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The first thing we need to do is to make the Windows partition smaller to make r oom on the hard disk.

One to two gigabytes is plenty of room for Puppy Linux, but you migh t also want to create a swap partition. The less memory (RAM) yopu have the more a swap par tition will help. The swap partition should be two to three times the amount of memory. In my case I have 256 megabytes of memory. My plan is to shrink my Windows partition by abou t two gigabytes. In this space I will create a 1.2 gigabyte partition to hold Puppy L inux, and a .8 gigabyte swap partition. To make these changes use the partition manager c alled "GParted". It is part of Puppy Linux. 5. Click on the Menu button in the lower lefthand corner. 6. Click on "GParted Partition Manager" in the system sub-menu. 7. In the partition list, right click on the Windows partition. The line that says "boot" in the flags column. 8. Click on "Resize/Move". 9. Adjust the size of the Windows partition. In my case I changed the "Free Space Following" to about 2000 megabytes. 10. Click Resize. The next step is to create the Puppy Linux partition. 11. Right click on the "unallocated" line. 12. Click New. 13. Adjust the "Free Space Following" to the size for your swap partition. In my case 750 - 800 megabytes. 14. Click on the box that says "ext2" to select the file system for the new part ition. 15. Select ext3. 16. Click on Add. If you are not creating a swap partition skip ahead to step 22. 17. Right click on the "unallocated" line. 18. Click New. 19. Click on the box that says "ext2" to select the file system for the new part ition. 20. Select Linux-swap. 21. Click on Add.

22. In the top menu bar, click on Edit. 23. Click on Apply. 24. The last chance warning box appears, click on Apply. A window opens up saying "Applying pending operations" 25. When the "All operations successfully completed" message comes up click clo se. The partition that says "ext3" in the file system column is the Puppy Linux part ition. Remember the name of the Puppy LInux partition. It will be in the format "/dev/ hdXN" where X is a lower case letter and N is a digit. (Probably /dev/hda2) 26. Right click on the Puppy linux partition. 27. Click "manage flags". 28. Check the box for boot. After the next step your computer will be unable to boot on it's own. It can on ly be booted from the Puppy Linux CD. 29. Click Close. 30. Click the X in the upper righthand corner of the window to close GParted. 31. Click the Menu Button. (Bottom left of screen.) 32. From the Setup sub-menu, click on "Puppy Universal Installer". 33. Select "IDE (ATA) internal hard drive", Click OK. 34. Select the hadr drive, probably "hda", and click OK. You may get a scary sounding warning message about an error mounting the NTFS partition. Close the box and don't worry about it. We will fix that later. 35. Click on the button to install to the ext3 partition you created. (Probably hda2) 36. Make sure that the CD is in the CD drive. Click OK, click CD, click OK. 37. Click Normal, Wait while the files are copied. 38. Read the message, click "Install GRUB" GRUB is the Linux boot loader, I don't know why they call it GRUB. 39. Read the Message, click OK. 40. Read the Message, choose the simple option, click OK. 41. Read the Message, choose the standard Linux Console, click OK. 42. Read the Message, click OK.

43. Read the Message, choose "Root", click OK. The message said to install to the MBR, but I found that it works better to install GRUB to root. 44. Read the Message, click OK. The message should tell you that GRUB was successfully installed. 45. Read the Message, Click No. Now the Computer is bootable again, but there is on edit that needs to be made t o the menu.lst file. If you were to re-boot now you would see the GRUB menu scree n. You would have toe option to select either Windows or Linux. If you were to cho ose Windows it would reset the boot flag that was set in GParted so that you could o nly boot Windows. The menu.lst file that grubconfig created looks like this: # # # # # GRUB configuration file '/boot/grub/menu.lst'. generated by 'grubconfig'. Mon Mar 26 10:24:48 2007

Start GRUB global section timeout 30 color light-gray/blue black/light-gray # End GRUB global section # Other bootable partition config begins title Windows (on /dev/hda1) rootnoverify (hd0,0) makeactive chainloader +1 # Other bootable partition config ends # Linux bootable partition config begins title Linux (on /dev/hda2) root (hd0,1) kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro vga=normal # Linux bootable partition config ends title Install GRUB to floppy disk (on /dev/fd0) pause Insert a formatted floppy disk and press enter. root (hd0,1) setup (fd0) pause Press enter to continue. title Install GRUB to Linux partition (on /dev/hda2) root (hd0,1) setup (hd0,1) pause Press enter to continue. title For help press 'c', then type: 'help' root (hd0) title For usage examples, type: 'cat /boot/grub/usage.txt' root (hd0) There are a few things you need to understand about this file. The "#" means that this line is a comment, it has no effect. When GRUB starts it will wait forever for you to make a selection. Removing the "#" for the "timeout" line near the top of the file will make GRUB load the top selection on the menu after the amount of

seconds specified. The "makeactive" line is what causes the boot flag to be changed to the Windows partition if Windows is started from the GRUB menu. This line needs to be removed, or commented out with a "#". Any other changes to the menu.lst file are optional. The lines after the two sections are not needed. My menu.lst file looks like this: # Start GRUB global section timeout 10 color light-gray/blue black/light-gray # End GRUB global section # # Other bootable partition config begins title Windows (on /dev/hda1) rootnoverify (hd0,0) chainloader +1 # Other bootable partition config ends # # Linux bootable partition config begins title Linux (on /dev/hda2) root (hd0,1) kernel /boot/vmlinuz root=/dev/hda2 ro vga=normal # Linux bootable partition config ends That explians the edits to the menu.lst file. Now we will make the edits. 46. Click the drives icon on the desktop. (The one that looks like a USB pen drive.) 47. Click on Mount beside the the ext3 partition. 48. Click on Rox beside the the ext3 partition. 49. Click on the boot folder, then the grub folder. 50. Click on the menu.lst file. The menu.lst file is now open in the editor. 51. Remove or comment out the "makeactive" line. 52. Make any other changes you want. 53. Click the "X" in the upper righthand corner of the edit window. 54. Click Save. 55. Remove the install CD, click Menu, Click Reboot Computer on the Shut Down submenu. 56. Use the arrow key to select <DO NOT SAVE> and press Enter. 57. The computer will reboot, when the GRUB menu comes up select Windows. When Windows boots it will automatically start a Check Disk. This will fix the error message I told you to ignore a while back.

The computer is now ready to use.