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MSC884 Dr Daniel Tan

Discussion on the sabre-tooth curriculum and Brazilian physics Definitions and aspects of curriculum Essential questions

Akker, J. van den (1998). The science curriculum: Between ideals and outcomes. In B. Fraser & K. Tobin (Eds.), International handbook of science education (pp. 421-447). Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Feynman, R. (1997). Surely you're joking, Mr. Feynman! New York, London: W.W. Norton & Company Peddiwell, J.A. (undated). The saber-tooth curriculum. Retrieved, January 12, 2011 from http://nerds.unl.edu/pages/preser/sec/articles/sabertooth .html Ornstein, A. & Hunkins, F.P. (2009). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson.

What are the learning points from the paper? What parts of my curriculum are similar to the sabre-tooth curriculum? Why? What parts of my curriculum are similar to the fishnet-making and using, antelope-snare construction and operation, and bear-catching and killing skills? Why?

What are the issues that Richard Feynman raise? Do the same issues apply to our science education? Give examples.

Plan for learning Curriculum is an organised set of formal education and/or training intentions Linear view of curriculum involves a sequence of steps Purpose, design, implementation and evaluation Behavioural slant

Providing experiences for learners Helping students to achieve self-realization through active participation within the school Humanistic and elementary school perspective
Childs interests and needs

Subject matter or content Science, Math, English etc Can be in terms of grade levels eg. primary, lower secondary, upper secondary Emphasises content knowledge and process skills of particular subject

Van den Akker (1998) Ideal (societal or system or macro level) Formal Perceived (institutional or school or meso level) Operational (classroom or micro level) Experiential Attained Hidden Null

Other aspects Hidden Null

Ideal curriculum

Original vision underlying the curriculum Basic philosophy, rationale, mission Socio-political considerations as values and interests of many individuals, groups and organisations are usually at stake in making curricular decisions.

Vision Thinking Schools, Learning Nation Mission Moulding the future of the nation

Key educational policies Bilingualism Thinking Schools, Learning Nation (TSLN) IT Masterplans Teach Less, Learn More (TLLM) Framework for 21st century competencies

Singapore's education system aims to nurture every child and help all students discover their talents, realise their full potential, and develop a passion for life-long learning. We want to nurture in our young the willingness to think in new ways, solve problems and create new opportunities for the future.

Equally important, we want to help our young acquire sound values and develop the strength of character to deal with future challenges. National Education aims to foster strong bonds among students and develop in them a deep sense of belonging and commitment to family, community and country.

Thinking Schools, Learning Nation (TSLN) adopted in 1997 as our vision in education describes a nation of thinking and committed citizens, and an education system capable of meeting the challenges of the 21st century. Since 2003, we have also focused on nurturing a spirit of Innovation and Enterprise (I&E) among our students and staff. Teach Less, Learn More

(TLLM), a call made by PM Lee Hsien Loong in his inaugural National Day Rally speech in 2004, was a call for our schools and teachers to teach better, improve the quality of interaction between teachers and students, and equip students with the knowledge, skills and values that prepare them for life. Teaching will be focused on developing understanding, critical thinking and the ability to ask questions and seek solutions.

A nation's wealth in the 21st Century will depend on the capacity of its people to learn. Their imagination, their ability to seek out new technologies and ideas, and to apply them in everything they do will be the key source of economic growth. Their collective capacity to learn will determine the well-being of a nation in a future of intense competition and shifting competitive advantages.

Teach Less, Learn More Teach better, improve the quality of interaction between teachers and students Equip students with the knowledge, skills and values that prepare them for life. Focused on developing understanding, critical thinking and the ability to ask questions and seek solutions. Top-down support from ground-up initiatives

Teach Less, Learn More


More For the Learner For Understanding For the Test of Life Less To Rush through the Syllabus To Dispense Information Only For a Life of Tests

Teach Less, Learn More


More
Engaged Learning Differentiated Teaching Guiding, Facilitating, Modelling Formative and Qualitative Assessing

Less
Drill and Practice One-size-fits-all Instruction Telling Summative and Quantitative Testing

Formal curriculum Vision elaborated in a curriculum document with either a prescribed/obligatory or exemplary/voluntary status How much of the ideal curriculum is in the formal curriculum?

Perceived curriculum The curriculum as interpreted by its users, especially teachers


Schemes of work Lessons plans

Is the congruence between the syllabus and the SOWs and lesson plans? If there are areas of divergence, what are they?

Operational curriculum The actual instructional process in the classroom Is the congruence between what is taught and what is planned? If there are areas of divergence, what are they?

Experiential curriculum The actual learning experiences of the students Is what is taught learnt? If there are areas of divergence, what are they?

Attained curriculum The resulting learning outcomes of the students Is what is learned attained? If there are areas of divergence, what are they?

Hidden curriculum Socio-psychological interaction among students and teachers, especially their feelings, attitudes and behaviours
Too much emphasis on grades elevates correct answers over understanding, facts over ideas, self over helping others Winning is everything, beating the system

Hidden curriculum
Students are expected to adapt to the teachers authority and become good workers and model students good work habits Teachers and schools create re-producers and not thinkers

Null curriculum Subject matter and experiences that are not taught eg.
Death Spirituality Law Human rights

Students may infer that what is omitted has little value Give examples of the null curriculum in your school.

What knowledge is of most worth for the science curriculum in Singapore? How should the science curriculum and materials be developed and implemented?

Ornstein, A. & Hunkins, F.P. (2009). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Philosophy_of_educa tion http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/educationphilosophy/

Ornstein, A. & Hunkins, F.P. (2009). Curriculum: Foundations, principles, and issues (5th ed.). Boston, MA: Pearson. http://www.learning-theories.com/ http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Learning_theory_(ed ucation) http://tip.psychology.org/theories.html http://www.infed.org/biblio/b-learn.htm