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BY STACY TAFF

staff@delphosherald.com
ELIDA As it approach-
es a new academic year,
Elida Local Schools is buzz-
ing with excitement at the
prospect of finally being able
to hold classes in its new high
school building.
Its hard to believe that
in just 10 days, teachers will
be filing in and then the fol-
lowing week the students will
be in here for their first day
of classes, Superintendent
Don Diglia said at Tuesdaya
school board meeting. Weve
been on this project for a few
years and now the most dif-
ficult part is all of the loose
ends that still have to be
tied up. This is a new build-
ing and I think the staff will
understand that things wont
be perfect just yet because
we havent been here before.
The teachers have been in
here all summer getting their
rooms ready. Those of us who
were involved with the project
have been here for a while
but there are a lot of people
who still havent seen it and
its very exciting for them.
Just recently, I had an alumni
come through here and he was
so impressed with the build-
ing he actually stopped over at
my office to let me know.
With the demolition of the
old high school underway,
the upcoming construction of
a new parking lot in its place
is becoming a point of focus
for the board.
Theres been a lot of
talk about asphalt versus
cement, Diglia said. I think
its very sensible to go for
cement. The price of oil has
caused the price of asphalt to
double. Back when we took
bids for the parking lot here
at the new high school, the
prices for asphalt and cement
werent that close. But now,
lets say youre building a
house and youre trying to
decide between asphalt and
cement. If its only $500
more to get the cement, who
wouldnt make that choice?
With asphalt, wed have to do
some upkeep every 2-3 years
and when you consider how
much oil has gone up in the
last five years, imagine how
high it will be in five or 10
more. The long-term benefits
of cement will get us some
great savings.
The following volun-
teers were approved: Ruth
Hardy, Sharon Savill,
Kimberly Watkins, Bruce
Watkins. Also approved
were the following van
drivers: Kevin Bowers,
Rebecca Cressman, David
Evans, Kyle Harmon, Lisa
Heffner, Keisha Larimore,
Bruce Marshall, Tyson
1
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Wednesday, august 17, 2011
DELPHOS HERALD
The
50 daily
Delphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Statehouse considering bar
in basement, p3

Golf roundup, p6
Upfront
Sports
Forecast
Obituaries 2
State/Local 3
Politics 4
Community 5
Sports 6
Business 7
Classifieds 8
TV 9
World News 10
Index
Partly cloudy
Thursday with a
30 percent
chance of
storms. High
in low 80s. See page 2.
www.delphosherald.com
Fort Jennings Mayor Jim Smith, center, and council members look over plans for a
sanitary sewer line to be installed at the village park. Plans were submitted by Surveyor
Mike Howbert, standing right.
Nancy Spencer photo
BY NANCY SPENCER
nspencer@delphosherald.com

FORT JENNINGS
Hopes of having new rest-
rooms at Fort Jennings Park
may be a little closer to real-
ity after Tuesdays village
council meeting.
Surveyor Mike Howbert
presented plans drawn by
Engineer Brad Niemeyer to
council to run a sanitary sewer
line from Second Street north
of Fort Jennings Bank to and
under the Auglaize River and
to the Fort Jennings Park
Board recreation building at
the west entrance of the park.
The line would then extend to
a lift station just south of the
tennis courts.
The proposed line would
make it possible to install
new restrooms at the park in
the future.
Council accepted the
plans, which were approved
for $500 at Julys meeting.
Mayor Jim Smith will sub-
mit them to the Ohio Public
Works Commission State
Capital Improvement and/
or Local Transportation
Improvement programs for
Issue I matching funds.
The projects estimated
cost is $42,525.
The deadline to submit
grant applications is Sept.
30. Funds are awarded in
February.
Council also accepted a
bid from Kincaid Painting
for $2,760 to paint the
maintenance building. Also
submitting bids were GW
Hunt Painting, $4,011; E.
Lee Construction, 7,227;
and Clifford Hunt Painting,
$4,931.
The project should be
completed before winter.
A refuse collection contract
was approved between the
village and Porter Disposal,
formerly Porter Sanitation.
The new contract was nec-
essary because Porter had
changed its name. Fees will
be $15.50 per month with a
$1.50 per month cart fee and
$11.75 per month for senior
citizens.
Plans are in place for
Motor Madness Weekend
which starts Friday with a car
show, burnout contest and
duck races. Events contin-
ue on Saturday with a lawn
mower poker run and lawn
mower races.
Fort Jennings Park Board
President Jerry Siefker asked
that a plumber be contacted
to see if the well pump at
the park could be repaired
or replaced before the event.
Mayor Smith agreed to try
and obtain someone to look
at the pump as soon as pos-
sible.
Smith also gave a
Bicentennial Committee
update. The event is tenta-
tively set for Motor Madness
Weekend in 2012 with
activities Thursday through
Sunday. The Bicentennial
Book sales have reached 452
copies.
Smith told council a local
Cub Scout leader was work-
ing on a tree project and coun-
cil agreed to allow Scouts to
plant trees at the wastewater
lagoon. Plans are tentative for
October.
Council entered into exec-
utive session to discuss legal
issues and adjourned with no
further business.
Venedocia native to
direct Gymanfa Ganu
Staff reports
VENEDOCIA Singing
has always been an important
part of Welsh culture. The
Gymanfa Ganu, the Welsh
Festival of Song, is a regular
event in any community with
a significant Welsh popula-
tion. The director picks verses
designated
for men or
women,
some a
cappella or
repeated
verses to
make it an
experience
and not just
a musical
program.
The
annual
Venedoica
Salem Presbyterian Church
Gymanfa Ganu will be held
Sept. 4. A light supper will be
served from 4-6 p.m. and the
Gymanfa will begin at 7 p.m.
This years director is
Margaret Morris-Lopez, who
was born and raised on a farm
south of Venedocia. Her par-
ents were Lester and Margaret
Morris. She attended York
and Lincolnview schools. Her
family always attended Salem
church and from the age of 8,
she sang in the youth choir.
She earned a bachelors degree
in music education from Ohio
Northern University.
Shortly thereafter, she
moved to New York City,
where she studied voice
and performed with a small,
amateur opera company and
worked in the classical concert
business. In 1973, she moved to
Albuquerque, N.M., where she
taught music, performed with
the New Mexico Symphony
Chorus, the Albuquerque Opera
Theatre and also earned a mas-
ters degree in voice perfor-
mance from the University of
New Mexico. During this time,
she was a member of the New
Mexico Welsh Society and
conducted their first Gymanfa
Ganu.
Twenty years ago, she and
her family moved to Grand
Junction, Colo., where she has
taught music as well as per-
formed with local dinner the-
atres, the High Desert Opera
Company and the Western
Colorado Chorale.
Her Welsh roots include
her paternal grandparents from
Jackson County in southern
Ohio, who were early settlers
in the Venedocia area. Her
maternal grandmothers family
emigrated to the United States
from Llanbrynmair, North
Wales.
Soloist Jake Wilder is a
Van Wert native and has been
called surprisingly powerful
by the Toledo Blade. He has
a unique way of introducing
his musical selections with
a personal approach which
helps him connect with the
audience.
Wilder completed his bach-
elors of music performance
degree in December 2010 at
BGSU. While there, he per-
formed numerous times for the
College of Musical Arts Opera
Theatre program.
This past April, Wilder had
the principle role in Toledo
Opera Young Artists Program
Opera On Wheels as Count
Almaviva in Rossinis Il bar-
bierre di saviglia for a total
of 64 productions in only two
months. Still contracted with
the Toledo Opera, he will be
performing in the opera chorus
as Studio
Master
for the
upcoming
produc-
tion of
Verdis La
Traviata
to be per-
formed in
October
at the
Valentine
Theatre in
Toledo.
Next summer, he will
complete his second degree
at BGSU in voice pedagogy
specialization and will be start-
ing his masters and doctorate
of music performance at the
University of Memphis.
He resides in Van Wert
as a private and group voice
instructor. His next pub-
lic appearance will be at the
Niswonger Performing Arts
Center in Van Wert with the
Fort Wayne Philharmonic for
the 9/11 Tribute Concert. He
will also be giving solo recitals
in the area and in Toledo this
October.
Organist for the Gymanfa
Ganu will be Connie ONeill
and pianist will be Sue
Fickle.
Landeck school
sets open house
Landeck Elementary
School will hold an open
house from 7-8 p.m. Aug. 24.
All Landeck students
and parents are invited
to come meet the teach-
ers and see classrooms for
the 2011-12 school year.
Thrift shop sets
25-cent sale
The Church Women
United Interfaith Thrift
Shop will hold its annual
25-cent sale from 5-7 p.m.
Thursday; 1-4 p.m. Friday;
and 9 a.m. to noon Saturday.
All clothing, shoes, books,
purses, coats, audio/video
and more is on sale. Not
included are Boutique and
household items and toys.
Ardner Memorial outing
taking teams, individuals
The 10th annual John
Ardner Memorial Golf Open
is set for Sept. 4 at The Oaks,
South Kemp Road. The
noon shotgun start includes
18 holes w/ cart and a BBQ
chicken dinner. Cost is $45
per person; proceeds benefit
the Delphos Stadium Club.
Deadline to sign up with
either Karen (Ardner) Murray
(419-303-9615) or Ben
Neumeier (419-905-8731) is
Aug. 26. Deadline to order
a shirt from Lion Clothing
for the occasion is Aug. 24
(money is due by then).
Thursdays slate
Football Scrimmage:
Celina at St. Johns, 10 a.m.
Cross Country:
All-Comers Meet at
Spencerville, 5 p.m.
Boys Golf: Fort Jennings,
Ottoville and Kalida at
Paulding Invitational
(Auglaize CC), 9 a.m.;
New Bremen at St. Johns
(MAC), 10 a.m.; Spencerville
at Shawnee, 4:30 p.m.
Girls Golf: Lincolnview
at Coldwater, 4 p.m.
Board calls
special meeting
Delphos City Schools
Board of Education has
called a special meeting
for 8 p.m. Thursday in the
administration building.
A variety of person-
nel items will be dis-
cussed and approved.
Jennings to seek Issue I
funds for park sewer line
Elida ready to move into new building
Wilder
Morris-Lopez
Stacy Taff photo
Demolition is moving along on the old Elida High School
building. The site will soon be converted into extensive
parking for the fieldhouse and outdoor sporting events.
See ELIDA, page 2
2 The Herald Wednesday, August 17, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
FUNERALS
LOTTERY
LOCAL PRICES
WEATHER
The Delphos
Herald
Vol. 142 No. 55
Nancy Spencer, editor
Ray Geary, general manager
Delphos Herald Inc.
Don Hemple, advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley,
circulation manager
The Daily Herald (USPS 1525
8000) is published daily except
Sundays and Holidays.
By carrier in Delphos and
area towns, or by rural motor
route where available $2.09 per
week. By mail in Allen, Van
Wert, or Putnam County, $105
per year. Outside these counties
$119 per year.
Entered in the post office
in Delphos, Ohio 45833 as
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No mail subscriptions will be
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where The Daily Herald paper
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Delphos weather
Wayward whale delighted
observers before her death
High temperature Tuesday
in Delphos was 80 degrees,
low was 55. High a year ago
today was 80, low was 60.
Record high for today is 98,
set in 1988. Record low is 49,
set in 1976.
By JEFF BARNARD
and JASON DEAREN
The Associated Press
KLAMATH, Calif. Janet
Wortman knew something was
wrong when she drove by the
U.S. Highway 101 bridge across
the Klamath River and there
were no people leaning over the
railing to watch the 45-foot gray
whale that had been there for
nearly two months.
She would just swim back
and forth right in front of you
and at one point go like this,
like she was waving at us,
recalled Wortman, a mem-
ber of the Yurok Tribe and a
partner in the Requa Inn bed
and breakfast overlooking the
river. Silly me, I waved back.
It was like she was there to see
people. She went back and
forth. It was almost like she
was going, Here I am, you
guys. Can you see me?
Before dawn Tuesday, the
whale died after beaching
itself on the north bank of the
river in this coastal town of
800 people that is the head-
quarters of the Yurok Tribe.
Scientists who had kept an eye
on her since she swam into the
river with her calf in late June
were by her side.
In the afternoon, a back-
hoe pulled the whale from
the river onto the gravel bank
amid tall willows and dug a
pit. Tribal members sang a
song and said a prayer to send
the whale on to the afterlife,
said Tribal Chairman Thomas
ORourke. Then they turned it
over to scientists to see if they
could determine a cause of
death before burying it.
For many, the whales
strange visit to the river recalled
a story that Wortmans great-
grandmothers cousin, Fannie
Flounder, used to tell, which
was recounted in the book,
The Inland Whale, by anthro-
pologist Theordora Kroeber.
She said when the whale
is in the river, it means the
world is out of balance ...
things arent the way they
should be, said Wortman.
Fannie said you all need
to get together and pray and
dance and beat your feet on
the ground and that will tilt
the earth back the way it is
supposed to be.
ORourke said he agreed
that the whales visit meant
the world was out of balance,
that ecosystems were failing.
He said the whale brought
together state and federal
agencies and the tribe in a
way he has never seen.
It is acts like this that are
going to happen if we are
going to stabilize the environ-
ment, he said.
There was no obvious rea-
son the whale died, or why
it sought refuge in the river,
instead of joining other gray
whales migrating north to
feeding grounds off Alaska,
said Dawn Goley, professor
of zoology at Humboldt State
University.
The whale came into the
river in late June with its
calf, gradually working its
way upriver until its favorite
haunt was underneath the U.S.
Highway 101 bridge.
Rich Mossholder would
check on the whale with loads
of tourists in his Klamath
Jetboats tours.
I believe this was her des-
tiny, he said. She decided
(she would die here) before
she came in the river. The baby
went on. After that happened,
I thought it would probably be
the end for her here.
During July and early
August, crowds of people
would gather on the bridge,
running across, oblivious to
speeding traffic, to watch
when she swam underneath.
Some serenaded the whales
with violins and flutes. One
person jumped out of a kayak
to swim with them.
It was like a rock concert,
said Reweti Wiki, Wortmans
son-in-law and a partner in
the Requa Inn. He is a Maori
from New Zealand and has a
traditional whales tooth tatoo
on his arm.
(Continued from page 1)
May, Denny Pohlman,
Barb Schwinnen, Dennis
Schwinnen, Matt Smith,
Steven Smith, Denny
Thompson and Quinn
Wittaker.
The following were
approved for Drivers
Education classes and in-
car phase: Randy Apple,
Sam Boyer, Sandra Ebeling-
Sayger, Mary Kaple, Linda
Rigali, Delbert Shinn, Bill
Vermillion and Pat Wilsey.
The following fees were
approved for all-day kinder-
garten: Practice Reading Book
$8, Reading/Language
Arts Book $24, Science/
Mathematics Activity Fee
$5, Technology Fee $2,
Library Fee $5, General
Instruction fee $33; for a
total of $77.
The sub bus driver rate
was approved at $14.50 per
unit.
In other news, the follow-
ing personnel were approved
for employment: non-certi-
fied Max Clement (bus
driver); Supplementals
Dave Evans (athletic man-
ager), Art Holman/Dave
May (faculty manager), Dave
Sandy (building technology),
Michelle Steinke (National
Honor Society), Rhonda
Bargerstock (high school
musical director), Elise
Jenkins (assistant girls soccer
coach), Brenda Longbrake
(6th-grade Quiz Bowl), Tom
Gibson (7th-grade head foot-
ball coach), Darren Smith
(7th-grade assistant football
coach); and substitute teach-
ers Evalynne Smith, Pat
Komarek, Mary Jean Miller,
Gene Wollenhaupt, Lvera
Sprague, Bill Oleson, Dottie
Jennell, Alix Stout, Linda
Holman, Dave May, Deb
Oberhaus, Christy Broshes,
Lisa Youngpeter, Bridget
Erdman, Matthew Webb,
Susan Albanese, Margaret
Turnbull, Richard Allen,
Aletia Hartzler, Emily
Lenhart, Alyssa Stiger,
Carole Mathewson, Emily
Richard, Steven Moorman,
Lindsey may, Sarah Neff, Erin
Marshall, Jennifer Pardon,
Elisha Wiss, Jule McKanna,
David Shutt, Brent Stocksdale,
Michelle Hanthorn, Anthony
Grigsby, Trisha Lauck, Alan
Kingsbery, Lisa Henline,
Penny Lindamuth, Adrianne
Moskal, James Brandt,
Mary Hasselschwert, Kayla
Williams, Anthony Hill, Sarah
Dyer, Elizabeth Rinehart,
Anna Raines, Denise
Ellerbrock, Angela Ramsdail,
Shannon Keeler, Fred Recker,
Marty Jo Sheets, Tracy
Jackson, Jennifer Whitehead,
Heather Pavel, Valerie
Parsell, Kayla King, Megan
Sanderson, Keith Blass; and
substitute aides Nacoma
Adcock, Karen Bible-Ramon,
Michelle Cahill, Nikki Cellar,
Ann Dellinger, Fara Ewing,
Laura Fingerle, Cord Frueh,
Tracy Hutchinson, Krista
Kempton, Michele Long,
Jenny Long, Erica Moening,
Kathy Phipps, Linda Rigali,
Loretta Saffle, Jolene Sarno;
Substitute Cooks Michele
Cahill, Fara Ewing, Sharon
Hurst, Erica Moening,
Monica Roberts; and substi-
tute bus drivers Douglas
Anthony, Jodi Callahan,
Lynn Davis, Pete Fisher,
John Foster, Ralph Long,
Kathy May, Connie Mault,
John McDermid, Mary Beth
Miller, Cheryl Musto, Janette
(Sue) Smith, Jamie Wise;
and substitute custodians
Sue Ball, Gary Broshes,
Walter Burton, John Foster,
Kacie Green, Imogene
Griffith, Sylvia Hullinger,
Sharon Hurst, Cynthia
Landers, Kevin Lachey, Paul
Lynch, Adam McIntosh,
Craig Newland, Ron Niese,
Robert Samons, Chris
Sanders, Anthony Smith,
Chad Smith, Larry Stager,
Greg Swickrath, R. Craig
Zuber; substitute secretary
Nacoma Adcock, Karen
Bible-Ramon, Jeananne
Blymyer, Sue Brinkman, Joy
Buetner, Michelle Cahill,
Nikki Cellar, Rebecca
Cressman, Joyce Diller, Fara
Ewing, Brenda Fetter, Laura
Fingerle, Tammy Fischer, Joy
Fletcher, Cord Frueh, Tracy
Hutchinson, Stacy Jolliff,
Cecilia Layman, Jenny Long,
Tracy Mathias, Darla Mull,
Kathy Phipps, Jolene Sarno,
Sandy Schwartzengraber;
and assistant treasurer
Jane Horstman.
KOHORST, Carl S.,
85, of Van Wert, funeral
services will begin at 10
a.m. Thursday at Alspach-
Gearhart Funeral Home &
Crematory, Van Wert, the
Revs. Jay Nesselroad and
Paul Miller officiating.
Burial will be in Woodland
Cemetery, Van Wert, with
military graveside rites con-
ducted. Friends may call
from 2-4 p.m. and 6-8 p.m.
today at the funeral home.
Preferred memorials are to the
Delphos Veterans of Foreign
Wars Post 3035 or Special
Olympics. Condolences may
be expressed at alspachgear-
hart.com.
BOCKEY, Charles E.
Sr., 85, of Delphos, Mass of
Christian burial begins at 11
a.m. Thursday at St. John the
Baptist Catholic Church, the
Rev. Jacob Gordon will offici-
ate, with military rites by the
Spencerville VFW. Burial will
be at a later date. Friends may
call from 4-8 p.m. Wednesday
at Harter and Schier Funeral
Home, where the parish wake
begins at 7:30 p.m. Memorials
are to the family.
Corn: $7.44
Wheat: $7.10
Beans: $13.40
CLEVELAND (AP)
These Ohio lotteries were
drawn Tuesday:
Mega Millions
04-38-41-42-43, Mega
Ball: 44
Estimated jackpot: $24
million
Megaplier
4
Pick 3 Evening
2-6-4
Pick 4 Evening
9-5-5-0
Powerball
Estimated jackpot: $25
million
Rolling Cash 5
05-11-31-34-36
Estimated jackpot:
$110,000
Ten OH Evening
06-10-11-12-19-40-43-49-
50-52-56-59-60-63-64-67-69-
70-73-76
WEATHER FORECAST
Tri-county
Associated Press
TONIGHT: Mostly clear
in the evening then becoming
partly cloudy. A 20 percent
chance of showers and thun-
derstorms. Lows in the lower
60s. Southwest winds around
5 mph.
THURSDAY: Partly
cloudy with a 30 percent
chance of showers and storms.
Highs in the lower 80s. West
winds around 10 mph.
THURSDAY NIGHT:
Mostly clear. Patchy fog after
midnight. Lows around 60.
Northwest winds around 5
mph in the evening becoming
light and variable.
FRIDAY: Mostly sunny.
Highs in the mid 80s.
Northwest winds around 5
mph shifting to the west in the
afternoon.
FRIDAY NIGHT: Mostly
clear. Lows in the lower 60s.
SATURDAY: Mostly
sunny in the morning then
becoming partly cloudy. A 30
percent chance of showers and
thunderstorms. Highs in the
mid 80s.
SATURDAY NIGHT:
Mostly cloudy with a 30 per-
cent chance of showers and
thunderstorms. Lows in the
mid 60s.
SUNDAY, SUNDAY
NIGHT: Partly cloudy with
a 30 percent chance of show-
ers and thunderstorms. Highs
in the mid 80s. Lows in the
mid 60s.
MONDAY: Partly cloudy.
Highs around 80.
MONDAY NIGHT,
TUESDAY: Mostly clear.
Lows in the upper 50s. Highs
in the upper 70s.
Packard Grilles Tribute To Lazarus Caf
Elida Road, Lima Next to WENDYS
Ph. 419-225-PACK
Available on lunch and dinner combinations, seven days a week.
*Subject to availability.
Broccoli Raisin Salad
Famous Chicken Salad
Broccoli Mushroom Chowder
Bread Pudding with Whiskey Sauce
Featuring 4 Lazarus Favorites
Elida
Tornado-stricken Joplin
takes back-to-school break
Police: NM kidnapper
thwarted by alert neighbor
ALAN SCHER ZAGIER
The Associated Press
JOPLIN, Mo. The trophy
case by the front entrance is
empty. Step ladders line some
hallways, next to unopened
boxes of computer monitors
and other equipment.
As workers in tornado-
ravaged Joplin rushed to pre-
pare ahead of todays start of
fall classes, signs of unfin-
ished business were prevalent
at what is now Joplin High
Schools upper-level cam-
pus. No one seemed to mind,
though, not when juniors and
seniors get to call a converted
big-box retail store at the citys
only mall their new home.
An open house that show-
cased the schools college-like
atmosphere complete with
Joplin Joes coffee bar and
free laptops for each student
seemed to win over plenty
of skeptics.
Students have spent nearly
three months hauling debris,
attending friends funerals,
watching endless TV images
of the destroyed school and
trying to put their lives back
together. Finally, theyre get-
ting back to what passes for
normal in a city where 160
people died and hundreds
more were injured the coun-
trys single deadliest tornado
in six decades.
You cant pretend like
nothing happened, said
English teacher Brenda White.
But everything is so new here.
Every single thing that is this
school is new and different.
Its going to take a while
to build everything back, but
books are a good start, she
said while stocking her class-
rooms with copies of The
Great Gatsby, The Kite Runner
and other literary staples, past
and present.
The school system was hit
especially hard by the May 22
tornado. Seven students and
one employee were among
the victims, including a senior
pulled from his car by vicious
winds on his way home from
Joplin Highs Sunday after-
noon graduation ceremony.
Six school buildings were
destroyed, including Joplin
High. Seven other buildings
were badly damaged.
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M.
(AP) The pair of 911 calls
came in quick succession from
a New Mexico mobile home
park.
On one, a frantic 12-year-
old says her little sister is
missing. On the other is the
wife of the man who would
be credited with saving the
6-year-old from every parents
nightmare.
We are outside of my
moms house here, Martha
Diaz told the dispatcher. We
heard a man going, Hey, hey
let her go. Let her go. So we
turn around ...
The man came running to
us and said, They stole a little
girl.
Phillip Garcia, 29, had
snatched the girl moments ear-
lier on Monday afternoon in
Albuquerque, taking her away
in a blue van, police said.
Diazs husband, Antonio
Diaz Chacon, jumped in his
black pickup and gave chase.
Garcia tried to lose him by
driving through a maze of
residential streets, turning,
and turning, Diaz Chacon,
a 24-year-old mechanic said
Tuesday night as a swarm of
media stood outside his home
to hear his story. The events
were interpreted and relayed
from Spanish to English by
his wife.
Finally, Diaz Chacon said,
the man crashed into a tele-
phone pole.
Garcia fled on foot, and
Diaz Chacon grabbed the girl
and took her home. Garcia
then returned to his wrecked
van and took off but was later
captured by police, authorities
said.
Hidden under a rock just 25
feet from the van was pack-
ing tape and a tie-down strap,
police said.
Inside the impounded
van were tostadas, a glove,
a Leatherman tool, a black
satchel, orange strapping simi-
lar to the strap found hidden
under the rock, police said.
This little girl was very
lucky, police Sgt. Tricia
Hoffman said. We can only
guess what would have hap-
pened to this child.
Throughout the county we
see situations like this and they
do not end typically well, she
said.
Diaz Chacon, she said, did
an amazing, amazing job and
he saved this girls life
Diaz Chacon said he was
proud people considered him a
hero, but that he never thought
twice about taking the action.
While he was chasing the van,
he said, he thought of his own
two girls, one 7 years old, the
other 5 months, and how he
would want someone to do the
same for him.
Jimmy Piersall of the New
York Mets celebrated his 100th
home run by running the bases
backwards in 1963.
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1122 Elida Avenue
Delphos, OH 45833
419-695-0660
Join us in Celebrating
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Saturday, Aug. 20th
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310 Elida Rd., Delphos
Open House 2:00-4:00 p.m.
Your fond memories & cards only. No gifts, please.
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419-695-PEAK
(7325)
Stadium Park
Office Complex
333 North Street
Delphos, OH
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Delphos Locations
Alco 1112 Elida Ave.
Arbys 1850 E. Fifth St.
Baked to Perfection. 112 E. Fifth St.
Bellmanns Party Shop 134 E. Fifth St.
Chief 1102 Elida Ave.
Circle K 904 E. Fifth St.
Delphos Discount Drugs 660 Elida Ave.
Delphos Post Office 127 N. Main St.
Delphos Trading Post 528 N.Washington St.
Eagle Print 111 E. Fourth St.
Family Dollar 1030 Elida Ave
Jims Restaurant 927 E. Fifth St.
Marys A&W 924 E. Fifth St.
McDonalds 1051 Elida Ave.
Microtel 480 Moxie Lane
Niedeckens Carryout 604 S. Main St.
Pats Donuts & Kreme 660 Elida Rd
Speedway 240 W. Fifth St.
Speedway S. Main St.
Subway 202 W. Fifth St.
The Delphos Herald 405 N. Main St.
The Grind Caf 226 N. Main St.
The Point 1150 Elida Ave.
Town House Carryout 944 E. Fifth St.
Westside Laundry State St.
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THE Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
THE DELPHOS
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Spencerville Post Office Spencerville
Chuffers Spencerville
Killbillys Spencerville
Top Hat Spencerville
On the Square Caf Kalida
Middle Point Post Office Middle Point
Ramblers Roost Middle Point
Keiths Landeck Tavern Landeck Rd.
Express Mart Ottoville
Village Market Ottoville
Ft. Jennings Post Office Ft. Jennings
Meyers Market Ft. Jennings
Happy Daz Elida Rd.
Uncle Als Carryout Gomer
Wednesday, August 17, 2011 The Herald 3
STATE/LOCAL
Briefs
www.delphosherald.com
Grant available to Ohio frefghters
WASHINGTON, D.C.
Ohio fire departments
can begin applying for criti-
cal federal resources. U.S.
Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-OH)
announced Tuesday that the
U.S. Department of Homeland
Securitys Federal Emergency
Management Agency has
opened the application period
for a critical grant program
that has allowed more than
550 Ohio fire departments
in 2009 secure proper equip-
ment and maintain jobs.
Our first responders put
their lives on the line every
day across Ohio, said Brown.
With so many communities
already facing budget short-
falls, critical federal resources
like AFG are pivotal in keep-
ing our Ohio cities, towns,
and villages safe.
The Fiscal Year 2011
Assistance to Firefighters
Grant Program (AFG) appli-
cation period closes Sept.
9. AFG grant guidance and
an applications kit are avail-
able from FEMA by clicking
here.
Earlier this year, Brown
released a county-by-county
report showing how Ohio
communities have utilized
resources from the Assistance
to Firefighters Grant
Program.
The program provides
funding to local fire depart-
ments to help them improve
the effectiveness of firefight-
ing operations. These include
specialized emergency train-
ing for response to situations
like terrorist attacks; enhance-
ment of emergency medical
services programs; develop-
ment of health and safety
initiatives; establishment of
fire education and prevention
programs; creation of well-
ness and fitness programs;
and equipment and facility
upgrades.
Ohios nursing home diversion and
transition initiative shows promise
From the Ohio
Department of Aging
COLUMBUS Many
adults with disabilities who
are currently living in a
nursing home or bound for
one can successfully return
or remain at home with the
right assistance according
to a Scripps Gerontology
Center report funded by the
Ohio Department of Aging.
The 14-month study exam-
ined the effectiveness of the
Nursing Home Diversion and
Transition Initiative passed by
the Ohio General Assembly
in 2009.
The results of this study
confirm that considering
the individuals care needs
before the location of the care
makes sense, said Bonnie
Kantor-Burman, director of
the department. Not only are
people happier and healthier
when they have a choice in
where they receive their care,
care delivered in a commu-
nity-based setting is usually
more cost-effective.
Ohioans currently use
nursing homes at a higher
rate than the nation overall,
added Robert Applebaum,
Ohio LTC Research Project
Director and co-author of the
report. We recommend the
state continues its diversion
and transition efforts in order
to achieve a long-term care
system that truly is person-
centered and produces posi-
tive outcomes.
From March 2010
through May 2011, Scripps
researchers followed 2,244
individuals who were iden-
tified as good candidates
for diversion from nursing
homes to receive services in
the community, and 1,555
individuals who, with assis-
tance, could transition from
living in a nursing home to
residing in the community.
Those who were assisted in
transitioning to the commu-
nity had lived in a nursing
home for three months or
longer.
A six-month review
showed that 80 percent of
diverted consumers, and
three-quarters of those
transitioning from nurs-
ing homes who were alive
at the six month follow-
up, were still residing in
the community. In several
cases, individuals who par-
ticipated in the transition
program had been nursing
home residents for three or
four years and had been
able to return to the com-
munity as part of this ini-
tiative. About 90 percent of
the transitioned consumers
were enrolled in the depart-
ments PASSPORT or
Assisted Living Medicaid
Waiver programs.
Ohio Statehouse considers bar
COLUMBUS (AP)
After spending their days
serving the public, Ohio law-
makers soon might be able to
head to the basement and get
served at the pub.
State officials are debat-
ing a proposal to establish
what would apparently be the
nations first statehouse bar
a venue where lawmakers and
even members of the public
could tip a few back after hours
if they reserve the space.
Opponents say it would
be inappropriate to open a
bar in a government building
frequented by schoolchildren,
while others note that alco-
hol already flows freely at
Statehouse events.
My point of view is
Prohibition ended in the 1930s,
so whats the big deal? said
Sen. Bill Seitz, a Cincinnati
Republican. Were not talking
about putting George Jones and
Willie Nelson on the jukebox
and having people spending all
their waking hours in the Capitol
Cafe, drowning their sorrows.
But the idea that theres alco-
hol in the Statehouse should
be completely unsurprising to
anyone.
Republican Rep. Rex
Damschroder, an advocate of
tough anti-drinking laws, said
the Statehouse is a place where
adults and children go to learn
history and see government in
action not lawmakers bel-
lying up to the bar.
At this point, I am aware
of no valid reason for a bar
to be located in the center
of Ohios government opera-
tions, he wrote in a recent
letter to a Statehouse opera-
tions committee. There are
plenty of bars in downtown
Columbus, and the Statehouse
is the last place that should be
added to the list.
The caterer who conceived
the idea for a wooden counter
that would serve beer, wine
and liquor for reserved events
like wedding rehearsal din-
ners says he was simply trying
to attract new customers to an
underused basement cafeteria.
The Capitol Cafe opened this
month, without alcohol.
The panel that oversees
Statehouse operations has
slowed the projects pace,
assigning it to a study com-
mittee that will sort out what
the business should offer.
The venue was never
intended to be a traditional
bar, Louie Pappas says
and he acknowledges that a
PR blitz last month, touting a
full-service bar for after-hours
private happy hours with
specialty bistro menus and
flat-screen televisions, went
overboard.
This has been twisted so
many ways, said Pappas,
who owns Milos Catering
and has been fielding angry
calls and nosy visitors for
weeks. Were just trying
to think outside the box and
create a little more revenue
for that space. If we succeed
in renting it out more often,
of course the state gets more
money from us because we
pay more rent. But the invest-
ment and the risk are ours.
Milos pays rent totaling
10 percent of its gross sales,
with half going to the 150-year-
old Statehouse which is
still paying off a $165 mil-
lion restoration completed in
1996 and half going to the
Ohio Rehabilitation Services
Commission, a vocational train-
ing program for the disabled.
Pappas said that he never
intended to put alcohol on
open display, and that the bar
would not have been open
to the public or during hours
when gangs of children might
be roaming the Statehouse on
a field trip.
Milos saw adding the bar
counter as a natural extension
of existing Statehouse offer-
ings. Catered events such as
weddings, conferences and
legislative receptions already
allow alcohol.
Politics and booze have
long enjoyed a symbiotic rela-
tionship.
Lawmakers in many states
keep beer refrigerators in
their common areas or bot-
tles in their bottom drawers.
In Missouri, beer companies
deliver to lawmakers offices.
Legislators in some states even
imbibe on legislative floors or
fill up in members lounges.
West Virginias Senate
has one such lounge dubbed
Senate Junior Rules where
legislators pour alcohol.
During late evening sessions,
they emerge holding plastic
keg cups; several years ago,
one senator knocked over the
desk of another member dur-
ing a spirited presentation.
The errant lawmaker apolo-
gized to the body not only for
knocking over the colleagues
desk, but also his glass of
wine with it.
There are also the inevi-
table drinking spots just steps
from statehouse doors, like
the Officers Club in Hartford,
Conn.; Jacks Oyster House
in Albany, N.Y.; Mitchells
in Columbus; and the Cloak
Room in Austin, Texas, which
runs a live feed of chamber
proceedings on session days.
COLUMBUS (AP)
Ohio has received far fewer
applications than the newly
expanded number of vouch-
ers available for transferring
students to private schools
from poor-performing public
ones.
The Columbus Dispatch
reports families turned in
more than 17,000 requests for
vouchers for the new school
year by Mondays deadline.
A provision in the state bud-
get signed at the end of June
offered as many as 30,000 of
the private school scholar-
ships, up from the old limit
of 14,000.
A representative of Join
the Future, an advocacy
group for public schools and
public school teachers, says
the response shows there isnt
much demand for vouchers.
But the head of pro-voucher
group School Choice Ohio
says there was nothing magi-
cal about the 30,000 cap and
that no one thought it would
be reached this year.
School voucher demand
less than was planned for
NEW ALBANY (AP)
A clothing company is offer-
ing money to Mike The
Situation Sorrentino and
his fellow Jersey Shore
cast members so theyll
stop wearing the brand on
the show.
Abercrombie & Fitch Co.
says in a news release posted
Tuesday that its concerned
that having Sorrentino seen
in its clothing could cause
significant damage to the
companys image.
Abercrombie says a con-
nection to The Situation
goes against the aspira-
tional nature of its brand
and may be distressing to
customers. The Ohio-based
retailer says it has offered
a substantial payment to
Sorrentino and producers
of the MTV show so hell
wear something else.
The company says it also
is making the offer to others
in the hard-partying cast.
Abercrombie
doesnt want free
advertising on
Jersey Shore
It is not love that is blind, but jealousy.
Lawrence Durrell, British-born author (1912-1990)
IT WAS NEWS THEN
4 The Herald Wednesday, August 17, 2011
POLITICS
www.delphosherald.com
Moderately confused
One Year Ago
Delphos Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 3035
Commander Jim Weeden gave Stadium Club Treasurer
Clara Hanf the final $5,000 check of a $15,000 pledge
made by the VFW for the work on the stadium this summer
and last. This years work included removing all stadium
seating, cleaning and repairing the stadium, painting it and
replacing the seats as well as opening the tunnel underneath
the stadium and renovating and improving the handicapped
seating area.
25 Years Ago 1986
The annual summer get-together of Allen County
Pork Producers was the scene for selecting the 1986 Allen
County Pork Queen. Selected was Renee Kloeppel of
Bluffton, who was crowned by 1985 Pork Queen Chris
Etzkorn of Delphos. First runner-up was Annie Burkholder
of Columbus Grove.
The I & K womens softball team recently won the
womens slo-pitch league at Stadium Park. Team mem-
bers are Michelle Meyer, Missy Clay, Cindy Grothouse,
Becky Krietemeyer, Mary Jo Kreidler, Julie Metzner,
Jeanie Bruskotter, Lynn VonSossan, Amy Schroeder, Diane
Webb, Sue Yance, Val Thatcher, Patty Stechschulte, Charlie
Beckner, batgirl Melissa Kohorst and coach Carl Kohorst.
Annette M. Lang was sworn in as a member of the
Massachusetts Bar Association this week in Boston. She
has been doing legal research in Buenos Aires, Argentina
for five months. She spent the 1983-84 school studying
Spanish in Seville, Spain. In September she will begin a law
clerkship in Washington, D.C. Annette is the daughter of
Ann S. Lang of Delphos and the late James O. Lang.
50 Years Ago 1961
There was an exceptionally good turnout for the Ladies
Day program at the Delphos County Club Tuesday, with
a number of out of town guests also present. Prizes in the
Blind Bogey contest went to Mrs. John Shenk and Mrs. Ed
Wiecher. Pin play was also held with the pin being awarded
to Shenk.
Tom and Lous Slo-Pitch softball team won the city
tournament Tuesday night when they defeated the Rustic,
7-6. Tom and Lous is managed by Gip Pohlman and Ivan
Tucker) Fair is the manager of the Rustic team. The vic-
tory made Tom and Lous league champions, tournament
champions and district champions. The team will play in the
state tournament Aug. 18 at Perrysburg.
The Delphos Volunteer Firemen Tuesday night were
hosts to the area fire departments and law enforcement
agencies that assisted them in the $624,000 fire that struck
the business district here on August 4. The wives of the
local firemen prepared a ham and chicken dinner and 145
attended the function at the firemens club house at Water
Works Park.
75 Years Ago 1936
Alice Nomina of this city, has been honored by being
chosen as superintendent of the Fostoria City Hospital. Miss
Nomina is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Nomina, west
of Delphos. She is a graduate of St. Johns High School
and received her professional training at St. Ritas Hospital,
Lima.
Fort Jennings lost their game Sunday to Glandorf by
a 7-6 score. The game was well played and interesting. L.
Mack, right-field for Fort Jennings, played an outstand-
ing game. Davis on the mound for Fort Jennings, allowed
twelve hits and Parcell, Glandorf, allowed eleven hits.
Mrs. John Bryan, Harding Highway, was hostess to the
members of the Bernice Sewing Club at her home Friday
afternoon. Plans for the annual Rebekah bazaar to be staged
on October 8 were discussed. Part of the afternoon was
devoted to sewing. The next meeting will be held with Mrs.
Bert Metcalfe, Scotts Crossing.
By ROBERT BURNS
AP National
Security Writer
WASHINGTON
Bigger defense cuts triggered
by failed deficit reduction
negotiations would have
devastating effects on the
nations security, Defense
Secretary Leon Panetta said
Tuesday.
In a rare joint appear-
ance at the National Defense
University, Panetta and
Secretary of State Hillary
Rodham Clinton made their
case for limiting their bud-
gets exposure to the politi-
cal battles in Congress over
identifying additional ways
of reduce future government
spending.
Panetta said the Pentagon
is prepared to make $350 bil-
lion in cuts over the next 10
years, as agreed by Congress.
But he warned of dangers to
the national defense if bigger
reductions are required.
The deficit compromise
reached between the White
House and Congress set up
a special bipartisan commit-
tee to draft legislation to find
more government cuts. If
the committee cannot agree
on a deficit-reduction plan
by years end or if Congress
rejects its proposal, it would
trigger some $500 billion
in additional reductions in
projected national security
spending.
This kind of massive cut
across the board which
would literally double the
number of cuts that were
confronting that would
have devastating effects
on our national defense; it
would have devastating
effects on certainly the State
Department, Panetta said.
Clinton said Americans
should understand that in
addition to preserving the
nations military strength,
it is in the nations security
interests to maintain the State
Departments role in diplo-
macy and development. She
suggested that the political
stalemate over spending cuts
has put that in jeopardy.
It does cast a pall over
our ability to project the kind
of security interests that are
in Americas interests, she
said. This is not about the
Defense Department or the
State Department ... This is
about the United States of
America. And we need to
have a responsible conversa-
tion about how we are going
to prepare ourselves for the
future.
Panetta was asked about
news reports that the Pentagon
is considering reducing
military retirement benefits,
which, along with military
health costs, have ballooned
in recent years.
Though those payments
have been considered sacro-
sanct part of the bargain
the nation makes with those
who protect it the eco-
nomic and debt crises have
put those issues squarely in
the crosshairs. A private sec-
tor advisory panel last month
drafted a plan to eliminate
the current system under
which those who retire with
20 years of service get imme-
diate, lifetime payments of
some 50 percent of their sala-
ries and those with less than
20 years get nothing.
Though the report is not
complete and it is non-bind-
ing at any rate, the board
recommends the system be
scrapped and replaced with a
401K-type defined contribu-
tion plan, grandfathering in
the disabled and retirees.
Its the kind of thing you
have to consider, Panetta
said. He quickly added that
it must have a grandfather
clause so the government
does not break faith with
the military force.
Clinton and Panetta were
responding to questions
posed by Frank Sesno, direc-
tor of the School of Media
and Public Affairs at George
Washington University, and
by members of the National
Defense University audience,
which included members of
the military and civilian offi-
cials.
Asked about the situa-
tion in Libya, Panetta said
the anti-Gadhafi forces are
on the move toward Tripoli
and regime forces are weak-
ened.
Panetta: National defense
cant withstand more cuts
By BEN FELLER
AP White House
Correspondent
WASHINGTON
Seeking a jolt for a wilting
economy, President Barack
Obama will give a major
speech in early September to
unveil new ideas for speeding
up job growth and helping the
struggling poor and middle
class, a senior administration
official told The Associated
Press.
The presidents plan is
likely to contain tax cuts, jobs-
boosting infrastructure ideas
and steps that would specifi-
cally help the long-term unem-
ployed. The official empha-
sized that all of Obamas pro-
posals would be fresh ones,
not a rehash of plans he has
pitched for many weeks and
still supports, including his
infrastructure bank idea to
finance construction jobs.
On a significant and related
front, Obama will also pres-
ent a specific plan to cut the
suffocating long-term national
debt and to pay for the cost of
his new short-term economic
ideas.
His debt proposal will be
bigger than the $1.5 trillion
package that a new super-
committee of Congress
must come up with by late
November.
The president will then
spend his fall publicly press-
ing Congress to take action
as the economic debate roars
into its next phase. Both the
economic ideas and the plan
to pay for them will be part of
Obamas speech, although the
address will focus mainly on
the jobs components.
The presidents speech is
expected right after the Sept. 5
Labor Day holiday.
The official spoke on con-
dition of anonymity because
Obama has not yet disclosed
his plans.
No final decisions on the
economic package have been
made.
Seeking re-election in a
dispiriting economic time for
the nation, Obamas rollout
plan allows him to come into
September swinging after one
of the roughest periods of his
presidency.
Obama has hinted about
new economic ideas for days
as the Republican presiden-
tial contenders take whacks as
his record. Obamas economic
team has been hashing out
the new package since he and
Congress struck a last-minute
debt deal in late July to pre-
vent a debilitating government
default.
Obama has been rum-
bling through the Midwest
all week, lobbying the locals
along the way to help him
pressure a divided Congress
into working with him. He has
one day of his bus tour left
on today before returning to
Washington and heading on a
vacation with his family.
Come September, Obama
will try to reframe the jobs
debate and press lawmakers to
act on his ideas. And, since he
is almost sure to face political
opposition from Republicans,
particularly the leadership of
the House, he is already pre-
paring to lobby the American
public for support if Congress
tosses his ideas aside.
As the leader of the coun-
try, Obama is under unparal-
leled pressure to start showing
more economic progress. His
own job is expected to depend
on it.
Nearly 14 million people
are unemployed. Many mil-
lions more have given up look-
ing for jobs or havent found a
way to move from part-time to
full-time work.
The administration official
would not offer details about
the tax cuts Obama is likely to
propose for the middle class.
They are expected to be
separate from the extension of
the payroll tax cut for employ-
ees that Obama has lobbied
for by the day. Obama also
has promoted a familiar list of
other ideas, including patent
reform and three major trade
deals. And he has pushed for
longer benefits for the chroni-
cally unemployed.
As for debt reduction,
Obama is trying to have some
say over the highly influen-
tial committee charged with
recommending major changes
fast.
By CHARLES
BABINGTON
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
rising profiles of Republican
presidential candidates Rick
Perry and Michele Bachmann
are giving the White House
a new opening: linking the
entire GOP field to the tea
party, whose popularity has
recently sagged.
If the strategy works, it
could cause guilt-by-associ-
ation problems even for non-
tea-party Republicans like
Mitt Romney.
That might be a lot to
ask, however. Unflattering
comparisons are a well-worn
campaign tactic and many
Americans have only a hazy
notion of the tea party move-
ment. Still, President Barack
Obamas top aides are giving
it a go.
Republican candidates
must decide whether to swear
allegiance to the tea party or
work with Democrats to cre-
ate jobs, Obama campaign
adviser Robert Gibbs said
Tuesday. After last weeks
GOP debate in Iowa, Obama
campaign guru David Axelrod
claimed the presidential con-
tenders were pledging alle-
giance to the tea party.
And a new video by
the Democratic National
Committee says Republican
lawmakers and presidential
candidates are embracing
extreme tea party policies.
Mike DuHaime, who
managed Republican Rudy
Giulianis 2008 presiden-
tial campaign, said the
Democrats tactic might suc-
ceed so long as Romney and
the other GOP candidates
seem to be toeing the tea
party line.
The strategy is sound for
the Obama team because they
would love the campaign to
be about the challenger, no
matter who it is, DuHaime
said. To the extent that our
candidates continue to essen-
tially march in lockstep with
each other on major issues, it
will be easy for the Obama
campaign to paint them all
with the same brush.
A recent New York Times/
CBS News poll found that 40
percent of American adults
had a not favorable view of
the tea party, compared with
18 percent in an earlier poll.
The proportion who said they
knew too little to form an
opinion of the tea party fell
to 21 percent, from an earlier
46 percent.
At the same time, Obamas
approval ratings also have
slumped, and Congress have
hit an all-time low.
Tying a political opponent
to a not-so-popular person
or movement is a hit-or-
miss strategy, said John J.
Pitney Jr., a political scien-
tist at Claremont McKenna
College. Bill Clintons 1996
re-election campaign ran
ads against DoleGingrich.
The goal was to link GOP
nominee Bob Dole to Newt
Gingrich, then the embattled
House speaker, and now a
presidential candidate.
The tea party could be a
tougher target, Pitney said.
A diffuse movement with no
clear leader does not arouse
the same kind of emotion,
he said.
Bachmann, the House
member from Minnesota
who chairs Congress tea
party caucus, won an Iowa
straw poll. Pawlenty ended
his campaign, and Perry, the
Texas governor with tea party
leanings, jumped in.
Tea party gives Dems easy strategy
Obama to reveal new jobs plan
ANTONIO (AP) In the
words of Gov. Rick Perry,
secession was one scenario on
the table for frustrated Texans.
The BP oil spill? Might have
been an act of God instead
of corporate errors. And if
the Federal Reserve puts more
money in the U.S. system, as
Perry told voters in Iowa this
week, you could chalk it up
as a treasonous act that would
be treated pretty ugly back
home.
No, that wasnt on the same
level as his famous interview
signoff, Adios, mofo. But
Perrys just warming up.
Just four days after launch-
ing his GOP presidential run,
the man from Paint Creek,
Texas, already is showing
off a colorful tongue. The
61-year-old with maybe the
most famous jogging-while-
armed story ever Dont
attack my dog or you might
get shot ... if youre a coy-
ote may emerge as the
most quotable candidate in the
Republican field.
But will that hurt as well as
help him?
The governors mouth may
come across as amusing to
some Texans who have grown
accustomed to Perryisms
over his decades in public
office. Now, however, hes on
a larger stage with a brighter
spotlight. Will his quips be a
plus something for voters
to identify with or a vulner-
ability in the campaign?
Obama said Tuesday he
was inclined to cut the gov-
ernor some slack since it
was so early in his run. The
president was asked on CNN
about Perrys suggestion
that military members would
respect the Texan more than
him because Perry served in
the military and he didnt.
I think that everybody who
runs for president, it probably
takes them a little bit of time
before they start realizing that
this isnt like running for gov-
ernor or running for Senate
or running for Congress,
Obama said. Youve got to
be a little more careful about
what you say.
Not everyone was so under-
standing about Perrys latest
comments.
Inappropriate and unpresi-
dential, tweeted Tony Fratto,
a Republican who worked
at the Treasury Department
and in the White House under
President George W. Bush.
That was his quick verdict
after Perry said at a campaign
appearance Monday in Cedar
Rapids, Iowa, that Federal
Reserve Chairman Ben
Bernanke would be commit-
ting a treasonous act if he
decided to print more money
to boost the economy. Perry
said such action by the Fed
would amount to a political
maneuver aimed at helping
President Barack Obama win
re-election.
If this guy prints more
money between now and the
election, I dont know what
yall would do to him in Iowa,
but we would treat him pretty
ugly down in Texas, Perry
said, responding to a question
from the audience.
He stood by that com-
ment later, telling reporters on
Tuesday in Dubuque, Iowa: I
am just passionate about the
issue, and we stand by what
we said.
On Monday, Perry also
said he would be a president
who was passionate about
America thats in love with
America.
Perrys tongue
takes the stage
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Otterbein St. Marys
Annual Fish Fry
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Saturday, Aug. 20, 2011
(419) 394-2366 or (800) 628-9341
11230 State Route 364, St. Marys, Ohio 45885
Door Prizes Campus Tours Open Houses
Golf Cart Tours Craft & Bake Sale
Pontoon Boat Rides Silent Auction
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The 65 ft. trackless passenger train,
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ENTERTAINMENT
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fishfry.indd 1 7/14/2011 1:44:12 PM
1
Wednesday, August 17, 2011 The Herald 5
COMMUNITY
Happy
Birthday
LANDMARK
www.delphosherald.com
Veterans Memorial Park
CALENDAR OF
EVENTS
TODAY
6 p.m. Shepherds of
Christ Associates meet in
the St. Johns Chapel.
6:30 p.m. Delphos
Kiwanis Club, Eagles Lodge,
1600 E. Fifth St.
7 p.m. Bingo at St.
Johns Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Hope Lodge
214 Free and Accepted
Masons, Masonic Temple,
North Main Street.
Sons of the American
Legion meet at the Delphos
Legion hall.
The Ottoville Board of
Education meets in the ele-
mentary building.
THURSDAY
9-11 a.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission Annex
Museum, 241 N. Main St., is
open.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
5:30 p.m. The Delphos
Canal Commission meets at
the museum, 241 N. Main St.
5-7 p.m. The Interfaith
Thrift Shop is open for shop-
ping.
7 p.m. Spencerville
Local Schools Board of
Education meets.
St. Johns Athletic Boosters
meet in the Little Theatre.
7:30 p.m. Delphos
Chapter 26 Order of the
Eastern Star meets at the
Masonic Temple on North
Main Street.
Delphos VFW Auxiliary
meets at the VFW Hall, 213
W. Fourth St.
FRIDAY
7:30 a.m. Delphos
Optimist Club, A&W Drive-
In, 924 E. Fifth St.
11:30 a.m. Mealsite
at Delphos Senior Citizen
Center, 301 Suthoff Street.
1-4 p.m. Interfaith Thrift
Store is open for shopping.
SATURDAY
9-11:30 a.m. Delphos
Project Recycle at Delphos
Fuel and Wash.
Please notify the Delphos
Herald at 419-695-0015 if
there are any corrections
or additions to the Coming
Events column.
Aug. 18
Virginia Burch
Kelly Wurth
Joe Saum
Young Verenas foot surgery a success
BY LOVINA EICHER
It is 6:30 a.m. on Aug.
11. I am sitting beside
daughter Verenas bed at
the childrens hospital.
She had surgery on her
foot yesterday and was
admitted to the
hospital. Doctors
were just in here
to see her but are
not sure if she
will be able to go
home today. She
had some pain
through the night
but is now taking
some pain medi-
cine and sleep-
ing really well.
Since the surgery, the feel-
ing is back in her right leg
and foot. It had been numb
from her knee on down
since the end of May. We
are very excited to see that
her feeling is back since
the surgery. Shell have to
wear a hard cast for 4 to 6
weeks. The cast comes up
to her knee. At nighttime
to go to bed, she has to
wear a brace on her whole
leg to keep it straight.
We are also so thankful
that her post-concussions
have not reoccurred for
2 1/2 months. We pray
they are gone for good.
Hopefully she is now on
the road to permanent
good health.
Daughters Elizabeth
and Susan are done de-
tasseling corn for this year.
I am glad they are fin-
ished so that they can be
home with the rest of the
children while my husband
Joe goes to work. Joe did
take the day off
from the factory
yesterday to be
up here at the
hospital while
Verena had her
surgery.
Our good
friend Ruth
took time out of
her schedule to
bring us here.
She stayed here
with us all day. We sure
appreciate what she does
to help us out.
This is now Saturday
afternoon, Aug. 13. Verena
ended up having to stay at
the hospital until last night.
We didnt arrive home
until 8 p.m. I was really
glad to see all the children
again. Jacob, Emma and
family brought in our sup-
per. It was nice not to have
to fix a meal after arriv-
ing home. I think daughter
Elizabeth was glad for the
break also. Her and Susan
worked hard but did a good
job of fixing the meals
and taking care of their
younger siblings while we
were away.
On Friday morning,
Elizabeth called us at the
hospital at 5 a.m. to tell
us all our horses were
out on the road. They
had some excitement
but with the help of oth-
ers, they soon had them
back in the field. The
horses must have pushed
open a gate that was left
unlatched.
Elizabeth and Susan
took the five youngest chil-
dren to the dentist for their
cleaning on Friday. They
took our horse Diamond
and the buggy to the den-
tist office in town. I was
glad when they called the
hospital to let us know
they were all home safe
and sound.
While we were out at
the hospital, we received
the sad, shocking news of
the death of a 38-year-old
single male in our com-
munity. He was killed
instantly in a farm acci-
dent while making hay.
Life is so uncertain. Only
God knows when our time
here on earth is done.
Joe and the boys did a
lot of weeding in the gar-
den. Makes it look a lot
better. Hopefully we can
get caught up with the gar-
den now. It looks like can-
ning will be in full swing
for the next couple of
weeks. Tomatoes, hot pep-
pers, red beets, and more
green beans are all ready
to be canned. I switched
my order for peaches until
next week when I found
out Verena would have to
stay at the hospital after
surgery.
We are still getting
quite a few zucchinis form
the garden so I will share
my zucchini brownies
recipe.
Zucchini Brownies
4 eggs
1-1 1/2 cup oil
2 cups white sugar
2 cups flour
2 teaspoons baking
soda
2 teaspoons cinnamon
1 teaspoon salt
4 tablespoons cocoa
1 teaspoon vanilla
3 cups shredded and
peeled zucchini
1 cup nuts
Preheat oven to 350
degrees. In a large mix-
ing bowl, beat together
eggs, oil, and sugar. In a
separate medium mixing
bowl, sift together flour,
soda, cinnamon, salt, and
cocoa. Add to egg, oil,
and sugar mixture. Then
add vanilla, zucchini and
nuts. Mix all together and
spread onto a greased 10
X 15 jelly roll pan. Bake
for 30 minutes.
Can be frosted but
are also really good just
plain.
Red cross sets CPR class
The Putnam County Red
Cross will hold an Infant and
Child CPR class from 6-8:30
p.m. on Tuesday at the Annex
Building in Ottawa, second
floor, third door on the left.
Cost is $30. All classes
must be prepaid in advance,
checks payable to the Putnam
County Red Cross.
Call 419-523-4810 for
more information.
Expand your knowledge
every day by reading the
newspaper. Its reliably
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6 The Herald Wednesday, August 17, 2011
SPORTS
www.delphosherald.com
Will Mike Brown finally realize that Carson Palmer is seri-
ous about his resolve to retire rather than play for the Cincinnati
Bengals?
There is a Palmer on the active roster but it isnt the right
one; its his brother Jordan.
Does Brown honestly think the Bengals
can compete in the always-tough AFC
North with the likes of the Steelers and
Ravens and even the optimistic Browns
with Jordan Palmer, Bruce Gradkowski,
Dan LeFevour (who?) and Andy Dalton as
your quarterbacks?
I am not saying they are schmucks
who dont belong in the National Football
League but lets face it, neither of them are
Carson Palmer, even if he is not the same
since his injuries.
Most of the guys he has under center today are really back-
ups. Dalton may eventually be a quality starter but that aint
this year.
I also dont see Brown bringing in another veteran.
Heres a little piece of advice: trade Carson Palmer if you
really and truly cannot get him to come back and get some-
thing for him. Then, actually hire a general manager that knows
the game like Mike Holmgren and let him do his work.
You do not want players that want out of Dodge. At some
point, the fans will show you where you stand with them if
they show up at all.
Brown has one senior VP of Player Personnel and one VP
of Player Personnel and they both have the Brown surname.
Hmmmm. Assuming they are some relation to him, they are
really going to tell him what he needs to hear!
He also has one executive VP, two VPs and an administra-
tive assistant.
Not a football guy in the bunch.
I have the same problem with the Cowboys, with Jerry Jones
the de facto general manager, director of player personnel,
coach and anything else and his son, Stephen, the COO, execu-
tive VP and director of player personnel.
His namesake son is also an executive VP.
Yeah, they are going to tell him what he needs to hear, too!
I have a bridge in Brooklyn ....
It seems that Jerry Jones wants to be a
younger version of Al Davis!
I hate to write this but they need to
have a business model like they have in
New England or even ------ Pittsburgh.
Robert Kraft and the Rooney Family
stay out of the limelight and let their
coaches, GMs and such do their jobs.
That is why those two franchises have
done so well over the years.
Think about it; doesnt it seem that
every draft pick the Steelers make pans out, no matter where
they are from? Or at what stage of the draft?
Or that Bill Belichick seems willing to make adjustments to
his style and game plan as his team changes?
If anyone can get the best out of a supremely-talented but
knuckleheaded guy like Albert Haynesworth, it is Belichick.
Heck, he got great production out of Randy Moss until he
finally went berzerko.
Belichick does what he does and everyone else does what
they do and you have results.
The Steelers do have some loose cannons who doesnt?
but they get the same results, even when they seem to have
too many aging, beyond their prime guys.
They tend not to have players that want out.
That is the type of team chemistry that you try to seek at
the professional level; not the camaraderie where everyone is
friends but where they all pull together as one when the game
is on the line.
That is about the best you can do and it works.
Some advice to Mike Brown - if he wants it!
Local Roundup
By TOM WITHERS
The Associated Press
BEREA Colt McCoy
picked up his cellphone, dialed
Brett Favres number and
hoped one of his idols might
help him out.
The Browns quarterback got
Favres assistance and more
than he could have dreamed.
He said, Yeah, come
down tonight, McCoy
recalled Favre saying. That
didnt happen.
But before he knew it,
McCoy was on a plane flying
to Mississippi to meet with
Favre, who picked him up at
the airport and then spent sev-
eral days schooling Clevelands
young quarterback on the
intricacies of the West Coast
offense, something the 3-time
NFL MVP mastered during 20
pro seasons.
Following practice on
Tuesday, McCoy described
in detail the time he shared
this summer with Favre, who
seems to have finally retired
for good after several is-he-
or-isnt-he seasons. McCoy
said the pair of quarterbacks
the graying gunslinger and
his eager-to-learn protege
immersed themselves in noth-
ing but football.
Hes an outstanding guy
and I learned a lot, McCoy
said, so I was thankful for
him being open to me even
coming down there. Its the
first time we had met. It was a
lot of fun.
OK, but the big question:
Did Favre look ready for
another come-
back?
We didnt
even go there,
McCoy replied,
laughing. We
talked football.
We stayed up
late and worked
out and he really
helped me. For
a guy who has
played in some versions of the
West Coast for 20 years, hes
a great resource to have and I
appreciated him being willing
to spend a couple of days with
me and help me out with some
things.
Because McCoy wasnt per-
mitted to have any contact dur-
ing the lockout with first-year
Browns coach Pat Shurmur
or any of his assistants, he
was looking for help with the
West Coast. McCoy was able
to get a copy of Shurmurs
playbook during a 1-day break
in the labor strife. But without
anyone to explain it to him,
McCoy needed help.
The Xs and Os, the arrows,
the terminology. It was like a
foreign language to McCoy.
Enter Favre, who knows the
West Coast as well as anyone.
Favre first learned the
system in Green Bay under
Browns president Mike
Holmgren, who coached the
Packers from 1992-98. McCoy
that figured if Favre was avail-
able, it would
be a waste not
to ask the mas-
ter.
M c C o y
picked up sev-
eral pointers
from Favre, a
player the for-
mer Texas star
has admired
since he first
buckled his chin strap.
McCoy arrived in
Mississippi with a list of ques-
tions. He wanted to absorb
all he could during their time
together. McCoy wanted to
know about his footwork;
about where to throw the ball if
the primary receiver was cov-
ered; about audibles. Really,
about everything.
Shurmur, who brought the
West Coast with him from St.
Louis, where he had a good
1-year run with Sam Bradford,
said McCoys willingness to
learn shows his maturity and
growth as a leader.
I just think that speaks to
what Colt is, Shurmur said.
He puts two and two together.
In an offense where you had a
player that was tremendously
successful, he took it upon
himself to go see him and I
think thats great. Ive got a lot
of respect for Brett. I consider
him a friend of sorts.
Ive always followed him
and admired what hes done.
First of all, Im thankful that
Brett would spend time with
him and then I think its great
on Colts part that he would
take the initiative to go do it.
Notes: TE Ben Watson (ham-
string) LBs Scott Fujita (thigh) and
Chris Gocong (stinger), and S Usama
Young (hamstring) sat out practice. ...
WR Mohamed Massaquoi said hope-
fully, real soon when asked when he
might practice for the first time. Hes
been out with a bone injury to his
left leg. ... Shurmur praised LB Titus
Brown, who has had an impressive
camp and returned a fumble 43 yards
for a touchdown against Green Bay
last week. ... RB Montario Hardesty
had a wrap on his left calf but took part
in drills. ... Todays practice is closed
to the public. ... His hands clasped
behind his back in a familiar pose,
Jim Tressel was back on a football
sideline. Just no longer as a coach.
Ousted at scandal-ridden Ohio State
and without a team to lead and teach
for the first time in 25 years, Tressel
visited Clevelands training camp,
where he intently watched practice,
spent time with Shurmur and McCoy
and even reminisced with former
Michigan coach Lloyd Carr. As he left
the Browns facility Tuesday, driving
a scarlet Mustang convertible with a
gray pinstripe that included a few Ohio
State block Os, Tressel was asked if
he would consider an NFL consulting
job. Not right now, he replied. Im a
fan. Always been a Browns fan. As a
kid, Tressel often visited Browns camp
with his father. A young Jim Tressel
once held the ball for Lou The Toe
Groza as the Hall-of-Famer practiced
kicking field goals.
McCoys visit with Favre invaluable
The Associated Press
National League
PHILADELPHIA Lyle Overbay
lined a 2-RBI double off Roy Halladay
in the ninth inning to lift the Arizona
Diamondbacks to a 3-2 win over the
Philadelphia Phillies on Tuesday night.
Overbay knocked in all three runs as
Arizona won its seventh straight game.
Bryan Shaw (1-0) tossed a scoreless eighth
and J.J. Putz worked the ninth for his 30th
save. Putz fanned Jimmy Rollins with the
tying run on second.
Halladay (15-5) had retired 12 straight
batters into the ninth. Halladay, who tied a
career high with 14 strikeouts and tossed
his seventh complete game, allowed con-
secutive singles to open the inning.
Shane Victorino hit a 2-run homer
off Arizona starter Josh Collmenter in
the fifth.
Braves 2, Giants 1, 11 innings
ATLANTA Rookie Randall
Delgado allowed no hits through six
innings in his second big-league start
and Atlanta pulled out another last at-bat
win on Martin Prados 2-out single in
the 11th.
Delgado was the star early on, allow-
ing his lone hit on Cody Ross leadoff
homer in the seventh. Prado came through
at the end, driving in Brooks Conrad
from third with an opposite-field single to
right off Javier Lopez (5-2). Conrad had
reached on a ground-rule double while
pinch-hitting.
Giants starter Jonathan Sanchez
sprained his left ankle in the third inning
when he slipped in front of the mound
while fielding Delgados sacrifice bunt.
He managed to make an awkward throw to
first base from the ground, barely getting
Delgado, but threw only one more pitch.
Brewers 2, Dodgers 1
MILWAUKEE Mark Kotsay hit a
tie-breaking RBI single in the ninth inning
and Milwaukee beat Los Angeles to take
its biggest lead in the NL Central this late
in a season.
The Brewers are seven games ahead
of second-place St. Louis.
After a pitching duel between Yovani
Gallardo and Chad Billingsley, the
Dodgers bullpen imploded in the ninth.
Hong-Chih Kuo (0-2) issued a leadoff
walk to Prince Fielder, then left for Mike
MacDougal. Casey McGehee singled on
MacDougals first pitch to put men on
first and second and Yuniesky Betancourt
walked on four pitches. Kotsay followed
with a single.
Padres 6, Mets 1
SAN DIEGO Rookie Cory Luebke
pitched six strong innings and combined
with three relievers on a 4-hitter for San
Diego.
Luebke (5-6) allowed one run and
three hits, struck out five and walked
three. Chad Qualls, Luke Gregerson and
Erik Hamren each got three outs.
Nick Hundley had three hits, includ-
ing two triples, for San Diego. Orlando
Hudson drove in two runs and Cameron
Maybin hit his eighth homer, a leadoff
drive in the seventh.
New York starter Jonathon Niese (11-
10) surrendered 10 hits over six innings
but allowed just three runs, two coming
in the first.
Pirates 5, Cardinals 4, 11 innings
PITTSBURGH Garrett Jones hom-
ered to lead off the bottom of the 11th
inning, lifting Pittsburgh over St. Louis.
Jones connected on a 2-2 pitch from
Arthur Rhodes (3-4) for his 14th home
run. Pittsburgh tied the game in the ninth
when Neil Walker homered on the first
pitch from closer Fernando Salas.
Centerfielder Andrew McCutchen
prevented St. Louis from going ahead
in the top of the 11th when he made a
running backhanded inning-ending catch
to rob Albert Pujols of extra bases and
keep Rafael Furcal from scoring from
first base.
Astros 6, Cubs 5
HOUSTON Pinch hitter Brian
Bogusevic hit a grand slam in the ninth
inning to propel Houston over Chicago
and snap a 7-game losing streak.
J.B. Shuck singled with one out in
the ninth off Cubs closer Carlos Marmol
(2-4) before advancing to second on a
wild pitch. Clint Barmes singled and Matt
Downs drew a walk to load the bases and
bring up Bogusevic.
Tyler Colvin hit a 2-run homer in the
sixth inning and Aramis Ramirez added a
solo shot in the eighth as the Cubs built
a 5-2 lead.
Marlins 6, Rockies 5
DENVER Anibal Sanchez tossed
eight strong innings to win his first game
in more than two months and Florida held
on to beat Colorado.
Mike Stanton homered, Bryan
Petersen had two triples and Leo Nunez
earned his 33rd save for the Marlins.
Jason Giambi hit a pinch-hit, 2-run homer
off Nunez with two outs in the ninth.
Ty Wigginton followed with a single
before Dexter Fowler popped out to end
the game.
Troy Tulowitzki, Carlos Gonzalez and
Seth Smith also homered for the Rockies.
Sanchez (7-6) was sharp in earning
his first victory since beating Arizona on
June 10.
Nationals 6, Reds 4
WASHINGTON Chien-Ming
Wang won back-to-back starts for the first
time in three years and Michael Morse
and Ryan Zimmerman homered to lift
Washington over Cincinnati.
Wang (2-2) allowed four runs and
seven hits in 6 1/3 innings. Morse hom-
ered into the right-field seats in the third
inning for his 21st shot this season. He
also hit a run-scoring double in the first.
Zimmerman led off the fifth with his sev-
enth home run.
Ian Desmond singled in two runs in
Washingtons 3-run first.
Cincinnatis Mike Leake (10-8)
allowed six runs five earned and
five hits in six innings.
American League
DETROIT Justin Verlander allowed
one run in 7 2/3 innings to become base-
balls first 18-game winner and the Detroit
Tigers breezed to a 7-1 victory over the
Minnesota Twins on Tuesday night.
Verlander (18-5) labored through a
29-pitch first inning but settled down
after that, allowing seven hits in another
impressive outing. He struck out eight to
surpass 200 on the year, walked one and
lowered his ERA to 2.31.
Miguel Cabrera drove in three runs for
the Tigers; Ramon Santiago hit his third
home run, a solo shot in the sixth.
Yankees 9, Royals 7
KANSAS CITY, Mo. Robinson
Cano hit a 3-run homer into the Kauffman
Stadium fountains, Russell Martin and
Derek Jeter each drove in a pair of runs
and New York beat Kansas City to give
Ivan Nova his eighth consecutive victory.
Nova (12-4) struggled almost as
much as Royals starter Danny Duffy
(3-7), allowing five runs and seven hits
through three innings. But he settled down
to retire the side in order the next two
frames and survived long enough to move
past Alfredo Aceves for the longest win-
ning streak by a Yankees rookie since
1980. The right-hander also tied Orlando
Hernandez and Andy Pettitte for the most
wins by a Yankees rookie in the past three
decades.
Rangers 7, Angels 3
ANAHEIM, Calif. Michael Young
had three of the Rangers 17 hits and drove
in three runs and Texas opened its biggest
AL West lead of the season.
Derek Holland (11-4) yielded nine hits
and fell one out shy of his fifth complete
game for the Rangers, who have moved
six games ahead the struggling Angels.
Josh Hamilton homered in a 3-hit
performance before leaving with back
spasms; Mitch Moreland had a 2-run sin-
gle among his three hits in Texas fifth
straight victory.
Torii Hunter had two hits and drove
in a run for the punchless Angels. Rookie
Tyler Chatwood (6-9) couldnt get out
of the third, yielding eight hits and five
runs while dropping to 1-5 over his last
eight starts.
Red Sox 3, Rays 1, 1st game; Rays 6,
Red Sox 2, 2nd game
BOSTON Rookie Desmond
Jennings hit his fifth home run of the
season and Jeff Niemann struck out 10 as
the Tampa Bay Rays salvaged a split of a
doubleheader with a second game victory
over Boston.
Niemann (8-4) pitched his first com-
plete game of the season and won his
seventh straight decision.
Jacoby Ellsbury hit a 3-run homer and
Jon Lester struck out eight in the win by
the Red Sox in the opener. Lester (12-6)
outdueled fellow All-Star James Shields.
Shields (11-10) retired the last 15 batters
he faced and struck out six. The only three
hits he allowed were a pair of singles by
Josh Reddick and Mike Aviles, followed
by Ellsburys homer.
White Sox 8, Indians 7, 14 innings.
CHICAGO Juan Pierres game-
ending single in the 14th inning capped a
wild, 5-hour marathon for Chicago.
Gordon Beckham doubled off of
Chad Durbin (2-2) with one out in the
final inning, advancing to third on Brent
Morels infield single. David Huff reliever
Durbin to face Pierre, who singled to left
to win it.
Jason Frasor (3-2) worked the top of
the inning to earn the victory.
Alejandro De Aza tripled in runs in
the second and sixth for the White Sox.
MLB Glance
Story idea...Comments
News releases...
email Nancy Spencer, editor
at nspencer@delphosherald.com
Big Green
destroys Bluffton
BLUFFTON Tuesdays
dual boys golf meet involving
Ottoville and host Bluffton
at Bluffton Golf Club didnt
have much drama.
The Big Green made
sure of that with a domi-
nating 3230424 beat-
down of the Pirates.
Kyle Karhoff rang up
a 76 to lead the way
for the Green and Gold,
while Craig Odenweller and
Travis Maag shot 81s and
Derek Schimmoeller an 85.
Rich Streicher was low
shooter for the hosts with a
96.
Ottoville is in
todays Kalida
Invitational and
Thursdays Paulding
Invitational (9 a.m.).
-----
T-Birds romp in
NWC golf quad
LIMA Lima Central
Catholics boys golfers
were rude guests Tuesday at
Colonial Hills, dominating a
Northwest Conference quad
meet.
The Thunderbirds put
together a 147 team
score to easily out-
distance second-place
Allen East (176),
Spencerville (201)
and Lincolnview (208).
Austin Goodridge led the
victors with a 1 under par
35, Evan Wilker and John
Kidd shot 37s and Josh Klaus
a 38.
No other golfer shot under
40.
Clay Plaugher led the
Mustangs with a 41.
Rick Brunswick
was low man for the
Bearcats with a 41 and
Brooks Ludwig carded
a 49 for the Lancers.
The Lancers (0-4, 0-2
NWC) return to action tonight
at the Mercer County Elks as
they take on Ft. Recovery and
resume NWC compe-
tition Friday morning
(10 a.m.) at Auglaize
Country Club as they
meet host Paulding in
a 3-team match also
involving Jefferson.
Spencerville (4-3,
2-3) is at Shawnee 4:30 p.m.
Thursday
Team Scores
LCC 147: Austin Goodridge 35, Evan
Wilker 37, John Kidd 37, Josh Klaus 38,
Timmy Levers 42, Zach Jamal 42.
Allen East 176: Clay Plaugher 41,
Lucas Herrmann 42, Tanner Richardson
45, Tyler Stevens 48, Dylan Mulholland
49, Cole Meyer 57.
Spencerville 201: Rick Brunswick
41, James Schaad 53, Dan Gelivera 53,
Chance Campbell 54, Kasey lee 62, Caleb
Yahl 65.
Lincolnview 208: Brooks Ludwig 49,
Wes Collins 50, Logan Miller 53,
Justis Dowdy 56, Damon Norton
57, Troy Patterson 66..
----
Lady Lancers grab
4-team matchup
VAN WERT
Kaitlyn Brant shot a 47 to
help the Lincolnview girls
golf team to a 231-235-282-
301 9-hole victory over host
Crestview, Mississinawa
Valley and Parkway Tuesday
at Hickory Sticks Golf
Club.
Leigha Taylor led
all scorers and the host
Lady Knights with as
46.
Lincolnview is at
Minster tonight (4 p.m.) and
Coldwater Thursday (4 p.m.),
while the Knights are off until
next week.
Team Scores:
Lincolnview 231: Kaitlyn Brant 47,
Macy Ashbaugh 53, Amanda Kocab 60,
Holly Diller 71.
Crestview 235: Leigha Taylor 46,
Macy Saylor 52, Morgan McClure 67,
Brooke Nofer 70.
Mississinawa Valley 282: (no
scores)
Parkway 301: Cierra Hoffman
59, Amy Roth 71, Brenna Brazle
71.
----
Knights down
Bulldogs, Panthers
in NWC golf
KALIDA Led by Jared
Hallfeldts medalist-winning
44, Crestviews boys golfers
knocked off host Columbus
Grove and Paulding 195-
198-221 in a Northwest
Conference tri-match on
a nice, sunny Tuesday
at Country Acres Golf
Club in Kalida.
Taylor Giesige led
the host Bulldogs (1-1,
1-1 NWC) with a 46,
while Trey Schroeders 52
led Paulding (0-5, 0-2).
The Knights (3-2, 1-2) and
Bulldogs are in a 5-team NWC
clash at Bluffton Golf
Club 10 a.m. Friday.
Team Scores:
Crestview 195: Jared
Hallfeldt 44, Jacob Wortman
50, Jacob Mengerink 50, Derek
Bissonette 51, Zach Schaadt
52.
Columbus Grove 198:
Taylor Giesige 46, Matt Silver
48, Jeff Birkemeier 51, Tony Koch 53,
Jacob Roebke 56, Blake Schroeder 58.
Paulding 221: Trey Schroeder 52,
Andy Smiley 53, Treston Gonzales 57,
Ben Heilshorn 59, Aaron Mock 61, Brad
Crawford 68.
JIM METCALFE
Metcalfes
Musings
Devin Sheets, an American
Family Insurance agent in
Van Wert, has been recog-
nized for customer satisfac-
tion excellence under the J.D.
Power and Associates
D i s t i n g u i s h e d
Insurance Agency
Program.SM Sheets
joins other American
Family agents who
have demonstrated
the highest level of
commitment to out-
standing customer
service.
Sheets has been an agent
for American Family since
January 2004. His office is
located at 118 S. Washington
St., Van Wert.
Industry-leading service
is our standard across the
board, said Jack Salzwedel,
American Family president
. Almost two-thirds of
American Family agents made
the commitment to achieving
this award, and that speaks
volumes about their dedica-
tion to our customers.
Sheets has qualified for
this award for 5 years.
The service excellence
distinction was determined
through an evaluation pro-
cess conducted by
J.D. Power and
Associates. The
process consists of
a customer satisfac-
tion survey which
measures custom-
ers overall expe-
rience with their
current American
Family agent.
Agents must meet or exceed
the standards measured on
a national benchmark estab-
lished by J.D. Power and
Associates annual auto and
home insurance customer sat-
isfaction studies. Only agen-
cies that perform in the top
20 percent of all insurance
agencies nationwide based
on customer satisfaction sur-
veys are eligible to become
a Distinguished Insurance
Agency.
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7 The Herald Wednesday, August 17, 2011
BUSINESS
www.delphosherald.com
WEBB
INSURANCE
AGENCY, INC.
HOME AUTO BUSINESS LIFE HEALTH
1-800-727-1113
212 W. High - Lima, 419-228-3211
138 N. Main - Bluffton, 419-358-4015
By KELLY OLSEN
The Associated Press
SEOUL, South Korea
A group of some 27,000
South Koreans is suing Apple
for $26 million for what they
claim are privacy violations
from the collection of iPhone
user location information.
Each person in the suit is
seeking 1 million won ($932)
in damages, Kim Hyeong-
seok, one of their attorneys,
said today. He said they are
targeting Apple Inc. and its
South Korean unit to protect
privacy rights.
Apple spokesman Steve
Park in Seoul declined to
comment.
Apple has faced com-
plaints and criticisms since it
said in April that its iPhones
were storing locations of
nearby cellphone towers and
Wi-Fi hot spots for up to a
year. Such data can be used
to create a rough map of the
device owners movements.
Apple also revealed
that a software bug caused
iPhones to continue to send
anonymous location data to
the companys servers even
when location services on the
device were turned off.
The company has said
it will no longer store the
data on phones for more than
seven days, will encrypt the
data and will stop backing up
the files to user computers. It
also has fixed the bug with a
free software update.
Kim, the lawyer, took
Apple to court earlier this
year over iPhone privacy and
was awarded 1 million won.
He said he expected the
first hearing in the new case
to take place in October or
November.
If the court in the south-
ern city of Changwon rules
in favor of the plaintiffs,
the total award could come
to about 27.6 billion won
($25.7 million). Cupertino,
California-based Apple
the most valuable company
in the United States earned
$7.31 billion in its fiscal third
quarter.
Jung Ogk-taek, an offi-
cial at the Changwon District
Court, said it was not clear
how much time would be
required to reach a verdict.
Kim said the decision to
seek damages of only 1 mil-
lion per person reflects that
South Korean courts do not
generally award amounts as
high as their counterparts in
the United States.
He said 26,691 plaintiffs
were listed in the civil suit
filed Wednesday. Another
921 are minors and lawyers
need to obtain the consent of
their parents before they can
join, Kim said. He expects
that to take about two weeks.
South Koreas communi-
cations regulator earlier this
month ordered Apples local
operation to pay a 3 million
won fine for what it said were
violations of the countrys
location information laws.
SKoreans sue Apple over
iPhone user information
Outstanding client service,
ethics and professionalism
have enabled Dennis
Lauth of Dennis
Lauth Insurance and
Financial Services
to achieve member-
ship in the presti-
gious Million Dollar
Round Table - The
Premier Association
of Financial
Professionals.
Attaining membership
in MDRT is a distinguished
career milestone achieved
by less than one percent of
the worlds life insurance
and financial services pro-
fessionals. It requires Lauth
to adhere to a strict code of
ethics, focus on providing
top-notch client service and
continue to grow profession-
ally through involvement in
at least one other
industry associa-
tion.
MDRT mem-
bers like Dennis
are united in their
commitment to
help individuals,
families and busi-
ness owners gain
financial peace
of mind, MDRT President
Julian H. Good Jr. said.
MDRT provides con-
tinuing education and skills
improvement designed to help
members provide the best in
client service. It also helps
members serve their commu-
nity and maintain strong per-
sonal values.
Lauth added to Million
Dollar Roundtable roles
Lauth
Sheets
The West Central Ohio
Manufacturing Consortium
(WCOMC) will begin its
Supervisor Leadership
series on Sept. 13.
This series covers a
wide range of topics for
supervisors, ranging from
leadership skills, to conflict
management, to conducting
effective meetings.
Topics include The
Supervisor as a Leader
(Sept. 13), The Terrible
Ts of Change (Oct. 20),
Communication Basics
(Nov. 17), Motiviation
and Morale (Jan. 19),
Situational Leadership
(Feb. 16), Dealing with
Conflict and Confrontation
(March 15), Generation
Management (April 19)
and Making Meetings
Work (May 17).
To get the Early Bird
Discount, registration and
payment for the Sept. 13
session must be received by
Aug. 30.
Fees are per person/per
session:
$105 WCOMC mem-
bers
$99 Multiple-
registrant Discount
$95 Early Bird
Discount
Call 419-995-8406 from
8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m. week-
days to register.
Consortium
offers
leadership series
By JEFFREY COLLINS
The Associated Press
COLUMBIA, S.C.
Tobacco companies want a
judge to put a stop to new
graphic cigarette labels that
include the sewn-up corpse
of a smoker and pictures of
diseased lungs, saying they
unfairly urge adults to shun
their legal products and will
cost millions to produce.
Four of the five largest
U.S. tobacco companies
sued the federal government
Tuesday, saying the warn-
ings violate their free speech
rights.
Never before in the United
States have producers of a
lawful product been required
to use their own packaging
and advertising to convey an
emotionally-charged govern-
ment message urging adult
consumers to shun their prod-
ucts, the companies wrote
in the lawsuit filed in federal
court in Washington.
The companies, led by
R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Co.,
Lorillard Tobacco Co., said
the warnings no longer simply
convey facts to allow people
to make a decision on wheth-
er to smoke. They instead
force them to put government
anti-smoking advocacy more
prominently on their packs
than their own brands, the
companies say. They want a
judge to stop the labels.
The FDA refused to com-
ment, saying the agency does
not discuss pending litiga-
tion. But when she announced
the new labels in June,
Health and Human Services
Secretary Kathleen Sebelius
called them frank and honest
warnings about the dangers
of smoking.
The FDA approved nine
new warnings to rotate on
cigarette packs. They will be
printed on the entire top half,
front and back, of the packag-
ing. The new warnings also
must constitute 20 percent
of any cigarette advertis-
ing. They also all include a
number for a stop-smoking
hotline.
One warning label is a pic-
ture of a corpse with its chest
sewed up and the words:
Smoking can kill you.
Another label has a picture of
a healthy pair of lungs beside
a yellow and black pair with a
warning that smoking causes
fatal lung disease.
The lawsuit said the imag-
es were manipulated to be
especially emotional. The
tobacco companies said the
corpse photo is actually an
actor with a fake scar, while
the healthy lungs were sani-
tized to make the diseased
organ look worse.
Tobacco: Graphic federal warnings arent fair

Description Last Price Change
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NAS/NMS COMPSITE 2,523.45 -31.75
S&P 500 INDEX 1,192.76 -11.73
AUTOZONE INC. 288.27 +0.87
BUNGE LTD 62.77 -0.22
EATON CORP. 42.44 -0.44
BP PLC ADR 40.97 -0.68
DOMINION RES INC 49.69 -0.01
AMERICAN ELEC. PWR INC 37.19 -0.30
CVS CAREMARK CRP 33.80 -0.20
CITIGROUP INC 29.94 -1.33
FIRST DEFIANCE 12.86 -0.49
FST FIN BNCP 15.20 +0.15
FORD MOTOR CO 11.22 -0.13
GENERAL DYNAMICS 62.04 -0.73
GENERAL MOTORS 25.83 -0.27
GOODYEAR TIRE 13.73 +1.66
HEALTHCARE REIT 47.78 +0.05
HOME DEPOT INC. 33.12 +1.66
HONDA MOTOR CO 33.93 -0.59
HUNTGTN BKSHR 5.05 -0.12
JOHNSON&JOHNSON 64.36 -0.08
JPMORGAN CHASE 36.03 -0.85
KOHLS CORP. 47.53 0
LOWES COMPANIES 20.09 +0.41
MCDONALDS CORP. 86.67 -0.15
MICROSOFT CP 25.35 0
PEPSICO INC. 63.76 +0.19
PROCTER & GAMBLE 61.62 -0.26
RITE AID CORP. 1.07 -0.02
SPRINT NEXTEL 3.59 +0.11
TIME WARNER INC. 30.38 +0.05
US BANCORP 22.18 -0.55
UTD BANKSHARES 8.74 -0.05
VERIZON COMMS 34.88 -0.17
WAL-MART STORES 51.92 +1.94
STOCKS
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EDWARD JONES INVESTMENTS
Close of business Aug. 16, 2011
Local insurance agent earns
J.D. Power distinction
COLUMBUS Time Warner Cable is
being named the 2011 Ohio Employer of the
Year by The Ohio Governors Council on
People with Disabilities.
The award is being presented to the compa-
ny at the Councils Annual Awards Ceremony
in the Atrium of the Ohio Statehouse on
Thursday.
Time Warner Cable is being recognized
for activities that the company has in place to
educate employees as well as for hiring and
supporting a diverse workforce.
This is a significant honor for Time
Warner Cable because it tells us that we are
doing the right thing across our region, most
notably within Ohio, said Karen Fasheun,
Midwest Region Manager of Diversity,
Inclusion and Development for Time Warner
Cable. Our approach to disabilities at Time
Warner Cable includes workplace, workforce
and marketplace strategies. It is a great honor
to receive this award.
According to the Governors Council, win-
ners of the Ohio Employer of the Year serve
as an example to inspire others and emphasize
ability rather than disability as the impor-
tant factor in employment, promotion, and
advancement within the company.
Time Warner Cable has undertaken several
initiatives in support of disability awareness
and diversity and inclusion.
In 2010, the company invited Nadine
Vogel, founder and president of Springboard
Consulting LLC, a firm with global expertise
on disability issues in the workplace, to give
a workshop for company leaders from across
the country on Disability Awareness, spark-
ing the launch of a new corporate initiative
on the topic.
Also in 2010, the Ohio Rehabilitation
Services Commission led Disability Awareness
training for the companys Midwest Region
Diversity and Inclusion Council. The com-
panys Diversity and Inclusion Council later
identified region-wide Disability business
objectives and strategies.
Also in 2010, Time Warner Cable has also
held four invitation only Supplier Diversity
Fairs in Cincinnati, Cleveland, Columbus
and Milwaukee. Three of these fairs includ-
ed participation by companies identified as
Disability vendors.
Time Warner Cable is also launching a
Disability Awareness training program for
employees later this year.
The Governors Council on People with
Disabilities works with the Governor and the
Legislature to promote the inclusion of people
with disabilities.
The 21-member council is appointed by the
governor. The council advises the Governor
and General Assembly on statewide disability
issues and educates and advocates for partner-
ships at the local, state and national levels.
The GCPD also promotes equality, access
and independence, and works to increase the
development of employment opportunities
as well as to promote the value of diversity,
dignity and the quality of life for people with
disabilities. The GCPD also serves as a cata-
lyst to create systematic change to promote
awareness of disability-related issues that will
ultimately benefit all citizens of Ohio.
Time Warner Cable wins Employer Of
The Year from Ohio Governors
Council On People With Disabilities
8 The Herald Wednesday, August 17, 2011 www.delphosherald.com
SPEARS
LAWN CARE
Total Lawncare &
Snow Removal
21 Years Experience Insured
Commercial & Residential
Lindell Spears
419-695-8516
LAWN MOWING
FERTILIZATION
WEED CONTROL
PROGRAMS
LAWN AERATION
FALL CLEANUP
MULCHING & MULCH
DELIVERY
SHRUB INSTALLATION,
TRIMMING & REMOVAL
950 Tree Service
L.L.C.
Trimming & Removal
24 Hour Service Fully Insured
KEVIN M. MOORE
(419) 235-8051
TEMANS
OUR TREE
SERVICE
Bill Teman 419-302-2981
Ernie Teman 419-230-4890
Since 1973
419-692-7261
Trimming Topping Thinning
Deadwooding
Stump, Shrub & Tree Removal
POHLMAN
BUILDERS
FREE ESTIMATES
FULLY INSURED
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
ROOM ADDITIONS
GARAGES SIDING ROOFING
BACKHOE & DUMP TRUCK
SERVICE
950 Lawn Care
ElwerLawnCare.com
Visit website for photos
and details of services
(419) 235-3708
Lawn Maintenance
Lawn Treatments
Mulch Installation
Shrub Trimming
New Landscapes
New Lawn Installs
Retaining Walls
Bulk Compost
Bulk Mulch
Geise
Transmission, Inc.
419-453-3620
2 miles north of Ottoville
automatic transmission
standard transmission
differentials
transfer case
brakes & tune up
950 Construction
POHLMAN
POURED
CONCRETE WALLS
Residential
& Commercial
Agricultural Needs
All Concrete Work
Mark Pohlman
419-339-9084
cell 419-233-9460
Hohlbeins
Ph. 419-339-4938
or 419-230-8128
30%
TAX REBATE
ON WINDOWS
Windows, Doors,
Siding, Roofing,
Sunrooms,
Kitchens & Bathroom
Remodeling,
Pole Buildings,
Garages
Home
Improvement
TOP SOIL
COMPOST
419-339-6800
On S.R. 309 in Elida
Delivery Available
950 Miscellaneous
COMMUNITY
SELF-STORAGE
GREAT RATES
NEWER FACILITY
419-692-0032
Across from Arbys
GOLD
CANYON
CANDLES
Gina Fox
419-236-4134
www.candlesbygina.com
The worlds finest candles,
candle scents, home decor.
Ask how to earn for FREE
950 Car Care
FLANAGANS
CAR CARE
816 E. FIFTH ST. DELPHOS
Ph. 419-692-5801
Mon.-Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-2
OIL - LUBE FILTER
Only
$
22.95*
*up to 5 quarts oil
Advertise
Your
Business
DAILY
For a low,
low price!
Service
AT YOUR
HERALD DELPHOS
THE
Telling The Tri-Countys Story Since 1869
Classifieds
Deadlines:
11:30 a.m. for the next days issue.
Saturdays paper is 11:00 a.m. Friday
Mondays paper is 1:00 p.m. Friday
Herald Extra is 11 a.m. Thursday
Minimum Charge: 15 words,
2 times - $9.00
Each word is $.30 2-5 days
$.25 6-9 days
$.20 10+ days
Each word is $.10 for 3 months
or more prepaid
THANKS TO ST. JUDE: Runs 1 day at the
price of $3.00.
GARAGE SALES: Each day is $.20 per
word. $8.00 minimum charge.
I WILL NOT BE RESPONSIBLE FOR
DEBTS: Ad must be placed in person by
the person whose name will appear in the ad.
Must show ID & pay when placing ad. Regu-
lar rates apply
FREE ADS: 5 days free if item is free
or less than $50. Only 1 item per ad, 1
ad per month.
BOX REPLIES: $8.00 if you come
and pick them up. $14.00 if we have to
send them to you.
CARD OF THANKS: $2.00 base
charge + $.10 for each word.
To place an ad phone 419-695-0015 ext. 122
We accept
www.delphosherald.com





We are the premier manufacturer of
mashed potatoes, side dishes and salads
located in Delphos Ohio.

Maintenance Technician
Repair and perform preventative
maintenance on food processing and
packaging equipment, conduct
unsupervised set-up of equipment.
Excellent knowledge in all aspects of
Electrical, Pneumatics, PLCs, and
Hydraulics. 3-5 years maintenance
experience required. High School
education or equivalent; preferably trade
school. Background in a food
manufacturing environment helpful.

$18.00 - $20.00 per hour, based on
experience.
Apply in person, email or fax resume to:

Email : patti.eilerman@orvalkent.com
Fax: 419-692-1944
1600 Gressel Dr.
Delphos OH 45833



We are the premier manufacturer of mashed potatoes,
side dishes and salads located in Delphos Ohio.
Maintenance Technician
Repair and perform preventative maintenance on food pro-
cessing and packaging equipment, conduct unsupervised
set-up of equipment. Excellent knowledge in all aspects of
Electrical, Pneumatics, PLCs, and Hydraulics. 3-5 years
maintenance experience required. High School education
or equivalent; preferably trade school. Background in a
food manufacturing environment helpful.
$18.00 - $20.00 per hour, based on experience.
Apply in person, email or fax resume.
Trailer Spotter / Warehouse
Loader
This position is for 3rd shift and is responsible for moving
trailers in and out of dock doors, loading product on to
trucks, locating product and rotating inventory.
Spots and switches trailer as directed 10% of time.
Loads/unloads trailers with the use of a stand up forklift
and works in warehouse, 90% of time.
Must posses and maintain a valid commercial drivers
license with at least a class A rating and an air brake
endorsement.
Salary range will be $13.00 per hour
Need Extra Money for the Holidays?
Now Hiring Seasonal Laborers
Salary will be $10.00 per hour. Candidates must be willing
to work varied schedules, weekends and overtime.
Interested candidates apply:
Email: Lisa.baumgardner@orvalkent.com
Fax: 419-692-1944
Mail: 1600 Gressel Dr., Delphos OH 45833
The Key
To Buying
Or Selling
940 E. FIFTH ST., DELPHOS
419-692-7773 Fax 419-692-7775
www.rsre.com
1 OPEN HOUSE THURSDAY 6-8 PM
160 W Fifth St., Ft. Jennings
$139,000-Ft. Jennings SD
Spacious 4 bedroom, 2 bath home located on shaded lot
in quiet neighborhood. 2 car att. garage, eat-in kitchen,
formal dining room. Newer roof, triple pane windows,
covered patio. (16) Melissa Pfenning 567-356-7191

*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.


*Will be trained by Microtel

Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage


close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE

OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.


TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS


FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos

928 N. Franklin St., Delphos


These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.

BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity


$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!





$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find



$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC





$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury

$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story



$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality



$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy

$84,900-Delphos SD
Enticing Two-story




w w w . t l r e a . c o m
419-692-SOLD

2 OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY 12- 1:00

GREAT 1
ST
TIME
HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION

THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty

www.jimlanghalsrealty.com

FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE

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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900

Call for showing ...


1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
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12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.

Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894

HELP WANTED
PART-TIME
PRE-PRESS

Eagle
Print

RAABE RAABE

GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT

BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH

MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN

2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING

$
14,999

Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells


Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today





*Will be responsible for operation of 56 room hotel.


*Will be trained by Microtel

Must see beautiful 3 bedroom, 1 bath ranch with 2 car garage


close to park and schools. Fireplace, 22x22 great room, large open
kitchen, new roof and furnace, appliances stay. Move in ready.
Available immediately.
Call for showing 419-863-9480. OPEN SUNDAYS 2-4
MLS SERVICE

OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 1-3 P.M.


TRICO REALTY IS OPEN SATURDAYS


FROM 8:30 TO 12:30 TO SERVE YOUR REAL ESTATE NEEDS
1109 S. Clay St., Delphos

928 N. Franklin St., Delphos


These are just a few of our listings, call us we have more!
OPEN HOUSE
SUNDAY, MARCH 9
TH
FROM 3:30-5 P.M.

BY APPOINTMENT
$99,500-Delphos SD
Ideal Opportunity


$99,900-Van Wert SD
Add Finishing To This Home!





$47,000-Delphos SD
A Fine Fix- up Find



$74,900-Delphos SD
Two-story That Needs Some TLC





$199,000-Elida SD
Exquisite Sense Of Luxury

$77,000-Ft Jennings SD
Large & Luxurious 1- 1/ 2 Story



$148,500-Elida SD
A Charming Personality



$73,000-Delphos SD
Peace And Privacy

$84,900-Delphos SD
Enticing Two-story




w w w . t l r e a . c o m
419-692-SOLD

2 OPEN HOUSES
SUNDAY 12- 1:00

GREAT 1
ST
TIME
HOME-BUYER
INCENTIVES
ARE AVAILABLE!!!
CALL US FOR
MORE INFORMATION

THINKING OF
SELLING??
MAKE THE CALL
THAT SAYS
IT ALL:
692-SOLD
Jim Langhals Realty

www.jimlanghalsrealty.com

FEATURED HOMES
Sun., March 9
1 to 3 p.m. OPEN HOUSE

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OPEN HOUSE
SUN., MARCH 9,
1:00- 2:30
2 OPEN HOUSES
SUN., MARCH 9, 3:00- 4:30
To view all listings go to www.DickClarkRealEstate.com
11970 Sarka Rd.
Spencerville - $104,900
408 W. Third St.
Delphos - $104,900

Call for showing ...


1310 Joshua St.
Delphos - $249,000
D
i
c
k

C
L
A
R
K
R
e
a
l

E
s
t
a
t
e
12505 Bloomlock Rd.
Delphos
Judy Bosch 419-230-1983
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894
415
S.
Cass
St.

Monday, March 10
at the Delphos Public Library
6 PM
648 S. Jefferson St.,
Delphos
Janet 419-236-7894

HELP WANTED
PART-TIME
PRE-PRESS

Eagle
Print

RAABE RAABE

GENUINE
MOTORCRAFT

BATTERIES
TESTED
TOUGH

MAX
with 100-month warranty
$
99
95
Some vehicles slightly higher
Installation extra.
Price valid with exchange.
See Service Advisor for
limited-warranty details. Taxes extra.
KNIPPEN

2007
CHRYSLER
SEBRING

$
14,999

Classifieds Sells Classifieds Sells


Place your Ad Today Place your Ad Today












See me,
BILL HOFFMAN
for the best buy on your
new or used vehicle.
TOM AHL
617 KING AVE., LIMA, OH 45805
419-228-3413 CELL 419-296-7188
005

Lost & Found
LOST: ORANGE Tiger,
medium length hair, fixed
male cat. De-clawed in
front. Has black dots on
his nose and lips. Lost
Saturday during storm
from S. Cass. Please call
419-692-9906,
5 6 7 - 2 5 9 - 9 0 1 3 o r
567-204-0127,
567-259-9962
010

Announcements
ADVERTISERS: YOU can
place a 25 word classified
ad in more than 100 news-
papers with over one and
a half million total circula-
tion across Ohio for $295.
It's easy...you place one
order and pay with one
check t hrough Ohi o
Scan-Ohi o St at ewi de
Classified Advertising Net-
work. The Delphos Herald
advertising dept. can set
this up for you. No other
classified ad buy is sim-
pler or more cost effective.
Call 419-695-0015, ext
138.
Delphos Trading Post
528 N. Washington St.
DELPHOS, OHIO
FLEA MALL
NOW OPEN
Every Saturday
7am to 4pm
Come See Variety
VENDORS
WANTED
Call
601-347-7525
or Stop By
for Information -
Setup
THE NAZARENE Church
in Spencerville is starting
an adult singles group.
Forging Friendships in
Faith Aug. 20th @ 6pm.
More information Call
419-236-3207
040

Services
LAMP REPAIR
Table or floor.
Come to our store.
Hohenbrink TV.
419-695-1229
040

Services
MASSAGE
THERAPY
NEW CLIENTS
419-953-8787
$25 THE 1
ST
MASSAGE
Stephanie Adams, LMT
Destinie Carpenter, LMT
Corner of Dutch Hollow & Nesbitt
080

Help Wanted
DRIVER WANTED
Driver needed to deliver
papers to local busi -
nesses, newsstand boxes
and carriers in Delphos.
15-20 hours/week. Valid
drivers license and reli-
able transportation with in-
surance required. Applica-
tions available at The Del-
phos Herald office 405 N.
Main St., Delphos.
GRAIN EQUIPMENT
dealer seeking crew
members to assemble and
erect grain elevator legs,
conveyors, grain bins and
dryers. Full time. Valid
drivers license and
drug test required.
Post Agri-Service
419-647-4925
HOME HEALTH Aides
All shifts, weekdays and
some weekends. STNA
preferred, not required.
No phone calls please.
Application online or at of-
fice:Community Health
Professionals
602 E. Fifth St., Delphos
www.ComHealthPro.org
120

Financial
IS IT A SCAM? The Del-
phos Herald urges our
readers to contact The
Better Business Bureau,
( 419) 223- 7010 or
1-800-462-0468, before
entering into any agree-
ment involving financing,
business opportunities, or
work at home opportuni-
ties. The BBB will assist
in the investigation of
these businesses. (This
notice provided as a cus-
tomer service by The Del-
phos Herald.)
Raines
Jewelry
Cash for Gold
Scrap Gold, Gold Jewelry,
Silver coins, Silverware,
Pocket Watches, Diamonds.
2330 Shawnee Rd.
Lima
(419) 229-2899
300

Household Goods
BED: NEW QUEEN pil-
low-top mattress set, can
del i ver $125. Cal l
(260)749-6100.
340

Garage Sales
10305 RI DGE Road.
Thurs. 9-6pm, Fri. 9-4pm.
Very ni ce baby boy
clothes, adult clothes, bas-
sinet, toys, dog cage, car-
dioglide exercise machine,
househol d i tems and
many misc.
428 W. Second St.
Delphos,
Thurs.& Fri.,
August 18-19, 9am- 5pm.
More treasures uncov -
ered! Sale of retired fourth
grade teachers collection
and Tri-County Business
Machines and Office Sup-
plies inventory continues!
Entertai nment center,
coputer tables, desk, and
misc. items.
DELPHOS SENIOR
Citizens Center
Garage Sale
301 Suthoff St.
Thursday, Aug. 18
8:30-5:00
Friday Aug. 19
8:30-5:00
NO CLOTHING
MOVING DAY Sale
238 Westbrook Ave.
Aug. 18, 9am-6pm
Aug. 19, 9am-5pm
Aug. 20, 9am-2pm
Air conditioner, micro-
wave, camcorder, clothes
and lots of misc. items.
600

Apts. for Rent
DUPLEX -1 BDRM Apt. all
new appliances, carpet,
paint, very clean. $400
plus deposit. No pets or
s m o k i n g . C a l l
419-692-6478
620

Duplex For Rent
3 BEDROOM duplex,
$450/mo. + security de-
posit. Stove, refrigerator,
washer/dryer hookup, 1
car garage. Available
9/1/11. (419)233-0083
3 BEDROOM, new carpet.
Available immediately.
Call 419-234-6983.
800

House For Sale
LAND CONTRACT or
Short term Rent to own
homes. Several available.
Addresses and pictures at
www.creativehomebuying-
solutions.com.
419-586-8220
810

Auto Repairs/
Parts/Acc.
Midwest Ohio
Auto Parts
Specialist
Windshields Installed, New
Lights, Grills, Fenders,Mirrors,
Hoods, Radiators
4893 Dixie Hwy, Lima
1-800-589-6830
840

Mobile Homes
RENT OR Rent to Own. 2
bedroom, 1 bath mobile
home. 419-692-3951.
890

Autos for Sale
ON THESE NAME
BRANDS:
YOKOHAMA
and PIRELLI
See dealer for details.
Expires 8-31-11
$
30 REBATE
WHEN YOU PURCHASE
FOUR TIRES
Over 85
years
serving
you!
www.raabeford.com
RAABE
FORD-LINCOLN
11260 Elida Rd., Delphos
M 7:30-8 ; T.-F. 7:30-6:00; Sat. 9-2
419-692-0055
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE 8 week old puppy,
f emal e Lab mi x.
419-796-5006
920

Free & Low Price
Merchandise
FREE BEAUTI FUL
WHITE, Very Tame, litter
traied-mature kittens. Must
See! Call 419-453-3340 or
614-203-0970
999

Legals
LEGAL NOTICE
CASH RENT VAN WERT
COUNTY FARM
The Board of Van Wert
County Commissioners
will receive sealed bids
until the 25th day of
August, 2011, at 10am at
the office of said Board in
the Van Wert County An-
nex, 114 East Main Street,
Suite 200, Van Wert, Ohio
45891, at which time said
bids will be opened and
read aloud for the cash
rent of the tillable acres at
the Van Wert County
Farm, Section 11, Ridge
Township, Van Wert, Ohio
The 304.927 acre farm will
be rented as one parcel of
land. Information for bid-
ders and bid forms are
available at the Board of
County Commissioners
Office, County Annex, 114
E. Main St., Suite 200,
Van Wert, Ohio. Only bid
forms furnished by the
Commissioners will be ac-
cepted. A bid may not be
withdrawn after the time
set by the Board to open
bids. Any bid is consid -
ered binding until the
Board awards and exe-
cutes a contract with the
successful bidder.
A bond, certified check or
official bank check in the
amount of Five Hundred
Dollars ($500.00) must ac-
company the bid. The
bond or check conditions
that the bidder, if their bid
is accepted and awarded,
executes a contract in
conformity with the pub-
lished conditions and
specifications and their
bid. Every bidders bond
or check will be returned
upon the signing of a con-
tract with the successful
bi dder. No personal
checks can be accepted.
The Board of Van Wert
County Commissioners re-
serves the right to reject
any or all bids and to
waive any informality.
By order of the Board of
Van Wert County
Commissioners,
Larry E. Clouse, Clerk/
Administrator
290

Wanted to Buy
620

Duplex For Rent
Classifieds Sell
Classifieds Sell!
To advertise
call
419-695-0015
B U N K O O K O M E N
S T A E A V E M I T E
M A N T A R A Y N C O S
T H O R N M I E N S
A U F R I A
C U P S A G E D O H M
A M A H W I G T A D
G P S N B A A T M S
E S O P E E L N O S E
L I D E R G
H A V O C A R D O R
A W E D F U J I Y A M A
F L E E O F F S D O C
T S P S P O K E S O Y
Answer to Puzzle
Todays Crossword Puzzle
ACROSS
1 Sweet roll
4 Dingbat
8 Bad or good sign
12 Depot (abbr.)
13 Icicle locale
14 Tiny insect
15 Huge flat fish (2
wds.)
17 PFC superiors
18 Briar
19 Bearings
20 Wiedersehen
22 Estuary
23 Holds gently
26 Like good brandy
28 Resistance unit
31 Bombay nanny
32 Clowns getup
33 Youngster
34 AMA members
35 Lakers org.
36 They need a PIN
37 Paul Ankas
Beso
38 Rind
39 Muzzle
40 Cover
41 Foot-pound
relative
43 Widespread
damage
46 Warmth
50 Floored
51 View from Tokyo
54 Cut and run
55 Switch positions
56 Whats up, ?
57 Recipe amts.
58 Prod along
59 Tofu base
DOWN
1 Realty ad abbr.
2 Provos place
3 Billionth, in
combos
4 Actor Reeves
5 Boat implement
6 Eggs, in biology
7 Enter data
8 vincit amor
9 Long-tailed
animals
10 Thames town
11 Capone foe
16 Rubbish
19 Central
21 Toadied
22 Wine and dine
23 Enclose
24 Game officials
25 El , Texas
27 Jeer at
28 von Bismarck
29 Scenery chewers
30 Inventory wd.
36 More than miffed
38 Snapshot
40 Mine finds
42 Collect for a
cause
43 Ax handle
44 Belt makers tools
45 Running mate
47 Half the parents
48 Melville work
49 Risque
51 Popinjay
52 Roswell crasher
53 DDE successor
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
12 13 14
15 16 17
18 19
20 21 22
23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30
31 32 33
34 35 36
37 38 39
40 41 42
43 44 45 46 47 48 49
50 51 52 53
54 55 56
57 58 59
Place a
House For
Sale Ad
In the Classifieds
Call
The Daily
Herald
419 695-0015
DEAR DR. GOTT:
I am a 39-year-old
female recently
diagnosed with Lyme
disease. For the past
3-1/2 months, I have
been experiencing
many nervous
system symptoms
and actually had a
test done to detect
Lyme disease about
1-1/2 months ago. It came up negative.
I happened to get information through a friend that there
are actually two types of Lyme tests and that one is much
more accurate than the other. I then went to a specialist who
ordered the more sensitive test and discovered that I do,
indeed, have Lyme.
I am shocked because I havent been hiking much in
recent years, and I dont live in a particularly high-risk area.
I have been freaking out for the past few months thinking I
had MS or God knows what else.
I am very concerned about others out there who could
have Lyme disease and come up with a negative test
because it was not the right test. I am confused about why
the less accurate test hasnt been discontinued, as it is so
misleading. (This is the test currently being ordered by most
MDs). Please tell your readers about the two types of test
as well as Lyme symptoms. It could literally save someones
life! Sign me ... GLAD TO BE DIAGNOSED FROM THE
CENTRAL COAST OF CALIFORNIA
DEAR READER: Lyme disease is the most common tick-
borne illness in North America. It is caused by a bacterium
known as Borrelia burgdorferi. The bacterium is spread by
deer ticks that feed on the blood of humans, mice, deer,
birds, cats and dogs. They are brown and approximately
the size of the head of a pin, making them very difficult to
spot. In order for a person to develop Lyme disease, he
or she must be bitten by an infected deer tick. Before any
bacteria can be transmitted, however, the tick typically has
to be attached for at least 48 hours.
Symptoms vary from person to person, with various
areas of the body affected. Common signs may include
a rash or bulls-eye ring in one location or over the body,
joint pain, headache, body aches, fever and chills. Less
common symptoms are neurological in nature -- such as
Bells palsy, weakness of the limbs, irregular heartbeat,
impaired memory, hepatitis and overwhelming fatigue.
These are typically associated with advanced disease.
Some symptoms of Lyme disease (without the telltale
bulls-eye ring or rash) are also found in disorders such
as fibromyalgia, depression, joint pain and chronic fatigue.
Therefore, if your physician has any question, he or she
might choose to order testing such as an ELISA (enzyme-
linked immunosorbent assay) test, a Western blot to detect
antibodies to several proteins of B. burgdorferi, or a PCR
(polymerase chain reaction) that detects bacterial DNA
through fluid drawn from an infected joint or spinal fluid.
The ELISA test is the current standard of care and is
ordered first. It can take several week following the initial bite
for the body to develop sufficient antibodies for the test to be
positive. Testing too early may produce a negative result. If
the ELISA is positive, it is followed up with a Western blot;
in patients with chronic Lyme or Lyme arthritis, the PCR
may also be ordered.
It is important for both physician and patient to realize
that testing may not indicate Lyme disease. And, once an
individual has been diagnosed, a portion of the report known
as the IgG may remain positive for months or years after the
initial infection. This doesnt require treatment, but remains
an indication that the patient had Lyme at one stage.
Treatment is commonly initiated with oral antibiotics such
as doxycycline for adults and children over the age of 8,
or amoxicillin or cefuroxime for those younger, pregnant
women or women who breast-feed. A two- to four-week
course is the norm. However, some research studies now
indicate that between 10 and 14 days might be sufficient.
With progression of Lyme disease that fails to respond to
traditional methods, treatment with intravenous antibiotics
may be appropriate. This method is extremely effective in
eradicating infection; however, it may cause a low white
blood cell count, diarrhea, or infection with other antibiotic-
resistant organisms unrelated to Lyme.
The Food and Drug Administration has warned consumers
and health care
providers to
avoid Bismacine.
This injectable
compound contains
high levels of a
metal known as
bismuth. It has
been prescribed by
some alternative
m e d i c i n e
p r a c t i t i o n e r s .
While safe in some
oral medications,
in its injectable
form it can cause
poisoning that can
lead to heart and
kidney failure and
is not approved.
Copy Right 2011
United Feature
Syndicate, Inc.
Lyme disease testing varies
DR. PETER J. GOTT
On
Health
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening August 17, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Family Family Happy Primetime Nightline Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Brother Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Late
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WOHL/FOX Mobbed House Local
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AMC Mad Max-Thunderdome Mad Max-Thunderdome
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BET Ray Toya: A F Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Matchmaker Rocco's Dinner Party Rocco's Dinner Party
CMT To the Mat CMT Made To the Mat
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Chappelle Chappelle South Pk South Pk South Pk Jon Daily Colbert South Pk Futurama
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NICK My Wife My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show My Wife My Wife Married Married
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TRAV Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd Truck Stp Truck Stp Man, Food Dessert Man v Fd Man v Fd
TV LAND M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced Divorced Cleveland Retired a Retired a
USA NCIS Royal Pains Necessary Roughness Burn Notice Royal Pains
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2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Wednesday, August 17, 2011 The Herald 9
Tomorrows
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Crabby in-law
causes turmoil
Dear Annie: Elaine has
been married to my brother
for 45 years. She is critical,
opinionated and condescend-
ing, and she loves to use
her poison tongue to point
out our faults to her hus-
band and children. I do my
best to remain cordial for my
brothers sake, but it is nearly
impossible.
When they married, we
welcomed Elaine with open
arms, but she made it clear
that we were never good
enough. When I
was a teenager,
she tried to plant
seeds of doubt in
my mind, saying
my parents didnt
love me. When
Elaine went back
to college later in
life, she became
worse. She ana-
lyzed everything
we said or did at
family gatherings,
making all events
stressful. When confronted
about her attitude, she blamed
others because, of course, she
is never wrong.
I now realize Elaine lacks
self-confidence and trashed
our family in order to elimi-
nate competition for the
affection of her husband and
children. She has no respect
for others. After my parents
died, Elaine told my daughter
that her grandparents didnt
love her, and that their lives
were one bitter feud that only
Elaine was smart enough to
notice. My confused daugh-
ter asked me about these
comments, which fortunately
gave me the opportunity to
set the record straight.
I wish my brother would
speak up, but he has been
dominated too long. It wont
do any good to tell Elaine
what I think of her. She cant
see that she has alienated
everyone with her abrasive
personality. But she is now
spreading her vile, delusional
untruths to the next genera-
tion. How do I nip that in the
bud? -- Sick of the Shrew
Dear Sick: Were
impressed that youve toler-
ated this woman for 45 years.
If Elaine tells a lie in your
presence, say sweetly, Now,
Elaine, dear, you know that
isnt true. You simply must
stop making things up.
Unfortunately, you have little
control over what she says
to her children behind your
back. When you see the kids,
be sure to emphasize the good
things -- how much the fam-
ily loves them, and how they
should come to you if they
ever have any questions.
Dear Annie: I am an
elderly woman with fragile
bones. Often, when I meet
someone new, they expect me
to shake hands. In my day,
the woman always extended
her hand if she wanted to
shake, but this custom has
changed. I have experienced
excruciating pain and, once,
a broken bone that didnt heal
properly. How can I avoid
shaking hands? -- Crushed
in Florida
Dear Florida: We have
actually covered this topic
before. Here are some of our
readers suggestions: bow-
ing instead, wearing a wrist
brace, or holding the persons
outstretched hand with both
of yours and saying, Id love
to shake your hand, but its
too painful for me.
Dear Annie: I read with
interest the letter
from Worried in
California, whose
13-year-old twin
sister has wild
mood swings.
I am the mother
of twin girls. At the
same age, one of
my girls developed
the same attitude.
Although we tried
various doctors,
counseling, etc.,
nothing changed.
At the age of 47, she was
diagnosed with Graves dis-
ease, which is a thyroid con-
dition. It took a long time to
diagnose even though there is
a history of thyroid problems,
including Graves disease, in
my family.
Through all those years,
my daughters moods were
out of control. Now that she
is receiving the proper care,
she is a totally different and
quite happy person. Would
you please tell Worried to
ask her parents to get her
sister tested for a thyroid
problem? Even if she tests
only slightly above or below
normal, the difference can
be unbelievable. -- Canadian
Mother
Annies Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annies Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annies Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, AUG. 18, 2011
Certain conditions will prove
to be more personally gratifying in
the year ahead than they have been
for a number of past years. The very
situations that gave you fits before
will now be the luckiest for you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- A
chance comment from an associate
might put you on the track of
resolving a difficult situation that has
been bugging you, and which no one
has been able to deal with. Itll be the
perfect solution.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- What you truly want to achieve
is within the realm of possibility.
However, the important thing to
remember is to make certain that your
goal is meaningful and not frivolous.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If
youre thinking of taking on something
big, first line up all of the helpers you
can muster. Youre fortunate right
now, but your best results will come
from group involvements.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
As long as youre willing to work for
what you get and dont leave anything
up to chance, you can make noticeable
improvements in conditions that relate
to your holdings and income.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Its not like you to sit in the
corner and be a wallflower, so dont
start now, regardless of your reasons.
Something nice could develop through
someone you meet for the first time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
--This could be the day youve been
waiting for. Something youve been
worrying about will do an about-face
and spur necessary changes thatll
turn out to be in your favor.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Strive to be as flexible as possible
where your important plans are
concerned. Youll succeed if you
dont restrict your ability to maneuver
and make constructive changes when
necessary.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Try to devote the greater portion of
your time and attention to matters that
are materially meaningful to you. It is
in these areas where your luck will be
the strongest and most powerful.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Think for yourself so that you can
get off to a good start doing what you
want. The course you set for yourself
is likely to be the one youll follow for
some time to come.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
You can gain the upper hand on your
financial picture by being assertive,
not aggressive, and by relying on
your own instincts and timing when it
really counts.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If
you are on the verge of announcing a
new endeavor, this might be the perfect
day to get it off of the launching pad.
In fact, the results could exceed your
expectations.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Its highly likely that you will be the
one who has the edge over the other
guy. However, dont take this for
granted, get careless and give the edge
to someone else.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
BEETLE BAILEY
SNUFFY SMITH
BORN LOSER
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
BIG NATE
FRANK & ERNEST
GRIZZWELLS
PICKLES
BLONDIE
HI AND LOIS
Wednesday Evening August 17, 2011
8:00 8:30 9:00 9:30 10:00 10:30 11:00 11:30 12:00 12:30
WPTA/ABC Middle Family Family Happy Primetime Nightline Local Nightline Jimmy Kimmel Live
WHIO/CBS Big Brother Criminal Minds CSI: Crime Scene Local Late Show Letterman Late
WLIO/NBC Minute to Win It America's Got Talent Love in the Wild Local Tonight Show w/Leno Late
WOHL/FOX Mobbed House Local
ION Without a Trace Without a Trace Criminal Minds Criminal Minds Without a Trace
Cable Channels
A & E Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage Storage
AMC Mad Max-Thunderdome Mad Max-Thunderdome
ANIM Bedbug Apocalypse Confessions Confessions Confessions Confessions
BET Ray Toya: A F Wendy Williams Show
BRAVO Housewives/NJ Matchmaker Rocco's Dinner Party Rocco's Dinner Party
CMT To the Mat CMT Made To the Mat
CNN Anderson Cooper 360 Piers Morgan Tonight Anderson Cooper 360 John King, USA Piers Morgan Tonight
COMEDY Chappelle Chappelle South Pk South Pk South Pk Jon Daily Colbert South Pk Futurama
DISC Sons of Guns Sons of Guns One Man Army Sons of Guns One Man Army
DISN Good Luck Shake It Lemonade Mouth Wizards Vampire Wizards Wizards
E! Sex-City Sex-City Sweet Home Alabama Chelsea E! News Chelsea
ESPN MLB Baseball Baseball Tonight SportsCenter Baseball NFL Live
ESPN2 Softball SportsNation World, Poker World, Poker SportsNation
FAM Melissa Melissa Georgia Georgia Melissa Melissa The 700 Club Whose? Whose?
FOOD Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Restaurant: Im. Food Truck Race Restaurant: Im.
FX Bride Wars Rescue Me Rescue Me Rescue Me
HGTV Property Income Income Property Brothers Hunters House Property Income Property
HIST American Pickers You Don't Know Dixie Ice Road Truckers American Pickers
LIFE Dance Moms Dance Moms Dance Moms Roseanne Roseanne Chris Chris
MTV Awkward. Awkward. Teen Mom The Challenge The Challenge Jersey Shore
NICK My Wife My Wife Lopez Lopez '70s Show '70s Show My Wife My Wife Married Married
SCI Ghost Hunters Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest Ghost Hunters Inter. Legend Quest
SPIKE Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Deadliest Warrior Ways Die Ways Die
TBS Browns Browns Payne Payne Payne Payne Conan Lopez Tonight
TCM The Maltese Falcon Sahara Beat the Devil
TLC Hoard-Buried Pregnant Pregnant Outrageou Outrageou Pregnant Pregnant Outrageou Outrageou
TNT The Mentalist The Mentalist Friday Night Lights Leverage
TOON Dude Destroy King-Hill King-Hill Amer. Dad Amer. Dad Fam. Guy Fam. Guy Chicken Aqua Teen
TRAV Man, Food Man, Food Man v Fd Man v Fd Truck Stp Truck Stp Man, Food Dessert Man v Fd Man v Fd
TV LAND M*A*S*H M*A*S*H Raymond Raymond Cleveland Divorced Divorced Cleveland Retired a Retired a
USA NCIS Royal Pains Necessary Roughness Burn Notice Royal Pains
VH1 Famous Food Ton of Cash Celebrity Rehab Ton of Cash 40 Funniest Fails
WGN Chris Chris How I Met How I Met WGN News at Nine Scrubs Scrubs South Pk South Pk
Premium Channels
HBO Robin Hood True Blood The Town
MAX Hoodlum The A-Team Zane
SHOW Green Weeds NASCAR Penn Franchise NASCAR Franchise Green Wild and Wonderful
2009 Hometown Content, listings by Zap2it
Wednesday, August 17, 2011 The Herald 9
Tomorrows
Horoscope
By Bernice Bede Osol
Crabby in-law
causes turmoil
Dear Annie: Elaine has
been married to my brother
for 45 years. She is critical,
opinionated and condescend-
ing, and she loves to use
her poison tongue to point
out our faults to her hus-
band and children. I do my
best to remain cordial for my
brothers sake, but it is nearly
impossible.
When they married, we
welcomed Elaine with open
arms, but she made it clear
that we were never good
enough. When I
was a teenager,
she tried to plant
seeds of doubt in
my mind, saying
my parents didnt
love me. When
Elaine went back
to college later in
life, she became
worse. She ana-
lyzed everything
we said or did at
family gatherings,
making all events
stressful. When confronted
about her attitude, she blamed
others because, of course, she
is never wrong.
I now realize Elaine lacks
self-confidence and trashed
our family in order to elimi-
nate competition for the
affection of her husband and
children. She has no respect
for others. After my parents
died, Elaine told my daughter
that her grandparents didnt
love her, and that their lives
were one bitter feud that only
Elaine was smart enough to
notice. My confused daugh-
ter asked me about these
comments, which fortunately
gave me the opportunity to
set the record straight.
I wish my brother would
speak up, but he has been
dominated too long. It wont
do any good to tell Elaine
what I think of her. She cant
see that she has alienated
everyone with her abrasive
personality. But she is now
spreading her vile, delusional
untruths to the next genera-
tion. How do I nip that in the
bud? -- Sick of the Shrew
Dear Sick: Were
impressed that youve toler-
ated this woman for 45 years.
If Elaine tells a lie in your
presence, say sweetly, Now,
Elaine, dear, you know that
isnt true. You simply must
stop making things up.
Unfortunately, you have little
control over what she says
to her children behind your
back. When you see the kids,
be sure to emphasize the good
things -- how much the fam-
ily loves them, and how they
should come to you if they
ever have any questions.
Dear Annie: I am an
elderly woman with fragile
bones. Often, when I meet
someone new, they expect me
to shake hands. In my day,
the woman always extended
her hand if she wanted to
shake, but this custom has
changed. I have experienced
excruciating pain and, once,
a broken bone that didnt heal
properly. How can I avoid
shaking hands? -- Crushed
in Florida
Dear Florida: We have
actually covered this topic
before. Here are some of our
readers suggestions: bow-
ing instead, wearing a wrist
brace, or holding the persons
outstretched hand with both
of yours and saying, Id love
to shake your hand, but its
too painful for me.
Dear Annie: I read with
interest the letter
from Worried in
California, whose
13-year-old twin
sister has wild
mood swings.
I am the mother
of twin girls. At the
same age, one of
my girls developed
the same attitude.
Although we tried
various doctors,
counseling, etc.,
nothing changed.
At the age of 47, she was
diagnosed with Graves dis-
ease, which is a thyroid con-
dition. It took a long time to
diagnose even though there is
a history of thyroid problems,
including Graves disease, in
my family.
Through all those years,
my daughters moods were
out of control. Now that she
is receiving the proper care,
she is a totally different and
quite happy person. Would
you please tell Worried to
ask her parents to get her
sister tested for a thyroid
problem? Even if she tests
only slightly above or below
normal, the difference can
be unbelievable. -- Canadian
Mother
Annies Mailbox is written
by Kathy Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors of the
Ann Landers column. Please
e-mail your questions to
anniesmailbox@comcast.net,
or write to: Annies Mailbox,
c/o Creators Syndicate, 5777
W. Century Blvd., Ste. 700,
Los Angeles, CA 90045.
Annies Mailbox
www.delphosherald.com
THURSDAY, AUG. 18, 2011
Certain conditions will prove
to be more personally gratifying in
the year ahead than they have been
for a number of past years. The very
situations that gave you fits before
will now be the luckiest for you.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) -- A
chance comment from an associate
might put you on the track of
resolving a difficult situation that has
been bugging you, and which no one
has been able to deal with. Itll be the
perfect solution.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
-- What you truly want to achieve
is within the realm of possibility.
However, the important thing to
remember is to make certain that your
goal is meaningful and not frivolous.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 23) -- If
youre thinking of taking on something
big, first line up all of the helpers you
can muster. Youre fortunate right
now, but your best results will come
from group involvements.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov. 22) --
As long as youre willing to work for
what you get and dont leave anything
up to chance, you can make noticeable
improvements in conditions that relate
to your holdings and income.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 23-Dec.
21) -- Its not like you to sit in the
corner and be a wallflower, so dont
start now, regardless of your reasons.
Something nice could develop through
someone you meet for the first time.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19)
--This could be the day youve been
waiting for. Something youve been
worrying about will do an about-face
and spur necessary changes thatll
turn out to be in your favor.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 19)
-- Strive to be as flexible as possible
where your important plans are
concerned. Youll succeed if you
dont restrict your ability to maneuver
and make constructive changes when
necessary.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March 20) --
Try to devote the greater portion of
your time and attention to matters that
are materially meaningful to you. It is
in these areas where your luck will be
the strongest and most powerful.
ARIES (March 21-April 19)
-- Think for yourself so that you can
get off to a good start doing what you
want. The course you set for yourself
is likely to be the one youll follow for
some time to come.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20) --
You can gain the upper hand on your
financial picture by being assertive,
not aggressive, and by relying on
your own instincts and timing when it
really counts.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20) -- If
you are on the verge of announcing a
new endeavor, this might be the perfect
day to get it off of the launching pad.
In fact, the results could exceed your
expectations.
CANCER (June 21-July 22) --
Its highly likely that you will be the
one who has the edge over the other
guy. However, dont take this for
granted, get careless and give the edge
to someone else.
COPYRIGHT2011 United Feature Syndicate, Inc.
2
756 W. Ervin Rd.
Van Wert 888-590-1685
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CHRYSLER JEEP DODGE
Visit our website: www.grevechryslerjeepdodgeofvanwert.com
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Answers to Tuesdays questions:
Surprisingly, the Jewish consumer only buys
20 percent of kosher food in America. Since
kosher delineates between items containing
milk and meat, Muslims, Seventh-Day Adventists,
vegetarians and lactose-intolerant people make up
the bulk of kosher food purchasers.
Daniel Websters best-selling book was not the
dictionary; it was his American Spelling Book,
nicknamed the Blue-Backed Speller. He sold
more than a million copies during his lifetime.
Today, it is estimated more than 100 million cop-
ies have helped spellers achieve perfection.
Todays questions:
Which city is farther west Reno, Nevada, or
Los Angeles, California?
Why will no major league baseball player
wear a jersey with No. 42?
Answers in Thursdays Herald.
Todays words:
Autophagia: biting oneself
Hecatomb: any mass slaughter
Todays joke:
Three boys are in the school yard bragging
about their fathers. The first boy says, My Dad
scribbles a few words on a piece of paper, he
calls it a poem, they give him $50.
The second boy says, Thats nothing. My
Dad scribbles a few words on piece of paper, he
calls it a song, they give him $100.
The third boy says, I got you both beat. My
Dad scribbles a few words on a piece of paper,
he calls it a sermon, and it takes eight people to
collect all the money!
10 The Herald Wednesday, August 17, 2011
www.delphosherald.com
Child welfare survey examines recession
By CRISTINA SILVA
Associated Press
LAS VEGAS Karla Washington
worries how she will afford new school
uniforms for her five-year-old daughter.
Washington, an undergraduate student,
earns less than $11,000 a year from a part-
time university job. The salary must cover
food, rent, health care, child care and the
occasional splurge on a Blues Clues item
for her only child.
My biggest fear is not providing my
daughter with everything that she needs to
be a balanced child, to be independent, to
be safe, to feel like she is of value, said
Washington, 41.
Washingtons economic woes are seen
throughout Nevada, where the nations
highest unemployment and foreclosure
rates have combined to devastate families
and empty neighborhoods and construction
yards.
A national study on child well-being to
be published today found that child pov-
erty increased in 38 states from 2000 to
2009. As a result, 14.7 million children,
20 percent, were poor in 2009. That rep-
resents a 2.5 million increase from 2000,
when 17 percent of the nations youth
lived in low-income homes.
In the foundations first examination of
the impact of the recession on the nations
children, the researchers concluded that
low-income children will likely suffer aca-
demically, economically and socially long
after their parents have recovered.
The research by the Annie E. Casey
Foundation found that Nevada had the
highest rate of children whose parents are
unemployed and underemployed. The state
is also home to the most children affected
by foreclosures 13 percent of all Silver
State babies, toddlers and teenagers have
been kicked out of their homes because of
an unpaid mortgage, the study found.
People who grew up in a financially
secure situation find it easier to succeed in
life, they are more likely to graduate from
high school, more likely to graduate from
college and these are things that will lead
to greater success in life, said Stephen
Brown, director of the Center for Business
and Economic Research at the University
of Nevada, Las Vegas. What we are
looking at is a cohort of kids who as they
become adults may be less able to contrib-
ute to the growth of the economy. It could
go on for multiple generations.
The annual survey monitored by policy
makers across the nation concludes that
children from low-income families are
more likely to be raised in unstable envi-
ronments and change schools than their
wealthier peers. As a result, they are less
likely to be gainfully employed as adults.
There are other social costs.
Economically disadvantaged children can
result in reduced economic output, higher
health expenditures and increased criminal
justice costs for society, the survey con-
cludes. The research is based on data from
many sources, including the Mortgage
Bankers Association, National Delinquency
Survey and U.S. Census Bureau.
Even if you dont care about kids
and all you care about is your own well-
being, then you ought to be concerned,
said Patrick McCarthy, president of the
Baltimore, Md.-based charity. ... Weve
got to think about what kind of state, what
kind of country we can expect to have if
we are not investing in the success of our
children.
The report found some bright spots.
In the two decades since researchers
began compiling the annual report, infant
mortalities, child and teen deaths and
high school dropout rates have declined.
But the number of unhealthy babies have
increased, and there were far more chil-
dren living in low-income families.
Programs such as food stamps, unem-
ployment insurance and foreclosure medi-
tation have acted like a dam against the
flood of poverty, McCarthy said, but that
assistance has been threatened by federal
and state government budget cuts.
Mississippi kept its overall last place
ranking in child welfare for the 10th
consecutive year, according to the sur-
vey. It was closely trailed by neighboring
Louisiana and Alabama, a nod to the pov-
erty that plagues southern states. Nevada
ranked 40th overall, its worst ranking in
10 years, largely because of its economic
decline.
The rankings are determined by a states
achievement in 10 indicators that reflect
child poverty, such as undernourished
infants, infant mortalities, teen births and
children in single-parent families. The top
state for children was New Hampshire,
ahead of Minnesota, Massachusetts and
Vermont.
Even if you dont
care about kids and all
you care about is your
own well-being, then you
ought to be concerned
Patrick McCarthy, president of
the Baltimore, Md.-based charity
By DONNA CASSATA
Associated Press
WASHINGTON The
Army improperly tested new
bullet-blocking plates for
body armor and cannot be
certain that 5 million piec-
es of the critical battlefield
equipment meet the stan-
dards to protect U.S. troops,
the Defense Departments
inspector general found.
The Pentagon report
focused on seven Army con-
tracts for the plates, known
as ballistic inserts, awarded
between 2004 and 2006 and
totaling $2.5 billion. The
inspector generals audit,
carried out over a two-year
period ending in March,
found the tests were incom-
plete, conducted with the
wrong size plates or relied
on ballistic test rounds that
were inconsistent. Due to
the demands of the wars in
Iraq and Afghanistan, tests
under certain temperatures
and altitudes were scrapped
altogether.
Consequently, the Army
cannot be sure that ballis-
tic inserts meet ... require-
ments, the report said. As
a result, the Army lacks
assurance that 5.1 million
ballistic inserts acquired
through the seven contracts
provide appropriate protec-
tion.
The inspector general
said it did not conduct its
own tests so it couldnt say
whether the plates were
defective.
In response, the Army
said Tuesday that it had ini-
tiated improvements to the
testing system before and
during the inspector gen-
erals audit. The service
also said all inspector gen-
eral recommendations to
improve the testing process-
es have been implemented.
... The Army continues to
work with the test commu-
nity for test improvements
to provide the best body
armor possible to the sol-
dier.
The Aug. 1 report was
the fourth in a series by the
inspector general in response
to Rep. Louise Slaughter.
Since January 2006, the
New York Democrat has
pressed the military about
the effectiveness of body
armor after The New York
Times reported that 80 per-
cent of Marines serving in
Iraq who had been shot in
the upper body had died
because of inadequate body
armor.
The body armor used by
most U.S. troops compris-
es a ballistic vest with two
large, hard ceramic plates
that protect the upper body
from bullets and shrapnel.
The equipment has been
crucial for American forces
in Iraq and Afghanistan for
nearly a decade.
The 51-page IG report
said the Army program
manager for soldier equip-
ment could provide only
limited assurance that the
plates met requirements.
The inspector general found
that for all seven contracts
the program manager did
not have a consistent way
of measuring and recording
velocity of the test rounds.
Two designs were approved
without valid tests.
The Army said it had cre-
ated a database for test infor-
mation, standardized the
protocol for ballistic testing
and continues to scan body
armor plates before deploy-
ment and during a soldiers
tour of duty to ensure there
are no internal cracks.
The Army conducts rig-
orous and extensive testing
of body armor to ensure that
it meets U.S. Army standards
and is safe for use in combat,
the service said in comments
included in the report.
In an interview, Slaughter
said she planned to write
to Defense Secretary Leon
Panetta and Army Secretary
John McHugh calling their
attention to the inspec-
tor generals report. Both
Panetta and McHugh are
former House colleagues of
Slaughter, a 13-term con-
gresswoman.
This needs to be told,
she said, remembering the
dead and wounded from the
nations wars. At the least,
we should have some confi-
dence that this part is taken
care of, that in the future
more diligence is taken.
Pentagon says Army improperly
tested body armor plates