Credits
Bruce Dickinson lead vocals Dave Murray guitar Adrian Smith guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris bass guitar, backing vocals Nicko McBrain drums

"I Got the Fire"

332

"I Got the Fire"


"I Got the Fire" is a song from the Montrose album Paper Money in 1974. While many consider the album to be an inferior follow up to their debut the previous year, this song stands out as a great song with a riff reminiscent of Led Zeppelin's Black Dog. It is said that this is the only song from that album to maintain the seething incendiary energy from the band's debut album. There is also an interesting story behind the solo: "Guitarist Ronnie Montrose also contributes a solo of singular dexterity and earth-shaking intensity thanks, ironically, to a studio screwup which resulted in the bottom-heavy reverberating noise in its intro." [1] This was one of the last collaborations between Ronnie Montrose and singer Sammy Hagar before Hagar left the band to pursue a solo career. The song was covered by US hard rock band Axe on their 1982 album Offering. The song was also covered by British band Iron Maiden. The group retitled the song "I've Got the Fire" on the b-side of their "Flight of Icarus" single in 1983. Although it had first been released as the B-side of Sanctuary as a live recording at the Marquee in 1980.(This song was covered in 2009 by Canadian rock band Cripple Creek Fairies for their "Metal Arms" Album)

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=33:2q17gj4r66ix

"Invasion"
"Invasion" is a song by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden and was released on The Soundhouse Tapes EP in 1979. It was rerecorded in 1981, and the rerecorded version was the B-Side to the Women in Uniform single. The subject of the song is probably the basis for later released "Invaders", from the 1982 album The Number Of The Beast.

"Iron Maiden"

333

"Iron Maiden"
"Iron Maiden"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer 9 November 1979 (in The Soundhouse Tapes) Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal, speed metal 3:35 EMI (UK) Capitol Records Steve Harris Will Malone Iron Maiden track listing "Charlotte the Harlot" (7) "Iron Maiden" (8)

"Iron Maiden" is a song by Iron Maiden on their debut album Iron Maiden. It was written by Steve Harris, and recorded with Paul Di'Anno on vocals, Clive Burr on drums, and Dennis Stratton and Dave Murray on guitars. The song is one of the band's most recognizable songs (along with "The Number of the Beast" and "Run to the Hills") being featured in all of their live performances, as the last song of their main set list before encores. Eddie, the band's mascot, often makes an appearance during the performance of the song. A live video was the 16th music video ever played on the American music video channel MTV.

Other versions
A previous, less polished version had been featured before on the Iron Maiden EP The Soundhouse Tapes. The song was covered in 2008 by Trivium on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine.[1] Trivium's cover is featured as a bonus track on the special edition of their album Shogun

Personnel
The original recording on the Iron Maiden album featured the following personnel: Paul Di'Anno: lead vocals Dave Murray: guitar Dennis Stratton: guitar, backing vocals Steve Harris: bass guitar, backing vocals Clive Burr: drums

"Iron Maiden"

334

References
[1] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html)

"The Longest Day"


"The Longest Day"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album A Matter of Life and Death Released Recorded Genre Length Label August 28, 2006 2006 at Sarm West Studios, London Heavy metal 7:48 Sanctuary Records Columbia Records EMI Europe Adrian Smith Steve Harris Bruce Dickinson Kevin Shirley A Matter of Life and Death track listing The Pilgrim (4) "The Longest Day" (5) "Out of the Shadows" (6)

Writer

Producer

"The Longest Day" is a song by British Heavy metal band Iron Maiden and was composed and written by Adrian Smith, Steve Harris, and Bruce Dickinson. The song is featured on their 2006 album, A Matter of Life and Death. James Christopher Monger of Allmusic selected the song as a top track pick, one of only two songs on the album to receive this honour and described the song as "brutal".[1] The song is about the terrifying experience being a soldier during Operation Overlord on D-Day of the 1944 World War II Battle of Normandy. The title of the song comes from the 1962 film The Longest Day which was based on the 1959 novel by Irish author Cornelius Ryan which was also titled The Longest Day. The song is considered a sequel by the band to the war epic Paschendale from the 2003 album Dance of Death written about the World War I Battle of Passchendaele in 1917.[2] The song was played live during every show on the A Matter of Life and Death Tour as the band included the entire performance of the album during every setlist on the tour.[3]

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Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums

External links
Commentary [4] Lyrics [5]

References
[1] A Matter of Life and Death (http:/ / allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& token=& sql=10:3cfqxqqdldfe) at Allmusic [2] Kerrang Interview (http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20060821205444/ http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ Kerrang050806. jpg) [3] Iron Maiden Guitarist Says Reaction To New Live Show Has Been 'Stunning' - Oct. 15, 2006 (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=60305) [4] http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=album14_amolad/ commentary14_amolad& link=albums& lang=eng#track5 [5] http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ lyrics/ a_matter_of_life_and_death. html#thelongestday

"Moonchild"

336

"Moonchild"
Seventh Son of a Seventh Son

Studio album by Iron Maiden Released 11 April 1988

Recorded Musicland Studios in Munich, Germany, during 1987 - March 1988 Genre Length Label Heavy Metal, Progressive metal 43:50 EMI

Producer Martin Birch Professional reviews


Allmusic Kerrang! Sputnikmusic -

link

[1] [2]

link

Iron Maiden chronology Somewhere in Time (1986) Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) No Prayer for the Dying (1990)

Singles from Seventh Son of a Seventh Son


1. 2. 3. 4.

"Can I Play with Madness"


Released: 20 March 1988

"The Evil That Men Do"


Released: 1 August 1988

"The Clairvoyant"
Released: 7 November 1988

"Infinite Dreams (live)"


Released: 6 November 1989

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son is a concept album by heavy metal band Iron Maiden, released in 1988 as the band's seventh studio album on EMI in Europe and its sister label Capitol Records in the US (it was re-released by Sanctuary/Columbia Records in the US in 2002). It is the first Iron Maiden album ever to have keyboards wich is played by Michael Kenney. Along with The Number of the Beast and later Fear of the Dark the album charted no.1 on the UK charts.

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History
Seventh Son of a Seventh Son was the last Iron Maiden album to feature guitarist Adrian Smith until the album Brave New World in 2000 (he did write a song that Bruce Dickinson finished for the next album, No Prayer for the Dying, titled "Hooks in You", a loose tie-in to the Charlotte the Harlot saga). "The Clairvoyant" was the first song written for the album. According to Steve Harris, the song's lyrics were inspired by the death of psychic Doris Stokes, saying "if she were really clairvoyant, if she were really able to see the future, wouldn't she have been able to forsee her own death?" At least five of the album's songs ("Moonchild", "Infinite Dreams", "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son", "The Prophecy" and "The Clairvoyant") can be directly related to a main lyrical storyline inspired by the folklore concept. Lyrically, the album centers around some main philosophical ideas: good vs. evil, mysticism, prophetic vision, reincarnation and afterlife. Almost all the album includes direct or indirect references to questions regarding to these concepts and poetically refers the answers. Stylistically, Seventh Son of a Seventh Son develops the sounds first heard on Somewhere in Time (1986), and continues the band's lyrical exploration of topics related to mysticism, power, and the occult. The album debuted at #1 in UK charts (their only since The Number of the Beast) as well as #12 in the U.S, while the singles "Can I Play with Madness", "The Evil That Men Do", "The Clairvoyant (live)" and "Infinite Dreams (live)" reached #3, #5, #6 and #6 positions, respectively. Of all the songs in the album, "The Evil That Men Do", "The Clairvoyant" and "Can I Play with Madness" remained on the set lists of nearly all of the band's concert tours subsequently following the 7th Tour of a 7th Tour.

Track listing
No. Title 1. "Moonchild" 2. "Infinite Dreams" 3. "Can I Play with Madness" 4. "The Evil That Men Do" Writer(s) Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith Steve Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris Dickinson, Smith, Harris Length 5:39 6:09 3:31 4:34 9:53 5:05 4:27 4:42

5. "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" Harris 6. "The Prophecy" 7. "The Clairvoyant" 8. "Only the Good Die Young" Dave Murray, Harris Harris Dickinson, Harris

1995 Reissue Bonus CD No. Title 1. "Black Bart Blues" 2. "Massacre" 3. "Prowler 88" 4. "Charlotte the Harlot 88" 5. "Infinite Dreams" (live) 6. "The Clairvoyant" (live) 7. "The Prisoner" (live) Writer(s) Dickinson, Harris Brian Downey, Phil Lynott, Scott Gorham Harris Murray Length 6:41 2:53 4:07 4:11

Harris Harris Smith, Harris

6:03 4:27 6:09

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338
8. "Killers" (live) 9. "Still Life" (live) Paul Di'Anno, Harris Murray, Harris 5:03 4:38

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals, guitar synth Steve Harris - bass, keyboards, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums, percussion

with Michael Kenney - additional keyboards

Production
Martin Birch producer, engineer, mixing, tape operator Albert Boekholt engineer, assistant engineer Ronald Prent engineer, assistant engineer George Marino mastering engineer

Chart performance
Album
Year Chart 1988 UK Albums Chart U.S. Billboard Hot 200 Position 1 12

Singles
Year Single Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart UK Singles Chart Sweden "The Clairvoyant" UK Singles Chart Position 3 Album "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son"

1988 "Can I Play With Madness" "The Evil That Men Do"

"The Clairvoyant"

1989 "Infinite Dreams"

1990 "Can I Play With Madness"

10

"The First Ten Years"

12 11

"Paschendale"

339

"Paschendale"
"Paschendale"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Dance of Death Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer September 2, 2003 Sarm West Studios, London in 2003 Heavy metal, symphonic metal 8:28 Columbia Records, EMI Europe Adrian Smith, Steve Harris Kevin Shirley, Steve Harris Dance of Death track listing New Frontier (7) "Paschendale" (8) Face in the Sand (9)

"Paschendale" is a song by the British heavy metal band Iron Maiden from their 2003 album Dance of Death. It is the eighth track on the album, following "New Frontier" and preceding "Face in the Sand". The song has a length of 8 minutes, 28 seconds, and includes three guitar solos played by Dave Murray, Adrian Smith and Janick Gers respectively. The song, sharing similar lyrical ideas with both "The Trooper" and "Aces High", describes a young soldier who dies in the Battle of Passchendaele, the Third Battle of Ypres campaign, during World War I, and his experiences. Paschendale begins with drummer Nicko McBrain's rhythmic tapping on the hi-hat, simulating the Morse Code used for communication at the time. The song then alternates between sections of loud and soft dynamics, reflecting life in the trenches of World War I, which alternated between fighting and periods of boredom for the soldiers. The muddy conditions of the battle are reflected twice in the lyrics, with the lines, "In the smoke, in the mud and lead" and "Drown in mud, no more tears." The machine gun, a relatively new weapon on the battlefield, is referenced in the line "Rapid fire and the end of us all." The barbed wire that was used by both sides to impede the movements of the enemy is referenced twice, in the lines "Lifeless bodies hang on barbed wire" and "Dodging shrapnel and barbed wire." The line "Surely a war no one can win" recognizes the stalemate that was occurring on the Western Front of the war, where the battle took place. The no man's land between the trenches is referenced in the line "In No Man's Land God only knows". The battle was one of the bloodiest of the entire war, as reflected in the line "Allied troops, they mourn their loss". The war was one of the first where propaganda was heavily used by both sides, partially reflected in the line "German war propaganda machine/Such before has never been seen". After the two guitar solos, the song becomes an account from the soldier's perspective of an unsuccessful charge on the enemy's trench. After a final chorus, the song ends as it began, slow and poignant, as the soldier describes his soul joining those of his fallen comrades and enemies, in peace. The part "into jaws of death we go" is a quote from the poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade", the same poem on which The Trooper was based. The live version of the song on the album Death on the Road includes an introduction by Bruce Dickinson, wherein parts from the first and second stanzas of the poem "Anthem for Doomed Youth" by Wilfred Owen, a British war

"Paschendale" poet who was killed in the First World War a week before the signing of the Armistice are recited. Similar to live versions of The Trooper, Dickinson wears a replica of an army coat worn at the time of the Battle of Passchendaele. On the limted edition EP No More Lies there is an orchestral version of Paschendale with a symphonic orchestra.

340

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Adrian Smith guitar Steve Harris bass guitar Nicko McBrain drums

"Phantom of the Opera"

341

"Phantom of the Opera"


"Phantom of the Opera"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer April 14, 1980 Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal 7:20 EMI / Capitol Records Steve Harris Iron Maiden track listing "Running Free" (3) "Phantom of the Opera" (4) "Transylvania" (5)

"Phantom of the Opera" is a song from Iron Maiden's debut album Iron Maiden. It was written by Steve Harris. It is the fourth track from the original US & UK album releases, and was the fifth track from the remastered 1998 release CD. It is based on the French novel The Phantom of the Opera by Gaston Leroux. The song is also a fan favorite, and is often played at the band's concerts. According to Bruce Dickinson, the song is "everything" to them. In the United Kingdom, the song is best known for its use in the Lucozade commercial in the 1980s.[1] In 2008, using the intro like the original, it was parodied for a TV teaser trailer for I'm a Celebrity... Get Me out of Here!.[2] The first of the guitar solos (played around the 5 min mark) is played by Dave Murray, and second by Dennis Stratton, although nowadays is played by both Janick Gers and Adrian Smith. In the studio, guitarist Dennis Stratton recorded a number of vocal harmonies, which band manager Rod Smallwood later removed as it made the band sound "too much like Queen".

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar Steve Harris - bass guitar Clive Burr - drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=1LtaD63zYoQ [2] http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=BgI8RAq0lv0

"Prowler"

342

"Prowler"
"Prowler"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer 9 November 1979 (in The Soundhouse Tapes) Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal 3:52 EMI (UK) Capitol Records Steve Harris Will Malone Iron Maiden track listing "Prowler" "Sanctuary" (1) (2)

"Prowler" is the first track from the eponymous debut album of British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Although it was not released as a single, it is believed to be one of the first songs written by Steve Harris. The song appeared on the original Maiden demo The Soundhouse Tapes but had been a part of the band's song list far longer. The song was played at almost every concert during the band's early years up until the World Piece Tour 83' where it was played only a few times. The song has since fallen out of regular use, though it is still considered to be one of their famous songs. During the release of The Early Days DVD the band performed "Prowler" during every performance of the Early Days Tour. On the DVD collection the song is featured on the Ruskin Arms video and is played briefly when Steve Harris mentions it on the Early Days documentary. "Prowler" was re-recorded in 1988 (along with Charlotte the Harlot) and was aptly titled 'Prowler '88' for the B-side of The Evil That Men Do single with singer Bruce Dickinson on vocals. The song was covered in 2008 by Black Tide on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden by Kerrang! magazine.[1] The lyrics are about a man who stalks and flashes women, and possibly also masturbates while watching these women ("Got me feeling myself and reeling around"). The song has also been covered live by American Heavy Metal band Metallica in 1992.

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar Steve Harris - bass guitar Clive Burr - drums

"Prowler"

343

References
[1] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html)

"Remember Tomorrow"
"Remember Tomorrow"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer April 14, 1980 Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal 5:27 EMI / Capitol Records Steve Harris Paul Di'Anno

"Remember Tomorrow" is the second track from Iron Maiden's self titled album. It was written by Steve Harris and Paul Di'Anno. Steve Harris, in a July 1983 interview with John Stix said, "This song is an old stage favorite. The crowds used to be really into this one. Paul Di'Anno wrote the lyrics to it. I wrote the music. Actually I played the parts I had and he worked it out. There's a lot of feeling in this song. Mind you I think any song should be filled with feeling. But on the slow parts of this one I think there is that extra measure." It has also been said by Paul Di'Anno that the song was a tribute to his grandfather and that "Remember Tomorrow" was a phrase he used. Several bands have covered 'Remember Tomorrow' including Anthrax and Crowbar. Notably, the Swedish metal band Opeth covered this track for the A Call to Irons: A Tribute to Iron Maiden album and the recording later appeared on a re-release of their 1998 album My Arms, Your Hearse. The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens recorded a live cover of the song as a hidden track on their self-titled debut album. The song was covered in 2008 by Metallica on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine. Metallica has stated this song had always been an Iron Maiden favorite of theirs. Also, Metallica has often played parts of this song live at their own shows. Metallica have stated on their website that the song "was basically the blueprint for songs like 'Fade to Black' and 'Sanitarium' [1].

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar Steve Harris - bass guitar Clive Burr - drums

"Remember Tomorrow"

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References
[1] http:/ / www. metallica. com/ index. asp?item=600988

"Revelations"
"Revelations"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Piece of Mind Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer May 16, 1983 1983 Heavy metal 6:48 EMI Bruce Dickinson Martin Birch Piece of Mind track listing "Where Eagles Dare" (1) "Revelations" (2) "Flight of Icarus" (3)

"Revelations" is the second track from Iron Maiden's fourth studio album Piece of Mind. It is one of the few Maiden songs written solely by Bruce Dickinson. The song is a fan favorite and is frequently performed live. On earlier live performances of the song, Dickinson played rhythm guitar on one section that required a dual lead performed by Dave Murray and Adrian Smith. In more recent performances such as Eddie Rips Up The World Tour and Somewhere Back In Time World Tour, the rhythm guitar section was performed by Janick Gers, giving Dickinson more freedom around the stage. A faster version of the song is included in the Live After Death album, which contains many differences with the studio recording.

Influences
The lyrics are based partly on a book by Aleister Crowley, but this is also juxtaposed with a verse taken from a hymn by G. K. Chesterton[1], which forms the first verse of the song: O God of earth and altar, Bow down and hear our cry, Our earthly rulers falter, Our people drift and die; The walls of gold entomb us, The swords of scorn divide, Take not thy thunder from us, But take away our pride.

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Cover versions
The all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens recorded a cover of the song on their 2007 Route 666. American progrock band Heart of Cygnus recorded a cover version as a bonus track for the limited edition of their second album Over Mountain, Under Hill in 2009.

References
[1] http:/ / www. cse. dmu. ac. uk/ ~mward/ gkc/ books/ a-hymn. html

"Roll Over Vic Vella"


"Roll Over Beethoven"
Singleby Chuck Berry B-side Released Format Genre Length Label Writer(s) "Drifting Heart" May 1956 7" Rock and roll 2:04 Chess #1626 Chuck Berry Chuck Berry singles chronology "No Money Down" (1955) "Roll Over Beethoven" (1956) "Too Much Monkey Business" (1956)

"Roll Over Beethoven" is a 1956 hit single by Chuck Berry originally released on Chess Records, with "Drifting Heart" as the B-side. The lyrics of the song mention rock and roll and the desire for rhythm and blues to replace classical music. The song has been covered by many other artists and Rolling Stone ranked it #97 on their list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time.

Inspiration and lyrics


According to Rolling Stone[1] and Cub Koda of Allmusic,[2] Berry wrote the song in response to his sister Lucy always using the family piano to play classical music when Berry wanted to play contemporary popular music. In addition to classical composers Beethoven and Tchaikovsky, the lyrics mention or allude to several popular artists. "Early in the Mornin'" is the title of a Louis Jordan song and "Blue Suede Shoes" refers to the Carl Perkins song. Finally, "Hey Diddle Diddle" which comes from the nursery rhyme, "The Cat and the Fiddle", is an indirect reference to Berry's Chess stablemate Bo Diddley, who was an accomplished violin player. Although the lyrics mention rocking and rolling, the music that the classics are supposed to step aside for is always referred to as "rhythm and blues" (R&B). Arthur Alexander appropriated the lyric "a shot of rhythm and blues" for the title of his later song. Later in the song, a "rhythm revue" describes the old style R&B show with many featured artists appearing on one bill in front of a big band.

"Roll Over Vic Vella"

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Release
Berry's version was originally released as a single by Chess Records in May 1956 with "Drifting Heart" as the B-side.[3] "Roll Over Beethoven" and three other Berry songs appeared on the Rock, Rock, Rock album, ostensibly a soundtrack to the film of the same name, but only four of the twelve songs on the album appeared in the film. There have been many subsequent releases on compilation albums.

Critical acclaim
In 2003, Berry's single was one of 50 recordings chosen that year by the Library of Congress to be added to the National Recording Registry. In 2004, "Roll Over Beethoven" was ranked number 97 on Rolling Stone magazine's list of the 500 greatest songs of all time. In the accompanying review, they wrote that it "became the ultimate rock & roll call to arms, declaring a new era."[4] Koda calls it a "masterpiece" that helped to define the rock and roll genre.[2]

Cover versions
"Roll Over Beethoven"
Song by The Beatles from the album With The Beatles Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer 22 November 1963 30 July 1963 Rock and roll 2:48 Parlophone Chuck Berry George Martin With The Beatles track listing

14 tracks Side one


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

"It Won't Be Long" "All I've Got to Do" "All My Loving" "Don't Bother Me" "Little Child" "Till There Was You" "Please Mister Postman"

Side two
2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

"Roll Over Beethoven" "Hold Me Tight" "You Really Got a Hold on Me" "I Wanna Be Your Man" "Devil in Her Heart" "Not a Second Time" "Money"

"Roll Over Vic Vella"

347

"Roll Over Beethoven"

Singleby Electric Light Orchestra from the album ELO 2 B-side Released Format Recorded Genre Length "Queen of the Hours" January 1973 (UK) February 1973 (USA) 7" 1972 Air Studios Rock music, Art rock 8:09 (album) 4:32 (single) 3:42 (USA promo single) Harvest Records Chuck Berry, Ludwig van Beethoven Jeff Lynne Electric Light Orchestra singles chronology "10538 Overture" (1972) "Roll Over Beethoven" (1973) "Showdown" (1973)

Label Writer(s) Producer

Flashback track listing "Mr. Radio" (4) "Roll Over Beethoven" (5) "Mama" (6)

"Roll Over Beethoven" is one of the most widely covered songs in popular music "a staple of rock & roll bands" according to Koda[2] with notable versions by Jerry Lee Lewis, The Beatles and the Electric Light Orchestra. Other covers were made by Mountain, Ten Years After, Raul Seixas, Leon Russell, Status Quo, The Rolling Stones, The Byrds, The 13th Floor Elevators, The Sonics, Wes Paul, Gene Vincent, Quartz, Uriah Heep, Kickhunter and Iron Maiden.

"Roll Over Vic Vella"

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The Beatles
"Roll Over Beethoven" was a favourite of John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison even before they had chosen "The Beatles" as their name, and they continued to play it live right into their American tours of 1964. Their version of "Roll Over Beethoven" was recorded on 30 July 1963 for their second British LP, With The Beatles, and features George Harrison on vocals and guitar.[5] In the United States, it was released 10 April 1964 as the opening track of The Beatles' Second Album.[6] In 1994, The Beatles released a live version of "Roll Over Beethoven" on Live at the BBC. This live version was recorded on 28 February 1964 and broadcast on 30 March 1964 as part of a BBC series starring The Beatles called From Us to You.[7] This version of "Roll Over Beethoven" was used in the film Superman III directed by Richard Lester who also directed The Beatles' first two films, Help! and A Hard Day's Night. The Rutles' song "Blue Suede Schubert" is based on The Beatles' cover of this song.

Electric Light Orchestra


"Roll Over Beethoven" is the second single released by the Electric Light Orchestra. It became their second consecutive top ten hit in the UK, as well as a hit in the United States when an edited version of the track was taken from the album ELO 2 in 1973. ELO's elaborate eight-minute reworking of the track included an opening musical quote from Beethoven's Fifth Symphony and clever interpolations of material from the symphony's first movement into Berry's song; the band closed all their concerts using this number, their signature song. The B-side Queen of the Hours was the first ever ELO published song, released by Harvest Records in November 1971 in a compilation called The Harvest Bag which featured various Harvest records artists.

Meat Loaf
Meat Loaf has performed many rock covers for his concerts throughout his career, including Chuck Berry songs. His covers of "Roll Over Beethoven" have been in his "Rock Medleys" of Elvis, Chuck Berry, and Little Richard favorites. Though a cover was never officially released into the medley, being edited out of the CD recording of the tour, it has been on one of Meat Loaf's Objects in the Rear View Mirror singles, recorded for VH-1 in the early 90's according to the CD jacket.

Iron Maiden
Iron Maiden included a cover of the Berry song on the B-side of their single "From Here to Eternity", called "Roll Over Vic Vella". The song features different lyrics (written by Steve Harris) about the band's long-time tour manager, Vic Vella.

References
[1] "Rolling Stone Review of "Roll Over Beethoven"" (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ news/ story/ 6595942/ roll_over_beethoven). . Retrieved 2007-03-01. [2] ""AMG Review of Chuck Berry's "Roll Over Beethoven"" (http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& token=& sql=33:giozefrkhg7n). . Retrieved 2007-03-01. [3] Dietmar Rudolph. "A Collector's Guide to the Music of Chuck Berry: The Chess Era (1955-1966)" (http:/ / www. crlf. de/ ChuckBerry/ chessupto1966. html). . Retrieved 2007-03-01. [4] "The Rolling Stone 500 Greatest Songs of All Time" (http:/ / www. rollingstone. com/ news/ coverstory/ 500songs). . [5] Mark Lewisohn (1988). The Beatles Recording Sessions. New York: Harmony Books. pp.34, 37. ISBN0-517-57066-1. [6] Mark Lewisohn (1988). The Beatles Recording Sessions. p.201. [7] (1994) Album notes for Live at the BBC by The Beatles [booklet]. London: Apple Records (31796).

"Strange World"

349

"Strange World"
"Strange World"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer April 14, 1980 Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal 5:45 EMI / Capitol Records Steve Harris

"Strange World" is a song from the band's debut album Iron Maiden. It was written by Steve Harris and co-written by Paul Day, although Paul Day wasn't credited [1] . It is the sixth track from the original US & UK album releases; and the seventh track from the remastered 1998 release CD. "Strange World" tells of a dystopian society, where people never grow old. Amongst other things the narrator (singer) laments how "smiling faces [are] ever so rare". The lyrics also contain what could be allusions or references to several famous dystopian fictions: the lack of aging and any emotions but empty happiness amongst the people could be references to Brave New World by Aldous Huxley; the line "ship of white light in the sky" could be an allusion to the novel We, specifically the scene in which it was discovered most of the world had been destroyed by a superweapon, as nowadays the term "superweapon" would likely be associated with nuclear warfare; and the lyric "living here just isn't the place" could be voicing on the running theme amongst dystopian fiction of seemingly perfect societies that beneath the surface really aren't perfect at all. The song that precedes it will always be Transylvania, the famous instrumental piece, because they both merge, as one song if listened to. This song was covered by spanish heavy metal band Mgo de Oz in 1999 for the special compilation: Transilvania 666.

Personnel
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Dennis Stratton - guitar Steve Harris - bass guitar Clive Burr - drums

References
[1] "Paul Mario Day official website" (http:/ / www. paulmarioday. com/ ). . Retrieved 2010-04-29.

"To Tame a Land"

350

"To Tame a Land"


"To Tame a Land"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Piece of Mind Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer May 16, 1983 1983 Heavy metal 7:27 EMI Steve Harris Martin Birch Piece of Mind track listing "Sun and Steel" (8) "To Tame a Land" (9)

"To Tame a Land" is the closing track on Iron Maiden's fourth studio album, Piece of Mind. The song contains some unusual modulations (such as from B minor to Ab minor just before the main riff sets in). Around 4:09 into the track, it quotes the main theme of classical guitar showpiece Leyenda (Asturias) by the Spanish composer Isaac Albniz. The track was only performed live on the World Piece Tour in support of Piece of Mind in 1983. When the song ended, it would segue into a guitar solo spot from co-lead guitarist Dave Murray and then a drum solo from Nicko McBrain.

Cover versions
"To Tame a Land" has been covered by the Pyrenean band Stille Volk (under the title "Adoumestica Una Terro"). The song was also covered in 2008 by Dream Theater on the tribute CD Maiden Heaven: A Tribute to Iron Maiden released by Kerrang! magazine,[1] and is included in the special edition release of their 2009 album Black Clouds & Silver Linings.

References
[1] Kerrang! Maiden Heaven Track Listing Revealed! (http:/ / www2. kerrang. com/ 2008/ 06/ maiden_heaven_track_listing_re. html)

"Total Eclipse"

351

"Total Eclipse"
'Total Eclipse' is a song by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden. It appears eighth on their 1982 album The Number of the Beast. This and Gangland are the only two songs to be written by drummer Clive Burr. It was originally left off the album and appeared only as a b-side; however, the band members felt the song was too good to be left off the album and included it in the setlist on the tour promoting The Number of the Beast, and was eventually added to the album on the 1998 CD remaster release. [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. seeklyrics. com/ lyrics/ iron-maiden/ total-eclipse. html

"Transylvania"

352

"Transylvania"
"Transylvania"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Iron Maiden Released Format Recorded Genre Length Label Writer April 14, 1980 CD Kingsway Studios, London Heavy metal 4:19 EMI / Capitol Records Steve Harris

"Transylvania" is an instrumental piece by the band Iron Maiden, which was composed by founder and bassist Steve Harris while he was with his previous band Smiler. The song appears as the fifth track on the original U.S. & U.K. releases of their debut album Iron Maiden and as the sixth track of the remastered release of the same album. Steve came up with the basic idea of the song while walking home from a local club called the Cart & Horses. He presented the song to his band at the time, Smiler, but everyone in Smiler found most of his songs too complicated, and refused to play them. When he formed Iron Maiden Transylvania became a regularly played song during The Early Days. The piece would be the guitar solo spot of guitarist Dave Murray in live performances from 1980-82 as heard on the Beast Over Hammersmith live recording from March, 1982. Another example was featured on the The BBC Archives recorded at The Reading Festival in August of 1982 which is of note when co-lead guitarist Adrian Smith had to play the second lead guitar solo before the finale as Murray had to replace his guitar which went dead. Transylvania was covered by American heavy metal band Iced Earth (on their 2001 studio album Horror Show), by the all-female Malaysian band Candy and by the all-female tribute band The Iron Maidens (on their 2008 EP The Root of All Evil). In 2008, on the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour the band used a recorded audio track of the song Transylvania and various video footage, including that of Ed Force One, as an intro at the concerts.

"Where Eagles Dare"

353

"Where Eagles Dare"


"Where Eagles Dare"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Piece of Mind Released Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer May 16, 1983 1983 Heavy metal 6:10 EMI Steve Harris Martin Birch Piece of Mind track listing "Where Eagles Dare" (1) "Revelations" (2)

"Where Eagles Dare" is the opening track on Iron Maiden's fourth studio album, Piece of Mind. It begins with a drum introduction by Nicko McBrain and features a fast paced, driving guitar riff and bass line. It is based on the 1967 novel and 1968 film of the same name. The song was also covered on Fozzy's album, Happenstance. According to statements on 12 Wasted Years, the band's crew found Nicko's performance on the recording extremely exhausting to the eye. It is often considered one of Nicko McBrain's most famous and difficult drumming performances. Towards the middle of the song, the sound of gunfire is heard during the guitar solo, which, when played live, is emulated using the effects alone to introduce the beginning of the song[1] .

References
[1] http:/ / www. youtube. com/ watch?v=J0R7eDAKayo

"Wrathchild"

354

"Wrathchild"
"Wrathchild"
Song by Iron Maiden from the album Killers Recorded Genre Length Label Writer Producer Battery Studios, 1980 Heavy metal 2:54 EMI Steve Harris Martin "Headmaster" Birch Killers track listing "The Ides of March" (1) "Wrathchild" (2) "Murders in the Rue Morgue" (3)

"Wrathchild" is the second track from the heavy metal band Iron Maiden's second album, Killers. It opens with a dark, lurking bass riff by Steve Harris - also the main writer of the song - before going into a short guitar solo by Dave Murray and then proceeding straight into the first verse. The song's lyrics are based from the perspective of a young man who's birth was unplanned by his parents, and decides to seek his father and never stop until he finds him. "Wrathchild" has grown to be one of the band's most famous songs since the release on Killers in 1981, still being played in live performances in the present, often as one of the first songs in the tracklist.

Trivia
A remade version of the song was found on the Iron Maiden tribute album Numbers from the Beast, with the original vocalist Paul Di'Anno, Testament guitarist Alex Skolnick, Helmet guitarist Chris Traynor, Anthrax bassist Frank Bello and White Zombie drummer John Tempesta. A cover version of the song was found in the music video game Guitar Hero Encore: Rocks the 80s. A cover version of the song is planning to be launched in a downloadable, metal-based song pack for the music video game Rock Band, as well. A cover version of the song was made by Paul Di'Anno's band Killers on their album Murder One.

355

Videography
Live at the Rainbow
Live at the Rainbow

Video by Iron Maiden Released May 1981

Recorded Rainbow Theatre, London, on 21 December 1980 Genre Length Label Heavy metal 31:51 PMI

Iron Maiden video chronology Live at the Rainbow (1981) Video Pieces (1983)

Live at the Rainbow is a live video recorded by Iron Maiden on December 21, 1980 and released in 1981, this was Iron Maiden's first live video and one of the first live music VHS and even the higher quality BETA (in Japan Only) tapes ever released. It also includes one of the earliest Maiden concerts with guitarist Adrian Smith. Also included is a very early version of "Killers," with lyrics that differ from the album version that would be recorded next year. Paul Di'Anno later admitted writing the lyrics 5 minutes before going on stage that night. This concert is included on disc 1 of The Early Days DVD.

''Live at the Rainbow''

356

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "The Ides of March" "Wrathchild" "Killers" "Remember Tomorrow" "Transylvania" "Phantom of the Opera" "Iron Maiden"

Credits
Paul Di'Anno - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar Steve Harris - bass Clive Burr - drums

''Video Pieces''

357

Video Pieces
Video Pieces

Video by Iron Maiden Released Genre Length Label Director July 1983 Heavy metal 18:00 PMI David Mallet Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden video chronology Live at the Rainbow (1981) Video Pieces (1983) Behind the Iron Curtain (1984)

Video Pieces was a home video released in 1983 on VHS/Beta/LaserDisc/Video 8 and the Japan Only VHD format. This release contains four promotional videos by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden. This is one of the few Iron Maiden released videos to not feature Eddie the Head on the cover.

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. "Run to the Hills" "The Number of the Beast" "Flight of Icarus" "The Trooper"

Credits
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar Steve Harris - bass Clive Burr - drums (on "The Number of the Beast" and "Run to the Hills") Nicko McBrain - drums (on "Flight of Icarus" and "The Trooper")

''Video Pieces''

358

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:hnfoxqt5ldke~T10

Behind the Iron Curtain


Behind the Iron Curtain

Video by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Director Producer October 23, 1984 World Slavery Tour, Poland, August 1984 Heavy metal 30:00 (original) 58:00 (expanded version) PMI Kenny Feuerman Martin Birch Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden video chronology Video Pieces (1983) Behind the Iron Curtain (1984) Live After Death (1985)

Behind the Iron Curtain is a discontinued VHS/Beta/LaserDisc/VHD video by the English metal band Iron Maiden. The video features footage of the band on the road in Eastern Europe in 1984, performing concerts in Hungary, Poland, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia as part of the World Slavery Tour. The title refers to the fact that the band were touring inside the Iron Curtain (countries within the Eastern Bloc); unusual given the area's separation from the West due to the then-ongoing Cold War. Aside from two promotional videos from the album Powerslave, the video also contains two live tracks and interviews with band members. The video has no MPAA rating and has a running length of 30 minutes. An expanded 58 minute version of the documentary is included on disc 2 of the Live After Death DVD. This expanded version was broadcasted by MTV in 1984 and was until the release of the Live After Death DVD only available on several bootleg recordings. Analysis of the tracks revealed that the audio of the tracks on the original video differ from the audio of the expanded documentary on the DVD version[2] .

''Behind the Iron Curtain''

359

Track listing of the original video version


All tracks by Steve Harris except were noted

1. 2. 3. 4.

"2 Minutes to Midnight (Studio Version)" (Bruce Dickinson, Adrian Smith) "Aces High (Studio Version)" "Hallowed Be Thy Name (recorded live in Katowice, Poland on 14 August 1984)" "Run to the Hills (recorded live in Budapest, Hungary on 17 August 1984)"

Track listing of the expanded MTV documentary


1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Aces High (recording date unclear)" "The Trooper (recorded live in Poznan, Poland on 11 August 1984)" "22 Acacia Avenue (recording date unclear)" "The Number Of The Beast (recorded live in Poznan, Poland on 11 August 1984)" "Hallowed Be Thy Name (recorded live in Poznan, Poland on 11 August 1984)" "2 Minutes to Midnight (recording date unclear)" "Run to the Hills (recorded live in Budapest, Hungary on 17 August 1984)"

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar Steve Harris - bass Nicko McBrain - drums

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:jifpxqqkldae~T10 [2] "Behind the Iron Curtain - analysis" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ fanclub/ showthread. php?t=74134). . Retrieved April 14, 2010.

''Live After Death''

360

Live After Death


Live After Death

Video by Iron Maiden Released October 23, 1985 (VHS/Betamax) February 4, 2008 (DVD) Heavy metal EMI Iron Maiden video chronology Behind the Iron Curtain (1984) Live After Death (1985) 12 Wasted Years (1986)

Genre Label

Iron Maiden DVDs video chronology Death on the Road (2005) Live After Death (2006) Iron Maiden: Flight 666 (2009)

Live After Death is the video compendium to the double-live Iron Maiden album of the same name. Released in VHS/Beta/LaserDisc/VHD/Hi-8 and DVD. Prior to the official DVD release in 2008, bootleg DVDs from Brazil had been illegally sold over the past few years. These DVDs were obviously produced using the laserdisc release of the video as the master. The video captures Iron Maiden in concert, recorded over a sold-out four-night stand at Long Beach Arena on the second night, March 15th 1985, during their World Slavery Tour. The video contains footage from a completely different night from the album, and was originally aired as a special on MTV. Iron Maiden released it on DVD on 4 February 2008, which coincided with the start of the band's Somewhere Back In Time World Tour.[1] On March 11, 2008 it was certified Gold by the RIAA having sold 50,000 units.[2] The new release had two mixes of the audio: Martin Birch's version which serves as the original concert audio, and a brand new 5.1 Stereo mix by Kevin Shirley. In addition to the nearly complete concert, the DVD followed up the documentary of the band on 2004's The Early Days with a focus on the Powerslave era of the band, as well as featuring a documentary on the band's tour of Poland and Germany, highlights of their set at Rock in Rio 1985 and other assorted footage.

''Live After Death'' Live After Death is distributed in the U.S. by Universal Music Group/Sony BMG Music Entertainment and in the rest of the world by EMI. It has been labeled with the Parental Advisory sticker due to profanity in the concert and the History of Iron Maiden documentary.

361

Track listing
1. "Intro: Churchill's Speech"/"Aces High" 2. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 3. "The Trooper" 4. "Revelations" 5. "Flight of Icarus" 6. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" 7. "Powerslave" 8. "The Number of the Beast" 9. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 10. "Iron Maiden" 11. "Run to the Hills" 12. "Running Free" 13. "Sanctuary"

DVD Disc 2
1. The History of Iron Maiden - Part 2 (60 mins) Continuation of the History of Iron Maiden self-documentary from The Early Days. Band members, crew, friends and associates talk about the period in the band's career which saw the writing, recording and release of the Powerslave album, and later Live After Death, and the subsequent massive touring. 2. Behind the Iron Curtain (57 mins approx) Shot during Maiden's historic tour of Poland and other parts to the Eastern Bloc in 1984 featuring interviews, live and offstage footage capturing the atmosphere of this remarkable journey behind the Wall at the height of the Cold War. 3. Live Footage - Rock in Rio '85 (50 mins approx) Highlights from the Maiden set supporting Queen on the first day of the first Rock in Rio in front of 350,000. 4. 'Ello Texas (15 minutes) Interview and live performance. Caught by a film crew in 1983 at the Alamo and sound checking their show in San Antonio. 5. Artwork Gallery, Tour Programme, Tour dates and photo gallery 6. Promotional clips for "Aces High" and "2 Minutes to Midnight."

''Live After Death''

362

Credits
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar Steve Harris - bass Nicko McBrain - drums

Charts
Video and DVDs
Chart (2008) Peak position 1 1 Top 10 Top 10 Top 10 Top 10 Top 10

Australia Charts UK Charts France Charts Italy Charts Sweden Charts Spain Charts New Zealand Charts Denmark Charts Finland Charts Germany Charts Portugal Charts Norway Charts Ireland Charts USA Charts India Charts

Top 10 Top 10 Top 10 2 2 2 2 3

Reviews
Metal Injection link [3]

References
[1] (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=688) [2] "RIAA sales certifications-Longform video" (http:/ / www. billboard. com/ bbcom/ riaa/ video. jsp). . Retrieved February 22, 2009. [3] http:/ / metalinjection. net/ blog/ 2008/ 04/ 09/ dvd-review-iron-maiden-life-after-death/

''12 Wasted Years''

363

12 Wasted Years
12 Wasted Years

Video by Iron Maiden Released Genre Length Label October 1987 Heavy metal 90:00 PMI Professional reviews

Allmusic (favorable) link

[1]

Iron Maiden video chronology Live After Death (1985) 12 Wasted Years (1987) Maiden England (1989)

12 Wasted Years is a video documentary of heavy metal band Iron Maiden, focusing on the history of the band from 1975-1987. It includes several rare videos and interviews from the band's career, most of which were later released on the 2005 DVD The Early Days. The video was originally released on laserdisc and VHS tape and has been out of print for over a decade.

Track listing
1. "Stranger in a Strange Land" (promotional video 1986) 2. "Charlotte the Harlot" (live 1980) 3. "Running Free" (live 1980) 4. "Women in Uniform" (promotional video 1980) 5. "Murders In The Rue Morgue" (live 1982) 6. "Children of the Damned" (live 1982) 7. "The Number of the Beast" (live 1985) 8. "Total Eclipse" (live 1982) 9. "Iron Maiden" (live 1983) 10. "Sanctuary" (live 1982) 11. "The Prisoner" (live 1982) 12. "22, Acacia Avenue" (live 1983) 13. "Wasted Years" (live 1986)

''12 Wasted Years'' 14. "The Trooper" (live 1985)

364

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:dnfoxqt5ldke~T10

''The First Ten Years: The Videos''

365

The First Ten Years: The Videos


The First Ten Years: The Videos

Video by Iron Maiden Released Genre Length Label November 1990 Heavy metal 73:00 PMI Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden video chronology Maiden England (1989) The First Ten Years: The Videos (1990) Donington Live 1992 (1993)

Alternate cover

From There to Eternity is an American extended version of The First Ten Years: The Videos, including tracks through the band's 1992 album Fear of the Dark

The First Ten Years: The Videos (re-issued as From There to Eternity) is a VHS and laserdisc music video compilation released by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden in 1990. It features all of the band's promotional videos from 1980-1990. The video is an addition to the The First Ten Years CD/double 12" single series, also released by Iron Maiden in 1990.

''The First Ten Years: The Videos''

366

Track listing
1. "Women in Uniform" 2. "Wrathchild" (live) 3. "Run to the Hills" 4. "The Number of the Beast" 5. "Flight of Icarus" 6. "The Trooper" 7. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 8. "Aces High" 9. "Running Free" (live) 10. "Wasted Years" 11. "Stranger in a Strange Land" 12. "Can I Play with Madness" 13. "The Evil That Men Do" 14. "The Clairvoyant" 15. "Infinite Dreams" (live) 16. "Holy Smoke" 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "Tailgunner" "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "From Here to Eternity" "Wasting Love" Tracks 1721 were included on the 1992 reissue of The First Ten Years: The Videos, re-titled as From There to Eternity.

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:fzfoxqqgldje~T10

''Donington Live 1992''

367

Donington Live 1992


Donington Live 1992

Video by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Director Producer November 10, 1993 Monsters of Rock, England, on August 22, 1992 Heavy metal 120:00 PMI Samuel Bayer Paul Spencer Iron Maiden video chronology The First Ten Years: The Videos (1990) Donington Live 1992 (1993) Raising Hell (1994)

This refers to the video compedium of Live at Donington (Iron Maiden album) by Iron Maiden. For other uses, see Live at Donington Donington Live 1992 is the video compendium to the album Live at Donington, performed by legendary heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The video features the band's complete headlining performance at the Donington Monsters of Rock festival in England as part of their 1992 world tour in support of their latest album Fear of the Dark. The band surprised fans by inviting former Maiden guitarist Adrian Smith onstage for the first time in four years for the encore of "Running Free."

Track listing
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. "Be Quick or Be Dead" "The Number of the Beast" "Wrathchild" "From Here to Eternity" "Can I Play with Madness" "Wasting Love"

7. "Tailgunner" 8. "The Evil That Men Do" 9. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers"

''Donington Live 1992'' 10. 11. 12. 13. 14. 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. "Fear of the Dark" "Bring Your Daughter...To the Slaughter" "The Clairvoyant" "Heaven Can Wait" "Run to the Hills" "2 Minutes to Midnight" "Iron Maiden" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "The Trooper" "Sanctuary" "Running Free" (with Adrian Smith)

368

Credits
Bruce Dickinson vocals Dave Murray guitar Janick Gers guitar Steve Harris bass guitar

Nicko McBrain drums with Michael Kenney - keyboard Adrian Smith - guitar on "Running Free"

''Raising Hell''

369

Raising Hell
Raising Hell

Video by Iron Maiden Released May 1994

Recorded Pinewood Studios in London, England, on August 28, 1993 Genre Length Label Director Producer Heavy metal 113:00 PMI Declan Lowney Michael Pillot Iron Maiden video chronology Donington Live 1992 (1993) Raising Hell (1994) Rock in Rio (2002)

Raising Hell is a concert video by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden, filmed on August 28, 1993 at the Pinewood Studios in London, England and broadcast live on pay-per-view television in North America. It was later bought by the BBC for broadcast in the UK as an edited version. The video is distributed on VHS and DVD by BMG Special Products in the U.S. and EMI in the rest of the world. The concert was the last to feature vocalist Bruce Dickinson (until he returned to the band in 1999). The band played on stage in conjunction with horror magician Simon Drake, who ended up "killing" Bruce in an Iron Maiden torture device, "amputated" Dave Murray's hands on a table saw and "killed" members of the crew and audience.

''Raising Hell''

370

Track listing
1. "Be Quick or Be Dead" 2. "The Trooper" Drake introduces this song while sitting down and swallowing a large pill. Suddenly, his pants open and two women pop out. 3. "The Evil That Men Do" 4. "The Clairvoyant" 5. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" Following this performance, Drake stabs his forearm with a long knife. Shortly after pulling the knife out, he simply wipes his forearm clean of any blood and reveals that the knife wound has disappeared. He then pulls out a cigar, but realizes he doesn't have a lighter. A fan in the front row gives him a lighter, but when Drake sees it doesn't work, he has the fan pulled out by his two henchmen and locked in a chest. Drake then "cremates" the fan by setting the inside of the chest on fire using a pair of electrical wires severed from a battery. 6. "Wrathchild" 7. "Transylvania" 8. "From Here to Eternity" During this performance, Drake has Murray's hands amputated on two cutting boards to have them play his guitar. Murray returns before the next song. 9. "Fear of the Dark" Following this number, Drake has a woman named Tracy chained before he rips her heart out from behind. After hammering the heart on a table, he inserts it back into her, bringing her back to life. A fan shouts something derogatory towards Drake, prompting him to have the fan pulled out of the crowd and stuffed into a black speaker box with his head and limbs sticking out. Drake and his female assistant twist the fan's arms, legs and head before he plugs the speaker box to an outlet, electrocuting the fan before the box explodes. 10. "The Number of the Beast" 11. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" During this performance, Drake slices a woman in two with a circular saw. After the performance, he drills a female assistant's head with an improvised drilling machine. He then decapitates a fan with a saw and plays football with the head before disposing it in a garbage can and dropping a grenade on it. Then, with a painted mannequin head and a cloak attached to the body, he brings the fan back to life. Drake introduces the song by stabbing a female assistant against the top of a television set. He then rips his shirt to reveal a clock on his chest. 12. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 13. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" 14. "Heaven Can Wait" 15. "Sanctuary" 16. "Run to the Hills" 17. "Iron Maiden" At the end of this performance, Bruce is dragged to another stage by Drake's assistants, where he is locked inside an Iron Maiden torture chamber. The spikes inside the chamber impale and "kill" Bruce within seconds. Suddenly, Eddie appears from behind Drake and lures him back to the main stage, where he is knocked unconscious by his own female assistant. Drake's two assistants and Eddie carry the magician to the tip of a long spike pointing upwards, which impales him in seconds. Eddie then returns to the other stage to decapitate Bruce and skewer the severed head on the tip of the spike.

''Raising Hell''

371

Credits
Bruce Dickinson - vocals Dave Murray - guitar Janick Gers - guitar Steve Harris - bass Nicko McBrain - drums

''Rock in Rio''

372

Rock in Rio
Rock in Rio

Video by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label July 16, 2002 Rock in Rio festival, on January 19, 2001 Heavy metal 125:00 Sanctuary Iron Maiden video chronology Classic Albums: The Number of the Beast (2001) Rock in Rio (2002) Visions of the Beast (2003)

Rock in Rio is a double DVD set (also available on VHS & UMD[1] ) of heavy metal band, Iron Maiden. Besides showing the entire performance at the Rock in Rio show, the second disc also includes three special features with interviews with band members, a short documentary on the day in the life of Iron Maiden, and photos by official photographer, Ross Halfin. It claimed the number one slot on the US Soundscan Music DVD Charts in its first week of release, while gaining number two on the Soundscan Music Video Charts[2] . The performance featured at least one song from every Iron Maiden album released to this point apart from 1986's Somewhere in Time and 1990's No Prayer for the Dying. The DVD was released worldwide by EMI on June 10, 2002, and in the U.S. by Columbia Music Video in the U.S. It was the final show on the band's 2000-2001 tour to support the album Brave New World. The concert had over 250,000 audience members. The video was edited by bassist/founder Steve Harris. This was Iron Maiden's first live DVD release.

''Rock in Rio''

373

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Intro: Arthur's Farewell" 2. "The Wicker Man" 3. "Ghost of the Navigator" 4. "Brave New World" 5. "Wrathchild" 6. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 7. "Blood Brothers" 8. "Sign of the Cross" 9. "The Mercenary" 10. "The Trooper" 11. "Dream of Mirrors" 12. "The Clansman" 13. "The Evil That Men Do" 14. "Fear of the Dark" 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. "Iron Maiden" "The Number of the Beast" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "Sanctuary" "Run to the Hills"

Disc two
Candid interviews with the band members. "A Day in the Life" of Iron Maiden. Ross Halfin Photo Diary - 50 exclusive photos from Iron Maiden's South American Tour, commentary from official photographer, Ross Halfin. Several secret short videos.

Credits
Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitar Adrian Smith - guitar, backing vocals Janick Gers - guitar Steve Harris - bass, keyboards, backing vocals Nicko McBrain - drums, percussion

''Rock in Rio''

374

Certifications
Country United States Certification Sales Platinum [3] 1,000,000+

References
[1] http:/ / www. amazon. co. uk/ dp/ B000AYSLMA [2] http:/ / web. archive. org/ web/ 20080222140520/ http:/ / www. sanctuarygroup. com/ index. php?page=1& l1=1& l2=2& l3=0& getArticleId=10 [3] RIAA certification (http:/ / riaa. com/ goldandplatinumdata. php?table=SEARCH_RESULTS). Retrieved December 28, 2008.

''Visions of the Beast''

375

Visions of the Beast


Visions of the Beast

Video by Iron Maiden Released Genre Length Label June 2, 2003 Heavy metal 150:00 EMI Iron Maiden video chronology Rock in Rio (2002) Visions of the Beast (2003) The Early Days (2004)

Visions of the Beast was released by Iron Maiden on June 2, 2003 and contains every promotional video through 2001's Rock in Rio. It is basically an updated version of The First Ten Years: The Videos and From There to Eternity. It also includes never-before-seen Camp Chaos animated versions of six definitive Iron Maiden songs, interactive menus and discographies, and some special hidden extras.[1]

Track listing
Disc one
1. "Women in Uniform" 2. "Wrathchild" (live) 3. "Run to the Hills" 4. "The Number of the Beast" 5. "Flight of Icarus" 6. "The Trooper" 7. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 8. "Aces High" 9. "Wasted Years" 10. "Stranger in a Strange Land" 11. "Can I Play with Madness" 12. "The Evil That Men Do" 13. "The Clairvoyant" (live) 14. "Infinite Dreams" (live)

''Visions of the Beast'' 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. 21. "Holy Smoke" "Tailgunner" "Aces High" (Camp Chaos version) "The Number of the Beast" (Camp Chaos version) "Futureal" (Football version) "Fear of the Dark" (live - Taken from Rock in Rio)[2] "Man on the Edge" (fun version - Easter Egg)

376

Uses clips of Charlie Chaplin films

Disc two
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Bring Your Daughter... to the Slaughter" "Be Quick or Be Dead" "From Here to Eternity" "Wasting Love" "Fear of the Dark" (live) "Hallowed Be Thy Name" (live) "Man on the Edge"

8. "Afraid to Shoot Strangers" (live with Blaze Bayley on vocals) 9. "Lord of the Flies" 10. "Virus" 11. "The Angel and the Gambler" 12. "Futureal" 13. "The Wicker Man" 14. "Out of the Silent Planet" 15. "Brave New World" (live) 16. "The Wicker Man" (Camp Chaos version) 17. "Run to the Hills" (Camp Chaos version) 18. "Flight of Icarus" (Camp Chaos version) 19. "The Trooper" (Camp Chaos version) (Easter Egg)

External links
Visions of the Beast (VHS/DVD) [3] at the Internet Movie Database

References
[1] Maiden-World.com (http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ articles/ visions_of_the_beast-dvdextras. html) [2] The Iron Maiden Commentary (http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=video13_visions/ video13_visions& lang=eng& link=videos) [3] http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt0378112/

''The Early Days''

377

The Early Days


The Early Days

Video by Iron Maiden Released Recorded Genre Length Label Director November 8, 2004 19801983 Heavy metal 270:00 EMI Matthew Amos Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Iron Maiden video chronology Visions of the Beast (2003) The Early Days (2004) Death on the Road (2006)

The Early Days DVD set features an exhaustive, thoroughly complete history of the early years of Iron Maiden, from their humble beginnings in London's East End in 1975 through their triumphant Piece of Mind album and tour in 1983. The set features a large collection of rare videos and concert footage, as well as interviews with former members such as Paul Di'Anno, Clive Burr, Dennis Stratton, Dave Sullivan, Terry Rance, Kent Ewing, Doug Sampson, Ron Matthews, Terry Wapram and Bob Sawyer.

''The Early Days''

378

Track listing
Disc one
Live at the Rainbow (21 December 1980) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "The Ides of March" "Wrathchild" "Killers" "Remember Tomorrow" "Transylvania" "Phantom of the Opera" "Iron Maiden"

Beast over Hammersmith (20 March 1982) 1. "Murders in the Rue Morgue" 2. "Run to the Hills" 3. "Children of the Damned" 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "The Number of the Beast" "22 Acacia Avenue" "Total Eclipse" "The Prisoner" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "Iron Maiden"

Live in Dortmund (18 December 1983) 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. "Sanctuary" "The Trooper" "Revelations" "Flight of Icarus" "22 Acacia Avenue" "The Number of the Beast" "Run to the Hills"

Disc two
The Early Days (90 minutes) Feature length documentary. 20th Century Box (20 minutes) Rare TV documentary from 1981 Live at the Ruskin Arms (1980) (45 minutes) 1. "Sanctuary" 2. "Wrathchild"

''The Early Days'' 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. "Prowler" "Remember Tomorrow" "Running Free" "Transylvania" "Another Life" "Phantom of the Opera" "Charlotte the Harlot"

379

Extras (40 minutes) 1. "Running Free" (Live on Top of the Pops 1980) 2. "Women in Uniform" (Live on Top of the Pops 1980) 3. "Running Free" (Live on Rock and Pop, Germany 1980) Promo Videos 1. "Women in Uniform" 2. "Run to the Hills" 3. "The Number of the Beast" 4. "Flight of Icarus" 5. "The Trooper" In addition, the DVD set includes a photo gallery featuring more than 150 pictures, images and artwork, full tour listings, discography and tour programmes.

Notes
The Live in Dortmund concert is missing the band's performance of "Iron Maiden," which was cut from ZDF TV's original broadcast as it was deemed "too violent." At the end of the performance, the band "mutilated" Eddie first, with Bruce Dickinson ripping his brain pieces out, followed by the other members kicking him on the ground until finally, Dave Murray smashed his then-favorite Fender Stratocaster on him.[2] A low-quality version of the footage can be found on Disc 2 of the Live After Death DVD. Videotaped by a friend of Steve Harris, Live at the Ruskin Arms is the earliest video coverage of the band performing live. [3] The band's performance of "Running Free" on the German show Rock and Pop was one of a handful of lip-synched performances, as the band prefers to perform live. "Remember Tomorrow" was also performed when the band made their appearance on the Rock and Pop. The reasons why it was dropped for the DVD are unknown. Also, on the VH1 special Heavy: The Story Of Metal, an excerpt of the performance of "Running Free" from the band's appearance on Rock and Pop was shown but instead has a bit of a more cleaner quality than the one found on the DVD.

"Sequel" - Somewhere Back in Time


During Iron Maiden's "A Matter of Life and Death" world tour, Bruce Dickinson mentioned that Maiden would be "bringing back the 80's Egyptian thing in 2008" (apparently referring to their Powerslave album). This referred to a "sequel" to the 2005 "Early Days" Tour and this DVD, which was in line with earlier comments that there would be a tour with songs from the Powerslave to Seventh Son of A Seventh Son era albums. This tour was called The Somewhere Back In Time World Tour. Part 2 of The Early Days is now in disc 2 of the Live After Death DVD.

''The Early Days''

380

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:a9ftxq8sld0e~T10 [2] The Iron Maiden Commentary (http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=video14_earlydays/ video14_earlydays& lang=eng& link=videos#dortmund) [3] The Iron Maiden Commentary (http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=video14_earlydays/ video14_earlydays& lang=eng& link=videos#lockup)

''Iron Maiden: Flight 666''

381

Iron Maiden: Flight 666


Iron Maiden: Flight 666

Directed by Produced by Starring

Scot McFadyen Sam Dunn Scot McFadyen Sam Dunn Iron Maiden

Distributed by EMI Universal Music Group (U.S.) Release date(s) April 21, 2009 (cinemas) Running time Language 112 minutes English

Iron Maiden: Flight 666 is a British/Canadian award winning concert documentary film featuring the heavy metal band Iron Maiden. The film follows the band on the first leg of their Somewhere Back in Time World Tour between February and March 2008. Flight 666 is co-produced by Toronto-based Banger Productions, known for their documentaries Metal: A Headbanger's Journey and Global Metal. The film was shot in High-definition video with accompanying 5.1 surround sound produced by Kevin Shirley (who has worked with the band since their 2000 album Brave New World). It was distributed by EMI (except in the U.S., where it was distributed by Universal Music Group) in select digital theatres on April 21, 2009.[1]

Theatrical showings
The film had its UK Premiere on Monday April 20 2009 with members of the band and crew joining the special screened showings. The following night, the movie was shown simultaneously to over 450 screens in 41 countries globally. It was the largest simultaneous worldwide release of a documentary film, with digital-only prints instead of the more common 35mm prints usually shown in theaters. The film made history with this unique digital DLP cinema showing. The movie generated a word of mouth buzz, including additional radio marketing for the digital premire. With this amount of publicity, Flight 666 had two nights of high profile coverage worldwide. In India it was released in 7 cities by PVR Films on 8th May 2009, playing in over 20 theaters for a minimum of 2 weeks, making it the most widespread release for a documentary film in the country.

''Iron Maiden: Flight 666''

382

Release
It was released on DVD and Blu-Ray in the UK on Monday 25 May (Tuesday June 9 in Canada and in the USA). The soundtrack went on sale Friday 22 May digitally from their official online store.[2]

Countries
Flight 666 was shown at cinemas in the countries listed below
Algeria Argentina Australia Austria Belgium Brazil Bulgaria Canada Chile Colombia Costa Rica Croatia Czech Republic Denmark Ecuador El Salvador Finland France Germany Guatemala Hungary India Ireland Italy Japan Latvia Mexico Netherlands Norway Panama Peru Portugal Puerto Rico Russia Serbia South Africa Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey United Kingdom United States

New Zealand

DVD Disc 1
The Film: 112 minutes "Taking you on a visual global tour from Mumbai to Sydney, Tokyo to L.A., Mexico City to Costa Rica, Bogota to So Paulo, Buenos Aires, Santiago, Puerto Rico, New Jersey and Toronto and places in-between, you travel with the band and crew on the plane, to and from shows, in the bar and during leisure time, while experiencing the exhaustion and fan pandemonium that comes with such as mission. FLIGHT 666 (named after the official airways flight call) reveals how the idea for this unique tour actually came about and how complex planning turned it into a reality. The documentary also contains some of the most spectacular live footage yet seen of the band, filmed in all of those locations and beyond. If you have ever wanted to see the inside story of a truly unique and worldwide tour, taking you to places you never imagined, Maiden fan or not, this is your opportunity."[3]

DVD Disc 2 & Soundtrack (Tour Setlist 2008)


For more information on the soundtrack, go to Flight 666 - The Original Soundtrack The Concert: 104 minutes (CD 1) 1. Churchill's Speech Bandra Kurla Complex/Mumbai, India February 1, 2008 2. Aces High (Steve Harris) Bandra Kurla Complex/Mumbai, India February 1, 2008 3. 2 Minutes To Midnight (Bruce Dickinson/Adrian Smith) Rod Laver Arena/Melbourne, Australia

''Iron Maiden: Flight 666'' February 7, 2008 4. Revelations (Dickinson) Acer Arena/Sydney, Australia February 9, 2008 5. The Trooper (Harris) Makuhari Messe/Tokyo, Japan February 16, 2008 6. Wasted Years (Smith) Arena Monterrey/Monterrey, Mexico February 22, 2008 7. The Number Of The Beast (Harris) The Forum/Los Angeles, USA February 19, 2008 8. Can I Play With Madness (Dickinson/Harris/Smith) Foro Sol/Mexico City, Mexico February 24, 2008 9. Rime Of The Ancient Mariner (Harris) Izod Center/East Rutherford, USA March 14, 2008 (CD 2) 1. Powerslave (Dickinson) Saprissa Stadium/San Jose, Costa Rica February 26, 2008 2. Heaven Can Wait (Harris) Palmeiras Stadium/Sao Paulo, Brazil March 2, 2008 3. Run To The Hills (Harris) Simon Bolivar Park/Bogota, Colombia February 28, 2008 4. Fear Of The Dark (Harris) Ferrocarril Oeste Stadium/Buenos Aires, Argentina March 7, 2008 5. Iron Maiden (Harris) Pista Atletica/Santiago, Chile March 9, 2008 6. Moonchild (Dickinson/Smith) Coliseo de Puerto Rico/San Juan, Puerto Rico March 12, 2008 7. The Clairvoyant (Harris) Pedreira Paulo Leminski/Curitiba, Brazil March 4, 2008 8. Hallowed Be Thy Name (Harris) Air Canada Centre/Toronto, Canada March 16, 2008

383

''Iron Maiden: Flight 666''

384

Reception
Flight 666 was welcomed by overwhelmingly positive reviews from the music press and general media. Rock and metal magazines Kerrang! and Metal Hammer each gave the movie full marks, with Kerrang! referring to it as a "unique peek behind the Iron Curtain" that was "not to be missed" and Metal Hammer calling it a "continent-jumping, fire-breathing monster of a film". Outside the music media The Sun gave it 4.5 out of 5, calling it an "outstanding Access All Areas documentary" and going onto say that "if you're not a fan, you will be after this". Empire gave it 4 stars and felt that the behind the scenes antics were interesting, despite lacking in drama when compared to Metallica's rockumentary "Some Kind of Monster". Empire went on to comment on the "magnificent" concert footage.[4] [5] Sky News also referred to it as "a music documentary that really delivers where so many others disappoint". Flight 666 also won the "24 Beats Per Second" award for best music documentary at the SXSW Film Festival in Austin, Texas.[6]

Personnel
Steve Harris - bass guitar, backing vocals Bruce Dickinson - lead vocals Dave Murray - guitars Adrian Smith - guitars, backing vocals Janick Gers - guitars Nicko McBrain - drums with Michael Kenney - live keyboards

External links
Iron Maiden: Flight 666 [7] at the Internet Movie Database Examiner.com (NJ film premiere feature) [8] Film and UK premier information [9] Interview with Sam Dunn and Scot McFadyen on Iron Maiden: Flight 666 [10] May 2009 Examiner Interview with drummer Nicko McBrain RE: Flight 666 [11] June 2009 Metal Hammer [12] Art [13] BBC [14]

References
[1] "Iron Maiden: Flight 666 The Movie" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1058). Iron Maiden.com. . Retrieved 2009-01-21. [2] Iron Maiden - Flight 666: The Original Soundtrack (http:/ / www. 7digital. com/ stores/ ironmaidenreskin_1/ artists/ iron-maiden/ flight-666-the-original-soundtrack-1/ ) [3] Flight 666 Blu-ray, 2-DVD set and live double soundtrack album (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1125) [4] Flight 666 Reviews (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1127) [5] UK Press Cuttings - Flight 666 Reviews (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1136) [6] FLIGHT 666 wins major award at prestigious SXSW Film Festival (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1096) [7] http:/ / www. imdb. com/ title/ tt1361558/ [8] http:/ / www. examiner. com/ x-5629-Heavy-Metal-Examiner~y2009m4d22-Iron-Maiden-takes-to-the-skies-with-Flight-666-a-documentary-film-of-epic-proportions [9] http:/ / www. sceg. co. nz/ skycity/ index. cfm?984205EB-D5EA-A37B-9956-39DEE78F5A1D& entryID=A2E55B05-BC96-66E8-CA07-2D58C8297CDC

''Iron Maiden: Flight 666''

385

[10] http:/ / www. exclaim. ca/ articles/ multiarticlesub. aspx?csid1=132& csid2=946& fid1=38157 [11] http:/ / www. examiner. com/ x-5629-Heavy-Metal-Examiner~y2009m6d10-Listen-With-Nicko-Part-Flight-666-Exclusive-Interview-with-Iron-Maiden-Drummer-Nicko-McBrain [12] http:/ / www. metalhammer. co. uk/ news/ steve-harris-talks-iron-maiden-flight-666/ [13] http:/ / www. reuters. com/ article/ entertainmentNews/ idUSTRE53E58M20090415 [14] http:/ / news. bbc. co. uk/ 1/ hi/ entertainment/ 7842422. stm

386

Tours
List of Iron Maiden concert tours
Iron Maiden are a British heavy metal band, founded in 1975 by bassist Steve Harris in east London, England. Since 1980, Iron Maiden have had a long touring history. They have performed in many places throughout the globe, from Europe to North and South America, Asia, Africa, and played in over 2000 shows.

Supporting Tours
Year Title Duration Dates Supported release Metal for Muthas Notes

1980 Metal for Muthas February 1 February 11, Tour 1980(Great Britain)

11

First concert tour by the band. Performed alongside many other New Wave of British Heavy Metal pioneers. The band did not play the last 19 shows of the tour in order to record their debut album. Supported this Judas Priest tour.

1980 British Steel Tour 1980 Unmasked Tour

March 7 March 27, 1980(Great Britain) August 29 October 16, 1980(Europe)

19

Iron Maiden

32

Iron Maiden

Supported European leg of this Kiss tour. Occurred between the two legs of the Iron Maiden Tour Supported European and North American legs of this Scorpions tour. Occurred during The Beast on the Road tour. Supported this 38 Special tour. Occurred during The Beast on the Road tour.

1982 Blackout Tour

May 1, 1982(Europe) July 2 August 4, 1982(North America) June 1 June 19, 1982(North America)

33

The Number of the Beast The Number of the Beast

1982 Special Forces Tour

13

Headlining Tours
Year Title Duration Dates Supported release Iron Maiden Notes

1980

Iron Maiden Tour

April 1 August 23, 1980(Europe)(first leg) November 21 December 21, 1980(Europe)(second leg)

75

Guitarist Dennis Stratton replaced mid-tour by Adrian Smith. Marquee Club show released on audio as Live!! +one. Broken into two legs to allow the band to support Kiss on their Unmasked Tour. First North America and Japan tours. Japan shows released on audio as Maiden Japan. Live at the Rainbow recorded on video (currently available on The Early Days DVD). Last tour with Paul Di'Anno on vocals. First tour with Bruce Dickinson on vocals.

1981

Killers World Tour

February 17 May 10, 1981(Europe) May 21 25, 1981(Japan) March 6 August 2, 1981(North America) August 15 December 23, 1981(Europe)

140

Killers

List of Iron Maiden concert tours

387
187 The Number of the Beast Hammersmith Odeon show released on audio as Beast over Hammersmith (video version available on The Early Days DVD). Last tour with Clive Burr on drums.

1982

The Beast On The Road

February 25 May 1, 1982(Europe) May 11 October 23, 1982(North America) November 7 21, 1982(Australia) November 26 December 10, 1982(Japan) May 2 June 12, 1983(Europe) June 21 October 25, 1983(North America) November 11 December 18, 1983(Europe) August 9 November 14, 1984(Europe) November 24, 1984 March 31, 1985(North America) January 11, 1985(Brazil Rock in Rio) April 14 25, 1985(Japan) May 2 10, 1985(Australia) May 23 July 5, 1985(United States)

1983

World Piece Tour

142

Piece of Mind

First full tour without supporting other bands. First tour with Nicko McBrain on drums.

198485 World Slavery Tour

193

Powerslave

First South America tour, including Rock in Rio. First tour within the Eastern Bloc. Performance in Long Beach, California, released in audio and video formats as Live After Death.

198687 Somewhere On September 10 December Tour 12, 1986(Europe) January 7 May 2, 1987(North America) May 11 21, 1987(Japan) 1988 Seventh Tour of a Seventh Tour April 28 December 12, 1988(Europe)

157

Somewhere in Time

101

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son

Birmingham NEC show released on audio and video as Maiden England. Last tour with Adrian Smith on guitar before returning in 1999. First tour with Janick Gers on guitar.

199091 No Prayer On The Road

September 19 December 22, 1990(Europe) January 13 March 19, 1991(North America) March 28 April 5, 1991(Japan) June 29 September 21, 1991(Europe) June 3 6, 1992(Europe) June 8 July 17, 1992(North America) July 23 August 4, 1992(South America) August 15 September 19, 1992(Europe) September 26 October 10, 1992(Central America) October 20 23, 1992(Oceania) October 26 November 4, 1992(Japan)

118

No Prayer for the Dying

1992

Fear Of The Dark Tour

68

Fear of the Dark

First Australia/New Zealand tour. Various performances released on audio as A Real Live Dead One. Monsters of Rock concert at Castle Donington, featuring a guest return appearance of Adrian Smith, released in album and video.

List of Iron Maiden concert tours

388
45 A Real Live One Last tour with Bruce Dickinson on vocals before returning in 1999. Dickinson's farewell show released on video as Raising Hell. First tour with Blaze Bayley on vocals. First and only tour in Israel and South Africa.

1993

Real Live Tour March 25 August 28, 1993(Europe)

199596 The X Factour

September 28 October 12, 1995(Africa/Middle East) October 14, 1995 February 2, 1996(Europe) February 8 April 5, 1996(North America) April 11 18, 1996(Japan) June 22 August 17, 1996(Europe) August 24 September 7, 1996(South America) April 22 May 30, 1998(Europe) June 26 August 9, 1998(North America) September 4 October 26, 1998(Europe) November 18 22, 1998(Japan) December 2 12, 1998(South America)

138

The X Factor

1998

Virtual XI World Tour

87

Virtual XI

First and only tour in Turkey. Last tour with Blaze Bayley on vocals.

1999

The Ed Hunter July 11 August 8, Tour 1999(North America) September 9 October 1, 1999(Europe) June 2 July 23, 2000(Europe) August 1 September 20, 2000(North America) October 19 29, 2000(Japan) November 2, 2000 January 7, 2001(Europe) January 9 19, 2001(North & South America) May 23 July 12, 2003(Europe) July 21 August 30, 2003(North America) October 19 21, 2003(Europe) January 11 17, 2004(South America) January 20 31, 2004(North America) February 5 8, 2004(Japan)

30

Ed Hunter

Return of Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith in the band. Adrian was absent from three concerts due to his father's funeral.

200001 Brave New World Tour

92

Brave New World

Rock in Rio performance released on audio and video.

2003

Give Me Ed... 'til I'm Dead Tour

56

Edward the Great Visions of the Beast Dance Of Death Performance at Dortmund released on audio and video as Death on the Road.

200304 Dance Of Death World Tour

53

List of Iron Maiden concert tours

389
45 The Early Days

2005

Eddie Rips Up The World Tour

May 28 July 9, 2005(Europe) July 15 August 20, 2005(North America) August 26 September 2, 2005(UK/Ireland)

Tour supporting The Early Days, celebrating Maiden's 25th anniversary of the release of their debut album. The setlist [1] consisted of songs from their first four albums. During the tour, Sharon Osbourne accused Dickinson of disrespecting the Ozzfest at the band's last Ozzfest performance. Repeatedly times, she turned off the P.A. system, and chanted "Ozzy! Ozzy!". Some members of the audience threw eggs at the band, to which Dickinson replied it was a premeditated assault organized by [2] insiders. A Matter of Life and Death album played in its entirety on select shows. First tour in India and Dubai.

200607 A Matter Of Life And Death Tour

October 4 October 21, 2006(North America) October 25 31, 2006(Japan) November 9 December 23, 2006(Europe) March 9 17, 2007(UAE/Europe/India) June 2 24, 2007(Europe) February 1 February 16, 2008(Australasia) February 19 March 12, 2008(Americas) March 14 June 21, 2008(North America) June 27, 2008 February 10, 2009(Europe) February 13 21, 2009(Asia/Oceania) February 25 April 2, 2009(North & South America) June 9 July 20, 2010(North America) July 30 August 19, 2010(Europe)

58

A Matter Of Life And Death

200809 Somewhere Back In Time World Tour

91

Somewhere Back in Time

First leg of tour recorded for the documentary film Iron Maiden: Flight 666.

2010

The Final Frontier World Tour

32

The Final Frontier

Support on the North American Leg will come from Dream Theater.

References
[1] "IRON MAIDEN: 'Eddie Rips Up the World' Tour Opener Setlist Revealed" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ BLABBERMOUTH. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=37364). Blabbermouth. 2005-05-28. . Retrieved 2010-01-01. [2] "Iron Maiden Pelted With Eggs At Final Ozzfest Performance" (http:/ / www. mtv. com/ news/ articles/ 1508028/ 20050822/ iron_maiden. jhtml?headlines=true). MTV. 2005-08-22. . Retrieved 2008-12-06.

Iron Maiden Tour

390

Iron Maiden Tour


Iron Maiden Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Locations Start date End date Shows Europe April 1, 1980 December 21, 1980 75 Iron Maiden tour chronology Metal for Muthas Tour (1980) Iron Maiden Tour (1980) Killers World Tour (1981)

The Iron Maiden Tour was a 1980 concert tour by Iron Maiden in support of their eponymous debut album. The band's first solo headlining tour, it followed the co-headlined Metal for Muthas Tour from earlier in the same year. The tour was broken into two legs, one from April 1 to August 23, the other from November 21 to December 21. From August 24 to October 16, the band supported Kiss on their Unmasked Tour. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Tour Dates
Date City First leg April 1 April 2 April 3 April 5 April 6 April 7 April 8 April 10 April 14 May 15 May 16 May 17 May 18 May 19 May 20 May 21 May 22 May 23 May 25 London, England London, England London, England Kortrijk, Belgium London, England Plymouth, England London, England Grimsby, England London, England Lincoln, England Rainbow Theatre Marquee Club Marquee Club Wheel Pop Festival The Bandwagon Fiesta The Ruskin Arms Central Hall The Ruskin Arms Drill Hall Venue

Newcastle upon Tyne, England Mayfair Ballroom Dunfermline, Scotland Ayr, Scotland Aberdeen, Scotland Carlisle, England Bradford, England Withernsea, England Cambridge, England Dunstable, England Kinema Ballroom Pavilion Music Hall Market Hall St George's Hall Grand Pavilion Corn Exchange Queensway Hall

Iron Maiden Tour

391
May 27 May 28 May 29 May 30 May 31 June 1 June 2 June 3 June 4 June 6 June 7 June 8 June 9 June 11 June 12 June 13 June 14 June 16 June 17 June 18 June 19 June 20 June 21 June 22 June 24 June 25 June 26 June 27 June 28 June 29 June 30 July 1 July 3 July 4 July 5 July 8 July 9 July 11 July 12 Blackburn, England Wolverhampton, England Hanley, England Swindon, England St Austell, England Bristol, England Malvern, England Portsmouth, England Cardiff, Wales West Runton, England Birmingham, England Sheffield, England Liverpool, England Sunderland, England Dundee, Scotland Glasgow, Scotland Middlesbrough, England Wakefield, England Leicester, England Chatham, England Guildford, England London, England Bracknell, England Swansea, Wales Norwich, England Derby, England Manchester, England Bath, England Oxford, England Brighton, England Poole, England Portsmouth, England London, England London, England London, England London, England London, England London, England London, England King George's Hall Wolverhampton Civic Hall Victoria Hall Brunnel's Room Cornwall Coliseum Locarno Winter Gardens Locarno Top Rank West Runton Pavilion Birmingham Odeon Top Rank Royal County Theatre Mecca Centre Caird Hall Apollo Theatre Town Hall Unity Hall De Montford Hall Central Hall Civic Hall Rainbow Theatre Sports Centre Brangwyn Hall St Andrews Hall Assembly Rooms Apollo Theatre Pavilion New Theatre Top Rank Arts Centre Locarno Marquee Club Marquee Club Marquee Club Marquee Club Marquee Club Marquee Club Marquee Club

Iron Maiden Tour

392
July 19 August 10 August 21 August 23 Oulu, Finland London, England West Runton, England Reading, England Second leg November 21 November 22 November 23 November 24 November 25 November 26 November 27 November 28 November 29 November 30 December 1 December 19 December 21 Uxbridge, England Brunel University Kuusrock Festival Global Village West Runton Pavilion Reading Festival

Leeds, England

Leeds University

Redcar, England

Coatham Bowl

Kingston upon Hull, England

City Hall

Newcastle upon Tyne, England City Halls

Birmingham, England

Birmingham Odeon

Derby, England

Assembly Rooms

Hanley, England

Victoria Hall

Sheffield, England

Sheffield University (Cancelled)

Manchester, England

Apollo Theatre

Nottingham, England London, England London, England

Rock City Marquee Club Rainbow Theatre

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour01_ironmaiden/ tour01_ironmaiden& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour01_ironmaiden/ dates01_ironmaiden& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ Iron_Maiden_Tour http:/ / www. maidenlive. com/ content/ view/ 18/ 10/ http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwtourdates

Killer World Tour

393

Killer World Tour


Killer World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Locations Europe Japan North America February 17, 1981 November 15, 1981 101 Iron Maiden tour chronology Iron Maiden Tour (1980) Killer World Tour (1981) The Beast On The Road (1982)

Start date End date Shows

The Killer World Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from February 17, 1981 to November 15, 1981. Towards the end of the tour, vocalist Paul DiAnno left and was replaced with Bruce Dickinson. During the North American leg of the tour, Iron Maiden supported Judas Priest on their World Wide Blitz Tour. [1]
[2] [3] [4] [5]

Tour dates
Date City Europe February 17 February 18 February 19 February 20 February 21 February 22 February 23 February 24 February 26 February 27 February 28 March 1 March 2 March 4 March 5 March 6 March 7 March 8 Ipswich, England Norwich, England Oxford, England Lancaster, England Derby, England Manchester, England Hanley, England Dunstable, England Guildford, England Bristol, England Taunton, England Bournemouth, England Southampton, England Bradford, England Liverpool, England Middlesbrough, England Newcastle upon Tyne, England Glasgow, Scotland Gaumont Hall University of East Anglia New Theatre Lancaster University Assembly Rooms Apollo Theatre Victoria Hall Queensway Hall Civic Hall Colston Hall Odeon Odeon Gaumont Theatre St George's Hall Empire Theatre Royal Court City Halls Apollo Theatre Venue

Killer World Tour

394
March 9 March 10 March 12 March 13 March 14 March 15 March 18 March 19 March 20 March 21 March 22 March 23 March 24 March 25 March 26 March 27 March 30 March 31 April 1 April 2 April 3 April 5 April 6 April 7 April 8 April 9 April 10 April 12 April 13 April 14 April 15 April 16 April 17 April 18 April 19 April 20 April 21 April 22 April 23 Edinburgh, Scotland Sheffield, England Birmingham, England Cambridge, England Bracknell, England London, England Lille, France Le Havre, France Reims, France Paris, France Paris, France Lyon, France Miramas, France Toulon, France Nice, France Montpellier, France Milan, Italy Reggio Emilia, Italy Brescia, Italy Gorizia, Italy Turin, Italy Zurich, Switzerland Munich, Germany Frankfurt, Germany Cologne, Germany Offenbach am Main, Germany Berlin, Germany Wrzburg, Germany Mannheim, Germany Villingen, Germany Karlsruhe, Germany Erlangen, Germany Strasbourg, France Mulhouse, France Douvaine, France Saarbrcken, Germany Bordeaux, France Bordeaux, France Orlans, France Odeon Theatre City Hall Odeon Corn Exchange Leisure Centre Hammersmith Odeon Palais St. Sauveur (Unknown) Maison des Sports Le Bataclan Le Bataclan Palais D'Hiver Salle des Ftes Patinoire Vert Cteau Thtre de Verdure Palais des Sports Rolling Stone (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) Volkshaus (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) Stadthalle Huxley's Neue Welt (Cancelled) (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) Hall Tivoli Palais des Ftes Salle de la Bulle Festival Colomiers Hall Salle du Grand Parc (Cancelled) Rothonde

Killer World Tour

395
April 24 April 25 April 26 April 27 April 28 April 29 April 30 May 2 May 3 May 4 May 5 May 6 May 7 May 8 May 9 May 10 Limburghal Cine Roma Stadsgehoorzaal De Klinker De Vereeniging Beat Club (Unknown) (Unknown) Ernst-Merck-Halle (Unknown) (Cancelled) (Unknown) (Cancelled) (Unknown) (Cancelled) Olympen (Cancelled) Gta Lejon (Cancelled) (Unknown) (Cancelled) Odd Fellow (Cancelled) Japan May 21 May 22 May 23 May 24 Tokyo, Japan Osaka, Japan Nagoya, Japan Tokyo, Japan Kosei Nenkin Hall Festival Hall Kosei Nenkin Hall Nakano Sun Plaza Hall North America June 14 June 19 June 21 June 22 June 26 Detroit, Michigan, United States Toronto, ON, Canada Montreal, QB, Canada Harpo's Concert Hall Le Club

Genk, Belgium Antwerp, Belgium Leiden, Netherlands Winschoten, Netherlands Nijmegen, Netherlands Bremen, Germany Hannover, Germany Dortmund, Germany Hamburg, Germany (Unknown), Germany (Unknown), Germany (Unknown), Germany Lund, Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Oslo, Norway Copenhagen, Denmark

Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States Summerfest Benefit Lynwood, Illinois, United States Europe Point East

August 15 August 16 August 22 August 23 August 26 August 27 August 29 August 31 September 1 September 6 September 8

Stuttgart, Germany Nuremberg, Germany Baarlo, Netherlands Darmstadt, Germany Frejus, France Cap d'Agde, France Bayonne, France Annecy, France Orange, France Belgrade, Yugoslavia Stockholm, Sweden

Canstadter Wasen Zeppelinfeld Sport Park Bllenfalltor Stadion Arenes Arenes Arenes Stadium Thtre antique d'Orange Hippodrome Draken

Killer World Tour

396
September 9 September 10 September 26 September 27 September 28 September 29 September 30 November 15 Lund, Sweden Copenhagen, Denmark Bologna, Italy Rome, Italy Florence, Italy Padova, Italy Milan, Italy London, England Olympen Odd Fellow(Paul Di'Anno's last concert) Palasport (Bruce Dickinson's first concert) Theatro Tenda Theatro Tenda Palasport Theatro Tenda Rainbow Theatre

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour02_killers/ tour02_killers& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour02_killers/ dates02_killers& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ Killer_World_Tour http:/ / www. maidenlive. com/ content/ view/ 19/ 11/ http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwtourdates

The Beast on the Road

397

The Beast on the Road


The Beast on the Road Tour by Iron Maiden Locations Europe North America Australia Japan 25 February 1982 10 December 1982 187 Iron Maiden tour chronology Killers World Tour (1981) The Beast On the Road (1982) World Piece Tour (1983)

Start date End date Shows

The Beast on the Road was a tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden, made in support of their album, The Number of the Beast in 1982. It is one of Iron Maiden's longest tours to date, only to be surpassed by the World Slavery Tour in length.

Tour dates
The Beast On The Road UK (February/March 1982)
Date 25/02/1982 26/02/1982 27/02/1982 28/02/1982 01/03/1982 03/03/1982 04/03/1982 05/03/1982 06/03/1982 08/03/1982 09/03/1982 10/03/1982 11/03/1982 12/03/1982 14/03/1982 15/03/1982 16/03/1982 17/03/1982 City Dunstable, England Huddersfield, England Venue Queensway Hall Huddersfield University

Wolverhampton, England Huddersfield University Hanley, England Bradford, England Birmingham, England Manchester, England Leicester, England Birmingham, England Portsmouth, England Oxford, England Derby, England Bristol, England Bracknell, England Glasgow, Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland Newcastle, England Sheffield, England Victoria Hall St George's Hall Royal Court Theatre Apollo Theatre De Montfort Hall Birmingham Odeon Guild Hall New Theatre Assembly Rooms Colston Hall Leisure Centre Apollo Theatre Playhouse Theatre City Hall City Hall

The Beast on the Road

398
19/03/1982 20/03/1982 Ipswich, England London, England Gaumont Hall Hammersmith Odeon

The Beast On The Road Europe (March/April 1982)


Date 22/03/1982 23/03/1982 24/03/1982 26/03/1982 27/03/1982 28/03/1982 30/03/1982 31/03/1982 02/04/1982 03/04/1982 04/04/1982 05/04/1982 06/04/1982 07/04/1982 08/04/1982 09/04/1982 10/04/1982 12/04/1982 13/04/1982 14/04/1982 15/04/1982 16/04/1982 17/04/1982 18/04/1982 20/04/1982 21/04/1982 22/04/1982 23/04/1982 24/04/1982 26/04/1982 27/04/1982 28/04/1982 29/04/1982 City Reims, France Lille, France Venue Palais des Sports Palais St Sauveurs

Nogent-sur-Marne, France Pavillon Baltard Lyon, France Palais D'Hiver

Clermont-Ferrand, France Maison des Sports Nice, France Montpellier, France Toulouse, France Barcelona, Spain Madrid, Spain San Sebastian, Spain Bergerac, France Le Mans, France Brest, France Poitiers, France Dijon, France Grenoble, France Winterthur, Switzerland Strasbourg, France Nancy, France Mulhouse, France Evry, France Rouen, France Brussels, Belgium Hanover, Germany Hamburg, Germany Bochum, Germany Wrzburg, Germany Nuremberg, Germany Munich, Germany Heidelberg, Germany Frankfurt, Germany Stuttgart, Germany Thatre de Verdure Palais des Sports Hall Comminges Palau Saint Jordi Palacio de los Deportes Velodrome Patinoire La Rotonde Parc des Expositions Arenas Maison des Sports Alp Expositions Stadthalle Tivoli Hall Parc des Expositions Salle des Ftes Agora Parc Des Expositions Forest National Niedersachsenhalle Messehalle 8 Ruhrlandhalle Kurachtalhalle Hemmerleinhalle Circus Krone Rhein-Neckar-Halle Stadthalle Sindelfinger Messehalle

The Beast on the Road

399
30/04/1982 Dsseldorf, Germany Philipshalle

Scorpions - Blackout Europe Tour (May 1982)


Date 01/05/1982 City Venue

Amsterdam, Netherlands Jaap Edenhall

Rainbow - Straight Between The Eyes US Tour (May 1982)


Date 11/05/1982 13/05/1982 14/05/1982 15/05/1982 16/05/1982 18/05/1982 20/05/1982 21/05/1982 22/05/1982 23/05/1982 25/05/1982 26/05/1982 29/05/1982 City Flint, Michigan, United States Venue IMA Auditorium

Grand Rapids, Michigan, United States Welsh Auditorium Detroit, Michigan, United States Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States Fort Wayne, Indiana, United States Toledo, Ohio, United States Cincinnati, Ohio, United States Louisville, Kentucky, United States Richfield, Ohio, United States Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Merrillville, Indiana, United States Davenport, Iowa, United States Des Moines, Iowa, United States Cobo Hall Wings Stadium Coliseum Toledo Sports Arena Cincinnati Gardens Memorial Auditorium Richfield Coliseum Convention Center Holiday Star Theater Palmer College Alumni Auditorium State Fairgrounds

38 Special - US Tour (June 1982)


Date 01/06/1982 02/06/1982 04/06/1982 05/06/1982 07/06/1982 08/06/1982 City Atlanta, Georgia, United States Nashville, Tennessee, United States (Omni) (Unknown) Venue

Birmingham, Alabama, United States (Boutwell Auditorium) Huntsville, Alabama, United States Knoxville, Tennessee, United States Columbus, Georgia, United States (Von Braun Center) (Unknown) (Columbus Municipal Auditorium) (Tallahassee Civic Center) Mid Hudson Civic Center (Unknown) (Barton Coliseum) (Tulsa Convention Center) (Hirsch Coliseum) (Unknown)

09/06/1982 11/06/1982 12/06/1982 15/06/1982 16/06/1982 18/06/1982 19/06/1982

Tallahassee, Florida, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Jackson, Tennessee, United States Little Rock, Arkansas, United States Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States Shreveport, Louisiana, United States Norman, Oklahoma, United States

The Beast on the Road The Rods(NYC) The Beast On The Road North America Tour (June 1982)
Date 22/06/1982 23/06/1982 24/06/1982 25/06/1982 26/06/1982 29/06/1982 30/06/1982 City Ottawa, ON, Canada Toronto, ON, Canada Kingston, ON, Canada Quebec City, QC, Canada Montreal, QC, Canada Venue Civic Centre Massey Hall Kingston Memorial Centre Quebec Coliseum Verdun Auditorium

400

New York, NY, United States Palladium Glen Cove, NY, United States North Stage Theater

Scorpions - Blackout North America Tour (July/August 1982)


Date 02/07/1982 03/07/1982 04/07/1982 06/07/1982 07/07/1982 09/07/1982 10/07/1982 11/07/1982 14/07/1982 16/07/1982 17/07/1982 18/07/1982 20/07/1982 21/07/1982 23/07/1982 24/07/1982 26/07/1982 27/07/1982 28/07/1982 30/07/1982 City Chicago, Illinois, United States Buffalo, New York, United States East Troy, Wisconsin, United States Danville, Illinois, United States Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Des Moines, Iowa, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Anaheim, California, United States Oakland, California, United States Victoria, BC, Canada Vancouver, BC, Canada Edmonton, AB, Canada Calgary, AB, Canada Regina, SK, Canada Winnipeg, MB, Canada Fargo, North Dakota, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Springfield, Illinois, United States Venue Circus Pavilion Buffalo Memorial Auditorium Alpine Valley Music Theater Danville Civic Center Five Seasons Arena Kiel Auditorium (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) Hec Edmundson Pavilion Anaheim Stadium Oakland Stadium Memorial Arena (Pacific Coliseum) Kinsmen Field House (Max Bell Arena) (Agridome) Ipsco Place (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown)

31/07/1982

Prairie Capital Convention Center Market Square Arena Richfield Coliseum Ohio Center

01/08/1982 03/08/1982 04/08/1982

Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Cleveland, Ohio, United States Columbus, Ohio, United States

The Beast on the Road The Beast On The Road North America Tour (August 1982)
Date 05/08/1982 City Venue

401

Chicago, Illinois, United States Chicagofest - Navy Pier

Scorpions - Blackout North America Tour (August 1982)


Date 06/08/1982 07/08/1982 08/08/1982 10/08/1982 11/08/1982 13/08/1982 14/08/1982 16/08/1982 17/08/1982 18/08/1982 City Louisville, Kentucky, United States Toledo, Ohio, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Beaumont, Texas, United States Venue (Unknown) Sports Arena North Hall Auditorium Beaumont Civic Center

Corpus Christi, Texas, United States Memorial Coliseum Houston, Texas, United States Dallas, Texas, United States San Antonio, Texas, United States Odessa, Texas, United States El Paso, Texas, United States The Summit Reunion Arena Convention Center Arena Ector County Coliseum (Unknown)

The Beast On The Road Europe Tour (August 1982)


Date 25/08/1982 City Venue

Chippenham, England Gold Diggers Club Poole, England Reading, England Arts Centre Reading Festival

26/08/1982 28/08/1982

Scorpions - Blackout North America Tour (September 1982)


Date 01/09/1982 03/09/1982 04/09/1982 05/09/1982 07/09/1982 09/09/1982 11/09/1982 12/09/1982 City Venue

Long Beach, California, United States Long Beach Arena Sacramento, California, United States Memorial Auditorium Oakland, California, United States Reno, Nevada, United States Boise, Idaho, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Portland, Oregon, United States Portland, Oregon, United States Oakland Coliseum (Centennial Coliseum) (Unknown) Seattle Center Coliseum (Coliseum) (Coliseum)

The Beast on the Road Judas Priest - Screaming For Vengeance US Tour (September/October 1982)
Date 14/09/1982 15/09/1982 16/09/1982 17/09/1982 19/09/1982 21/09/1982 22/09/1982 23/09/1982 25/09/1982 26/09/1982 28/09/1982 29/09/1982 01/10/1982 02/10/1982 03/10/1982 06/10/1982 07/10/1982 08/10/1982 09/10/1982 11/10/1982 12/10/1982 13/10/1982 15/10/1982 16/10/1982 City St Louis, Missouri, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Lincoln, Nebraska, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Rockford, Illinois, United States Chicago, Illinois, United States Richfield, Ohio, United States Trotwood, Ohio, United States Detroit, Michigan, United States Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States Huntington, West Virginia, United States Columbus, Ohio, United States Worcester, Massachusetts, United States New York, New York, United States Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, United States Portland, Maine, United States Providence, Rhode Island, United States Glens Falls, New York, United States New Haven, Connecticut, United States Binghamton, New York, United States Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States Buffalo, New York, United States Syracuse, New York, United States Venue Kiel Auditorium Municipal Auditorium (Pershing Auditorium) Metro Center (Unknown) Chicago Stadium Richfield Coliseum Hara Arena Cobo Hall Wings Stadium (Civic Center) Ohio Center The Centrum Madison Square Garden City Island Civic Center Civic Center Civic Center New Haven Coliseum Broome County Arena The Spectrum Civic Arena Memorial Auditorium Onondaga War Memorial Capitol Center Civic Center Civic Center (Unknown)

402

17/10/1982 19/10/1982 20/10/1982 21/10/1982 22/10/1982 23/10/1982

Landover, Maryland, United States Baltimore, Maryland, United States Salisbury, Maryland, United States Norfolk, Virginia, United States

East Rutherford, New Jersey, United States Brendan Byrne Arena Rochester, New York, United States War Memorial

The Beast on the Road The Beast On The Road Australia Tour (November 1982)
Date 07/11/1982 08/11/1982 09/11/1982 12/11/1982 14/11/1982 15/11/1982 16/11/1982 19/11/1982 20/11/1982 21/11/1982 City Sydney, Australia Sydney, Australia Venue (Unknown) (Unknown)

403

Newcastle, Australia (Unknown) Adelaide, Australia Adelaide Town Hall

Melbourne, Australia Palais Theatre Melbourne, Australia Palais Theatre Brisbane, Australia Canberra, Australia Sydney, Australia Sydney, Australia (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown)

The Beast On The Road Japan Tour (November/December 1982)


Date 26/11/1982 27/11/1982 29/11/1982 30/11/1982 01/12/1982 02/12/1982 04/12/1982 07/12/1982 City Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Osaka, Japan Kyoto, Japan Venue (Unknown) Nakano Sun Plaza Hall Festival Hall (Unknown)

Nagoya, Japan City Kokaido Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Sapporo, Japan Sapporo, Japan Niigata, Japan Shibuya Public Hall Shibuya Public Hall (Unknown)

08/12/1982

(Unknown)

10/12/1982

(Unknown)

References
Iron Maiden The Beast On The Road Tour [1]

References
[1] http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=tour03_notb/ dates03_notb& lang=eng& link=tours

World Piece Tour

404

World Piece Tour


World Piece Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows May 02, 1983 December 18, 1983 142 Iron Maiden tour chronology The Beast On The Road (1982) World Piece Tour (1983) World Slavery Tour (1984/85)

The World Piece Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from May 2, 1983 to December 18, 1983. The tour was in support of the band's fourth album Piece of Mind.

World Piece Tour


World Piece Tour UK (May 1983)
Date 02/05/1983 03/05/1983 05/05/1983 11/05/1983 City Hull, England Preston, England Oxford, England Bradford, England Venue Hull City Hall Guildhall New Theatre St George's Hall, Bradford Apollo Theatre Edinburgh Playhouse St David's Hall Sheffield City Hall Newcastle City Hall Victoria Hall Colston Hall

12/05/1983 13/05/1983 15/05/1983 16/05/1983 17/05/1983 18/05/1983 20/05/1983 21/05/1983 22/05/1983 23/05/1983 25/05/1983 26/05/1983 27/05/1983 28/05/1983

Glasgow, Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland Cardiff, Wales Sheffield, England Newcastle, England Hanley, England Bristol, England

Birmingham, England Birmingham Odeon Birmingham, England Birmingham Odeon Manchester, England London, England London, England London, England London, England Manchester Apollo Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon

World Piece Tour World Piece Tour Europe (June 1983)


Date 01/06/1983 03/06/1983 04/06/1983 05/06/1983 07/06/1983 09/06/1983 10/06/1983 11/06/1983 12/06/1983 City Helsinki, Finland Gothenburg, Sweden Drammen, Norway Stockholm, Sweden Copenhagen, Denmark Kerkrade, Netherlands Jhalli Scandinavium Drammenshallen Isstadion Falkoner Theatre Rodahal (Cancelled) Venue

405

Schifflange, Luxembourg Hall Polyvalent Brussels, Belgium Amsterdam, Netherlands Forest National (Cancelled) Jaap Edenhall

World Piece Tour North America (June 1983 - October 1983)


Date 21/06/1983 22/06/1983 23/06/1983 24/06/1983 27/06/1983 28/06/1983 29/06/1983 02/07/1983 03/07/1983 05/07/1983 07/07/1983 08/07/1983 09/07/1983 11/07/1983 12/07/1983 13/07/1983 14/07/1983 16/07/1983 17/07/1983 20/07/1983 22/07/1983 23/07/1983 24/07/1983 26/07/1983 City Casper, Wyoming, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Boise, Idaho, United States Spokane, Washington, United States Portland, Oregon, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Daly City, California, United States Sacramento, California, United States Fresno, California, United States San Bernardino, California, United States San Diego, California, United States Los Angeles, California, United States Tucson, Arizona, United States Phoenix, Arizona, United States Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States Denver, Colorado, United States Lubbock, Texas, United States Amarillo, Texas, United States El Paso, Texas, United States Norman, Oklahoma, United States Dallas, Texas, United States Houston, Texas, United States Corpus Christi, Texas, United States Venue Casper Events Center Salt Palace Boise State University Spokane Coliseum Portland Coliseum Seattle Center Coliseum Pacific Coliseum Cow Palace Memorial Auditorium Selland Arena Orange Pavilion San Diego Sports Arena Long Beach Arena Tucson Convention Center Phoenix Coliseum Tingley Coliseum McNichols Sports Arena Lubbock Memorial Civic Center Amarillo Civic Center El Paso Coliseum Lloyd Noble Center Dallas Convention Center Sam Houston Coliseum Corpus Christi Coliseum

World Piece Tour

406
27/07/1983 29/07/1983 30/07/1983 31/07/1983 01/08/1983 02/08/1983 06/08/1983 07/08/1983 09/08/1983 10/08/1983 11/08/1983 13/08/1983 14/08/1983 15/08/1983 16/08/1983 18/08/1983 19/08/1983 20/08/1983 23/08/1983 24/08/1983 25/08/1983 26/08/1983 27/08/1983 San Antonio, Texas, United States Shreveport, Louisiana, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Little Rock, Arkansas, United States Nashville, Tennessee, United States Louisville, Kentucky, United States East Troy, Wisconsin, United States Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Fort Wayne, Indiana, United States Kalamazoo, Michigan, United States Detroit, Michigan, United States Erie, Pennsylvania, United States Richfield, Ohio, United States Buffalo, New York, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Largo, Maryland, United States Glens Falls, New York, United States Syracuse, New York, United States Uniondale, New York, United States New Haven, Connecticut, United States South Yarmouth, Massachusetts, United States Portland, Maine, United States Providence, Rhode Island, United States Poughkeepsie, New York, United States Rochester, New York, United States Maple, Ontario, Canada Montral, Quebec, Canada Chicoutimi, Quebec, Canada Quebec City, Quebec, Canada Toledo, Ohio, United States Lansing, Michigan, United States Madison, Wisconsin, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Calgary, Alberta, Canada Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Lincoln, Nebraska, United States Convention Center Arena Hirsch Memorial Coliseum Cook Convention Center Barton Coliseum Nashville Municipal Auditorium Louisville Gardens Alpine Valley Market Square Arena Fort Wayne Mad Ants Wings Stadium Cobo Arena Civic Center Coliseum at Richfield Buffalo Memorial Auditorium Mellon Arena Fairgrounds Spectrum Capital Centre Glens Falls Civic Center War Memorial at Oncenter Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum New Haven Coliseum Cape Cod Coliseum

29/08/1983 30/08/1983 31/08/1983 01/09/1983 05/09/1983 06/09/1983 07/09/1983 08/09/1983 10/09/1983 11/09/1983 13/09/1983 14/09/1983 15/09/1983 19/09/1983 20/09/1983 25/09/1983

Cumberland County Civic Center Mid-Hudson Civic Center Blue Cross Arena Kingswood Music Theatre Verdun Auditorium Georges Vizina Centre Colise Pepsi Toledo Sports Arena Civic Center Alliant Energy Center Metro Centre Winnipeg Arena Stampede Corral Northland Coliseum Pershing Auditorium (Cancelled)

World Piece Tour

407
26/09/1983 27/09/1983 29/09/1983 30/09/1983 01/10/1983 02/10/1983 04/10/1983 08/10/1983 09/10/1983 10/10/1983 12/10/1983 14/10/1983 15/10/1983 16/10/1983 18/10/1983 19/10/1983 20/10/1983 21/10/1983 23/10/1983 24/10/1983 25/10/1983 Kansas City, Missouri, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Peoria, Illinois, United States Chicago, Illinois, United States Cincinnati, Ohio, United States Columbus, Ohio, United States Baltimore, Maryland, United States New York, New York, United States Norfolk, Virginia, United States Charleston, West Virginia, United States Columbia, South Carolina, United States Miami, Florida, United States Jacksonville, Florida, United States Lakeland, Florida, United States Johnson City, Tennessee, United States Knoxville, Tennessee, United States Charlotte, North Carolina, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Lincoln, Nebraska, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Memorial Auditorium (Cancelled) Kiel Auditorium (Cancelled) Peoria Civic Center UIC Pavilion Cincinnati Gardens Battelle Hall 1st Mariner Arena Madison Square Garden Norfolk Scope Charleston Civic Center Carolina Coliseum Hollywood Sportatorium Jacksonville Memorial Coliseum Lakeland Center Freedom Hall James White Civic Coliseum Charlotte Coliseum Omni Coliseum Pershing Auditorium Memorial Auditorium Kiel Auditorium

World Piece Tour Europe (November 1983 - December 1983)


Date 05/11/1983 07/11/1983 08/11/1983 09/11/1983 10/11/1983 11/11/1983 14/11/1983 15/11/1983 17/11/1983 18/11/1983 19/11/1983 20/11/1983 22/11/1983 24/11/1983 25/11/1983 City Kerkrade, Netherlands Hannover, Germany Hamburg, Germany Kiel, Germany Bremen, Germany Kerkrade, Netherlands Brussels, Belgium Rouen, France Paris, France Besanon, France Rodahal Niedersachsenhalle Ernst-Merck-Halle Ostseehalle Stadthalle Rodahal (Cancelled) Forest National Parc des Exposition Espace Balard Palais des Sports Venue

Clermont-Ferrand, France Maison des Sports Lyon, France Barcelona, Spain Madrid, Spain Madrid, Spain Palais d'Hiver Sports Palace Real Madrid Pavilion Real Madrid Pavilion

World Piece Tour

408
27/11/1983 30/11/1983 01/12/1983 02/12/1983 03/12/1983 04/12/1983 06/12/1983 07/12/1983 08/12/1983 09/12/1983 10/12/1983 11/12/1983 12/12/1983 13/12/1983 17/12/1983 18/12/1983 Velodrome Anoeta Olympiahalle Hemmerleinhalle Hemmerleinhalle s.Oliver Arena Philipshalle Donauhalle Friedrich-Ebert-Halle Schleyerhalle Westfalenhalle 3 Walter-Kbel-Halle Palais de Beaulieu Palazzo dello Sport (Cancelled) Palalido (Cancelled) Westfalenhalle Westfalenhalle

San Sebastian, Spain Munich, Germany Nuremberg, Germany Nuremberg, Germany Wrzburg, Germany Dsseldorf, Germany Ulm, Germany Ludwigshafen, Germany Stuttgart, Germany Dortmund, Germany Rsselsheim, Germany Lausanne, Switzerland Padova, Italy Milan, Italy Dortmund, Germany Dortmund, Germany

World Slavery Tour

409

World Slavery Tour


World Slavery Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows August 9, 1984 July 5, 1985 193 Iron Maiden tour chronology World Piece Tour (1983) World Slavery Tour (1984/85) Somewhere On Tour (1986/87)

The World Slavery Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from August 9, 1984 to July 5, 1985 ending at Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre in Irvine, California. The tour was in support of the band's fifth album Powerslave, which was completed before the tour. It was one of the longest tours in rock history. Though the tour itself was very successful, by its end in 1985, it had left the band exhausted and led to a break for the rest of the year before the band started work on Somewhere In Time in 1986. The tour lasted 331 days and 193 gigs. Some of the original props from the tour, like the sarcophagi, can be seen in Eddie's Bar in Portugal. Iron Maiden's live album Live After Death was recorded during this tour, during the band's four shows at London's Hammersmith Odeon in October 1984 and four shows at the Long Beach Arena in Long Beach, California in March 1985. A documentary video Behind the Iron Curtain was filmed during the first few shows in August 1984, which lead the band through Poland, Hungary, Yugoslavia and Czechoslovakia for the first time in their career. The band's 2008-2009 tour, Somewhere Back In Time World Tour, has a set that is very similar to that used on the World Slavery Tour. They played in 24 countries. Several dates in South Africa were cancelled due to the name of the tour.

World Slavery Tour


European Leg One
Date 08/09/1984 08/10/1984 08/11/1984 08/12/1984 08/14/1984 08/16/1984 08/17/1984 08/18/1984 08/19/1984 08/21/1984 08/22/1984 08/25/1984 City Warsaw, Poland Lodz, Poland Poznan, Poland Wroclaw, Poland Katowice, Poland Vienna, Austria Budapest, Hungary Venue Towar Sports Hall Sporthall Aleja Politechniki Poznan Arena Folks Hall Sporthall Makoszowy Aichfeldhall Sportzentram Budapest Sports Hall

Belgrade, Yugoslavia Sajam Exhibition Centre Ljubljana, Yugoslavia Dvorana Tivoli Pordenone, Italy Pietra Ligure, Italy Annecy, France Parcogalavani F.C. Stadium Parc des Expositions

World Slavery Tour

410
08/26/1984 08/29/1984 08/31/1984 09/01/1984 09/03/1984 09/05/1984 09/07/1984 09/08/1984 Arennes de Palavas Pabellon de los Deportes Pavilhao Infante de Sagres Pavilhao Dramatico Estadio Roman Valero Palacio de los Deportes Palais des Sports Palais des Sports

Palavas, France San Sebastian, Spain Porto, Portugal Cascais, Portugal Madrid, Spain Barcelona, Spain Toulouse, France Bordeaux, France

UK Leg
Date 09/11/1984 09/12/1984 09/13/1984 09/15/1984 09/16/1984 09/17/1984 09/18/1984 09/20/1984 09/21/1984 09/22/1984 09/23/1984 09/25/1984 09/26/1984 09/27/1984 09/29/1984 09/30/1984 10/02/1984 10/03/1984 10/05/1984 City Glasgow, Scotland Aberdeen, Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland Newcastle, England Newcastle, England Sheffield, England Ipswich, England Leicester, England Oxford, England St. Austell, England Bristol, England Manchester, England Manchester, England Hanley, England Nottingham, England Cardiff, Wales Birmingham, England Birmingham, England Southampton, England Cardiff, Wales London, England Venue The Apollo Capitol Theatre The Playhouse Newcastle City Hall Newcastle City Hall Sheffield City Hall Gaumont Theatre De Monfort Hall Apollo Theatre Cornwall Coliseum The Hippodrome Manchester Apollo Manchester Apollo Victoria Hall Royal Concert Hall St. David's Hall Birmingham Odeon Birmingham Odeon Mayflower Theatre

10/07/1984 10/08/1984

St. David's Hall Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon

10/09/1984

London, England

10/10/1984

London, England

10/12/1984

London, England

World Slavery Tour European Leg Two


Date 10/15/1984 10/16/1984 10/17/1984 10/19/1984 10/20/1984 10/21/1984 City Cologne, Germany Bblingen, Germany Heidelberg, Germany Wurzburg, Germany Brussels, Belgium Nancy, France Venue Sporthalle Sporthalle Rhein-Neckar Halle Carl Diem Halle Forest National Parc des Expositions Stadthalle Olympiahalle Grugahalle Stadthalle Ljsselhal Espace Balard Broendbyhallen

411

10/23/1984 10/24/1984 10/26/1984 10/27/1984 10/28/1984 10/29/1984 11/01/1984

Freiburg, Germany Munich, Germany Essen, Germany Bremen, Germany Zwolle, Nerthelands Paris, France Copenhagen, Denmark Stockholm, Sweden Gothenburg, Sweden Helsinki, Finland Russelheim, Germany Nuremburg, Germany Bologna, Italy Milan, Italy Lyon, France Basel, Switzerland

11/02/1984 11/03/1984 11/05/1984 11/08/1984 11/09/1984 11/11/1984 11/12/1984 11/13/1984 11/14/1984

Isstadion Scandinavium Ishallen Walter Koebel Halle Hammerleinhalle Teatre Tenda Teatre Tenda Hall Tony Garnier St. Jakob Sporthall

North American Leg One


Date 11/24/1984 11/26/1984 11/27/1984 11/28/1984 11/30/1984 12/01/1984 12/03/1984 12/04/1984 12/06/1984 12/07/1984 City Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Quebec City, Quebec, Canada Montreal, Quebec, Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Sudbury, Ontario, Canada Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Calgary, Alberta, Canada Venue Metro Centre Colise Pepsi Montreal Forum Ottawa Civic Centre Maple Leaf Gardens Sudbury Arena Winnipeg Arena Agri Dome Northlands Coliseum Stampede Corral

World Slavery Tour

412
12/09/1984 12/10/1984 12/11/1984 12/13/1984 12/15/1984 12/17/1984 12/18/1984 12/19/1984 12/20/1984 12/21/1984 01/03/1985 01/04/1985 01/05/1985 01/06/1985 01/07/1985 01/11/1985 01/14/1985 01/15/1985 01/17/1985 01/18/1985 01/19/1985 01/20/1985 01/21/1985 01/23/1985 01/24/1985 01/25/1985 01/28/1985 01/29/1985 01/31/1985 02/01/1985 02/02/1985 02/03/1985 02/05/1985 02/06/1985 02/08/1985 02/09/1985 02/10/1985 02/12/1985 02/14/1985 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Seattle, Washington, United States Portland, Oregon, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Denver, Colorado, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States St. Louis, Missouri, United States Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Chicago, Illinois, United States Cincinnati, Ohio, United States Detroit, Michigan, United States Columbus, Ohio, United States Cleveland, Ohio, United States Buffalo, New York, United States Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Hartford, Connecticut, United States Worcester, Massachusetts, United States New York City, New York, United States New York City, New York, United States New York City, New York, United States New York City, New York, United States New York City, New York, United States New York City, New York, United States New York City, New York, United States Bethlehem, Pennsylvania, United States Landover, Maryland, United States Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Columbia, South Carolina, United States Johnson City, Tennessee, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Nashville, Tennessee, United States Knoxville, Tennessee, United States Charlotte, North Carolina, United States PNE Coliseum Seattle Coliseum Portland Coliseum Salt Palace McNichols Sports Arena Kemper Arena Kiel Auditorium Mecca Arena Metro Centre Rosemont Horizon Cincinnati Gardens Joe Louis Arena Battelle Hall Richfield Coliseum Memorial Auditorium Rock In Rio Hartford Civic Center The Centrum Radio City Music Hall Radio City Music Hall Radio City Music Hall Radio City Music Hall Radio City Music Hall Radio City Music Hall Radio City Music Hall Stabler Arena Capitol Center The Spectrum Carolina Coliseum Freedom Hall The Omni Mid South Coliseum Municipal Auditorium Civic Coliseum Coliseum

Greensboro, North Carolina, United States Coliseum Greenville, South Carolina, United States Jacksonville, Florida, United States Fort Myers, Florida, United States Auditorium Memorial Coliseum Lee County Arena

World Slavery Tour

413
02/15/1985 02/16/1985 02/17/1985 02/19/1985 02/20/1985 02/21/1985 02/23/1985 02/24/1985 02/27/1985 02/28/1985 03/01/1985 03/02/1985 03/04/1985 03/05/1985 03/07/1985 03/08/1985 03/09/1985 03/10/1985 03/14/1985 03/15/1985 03/16/1985 03/17/1985 03/19/1985 03/20/1985 03/21/1985 03/23/1985 03/24/1985 03/25/1985 03/26/1985 03/31/1985 Hollywood, Florida, United States Lakeland, Florida, United States St. Petersburg, Florida, United States Chattanooga, Tennessee, United States Birmingham, Alabama, United States Huntsville, Alabama, United States Beaumont, Texas, United States Biloxi, Mississippi, United States New Orleans, Louisiana, United States Houston, Texas, United States Waco, Texas, United States Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Dallas, Texas, United States San Antonio, Texas, United States Lubbock, Texas, United States El Paso, Texas, United States Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States Tucson, Arizona, United States Long Beach, California, United States Long Beach, California, United States Long Beach, California, United States Long Beach, California, United States Reno, Nevada, United States Fresno, California, United States San Francisco, California, United States San Diego, California, United States Tempe, Arizona, United States Las Vegas, Nevada, United States San Bernardino, California, United States Honolulu, Oahu, Hawaii, United States Sportatorium Lakeland Center Bayfront Center UTC Arena Boutwell Auditorium Von Braun Center Civic Center Mississippi Coast Coliseum Lakefront Arena The Summit Waco Convention Center Myriad Convention Center Reunion Arena Convention Center Arena Municipal Coliseum El Paso Coliseum Tingley Coliseum Tucson Community Center Long Beach Arena Long Beach Arena Long Beach Arena Long Beach Arena Lawlor Events Center Selland Arena Cow Palace San Diego Sports Arena Compton Terrace Thomas & Mack Center Orange Pavilion Neal Blaisdell Center

Pacific Leg

World Slavery Tour

414

Date 04/14/1985 04/15/1985 04/17/1985 04/19/1985 04/20/1985 04/22/1985 04/24/1985 04/25/1985 05/02/1985 05/03/1985 05/04/1985 05/06/1985 05/07/1985 05/08/1985 05/10/1985

City Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Nagoya, Japan Fukuoka, Japan Osaka, Japan Tokyo, Japan Canberra, Australia Melbourne, Australia Adelaide, Australia

Venue Nakano Sun Plaza Hall Nakano Sun Plaza Hall Koseinenkin Hall Koseinenkin Hall Kokaido Hall Sun Palace Festival Hall Nakano Sun Plaza Hall Civic Theatre Festival Hall Thebarton Town Hall

Woollongong, Australia Shellharbour Sydney, Australia Newcastle, Australia Brisbane, Australia Hordern Pavilion City Hall Festival Hall

North American Leg Two


Date 05/23/1985 05/24/1985 05/25/1985 05/27/1985 05/28/1985 05/29/1985 05/31/1985 06/01/1985 06/02/1985 06/04/1985 06/05/1985 06/07/1985 06/08/1985 06/09/1985 06/11/1985 06/12/1985 06/14/1985 06/15/1985 06/16/1985 City Portland, Maine, United States Uniondale, New York, United States Binghamton, New York, United States Rochester, New York, United States Glens Falls, New York, United States Venue Cumberland County Civic Center Nassau Coliseum Broom County Arena War Memorial Civic Center

Springfield, Massachusetts, United States Civic Center New Haven, Connecticut, United States Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States Providence, Rhode Island, United States Columbia, Maryland, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States Dayton, Ohio, United States Evansville, Indiana, United States East Troy, Wisconsin, United States Toledo, Ohio, United States Detroit, Michigan, United States Saginaw, Michigan, United States Charlevoix, Michigan, United States Hoffman Estates, Illinois, United States New Haven Coliseum Fairgrounds Civic Center Merriweather Post Pavilion Civic Arena Hara Arena Mesker Music Theater Apline Valley Music Theater Sports Arena Pine Knob Music Theater Wendler Arena Castle Farms Music Theater Poplar Creek Music Theater

World Slavery Tour

415
06/18/1985 06/19/1985 06/21/1985 06/22/1985 06/23/1985 06/24/1985 06/26/1985 06/27/1985 06/29/1985 07/03/1985 07/04/1985 07/05/1985 Peoria, Illinois, United States Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States Madison, Wisconsin, United States Green Bay, Wisconsin, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Fargo, North Dakota, United States Des Moines, Iowa, United States Omaha, Nebraska, United States Denver, Colorado, United States San Jose, California, United States Sacramento, California, United States Laguna Hills, California, United States Civic Center Five Seasons Center Dane County Coliseum Brown County Arena Trout Aire Amphitheatre Red River Fairgrounds Veterans Memorial Auditorium Civic Auditorium Red Rocks Amphitheatre Civic Auditorium Cal Expo Amphitheatre Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre

Setlist of the tour


1. Churchill's Speech 2. Aces High 3. 2 Minutes to Midnight 4. The Trooper 5. Revelations 6. Flight of Icarus 7. Rime of the Ancient Mariner 8. Powerslave 9. The Number of the Beast 10. Hallowed Be Thy Name 11. Iron Maiden 12. Run to the Hills 13. Running Free 14. Sanctuary (Was played at certain venues) On the 1984 European leg of the tour, as well as certain dates on the American leg (most notably the dates at Radio City Music Hall in New York City) an additional song was usually played between "Revelations" and "Flight of Icarus". Among the songs that were performed: Wrathchild, Murders in the Rue Morgue, Phantom of the Opera, or Die With Your Boots On. The European leg of the tour also saw the band play "Los'fer Words", which was dropped before the American leg of the tour. Additionally, "22 Acacia Avenue" was played early on in the European leg but was also dropped prior to the American leg of the tour. Dave Murray would also perform a guitar solo immediately following "Powerslave".

Somewhere on Tour

416

Somewhere on Tour
Somewhere On Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows September 10, 1986 May 21, 1987 157 Iron Maiden tour chronology World Slavery Tour (1984/85) Somewhere On Tour (1986/87) Seventh Tour of a Seventh Tour (1988)

The Somewhere On Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from September 10, 1986 to May 21, 1987.

Setlist of the Tour


1. Intro: Theme from Blade Runner 2. Caught Somewhere in Time 3. 2 Minutes To Midnight 4. Sea Of Madness 5. Children Of The Damned 6. Stranger In A Strange Land 7. Wasted Years 8. Rime of the Ancient Mariner 9. Guitar solo "Walking On Glass" 10. Where Eagles Dare 11. Heaven Can Wait 12. Phantom Of The Opera 13. Hallowed Be Thy Name 14. Iron Maiden 15. The Number Of The Beast 16. Run To The Hills 17. Running Free 18. Sanctuary On the American leg of the tour, Sea of Madness was dropped from setlist. At the beginning of the tour, The Loneliness Of The Long Distance Runner was played only once.

Tour dates
Somewhere On Tour Japan (May 1987)

Somewhere on Tour

417

Date 11/05/1987 13/05/1987 15/05/1987 16/05/1987 18/05/1987 20/05/1987 21/05/1987

City Nagoya, Japan Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Kyoto, Japan

Venue Kokaido Hall Budokan NHK Hall Kyoto Kaikan

Hiroshima, Japan Kosei Nenkin Kaikan Osaka, Japan Osaka, Japan Festival Hall Festival Hall

7th Tour of a 7th Tour

418

7th Tour of a 7th Tour


7th Tour Of A 7th Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows 28 April 1988 12 December 1988 101 Iron Maiden tour chronology Somewhere On Tour (1986/87) 7th Tour Of A 7th Tour (1988) No Prayer On The Road (1990/91)

The 7th Tour Of A 7th Tour was a world tour conducted by British heavy metal band Iron Maiden in 1988.

Opening bands
Opening bands for this tour were: David Lee Roth; Metallica; Anthrax; Megadeth; Guns N' Roses; W.A.S.P.; Helloween; Killer Dwarfs; Ossian; Trust; Great White; L.A. Guns; Backstreet Girls (replaced Helloween in Norway); Ace Frehley's Comet.

7th Tour Of A 7th Tour


Charlotte And The Harlots World Tour (April 1988 - May 1988)
Date 28/04/1988 29/04/1988 08/05/1988 City Cologne, Germany Cologne, Germany Venue Empire Club (Secret Concert) Empire Club (Secret Concert)

Brooklyn, New York, United States L'Amour (Secret Concert)

7th Tour Of A 7th Tour North America (May 1988 - August 1988)
Date 13/05/1988 14/05/1988 16/05/1988 17/05/1988 18/05/1988 20/05/1988 23/05/1988 25/05/1988 27/05/1988 30/05/1988 31/05/1988 City Moncton, New Brunswick, Canada Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Quebec, Quebec, Canada Montral, Quebec, Canada Ottawa, Ontario, Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Calgary, Alberta, Canada Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada Spokane, Washington, United States Venue Moncton Coliseum Halifax Metro Centre Colise Pepsi Montreal Forum Ottawa Civic Centre C.N.E. Band Shell Winnipeg Arena Northlands Coliseum Olympic Saddledome Pacific Coliseum Spokane Coliseum

7th Tour of a 7th Tour

419
01/06/1988 03/06/1988 05/06/1988 06/06/1988 08/06/1988 09/06/1988 10/06/1988 12/06/1988 13/06/1988 14/06/1988 15/06/1988 17/06/1988 18/06/1988 19/06/1988 21/06/1988 22/06/1988 23/06/1988 25/06/1988 27/06/1988 28/06/1988 29/06/1988 01/07/1988 02/07/1988 03/07/1988 05/07/1988 06/07/1988 08/07/1988 10/07/1988 13/07/1988 15/07/1988 16/07/1988 17/07/1988 19/07/1988 20/07/1988 22/07/1988 24/07/1988 26/07/1988 27/07/1988 29/07/1988 Seattle, Washington, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Mountain View, California, United States Sacramento, California, United States Laguna Hills, California, United States Laguna Hills, California, United States San Diego, California, United States Inglewood, California, United States Phoenix, Arizona, United States Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States Denver, Colorado, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Omaha, Nebraska, United States Bloomington, Minnesota, United States Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States Chicago, Illinois, United States East Troy, Wisconsin, United States Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Columbus, Ohio, United States Cincinnati, Ohio, United States Saginaw, Michigan, United States Detroit, Michigan, United States Cleveland, Ohio, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States Poughkeepsie, New York, United States Seattle Center Arena Salt Palace Shoreline Amphitheatre Cal Expo Amphitheater Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre Sports Arena The Forum Compton Terrace Tingley Coliseum McNichols Sports Arena Kiel Auditorium Kemper Arena Omaha Civic Auditorium Metro Center Five Seasons Center Allstate Arena Alpine Valley Music Theatre Market Square Arena Battelle Hall Cincinnati Gardens Dow Event Center Joe Louis Arena Coliseum at Richfield Civic Arena Mid-Hudson Civic Center

East Rutherford, New Jersey, United States Brendan Byrne Arena Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States New Haven, Connecticut, United States Uniondale, New York, United States Troy, New York, United States Worcester, Massachusetts, United States Portland, Maine, United States Providence, Rhode Island, United States Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Landover, Maryland, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Fort Worth, Texas, United States Frank Stabler Arena (Cancelled) New Haven Coliseum Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum RPI Fieldhouse Centrum Cumberland County Civic Center Civic Center Spectrum Capitol Center (Cancelled) Fox Theater (Cancelled) Fox Theater Tarrant County

7th Tour of a 7th Tour

420
30/07/1988 31/07/1988 02/08/1988 04/08/1988 05/08/1988 06/08/1988 07/08/1988 08/08/1988 09/08/1988 10/08/1988 Austin, Texas, United States Houston, Texas, United States New Orleans, Louisiana, United States Daytona Beach, Florida, United States Hollywood, Florida, United States Tampa, Florida, United States Landover, Maryland, United States Columbia, South Carolina, United States Charlotte, North Carolina, United States Hampton, Virginia, United States Frank Erwin Center Summit Lakefront Arena Ocean Center Hollywood Sportatorium Sundome Capitol Centre Carolina Coliseum Charlotte Coliseum Hampton Coliseum

Charlotte And The Harlots World Tour (August 1988)


Date 18/08/1988 City Venue

London, England Queen Mary's College (Secret Concert)

7th Tour Of A 7th Tour Europe (August 1988 - October 1988)


Date 20/08/1988 25/08/1988 27/08/1988 28/08/1988 31/08/1988 02/09/1988 04/09/1988 08/09/1988 10/09/1988 13/09/1988 17/09/1988 18/09/1988 20/09/1988 22/09/1988 24/09/1988 25/09/1988 26/09/1988 28/09/1988 30/09/1988 01/10/1988 03/10/1988 City Venue

Castle Donington, England Monsters of Rock Prague, Czechoslovakia Schweinfurt, Germany Bochum, Germany Budapest, Hungary Innsbruck, Austria Tilburg, Netherlands Lausanne, Switzerland Modena, Italy Athens, Greece Pamplona, Spain Madrid, Spain Cascais, Portugal Barcelona, Spain Paris, France Paris, France Brussels, Belgium Copenhagen, Denmark Stockholm, Sweden Gothenburg, Sweden Helsinki, Finland Sparta FC Stadium (Cancelled) Maimarkt-Gelnde Ruhrland Stadion Stadion Hidegkuti Nndor Olympiahalle Innsbruck Sportpark Wilhelm II Palais de Beaulieu Arena Festa Nazionale Dell Unita AEK Stadium Plaza de toros Casa Campo Pavilho de Cascais Plaza de toros Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy Forest National K.B. Hallen Isstadion Scandinavium Helsinki Ice Hall

7th Tour of a 7th Tour

421
05/10/1988 Drammenshallen

Drammen, Norway

7th Tour Of A 7th Tour UK (November 1988 - December 1988)


Date 18/11/1988 20/11/1988 21/11/1988 22/11/1988 24/11/1988 25/11/1988 27/11/1988 28/11/1988 30/11/1988 01/12/1988 04/12/1988 06/12/1988 07/12/1988 10/12/1988 11/12/1988 12/12/1988 City Newport, Wales Edinburgh, Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland Edinburgh, Scotland Venue Newport Centre Edinburgh Playhouse Edinburgh Playhouse Edinburgh Playhouse

Whitley Bay, England Whitley Bay Ice Rink Whitley Bay, England Whitley Bay Ice Rink Birmingham, England NEC Arena Birmingham, England NEC Arena Manchester, England Manchester, England Sheffield, England London, England London, England London, England London, England London, England Manchester Apollo Manchester Apollo Sheffield City Hall Hammersmith Odeon Hammersmith Odeon Wembley Arena Wembley Arena Hammersmith Odeon

Setlist Of the Tour


"Moonchild" "The Evil That Men Do" "The Prisoner" "Infinite Dreams" "The Trooper" "Can I Play With Madness" "Heaven Can Wait" "Wasted Years" "The Clairvoyant" "Seventh Son Of A Seventh Son" "The Number Of The Beast" "Hallowed Be Thy Name" "Iron Maiden" "Run To The Hills" "Running Free" "Sanctuary"

Tracks played only at a few venues: "Wrathchild" "Still Life"

7th Tour of a 7th Tour "Die With Your Boots On" "Killers" "22 Acacia Avenue" "2 Minutes To Midnight"

422

References
http://www.maidenlive.com/index.php?option=com_content&task=view&id=24&Itemid=16

No Prayer on the Road

423

No Prayer on the Road


No Prayer On The Road Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows September 19, 1990 September 21, 1991 118 Iron Maiden tour chronology 7th Son Of A 7th Son Tour (1988) No Prayer On The Road (1990/91) Fear Of The Dark Tour (1992)

Opening Bands
Opening bands for this tour were: Wolfsbane, Anthrax, The Almighty and King's X.

No Prayer on the Road


The Holy Smokers UK Tour (September 1990)
Date 19/09/1990 City Venue

Milton Keynes, England Woughton Centre (Secret Concert)

Intercity Express Tour (UK and Ireland, September 1990 - October 1990)
Date 20/09/1990 City Southampton, England Oxford, England Dublin, Ireland Venue Mayflower Theatre

21/09/1990 23/09/1990

Apollo Theatre The Point King's Hall Newcastle City Hall Edinburgh Playhouse Capitol Theatre Pavilion Guildhall De Montfort Hall Royal Court Theatre, Liverpool Hull City Hall Newport Centre Corn Exchange Sheffield City Hall

24/09/1990 Belfast, Northern Ireland 26/09/1990 27/09/1990 28/09/1990 30/09/1990 01/10/1990 02/10/1990 04/10/1990 05/10/1990 07/10/1990 08/10/1990 09/10/1990 Newcastle, England Edinburgh, Scotland Aberdeen, Scotland Ayr, Scotland Preston, England Leicester, England Liverpool, England Hull, England Newport, Wales Cambridge, England Sheffield, England

No Prayer on the Road

424
11/10/1990 12/10/1990 14/10/1990 15/10/1990 16/10/1990 18/10/1990 Derby, England Manchester, England Torbay, England Poole, England Hanley, England London, England Assembly Rooms Manchester Apollo Leisure Centre Arts Centre Victoria Hall Hammersmith Odeon

No Prayer on the Road (Europe, October 1990 - December 1990)


Date 21/10/1990 23/10/1990 25/10/1990 27/10/1990 29/10/1990 30/10/1990 01/11/1990 02/11/1990 03/11/1990 05/11/1990 City Barcelona, Spain Cascais, Portugal Madrid, Spain San Sebastian, Spain Paris, France Paris, France Brussels, Belgium Leiden, Netherlands Leiden, Netherlands Copenhagen, Denmark Copenhagen, Denmark Drammen, Norway Gothenburg, Sweden Stockholm, Sweden Helsinki, Finland Berlin, Germany Bern, Switzerland Milan, Italy Florence, Italy Rome, Italy Treviso, Italy Venue Palau dels Esports de Barcelona Pavilho de Cascais Palacio de Deportes Velodrome Le Znith Le Znith Forest National Groenoordhal Groenoordhal K.B. Hallen

06/11/1990

K.B. Hallen (Cancelled)

08/11/1990 09/11/1990 10/11/1990 12/11/1990 15/11/1990 17/11/1990 18/11/1990 19/11/1990 20/11/1990 21/11/1990 23/11/1990 24/11/1990 25/11/1990 28/11/1990 29/11/1990 03/12/1990 04/12/1990

Drammenshallen Scandinavium Isstadion Helsinki Ice Hall Deutschlandhalle Festhalle (Cancelled) Palatrussardi Palasport Palaeur Palasport

Saarbrcken, Germany Saarlandhalle Grenoble, France Toulouse, France Marseille, France Turin, Italy Munich, Germany Stuttgart, Germany Le Summum (Cancelled) Palais des Sports (Cancelled) Palais des Sports (Cancelled) Palasport (Cancelled) Rudi-Sedlmayer-Halle Martin-Schleyer-Halle

No Prayer on the Road

425
05/12/1990 07/12/1990 08/12/1990 11/12/1990 13/12/1990 14/12/1990 15/12/1990 17/12/1990 18/12/1990 20/12/1990 21/12/1990 22/12/1990 Wrzburg, Germany Bremen, Germany Hannover, Germany Edinburgh, Scotland Whitley Bay, England Birmingham, England Birmingham, England London, England London, England Genk, Belgium Dortmund, Germany Frankfurt, Germany Carl-Diem-Halle Stadthalle Eilenriedhalle Ingliston Exhibition & Trade Centre Ice Rink NEC Arena NEC Arena Wembley Arena Wembley Arena Limburghalle Westfalenhalle Festhalle

No Prayer on the Road (North America, January 1991 - March 1991)


Date 13/01/1991 15/01/1991 16/01/1991 18/01/1991 19/01/1991 21/01/1991 22/01/1991 23/01/1991 25/01/1991 26/01/1991 28/01/1991 29/01/1991 31/01/1991 01/02/1991 02/02/1991 04/02/1991 05/02/1991 06/02/1991 08/02/1991 09/02/1991 10/02/1991 13/02/1991 15/02/1991 16/02/1991 City Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada Montral, Quebec, Canada Quebec City, Quebec, Canada Toronto, Ontario, Canada Rochester, New York, United States Venue Halifax Metro Centre Montreal Forum Colise Pepsi Maple Leaf Gardens War Memorial

East Rutherford, New Jersey, United States Brendan Byrne Arena Albany, New York, United States Worcester, Massachusetts, United States Providence, Rhode Island, United States New Haven, Connecticut, United States Springfield, Massachusetts, United States Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States Fairfax, Virginia, United States Charleston, West Virginia, United States Auburn Hills, Michigan, United States Cleveland, Ohio, United States Cincinnati, Ohio, United States Miami, Florida, United States Orlando, Florida, United States Tampa, Florida, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Houston, Texas, United States Dallas, Texas, United States Knickerbocker Arena Centrum Civic Center New Haven Coliseum Civic Center (Cancelled) Spectrum A.J. Palumbo Center Patriot Center Charleston Civic Center The Palace of Auburn Hills Coliseum at Richfield Cincinnati Gardens Miami Arena (Cancelled) Amway Arena (Cancelled) Sundome (Cancelled) Omni Coliseum (Cancelled) Summit Fairgrounds

No Prayer on the Road

426
17/02/1991 19/02/1991 20/02/1991 22/02/1991 23/02/1991 24/02/1991 25/02/1991 27/02/1991 28/02/1991 01/03/1991 03/03/1991 04/03/1991 06/03/1991 08/03/1991 10/03/1991 11/03/1991 13/03/1991 14/03/1991 15/03/1991 17/03/1991 19/03/1991 San Antonio, Texas, United States San Diego, California, United States Los Angeles, California, United States Los Angeles, California, United States Phoenix, Arizona, United States Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States Denver, Colorado, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Sioux Falls, South Dakota, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Chicago, Illinois, United States Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada Edmonton, Alberta, Canada Salem, Oregon, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Sacramento, California, United States Daly City, California, United States Bakersfield, California, United States Laguna Hills, California, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Convention Center Arena Sports Arena Long Beach Arena Long Beach Arena Compton Terrace Tingley Coliseum McNichols Sports Arena Kemper Arena Sioux Falls Arena (Cancelled) Target Center Fox Theater Allstate Arena Winnipeg Arena Agri Dome Armory Auditorium Seattle Ice Arena ARCO Arena Cow Palace Bakersfield Civic Auditorium Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre Salt Palace

No Prayer on the Road (Japan, March 1991 - April 1991)


Date 28/03/1991 29/03/1991 01/04/1991 02/04/1991 03/04/1991 05/04/1991 City Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan Omiya, Japan Osaka, Japan NHK Hall NHK Hall Sonic City Hall Kosei Nenkin Hall Venue

Yokohama, Japan Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium Tokyo, Japan NHK Hall

No Prayer for the Summer (Europe, June 1991 - September 1991)

No Prayer on the Road

427

Date 29/06/1991 05/09/1991 06/09/1991

City Roskilde, Denmark Bern, Switzerland Winterthur, Switzerland Toulon, France

Venue Roskilde Festival Festhalle Alt Stadt

21/09/1991

Circuit Paul Ricard

Setlist of the Tour


Intro: 633 Squadron Music Tailgunner Public Enema Number One Wrathchild Die With Your Boots On Hallowed Be Thy Name 22, Acacia Avenue Holy Smoke The Assassin No Prayer for the Dying Hooks in You The Clairvoyant 2 Minutes to Midnight The Trooper Heaven Can Wait Iron Maiden The Number of the Beast Bring Your Daughter...to the Slaughter Run to the Hills Sanctuary

Tracks dropped at some US dates: The Assassin Hooks in You Tracks played only at a few venues: The Prisoner The Evil That Men Do

Fear of the Dark Tour

428

Fear of the Dark Tour


Fear Of The Dark Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows June 3, 1992 November 4, 1992 68 Iron Maiden tour chronology No Prayer On The Road (1990/91) Fear Of The Dark Tour (1992) Real Live Tour (1993)

The Fear of the Dark Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from June 3, 1992 to November 4, 1992.

Legs
The Nodding Donkeys UK Tour (June 1992)
Date 03/06/1992 City Venue

Norwich, England The Oval P.H. (Secret Concert)

Fear of the Dark Tour Europe (June 1992)


Date 05/06/1992 City Venue

Reykjavik, Iceland Laugardalshll

Fear of the Dark Tour North America (June 1992 - July 1992)
Date 08/06/1992 11/06/1992 13/06/1992 14/06/1992 16/06/1992 17/06/1992 19/06/1992 20/06/1992 21/06/1992 22/06/1992 25/06/1992 City New York, New York, United States Rochester, New York, United States Quebec City, Canada Ottawa, Canada Montral, Canada Toronto, Canada Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio, United States Clarkston, Michigan, United States Tinley Park, Illinois, United States East Troy, Wisconsin, United States Saint Paul, Minnesota, United States The Ritz War Memorial Coliseum Frank Clair Stadium Montreal Forum CNE Coliseum Blossom Music Center Pine Knob The World Alpine Valley Music Theatre Forum Venue

Fear of the Dark Tour

429
27/06/1992 28/06/1992 30/06/1992 01/07/1992 02/07/1992 Morrison, Colorado, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Sacramento, California, United States Daly City, California, United States Laguna Hills, California, United States Phoenix, Arizona, United States San Antonio, Texas, United States Dallas, Texas, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Nashville, Tennessee, United States Sunrise, Florida, United States Red Rocks Amphitheatre Salt Palace California Expositions Amphitheater Cow Palace Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre

05/07/1992 07/07/1992 08/07/1992 09/07/1992 11/07/1992 14/07/1992 15/07/1992 17/07/1992

Compton Terrace Freeman Coliseum Starplex Amphitheatre Sandstone Amphitheater Lakewood Amphitheater Riverport Amphitheater Starwood Amphitheatre Sunrise Musical Theater

Fear of the Dark Tour South America (July 1992 - August 1992)
Date 23/07/1992 City Santiago, Chile Venue Estacin MapochoCANCEL

25/07/1992 28/07/1992 31/07/1992 01/08/1992 04/08/1992

Buenos Aires, Argentina Ferrocarril Oeste Stadium Montevideo, Uruguay Rio de Janeiro, Brazil So Paulo, Brazil Porto Alegre, Brazil General Artigas Station Ginsio do Maracanzinho Palmeiras Stadium Gigantinho

Fear of the Dark Tour Europe (August 1992 - September 1992)


Date 15/08/1992 17/08/1992 22/08/1992 25/08/1992 27/08/1992 29/08/1992 31/08/1992 02/09/1992 04/09/1992 05/09/1992 07/09/1992 08/09/1992 City Mannheim, Germany Brussels, Belgium Venue Maimarkt-Gelnde Forest National

Castle Donington, England Monsters of Rock Copenhagen, Denmark Helsinki, Finland Stockholm, Sweden Oslo, Norway Den Bosch, Netherlands Lausanne, Switzerland Paris, France Mulhouse, France Annecy, France Valby Hallen Helsinki Ice Hall Globe Arena Oslo Spektrum Brabanthal Patinoire de Malley Parc de la Villette Palais des Sports Parc des Expositions

Fear of the Dark Tour

430
10/09/1992 12/09/1992 14/09/1992 15/09/1992 17/09/1992 18/09/1992 19/09/1992 Les Arnes Arena Festa Dell' Unita Monumental Bullring Velodrome (Postponed 17th) Velodrome Las Ventas Plaza de toros

Bziers, France Reggio Emilia, Italy Barcelona, Spain San Sebastian, Spain San Sebastian, Spain Madrid, Spain Zaragoza, Spain

Fear of the Dark Tour Central America (September 1992 - October 1992)
Date 26/09/1992 Rico 01/10/1992 02/10/1992 04/10/1992 09/10/1992 10/10/1992 Mexico City, Mexico Mexico City, Mexico Guadalajara, Mexico Caracas, Venezuela Caracas, Venezuela Palacio de los Deportes Palacio de los Deportes Estadio Jalisco Poliedro Poliedro City Bayamn, Puerto Venue Juan Ramn Loubriel Stadium

Fear of the Dark Tour Oceania (October 1992)


Date 20/10/1992 City Auckland, New Zealand Melbourne, Australia Sydney, Australia Venue Logan Campbell Centre Festival Hall Hordern Pavilion

22/10/1992 23/10/1992

Fear of the Dark Tour Japan (October 1992 - November 1992)


Date 26/10/1992 28/10/1992 30/10/1992 01/11/1992 02/11/1992 03/11/1992 04/11/1992 City Nagoya, Japan Fukuoka, Japan Venue Nagoya Rainbow Hall Kosei Nenkin Hall

Hiroshima, Japan Kosei Nenkin Hall Osaka, Japan Osaka, Japan Archaic Hall Festival Hall

Yokohama, Japan Yokohama Cultural Gymnasium Tokyo, Japan Yoyogi National Gymnasium

Fear of the Dark Tour

431

Setlist of the Tour


Be Quick or Be Dead The Number of the Beast Wrathchild From Here to Eternity Can I Play With Madness? Wasting Love Tailgunner The Evil That Men Do Afraid to Shoot Strangers Fear of The Dark Bring Your Daughter to the Slaughter The Clairvoyant Heaven Can Wait Run to the Hills 2 Minutes to Midnight Iron Maiden

Encore: Hallowed Be Thy Name The Trooper Sanctuary Running Free

Real Live Tour

432

Real Live Tour


Real Live Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows March 25, 1993 August 28, 1993 45 Iron Maiden tour chronology Fear Of The Dark Tour (1992) Real Live Tour (1993) The X Factour (1995/96)

The Real Live Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from March 25, 1993 to August 28, 1993.

Real Live Tour


Real Live Tour Europe (March 1993 - June 1993)
Date 25/03/1993 27/03/1993 28/03/1993 City Faro, Portugal Madrid, Spain San Sebastian, Spain Kadoc Sala Canciller Polideportivo Anoeta Zeleste Venue

29/03/1993 05/04/1993 06/04/1993 07/04/1993 09/04/1993 10/04/1993 11/04/1993 13/04/1993 15/04/1993 16/04/1993 17/04/1993 19/04/1993 20/04/1993 21/04/1993 23/04/1993 25/04/1993 27/04/1993 28/04/1993

Barcelona, Spain

Ostrava, Czech Republic Ostrava arena Bratislava, Slovakia Vienna, Austria Arnhem, Netherlands Paris, France Berlin, Germany Wrzburg, Germany Hannover, Germany Bremen, Germany Essen, Germany Stuttgart, Germany Saarbrcken, Germany Augsburg, Germany Gothenburg, Sweden Bourges, France Turin, Italy Majano, Italy Zimny Stadion Wiener Stadthalle Rijnhal Elyse Montmartre Huxley's Neue Welt Carl-Diem-Halle Music Hall Stadthalle Grugahalle Schleyerhalle Saarlandhalle Schwabenhalle Scandinavium Pavillon Palasport Campo Sportivo

Real Live Tour

433
29/04/1993 30/04/1993 01/05/1993 02/05/1993 03/05/1993 05/05/1993 06/05/1993 08/05/1993 09/05/1993 11/05/1993 13/05/1993 14/05/1993 16/05/1993 17/05/1993 19/05/1993 20/05/1993 21/05/1993 23/05/1993 Palasport Palaghiaccio Palaghiaccio Palasport Palasport Teatro Tenda Parc Nord Palasport Forum di Assago Le Znith Summum Le Znith Sheffield Arena Wembley Arena G-Mex NEC Arena S.E.C.C. The Point King's Hall, Belfast Patinoire du Littoral Olympic Stadium Olympic Stadium Olympic Stadium

Florence, Italy Rome, Italy Rome, Italy Priolo Gargallo, Italy Reggio Calabria, Italy Naples, Italy Bologna, Italy Genoa, Italy Milan, Italy Toulon, France Grenoble, France Nancy, France Sheffield, England London, England Manchester, England Birmingham, England Glasgow, Scotland Dublin, Ireland

24/05/1993 Belfast, Northern Ireland 27/05/1993 02/06/1993 03/06/1993 04/06/1993 Neuchtel, Switzerland Moscow, Russia Moscow, Russia Moscow, Russia

Raising Hell UK Tour (August 1993)


Date 27/08/1993 City Venue

London, England Pinewood Studios London, England Pinewood Studios

28/08/1993

Real Live Tour

434

Setlist of the Tour


Intro Be Quick Or Be Dead The Number Of The Beast Prowler Transylvania Remember Tomorrow Where Eagles Dare From Here to Eternity Wasting Love Bring your Daughter...To the Slaughter Wasted Years The Evil That Men Do Afraid to Shoot Strangers Fear of the Dark The Clairvoyant Heaven can Wait Run to the Hills 2 Minutes to Midnight Iron Maiden Hallowed Be Thy Name The Trooper Sanctuary

Tracks played only at a few venues Wrathchild

The X Factour

435

The X Factour
The X Factour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows September 28, 1995 September 7, 1996 138 Iron Maiden tour chronology Real Live Tour (1993) The X Factour (1995/96) Virtual XI World Tour (1998)

The X Factour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from September 28, 1995, to September 7, 1996. The opening acts on varying dates of the tour included Psycho Motel, Fear Factory and My Dying Bride[1] .

The X Factour
The X Factour Africa/Asia 1995 (September 1995 - October 1995)
Date 28/09/1995 29/09/1995 30/09/1995 05/10/1995 City Jerusalem, Israel Haifa, Israel Tel Aviv, Israel Johannesburg, South Africa Durban, South Africa Cape Town, South Africa Beirut, Lebanon Sing Sing The End Cinerama Theater Standard Bank Arena Venue

07/10/1995 09/10/1995 12/10/1995

Village Green Good Hope Center Mont La Salle (Cancelled)

The X Factour Europe (October 1995 - November 1995)


Date 14/10/1995 15/10/1995 16/10/1995 17/10/1995 20/10/1995 21/10/1995 22/10/1995 City Athens, Greece Salonika, Greece Sofia, Bulgaria Bucharest, Romania Budapest, Hungary ilina, Slovakia Prague, Czech Republic Warsaw, Poland Helsinki, Finland Stockholm, Sweden Peristeri Stadium Ivanofiou Hristo Botev Hall Polyvalent Hall Petofi Csarnok Sports Hall Industrial Palace Venue

24/10/1995 27/10/1995 29/10/1995

Torwar Hall House of Culture Circus

The X Factour

436
30/10/1995 01/11/1995 02/11/1995 Sentrum Kren (Recording of "The Eternal Flame" KB Hallen

Oslo, Norway Gothenburg, Sweden Copenhagen, Denmark

The X Factour UK (November 1995)


Date 04/11/1995 05/11/1995 06/11/1995 08/11/1995 City Venue

Wolverhampton, England Civic Hall Glasgow, Scotland Manchester, England Leeds, England Barrowlands Apollo Theatre Town And Country Newport Centre Brixton Academy

09/11/1995 10/11/1995

Newport, Wales London, England

The X Factour Europe (November 1995 - February 1996)


Date 12/11/1995 13/11/1995 14/11/1995 16/11/1995 18/11/1995 20/11/1995 21/11/1995 22/11/1995 24/11/1995 26/11/1995 27/11/1995 28/11/1995 30/11/1995 01/12/1995 02/12/1995 03/12/1995 05/12/1995 06/12/1995 07/12/1995 09/12/1995 10/12/1995 12/12/1995 13/12/1995 City Cologne, Germany Deinze, Belgium Bielefeld, Germany Paris, France Pamplona, Spain Barcelona, Spain Madrid, Spain Cascais, Portugal Granada, Spain Turin, Italy Modena, Italy Rome, Italy Milan, Italy Florence, Italy Pordenone, Italy Bolzano, Italy Geneva, Switzerland Zurich, Switzerland Furth, Germany Hannover, Germany Leipzig, Germany Bremen, Germany Hamburg, Germany E-Werk Briepoort PC 69 Le Znith Pabellon Anaitasuna Pavello Olimpic Hall Ebron Real Madrid Pavilion Pavilho de Cascais Pabellon Ifagra Palasport Palastompa Palaeur Palatrussardi Palasport Palasport Palaonda Salle des Ftes de Thonex Volkshaus Stadthalle Capitol Haus Auensee Aladin Music Hall Docks Venue

The X Factour

437
14/12/1995 16/12/1995 17/12/1995 19/12/1995 20/12/1995 22/12/1995 23/12/1995 12/01/1996 13/01/1996 16/01/1996 17/01/1996 18/01/1996 19/01/1996 21/01/1996 23/01/1996 24/01/1996 26/01/1996 27/01/1996 28/01/1996 30/01/1996 31/01/1996 02/02/1996 Berlin, Germany Vienna, Austria Munich, Germany Stuttgart, Germany Neu Isenburg, Germany Cologne, Germany Zwolle, Netherlands Athens, Greece Athens, Greece Acireale, Italy Napoli, Italy Ancona, Italy Brescia, Italy Ljubljana, Slovenia Lyon, France Nice, France Montpellier, France Montluon, France Nancy, France Neue Welt Wiener Stadthalle Terminal 1 Messe Congress Zentrum B Hugenottenhalle E-Werk IJsselhal Peristeri Stadium Peristeri Stadium Palasport Palapartenope Palasport Palasport Hala Tivoli Le Transbordeur Thtre de Verdure Le Znith Anthanor Le Znith

Belfast, Northern Ireland Maysfield Leisure Centre Dublin, Ireland Nottingham, England SFX City Theatre Rock City

The X Factour North America (February 1996 - April 1996)


Date 08/02/1996 09/02/1996 11/02/1996 13/02/1996 14/02/1996 16/02/1996 17/02/1996 19/02/1996 20/02/1996 21/02/1996 23/02/1996 24/02/1996 25/02/1996 27/02/1996 City Quebec City, Canada Montral, Canada Toronto, Canada Boston, Massachusetts, United States Providence, Rhode Island, United States New York, New York, United States Venue Pavillon de la Jeunesse Verdun Auditorium R.P.M. Warehouse Avalon Ballroom Lupo's Heartbreak Hotel The Academy

Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Electric Factory Baltimore, Maryland, United States Old Bridge, New Jersey, United States Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States Detroit, Michigan, United States Cleveland, Ohio, United States Cincinnati, Ohio, United States Hammerjack's Birch Hill Night Club Metron Metropol Harpo's Odeon Concert Club Annie's

The X Factour

438
28/02/1996 29/02/1996 02/03/1996 03/03/1996 02/03/1996 05/03/1996 07/03/1996 08/03/1996 09/03/1996 10/03/1996 12/03/1996 14/03/1996 15/03/1996 17/03/1996 19/03/1996 20/03/1996 21/03/1996 23/03/1996 24/03/1996 25/03/1996 27/03/1996 28/03/1996 30/03/1996 31/03/1996 01/04/1996 02/04/1996 04/04/1996 05/04/1996 Fort Wayne, Indiana, United States Chicago, Illinois, United States Milwaukee, Wisconsin, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Orlando, Florida, United States Fort Lauderdale, United States Jacksonville, Florida, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Houston, Texas, United States San Antonio, Texas, United States Dallas, Texas, United States Lubbock, Texas, United States Pierre's Vic Theater The Rave Mirage Mississippi Nights Masquerade Embassy The Edge Shades 616 Millennium Sneakers Deep Ellum Live Depot

Albuquerque, New Mexico, United States Midnight Rodeo Denver, Colorado, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Vancouver, Canada Portland, Oregon, United States Sacramento, California, United States San Francisco, California, United States Riverside, California, United States Las Vegas, Nevada, United States Phoenix, Arizona, United States San Diego, California, United States Los Angeles, California, United States Los Angeles, California, United States Ogden Theater Salt Air Off Ramp Cafe Commodore Ballroom (Cancelled) Roseland (Cancelled) The Boardwalk (Cancelled) The Fillmore (Cancelled) Rocking Horse (Cancelled) The Beach (Cancelled) Electric Ballroom (Cancelled) Soma (Cancelled) The Palace The Palace

The X Factour Japan (April 1996)

The X Factour

439

Date 11/04/1996 12/04/1996 14/04/1996

City Tokyo, Japan Nagoya, Japan Fukuoka, Japan Osaka, Japan Tokyo, Japan Tokyo, Japan

Venue Nakano Sun Plaza Hall Kinro Kaikan Hall Skara Espacio

16/04/1996 17/04/1996 18/04/1996

Kosei Nenkin Kaikan Kan-i Hoken Hall Nakano Sun Plaza Hall

The X Factour Europe (June 1996 - August 1996)


Date 22/06/1996 30/06/1996 06/07/1996 13/07/1996 09/08/1996 City Kauhajoki, Finland Dessel, Belgium Odense, Denmark Weert, Netherlands Murcia, Spain Venue Nummirock Festival Graspop Metal Meeting Midtfyn Festival Bospop Festival San Javier Football Stadium Recinto Ferial de Jerez Football Stadium

10/08/1996 11/08/1996 13/08/1996 14/08/1996 16/08/1996 17/08/1996

Jerez, Spain Miajadas, Spain

Villarrobledo, Spain Municipal Football Stadium Huesca, Spain Colmar, France Cunlhat, France Fraga Pabellon Ferial Parc des Expositions Free Wheel

The X Factour South America (August 1996 - September 1996)


Date 24/08/1996 25/08/1996 26/08/1996 27/08/1996 29/08/1996 31/08/1996 01/09/1996 04/09/1996 07/09/1996 City So Paulo, Brazil Curitiba, Brazil Rio de Janeiro, Brazil Porto Alegre, Brazil Santiago, Chile Venue Estdio do Pacaembu Estdio Couto Pereira Metropolitan Gigantinho (Cancelled) Teatro Monumental

Buenos Aires, Argentina Obras Sanitarias Stadium Buenos Aires, Argentina Obras Sanitarias Stadium Mexico City, Mexico Monterrey, Mexico Palacio de los Deportes Auditorio Coca-Cola

The X Factour

440

Setlist of the Tour


Intro-Man on the edge Wrathchild Heaven can Wait Lord of the Flies Fortunes of War Blood on the Worlds Hands Afraid to Shoot Strangers The Evil that Men Do The Aftermath Sign of the Cross 2 minutes to Midnight The Edge of Darkness Fear of the Dark The Clairvoyant Iron Maiden The Number of the Beast

Hallowed Be Thy Name The Trooper Tracks played only at a few venues Running Free Sanctuary

References
[1] "The X Factour Commentary" (http:/ / www. maidenfans. com/ imc/ ?url=tour10_xfactor/ tour10_xfactor& lang=eng& link=tours). . Retrieved 2009-03-15.

Virtual XI World Tour

441

Virtual XI World Tour


Virtual XI World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date April 22, 1998 December 12, 1998 Iron Maiden tour chronology The X Factour (1995/96) Virtual XI World Tour (1998) The Ed Hunter Tour (1999)

The Virtual XI Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Iron Maiden from April 22, 1998 to December 12, 1998. During the American leg, singer Blaze Bayley lost his voice, and the band cancelled 12 shows. The band later made up the Los Angeles and San Diego dates.

Virtual XI World Tour


The Angel And The Gamblers World Tour (April 1998)
Date April 22, 1998 City Norwich Country England Venue The Oval P.H. (Secret Concert)

Virtual XI World Tour Europe (April 1998 - May 1998)


Date April 26, 1998 April 27, 1998 April 29, 1998 April 30, 1998 May 2, 1998 May 3, 1998 May 5, 1998 May 6, 1998 May 8, 1998 May 9, 1998 May 10, 1998 May 12, 1998 May 13, 1998 City Lille Country France Venue Le Znith

Nancy

France

Le Znith

Genova

Italy

Palasport

Florence

Italy

Palasport

Pesaro Rome Milan Trieste Bblingen Hannover Dsseldorf Paris Leuven

Italy Italy Italy Italy Germany Germany Germany France Belgium

BPA Palace Palaeur Palavobis Palasport Sporthalle Music Hall Philipshalle Le Znith Brabanthal

Virtual XI World Tour

442
May 14, 1998 May 16, 1998 May 18, 1998 May 19, 1998 May 20, 1998 May 22, 1998 Rotterdam London Barcelona Madrid Cascais Orense Ahoy Hall Brixton Academy Pabelln Vall dHebrn Real Madrid Pavilion Pavilion Pabelln Paco Paz Bullring Velodromo Velodromo Luis Puig Le Znith (Cancelled) Le Znith Open Air

Netherlands England Spain Spain Portugal Spain Spain Spain Spain France France Malta

May 23, 1998 Laguna de Duero May 24, 1998 May 26, 1998 May 27, 1998 May 28, 1998 May 30, 1998 San Sebastian Valencia Pau Montpellier Ta' Qali

Virtual XI World Tour North America/Mexico (June 1998 - August 1998)


Date June 26, 1998 June 27, 1998 June 28, 1998 June 30, 1998 July 1, 1998 July 2, 1998 July 4, 1998 July 5, 1998 July 7, 1998 July 10, 1998 July 11, 1998 July 12, 1998 July 14, 1998 July 15, 1998 July 16, 1998 July 18, 1998 July 19, 1998 July 22, 1998 July 24, 1998 July 25, 1998 July 26, 1998 July 28, 1998 July 29, 1998 City Chicago, Illinois Columbus, Ohio Hamilton, Ontario Kalamazoo, Michigan Clarkston, Michigan Cleveland, Ohio Montreal, Quebec Quebec City, Quebec New York, New York San Antonio, Texas San Benito, Texas Dallas, Texas Phoenix, Arizona Las Vegas, Nevada Los Angeles, California San Diego, California San Francisco, California Denver, Colorado Medina, Minnesota Milwaukee, Wisconsin Cincinnati, Ohio Washington, D.C. Baltimore, Maryland Country United States United States Canada United States United States United States Canada Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States Venue Riviera Theater Brewery District Pavilion Copps Coliseum Wings Stadium Pine Knob Music Theater Nautica Theater Stade du Maurier L'Agora Roseland Ballroom Sunken Garden Theater The Road House Starplex Amphitheater Club Rio The Joint Universal Amphitheater (Cancelled) S.D.S.U. Open Air Theater (Cancelled) Maritime Hall (Cancelled) Paramount Theater (Cancelled)

United States Medina Entertainment Center (Cancelled) United States United States United States United States Modjeska Theatre (Cancelled) Bogart's (Cancelled) Capitol Ballroom (Cancelled) Michael's 8th Avenue (Cancelled)

Virtual XI World Tour

443
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania Hartford, Connecticut Sea Bright, New Jersey Los Angeles, California Atlanta, Georgia San Diego, California Monterey Mexico City United States Electric Factory (Cancelled)

July 31, 1998

August 1, 1998 August 2, 1998 August 2, 1998 August 3, 1998 August 4, 1998 August 7, 1998 August 9, 1998

United States United States United States United States United States Mexico Mexico

Webster Theater (Cancelled) Tradewinds (Cancelled) Universal Amphitheater Electric Factory (Cancelled) S.D.S.U. Open Air Theater Auditorio Coca-Cola Palacio de los Deportes

Virtual XI World Tour Europe (September 1998 - October 1998)


Date September 4, 1998 September 5, 1998 September 7, 1998 City Athens Thessaloniki Istanbul Country Greece Greece Turkey Venue Lycabettus Theatre Forrest Theatre Cemil Topuzlu Akhava Cemil Topuzlu Akhava E-Klub Spodek Eden Sports Hall

September 8, 1998

Istanbul

Turkey

September 11, 1998 September 12, 1998 September 13, 1998

Budapest Katowice Prague

Hungary Poland Czech Republic Germany Germany Germany Germany Denmark Finland Sweden Germany Germany Germany

September 15, 1998 September 16, 1998 September 18, 1998 September 19, 1998 September 20, 1998 September 23, 1998 September 25, 1998 September 27, 1998 September 28, 1998 September 29, 1998

Munich Furth Erfurt Hamburg Copenhagen Helsinki Stockholm Essen Berlin Halle, Saxony-Anhalt Offenbach am Main Winterthur Mulhouse Besanon Lyon Zaragoza Albacete

Colosseum Stadthalle Thringen Halle Sporthalle Vega Ishall Isstadion Grugahalle Colombia Halle Easy Schorre Club

October 1, 1998 October 2, 1998 October 3, 1998 October 5, 1998 October 6, 1998 October 8, 1998 October 9, 1998

Germany Switzerland France France France Spain Spain

Stadthalle Eulachalle Phoenix Palais des Sports Le Transbordeur Pabelln Principe Felipe Bullring

Virtual XI World Tour

444
October 10, 1998 October 13, 1998 October 14, 1998 October 15, 1998 October 17, 1998 October 18, 1998 October 19, 1998 October 21, 1998 October 22, 1998 October 23, 1998 October 25, 1998 October 26, 1998 Dos Hermanas Nice Pau Clermont-Ferrand Manchester Newcastle Glasgow Nottingham Wolverhampton Newport Sheffield Portsmouth Campo de Futball Thtre de Verdure Le Znith Maison des Sports Apollo Theatre City Hall Barrowlands Royal Concert Hall Civic Hall Centre City Hall Guildhall

Spain France France France England England Scotland England England Wales England England

Virtual XI World Tour Japan (November 1998)


Date November 18, 1998 November 20, 1998 November 21, 1998 November 22, 1998 City Tokyo Country Japan Venue Shibuya Kokaido

Nagoya

Japan

Club Diamond Hall

Osaka

Japan

IMP Hall

Tokyo

Japan Nakano Sun Plaza Hall

Virtual XI World Tour South America (December 1998)


Date December 2, 1998 December 4, 1998 December 5, 1998 December 6, 1998 December 10, 1998 City Rio de Janeiro Campinas So Paulo Curitiba Santiago Country Brazil Brazil Brazil Brazil Chile Argentina Venue Metropolitan Brinco da Princessa (Cancelled) Anhembi Pedreira Paulo Leminski Velodromo (Cancelled) Vlez Sarsfield Stadium

December 12, 1998 Buenos Aires

The Ed Hunter Tour

445

The Ed Hunter Tour


The Ed Hunter Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows July 11, 1999 October 10, 1999 30 Iron Maiden tour chronology Virtual XI World Tour (1998) The Ed Hunter Tour (1999) Brave New World Tour (2000/01)

The Ed Hunter tour began in Saint John, New Brunswick Canada. Iron Maiden began rehearsals at Harbour Station, the city's largest arena for about a week, then performing there for one night before embarking on the tour.

Setlist
1. "Intro: Churchill's Speech" 2. "Aces High" 3. "Wrathchild" 4. "The Trooper" 5. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 6. "The Clansman" 7. "Wasted Years" 8. "Killers" 9. "Futureal" 10. "Man on the Edge" 11. "Powerslave" 12. "Phantom of the Opera" 13. "The Evil that Men Do" 14. "Fear of the Dark" 15. "Iron Maiden" 16. "The Number of the Beast" 17. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 18. "Run to the Hills" Stranger in a Strange Land was only played in the tour's first five concerts.

Tour dates

The Ed Hunter Tour

446

Date

City

Country North America

Venue

July 11, 1999 July 13, 1999 July 14, 1999 July 16, 1999 July 17, 1999 July 18, 1999 July 20, 1999 July 21, 1999 July 23, 1999 July 24, 1999 July 25, 1999 July 27, 1999 July 30, 1999 July 31, 1999 August 2, 1999 August 3, 1999 August 5, 1999 August 7, 1999 August 8, 1999

Saint John, New Brunswick Montral Quebec City New York, New York New York, New York Boston, Massachusetts Toronto Cleveland, Ohio Milwaukee, Wisconsin Detroit, Michigan Chicago, Illinois Denver, Colorado Los Angeles, California San Jose, California Las Vegas, Nevada Phoenix, Arizona El Paso, Texas San Antonio, Texas Dallas, Texas

Canada Canada Canada United States United States United States Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States

Harbour Station Molson Centre (Amphitheatre) L'Agora Hammerstein Ballroom Hammerstein Ballroom Orpheum Theatre Massey Hall Plain Dealer Pavilion Eagles Ballroom Pine Knob Amphitheatre Aragon Ballroom Fiddler's Green Amphitheatre Greek Theater Arena Theater (Cancelled) The Joint (Cancelled)

United States Mesa Amphitheatre (Cancelled) United States United States United States Europe El Paso County Coliseum Sunken Gardens Amphitheatre Bronco Bowl

September 9, 1999

Paris

France

Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy Ahoy' Rotterdam Sporthalle Helsinki Ice Hall Stockholm Globe Arena Scandinavium Grugahalle Schleyerhalle Filaforum Palau Olympic Plaza de toros Peristeri Stadium

September 10, 1999 September 12, 1999 September 15, 1999 September 17, 1999 September 18, 1999 September 20, 1999 September 21, 1999 September 23, 1999 September 25, 1999 September 26, 1999 October 1, 1999

Rotterdam Hamburg Helsinki Stockholm Gothenburg Essen Stuttgart Milan Barcelona Madrid Athens

Netherlands Germany Finland Sweden Sweden Germany Germany Italy Spain Spain Greece

Brave New World Tour

447

Brave New World Tour


Brave New World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Associated album Brave New World Start date End date Shows 2 June, 2000 19 January, 2001 92 Iron Maiden tour chronology The Ed Hunter Tour (1999) Brave New World Tour (2000/01) Give Me Ed... 'til I'm Dead Tour (2003)

The Brave New World Tour was a concert tour by Iron Maiden which began on 2 June 2000 and ended on 19 January 2001. The tour was in support of the release of their 2000 album Brave New World. In Europe, the tour was called Metal 2000. Three dates scheduled for Germany and Bulgaria in mid-July 2000 were canceled so that guitarist Janick Gers could recover after an infamous accident at Mannheim, Germany, on 8 July where Gers slipped and fell off the stage, sustaining a concussion and spraining his back.

Tour dates
Date City Country Europe June 2, 2000 June 3, 2000 June 5, 2000 Strasbourg Nijmegen Prague France Netherlands Czech Republic June 6, 2000 June 7, 2000 June 9, 2000 June 10, 2000 June 11, 2000 June 13, 2000 June 14, 2000 June 16, 2000 June 20, 2000 June 21, 2000 June 23, 2000 June 24, 2000 June 26, 2000 June 27, 2000 Bansk Bystrica Budapest Izola Monza Kiev Saint-tienne Paris London Katowice Warsaw Leipzig Dessel Oslo Stockholm Slovakia Hungary Slovenia Italy Ukraine France France England Poland Poland Germany Belgium Norway Sweden Bystrica Amphitheatre Kisstadion Izola Stadium Gods of Metal RocKiev Festival (Cancelled) Palais des Spectacles Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy Earls Court Spodek Torwar Hall With Full Force Graspop Metal Meeting Oslo Spektrum Stockholms Olympiastadion Festival des Artfacts Dynamo Open Air Paegas Arena Venue

Brave New World Tour

448
Roskilde Turku Tallinn Vienna Munich Zrich Mannheim Oberhausen Sofia Athens Vilar de Mouros San Sebastian Madrid Mijas Murcia Barcelona Roskilde Festival Ruisrock Festival Song Festival Grounds Libro Music Hall Zenith Hallenstadion Maimarkt-Gelnde Arena (Cancelled) Akademik Stadium (Cancelled) Posidonas Stadium (Cancelled) Festival Vilar de Mouros Velodrome Anoeta Las Ventas Open Air (Cancelled) Open Air Palau Sant Jordi

June 29, 2000 June 30, 2000 July 2, 2000 July 4, 2000 July 5, 2000 July 6, 2000 July 8, 2000 July 9, 2000 July 12, 2000 July 14, 2000 July 16, 2000 July 18, 2000 July 19, 2000 July 21, 2000 July 22, 2000 July 23, 2000

Denmark Finland Estonia Austria Germany Switzerland Germany Germany Bulgaria Greece Portugal Spain Spain Spain Spain Spain North America

August 1, 2000 August 2, 2000 August 3, 2000 August 5, 2000 August 6, 2000 August 8, 2000 August 9, 2000 August 11, 2000 August 12, 2000 August 13, 2000 August 15, 2000 August 16, 2000 August 17, 2000 August 19, 2000 August 20, 2000 August 23, 2000 August 25, 2000 August 26, 2000 August 27, 2000 August 29, 2000 August 30, 2000 September 1, 2000

Toronto Montral Quebec City New York, New York Mansfield, Massachusetts Hartford, Connecticut Portland, Maine Burgettstown, Pennsylvania Camden, New Jersey Scranton, Pennsylvania Detroit, Michigan Buffalo, New York Holmdel, New Jersey Saint Louis, Missouri Kansas City, Missouri Cleveland, Ohio Chicago, Illinois Milwaukee, Wisconsin Saint Paul, Minnesota Colorado Springs, Colorado Denver, Colorado Dallas, Texas

Canada Canada Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States

Air Canada Centre Molson Centre (Amphitheatre) Colise Pepsi Madison Square Garden Tweeter Center New England Dodge Music Center Cumberland County Civic Center Post-Gazette Pavilion E Center Coors Light Amphitheatre Pine Knob Amphitheatre Darien Lake Amphitheatre Arts Center Riverport Amphitheater Sandstone Amphitheatre Blossom Music Center UIC Pavilion Marcus Amphitheater Roy Wilkins Auditorium World Arena Red Rocks Amphitheatre Starplex Amphitheater

Brave New World Tour

449
Houston, Texas San Antonio, Texas San Antonio, Texas El Paso, Texas Albuquerque, New Mexico Phoenix, Arizona Laguna Hills, California San Diego, California Los Angeles, California Bakersfield, California San Jose, California Las Vegas, Nevada Anchorage, Alaska Tacoma, Washington Vancouver Edmonton, Alberta Calgary, Alberta United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States Canada Canada Canada Woodlands Pavilion Sunken Garden Amphitheatre Sunken Garden Amphitheatre University of Texas at El Paso Mesa del Sol Cricket Wireless Pavilion Verizon Wireless Amphitheater San Diego Sports Arena Gibson Amphitheatre Cintennial Amphitheatre Shoreline Amphitheatre Aladdin Theater Sullivan Arena (Cancelled) Tacoma Dome Pacific Coliseum Rexall Place (Cancelled) Pengrowth Saddledome (Cancelled)

September 2, 2000 September 3, 2000 September 4, 2000 September 6, 2000 September 8, 2000 September 9, 2000 September 10, 2000 September 12, 2000 September 13, 2000 September 15, 2000 September 16, 2000 September 17, 2000 September 18, 2000 September 19, 2000 September 20, 2000 September 23, 2000 September 24, 2000

Japan October 19, 2000 October 21, 2000 October 22, 2000 October 23, 2000 October 25, 2000 October 26, 2000 October 28, 2000 October 29, 2000 Sendai Tokyo Yokohama Tokyo Osaka Sendai Fukuoka Tokyo Europe November 2, 2000 November 3, 2000 November 4, 2000 November 6, 2000 November 10, 2000 January 6, 2001 January 7, 2001 Glasgow Manchester Birmingham Essen Athens London London Scotland England England Germany Greece England England South America January 9, 2001 January 12, 2001 January 13, 2001 January 15, 2001 Mexico City Buenos Aires Buenos Aires Santiago Mexico Argentina Argentina Chile Foro Sol Obras Sanitarias Arena (Cancelled) Vlez Sarsfield Stadium Pista Atletica S.E.C.C. MEN Arena N.E.C. Arena Grugahalle Posidonas Stadium/St. Cosmas Shepherds Bush Empire Shepherds Bush Empire Japan Japan Japan Japan Japan Japan Japan Japan Sun Plaza Kosei Nenkin Hall Pacifico Yokohama Tokyo International Forum Hall A Zepp Sun Plaza Shi Kokaido Zepp

Brave New World Tour

450
Rio de Janeiro Rock In Rio

January 19, 2001

Brazil

External links
MaidenFans Tour Details [1] Maiden-World Setlist Database [2]

References
[1] http:/ / ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour12_bnw/ tour12_bnw& lang=eng& link=tours [2] http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ Brave_New_World_Tour

Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour

451

Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour


Give Me Ed... 'til I'm Dead Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows May 23, 2003 August 30 2003 56 Iron Maiden tour chronology Brave New World Tour (2000/01) Give Me Ed... 'til I'm Dead Tour (2003) Dance of Death World Tour (2003/04)

Give Me Ed... 'til I'm Dead Tour was a concert tour by Iron Maiden that began on 23 May 2003 and ended on 30 August 2003. During the tour, the song Wildest Dreams was played as a teaser for the band's upcoming thirteenth studio album Dance of Death.

Tour dates
Date City Country Europe May 23, 2003 May 24, 2003 May 26, 2003 May 27, 2003 May 31, 2003 June 3, 2003 June 4, 2003 June 6, 2003 June 7, 2003 June 8, 2003 June 11, 2003 June 12, 2003 June 13, 2003 June 15, 2003 June 17, 2003 June 19, 2003 La Corua Gijon Toulon Toulouse Castle Donington Katowice Budapest Nrburgring Nrnberg Vienna Barcelona Madrid San Sebastian Imola Zagreb Zln Spain Spain France France England Poland Hungary Germany Germany Austria Spain Spain Spain Italy Croatia Czech Republic Netherlands Switzerland France Sports Palace Sports Palace Le Znith Le Znith Download Festival Spodek Kisstadion Rock Am Ring Rock Im Park Stadthalle Palau Sant Jordi Las Ventas Plaza de toros Imola Autodromo Gradski Stadium Sportshall Venue

June 21, 2003 June 23, 2003 June 25, 2003

Bergum Fribourg Paris

Waldrock Festival Forum Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy

Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour

452
Roskilde Stockholm Helsinki Oslo Oslo Dessel Lisbon Jerez Albacete Roskilde Festival Stockholm Stadium Hartwall Areena Oslo Spektrum Oslo Spektrum Graspop Metal Meeting Pavilho Atlntico Festival Esprrago Rock Metalmania

June 27, 2003 June 28, 2003 June 30, 2003 July 2, 2003 July 3, 2003 July 5, 2003 July 9, 2003 July 11, 2003 July 12, 2003

Denmark Sweden Finland Norway Norway Belgium Portugal Spain Spain North America

July 21, 2003 July 22, 2003 July 23, 2003 July 25, 2003 July 26, 2003 July 29, 2003 July 30, 2003 August 1, 2003 August 2, 2003 August 3, 2003 August 5, 2003 August 6, 2003 August 8, 2003 August 9, 2003 August 10, 2003 August 13, 2003 August 15, 2003 August 16, 2003 August 18, 2003 August 20, 2003

Worcester, Massachusetts Hartford, Connecticut Camden, New Jersey Holmdel, New Jersey Wantagh, New York Columbia, Maryland New York, New York Quebec City, Quebec Montral, Quebec Toronto, Ontario Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Clarkston, Michigan Burgettstown, Pennsylvania Columbus, Ohio Tinley Park, Illinois Dallas, Texas Selma, Texas The Woodlands, Texas El Paso, Texas Greenwood Village, Colorado Albuquerque, New Mexico Phoenix, Arizona Irvine, California Long Beach, California San Diego, California Mountain View, California Concord, California Marysville, California

United States United States United States United States United States United States United States Canada Canada Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States

DCU Center Meadows Music Theatre Tweeter Center PNC Bank Arts Center Nikon at Jones Beach Theater Merriweather Post Pavilion Madison Square Garden Colise Pepsi Bell Centre Molson Amphitheatre Blossom Music Center DTE Energy Music Theater Post Gazette Pavilion Germain Amphitheater Tweeter Center Smirnoff Music Centre Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre Woodlands Pavilion U.T.E.P. Fiddler's Green

August 21, 2003 August 22, 2003 August 24, 2003 August 25, 2003 August 26, 2003 August 28, 2003 August 29, 2003 August 30, 2003

United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States

Journal Pavilion (Cancelled) Cricket Wireless Pavilion Verizon Wireless Amphitheatre Long Beach Arena San Diego Sports Arena Shoreline Amphitheatre Sleep Train Pavilion Sleep Train Amphitheatre

Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour

453

External links
MaidenFans Tour Details [1] Maiden-World Setlist Database [2]

References
[1] http:/ / ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour13_dod/ tour13_dod& lang=eng& link=tours [2] http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ Give_Me_Ed. . _Till_I%27m_Dead_Tour

Dance of Death World Tour

454

Dance of Death World Tour


Dance Of Death World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Associated album Start date End date Shows Dance of Death October 19, 2003 February 8, 2004 53 Iron Maiden tour chronology Give Me Ed... 'Til I'm Dead Tour (2003) Dance Of Death World Tour (2003/04) Eddie Rips Up The World Tour (2005)

Tour dates
Date City Country Europe October 19, 2003 October 21, 2003 October 22, 2003 Debrecen Bansk Bystrica Prague Hungary Slovakia Czech Republic Germany Germany Italy Italy Switzerland Spain Spain Germany Netherlands Poland Finland Phoenix Hall Bystrica Sports Hall T-Mobile Arena Venue

October 24, 2003 October 25, 2003 October 27, 2003 October 28, 2003 October 30, 2003 November 1, 2003 November 2, 2003 November 4, 2003 November 5, 2003 November 7, 2003 November 10, 2003 November 12, 2003 November 14, 2003 November 15, 2003 November 17, 2003

Munich Stuttgart Assago Florence Zurich Badalona Madrid Frankfurt Rotterdam Wroclaw Helsinki

Olympiahalle Schleyerhalle Filaforum Nelson Mandela Forum Hallenstadion Palau Municipal d'Esports de Badalona Palacio Vistalegre Jahrhunderthalle Ahoy Rotterdam (rescheduled) Centennial Hall (rescheduled) Hartwall Areena (rescheduled)

Copenhagen

Denmark

Valby Hallen

Stockholm

Sweden

Globen Arena

Gothenburg

Sweden

Scandinavium

Hannover

Germany

Eilenriedehalle

Dance of Death World Tour

455
Berlin Germany Treptow Arena

November 18, 2003 November 20, 2003 November 22, 2003 November 24, 2003 November 26, 2003 November 27, 2003 November 28, 2003 November 29, 2003 December 1, 2003 December 3, 2003

Leuven

Belgium

Brabenthal

Paris

France

Palais Omnisports de Paris/Bercy

Dortmund

Germany

Westfalenhalle

Hamburg

Germany

Sporthalle

Leipzig

Germany

Arena Leipzig

Wroclaw

Poland

Hala Ludowa

Paris

France

Le Znith (rescheduled)

Dublin Newcastle upon Tyne Nottingham Sheffield Glasgow Manchester

Ireland England

The Point Telewest Arena

December 4, 2003 December 6, 2003 December 8, 2003 December 9, 2003

England England Scotland England England Netherlands Wales England France Finland South America

Nottingham Arena Hallam FM Arena S.E.C.C. MEN Arena Earls Court Ahoy Hall C.I.A. N.E.C. Galaxie Amneville Hartwall Areena

December 12, 2003 London December 13, 2003 Rotterdam December 15, 2003 Cardiff December 16, 2003 Birmingham December 18, 2003 Metz December 21, 2003 Helsinki

January 11, 2004 January 13, 2004 January 16, 2004 January 18, 2004

Buenos Aires Santiago Rio de Janeiro Sao Paolo

Argentina Chile Brazil Brazil North America

Vlez Sarsfield Stadium Pista Atltica Claro Hall Pacaembu Stadium

January 20, 2004 January 21, 2004 January 23, 2004 January 24, 2004 January 26, 2004 January 27, 2004 January 30, 2004

Montreal Quebec New York New York New York New York Los Angeles

Canada Canada United States United States United States United States United States

Bell Centre Colise Pepsi Arena Hammerstein Ballroom Hammerstein Ballroom Hammerstein Ballroom Hammerstein Ballroom (cancelled) Universal Amphitheatre

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Los Angeles United States Japan Universal Amphitheatre

January 31, 2004

February 5, 2004 February 7, 2004 February 8, 2004

Sapporo Osaka Tokyo

Japan Japan Japan

Nenkin Hall Jo Hall Saitama Arena

Setlist
Intro Wildest Dreams Wrathchild Can I Play With Madness The Trooper Dance Of Death Rainmaker Brave New World Paschendale Lord Of The Flies No More Lies Hallowed Be Thy Name Fear Of The Dark Iron Maiden Journeyman The Number Of The Beast Run To The Hills

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Eddie Rips Up the World Tour


Eddie Rips Up The World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows May 28, 2005 August 31, 2005 45 Iron Maiden tour chronology Dance Of Death World Tour (2003/04) Eddie Rips Up The World Tour (2005) A Matter Of Life And Death Tour (2006/07)

Eddie Rips Up the World Tour was a concert tour by Iron Maiden in 2005 to support the release of the band's DVD The Early Days. Hence, the set list consisted of songs from the band's 1980 debut album to 1983's Piece of Mind. At July 9, the final concert of the European Tour at Ullevi Stadium in Gothenburg, Sweden, was broadcast live in full on both Swedish national television and radio. The August 20, 2005 show at the Hyundai Pavilion in San Bernardino, CA, was part of Ozzfest, and ended in a sour note. In retaliation to vocalist Bruce Dickinson's comments on Ozzy Osbourne using an Autocue on stage, Ozzy's wife Sharon and daughter Kelly had some people from the crowd and members of other bands spoil Iron Maiden's performance by pelting the band with eggs and running on stage with a flag that read, "Don't Fuck with Ozzy." In addition, Sharon had the P.A. system shut off multiple times, cutting off power to Dickinson's microphone and the band's instruments. At the end of the band's performance, Sharon entered the stage to the unanimous boos from the crowd and stated that while she loved Iron Maiden, she called Dickinson a "prick."[1] Following the show, Iron Maiden's manager Rod Smallwood issued a statement condemning the incident.[2]

Opening Bands
Opening bands for this tour were: Mastodon, DragonForce, Dream Theater, Marilyn Manson, Turbonegro and more

The Early Days Tour


Europe Tour Dates (May/July 2005)
Date City Country Europe May 28, 2005 May 29, 2005 May 31, 2005 June 4, 2005 June 5, 2005 June 7, 2005 Prague Czech Republic Poland T-Mobile Arena Venue

Chorzw

Mystic Festival

Graz

Austria

Stadthalle

Nrburgring Nuremberg Reykjavk

Germany Germany Iceland

Rock am Ring Rock im Park Egilshll

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June 11, 2005 June 12, 2005 June 16, 2005 June 18, 2005 June 21, 2005 June 25, 2005 June 26, 2005 June 28, 2005 June 29, 2005 July 2, 2005 July 3, 2005 July 6, 2005 July 7, 2005 July 9, 2005 Bologna Gods of Metal

Italy

Zrich

Switzerland Portugal

Spirit of Music Festival

Lisbon

Pavilho Atlntico

Murcia

Spain

Lorca Rock Festival

Athens

Greece

Terra Vibe Park

Paris

France

Parc des Princes

Dessel

Belgium

Graspop Metal Meeting

Oslo

Norway

Oslo Spektrum

Oslo

Norway

Oslo Spektrum

Leipzig Weert Helsinki Helsinki Gothenburg

Germany Netherlands Finland Finland Sweden

With Full Force Bospop Hartwall Areena Hartwall Areena Ullevi Stadium

North America Tour Dates (July/August 2005) - OZZFEST


Date City Country Venue Tickets sold 20,100 Tickets on sale 20,100 Percentage sold 100%

July 15, 2005

Mansfield, Massachusetts

United States Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States

Tweeter Center

July 16, 2005 July 17, 2005

Qubec City, Qubec Hartford, Connecticut

Colise Pepsi New England Dodge Music Center Tweeter Center at the Waterfront 20,430 24,000 85%

July 19, 2005

Camden, New Jersey

23,655

25,371

93%

July 21, 2005

Darien, New York

Darien Lake Performing Arts Center Post-Gazette Pavilion

15,044

21,800

69%

July 23, 2005

Burgettstown, Pennsylvania Bristow, Virginia

21,526

23,085

93%

July 24, 2005

Nissan Pavilion

18,803

20,975

90%

July 26, 2005

Holmdel, New Jersey

PNC Bank Arts Center

12,059

17,000

71%

July 27, 2005

Holmdel, New Jersey

PNC Bank Arts Center

12,060

17,000

71%

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United States United States United States Canada Tweeter Center 20,794 28,644 73%

July 30, 2005

Tinley Park, Illinois

July 31, 2005

Noblesville, Indiana

Verizon Wireless Music Center

20,038

24,204

83%

August 2, 2005 August 3, 2005 August 4, 2005 August 6, 2005 August 7, 2005 August 9, 2005 August 11, 2005 August 13, 2005 August 14, 2005 August 15, 2005 August 16, 2005 August 18, 2005 August 20, 2005

Columbus, Ohio

Germain Amphitheatre

14,606

20,000

73%

Toronto, Ontario

Molson Amphitheatre

Clarkston, Michigan

United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States United States

DTE Energy Music Theatre

17,202

17,202

100%

East Troy, Wisconsin

Alpine Valley Music Theatre

20,575

35,072

59%

Somerset, Wisconsin

Float-Rite Amphitheater

(Cancelled)

Greenwood Village, Colorado Auburn, Washington

Coors Amphitheater

4,953

14,800

33%

White River Amphitheatre

16,923

19,536

87%

Mountain View, California

Shoreline Amphitheatre

19,623

22,000

89%

Marysville, California

Sleep Train Amphitheater

(Cancelled)

Marysville, California

Sleep Train Amphitheater

11,709

18,500

63%

West Valley City, Utah

USANA Amphitheatre

(Cancelled)

Phoenix, Arizona

Cricket Wireless Pavilion

16,430

20,151

82%

San Bernardino, California

Hyundai Pavilion

46,078

46,843

98%

United Kingdom & Republic of Ireland Tour Dates (August 2005)


Date City Country Venue

United Kingdom August 26, 2005 August 28, 2005 August 30, 2005 Leeds Reading Dublin England England Ireland Leeds Festival Reading Festival Royal Dublin Society

September 2, 2005 London

England Hammersmith Apollo

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Setlist Of The Tour


## #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 #8 #9 Song Intro: The Ides Of March Killers Album Year 1981 1981 1981 1980 1983 1980 1983

Murders In The Rue Morgue Killers Another Life Prowler The Trooper Remember Tomorrow Where Eagles Dare Run To The Hills Revelations Killers Iron Maiden Piece of Mind Iron Maiden Piece of Mind

The Number of the Beast 1982 Piece of Mind Killers Piece of Mind Iron Maiden 1983 1981 1983 1980

#10 Wrathchild #11 Die With Your Boots On #12 Phantom Of The Opera #13 The Number Of The Beast #14 Hallowed Be Thy Name #15 Iron Maiden #16 Running Free #17 Drifter #18 Sanctuary

The Number of the Beast 1982 The Number of the Beast 1982 Iron Maiden Iron Maiden Killers Iron Maiden 1980 1980 1981 1980

Tracks played only at a few venues


## Song Album Year 1980

# 19 Charlotte The Harlot Iron Maiden

References
[1] The revenge of Sharon Osbourne | | guardian.co.uk Arts (http:/ / arts. guardian. co. uk/ features/ story/ 0,,1555172,00. html) [2] KNAC.COM - News - Rob Smallwood Iron Maiden (http:/ / www. knac. com/ article. asp?ArticleID=3824)

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A Matter of Life and Death Tour


A Matter of Life and Death Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Start date End date Shows October 4, 2006 June 24, 2007 58 Iron Maiden tour chronology Eddie Rips Up The World Tour (2005) A Matter of Life and Death Tour (2006/07) Somewhere Back in Time World Tour (2008)

A Matter of Life and Death and A Matter of the Beast were two concert tours by Iron Maiden from 2006 to 2007. The first tour was unique, as the set list primarily consisted of the band's album A Matter of Life and Death in its entirety. Unusually, one of the setlists of the tour didn't have the songs "The Number of the Beast" and "The Trooper", songs that were played in all shows up to then.

Opening Bands
Lauren Harris Trivium Bullet for My Valentine 3 Inches of Blood Parikrama

Tour dates
Date City Country North America October 4, 2006 October 6, 2006 October 7, 2006 October 9, 2006 October 10, 2006 October 12, 2006 October 13, 2006 October 16, 2006 October 17, 2006 October 18, 2006 October 21, 2006 Hartford, Connecticut Boston, Massachusetts Camden, New Jersey Quebec City, Quebec Montreal, Quebec Uniondale, New York East Rutherford, New Jersey Toronto, Ontario Auburn Hills, Michigan Rosemont, Illinois Irvine, California United States United States United States Canada Canada United States United States Canada United States United States United States Japan October 25, 2006 October 26, 2006 Tokyo Hiroshima Japan Japan Nippon Budokan Yubinchokin Hall New England Dodge Music Center Agganis Arena Tweeter Center at the Waterfront Colise Pepsi Bell Centre Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum Continental Airlines Arena Air Canada Centre The Palace of Auburn Hills Allstate Arena Verizon Wireless Amphitheater Venue

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Tokyo Osaka Nagoya Forum Osaka-jo Hall Shimin Hall

October 28, 2006 October 30, 2006 October 31, 2006

Japan Japan Japan Europe

November 9, 2006 November 10, 2006 November 12, 2006 November 14, 2006 November 15, 2006 November 17, 2006 November 18, 2006 November 20, 2006 November 21, 2006 November 23, 2006 November 25, 2006 November 27, 2006 November 28, 2006 November 30, 2006 December 2, 2006 December 3, 2006 December 5, 2006 December 7, 2006 December 9, 2006

Aalborg Copenhagen

Denmark Denmark

Gigantium Valby Hallen

Tampere

Finland

Icehall

Helsinki

Finland

Hartwall Areena

Helsinki

Finland

Hartwall Areena

Stockholm

Sweden

Stockholm Globe Arena

Stockholm

Sweden

Stockholm Globe Arena

Gothenburg

Sweden

Scandinavium

Oslo

Norway

Vallhall Arena

Bergen

Norway

Vestlandshallen

Stockholm

Sweden

Stockholm Globe Arena

Den Bosch

Netherlands

Brabanthallen

Paris

France

Palais Omnisports de Paris-Bercy

Barcelona

Spain

Palau Sant Jordi

Milan Milan Zurich Stuttgart Dortmund

Italy Italy Switzerland Germany Germany United Kingdom United Kingdom United Kingdom United Kingdom

DatchForum DatchForum Hallenstadion Schleyerhalle Westfalenhalle Cardiff CIA

December 11, 2006 Cardiff

December 12, 2006 Birmingham

NEC

December 14, 2006 Manchester

Manchester Arena

December 15, 2006 Glasgow

Glasgow SECC

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United Kingdom United Kingdom Ireland United Kingdom United Kingdom UAE/Europe/India Metro Radio Arena

December 17, 2006 Newcastle

December 18, 2006 Sheffield

Sheffield Arena

December 20, 2006 Dublin December 22, 2006 London

The Point Earls Court Arena

December 23, 2006 London

Earls Court Arena

March 9, 2007 March 11, 2007 March 14, 2007 March 17, 2007

Dubai Athens Belgrade Bangalore

UAE Greece Serbia India Europe

Desert Rock Festival Hellinikon Basketball Arena Belgrade Fair Hall 1 Eddfest, Bangalore Palace Grounds

June 2, 2007 June 4, 2007 June 6, 2007 June 8, 2007 June 10, 2007

Ljubljana Sofia Ostrava Ludwigshafen Donington Park

Slovenia Bulgaria Czech Republic Germany United Kingdom Italy Netherlands Germany Italy Spain Belgium United Kingdom

Bezigrad Stadium Lokomotiv Stadium Bazaly Stadium Sdweststadion Download Festival

June 14, 2007 June 16, 2007 June 17, 2007 June 20, 2007 June 21, 2007 June 23, 2007 June 24, 2007

Venice Biddinghuizen Dsseldorf Rome Bilbao Dessel London

Heineken Jammin' Festival Fields of Rock Festival ISS-Dome Stadio Olimpico Bilbao Live Festival Graspop Metal Meeting Brixton Academy

Setlist of the Tour


A Matter of Life and Death Tour Setlist

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## #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 Different World

Song

Album A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death

Year 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006 2006

These Colours Don't Run Brighter Than A Thousand Suns The Pilgrim The Longest Day Out of the Shadows The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg For the Greater Good of God Lord of Light

#8 #9

A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death Fear of the Dark Iron Maiden Powerslave

2006 2006 2006 1992 1980 1984

#10 The Legacy #11 Fear of the Dark #12 Iron Maiden #13 2 Minutes to Midnight #14 The Evil That Men Do #15 Hallowed Be Thy Name

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1988 The Number of the Beast 1982

A Matter of the Life And Death World Tour- Eddfest Bangalore, Desert Rock Festival, Greece and Serbia Setlist
## #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 Different World These Colours Don't Run Brighter Than A Thousand Suns Wrathchild The Trooper The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg For the Greater Good of God The Number of the Beast Fear of the Dark Song Album A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death Killers Piece of Mind A Matter of Life and Death Year 2006 2006 2006 1981 1983 2006

#7 #8 #9

A Matter of Life and Death The Number of the Beast Fear of the Dark The Number of the Beast Iron Maiden Powerslave

2006 1982 1992 1982 1980 1984

#10 Run to the Hills #11 Iron Maiden #12 2 Minutes to Midnight #13 The Evil That Men Do #14 Hallowed Be Thy Name

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1988 The Number of the Beast 1982

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A Matter of the Beast Summer Tour Setlist


## #1 #2 #3 #4 #5 #6 #7 Different World These Colours Don't Run Brighter Than A Thousand Suns Wrathchild The Trooper Children of the Damned The Reincarnation of Benjamin Breeg For the Greater Good of God The Number of the Beast Song Album A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death A Matter of Life and Death Killers Piece of Mind The Number of the Beast A Matter of Life and Death Year 2006 2006 2006 1981 1983 1982 2006

#8 #9

A Matter of Life and Death The Number of the Beast Fear of the Dark The Number of the Beast Iron Maiden Powerslave

2006 1982 1992 1982 1980 1984

#10 Fear of the Dark #11 Run to the Hills #12 Iron Maiden #13 2 Minutes to Midnight #14 The Evil That Men Do #15 Hallowed Be Thy Name

Seventh Son of a Seventh Son 1988 The Number of the Beast 1982

Somewhere Back in Time World Tour

466

Somewhere Back in Time World Tour


Somewhere Back In Time World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Locations Start date End date Legs Shows Americas, Europe, Asia, Oceania February 1, 2008 April 2, 2009 6 91 (1 cancelled) Iron Maiden tour chronology A Matter Of Life And Death Tour (2006-2007) Somewhere Back In Time World Tour (2008-2009) The Final Frontier World Tour (2010)

Somewhere Back in Time World Tour was a concert tour by Iron Maiden in 2008 and 2009 to promote the DVD release of their 1985 concert video Live After Death, a second installment in a series of DVD re-releases of concerts, supported by tours, titled "The History of Iron Maiden". To tie in with the tour, a new greatest hits compilation Somewhere Back In Time - The Best Of: 1980-1989 - was also released. These combined with Iron Maiden's Bruce Airways service (where singer Bruce Dickinson flies fans to concerts) and their most expansive merchandise campaign - including an individual tour shirt for each concert among other things - mean this tour was heralded as the band's most important in many years. Many of the band's songs had not been played in a long time, as much as 21 years in one case, and two of them ("Moonchild" and "Rime of the Ancient Mariner") never played by the current line-up. A subsequent tour documentary titled Flight 666 was released in April 2009 with an accompanying DVD and soundtrack, with a limited release of the documentary into cinemas. The World Slavery Tour's stage had been the biggest and most complicated the band ever designed, but a number of modifications were made for this tour. The tour used an updated version of the band's 1984-5 World Slavery Tour stage set, which carried an Ancient Egyptian theme, and the band played a set focussing on the 1980s - specifically the years when albums Powerslave (1984), Somewhere in Time (1986) and Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (1988) were released. The only song the band played that was not from the 1980s was the title track from 1992's Fear of the Dark album, because it is one of the band's best known songs. During the whole tour Iron Maiden played to more than 2 million people worldwide.

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Tour commentary
The first leg of Iron Maiden's Somewhere Back in Time World Tour opened in Mumbai, India on February 1, and continued through Australia, Japan, Los Angeles and Mexico, followed by concerts in Costa Rica, Colombia, Brazil, Argentina, Chile, Puerto Rico and New Jersey, before finishing in Toronto, on March 16. Over the 45 day period the band played 23 concerts to over 500,000 fans in 11 countries, flying close to 50,000 miles in the specially refitted plane: Iron Maiden's Boeing 757 tour plane, nicknamed "Ed Force One." Boeing 757, dubbed "Ed Force One" after a competition to name the plane. On this leg of the tour, the Iron Maiden: Flight 666 movie was filmed. Concerning concerts in Scandinavia, EMA Telstar announced that the Iron Maiden tour will be the biggest rock tour that any band has ever undertaken in these Nordic regions. Comments tour promoter Thomas Johansson of EMA Telstar: "We are all very proud to be making history by giving our rock fans the biggest Nordic Rock Tour there has ever been and certainly one of the most spectacular. Maiden is so hugely popular with the Nordic peoples that we wanted to ensure that as many fans as possible got the opportunity to see this very special show next year as we expect demand for tickets to be enormous.",[1] Maiden had also announced that they would be returning to cities that they hadn't returned to for years. Western Canada is included, as their five city run through Western Canada had sold out the very day they went on sale. Calgary and Regina had sold out in just under an hour. Edmonton sold out completely in a few hours. Winnipeg and Vancouver sold out within two hours. Calgary also had the highest pre-sale ever for the band, in which they sold out half the tickets. Edmonton and Regina were not far behind. Says Dickinson about the results: "We are truly overwhelmed by this response, especially as some of these cities we haven't played in 20 years!! Being Brits we are always very comfortable with Canadians and it will be a great pleasure to get back on the prairies again. It was always a LOUD response there! We look forward to this immensely and hope to give you all a show to remember."[2] Most recently they played at Madison Square Garden in New York City. Tickets to this show were sold out. During the performance of "Powerslave" the band's instruments lost power for a brief period of time and they passed time by playing football on the stage. Once the equipment was fixed they returned and asked the audience if they should play the last verse of the song or do the next one. The band opted to play the next song which was "Heaven Can Wait". Rarely ever have Maiden been canceling gigs in the past 2 years, but due to storm damage to the PA and lights at the Metalway Festival in Zaragoza, Spain, Maiden had to cancel their July 12 date. The Metalway Festival in Zaragoza could be rescheduled, but it seems unlikely that Maiden can appear for their fans in Zaragoza.[3] The March 15th presentation, in So Paulo's Race Course, had Maiden's all-time biggest attendance for them as sole performers (not a festival). Bruce Dickinson announced to the crowd that "100.000 fans" were at the venue, and later the number was resized to 63.000.

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Support acts
Opening bands for this tour are: First Leg: Lauren Harris, Vanishing Point, Behind Crimson Eyes, Parikrama. Second Leg: Lauren Harris[4] Anthrax (May 30 and 31 only) and Trivium (Holmdel only)[5] . Third Leg: Lauren Harris, Within Temptation (London and Assen only), Kamelot (Assen), Avenged Sevenfold (not at every show), Trooper (Bucharest), Made of Hate (Warsaw), Salamandra (Prague), Slayer (Lisbon and Mrida), Tainted
(Christchurch)

Fourth Leg: Lauren Harris, Carcass, Atreyu, Morbid Angel, Anthrax (Bogota), gora (Mexico City), IRA (Monterrey), M.A.S.A.C.R.E. (Lima), Witchblade (Chile)

Personnel
Bruce Dickinson lead vocals Dave Murray guitars Adrian Smith guitars, backing vocals Janick Gers guitars Steve Harris bass, backing vocals

Nicko McBrain drums, percussion with Michael Kenney keyboards

Tour dates
Asia & Oceania Leg

Fan club members join Iron Maiden to sing the chant during "Heaven Can Wait".

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Date

City

Country

Venue

Tickets sold

Tickets on sale

Percentage sold

India February 1, 2008 Mumbai India Bandra-Kurla complex Australia February 4, 2008 February 6, 2008 February 7, 2008 February 9, 2008 Perth Melbourne Melbourne Sydney Australia Burswood Dome Australia Rod Laver Arena Australia Rod Laver Arena Australia Acer Arena Australia Acer Arena Australia Entertainment Centre Japan February 15, 2008 Yokohama February 16, 2008 Tokyo Japan Japan Yokohama Pacifico Makuhari Messe 5,000 10,000 5,000 10,000 100% 100% 14,000 14,000 14,000 20,100 20,100 13,500 14,000 14,000 14,000 20,100 20,100 13,500 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 30,000 30,000 100%

February 10, 2008 Sydney February 12, 2008 Brisbane

American Leg
Date City Country Venue Tickets sold 17,200 Tickets on sale 17,200 Percentage sold 100%

February 19, 2008 February 21, 2008 February 22, 2008 February 24, 2008 February 26, 2008 February 28, 2008 March 2, 2008 March 4, 2008 March 5, 2008 March 7, 2008 March 9, 2008 March 12, 2008 March 14, 2008

Inglewood, California

United States Mexico

The Forum

Guadalajara

Auditorio Telmex

11,500

11,500

100%

Monterrey

Mexico

Monterrey Arena

12,500

12,500

100%

Mexico City

Mexico

Foro Sol

55,000

55,000

100%

San Jos

Costa Rica

Estadio Ricardo Saprissa

27,000

27,000

100%

Bogot

Colombia

Simn Bolvar Park

55.000

55.000

100%

So Paulo Curitiba Porto Alegre Buenos Aires Santiago San Juan East Rutherford, New Jersey Toronto, Ontario Selma, Texas

Brazil Brazil Brazil Argentina Chile Puerto Rico United States Canada United States

Estdio Palestra Itlia Pedreira Paulo Leminski Gigantinho Estadio Ricardo Etcheverry Pista Atletica Coliseo De Puerto Rico Izod Center

45,000 23,000 16,000 30,000 30,000 16,500 15,154

45,000 23,000 16,000 30,000 30,000 16,500 15,154

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

March 16, 2008 May 21, 2008

Air Canada Centre Verizon Wireless Amphitheater

16,766 14,667

16,766 19,982

100% 73%

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United States United States United States United States United States United States United States Canada Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion Journal Pavilion 13,108 15,861 83%

May 22, 2008

The Woodlands, Texas

May 25, 2008

Albuquerque, New Mexico

12,973

12,973

100%

May 26, 2008

Phoenix, Arizona

Cricket Wireless Pavilion

19,921

19,921

100%

May 28, 2008

Concord, California

Sleep Train Pavilion

12,500

12,500

100%

May 30, 2008

Irvine, California

Verizon Wireless Amphitheater Verizon Wireless Amphitheater White River Amphitheatre

17,133

17,133

100%

May 31, 2008

Irvine, California

17,133

17,133

100%

June 2, 2008

Auburn, Washington

14,188

19,508

71%

June 3, 2008

Vancouver, British Columbia Calgary, Alberta Edmonton, Alberta Regina, Saskatchewan Winnipeg, Manitoba Rosemont, Illinois

Pacific Coliseum

15,150

15,150

100%

June 5, 2008 June 6, 2008 June 8, 2008 June 9, 2008 June 11, 2008

Canada Canada Canada Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States Canada

Saddledome Rexall Place Brandt Centre MTS Centre Allstate Arena

12,000 14,000 7,000 15,000 15,254

12,000 14,000 7,000 15,000 15,300

100% 100% 100% 100% 99%

June 12, 2008

Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio

Blossom Music Center

11,028

21,340

51%

June 14, 2008

Holmdel, New Jersey

PNC Bank Arts Center

19,996

19,996

100%

June 15, 2008

New York, New York

Madison Square Garden

20,000

20,000

100%

June 17, 2008

Camden, New Jersey

Susquehanna Bank Center

7,779

25,265

31%

June 18, 2008

Columbia, Maryland

Merriweather Post Pavilion

19,316

19,316

100%

June 20, 2008

Mansfield, Massachusetts

Comcast Center

19,900

19,900

100%

June 21, 2008

Montral, Qubec

Parc Jean-Drapeau

25,000

50,000

50%

According to sponsors and the Flight 666 documentary, the concert held in Costa Rica marks the biggest of the region, Central America, with over 27000 attendants. The concert in the Simon Bolivar Park of Bogota, Colombia was planned for 45000 people but due to the great demand that was generating the Iron Maiden's first concert in Colombia they sold more tickets that have planned coming to the 55000.

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European Leg
Date City Country Venue Tickets sold Tickets on sale 40,000 55,000 17,500 17,500 60,000 35,000 30,000 (Cancelled) 33,000 48,000 30,000 25,000 30,000 60,132 25,000 85,000 40,000 28,000 33,000 37,000 Percentage sold 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 60% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

June 27, 2008 June 29, 2008 July 1, 2008 July 2, 2008 July 5, 2008 July 9, 2008 July 11, 2008 July 12, 2008 July 16, 2008 July 18, 2008 July 19, 2008 July 22, 2008 July 24, 2008 July 26, 2008 July 27, 2008 July 31, 2008 August 2, 2008 August 4, 2008 August 7, 2008 August 8, 2008

Bologna Dessel Paris Paris London Lisbon Mrida Zaragoza Stockholm Helsinki Tampere Trondheim Oslo Gothenburg Horsens Wacken Attica Bucharest Warsaw Prague

Italy Belgium France France England Portugal Spain Spain Sweden Finland Finland Norway Norway Sweden Denmark Germany Greece Romania Poland Czech Republic Croatia Hungary Switzerland Netherlands Russia Serbia

Gods of Metal Graspop Metal Meeting Palais omnisports de Paris-Bercy Palais omnisports de Paris-Bercy Twickenham Stadium Super Bock Super Rock Via de la Plata Festival Metalway Festival Stockholm Olympic Stadium Helsinki Olympic Stadium Ratina Stadium Lerkendal Stadium Valle Hovin Ullevi Stadium Gods Bane Pladsen Wacken Open Air Terra Vibe Park Cotroceni Stadium Gwardia Stadium Slavia Stadium

40,000 55,000 17,500 17,500 60,000 35,000 30,000 40,000 33,000 48,000 30,000 25,000 30,000 60,132 15,000 85,000 40,000 28,000 33,000 37,000

August 10, 2008 August 12, 2008 August 14, 2008 August 16, 2008 August 19, 2008

Split Budapest Mnchenstein Assen Moscow

Poljud City Stadium Sziget Festival St. Jakobshalle TT Circuit Assen Olympic Stadium (Moscow arena) Belgrade Arena

29,650 74,000 11,000 30,000 40,000 22,000

33,000 74,000 11,000 30,000 40,000 22,000

92.16% 100% 100% 100% [6]

100% 100%

February 10, 2009 Belgrade

The Metalway Festival appereance was cancelled due to bad weather. The EUROPEAN LEG was the biggest sales achievement in band's career - Most shows were sold out in rapid time and streams of tickets were officially extra added due to high demand. WACKEN OPEN AIR'08 "Night Of Iron Maiden" attracted highest number of fans for festival IRON MAIDEN gig on 2008/09 tour. According to "Metal Hammer DE"- "...not less than 83.000 metal maniacs from all over the world attended this show".

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Asia & Oceania Leg II

Dave Murray and Steve Harris in Mansfield, MA.

Date

City

Country

Venue

Tickets sold

Tickets on sale 15,000 20,000

Percentage sold 100% 100%

February 13, 2009 Dubai February 15, 2009 Bangalore

UAE India

Media City Amphitheatre Palace Grounds Oceania

15,000 20,000 [7]

February 20, 2009 Auckland

New Zealand New Zealand

Mount Smart Stadium

20,000

[8]

20,000

100%

February 22, 2009 Christchurch

Westpac Arena

10,000

10,000

100%

American Leg II
Date City Country Venue Tickets sold Total Tickets Percentage sold 86% 90% 97% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100%

February 25, 2009 Monterrey February 26, 2009 Guadalajara February 28, 2009 Mexico City March 3, 2009 March 5, 2009 March 7, 2009 March 10, 2009 March 12, 2009 March 14, 2009 March 15, 2009 March 18, 2009 March 20, 2009 March 22, 2009 March 26, 2009 March 28, 2009 March 31, 2009 April 2, 2009 Alajuela Caracas Bogota Quito Manaus Rio de Janeiro So Paulo Belo Horizonte Brasilia Santiago Lima Buenos Aires Recife Sunrise, Florida

Mexico Mexico Mexico Costa Rica Venezuela Colombia Ecuador Brazil Brazil Brazil Brazil Brazil Chile Peru Argentina Brazil

Estadio Universitario Arena VFG Foro Sol Estadio Alejandro Morera Soto Poliedro de Caracas Simon Bolivar Park Estadio Aucas Sambodromo Praa da Apoteose Autodromo de Interlagos Mineirinho Estdio Man Garrincha Club Hipico Santiago Estadio Nacional Vlez Sarsfield Stadium Jockey Club de Pernambuco

30,500 11,800 52,000 22,000 25,000 55,000 35,000 20,000 22,000 100,000* 22,000 28,000 60,000 40,000 50,000 28,000 21,000

35,000 13,600 55,000 22,000 25,000 55,000 35,000 20,000 22,000 100,000* 22,000 28,000 60,000 40,000 50,000 28,000 21,000

United States BankAtlantic Center

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There are rumours of the producers that more than 95,000 tickets were sold for the So Paulo concert. Official numbers were around 65,000, due to organizator's problems with fire department and security hiring for the actual attendance. On the Latin American Leg in 2009 Iron Maiden played 16 gigs to well over half a million people. Their show at Autodromo de Interlagos had the biggest attendance for a rock music event in history of the venue. All number figures according to local reviews sites statistics, published and multiplexed many times.

References
[1] 06.11.2007 Dates for the Nordic tour (http:/ / ironmaiden-bg. com/ news_archive_eng. html#06112007) [2] Iron Maiden official website - Maiden Mania now hits Western Canada (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=864) [3] Iron Maiden Official Website - Zaragoza cancelled today (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=959) [4] Iron Maiden Official Website - Lauren Harris debut album and tour details (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=875) [5] "TRIVIUM To Support IRON MAIDEN In New Jersey" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=94852). Blabbermouth.net. . Retrieved April 14, 2008. [6] http:/ / www. ironmaidenforum. com/ showthread. php?t=39837 [7] http:/ / rockinindia. com/ relive2009. php [8] http:/ / www. nzherald. co. nz/ entertainment/ news/ article. cfm?c_id=1501119& objectid=10557948

http://rockinindia.com/relive.php

External links
Official website (http://www.ironmaiden.com/) Iron Maiden (http://www.dmoz.org//Arts/Music/Bands_and_Artists/I/Iron_Maiden//) at the Open Directory Project (http://rockinindia.com/relive.php)

The Final Frontier World Tour

474

The Final Frontier World Tour


The Final Frontier World Tour Tour by Iron Maiden Associated album Start date End date Shows The Final Frontier June 9, 2010 TBA 36 (scheduled to date) Iron Maiden tour chronology Somewhere Back in Time World Tour (2008) The Final Frontier World Tour (2010-2011)

The Final Frontier World Tour is a concert tour by Iron Maiden that began on June 9, 2010 in Dallas, Texas. The tour comes in support of the band's 15th album, The Final Frontier. The news was announced on the band's official website on March 5th under the following statement[1] : "Iron Maiden are pleased to announce that their forthcoming new studio album will be called 'The Final Frontier', and is expected be released late summer of this year. The announcement comes with news of a North American Tour with Very Special Guests Dream Theater to open in Dallas, Texas, on 9th June and finish in Washington D.C. on 20th July, making it Maiden's most extensive North American tour in many years. Following these shows in USA and Canada The Final Frontier World Tour will travel back to Europe for a few selected major festival and stadium shows with the band planning to continue to many other countries in 2011." Concerning the tour, Steve Harris said on June 7[2] : Were hugely excited about this tour. I think the fans will really like the brand new stage production and lights and we will also be debuting one of the new album tracks, "El Dorado." Our Texan fans will be the very first people anywhere to hear it live, so it will be interesting to see their reaction and how it goes down with the crowd on the night! Eddie has changed a bit for this tour but is possibly the most outrageous one to date... I cant say too much about him as dont want to spoil the surprise but I guarantee he will scare the hell out of you!

Opening bands
Dream Theater on all North American dates except Winnipeg[1] Automan in Winnipeg[3] Heaven & Hell were scheduled to support in both Bergen, Norway[4] and Dublin, Ireland,[5] but due to Ronnie James Dio's ongoing battle with cancer, all of the band's summer concerts were canceled on 4 May 2010.[6] Dio later died on 16 May 2010.[7]

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Tour dates
The following are the currently confirmed tour dates; Iron Maiden has said that the tour will continue into 2011, although dates and venues beyond those listed below have not been announced:[1] [8]
Date City Country North America June 9, 2010 June 11, 2010 June 12, 2010 June 14, 2010 Dallas, Texas The Woodlands, Texas San Antonio, Texas Greenwood Village, Colorado Albuquerque, New Mexico Phoenix, Arizona San Bernardino, California Concord, California Auburn, Washington Vancouver, British Columbia Edmonton, Alberta Calgary, Alberta Saskatoon, Saskatchewan Winnipeg, Manitoba Toronto, Ontario Ottawa, Ontario United States United States United States United States SuperPages.com Center Cynthia Woods Mitchell Pavilion AT&T Center Comfort Dental Amphitheatre Venue

June 16, 2010 June 17, 2010 June 19, 2010 June 20, 2010 June 22, 2010 June 24, 2010 June 26, 2010 June 27, 2010 June 29, 2010 June 30, 2010 July 3, 2010 July 6, 2010

United States United States United States United States United States Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada Canada

The Pavilion Cricket Wireless Pavilion San Manuel Amphitheater Sleep Train Pavilion White River Amphitheatre General Motors Place Rexall Place Pengrowth Saddledome Credit Union Centre MTS Center Molson Amphitheatre Ottawa Bluesfest at LeBreton Flats Park Bell Centre Plains of Abraham PNC Bank Arts Center Madison Square Garden First Niagara Pavilion Blossom Music Center DTE Energy Music Theatre First Midwest Bank Amphitheatre Jiffy Lube Live

July 7, 2010 July 9, 2010 July 11, 2010 July 12, 2010 July 14, 2010 July 15, 2010 July 17, 2010 July 18, 2010 July 20, 2010

Montral, Qubec Qubec City, Qubec Holmdel, New Jersey New York, New York Burgettstown, Pennsylvania Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio Clarkston, Michigan Tinley Park, Illinois Bristow, Virginia

Canada Canada United States United States United States United States United States United States United States Europe

July 30, 2010 August 1, 2010

Dublin Knebworth

Ireland United Kingdom Germany Sweden Finland Norway

The O2 Knebworth House Sonisphere Festival

August 5, 2010 August 7, 2010 August 8, 2010

Wacken Stockholm Pori

Wacken Open Air Festival Stora Skuggan Sonisphere Festival Kirjurinluoto Sonisphere Festival Koengen

August 11, 2010 Bergen

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Hungary Romania Italy Belgium Spain Sziget Festival Polus Center Villa Manin Pukkelpop Auditorio Marina Sur

August 14, 2010 Budapest August 15, 2010 Cluj-Napoca August 17, 2010 Codroipo August 19, 2010 Hasseltt August 21, 2010 Valencia

Setlist
After the Somewhere Back in Time World Tour, which focused on songs from the band's 1980s albums, the setlist for the 2010 leg of the Final Frontier World Tour consists primarily of songs from the albums the band has released since the return of Bruce Dickinson and Adrian Smith in 2000.

References
[1] "IRON MAIDEN announce new studio album 'THE FINAL FRONTIER' and North American Tour" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1184). Iron Maiden Official Website. 4 March 2010. . Retrieved 28 March 2010. [2] "MAIDEN ANNOUNCE RELEASE DATE, ARTWORK AND TRACKLISTING FOR NEW ALBUM THE FINAL FRONTIER TOUR STARTS THIS WEEK" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ thebigbang_2. html). Iron Maiden official website. 7 June 2010. . Retrieved 8 June 2010. [3] Iron Maiden Tickets (http:/ / www. livenation. com/ edp/ eventId/ 419359) Live Nation [4] Heaven & Hell to Support Maiden in Norway (http:/ / maidenfans. com/ 2010/ heaven__hell_to_support_maiden_in_norway) [5] http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=8& p2_articleid=1193 [6] "HEAVEN & HELL: All Summer Shows Cancelled" (http:/ / www. roadrunnerrecords. com/ blabbermouth. net/ news. aspx?mode=Article& newsitemID=139554). Blabbermouth.net. 4 May 2010. . Retrieved 5 May 2010. [7] "Metal singer Ronnie James Dio dies aged 67" (http:/ / en. wikinews. org/ wiki/ Metal_singer_Ronnie_James_Dio_dies_aged_67). Wikinews. 16 May 2010. . Retrieved 17 May 2010. [8] "**THE FINAL FRONTIER 2010 NORTH AMERICAN TOUR**" (http:/ / www. ironmaiden. com/ index. php?categoryid=15). Iron Maiden Official Website. . Retrieved 7 May 2010.

477

Other tours
Metal for Muthas Tour
Metal for Muthas Tour Tour by various NWOBHM era artists Location Start date End date Shows Great Britain February 1, 1980 March 2, 1980 30

The Metal for Muthas Tour was a 1980 concert tour headlined variously by Motrhead, Samson, and Saxon. Supporting the New Wave of British Heavy Metal compilation album Metal for Muthas, the tour featured a large number of bands identified as the founders of the movement. During the tour, the three headlining bands were supported by a total of twenty two other bands, including a then unknown Iron Maiden. [1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Tour dates
Date February 1 February 2 February 3 February 4 February 5 February 6 February 7 February 8 February 9 City Aberdeen Glasgow Saint Andrews Edinburgh Grimsby Bristol Wakefield Huddersfield Manchester Country Venue

Scotland Aberdeen University Scotland Glasgow University Scotland St Andrews University Scotland Tiffany's England Centre Hall England Romeo & Juliet's England Unity Hall England Huddersfield Polytechnic England UMIST England The Lyceum England Civic Theatre England Tiffany's Wales Circles

February 10 London February 11 Mansfield February 13 Coventry February 14 Swansea February 15 Hitchin February 16 West Runton February 17 Redcar February 18 Birkenhead February 19 Oldham February 20 Blackburn February 21 Carlisle

England Hitchin College England West Runton Pavilion England Coatham Bowl England Hamilton Club England Civic Hall England King George's Hall England Market Hall

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478
February 22 Newcastle upon Tyne February 23 Leicester February 24 Sheffield February 25 Plymouth February 26 Cardiff February 27 Portsmouth February 28 Wolverhampton England Mayfair Ballroom

England Leicester University England Top Rank England Fiesta Wales Top Rank

England Portsmouth Polytechnic England Wolverhampton Civic Hall England Victoria Hall England The Porterhouse England Top Rank

February 29 Hanley March 1 March 2 Redford Birmingham

Featured acts
Air Angels Angel Witch Bad Manners Blitzfish Bombshell Desolation Angels Diamond Head Dogwatch Fist Iron Maiden Magnum The Monos More Motrhead Nutz Praying Mantis Quartz Raven Samson Saxon Sledgehammer Toad the Wet Sprocket Urchin Witchfynde Wounded John Scott Cree

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References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour00_mfm/ dates00_mfm& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour00_mfm/ tour00_mfm& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwtourdates http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ The_Early_Years#1980 http:/ / www. maidenlive. com/ content/ view/ 17/ 9/

British Steel Tour

480

British Steel Tour


British Steel Tour Tour by Judas Priest Associated album Start date End date Shows British Steel March 7, 1981 August 28, 1981 75 Judas Priest tour chronology Hell Bent for Leather Tour (1979) British Steel Tour (1980) World Wide Blitz Tour (1981)

The British Steel Tour was a 1980 concert tour by British heavy metal band Judas Priest, in support of their most recent release, British Steel (album). During the UK leg of the tour, they were supported by Iron Maiden.[1]

Tour dates
Date March 7 March 8 March 9 March 10 March 11 March 12 March 13 March 14 March 15 March 16 March 18 March 19 March 20 March 21 City Cardiff, Wales Leeds, England Bristol, England Manchester, England Venue Cardiff University Leeds University Colston Hall Apollo Theatre

Sheffield, England

City Hall

Sheffield, England

City Hall

Leicester, England

De Montford Hall

London, England

Hammersmith Odeon

London, England

Hammersmith Odeon

Southampton, England

Gaumont Theatre

Aberdeen, Scotland

Capitol Theatre

Edinburgh, Scotland

Odeon

Newcastle upon Tyne, England Mayfair Ballroom

Newcastle upon Tyne, England Mayfair Ballroom

British Steel Tour

481
March 22 March 23 March 25 March 26 March 27 Glasgow, Scotland Apollo Theatre

Queensferry, Wales

Deeside Leisure Centre

Stoke-on-Trent, England

Trentham Gardens Grand Hall Theatre Birmingham Odeon

Birmingham, England

Birmingham, England

Birmingham Odeon

References
[1] http:/ / maddrakket. com/ BRITISHSTEEL. html

Unmasked Tour

482

Unmasked Tour
Unmasked Tour Tour by Kiss Start date End date Legs Shows 25 July 1980 3 December 1980 4 43 (1 cancelled) Kiss tour chronology Dynasty Tour (1979) Unmasked Tour (1980) Creatures of the Night Tour (1982-1983)

The Unmasked Tour was a 1980 concert tour by the hard rock group Kiss. It was the first tour not to feature original drummer Peter Criss, and the touring debut of his replacement Eric Carr. The Unmasked tour was the first time that Kiss only played in Europe, Australia, and New Zealand, with only one show played in the United States, at the Palladium Theatre in New York. "Cold Gin" returned to the set for the first time since the Rock & Roll Over Tour, as did "Strutter", which had not been performed live since the Destroyer Tour. Iron Maiden were the opening act for the European leg of the tour.[1]

Tour setlist
1. "Detroit Rock City" 2. "Cold Gin" 3. "Strutter" 4. "Calling Dr. Love" 5. "Is That You?" 6. "Firehouse" 7. "Talk to Me" 8. "Shandi" 9. "2,000 Man" 10. "I Was Made for Lovin' You 11. "New York Groove" 12. "Love Gun" 13. "God of Thunder" 14. "Rock and Roll All Nite" 15. "Shout It Out Loud" 16. "King of the Night Time World" 17. "Black Diamond"

Unmasked Tour

483

Cancelled European tour


The planned summer 1980 UK tour was initially announced in February 1980, though the dates had leaked in late January. The Wembley dates, at least, went on sale on April 17. The tour, including European dates, was cancelled in April. The official statement released regarding this stated "Due to the extended studio time KISS needed to complete the recording of their next album, 'KISS Unmasked...' The decision to postpone the tour was made by the management and the group when they realized they wouldn't have time to record the album and rehearse their show before the tour started" (Sounds, 4/26/80). However, it was rumored at the time that "KISS have been re-negotiating their contract with Casablanca and were unable to do their UK and European tours as planned because of this (ongoing?) label limbo situation" (Sounds, 5/10/80). However, the Wembley dates had only sold 200 worth of tickets, and only 7 Edinburgh tickets had been sold due to that show having gone on sale the day prior to cancellation and only having been advertised locally. Dates were rescheduled in May, though negotiations for concerts in Brighton and Edinburgh were not successful.

Warm Up Show
Date July 25, 1980 NY City New York, Venue The Palladium

European Leg
Date August 29, 1980 August 30, 1980 August 31, 1980 September 2, 1980 September 5, 1980 September 6, 1980 September 8, 1980 September 9, 1980 September 11, 1980 September 12, 1980 September 13, 1980 September 15, 1980 September 17, 1980 September 18, 1980 September 20, 1980 September 21, 1980 September 23, 1980 September 24, 1980 September 26, 1980 September 27, 1980 City Rome, Italy Perugia, Italy Genova, Italy Milan, Italy Stafford, England Chester, England London, England London, England Nrnberg, Germany Dsseldorf, Germany Frankfurt, Germany Dortmund, Germany Stuttgart, Germany Munich, Germany Kassel, Germany Brussels, Belgium Avignon, France Lyon, France Lille, France Paris, France Venue Castel Sant'Angelo Stadio Santa Giuliana Genova Palasport Velodromo Vigorelli Bingley Hall Deeside Leisure Center Wembley Arena Wembley Arena Messehalle Philipshalle Maimarkt-Gelnde Westfalenhalle Singelfingen Messehalle Olympiahalle Eissporthalle Forest National Parc des Expositions Palais Des Sports Parc des Expositions Le Bourget

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484
September 28, 1980 September 30, 1980 October 1, 1980 October 2, 1980 October 4, 1980 October 5, 1980 October 6, 1980 October 9, 1980 October 10, 1980 October 11, 1980 St. Jakobshalle Cologne Sporthalle Bremen Stadthalle Niedersachsenhalle Alsterdorfer Sporthalle Groenoordhalle Schwarzwaldhalle Stockholm Isstadion Scandinavium Brndbyhallen

Basel, Switzerland Cologne, Germany Bremen, Germany Hannover, Germany Hamburg, Germany Leiden, Netherlands Karlsruhe, Germany Stockholm, Sweden Gothenburg, Sweden Copenhagen, Denmark Drammen, Norway Paris, France

October 13, 1980 October 16, 1980

Drammenshallen L'Hippodrome (CANCELLED)

Australia/New Zealand Leg


Date November 8, 1980 November 9, 1980 November 10, 1980 November 11, 1980 November 15, 1980 November 18, 1980 November 21, 1980 November 22, 1980 November 25, 1980 November 30, 1980 December 3, 1980 City Perth, Australia Perth, Australia Perth, Australia Perth Entertainment Centre Perth Entertainment Centre Perth Entertainment Centre Venue

Perth, Australia

Perth Entertainment Centre

Melbourne, Australia

Waverley Park

Adelaide, Australia

Adelaide Oval

Sydney, Australia

Sydney Showground

Sydney, Australia

Sydney Showground

Brisbane, Australia

Lang Park

Wellington, New Zealand Auckland, New Zealand

Athletic Park

Western Springs Stadium (Ace Frehley's final show, until 1996 Reunion Tour)

References
[1] http:/ / www. kissfaq. com/ KissFAQ-wiki/ index. php?title=Kiss_Tourdates_-_1980

World Wide Blitz Tour

485

World Wide Blitz Tour


World Wide Blitz Tour Tour by Judas Priest Associated album Point of Entry Start date End date Shows February 13, 1981 December 14, 1981 76 Judas Priest tour chronology British Steel Tour (1980) World Wide Blitz Tour (1981) World Vengeance Tour (1982)

The World Wide Blitz Tour was a 1981 concert tour by British heavy metal band Judas Priest. In support of their Point of Entry album, the tour ran from February 13 to December 14, comprising 76 dates in Europe and the United States. The first European leg was supported by Saxon, the American leg by Iron Maiden, and the second European leg by Accept.[1]

Tour Dates
Date June 3 June 4 June 5 June 6 June 7 June 8 June 9 June 10 June 11 June 13 June 27 June 28 July 1 July 2 July 3 July 4 City Las Vegas, Nevada, United States Phoenix, Arizona, United States El Paso, Texas, United States Odessa, Texas, United States Lubbock, Texas, United States McAllen, Texas, United States Laredo, Texas, United States San Antonio, Texas, United States Aladdin Hotel Arizona Veterans Memorial Coliseum El Paso County Coliseum Ector County Coliseum Memorial Coliseum Villa Real Civic Center Freeman Coliseum Venue

University Park, Texas, United States

Moody Coliseum

Houston, Texas, United States

Coliseum

Cleveland, Ohio, United States

Agora Theater

Largo, Maryland, United States

Capitol Center

Asbury Park, New Jersey, United States Salisbury, Maryland, United States Norfolk, Virginia, United States Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States

Asbury Park Convention Hall Civic Center Scope Stanley Theater

World Wide Blitz Tour

486
July 7 Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, United States Atlanta, Georgia, United States Johnson City, Tennessee, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Trotwood, Ohio, United States Johnstown, Pennsylvania, United States Buffalo, New York, United States Rochester, New York, United States Syracuse, New York, United States Albany, New York, United States New York, New York, United States New York, New York, United States New York, New York, United States New York, New York, United States New Haven, Connecticut, United States Allentown, Pennsylvania, United States Boston, Massachusetts, United States Baltimore, Maryland, United States Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States Civic Center

July 9 July 10 July 11 July 12 July 15 July 16 July 17 July 18 July 19 July 21 July 22 July 23 July 24 July 25 July 26 July 28 July 29 July 30

Fox Theater Freedom Hall North Hall Hara Arena Cambria County War Memorial Arena Shea's Theater Auditorium Theater Landmark Theater Palace Theatre Palladium Palladium Palladium Palladium Coliseum Fairgrounds Orpheum Theater Civic Center Tower Theater

References
[1] http:/ / maddrakket. com/ POINTOFENTRY. html

Blackout Tour

487

Blackout Tour
Blackout Tour Tour by Scorpions Locations Europe Japan North America March 16, 1982 December 18, 1983 90 Scorpions tour chronology Animal Magnetism Tour (1980) Blackout Tour (1982-83) Love at First Sting Tour (1984-86)

Start date End date Shows

The Blackout Tour was a concert tour by the heavy metal band Scorpions from March 16, 1982 to December 18, 1983. The North American leg of the tour was supported by Iron Maiden.[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6]

Tour Dates
Date City Europe May 1, 1982 Amsterdam, Netherlands North America July 2, 1982 July 3, 1982 July 4, 1982 July 6, 1982 July 7, 1982 July 9, 1982 July 10, 1982 July 11, 1982 July 14, 1982 July 16, 1982 July 17, 1982 July 18, 1982 July 20, 1982 July 21, 1982 July 23, 1982 July 24, 1982 July 26, 1982 Chicago, Illinois, United States Buffalo, New York, United States East Troy, Wisconsin, United States Danville, Illinois, United States Cedar Rapids, Iowa, United States Saint Louis, Missouri, United States Kansas City, Missouri, United States Des Moines, Iowa, United States Salt Lake City, Utah, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Anaheim, California, United States Oakland, California, United States Victoria, BC, Canada Vancouver, BC, Canada Edmonton, AB, Canada Calgary, AB, Canada Regina, SK, Canada Circus Pavilion Buffalo Memorial Auditorium Alpine Valley Music Theater Danville Civic Center Five Seasons Arena Kiel Auditorium (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown) Hec Edmundson Pavilion Anaheim Stadium Oakland Stadium Memorial Arena Pacific Coliseum Kinsmen Field House Max Bell Arena (Agridome) Ipsco Place Jaap Edenhall Venue

Blackout Tour

488
July 27, 1982 July 28, 1982 July 30, 1982 Winnipeg, MB, Canada Fargo, North Dakota, United States Minneapolis, Minnesota, United States Springfield, Illinois, United States (Unknown) (Unknown) (Unknown)

July 31, 1982

Prairie Capital Convention Center Market Square Arena Richfield Coliseum Ohio Center Long Beach Arena Memorial Auditorium Oakland Coliseum Centennial Coliseum (Unknown) Seattle Center Coliseum Coliseum Coliseum

August 1, 1982 August 3, 1982 August 4, 1982 September 1, 1982 September 3, 1982 September 4, 1982 September 5, 1982 September 7, 1982 September 9, 1982 September 11, 1982 September 12, 1982

Indianapolis, Indiana, United States Cleveland, Ohio, United States Columbus, Ohio, United States Long Beach, California, United States Sacramento, California, United States Oakland, California, United States Reno, Nevada, United States Boise, Idaho, United States Seattle, Washington, United States Portland, Oregon, United States Portland, Oregon, United States

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] [6] http:/ / www. the-scorpions. com/ english/ tourography/ blackout_tour_1982. asp http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour03_notb/ dates03_notb& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ The_Beast_On_The_Road http:/ / www. maidenlive. com/ content/ view/ 20/ 12/ http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwtourdates http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour03_notb/ tour03_notb& lang=eng& link=tours

Special Forces Tour

489

Special Forces Tour


Special Forces Tour Tour by 38 Special Locations Start date End date Shows North America June 1, 1982 June 19, 1982 13

The Special Forces Tour was a 1982 concert tour by 38 Special in support of their album Special Forces. The tour was supported by Iron Maiden.[1] [2] [3] [4] [5]

Tour dates
Date June 1, 1982 June 2, 1982 June 4, 1982 June 5, 1982 June 7, 1982 June 8, 1982 June 9, 1982 June 11, 1982 June 12, 1982 June 15, 1982 June 16, 1982 June 18, 1982 June 19, 1982 City Atlanta, Georgia, United States Nashville, Tennessee, United States Omni (Unknown) Venue

Birmingham, Alabama, United States Boutwell Auditorium Huntsville, Alabama, United States Knoxville, Tennessee, United States Columbus, Georgia, United States Tallahassee, Florida, United States Memphis, Tennessee, United States Von Braun Center (Unknown) Columbus Municipal Auditorium Tallahassee Civic Center Mid Hudson Civic Center

Jackson, Tennessee, United States

(Unknown)

Little Rock, Arkansas, United States

Barton Coliseum

Tulsa, Oklahoma, United States

Tulsa Convention Center

Shreveport, Louisiana, United States

Hirsch Coliseum

Norman, Oklahoma, United States

(Unknown)

Special Forces Tour

490

References
[1] [2] [3] [4] [5] http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour03_notb/ dates03_notb& lang=eng& link=tours http:/ / www. maiden-world. com/ live/ The_Beast_On_The_Road http:/ / www. maidenlive. com/ content/ view/ 20/ 12/ http:/ / maidenfans. com/ index. php?ACT=module& name=rwtourdates http:/ / www. ironmaidencommentary. com/ ?url=tour03_notb/ tour03_notb& lang=eng& link=tours

491

Related articles
Anton Gustafsson tolkar Iron Maiden
Anton Gustafsson tolkar Iron Maiden

Studio album by Anton Maiden Released Genre Label 1999 Heavy metal Lunacy, Nihilism Professional reviews

Allmusic

link

[1]

Anton Gustafsson tolkar Iron Maiden (Swedish for "Anton Gustafsson Interprets Iron Maiden") is the debut album by Anton Maiden. It was released in 1999.

Track listing
1. "Run to the Hills" 2. "The Trooper" 3. "The Number of the Beast" 4. "2 Minutes to Midnight" 5. "Aces High" 6. "Die With Your Boots On" 7. "Hallowed Be Thy Name" 8. "Rime of the Ancient Mariner" 9. "Flight of Icarus" 10. "Seventh Son of a Seventh Son" 11. "Powerslave"

Anton Gustafsson tolkar Iron Maiden

492

External links
Anton Maiden for Ever [2] Website with mp3s of Gustafsson singing.

References
[1] http:/ / www. allmusic. com/ cg/ amg. dll?p=amg& sql=10:xq5h8qbzbtz4 [2] http:/ / www. antonmaiden. altervista. org/

Martin Birch
Martin Birch is a British rock and heavy metal music producer, who became renowned for engineering and producing albums by the British rock bands Deep Purple and Iron Maiden. Birch has also produced and engineered albums for numerous artists, such as Deep Purple-related projects (Rainbow, Paice, Ashton & Lord, Whitesnake, Roger Glover, Jon Lord), but also Fleetwood Mac, Black Sabbath, Wayne County & the Electric Chairs and Blue yster Cult. On Fleetwood Mac's album Mystery to Me (1973) he is also credited playing acoustic guitar. The song "Hard Lovin' Man" from the Deep Purple album Deep Purple in Rock is dedicated to him : "For Martin Birch - catalyst".[2] He retired around 1992, after producing Iron Maiden's Fear of the Dark album. Birch appears on Iron Maiden's music video "Holy Smoke".

Selected discography
Sources: [1] , Discogs

For Fleetwood Mac


1969 Then Play On (engineer) 1970 Kiln House (engineer) 1972 Bare Trees (engineer) 1973 Penguin (producer, engineer, mixing) 1973 Mystery to Me (producer, engineer, guitar)

For Deep Purple


1969 Concerto for Group and Orchestra (engineer) 1970 Deep Purple in Rock (engineer) 1971 Fireball (engineer) 1972 Machine Head (engineer) 1972 Made in Japan (engineer) 1973 Who Do We Think We Are (engineer) 1974 Burn (engineer, mixing) 1974 Stormbringer (producer, engineer, mixing) 1975 Come Taste the Band (producer, engineer, mixing) 1976 Made in Europe (producer, engineer, mixing)- recorded live in April 1975 1977 Last Concert in Japan (producer, engineer) - recorded live in December 1975

Martin Birch

493

For Wishbone Ash


1970 Wishbone Ash (engineer) 1971 Pilgrimage (engineer) 1972 Argus (engineer)

For Rainbow
1975 Ritchie Blackmore's Rainbow (producer, engineer, mixing) 1976 Rising (producer, engineer, mixing) 1977 On Stage (producer, engineer, mixing) - recorded live in 1976 1978 Long Live Rock 'n' Roll (producer, engineer, mixing) 1986 Finyl Vinyl (producer) - collection

For Whitesnake
1978 Snakebite (producer) 1978 Trouble (producer) 1978 Live at Hammersmith (producer) 1979 Lovehunter (producer, engineer) 1980 Ready an' Willing (producer, engineer, mixing) 1980 Live...In the Heart of the City (producer, engineer) - recorded live in 1978 and 1980 1981 Come an' Get It (producer, engineer, mixing) 1982 Saints & Sinners (producer, engineer, mixing) 1984 Slide It In (producer)

For Black Sabbath


1980 Heaven and Hell (producer, engineer) 1981 Mob Rules (producer, engineer)

For Blue yster Cult


1980 Cultsaurus Erectus (producer, engineer) 1981 Fire of Unknown Origin (producer, engineer)

For Iron Maiden


1981 Killers (producer, engineer) 1982 The Number of the Beast (producer, engineer) 1983 Piece of Mind (producer, engineer, mixing) 1984 Powerslave (producer, engineer, mixing) 1985 Live After Death (producer, engineer, mixing) 1986 Somewhere in Time (producer, engineer) 1988 Seventh Son of a Seventh Son (producer, engineer, mixing) 1990 No Prayer for the Dying (producer, engineer, mixing) 1992 Fear of the Dark (producer, engineer, mixing)

Martin Birch

494

For other artists


1969 Jeff Beck - Beck-Ola (Cosa Nostra) (engineer) 1970 Peter Green - The End of the Game (engineer) 1970 The Groundhogs - Thank Christ for the Bomb (engineer) 1971 Stackridge - Stackridge (engineer) 1971 Canned Heat and John Lee Hooker - Hooker 'N' Heat (Mixdown Engineer) - recorded in 1970 1971 Jon Lord - Gemini Suite (engineer) 1971 Skid Row - 34 Hours (engineer) 1971 Toad - Toad (engineer) 1971 Faces - Long Player (engineer) 1972 Silverhead - Silverhead (producer) 1972 Toad - Tomarrow Blue (engineer) 1972 Flash - Flash (engineer) 1972 Flash - In the Can (engineer) 1973 Gary Moore - Grinding Stone (producer, engineer) 1974 Tony Ashton & Jon Lord - First of the Big Bands (engineer) 1976 Jon Lord - Sarabande (producer, engineer, remixing) 1977 Paice, Ashton & Lord - Malice in Wonderland (engineer) 1978 The Electric Chairs-"The Electric Chairs"(producer) 1978 Wayne County & the Electric Chairs - Storm The Gates Of Heaven (producer) 1978 Wayne County & the Electric Chairs - Blatantly Offensive E.P. (producer) 1978 Roger Glover - Elements (producer) 1979 Cozy Powell - Over the Top (producer) 1982 Michael Schenker Group - Assault Attack (producer, engineer)

References
[1] Martin Birch (http:/ / www. artistdirect. com/ nad/ music/ artist/ appears/ 0,,404413,00. html) at artistdirect.com

Martin Birch other artists, Mainland title Exposure 1979 1979 Mainland Exposure Producer [2] Deep Purple In Rock inlay 1970 - Harvest / EMI Records Inc.

External links
Martin Birch (http://www.discogs.com/artist/Martin+Birch) at Discogs Martin Birch discography (http://musicbrainz.org/artist/8e09f689-8f39-42a5-a3c0-c7acaf30d941.html) at MusicBrainz Martin Birch (http://www.imdb.com/name/nm1321563/) at the Internet Movie Database

Chemical Wedding

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Chemical Wedding
Chemical Wedding

Theatrical poster
Directed by Produced by Julian Doyle David Pupkewitz Malcolm Kohll Ben Timlett Justin Peyton Bruce Dickinson Simon Callow Kal Weber Lucy Cudden Jud Charlton Paul McDowell John Shrapnel Terence Bayler Mike Shannon Bruce Dickinson Bill&Ben Productions Focus Films

Written by Starring

Studio

Distributed by Anchor Bay Entertainment (U.S.) Release date(s) May 4, 2008 Country Language United Kingdom English

Chemical Wedding (released in the U.S. as Crowley[1] ) is a British supernatural horror/science fiction film produced by Bill&Ben Productions in conjunction with the London-based Focus Films. It is directed by Julian Doyle, who edited Terry Gilliam's Brazil and Time Bandits, Life of Brian and The Meaning of Life. The story is based on an original screenplay by Bruce Dickinson, frontman of heavy metal band Iron Maiden. Dickinson released a solo album entitled The Chemical Wedding in 1998, which despite sharing the title and title track from the film's soundtrack, is otherwise unrelated.

Chemical Wedding

496

Plot
Upon entering a VR machine, Professor Oliver Haddo, a modern Cambridge scholar, becomes possessed by the spirit of the infamous occultist Aleister Crowley, as the machine's program has been corrupted by a former follower of Crowley. Resurrected 50 years after his death, Crowley begins his occult practices anew, with devastating results.

Cast
Simon Callow as Professor Oliver Haddo/Aleister Crowley Kal Weber as Dr. Joshua Mathers Lucy Cudden as Lia Robinson Jud Charlton as Victor Nuberg Paul McDowell as Symonds John Shrapnel as Aleister Crowley