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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
A Publ ication of the
Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce
1445 Market Street Denver, CO 80202
303-534-8500 fax 303-534-3200
www.denverchamber.org
PRESIDENT AND CEO
Kel l y J. Brough
CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER
Robert R. Bl ankenship
EXECUTIVE VICE PRESIDENT
Tom Cl ark
PUBLICATIONS EDITOR
Amy J.V. Atwel l
amy.atwel l @denverchamber.org
____________________________________________
A PUBL I CATI ON BY
CEO
Derek Wright
PRESIDENT
Kevin Evans
PUBL I SHER
Stephanie Halpin
CREATI VE DI RECTOR
Erin Hayden Seal
SALES
Allison Cornwell, Bruce Keating, Laura Mendez
EDI TORI AL CONTENT
We would like to thank the following individuals and organizations
for their editorial contributions to the publication:
Amy Lemen, David Nagore, Beverly Roman, Colorado State Parks
PHOTOGRAPHY
We would like to thank the following individuals, companies,
and organizations for their contributions to the publication:
Andrea Golod, Matt Inden, Denise Chambers, Jackie Schumaker
Jay Simon, Weaver Multimedia Group, The Colorado Tourism Office,
Littleton Public Schools, Porter Adventist Hospital, One Lincoln Park,
Colorado State Parks, Heritage Hills and Pradera
The Metro Denver Relocation Guide is published and distributed
biannually by ARG Publications, LLC dba ARG Publishing Company.
For advertising information, please call 303-241-7452.
Although every attempt is made to be as comprehensive and accurate
as possible, ARG Publications, LLC or the Denver Metro Chamber of
Commerce are not responsible for any misprints, errors, omissions,
deletions or the accuracy of the information in the publication. ARG
Publications, LLC does not accept responsibility for any loss, injury or
inconvenience sustained by anyone using this publication.
ARG Publications, LLC 2011. All rights reserved. No part of this
publication may be reproduced or transmitted in any form, by any
means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, or otherwise, without
the written permission of the Publisher.
table of
contents
WEL COME TO METRO DENVER 4
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY 10
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER 18
Public Education.................................................21
Options in Education............................................25
Child Care Resources...........................................29
Higher Education................................................30
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES 38
Major Medical Facilities.......................................39
Specialized Facilities...........................................44
HOUSING AND NEIGHBORHOODS 48
Metro Denver Map.........................................54-55
Counties and Cities.............................................56
Experience Life Downtown....................................63
Home, Garden and More.....................................72
Buying Your New Home.......................................75
Renting and Leasing.............................................78
L EI SURE AND RECREATI ON 80
Arts and Culture..................................................82
Attractions and Fun Things to Do.............................90
Take It Outside....................................................94
State Parks.......................................................103
Spectator Sports................................................107
Calendar of Events............................................110
SHOPPI NG AND DI NI NG 116
ACTI VE ADULTS 126
Resources for Active Adults..................................127
GETTI NG SETTL ED 130
Getting Around in Metro Denver...........................133
Newcomer Information.......................................136
Lend A Helping Hand........................................142
Religious Resources............................................144
Index of Advertisers...........................................148
2900 N. Quinlan Park Rd, Ste B-240 #344
Austin, Texas 78732
Phone: 512-266-2900 Fax: 512-266-2910
www.DenverRelocationGuide.net
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ne look, and youll want to stay. Denver has the kind of enviable quality of life that
makes it one of the best places in the United States to live and work and all you
have to do is just step outside. With a panoramic view of the Rocky Mountains, the
nations largest public park system, and more than 300 days of sunshine a year, its no surprise that Denver
consistently tops the lists of most livable cities.
Recreation and an active lifestyle beckon. Metro Denvers young, active residents are among the
nations healthiest. Area residents dabble in everything from skiing to hiking, mountain biking to river
rafting. Perhaps thats why the area is ranked as one of the fittest cities in the country! When theyre
not enjoying the regions great outdoors, citizens take advantage of championship sports teams and
cultural attractions, such as events at the Denver Performing Arts Complex the largest such facility
outside of New York City.
Welcome to
Metro Denver
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AN IDEAL CLIMATE
The metro Denver area is on the high
plains at the base of the Rocky
Mountains. Moderate temperatures, low
levels of humidity and abundant sunshine
offer an ideal climate for year-round
activities. In fact, the Denver area has
more days of sunshine per year than
either San Diego or Miami Beach.
What about the snow? Metro Denvers
climate is best described as semi-arid,
averaging a little less than 16 inches of
precipitation annually. Winter storms
here are usually short-lived, and the
snow melts rapidly. However, the nearby
mountains and ski resorts often get signif-
icant annual snowfall, allowing residents
to enjoy the best of both worldsa mild
climate for hiking, biking and a variety
of outdoor activities, and ideal weather
for skiing, snowboarding, and other
mountain activities.
COMMUNITIES FOR ALL
Known as the Mile High City, Denver is
the heart of an energetic metropolitan
area that embraces both newcomers and
visitors. The metro Denver area consists of
seven counties, including Adams,
Arapahoe, Boulder, Broomfield, Denver,
Douglas and Jefferson.
This diverse region ranges from a dynamic
central business district with a cosmopolitan
urban atmosphere to small communities
with a distinctly rural flavor and pictur-
esque mountain towns nestled in the
foothills of the Rockies. Denver is also
home to an active and historic downtown
area, with lofts and high-rise housing
options, as well as tree-lined neighbor-
hoods with historic roots.
Jefferson County is the areas second-
largest county and includes three cities:
Arvada, Lakewood and Westminster that
have populations greater than 100,000.
In the countys western section, residents
can live in mountain communities, yet still
work in a major metro area.
Located just east of Denver, Arapahoe
County has experienced major residential
growth. The countys largest city is
Aurora with a population of more than
290,000; Cherry Hills Village and
Greenwood Village are known as more
affluent neighborhoods.
Home to Denver International Airport,
Adams County is a mix of established
cities, new master-planned communities
and rural farmsteads. Most of its cities
offer a small-town atmosphere with easy
access to businesses and attractions in
nearby Denver.
Situated on the eastern slope of the
Rocky Mountains, Boulder Countys
mountain communities, parks and trail
systems offer a serene lifestyle and easy
access to skiing, hiking, mountain biking
and climbing.
Located just south of Denver, Douglas
County is one of the fastest growing
counties in the nation, but with large
portions of the county designated for
agricultural and open-space uses.
Most residents commute to Denver or
Colorado Springs.
Finally, just north of Denver is Broomfield
County known as a high-tech center
and home to several major companies
with housing development that continues
to grow with the county and its successes.
AFFORDABLE LIVING
Denver is a certainly a city of distinctive
neighborhoods, yet the cost of living
here remains affordable. Living here is
easier on your wallet than living in
California or many east coast cities, as
well as Chicago, Minneapolis, or
Portland.
Colorados focus on low taxes, coupled
with the regions high household
incomes, has kept the regions cost of
living at or near the national average.
Denver ranks slightly above the national
average for cost of living, but it is also
well below many other major cities.
According to the Metro Denver
Economic Development Corporation,
home prices in Denver have fared better
than prices in many other metro areas.
Metro Denvers median home price is
expected to increase modestly in the
next few years.
Many communities, employers and
organizations in the area also provide
programs for down-payment assistance
and other community advocacy programs
to help residents purchase affordable
homes.
ACTIVE CITIZENS
Metro Denvers mild climate, low humidity,
plentiful sunshine and Mountain
West lifestyle all combine to create an
ideal atmosphere for a year-round
recreation. In fact, Denver has the
largest public parks system of any U.S.
city, with 205 parks within the city limits.
The city also owns 14,000 acres of
mountain parks and 2,500 acres of
natural areas, as well as more than
WELCOME TO METRO DENVER
Metro Denver attracts many highly educated workers from
other states and the area is projected to have net-migration of
17,673 residents in 2011.(Source: Metro Denver Economic
Debelopment Corp.)
FACT of INTEREST
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WELCOME TO METRO DENVER
60 miles of bicycle paths. In total, there
are nearly 400 parks and pathways
located throughout the metro area.
There are also 40 state parks and three
national parks in metro Denvers backyard,
with prime recreational opportunities
for biking, hiking, camping, fishing and
skiing.
Located within 100 miles of metro
Denver, the Rocky Mountains are home
to some 25 world-class ski resorts, offering
downhill and cross- countr y skiing,
snowboarding, inner-tubing fun, and
mountain climbing. No matter where
you look, thousands of acres of open
space dot the area, giving citizens a
huge outdoor playground to hike, bike,
ski, snowshoe and more just steps from
their homes.
In the summer months, the resorts are a
spectacular background for a variety of
music and food festivals, as well as outdoor
activities like river rafting and horseback
riding. Denver also has an extensive trail
system: One of the longest recreational
trails in the metro Denver area, the High
Line Canal, runs 60 miles and connects
Douglas, Arapahoe and Denver counties.
But there are plans for more. One is a
$200 million network of trails, greenbelts
and open space areas in the cities of
Denver, Aurora, Brighton, Commerce City
and portions of Adams Countycalled
the Northeast Greenway Corridor. The
project will preserve farmland, wetlands
and open space in growing population
areas.
Other plans include creating a continuous
trail linking Denvers Front Range commu-
nities with a multi-use trail that runs
from New Mexico to Wyoming. The
Colorado Front Range Trail will link exist-
ing and planned trail systems with new
trail corridors to create an extensive path-
way system to connect Colorados major
population centers.
Thats not all; theres even more to do!
With more than 75 public and private
golf courses located throughout the
region, the Denver area gives seasoned
and novice golfers a host of choices.
Other recreational activities in the area
include hunting, boating, sailing, wind
surfing, swimming and fishing in
Colorados many streams, lakes and
reservoirs.
EDUCATION AND MORE
Did you know that Denver boasts the second-
highest percentage of college graduates
in the country and that, of the adult
population, 89.3 percent are high school
graduates and 39.7 percent have
college degrees?
Both public and private schools offer an
array of educational options for primary
and secondary students. All metro Denver
schools offer open enrollment, which
allows students living in one school district
to attend a school in another district.
Parents can select a school that matches
a childs individual needs, and accounta-
bility reports are available by area school
districts.
The region also provides a wide range
of higher educational resources, including
world-class research institutions, graduate
and professional schools, and a broad
spectrum of undergraduate programs.
Consider that Colorado universities
receive more than $450 million in
research grants annually. Many of
metro Denvers colleges and universities
offer nontraditional or adult education
programs, and distance learning pro-
grams are available for those seeking
degrees or certifications. In fact, there
are 10 four-year public and private
colleges and universities in the metro
area, with enrollments totaling more
than 125,000. The regions largest
providers of workforce training and edu-
cational services are its five two-year
public community colleges and 60
vocational/technical schools.
QUALITY HEALTH CARE
Metro Denver is home to some of the
finest hospitals and medical research
facilities in the world. For example, the
National Jewish Medical and Research
Center in Denver has been named the
best respiratory hospital in the nation
for multiple years in a row. And, Craig
Hospital in Englewood has been
named sixth in rehabilitation; Childrens
Hospital in Denver was ranked seventh
in pediatrics; and the University of
Colorado Hospital ranked in the top
25 in six categories.
With a growing metro area, the number
of new health care facilities continues to
increase; Centuras St. Anthony Central
Hospital plans to construct a $440
million, 330-bed hospital in Lakewood,
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WELCOME TO METRO DENVER
while the first phase of the $144.8 million
Anschutz Inpatient Pavilion at Fitzsimons
opened in 2004. The University of
Colorado facility is part of the 20-year,
$4.3 billion redevelopment of the former
Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in
Aurora. Other recently completed projects
include a 58-bed Parker Adventist
Hospital in Parker and a 172-bed
Exempla Good Samaritan Medical
Center.
Other projects include an $80 million
renovation of the Porter Adventist Hospital
in Denver, a $458 million Childrens
Hospital project that opened at Fitzsimons
in 2007, a new University of Colorado
Hospital at Fitzsimons, and a $148 million
expansion by the Denver Health Medical
Center.
THRIVING CULTURE
Culture abounds and thrives in metro
Denvera place for energetic minds.
The areas diverse population supports
culture through the Scientific and
Cultural Facilities District (SCFD), a
unique regional funding system for venues
such as the Denver Performing Arts
Complex and the Denver Art Museum.
Each year, the SCFD distributes millions
of dollars in tax funds to local arts and
cultural organizations.
Metro Denver is also a sports city
and has the fans and facilities to prove
it. More than six million fans attend
sporting events in the area each year,
with sports venues that include Coors
Field and the Colorado Rockies base-
ball team; Dicks Sporting Goods Park
and the Colorado Rapids professional
soccer team; INVESCO Field at Mile
High, which is home to the two-time
world champion Denver Broncos foot-
ball team and the Denver Outlaws
lacrosse team; Pepsi Center and the
Denver Nuggets basketball team, the
two-time Stanley Cup champions
Colorado Avalanche hockey team,
and the Colorado Mammoth lacrosse
team.
All four sports venues are located near
downtown Denver and have played a big
part in the areas revitalization. In fact,
Denver was the first North American city to
host the Global Sportaccord Conference in
March 2009, and the Denver-based
Colorado Rockies made their first World
Series appearance in 2007.
SHOPPING AND DINING
Denver features many shopping and dining
options, including popular retail chains,
trendy and unique specialty shops, and a
variety of service establishments, as well
as local flavors and a selection of national
restaurant options.
For shopping, Cherry Creek Shopping
Center in central Denver is one of the
areas top tourist destinations, offering
160 restaurants and stores including
Saks Fifth Avenue and Neiman Marcus.
Downtown Denvers 16th Street Mall is
another popular tourist attraction. The 16-
block pedestrian and transit-way is down-
town Denvers retail core and includes the
To join the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce and receive
a special offer, visit www.denverchamber.org or call 303-534-8500.
What makes the difference is you.
You create opportunity.
You instill condence.
You belong. You innovate. You matter.
ARE YOU THE PIECE
WE ARE MISSING?
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Denver Pavilions. Belmar, the city of
Lakewoods downtown district, offers 22
blocks of stores, boutiques, restaurants,
entertainment, parks, plazas, offices and
residences.
Colorado Mills in Lakewood features
outlet-style retail, entertainment and
restaurants, and Southlands, a 1.5-mil-
lion-square-foot shopping center in
Aurora, includes 1,100 residential
units and office space. Other malls
include FlatIron Crossing in northern
metro Denver, Park Meadows in Lone
Tree, and Southwest Plaza in the southwest
metro area.
BUSINESS SUCCESS
Denver is also home to a thriving business
climate with companies both large and
small representing a healthy cross-section
of industries, including aerospace, bio-
sciences, software development, financial
services and energy.
The areas economic engine attracts a
young, diverse and talented workforce,
including educated high-tech professionals.
There are plenty of opportunities for
employees to establish careers and keep
skills fresh via a multitude of educational
resources and professional associations,
including 10 four-year public and private
colleges and universities, five two-year
community colleges, and 60 vocational/
technical schools.
Denver voters also approved the
FasTracks $4.7 billion transportation
initiative, which is shaping the way the
metro area grows and will not only
improve mobility, but will also provide
alternative transportation for employees
across the city. This plan calls for the
expansion of the entire metro Denver light
rail system adding new lines, extending
existing routes and expanding the regional
bus network.
The Denver International Airport is also
core to area businesses, as well as for the
transportation needs of the region. Located
23 miles northeast of downtown Denver,
the $4.2 billion airport celebrated its 15th
anniversary in 2010. The airport is the
fifth-busiest airport in North America and
the 10th busiest in the world.
WELCOME TO THE
MOUNTAIN WEST
Theres no doubt that Denver residents
come full circle with a Mountain West
lifestyle that links them to the great out-
doors, where they can enjoy the areas
numerous recreational opportunities, or
just sit outside and enjoy spectacular
Rocky Mountain views.
Mix in a sunny climate, affordable housing
options, a moderate cost of living, plenty of
education options, quality health care, a
host of cultural venues, some of the nations
greatest sports teams, exciting shopping
and dining options, and a dynamic busi-
ness community, and you have one of the
countrys best places to live, work, learn
and play. Welcome to Denver!
WELCOME TO METRO DENVER
VISITOR INFORMATION
Colorado Tourism Office 1625 Broadway, Suite 1700 303-892-3885 www.colorado.com
Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce 1445 Market St. 303-534-8500 www.denverchamber.org
VISIT Denver 1555 California, Suite 300 303-892-1112 www.denver.org
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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
ith a vibrant, highly educated workforce and one of the best business economies
in the country, theres no question that metro Denver offers relocating and expanding
companies everything they need to grow and thrive.
A balanced, appealing quality of life; a well-connected, diverse business environment; a growing, multi-
modal transportation network; multiple technology, educational, and research resources; and robust Internet,
satellite and cable communications make the city a top choice for businesses and for employees.
Consistently ranked among the top 10 places to live in the United States, metro Denver also has all the
things businesses need to flourish, including a highly educated workforce, an affordable cost of doing
business, and a multimodal transportation system designed for years of future growth.
Business
and Economy
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IDEAL FOR BUSINESS
The qualities that make metro Denver a
great place to live also make it perfect for
business. With its balanced lifestyle and
natural appeal, recruitment has never been
a problem for Denver employers. The cost
of living is easier on the wallet than in
many major cities. With its selection of
distinctive neighborhoods, Denver offers
residents a broad range of housing
options, as well as advanced medical
facilities, and a quality educational system.
The citys location is also ideal for business.
Nestled between the towering Rocky
Mountains to the west and the vast high
plains to the east, Denvers strategic loca-
tion almost in the center of the United States
makes the area a natural crossroads for
both domestic and international commerce.
A growing multimodal transportation
network encourages global interconnectivity,
beginning with Denver International
Airport the fifth-busiest airport in the
U.S. and one of the most modern in the
world. Metro Denver is constructing
FasTracks, the largest one-time build out
of a metro area mass transit system in
U.S. history.
Data moves efficiently in metro Denver, too.
As a national center for telecommunications,
the area is home to giants in the satellite,
subscription TV, and telephone industries
not to mention one satellite bounce away
from virtually anywhere on earth.
AFFORDABLE
BUSINESS CLIMATE
Many factors make the cost of doing
business in the region affordable. First, as
a state, Colorado ranks sixth in Small
Business Innovative Research (SBIR) grants,
seventh in venture capital investments
per $1,000 for state gross domestic
product (GDP), and fifth in number of
new companies per 1,000 employees.
Metro Denvers utility rates are consistently
among the lowest of any major U.S. city.
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BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
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POPULATION BY COUNTY, 2010
County Population Percent of Metro
Adams 447,760 15.6%
Arapahoe 578,444 20.2%
Boulder 305,268 10.6%
Broomfield 58,629 2.0%
Denver 631,809 22.0%
Douglas 296,072 10.3%
Jefferson 551,938 19.2%
Metro Denver 2,869,920 100%
Colorado 5,171,798
Note: Percentages may not add to 100 due to rounding.
Source: Colorado Division of Local Government, Demography Office.
METRO DENVER POPULATION BY AGE AND GENDER, 2010
Age Males Females Total Percent of Total
0 to 14 311,556 297,131 608,687 21.2%
15 to 29 309,214 292,320 601,534 21.0%
30 to 44 315,416 295,208 610,624 21.3%
45 to 59 310,674 310,601 621,275 21.6%
60 to 74 145,768 158,950 304,718 10.6%
75 to 89 44,070 68,862 112,932 3.9%
90 and older 2,802 7,348 10,150 0.4%
Total 1,439,50 0 1,430,42 0
Source: Colorado Division of Local Government, Demography Office.
METRO DENVER POPULATION BY MAJOR CITY, 2008
County/City Population Percent of County
Adams Thornton 115,619 26.6%
Arapahoe Aurora* 321,949 49.5%
Boulder Boulder 100,418 33.6%
Broomfield Broomfield 54,796 100%
Denver Denver 611,509 100%
Douglas Castle Rock 45,983 16.2%
Jefferson Lakewood 144,382 26.7%
*A majority of the population in the City of Aurora is located in Arapahoe County, but some
population is also located in Adams County. Population listed is the total for both counties.
Percent of county reflects the Arapahoe County portion of Aurora population only.
Source: Colorado Division of Local Government, Demography Office.
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From modern office parks wired with
Internet capabilities for the needs of
high-tech industries, to warehouse and
distribution space, metro Denvers large
inventory of commercial and industrial
real estate gives companies room to grow
and expand.
A competitive commercial real estate
market has also allowed existing businesses
to renegotiate leases, move up to higher
quality space, and shift from lease to
ownership. As a result, many companies
see Denver as an ideal place to rent or
buy prime commercial and retail spaces
for growing businesses, relocations,
startups, and company expansions.
Colorados low state corporate tax, fair
regulatory environment, low business costs,
and incentives at both the state and local
levels also combine to make the city one of
the nations most competitive business venues.
SMART WORKFORCE,
GREAT OPPORTUNITIES
With all the amenities that help to attract
and retain a highly educated workforce,
Denver is a magnet for young, smart, and
diverse workers. In fact, this region of
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
METRO DENVER HISTORIC AND PROJECTED POPULATION
Year Population
1950 615,635
1960 934,199
1970 1,238,273
1980 1,618,461
1990 1,848,319
2000 2,400,570
2009 projected 2,828,564
2010 projected 2,869,920
2020 projected 3,340,040
Note: Population figures for years 1950-2000 are from the Apr 1 Census;
population figures for subsequent years are July 1 estimates. Percentages
may not add to 100 due to rounding.
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census; Colorado Division of Local Government,
Demography Office
MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME, 2008
Selected Metropolitan Area Median Income
San Jose $88,098
Washington, DC $85,824
Boston $71,361
Seattle $66,465
New York $64,747
Chicago $61,295
Atlanta $60,682
Metro Denver $60,344
Los Angeles $60,264
Dallas $56,377
Phoenix $55,887
U.S. Median $52,029
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey.
METRO DENVER MEDIAN HOUSEHOLD INCOME 2008
County/
Region
Median HH
Income
Number of
HH
Percent of Households By Income Bracket
(2008 Dollars) (Thousands) Less than $25k $25k$49,999 $50k$74,999 $75k and higher
Adams $56,529 149.6 18.2% 25.0% 21.7% 35.1%
Arapahoe $58,334 214.9 20.2% 22.6% 19.6% 37.6%
Boulder MSA $66,463 118.4 17.7% 19.0% 19.0% 44.3%
Broomfield* n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a
Denver $45,831 248.1 28.6% 24.4% 16.5% 30.5%
Douglas $98,871 97.1 6.1% 14.0% 16.5% 63.4%
Jefferson $66,344 217.5 15.9% 21.9% 18.1% 44.1%
Metro Denver $60,344 968.1 19.4% 22.4% 18.6% 39.6%
United States $52,029 113,101.3 23.3% 24.5% 18.8% 33.4%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, 2008 American Community Survey.
*Data for the City and County of Broomfield is not currently available through the American Community Survey.
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more than 2.8 million people is one of
the fastest growing in the country.
Denver is well known for its highly
educated workforce. In fact, of metro
Denvers adult population age 25 and
older, 39.5 percent have a bachelors or
higher-level degree and 89 percent have
graduated from high school. Colorado
ranks second among the 50 states in the
percentage of adult population with a
bachelors or more advanced degree.
There are also plenty of opportunities for
training. Five community colleges in
Denver serve 55,000 students, and all
work with businesses to provide special
training and courses to meet the needs of
area employers. Financial programs are
also available from state and federal
sources to assist new and expanding
companies with training costs.
The citys smart and thriving workforce
makes it easy for employers to recruit and
hire from a vigorous and diverse pool
of workers with the skill sets needed for
corporate growth over the long term.
EDUCATION AND RESEARCH
Colorados robust statewide educational
system includes a network of world-class
research institutions, graduate and profes-
sional schools, and a wide spectrum
of undergraduate programs that have
spawned partnerships that have contributed
to the areas business community and have
helped set the stage for future success.
For example, in 2007, the University of
Colorado at Boulder, Colorado School of
Mines, Colorado State University, and the
National Renewable Energy Laboratory
(NREL) joined forces to form the Colorado
Renewable Energy Collaboratory in
2007. The Collaboratory works with public
agencies and nonprofits, private compa-
nies, and higher education institutions to
forward renewable energy research and
commercialize renewable energy and
energy efficiency technologies.
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
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LARGE FOUR-YEAR EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS, FALL 2009
Institution Enrollment
University of Colorado (CU) - Boulder 31,140
Colorado State University (CSU) - Fort Collins, Denver 25,890
Metropolitan State College (Metro) - Denver 22,620
University of Colorado Denver (UCD) - Denver, Aurora 17,510
University of Denver (DU) - Denver 11,290
University of Northern Colorado (UNC) - Greeley 11,240
Regis University - Denver 11,040
Colorado School of Mines (Mines) - Golden 5,120
Colorado Christian University - Lakewood 2,510
University of Phoenix Metro Denver 2,370
Johnson & Wales - Denver 1,460
Source: Colorado Commission on Higher Education; Individual Schools
EDUCATIONAL ATTAINMENT, 2008
(PERSONS 25 YEARS & OLDER)
Metropolitan
Areas
Percent Completing
College
Percent Completing
High School
San Jose 43.5% 85.3%
San Francisco 43.4% 86.9%
Boston 41.9% 89.9%
Metro Denver 39.5% 89.0%
Seattle 36.4% 91.3%
New York 35.2% 83.8%
Atlanta 34.6% 87.3%
San Diego 34.2% 85.0%
Chicago 33.0% 85.5%
Philadelphia 32.1% 87.6%
Kansas City 31.9% 90.1%
Salt Lake City 30.0% 88.9%
Dallas 29.6% 81.2%
U.S. Average 27.7% 85.0%
Phoenix 26.5% 83.7%
Source: U.S. Bureau of the Census, 2008 American Community Survey.
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The group launched its first research center
spinoff for biofuels called C2B2 in
2007. A second spinoff, a major solar
energy research center called CRSP,
launched in 2008. And in 2009, the
group celebrated both the opening of the
Center for Research and Education in Wind
(CREW), and the groundbreaking of the
Solar Technology Acceleration Centers
(SolarTAC) broke large-scale solar power
test and demonstration facility.
Colorados universities have also reaped
benefits of considerable academic
research funding and that has also
helped to fuel the citys thriving business
climate. For example, in 2009, the
University of Colorado at Boulder
received a record $339.7 million in
sponsored research awards; the University
of Colorado at Denver was awarded
$22.8 million; and the University of
Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus
received $342.4 million. The University
of Denver also benefited in 2009, with
nearly $21 million in sponsored research
grants, and the Colorado School of
Mines received $51.4 million.
QUALITY OF LIFE
Its not surprising that people gravitate
here from other areas of the country for
Colorados high-tech economic base and
quality environment: A large portion of
Denvers population growth has come
from highly educated workers from other
states who are attracted to Denvers quality
of life and outdoor beauty. In fact, estimates
suggest a net migration of nearly 16,000
residents to the city in the next year and
thats good for business.
After all, the combination of the states
and especially Denvers world-class cul-
tural amenities, professional sports teams,
beautiful scenery, and plenty of recre-
ational opportunities give relocating
employees a lot to love about this area.
For example, Denver is home to the
largest public parks system of any U.S.
city. Thousands of acres of open space
dot the area, giving relocating employees
and their families plenty of opportunities
to hike, bike, and snowshoe in their own
backyards since the spectacular Rocky
Mountains, with world-class ski resorts
and scenery, are only minutes away.
STATE AND FEDERAL SUPPORT
Government support has also influenced the
citys business growth. For example the U.S.
Department of Labor awarded the seven-
county metro Denver region and two-county
Northern Colorado area a four-year, $15
million Workforce Innovation in Regional
Economic Development (WIRED) grant in
2006.
The goal was to expand the pipeline of
highly skilled workers in the regions fastest
growing industries: aerospace, bioscience,
energy, and information technology, and to
implement a transformational approach to
regional workforce development, and that
has proven successful in expanding the
citys economic and business appeal.
In addition, with several Colorado
Workforce Centers strategically located
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
FORTUNE 500 HEADQUARTERS
Rank Company Industry Employees*
188 Qwest Communications Telecommunications 30,138
200 DISH Network Telecommunications 24,500
210 Liberty Global Telecommunications 23,000
227 Liberty Media
Internet Services &
Retailing
23,073
295 Newmont Mining
Mining, Crude Oil
Production
14,500
307 Ball Corporation Packaging, Containers 14,500
381 CH2M Hill Engineering, Construction 23,500
413 Western Union Financial Data Services 6,800
*Total employees, not all located in Metro Denver; Source: Fortune, May 3, 2010.
VALUE OF COLORADO EXPORTS (IN MILLIONS)
Year Total Exports Percent Change
2000 $6,593.0 11.2%
2001 $6,125.5 -7.1%
2002 $5,525.1 -9.8%
2003 $6,086.9 10.2%
2004 $6,659.8 9.4%
2005 $6,773.3 1.7%
2006 $7,954.7 17.4%
2007 $7,352.2 -7.6%
2008 $7,712.6 4.9%
2009 $5,780.0 -25.1%
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, Foreign Trade Division.
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throughout the region, employers are well
supported with recruitment assistance, and
employees have a rich resource for job
search tools, job placement and training.
MAJOR INDUSTRIES
Metro Denvers employer base repre-
sents a cross-section of industries, with
seven key industry clusters targeted for
growth and expansion. These diverse
industries are critical to the economic
base of the nine-county metro Denver
and northern Colorado regions and are
primary targets for economic develop-
ment efforts.
Aerospace: More than 54,300 private
sector workers and military personnel
worked in Colorados aerospace cluster
in 2009. The state is home to four military
commands, eight major space contrac-
tors, and more than 300 aerospace
companies and suppliers. Colorado
ranked first among the 50 states for
private aerospace employment concen-
tration in 2009.
Aviation: Denver International Airport
and three reliever airports create a solid
foundation for the 15,690 workers directly
employed by aviation companies. The
nine-county region ranked 10th among
the nations 50 largest metro areas for avi-
ation employment concentration in 2009.
Bioscience: In 2009, the regions businesses
employed 5,610 biotechnology and
pharmaceuticals workers and 9,480
workers in medical devices and instruments
production. Ten local higher education
institutions support the cluster with bio-
science programs and research assets, as
does the Fitzsimons Life Science District and
the Anschutz Medical Campus in Aurora.
Broadcasting and Telecommunications:
Denvers Mountain time zone location makes
it the largest U.S. region with one-bounce
satellite uplinks, which give companies
real-time connections to six of seven conti-
nents. With a broad mix of broadcasting and
telecommunications firms, the region ranked
fourth out of the 50 largest metro areas for
broadcasting and telecommunications
employment concentration in 2009.
Energy: The Rocky Mountain region is a
key fossil fuel production corridor with
large concentrations of coal, oil, and
natural gas. The region is also the leader
in energy research and clean technology,
which encompasses renewable energy
and energy efficiency activities. The
regions abundant natural resources and
several key energy research facilities have
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
Square Miles: 4,532
Population: 2,869,920
Labor Force: 1,523,913
Employment: 1,358,200
Average Wage: $51,995
Median Age: 35.8
DENVER
QUICK FACTS
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attracted numerous clean technology
manufacturers and their suppliers to the
area. Consider that, in 2009, fossil fuel
and clean technology companies
employed more than 32,000.
Financial Services: The region is one of
the few areas outside of the Northeast
with a substantial financial services industry
in three key market segments. A variety of
trade associations and service firms support
the regions diverse financial services
industry base of more than 11,930
companies and 93,950 employees.
Information Technology - Software: A strong
entrepreneurial spirit fuels this small
business-dominated cluster, which
employed 42,300 workers in the region
in 2009. According to a report by the
TechAmerica Foundation, Colorado has
the nations fifth-largest employment base
in software publishing. The state also
ranked seventh in total venture capital
investment in 2009. More than 1,100
Colorado deals closed for a total of
$528.8 million in investment. Investments
in biotechnology including a major
pharmaceutical deal represented roughly
50 percent of the total venture dollars.
POSITIVE GROWTH,
THRIVING BUSINESSES
Denver has more than 500 large business-
es those with 250 or more workers and
the regions largest employers represent a
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
Metro Denvers central location on the 105th meridian
the exact midpoint between Tokyo and Frankfurt
makes it an attractive location for multinational
companies andinternational trade andthat has resulted
in a thriving business and economic sector for the city.
First, the regions businesses have easy access to
air travel and satellite communications to Europe,
Asia, and Latin and South America. Denver is also
strategically located between Canada and Mexico,
which are partners in the trilateral North American
Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA). Exports to NAFTA
partners represented almost 40 percent of
Colorados total export value in 2009. Colorados
five largest trading partners in 2009 were Canada
($1.7 billion), Mexico ($584 million), mainland
China ($441 million), Japan ($276 million) and
Germany ($221 million).
In terms of total exports, the recession dramatically
curtailed global demand for goods in 2009, and the
value of Colorados exports fell 25 percent. Colorado
was not alone in the dramatic shift 2009 exports in
almost half of the 50 states declined 20 percent or
more over the year. Total U.S. exports declined 18
percent in 2009. Colorados top exports in 2009
were computers and electronic products ($1.6
billion), chemicals ($777 million) and processed
foods ($744 million).
The Colorado Consular Corp also supports inter-
national trade with 39 foreign consulates, including
full-time offices for Canada, Guatemala, Japan,
Mexico, Peru and the United Kingdom. The
consulates provide information and services related
to trade, tourism, and cultural exchange. Colorado
also has an active trade representative based in
Mexico City who provides market intelligence services.
The state also maintains honorary trade offices in Japan,
Germany, Switzerland and the Kingdom of Jordan.
The World Trade Center Denver is part of a global
network of nearly 300 Trade Centers in 75 countries
and also helps to support Denvers international
companies. The Denver location offers trade-related
education and training plus a state-of-the-art computer
system that links Colorado-based companies with
buyers and sellers throughout the world.
In addition, two general purpose Foreign Trade
Zones located in Denver (one near Stapleton and the
other near Denver International Airport) allow manu-
facturers to expedite customs, and reduce or eliminate
fees and tariffs on imported materials. High-volume,
high-tariff manufacturers can also establish Foreign
Trade Subzones at their places of business.
Finally, the Colorado International Trade Office offers
grants to cover travel costs and other business expenses
for small Colorado companies seeking to expand in
international markets. Award amounts range
between $500 and $2,000 per company, and
recipients can access free business counseling and
market research services. With plenty of resources
and expertise, Denver makes it easy for multinational
companies to thrive and succeed.
INTERNATIONAL TRADE
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diverse cross-section of industries including
aerospace, aviation, bioscience, financial
services, and telecommunications.
With major employers located throughout
metro Denver, the region has a good geo-
graphic balance of employment centers.
In fact, two metro Denver companies
Liberty Media and Western Union were
named to Fortune magazines 2010 list of
The Worlds Most Admired Companies.
The state is also good for growing business-
es, and metro Denver reaps the benefits of
that. In 2009, Colorado ranked sixth in the
nation for research money obtained from
the Small Business Innovation Research
(SBIR) program. That year, Colorado recipi-
ents secured 281 awards totaling $92.2
million in SBIR funds. Colorado ranked
fourth in the nation for Small Business
Technology Transfer Program (STTR) funds
with 33 awards totaling $12.8 million.
Technology and entrepreneurship are
hallmarks of the state and of Denver.
Colorado ranks third in the nation for its
concentration of high-tech jobs, according
to the TechAmerica Foundations 2010
Cyberstates Report. And, the average
wages for high technology workers in
Colorado are 92 percent higher than the
states overall private sector average.
Colorado also ranks third in the nation for
its ability to support a knowledge- and
technology-based economy, according to
the Milken Institutes 2008 State Technology
and Science Index. The index measured
77 indicators in five categories including
education, the science and engineering
workforce, research and development,
high-tech employment concentration,
and entrepreneurial environment and
Colorado ranked among the nations top
five states in each of the categories.
Like many cities and economies nationwide,
Denvers economy fell into recession in
late 2008. But, despite a 4.4 percent job
loss between 2008 and 2009, the
regions unemployment rate remained
considerably below the national average.
And thats good news for both employees
and relocating businesses.
The most recent edition of Toward a
More Competitive Colorado from the
Metro Denver Economic Development
Corp., which benchmarks Colorados
strengths, challenges, and opportunities
for future job growth, also shows a
positive outlook for the states future. The
states top-10 rankings included college-
level educational attainment, high-tech
employment, venture capital and initial
public offerings, and numerous measures
of business costs and general economic
strength.
In the end, theres no doubt that Denvers
appealing quality of life, federal and city
government support, strategic partner-
ships, smart workforce, and positive
growth have all contributed to the
citys business success and to its bright
future.
BUSI NESS AND ECONOMY
ANNUAL AVERAGE NON-FARM EMPLOYMENT
(BY NAICS SECTOR, 2009)
Sector Employment Share of Total
Professional and Business Services 230,200 16.9%
Wholesale and Retail Trade 203,500 15.0%
Government 207,600 15.3%
Education and Health Services 157,600 11.6%
Leisure and Hospitality 142,600 10.5%
Financial Activities 99,900 7.4%
Natural Resources and Construction 81,600 6.0%
Manufacturing 78,400 5.8%
Information 55,000 4.1%
Other Services 52,800 3.9%
Transportation and Utilities 49,100 3.6%
Total 1,358,200 100%
Note: Employment and percentage shares for sectors may not add to totals due to rounding.
Source: Colorado Department of Labor and Employment, Current Employment Statistics.
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ducation is important to the state of Colorado and to Denver, and it shows. In fact, metro
Denver has one of the highest per-capita education levels in the country. Consider that,
of metro Denvers adult population, 38 percent are college graduates and 89.6 percent
have graduated from high schoola testament that area residents value education and
learning.
The regions K-12 schools, community colleges, and universities are well situated to prepare students for
an ever-changing work environment. Metro Denvers high school graduation rate was more than 73
percent in 2009, and the completion rate which includes students who participated in GED
programs was 77.6 percent.
The citys educational roots started in 1859, when the first private school was established and when the
city was first founded. The new territorial government formed two public school districts that opened in
1862, providing the foundation for the 19 highly rated metro Denver public school districts that serve
approximately 428,000 area children today.
Education in
Metro Denver
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QUALITY PUBLIC SCHOOL
EDUCATION IN DENVER
The seven-county metro Denver area is
home to 19 school districtsseven in
Adams County, seven in Arapahoe County,
two in Boulder County, and one each in
Denver, Douglas and Jefferson counties.
Public school K-12 education in Denver
revolves around choice, with both public and
private schools offering many educational
options for primary and secondary students.
The K-12 education system includes 19
public school districts and a number of
private and parochial school systems.
Students can also choose from charter and
magnet schools, international baccalaure-
ate programs, and Montessori and English
Primary schools. In the case of charter
schools, individuals and organizations in
Colorado can establish their own schools
and curricula to meet special needs within
established school districts. These charter
schools are approved by local school
districts and receive funding from the local
district and the state of Colorado.
All metro Denver public schools offer
open enrollment, which allows students to
attend school in the district of their choice.
This flexibility helps parents select schools
that match each students individual
needs. See the Public Schools listings for
more information and resources.
DENVER K-12 PRIVATE
SCHOOLS
Metro Denver has a large selection of
nonpublic private, parochial and inde-
pendent schools for pre-kindergarten
(pre-K) through the 12th grade. These
schools offer traditional classroom settings,
innovative learning centers, accelerated
programs and special preparatory classes
for college-bound students. Most schools
offer financial aid.
The Colorado Department of Education website
(www.cde.state.co.us/index_choice.htm)
lists these schools and provides some statistical
information. CDE does not accredit private
schools; however, accreditation by other
organizations is recognized. The
Association of Colorado Independent
Schools (www.acischools.com) accredits,
supports and promotes independent
schools in Colorado.
Although Denver has excellent private
schools, overall enrollment is low because
the region offers so many high-quality public
school options. About 7 percent of metro
Denvers total student population attended
private schools in the 2009 school year.
See the Private Schools listings for more
information and resources.
DENVER CHARTER SCHOOLS
Charter schools are free, public schools
of choice that are open to all students.
Colorado has 120 charter schools across
the state, serving approximately 40,000
students in metro, suburban and rural
areas.
These nonsectarian, nonreligious schools do
not have admission criteria or require
admission tests. As with all metro Denver
public schools, charter schools offer open
enrollment, which allows students living in
one school district to attend a school in
another district, subject to space availability.
As innovators in public school education,
charter schools allow creative educators
and parents to reach students whose
needs arent met in traditional public
school systems. However, they are held to
the same state and federal testing stan-
dards as all other public schools. Charter
schools are approved by local school dis-
tricts, assure local control, and receive
funding from the local district and the
state of Colorado. See the Charter
Schools listing for more information and
resources.
HOME SCHOOLING IN DENVER
Home schooling offers parents another
option for educating their children.
Parents who home school their children
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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Highlands Ranch, CO
303.791.5500
cherryhillschristian.org
PreSchool
Elementary School
Middle School
Small Class Sizes
Interactive whiteboards
in every classroom
grades 1-8
Fully accredited
Licensed teachers
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must follow the same general educational
requirements mandated for public or private
academic programs in Colorado. Parents
are required to provide instruction for a
minimum of four hours per day, 172 days
a year.
Parents of home-schooled students are
also encouraged to allow their children to
participate in the extracurricular activities
offered by public schools. See the Home
Schooling listings for more information
and resources.
COLORADO K-12
STANDARDS AND TESTING
The Colorado Department of Education
has implemented rigorous standards and
developed tools to help identify and close
achievement gaps.
The departments SchoolView portal
(www.schoolview.org) is a good resource
for parents, policymakers, and the general
public, giving them visibility into how
well school districts and individual
schools are meeting statewide academic
standards.
Colorado requires annual student testing
to determine whether students are meeting
established knowledge levels expected
for their grade level. The Colorado
Student Assessment Program (CSAP)
administers this statewide testing to make
sure students are meeting grade-level stan-
dards in mathematics, science, reading,
and writing. The program provides a
series of snapshots of student achievement
in reading, writing, math and science as
the students move through the third
through the 10th grades.
The Colorado Department of Education
(CDE) reports CSAP results for the state
and for each local school district, and
schools must meet minimum CSAP stan-
dards to maintain accreditation. Refer to
the SchoolView Portal or to the CDE Web
site at www.cde.state.co.us for more
information on testing. See the Public
Schools for a listing of Denver area public
school districts.
COLLEGE PLACEMENT TESTS
AND GREAT RESULTS
Other testing includes such standard
college entrance exams as the American
College Test (ACT) and the Scholastic
Aptitude Test (SAT) and Colorado
students excel in both areas. The ACT is
the primary college entrance exam in
Colorado and is required for all eleventh-
grade students.
In 2009, Colorado students average
ACT score was 20.8 (the national average
was 21.1). Its important to note that part
of the disparity is related to Colorados
universal testing requirement. Colorado is
one of just three states that require all
students to take the ACT not just those
who are college-bound.
In 2009, nearly 10,000 Colorado high
school students took the SAT and received
an average composite score of 1698.
The highest possible SAT score is 2400,
and the nationwide average was 1509
in 2009. Students in Colorado are No. 1
in the nation for the highest ACT and SAT
scores per 1,000 high school graduates.
A LONG HISTORY OF
HIGHER EDUCATION
Higher education has quite a long history
in Denver, and the city is home to some of
the oldest universities in the western
United States. For example, the University
of Denver, established in 1864, is the
oldest independent university in the Rocky
Mountain region. Other universities estab-
lished in the 19th century include: Colorado
State University (1870); Colorado School
of Mines (1874); University of Colorado
at Boulder (1876); and Regis University
(1877).
Today, there are approximately 142,200
Denver students enrolled in four-year
educational programs throughout the
region, and Denver is home to 12 four-
year public and private colleges and
universities. The areas community colleges
have more than 20 campuses, and there
are more than 60 vocational and technical
schools in the region, providing a large
network of workforce training and educa-
tional services to meet the training and
employment needs of both students and
area businesses.
A number of smaller colleges and
technical and vocational schools with
specialized programs also offer a variety
of educational opportunities. For example,
the Auraria Higher Education Center,
adjacent to downtown Denver, has the
largest concentration of students in metro
Denver. The University of Colorado
Denver, Metropolitan State College, and
the Community College of Denver share
the 127-acre campus and serve more
than 51,000 students.
Colorados universities are also prominent
members of the academic research
community. The University of Colorado at
Boulder received a record $339.7
million in sponsored research awards in
fiscal year 2009; the University of
Colorado Denver received $22.8 million
in fiscal year 2009 awards; the
University of Colorado Anschutz Medical
Campus received $342.4 million; the
University of Denver reported $20.6
million in sponsored research expenditures
for fiscal year 2009; and the Colorado
School of Mines received $51.4 million
in awards. See the Higher Education listings
for more information and resources.
SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE
IN DENVER!
No matter what your educational prefer-
ence, theres something for everyone in
the family with Denvers comprehensive
offering of great public schools, quality
private schools, alternative educational
opportunities with homeschooling and
charter schools, and a huge selection of
higher education, technical and vocational
options. Welcome to Denver!
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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The seven-county metro Denver area is
home to 20 school districts in Adams,
Arapahoe, Boulder, Denver, Douglas,
Weld, and Jefferson counties. Together,
they serve the educational needs of nearly
500,000 area children.
The following is a description of each district;
for more detailed information on specific
districts and schools (including individual
district and school test results and rank-
ings), visit the Colorado Department of
Education website at www.cde.state.co.us.
DENVER AREA PUBLIC
SCHOOL DISTRICTS
Adams County School District 12
Adams 12 Five Star Schools
1500 E. 128th Avenue
Thornton, 80241
720-972-4000
www.adams12.org
Located just seven miles north of down-
town Denver, Adams 12 Five Star Schools
is the largest school district located in
Adams and Broomfield counties and the
fifth-largest district in Colorado. With
nearly 42,000 students, more than
5,000 employees, and 52 learning
centers, the districts five stars represent
the communities it serves, including
Broomfield, Federal Heights, Northglenn,
Thornton, and Westminster. The district
also serves students in portions of Adams
and Broomfield counties. The district has
received state and national recognition
for such initiatives as using business
models to improve education, developing
innovative community relations programs,
and incorporating research-based lessons
in the classroom.
Adams County School District 14
5291 East 60th Avenue
Commerce City, 80022
303-853-3333
www.adams14.org
Located just north of downtown Denver,
Adams 14 serves more than 6,700
students in the historic community of
Commerce City an area of approxi-
mately 33,000 residents. The district has
14 schools, including 6 elementary, 2
middle, 2 high schools, 2 preschools; 1
pre-K-8 school, and 1 charter school.
Known as state and nationally recog-
nized leader in innovative education,
Adams 14 has 847 full- and part-time
employees and is the second-largest
employer in Commerce City. The district
provides several school-based health
centers and an International Learning
Center that offers year-round academic,
recreation, and human services for all
ages, and before- and afterschool childcare
for elementary students.
Adams County School District 50
6933 Raleigh Street
Westminster, 80030
303-428-3511
www.adams50.org
Adams County District 50 serves just over
10,000 students in the northwestern
suburb of Westminster and has more than
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EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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EDUCATION
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a thousand employees. The districts 19
schools include one preschool, 12
elementary schools, three middle schools,
two high schools, and one charter school.
The district offers school and program
choices so families can choose the school
that best meets their childs needs. Each
school has a Gifted and Tal ented
program, and school-within-a-school
educational programs include an
International Baccalaureate program,
Core Knowledge, Montessori, Year-
Round School, Dual Language, Highly
Gifted and Talented, and a Career/
Technical high school option, along with
a traditional preschool through grade 12
programs
Arapahoe County School District
Aurora Public Schools
Adams-Arapahoe School District 28J
1085 Peoria St.
Aurora, 80011
303-344-8060
www.aps.k12.co.us
One of the Denver areas largest and
most diverse school districts, Aurora
Public Schools in Arapahoe County
serves nearly 40,000 students in 56
schools, including 2 preschools, 27
elementary schools, 4 K-8 schools, 1 K-9
school, 6 middle schools, 1 academy for
grades 6-12, 4 comprehensive high
schools, 3 pilot schools, 1 vocational/
technical college, 1 gifted and talented K-8
school, and 6 charter schools. Students
come from more than 90 countries and
speak more than 100 languages.
Innovative district plans include partnering
with economic development, higher
education, industry and workforce
development to offer academic and
career pathways in Arts and Communication;
Business; Health Sciences and Science,
Technology, Engineering and Math at 18
schools by 2015.
Bennett School District 29J
615 7th Street
Bennett, 80102
303-644-3234
www.bennett29j.k12.co.us
Located just east of Denver, the Bennett
School District serves residents within a
289-square-mile area in the central
portions of Adams and Arapahoe counties;
Bennett and Watkins are the main
communities within the district. This small
school district has nearly 1,100 students
in grades PK-12 in two elementary
schools, one middle school, and one high
school. Bennett High School offers a
wide range of academic programs,
including vocational programs.
Boulder Valley School District
6500 Arapahoe Road
Boulder, 80303
303-447-1010
www.bvsd.org
Boulder Valley School District serves the
cities of Boulder, Gold Hill, Jamestown,
Lafayette, Louisville, Nederland, Superior,
Ward, and parts of Broomfield and Erie,
covering more than 500 square miles
and serving nearly 29,000 students in
55 schools. Known for its academic
excellence, the district ranks among the
top three of Colorados large Front Range
school districts, as measured by state and
national academic rankings. Voters
recently approved a tax increase of
nearly $300 million for capital improve-
ments to the districts 55 schools over the
next six years.
Brighton School District 27J
18551 E. 160th Avenue
Brighton, 80601
303-655-2900
www.brightonps27j.k12.co.us
The Brighton School District 27J serves
more than 15,000 students in grades
preK-12. The districts 23 schools include
12 elementary, eight middle, and four
high schools. Innovations include one net-
worked computer per every four students,
and a health sciences program at
Brighton High School that works in
col l aboration with the Platte Valley
Medical Center and Front Range
Community College to offer students a
curriculum in preparation for a health
professions career.
Byers School District 32J
444 E. Front St.
Byers, 80103
303-822-5292
www.byers32j.k12.co.us
A rural school district located about 50
miles east of Denver, Byers serves more
than 500 students at one elementary
school, one middle school, and one high
school that are all located on one
campus. The district also offers 3-year-old
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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preschool, 4-year-old preschool, all-day
kindergarten, day care, and before- and
after-school care.
Cherry Creek School District 5
4700 S. Yosemite Street
Greenwood Village, 80111
303-773-1184
www.ccsd.k12.co.us
One of the Denver areas largest school
districts and the fourth-largest district in the
state, the Cherry Creek School District
serves more than 51,000 students in 60
schools and programs, including 39
elementary schools, 10 traditional middle
schools, 1 alternative middle school
program, 6 high schools, 1 alternative
high school program, 1 charter school, 1
Challenge school (K-8), and 1 Rocky
Mountain School of Expeditionary
Learning (K-12). The district is nationally
recognized for excellence in academics,
the arts, and athletics, and the districts
2010 graduates earned more than $38
million in college scholarships.
Deer Trail School District 26J
350 Second Avenue
Deer Trail, 80105
303-769-4421
www.dt26j.org
Located approximately 50 miles east of
Denver, the Deer Trail School District is
located in a rural community and serves
about 200 students. The districts elemen-
tary school serves preschool through 5th
grades; the junior high school serves 6th
through 8th grades; and the high school
serves 9th through 12th grades.
Denver Public School District
900 Grant Street
Denver, 80203
720-423-3200
www.dpsk12.org
One of the largest school districts in the
state with nearly 80,000 students and
recognized as one of the best urban
school systems in the country, Denver
Public Schools (DPS) was created in
1902 when voters approved a constitutional
amendment that created the City and
County of Denver and that also consoli-
dated five school districts into todays
School District No. 1. District schools
include 73 elementary, 16 K-8 schools, 16
middle schools, 12 traditional high
schools, 30 charter schools, and 10 alter-
native schools, including six intensive
pathway schools.
Douglas County School District
620 Wilcox Street
Castle Rock, 80104
303-387-0100
www.dcsdk12.org
The Douglas County School District, located
between Denver and Colorado Springs,
is the fourth largest in the state with
nearly 44,000 K-12 students in 63
schools and programs, including 46
elementary, 9 middle, 9 high schools, 8
charter schools, 2 magnet schools, 1
alternative high school, 1 evening high
school, 1 university center, and 34
preschool sessions. Innovative programs
and educational approaches include flex-
ibility within each school build its own
instructional programs and choices for
parents, including open enrollment, charter
schools, instruction for gifted and talented
students, magnet schools, an International
Baccalaureate program, and Advanced
Placement courses. The district is one of
the states highest performing, outperforming
the state in grades and subjects tested
by the Colorado Student Assessment
Program (CSAP).
Englewood Public Schools 1
4101 South Bannock
Englewood, 80110
303-761-7050
www.englewoodschools.org
Englewood is a small suburban community
located between the city of Denver and its
suburbs to the south, and its school district
serves about 3,000 students in eight
district schools, including 4 elementary
schools, 1 Leadership Academy, 1 middle
school, 1 alternative high school, and 1
traditional high school. Approximately
25 percent of all Englewood School
District students come from outside the
school district, making it one of the
top districts in the state in terms of open
enrollment.
Fort Lupton/Weld School District Re-8
301 Reynolds Street
Fort Lupton, 80621
303-857-3200
www.ftlupton.k12.co.us
The Weld/Fort Lupton School District
serves the city of Fort Lupton in Weld
County, as well as students from
Broomfield County. The district includes a
preschool program, 2 elementary
schools, 1 middle school, 1 high school,
and 1 alternative education program
(Quest Academy), and student enrollment
is about 2,300. The district is committed
to developing student abilities in collab-
oration, invention, critical thinking, self-
direction, and information literacy to
ensure success and college readiness.
Jefferson County School District
1829 Denver West Drive, #27
Golden, 80401
303-982-6500
jeffcoweb.jeffco.k12.co.us
Jeffco Public Schools serves all of Jefferson
County and a portion of Broomfield
County and is also the largest school
district in Colorado with 155 schools,
nearly 85,000 students, and 12,000
employees. Schools include 94 elemen-
tary schools, 20 middle schools, 17 high
schools, 14 charter schools, 10 option
schools, 2 outdoor laboratory schools,
and 1 online school. The district has
received national recognition for its
programs, and its students and staff have
earned state and national honors. Four
district high schools Lakewood,
Evergreen, Conifer and DEvelyn were
named to Newsweeks Americas Best
High Schools list in 2009-2010; and
Education Week Magazine ranked
Jeffco fifth in the nation for having the
highest graduation rates among large
school districts.
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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Littleton Public Schools
5776 Crocker Street
Littleton, 80120
303-347-3300
www.littletonpublicschools.net
The Littleton Public School District is located
a few miles south of downtown Denver and
serves the majority of the city of Littleton,
town of Columbine Valley, and portions of
the Bow Mar, Centennial, Greenwood
Village, and Englewood municipalities. The
district serves 15,521 students in 25
schools, including 13 elementary schools
(K-5); 4 middle schools (6-8); 3 high
schools (9-12); 3 alternative education
schools; and 2 charter schools, plus options
for preschool, half-day and full-day kinder-
garten programs. The only school district in
the greater Denver metro area to be named
Accredited with Distinction, Littleton offers
National Blue Ribbon Schools of
Excellence and a high school International
Baccalaureate program.
Mapleton Public Schools
591 E. 80th Avenue
Denver, 80229
303-853-1000
www.acsd1.k12.co.us
The Mapleton School District covers 25
square miles and serves nearly 6,000
students in grades preK-12 at its 17
schools, which include one pre-K; 3
elementary schools; 5 middle schools, and
7 high school, alternative and charter
schools. Innovations include the districts
Connections Academy an online K-12
school and Mapletons Choices for Learning
portfolio allows students to choose the
school that best matches their learning style.
Sheridan School District #2
4000 South Lowell Blvd.
Denver, 80236
720-833-6991
www.sheridank12.org
Located in Arapahoe County, the
Sheridan School District serves more than
1,600 students from preschool through
12th grade in five schools: 1 early
childhood center, 1 primary school, 1
elementary school, 1 middle school, and
1 high school. The high school offers a
differentiated diploma program, which
includes a diploma that provides
Sheridan students an opportunity to
receive a degree from Arapahoe
Community College. More than 50
percent of Sheridans students enroll from
out of district during open enrollment.
St. Vrain Valley School District
395 South Pratt Parkway
Longmont, 80501
303-776-6200
www.stvrain.k12.co.us
Located approximately 30 miles north of
Denver, the St. Vrain Valley School District is
the ninth largest school district in the state,
serving more than 26,000 students in parts
of four counties (Boulder, Broomfield,
Larimer and Weld), and in 13 communities,
including eastern Boulder, Broomfield,
Dacono, Erie, Firestone, Frederick,
Hygiene, Longmont, Lyons, Mead, Niwot,
Peaceful Valley, and Raymond. The districts
49 schools are spread over 411 square
miles and include 25 elementary, 9 middle,
1 middle/senior, 7 high schools, 2 alterna-
tive schools, and 5 charter schools. The district
has met 96 percent of its targets for student
achievement; the graduation rate for high
school students is 86.6 percent; and 28
percent of all juniors and seniors took at
least one advanced placement (AP) course.
Strasburg School District 31J
56729 E. Colorado Avenue
Strasburg, 80136
303-622-9211
www.strasburg31j.com
Located in the small rural community of
Strasburg, just east of the Rocky
Mountains, the Strasburg School District
serves about 900 students. Schools
include one elementary school, one junior
high school, and one high school. The
district also operates the Prairie Creeks
Charter School to serve nontraditional
students at risk by role-modeling positive
behavior and nurturing educational,
emotional and physical well-being.
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
Ahighly educated city that places
equally high value on education, Denver
offers a wealth of options and resource to
educate children. Metro Denver boasts
excellent public and private schools;
about seven percent of Metro Denvers
total student population attended private
schools in the 2009 school year. The
following is a sampling of Metro Denver
private schools, as well as private school,
charter and homeschooling resources for
Denver area families.
DENVER-AREA PRIVATE
SCHOOLS
Colorado Academy
3800 South Pierce Street
Denver, CO 80235
(303) 986-1501
www.coloradoacademy.org
Grades PreK-12. A dynamic liberal arts
and science program that challenges
students ethically, academically, artistically
and athletically creates the foundation of
Colorado Academy.
Cherry Hills Christian
3900 Grace Blvd.
Highlands Ranch CO 80126
(303) 791-5500
www.cherryhillschristian.org
Grades Preschool-8. Each step of learning
is an investment in your childs future. We
are committed to honoring Christ by
teaching, encouraging, training and
grounding students in Gods truth within a
dynamic, academic environment.
Denver Christian Schools
2135 South Pearl
Denver, CO 80210
(303) 733-2421
www.denver-christian.org
Grade PreK-12. Provides an education
with Christ at its foundation. Students
educated from this perspective learn to
think critically and wisely about the world,
see how Biblical truth applies to all
aspects of life, and practice integrating
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OPTIONS in
EDUCATION
SOMETHING
for EVERYONE
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their faith and learning as they develop a
worldview that prepares them for service
in the Kingdom of God.
Denver Wardorf School
940 Fillmore Street
Denver CO 80206
(303) 777-0531
www.denverwaldorf.org
Grade PreK-12. Offers an artistically
integrated, developmentally based and
academically rigorous curriculum that
prepares graduates for the challenges of
tomorrows world.
Faith Christian Academy
6210 Ward Road
Arvada, CO 80004
(303) 424-7310
www.fca-schools.org
Grades K-12. Offer an education,
empowered by the Holy Spirit, to provide
an excellent biblically integrated curriculum,
which inspires students to acquire wisdom,
knowledge, and character.
Graland County Day School
30 Birch Street
Denver, CO 80220
(303) 399-8361
www.graland.org
Grade K-9. Prepares students academi-
cally and to be responsible, caring,
effective and active citizens of the world.
Students take an active role in their
community and learn to become stewards
of their surroundings.
J.K. Mullen High School
3601 South Lowell Blvd.
Denver, CO 80235
(303)761-1764
www.mullenhighschool.com
Grades 9-12. A Catholic college
preparatory high school whose graduates
embrace Gods gift of learning, devote
their lives to seeking ceaselessly for His
learning, and commit themselves to using
His learning in the service of others. J.K.
Mullens hallmarks are it exemplary
teaching, its community of faith, it
scholastic rigor, and its care and vigilance
for each student.
Kent Denver
4000 East Quincy Avenue
Englewood, CO 80113
(303) 770-7660
www.kentdenver.org
Grade 6-12. Excellence in scholarship
and character is the goal of a Kent
Denver education. We seek to build a
caring, diverse community of responsible
citizens. To that end, the school
provides a challenging college prepara-
tory curriculum and sets high ethical
standards.
Regis Jesuit High School
6400 South Lewiston Way
Aurora, CO 80016
(303) 269-8000
www.regisjesuit.com
Grades 9-12. Provides a college preparatory
education for young men and women.
The hallmark of Jesuit education is cura
personalis, the core and concern of
individual. This educational community
provides a student-centered environment
in which each individual can develop
intellectually, socially, emotionally and
spiritually.
St. Marys Academy
4545 South University Blvd.
Englewood, CO 80113
(303) 762-8300
www.smanet.org
Grade K-12. Fosters excellence in each
child through academic achievement,
spiritual development and service. The
Loretto School Values of faith, community,
justice and respect provide the foundation
for students to be powerful agents of
change.
St Thomas More Parish School
7170 East Otero Avenue
Centennial CO 80112
(303) 770-0441
www.stthomasmore.org
Grade K-8. A private, parochial school,
deeply rooted in the Gospel of Jesus
Christ and the teaching of the Catholic
Church. In the great tradition of Catholic
education, we remain devoted to the
development of the whole person in each
of our students.
Southeast Christian School
9650 Jordan Road
Parker, CO 80134
(303) 841-5988
www.sechristian.org
Grade PreK-8. We utilize proven Bible-
based curriculum but believe more in
doing whatever it takes for each child.
We provide small class sizes, caring but
firm teachers and academic excellence.
Valor Christian High School
3775 Grace Blvd.
Highlands Ranch CO 80126
(303) 471-3000
www.GoValor.org
Grade 9-12. Provide a rigorous and
comprehensive college preparator y
program, supporting students unique gifts
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
Students compete on 68
athletic teams
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and abilities, in a vibrant, Christ-centered
environment. Enhanced by cutting-edge
facilities, and led by highly-skilled,
innovative faculty, in partnership with
committed parents.
PRIVATE SCHOOLS
RESOURCES
Colorado Department of Education
Private Schools Resources
201 East Colfax Ave., Suite 300
Denver, 80203
303-866-6964
www.cde.state.co.us/choice/nonpublic
_resources.htm
National Center for Education Statistics,
Institute of Education Sciences
U.S. Dept. of Education
1990 K Street, NW
Washington, DC 20006
202-502-7300
http://nces.ed.gov/surveys/pss/private
schoolsearch/
The Association of Boarding Schools
4455 Connecticut Avenue, Suite A-200
Washington, D.C. 20008
202-966-8705
www.tabs.com
Association of Colorado Independent
Schools (ACIS)
1702 Sumac Avenue
Boulder, CO 80304
303-444-2201
www.acischools.com
Association of Christian Schools
International
731 Chapel Hills Drive
Colorado Springs, CO 80920-1027
719-528-6906 or 800-367-0798
www.acsi.org
National Association of
Independent Schools
1620 L Street NW, Suite 1100
Washington, DC 20036-5695
202-973-9700
www.nais.org
National Commission for
Exceptional Schools (NCES)
4617 West County Road, #2
Berthoud, Colorado 80513
www.nationalcommission.org
National Private School Association Group
10th Floor Lenox Towers
3390 Peachtree Road NE
Atlanta, Georgia 30326
www.npsag.com
NCA Commission on Accreditation
and School Improvement
Arizona State University
PO Box 873011
Tempe, AZ 85287-3011
www.ncahigherlearningcommission.org
CHARTER SCHOOLS &
RESOURCES
Charter schools are smaller schools,
and they often have greater parental
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
The perfect
match
for open
minds:
an
atmosphere
that embraces
you with
open arms.

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involvement. Families that want to enroll
their children in a charter school should
check with the local school district as soon
as they know theyre relocating to Denver,
since many charter schools have enrollment
deadlines. The following is a listing of
Denver-area charter school resources and a
sampling of schools.
Colorado Department of Education
Schools of Choice Unit
1560 Broadway, Suite 145
Denver, 80202
303-866-6964
www.cde.state.co.us/index_charter.htm
Colorado League of Charter Schools
1601 Vine St.
Denver, 80206
303-989-5356
www.coloradoleague.org
The Odyssey School
8750 E. 28th St.
Denver, 80238
303-316-3944
Fax: 303-316-4016
HOMESCHOOLING RESOURCES
Homeschooling offers parents yet another
option for educating their children, and
Denver-area parents have plenty of
resources to help.
Parents are required to provide instruction
for a minimum of four hours per day, 172
days a year, and children must follow the
same general educational requirements
mandated for public or private academic
programs in Colorado.
Parents also are encouraged to have
their children participate in the many
extracurricular activities offered by
Denver area public schools. The following
is a list of both Denver- and nationally-
based homeschooling organizations
and resources:
Christian Home Educators of Colorado
10431 S. Parker Road
Parker, 80134
720-842-4852
www.chec.org
Christian Home Educators of Colorado
(CHEC) is a non- profit, Christian
organization, dedicated to providing
information, resources and leadership
to all families involved in home-centered
education. We believe that parents
committing time and resources to provide
their children with an academically
excellent education, grounded in proper
values have the potential to affect the
very course of our nation as their children
grow up to become competent
Christian leaders in the years to come.
Christian Home Educators of Colorado
is committed to the advancement of
home education, and consider it part of
our mission to help ease the burden of
this responsibility for all families across
Colorado involved in home-centered
education.
Colorado Department of Education
201 East Colfax Ave.
Denver, CO 80203
303-866-6600
www.cde.state.co.us/cdeedserv/
homeschool.htm
The Colorado Department of Education
has a special resource section for
homeschooling parents, including a
copy of the laws associated with home-
schooling; frequently asked questions
about Colorado homeschooling; and a
listing of homeschool support groups
around the state.
The Colorado Homeschooler
P.O. Box 26569
Colorado Springs, 80936
719-598-2636
www.hschool.com
Homeschool Central/
Homeschool Colorado
www.homeschoolcentral.com/
www.homeschoolcentral.com/support/
colorado_homeschool.htm
A national organization that features
comprehensive, online resources for
homeschooling families, Homeschool
Central has served the homeschool
community since 1996. The organiza-
tions Colorado-specific site offers
statewide information, as well as specif-
ic information on resources in the metro
Denver area.
Homeschool Reporting
www.homeschoolreporting.com
This national resource helps families
with the necessar y recordkeeping
required with a homeschool curriculum
via its Homeschool Reporting Online
solutions.
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
Choosing a reliable and nurturing
child care provider is at the top of the list of
important decisions when families move to
a new city. Besides its reputation for top
educational resources, metro Denver also
offers resources to help parents find the right
child care provider for their family.
Colorado Department of Human
Services, Division of Child Care
1575 Sherman St.
Denver, 80203
800-799-5876
www.cdhs.state.co.us/childcare/home.htm
The Colorado Department of Human
Services, Division of Child Care regulates
metro-area facilities and maintains files on
the approximately 10,000 licensed child
care facilities in the state.
Early Childhood Association of
Colorado (ECAC)
1120 Lincoln Street, Suite 1303
Denver, 80203
303-860-7174 or 800-870-7174
www.coloradoecea.org/parents.html
The Early Childhood Education Association
of Colorado is a non-profit organization
dedicated to providing support and
guidance in the management and admin-
istration of childcare. ECEA is the second
largest childcare association in the
nation and represents over 400 licensed
childcare centers, preschools, and
school-age programs. The Parents
section of the site is a wealth of information
on how to find and choose a qualified
provider, plus referrals to providers in
Denver and statewide.
Mayors Office for Education
and Children
The Mayors Office for Education and
Children is committed to helping
Denver children grow up with the
strengths, knowledge, and skills necessary
to become confident and successful
residents. Established in 1995, the
Office advocates for the children,
youth, and families of Denver and
serves as the Citys liaison to Denver
Public Schools.
Mile High United Way Child Care
Referral Line
Dial 211
303-561-2244
Call the city line at 211, or the direct line
to speak to someone who can help you
find childcare, health, human services,
and other resources for Denver residents
free of charge. Families can also email
211.childcareoptions@unitedwaydenver.org .
Qualistar Early Learning
3607 Martin Luther King Blvd.
Denver, 80205
877-338-CARE
www.qualistar.org
Qualistar Early Learning is the childcare
resource and referral network for the state of
Colorado. The network includes 15
agencies throughout the state to help
parents take the guesswork out of choosing
childcare offering referrals to local child
care providers, information on state licensing
requirements, availability of child care
subsidies, and other important information.
Family Resources & Child Care Education
www.frcce.org
Family Resources & Child Care Education
connects families with childcare providers
in the Denver area, serving the counties of
Adams, Arapahoe, Broomfield, Clear
Creek, Denver, Douglas, Gilpin, Jefferson,
and Park. The organization provides:
Free child care referrals to parents in
eight counties
Resources for families who need
information on early care and education
Parent education and information about
choosing quality childcare
Statistical information for parents about
childcare in their area
The organization also offers educational
resources and classes for providers to
meet licensing requirements, as well
as suppor t informat ion, out reach,
and collaboration with Denver-area
communities.
CHILD CARE
RESOURCES
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EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
Metro Denver students have access
to a wide range of higher education
options, including world-class research
institutions, graduate and professional
schools, and a broad spectrum of under-
graduate programs. Its no wonder that
the city has such a high percentage of
college graduates. The following listings
include community colleges, four-year
public and private colleges and universities,
and technical/vocational schools.
COMMUNITY COLLEGES
Arapahoe Community College (ACC)
5900 S. Santa Fe Drive
Littleton, 80160
303-797-4222
www.arapahoe.edu
ACC serves more than 7,700 credit-
earning students each semester in four
locations. Its Art and Design Center,
ACC@DTC, and main campus are located
in Littleton. ACC also offers courses at the
University Center at Chaparral in Parker,
which is a partnership with other metro
Denver educational institutions. ACCs
fastest growth is occurring in online and
hybrid coursesones that require less
classroom time and more online work.
Established in 1965, ACC is the oldest
community college in the metro Denver
area. The college offers more than 80
degree and/or certificate programs in
fields such as accounting, automotive,
HIGHER
EDUCATION
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business, information technology, law
enforcement, engineering, financial
services and several health professions
programs.
Community College of Aurora
1600 E. Centre Tech Pkwy.
Aurora, 80011
303-360-4700
www.ccaurora.edu
The Community College of Aurora has
more than 5,500 students enrolled at two
Aurora campuses the main campus on
East Centre Tech Parkway and the Lowry
Campus on East 10th Place. The college
offers over 40 degree and certificate
programs that specialize in transfer and
vocational education. This fully accredited
educational institution accommodates
the adult student in traditional and
nontraditional education, as well as
online courses. The college ser ves
students seeking associate of arts and
science degrees.
Community College of Denver (CCD)
1111 W. Colfax Ave.
Denver, 80204
303-556-2600
www.ccd.edu
Community College of Denver is regarded
as Denvers community college. CCD
partners with local business and govern-
ment leaders to stay on top of whats
going on in Denvers fast-paced business
community. CCD has more than 14,000
students at its main site on the Auraria
Campus downtown and at its four
community campuses. The college offers
more than 100 degree and certificate
programs with flexible classes that fit into
even the busiest schedule. In addition to
its degree and certificate programs, CCD
offers continuing education, training, and
consulting services to help individuals and
organizations achieve their peak perform-
ance. CCDs Performance Solutions
also offers a full spectrum of on-site,
customized training, consulting, assessment,
skill gap analysis and related services.
Performance Solutions has online and
continuing education courses with individ-
ualized and alternative delivery options.
For information about Performance
Solutions, call 303-352-6922, or visit
www.ccd.edu/performancesolutions.
Front Range Community College
2190 Miller Drive
Longmont, 80501
303-678-3722
1931 E. Bridge St.
Brighton, 80601
303-404-5099
4616 S. Shields St.
Fort Collins, 80526
970-226-2500
3645 W. 112th Ave.
Westminster, 80031
303-404-5000
www.frontrange.edu
The largest community college in
Colorado, Front Range Community
College is a comprehensive, two-year,
state-supported community college with
an enrollment of more than 23,000. It
has three campuses and one center. Front
Range offers more than 100 degree,
occupational and technical programs, as
well as a full complement of transfer courses.
The college also offers more than 225
online courses. Hybrid courses are
available, allowing students to combine
online and classroom learning. The
Center for Workforce Development
provides skill training, educational and
organizational development consulting
services to help organizations maximize
their profit and productivity potential.
Red Rocks Community College
13300 W. 6th Ave.
Lakewood, 80228
303-914-6600
5420 Miller St.
Arvada, 80002
303-914-6010
www.rrcc.edu
Founded in 1969, Red Rocks Community
College serves more than 14,000 credit and
non-credit students. Some of the colleges
special programs include construction
technology, film and video technology,
medical assisting and biotechnology. Red
Rocks offers traditional classroom instruction
during the day, night or weekends, as well
as online, self-paced independent study or
telecourses at its Lakewood and Arvada
campuses. The Rocky Mountain Education
Center provides continuing educational
opportunities at the college and includes all
professional workforce development
training. Red Rocks works closely with
employers and an Advisory Council to
anticipate the training needs of the
workforce of the future.
FOUR-YEAR PUBLIC SCHOOLS
Colorado School of Mines (CSM)
1500 Illinois St.
Golden, 80401
303-273-3000 or 800-446-9488
www.mines.edu
Established in 1874 to serve the needs of
the local mining industry, Colorado School
of Mines now has an international reputa-
tion for excellence in engineering and
applied sciences, with special expertise in
the development and stewardship of the
Earths resources. The university offers all the
advantages of a world-class research
institution with a size that allows for personal
attention for its 4,000 students. With the
highest admissions standards of any public
university in Colorado, also among the
highest in the nation, the school offers an
innovative curriculum emphasizing practical,
hands-on experiences and an interdiscipli-
nary approach to solving problems of
importance to society. Contributing highly
valued and talented individuals to the work-
force, Mines places 98 percent of its grad-
uates within 12 months of graduation.
Colorado State University (CSU)
102 Administration Building
Fort Collins, 80523
970-491-1101
www.colostate.edu
A student-centered research university,
CSU ranks among the nations top public
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institutions. Founded in 1870, this world-
class institution has grown from 19 students
in 1879 to nearly 26,000 students today.
CSU has four campuses in Fort Collins
Main Campus, Foothills Campus,
Veterinary Teaching Hospital (agricultural
campus) and Pingree Park (mountain cam-
pus). More than 150 programs of study are
offered within eight collegesagricultural
sciences, applied human sciences,
business, engineering, liberal arts, natural
resources, natural sciences and veterinary
medicine and biomedical sciences. CSUs
Denver Center offers graduate degree
programs that are designed for working
professionals and are held in the evening or
weekends. Colorado State offers online
and distance learning education, as well as
on-site and custom training. The university
also has a large athletics program with
opportunities for students to participate in a
variety of sports.
Emporia State University School of
Library & Information Management
1059 Alton Way #222
Denver, 80230
800-710-2959
www.slim.emporia.edu
The School of Library & Information
Management at Emporia State University,
Emporia, Kansas, has offered its master of
library science (MLS) degree program in
Denver since 1989. Faculty members
travel from the home campus to Denver to
teach classes on weekends and online.
More than 300 residents of the Rocky
Mountain region have earned the MLS degree
without attending classes at the Kansas
campus. The program is designed for
nontraditional students, particularly those
with full-time employment and family com-
mitments. Students meet approximately 14
weekends per year and complete the 42-
hour requirements for graduation in less than
three years. The curriculum is also accredited
by the American Library Association. For infor-
mation about the MLS program in Denver,
call 303-340-2575 or 800-710-2959.
Metropolitan State College
900 Auraria Pkwy.
Denver, 80204
303-556-2400
5660 Greenwood Plaza
Englewood, 80111
303-721-1313
11990 Grant St.
Northglenn, 80233
303-450-5111
www.mscd.edu
Located close to the financial and artistic
heart of downtown Denver, Metropolitan
State is the third largest higher educational
institution in Colorado and one of the
largest four-year public colleges in the
nation with an annual enrollment of approx-
imately 20,000. Established in 1965,
Metropolitan State offers day, night,
weekend, correspondence and online
courses. The college provides approximately
160 online courses to more than 3,700
students each semester. Metropolitan State
offers 50 major fields of study and nine
minors through its three schoolsbusiness;
letters, arts and sciences; and professional
studies. The colleges main campus is
located at the Auraria Higher Education
Center, a 175-acre site shared with the
University of Colorado at Denver and
Community College of Denver. Metropolitan
State has two satellite campuses Metro
State South in Englewood and Metro State
North in Northglenn.
University of Colorado (CU) at Boulder
Boulder, 80309
303-492-1411
www.colorado.edu
Founded in 1876 at the base of the
Rocky Mountains, CU-Boulder was the
first established university of the University
of Colorado system, which today also
has two campuses in Denver and one in
Colorado Springs. With more than
30,300 students and nine colleges and
schools, CU-Boulder offers 3,400 courses
in 150 fields of study. Students can
choose from 85 majors at the bachelors
level, 70 at the masters level and 50 at
the doctoral level. It has nearly 100
research centers, institutes and laboratories
and received more than $260 million in
sponsored research awards for the 2004
fiscal year. CU-Boulder has three loca-
tions in Boulderthe 786-acre Main
Campus, the East Campus (including the
Research Park) and Williams Village
and the Mountain Research Station north
of Nederland. The award-winning university
is home to a prestigious faculty, including
three Nobel Prize winners.
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University of Colorado at Denver
& Health Sciences Center
1250 15th Street
Denver, 80217
303-556-5600
www.cudenver.edu
The University of Colorado at Denver
and Health Sciences Center (UCDHSC)
joins the strengths of a comprehensive
campus in downtown Denver with the
research and advanced health care
programs of the Health Sciences Center.
The combined UCDHSC now serves
more than 27,000 students in Denver
and Aurora. It awards more than 3,400
degrees each year and more graduate
degrees than any other school in
Colorado. Founded in 1912 as an
extension of the University of Colorado,
the downtown Denver campus became
the University of Colorado at Denver in
1974. In July 2004, the University of
Colorado at Denver consolidated with
the University of Colorado Health
Sciences Center to form the new
University of Colorado at Denver and
Health Sciences Center. With a solid
academic reputation, award-winning
faculty and renowned researchers, the
downtown Denver campus offers more
than 80 highly rated degree programs
at bachelors, masters and doctoral levels.
Schools and colleges include architec-
ture and planning, arts and media,
business, education, engineering and
applied sciences, liberal arts and sciences,
and public affairs.
The downtown Denver campus is home
to more than 12,200 students, traditional
and nontraditional, from recent high
school graduates to seasoned professionals.
Students come from throughout Colorado,
around the country and overseas to
pursue an education here. Located at
the Auraria Higher Education Center,
the downtown campus of UCDHSC is
just steps away from Denvers historic
lower downtown district with its myri-
ad entertainment, cultural and sports
venues.
University of Colorado at Denver
and Health Sciences Center
Ninth Avenue at Colorado Boulevard &
Fitzsimons Campuses
Denver, 80262
303-372-0000
www.uchsc.edu
CU-Health Sciences Center routinely
ranks among the top 25 medical centers
in the nation. Serving the entire Rocky
Mountain region, the center encompasses
the schools of medicine, nursing, dentistry,
pharmacy and a graduate school. Its
widely renowned health sciences institu-
tions include two teaching hospitals
University of Colorado Hospital and
Colorado Psychiatric Healthas well as
the University of Colorado Cancer Center
and a host of prestigious research and
treatment institutions. CU-Health Sciences
Centers more than 2,600 students enroll
in undergraduate, graduate and post-
graduate educational programs. As the
major health research base in Colorado,
the center attracts more than $200 million
in research and training grants and
contracts annually. The campus $31 million
Biomedical Research Building houses
centers of excellence in molecular biology,
cancer and neuroscience.
PRIVATE SCHOOLS
Argosy University/Denver
1200 Lincoln St.
Denver, 80203
303-248-2705
www.argosyu.edu/denver
Argosy University/Denver is one of 14
Argosy University campuses and four
approved degree sites in 12 states.
Argosy University/ Denver offers doctoral
and masters degree programs in psychology,
business, counseling and education. The
university also offers bachelor degree
completion programs in psychology and
business. Argosy is accredited by the
Higher Learning Commission and is a
member of the North Central Association.
Argosy University/Denver offers an
expanded portfolio of academic programs
within its American School of Professional
Psychology, College of Business and
Information Technology, and College of
Health Sciences.
The Denver campus is initially offering a
doctor of business administration (DBA), a
doctor of education in organizational
leadership (EdD), a doctor of education in
counselor education and supervision
(EdD), a master of business administration
(MBA), a master of arts in community
counseling (MA), a bachelor of arts in
psychology (BA), and a bachelor of
science in business administration com-
pletion programs (BSBA).
Colorado Christian University (CCU)
8787 W. Alameda Ave.
Lakewood, 80226
800-44-FAITH
www.ccu.edu
With a heritage dating back to 1914,
CCU is committed to offering a complete
education that develops students intellec-
tually, professionally and spiritually. As the
only member of the Council for Christian
Colleges and Universities in an eight-state
region, CCU is uniquely positioned to
offer students a distinctive variety of edu-
cational opportunities and experiences.
More than 1,800 undergraduate and
graduate students are enrolled at the main
campus near Denver and at regional
locations located in Colorado Springs,
Grand Junction and Loveland. CCU is
accredited by the North Central
Association of Colleges and Schools and
offers a comprehensive spectrum of
educational programs for traditional
undergraduate, adult-focused and graduate-
level learning. Convenient accelerated
course schedules and online degrees are
available for working adults and profes-
sionals with travel requirements.
Denver Seminary
6399 S. Santa Fe Drive
Littleton, 80120
303-761-2482
www.denverseminary.edu
Founded in 1950, Denver Seminary is
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committed to the Christian faith and offers
the following programsa master of
divinity, a master of arts and a doctor of
ministry. The seminary has approximately
700 students. In addition to a traditional
classroom setting, the seminary offers
online courses.
DeVry University
1870 W. 122nd Ave.
Westminster, 80234
303-280-7400
www.devry.edu
DeVrys University is one of the largest
higher-education systems in North
America and provides career-oriented
undergraduate and graduate degree
programs, which integrate general educa-
tion with industry-specific coursework. The
applications-oriented focus used by DeVry
helps students to apply their education to
the workplace. Students can attend tradi-
tional classroom-based courses during the
day, accelerated courses for working
professionals during the evenings and
weekends, or take courses online. On
campus and online courses are known for
their smaller class sizes and instructors
with real-world experience. The university
offers undergraduate degree programs in
business, biotechnology, computer and
information technology, electronics and
engineering, and network and communi-
cations. Degree completion programs are
available for students with associates
degrees or previous college credits.
Johnson & Wales University
7150 Montview Blvd.
Denver, 80220
303-256-9300
www.jwu.edu
Johnson & Wales was founded in 1914
in Providence, R.I., and has campuses in
six states. The 26-acre Denver campus
opened in 1999 in one of Denvers most
historic neighborhoods. Today, more than
1,300 students attend classes in Denver.
The university offers undergraduate
degrees in business, secondary educa-
tion, hospitality and culinary arts. Johnson
& Wales has an upside-down curriculum
which means that students are immersed
in their chosen field of study during their
first year. For 25 years in a row, at least
98 percent of Johnson & Wales graduates
are working within their field of study
within 60 days of graduation.
Regis University
3333 Regis Blvd.
Denver, 80221
800-967-3237
www.regis.edu
Regis University offers programs for many
different types of learners. Nationally
recognized as a leader in adult higher
education since the 1970s, Regis
University School for Professional Studies
(SPS) offers affordable bachelors/masters
degrees and certificates designed specifi-
cally for working adults. Regis University
also offers the Rueckert- Hartmann
School for Healthcare Professions and a
traditional undergraduate program
through Regis College.
University of Denver (DU)
2199 S. University Blvd.
Denver, 80208
303-871-2000
www.du.edu
The University of Denver is the oldest inde-
pendent university in the Rocky Mountain
region, offering multidisciplinary under-
graduate degrees and an extensive grad-
uate program. This innovative research
university also has more than 9,500
students from all 50 states and 90
countries. The schools undergraduate,
graduate and continuing education
programs offer small class sizes with an
undergraduate student-to-faculty ratio of
13-to-1. The University of Denver offers
more than 65 programs of study, and the
National Endowment for the Humanities
has recognized its core curriculum for
undergraduates as a model program in
higher education. The school is also
recognized for its graduate and profes-
sional programs. The University of Denver
High School is also located on the DU
campus. A division of the College of
Education, it serves as a reservoir for
model programs that can be shared with
other private and public high schools.
TECHNICAL AND
SPECIALIZED SCHOOLS
The Art Institute of Colorado
1200 Lincoln St.
Denver, 80203
800-275-2420
www.aic.artinstitutes.edu
The Art Institute offers innovative programs
to prepare its approximately 2,300
students for employment in creative fields,
such as design for advertising, graphics,
industrial, interior and the Web. Other
students concentrate on creative applica-
tions in photography, animation, multimedia,
Web site development, video and
culinary arts. Located near downtown
Denver, the institute is in session year-
round and, depending on the program,
students can graduate in 18 to 48 months
with either an associate of applied
science or a bachelor of arts degree.
New online courses also are available.
Aspen University
501 S. Cherry, Suite 350
Denver, 80246
303-333-4224
www.aspen.edu
Aspen University, formerly known as the
International School of Information
Managers, was an early pioneer in online
education. In 1987, it was the first university
to offer an accredited, 100 percent
online master of business administration
degree. Aspen University offers graduate
degree programs in business, technology
and education; a bachelor completion
program in business administration; and
certificate programs in information tech-
nology and project management.
College for Financial Planning
6161 S. Syracuse Way
Greenwood Village, 80111
800-237-9990
www.cffp.edu
EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
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EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
The oldest and most widely respected
provider of financial planning education
in the United States, the College for
Financial Planning offers several industry
education and certification programs. In
1972, the College of Financial Planning
created the countrys first financial plan-
ning education programthe CFP
Certification Professional Education
Program. Today, it is the colleges most
popular program.
Concorde Career Institute
111 Havana St.
Aurora, 80010
303-861-1151
www.concorde.edu
Concorde offers short, affordable and
hands-on training programs for dental
assistants, insurance coding and billing
specialists, medical assistants, radiologic
technology, surgical technologists and
practical nursing.
Cook Street Culinary School
of Fine Cooking
1937 Market St.
Denver, 80202
303-308-9300
www.cookstreet.com
Cook Street School of Fine Cooking is a
contemporary culinary center dedicated
to professional and recreational culinary
and wine education. Cook Streets
Recreational Program offers wine and
food enthusiasts at every skill level a
chance to expand their knowledge
through classes and special events. Every
class offered is hands-on with full student
participation. The Professional Food and
Wine Career Program features intensive,
hands-on training committed to regional
European culinary tradition and tech-
nique. These programs make Cook Street
one of the premier culinary schools in the
nation. Cook Street also offers its space
for private events in which the facility is
exclusively yours.
Emily Griffith Opportunity School
1250 Welton St.
Denver, 80204
720-423-4700
www.egos-school.com
Emily Griffith founded Denvers
Opportunity School in 1916. It is the
oldest adult vocational/technical school
in the United States and enrolls between
11,000 and 15,000 students each
year. Individualized hands-on instruction
prepares students for jobs as account-
ants, welders and approximately 37
other careers or trades. Up-to-date
accredited courses are offered in an
affordable, professional and friendly
environment.
Everest College
9065 Grant St.
Thornton, 80229
303-457-2757
14280 E. Jewell Ave., Suite 100
Aurora, 80012
303-745-6244
www.everest-college.com
Everest College, formerly Parks College,
is a career-oriented school that offers a
variety of occupational programs. The
Thornton Campus is the main campus
and has a history that dates back to
1895. The Aurora Campus opened in
1989.
The Iliff School of Theology
2201 S. University Blvd.
Denver, 80210
303-744-1287
www.iliff.edu
Founded in 1892, The Iliff School of
Theology is one of the nations 13 United
Methodist seminaries and serves approxi-
mately 350 students each quarter. The
school offers both masters and doctoral
degree programs, including the master of
divinity, the master of arts in specialized
ministry, the master of arts, and the
master of theological studies. Iliff also
offers, jointly with the University of Denver,
a doctor of philosophy program in
religious and theological studies. A doctor
of ministry program has recently been
developed for clergy interested in
advanced professional education.
ITT Technical Institute
500 E. 84th Ave., Suite B-12
Thornton, 80229
303-288-4488
www.itt-tech.edu
This nationally known technical institute
offers associate and bachelors degrees
in five schoolsinformation technology,
electronics technology, drafting and
design, business and criminal justice.
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EDUCATI ON I N METRO DENVER
Naropa University
2130 Arapahoe Ave.
Boulder, 80302
303-444-0202
www.naropa.edu
Naropa University is a private, nonprofit,
nonsectarian liberal arts institution
whose core mission is contemplative
educationan approach to learning
that integrates the best of Eastern and
Western educational traditions. The
university comprises a four-year under-
graduate college and graduate programs
in the arts, education, environmental
studies, psychology, religious studies
and creation spirituality. It offers bache-
lors and masters degrees, as well as
professional development training and
classes for the community.
National American University (NAU)
1325 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 100
Denver, 80222
303-758-6700
www.national.edu
NAU offers graduate, bachelor, associate
and certificate programs. The Denver
campus provides flexible schedules and
programs in masters of business
administration, accounting, applied
management, business administration,
computer/information systems careers,
information technology, management
information systems, health care man-
agement, medical assisting and general
education studies.
Ohio Center for Broadcasting
1310 Wadsworth Blvd.
Lakewood, 80214
303-937-7070
303-233-4484 (Spanish)
www.national.edu
www.mediosuno.com (Spanish)
Since 1986, the Ohio and Illinois
Centers for Broadcasting have taught
all aspects of broadcasting through an
intensive, hands-on program. The
Centers for Broadcasting possess a
unique mix of broadcasting leadership
and experience, educational excellence
and use of cutting-edge technologies.
The Lakewood campus is also home to
the first Hispanic media-training pro-
gram, the first and only one in the
U.S.
Rocky Mountain College of
Art + Design
1600 Pierce St.
Lakewood, 80214
303-753-6046
www.rmcad.edu
Founded in 1963, Rocky Mountain
College of Art + Design offers bachelor
of fine arts degree programs in animation/
two-dimensional, animation/three-
dimensional, art education, graphic
design and interactive media, illustration,
interior design, painting and drawing,
and sculpture.
University of Phoenix
3151 S. Vaughn Way
Aurora, 80015
303-694-9093
10004 Park Meadows Drive
Lone Tree, 80124
303-694-9093
10190 Bannock St.
Northglenn, 80221
303-755-9090
8700 Turnpike Drive
Westminster, 80031
303-487-7155
www.phoenix.edu
With more than 100 locations nation-
wide, the University of Phoenix is the
nations largest private university that
specializes in education for working
adults. Metro Denver has five campuses.
The university offers bachelors, masters
and doctoral degrees on campus,
online, or a combination of both.
Degree programs are offered in business,
nursing/health care, human services,
technology, criminal justice and edu-
cat ion. Cer t ificat e programs are
offered in human resource manage-
ment and several information technology
disciplines.
Webster-University
Denver Graduate Center
9250 E. Costilla Ave.,
Suite 310
Greenwood Village, 80112
303-708-8305
www.webster.edu/denver
Webster Universitys Denver Graduate
Center has been in the Denver area
since 1976, offering graduate pro-
grams to working adults. Webster
offers five, nine-week terms per year,
and classes meet only once a week.
Degree programs include a master of
business administration, as well as
master of arts degrees in management
and l eadership, human resources
development, and human resources
management. The university also offers
a master of science in space systems
operations management. Webster University
is a private, nonprofit, regionally accred-
ited university founded in St. Louis,
Missouri in 1915. Webster is accredited
by the Higher Learning Commission
and is also a member of the North
Central Association of Colleges and
Schools.
Westwood College
of Technology
7350 N. Broadway
Denver, 80221
303-426-7000
3150 S. Sheridan Blvd.
Denver, 80227
303-934-2790
10851 W. 120th Ave.
Broomfield, 80021
303-466-1714
www.westwood.edu
Westwoods two Denver campuses
offer associate and bachelors pro-
grams in business, design and tech-
nology. The Denver North Campus
also offers programs in industrial and
medi cal f i el ds. The Broomf i el d
Campus offers programs in avionics
as well as airframe and power plant
maintenance.
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ME T R O D E NV E R R E L OC AT I ON GU I D E S P R I NG 2 0 1 1
he metro Denver area is home to some of the finest hospitals and medical research facilities in
the world. Several hospitals in metro Denver rank among the best health care facilities in the
country according to the 2009-2010 Americas Best Hospitals edition of U.S. News and
World Report.
Thanks to award-winning research institutions, such as those in place at the University of Colorado, the
region is a leading figure in the larger national health care industry. With the industry and business behind
individual wellbeing, the hospitals and care networks of Colorado strive to bring the most current
technologies and the highest level of innovation to the populace.
Health Care in
Metro Denver
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MAJOR MEDICAL FACILITIES
Anschutz Inpatient Pavilion
1260 E. 16th Ave.
Aurora, 80045
720-848-0000
www.uch.edu
The University of Colorado facility is part
of the 20- year, $4.3 billion redevelop-
ment of the former Fitzsimons Army
Medical Center, located in Aurora. The
hospital is touted as a Hospital of the
Future by USA Today for its state-of-the-art
approach to care and commitment to the
highest levels of patient satisfaction. Upon
completion of future phases, the Anschutz
Inpatient Pavilion will have 99 beds,
including 72 medical/surgical beds, five
labor/delivery/recovery rooms, 10
postpartum beds and four suites that offer
additional amenities.
Anschutz Outpatient Pavilion
1635 N. Aurora Court
Aurora, 80045
720-848-0000
www.uch.edu
The Fitzsimons campus is constructed for
extensive medical research and appli-
cation, and the University of Colorados
Health Sciences Center relocated to the
campus recently. The Anschutz Outpatient
Pavilion offers a full range of services for
specialty outpatient care and outpatient
ambulatory surgery. In addition, this pavilion
will include the metro Denver areas only
Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging
system and cyclotron, used to diagnose
diseases and detect early-stage cancer.
The cyclotron produces radiopharmaceu-
ticals used by the PET.
Avista Adventist Hospital
100 Health Park Drive
Louisville, 80027
303-673-1000
www.avistahosp.org
Avista Adventist offers cutting-edge medical
technology and two locations for physical,
occupational and speech therapy. The
hospital is the leader for birthing services
in Broomfield and Boulder counties at the
New Life Center with a Level II Nursery. It
also offers many other services, including
a Level III trauma center and emergency
department, a new intensive care unit and
an interventional cardiac catheterization
suite.
Boulder Community Hospital (BCH)
1100 Balsam Ave.
Boulder, 80301
303-440-2273
www.bch.org
A full-service nonprofit hospital, BCH is
home to the regions only cyberknife
centeran advanced, non-surgical
method of treating cancers, tumors and
other difficult medical conditions. The hospital
has excellent cardiology services and is
developing advanced technology related
to neurological services for its patients.
BCH also operates a sports medicine
center, radiation center and other health
care facilities throughout the region.
Centennial Medical Plaza
(a campus of The Medical Center of Aurora)
14200 E. Arapahoe Road
Centennial, 80112
303-699-3000
www.auroramed.com
CMP offers a variety of health care
services for the entire family. Focusing on
personalized care provided by experi-
enced professionals, CMP consistently
has high patient, physician and employee
satisfaction in the metro area and is
recognized as a national leader. CMP
treats injuries and illnesses with many of
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
IMPORTANT HELATHCARE RESOURCE INFORMATION
American Diabetes Association 720-855-1102
American Medical Response Ambulance Services 303-495-1200
American Red Cross 303-722-7474
Arthritis Foundation 303-756-8622
Bonfils Blood Center 303-363-2202
Center for People with Disabilities 303-442-8662
Colorado AIDS Project 303-837-0166
Crohns & Colitis Foundation 303-639-9163
Denver Commission for People with Disabilities 720-913-8480
Denver Options 303-636-5600
Disability Center for Independent Living 303-320-1345
Easter Seals Colorado 303-233-1666
Hospice of Metro Denver 303-321-2828
MDS Counseling Center 303-756-9052
Mental Health Association of Colorado 303-377-3040
Mile High United Way 303-433-8383
Namaste Comfort Care 303-860-9915
Parker Task Force Food Bank 303-841-3460
Rocky Mountain Cancer Centers 303-930-7800
University of Denver Bridge Project 303-871-7405
Visiting Nurse Corp. of Colorado, Inc. 303-698-2121
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HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
the support services of a hospital setting,
including a full-service emergency
department, a chest pain center (with
Chest Pain Accreditation), and a surgery
center. Other specialties include digital
mammography, imaging services, phar-
macy, pain management, sleep disorders,
sports medicine and womens heart
health services.
The Childrens Hospital (TCH)
13123 E. 16th Ave.
Aurora, 80045
720-777-1234
The Childrens Hospital Aurora
12635 E. Montview Blvd.
Aurora, 80010
720-859-4100
www.thechildrenshospital.org
The hospital is dedicated to improving
the health of children through the provision
of high-quality, coordinated programs of
patient care, education, research and
advocacy. With 1,130 pediatric spe-
cialists and more than 2,300 full-time
employees, Childrens is home to a
number of nationally and internationally
recognized medical programs. The hospital
is at the forefront of research into child-
hood disease and receives more than
$30 million each year from the National
Institutes of Health and other government
agencies. From medical breakthroughs to
late-night fevers, Childrens provides
complete pediatric care at its main
campus and through a network that
includes five community-based, after-hour
care sites, eight specialty-care centers,
and more than 400 outreach clinics held
in three states each year.
Denver Health Medical Center (DHMC)
777 Bannock St.
Denver, 80204
303-436-6000
www.denverhealth.org
Colorados largest public hospital operates
nine family health centers as well as the
Rocky Mountain Regional Trauma Center.
DHMC is particularly proud of its
Wellington E. Webb Center for Primary
Care, a 75,000-square-foot complex that
includes adult and pediatric care, a dental
clinic, outpatient pharmacy, radiology
services, and the Denver Health Medical
Plan Clinic. The complex stands as the
first in the nation located adjacent to an
acute care medical facility. It is equipped
with the newest state-of-the-art equipment
and advanced technology, and also has
large patient rooms, nurse visit rooms,
classrooms and group visit areas, allowing
care providers to assist patients using the
newest innovations and protocols in
medicine to improve patient outcomes.
Good Samaritan Medical Center
200 Exempla Circle
Lafayette, 80026
303-689-4000
www.exempla.org/care/facilities/EGSMC
This facility houses more than 340 beds.
Services include labor and delivery,
cardiovascular care, Level II neonatal
intensive care, adult intensive care,
emergency and urgent care, interventional
and diagnostic radiology, orthopedics
and pediatrics. The center incorporates
mountain and garden views, walking
trails and natural landscaping to capture
the essence of Colorado. The campus
also includes a central garden, soothing
water features and colorful flowersall
designed to reflect its focus on healing.
Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children at
Presbyterian/St. Lukes Medical Center
1719 E. 19th Ave.
Denver, 80218
303-839-6000
www.RockyMountainHospitalforChildren.com
Nearly 20 years ago, a number of
pediatric physicians moved their practices
to P/SL and established a regionally
renowned center caring for high-risk
births, neonates, infants, children and
teens. These specialists became the impetus
for establishing a state-of-the-art pediatric
medical center.
This facility opened in the fall of 2010
and encompasses a 160,000-square-
foot pediatric care center with a new
pediatric cancer center and heart center,
a pediatric intensive care unit, operating
rooms, emergency department and diag-
nostic imaging area. A 100,000-square-
foot pediatric-focused office building
accompanies the addition.
Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children is a
system of pediatric care throughout the
entire HealthONE family of hospitals.
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HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
Kaiser Permanente
Total health care coverage provider
303-338-3800
www.kp.org
Whether you want Kaiser Permanente
group coverage or individual cover-
age, you will enjoy top-rated health
care that can include: preventive care
services, such as routine physicals,
well-woman care, well-child care,
immunizations and diagnostic screen-
ings; a wide variety of health educa-
tion classes, most at no charge or for
just a small fee; personalized online
resources to help you lose weight,
reduce stress, or quit smoking; dis-
counts on acupuncture, chiropractic
and massage therapy services just to
name a few.
Kaiser Permanente employer-sponsored
plans include HMO, PPO and POS
plan options to help satisfy everyone,
including those who need more choice
and affordable care.
Littleton Adventist Hospital
7700 S. Broadway
Littleton, 80122
303-730-8900
www.mylittletonhospital.org
Littleton Adventist is a full-service, acute-
care hospital known for its womens and
newborn care services, and comprehensive
emergency care. As a Level II trauma
center in south metro Denver, Littleton
Hospital has assembled a team of specially-
trained physicians and staff to handle
even the most severe trauma cases.
Littleton Hospital provides a full spectrum
of womens and newborn services including
a Level III neonatal intensive care unit.
Littleton Adventist Hospital is a place
where patient-centered care and compas-
sion meet medicine and technology.
Lutheran Medical Center
8300 W. 38th Ave.
Wheat Ridge, 80033
303-425-4500
www.exempla.org/care/facilities/ELMC
Exemplas main facility offers a full range of
medical services for the metro Denver area
including emergency care, cardiovascular
services and physical medicine and reha-
bilitation. The hospital recently built a new
birthing unit and expanded its radiation/
oncology unit as well as its heart center. It
has recently been recognized by Solucient,
a health care consulting company, for its
outstanding orthopedic care.
Lutheran Medical Southwest
303-425-2929
www.exempla.org/care/facilities
This Exempla Lutheran Medical Center
Southwest, a 125,000- square- foot
medical facility, was designed to provide
medical services in a welcoming, relaxed
environment for local residents.
The Medical Center of Aurora Main Campus
1501 S. Potomac St.
Aurora, 80012
303-695-2600
www.auroramed.com
Enroll in Chamber Health Plus.
Better health. Better rates.
A healthler areach fer yeur buslness and emleyees
Lmplo\ers and emplo\ees who embraoe healthy habits deserve
a break on their health insuranoe.
1hat is why the Uenver Metro Chamber of Commeroe oreated
Chamber Realth Plus, a ooalition of emplo\ers working together
with a leading insuranoe oarrier to oontrol health oare oosts.
Chamber Realth Plus artlclants may reduce remlum
cests by successfully cemletlng seclc annual wellness
requlrements.
1his program is exolusively for Uenver Metro Chamber members
with 51 - 300 enrolled emplo\ees. Fer mere lnfermatlen en
Chamber Realth Plus and a llst ef select brekers, vlslt www.
denverchamber.erg,chamberhealthlus er call the benver
Metre Chamber ef Cemmerce at 303-534-8500.
SM
When you and your employees
commit to healthier choices,
everyone benets.
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The Medical Center of Aurora, the first
community hospital in the Denver metro
area to receive Magnet Recognition for
nursing excellence, is an acute care
hospital with specialization in cardiovas-
cular services, neurosciences, oncology,
surgery and womens services. The
Medical Center of Aurora also has
Primary Stroke Certification, Chest Pain
Accreditation, Level II trauma designation
and a new state-of-the-art Heart Care
Tower. In 2008, it opened an 84-bed, all-
private-room, state-of-the-art Heart Care
Tower. The facility offers progressive thera-
pies like Aquapheresis, a safe and effective
treatment that improves Congestive Heart
Failure patients quality of life. In 2008, both
the South Campus and Centennial Medical
Plaza became accredited chest pain centers
by the Society of Chest Pain Centers.
Medical Center North Campus
700 Potomac St.
Aurora, 80011
303-695-2600
As part of The Medical Center of Aurora,
the north campus provides a variety of
outpatient services and specialized inpa-
tient care. It offers a variety of medical
services including imaging services, out-
patient surgery, private rooms for hospital
patients, medical stabilization, long-term
care, a senior health center and The
Womens Health Pavilion.
In April 2011, HealthONE debuted
Access HealthONE at the North Campus,
a centralized call center providing a one-
step process for emergency responders
and physicians to admit or transfer a
patient and consult with other clinicians.
North Suburban Medical Center
9191 Grant St.
Thornton, 80229
303-451-7800
www.northsuburban.com
For the past 25 years, North Suburban
Medical Center has been recognized for
its commitment to accommodate families
needs for high-quality, specialty care
close to home. The doctors, nurses and
health care providers of this 157-bed
facility deliver superior primary and acute-
care services to north Denvers neighbor-
hoods and communitiescaring for
patients when they are most at risk.
Located in Thornton, just one block east of
I-25, North Suburban offers a wide range
of womens services, critical care, emer-
gency medical services and surgical serv-
ices. North Suburban has also been recog-
nized for cardiovascular medicine includ-
ing a full range of diagnostic procedures,
treatments and recovery assistance for
patients with heart and vascular diseases.
The campus has two adjoining medical
office buildings, a Musculoskeletal Surgery
Center, Diagnostic Sleep Disorders Center
and Center for Weight Loss Surgery.
Parker Adventist Hospital
9395 Crown Crest Blvd.
Parker, 80138
303-269-4000
www.parkerhospital.org
Parker Adventist Hospital is an acute care
facility featuring a full range of services
including cardiac, emergency and trauma
care, surgical, imaging, labor and delivery,
and through a unique partnership with the
Childrens Hospital, specialized pediatric
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
HUMAN & SOCIAL SERVICE RESOURCES
Adams County Department of Social Services 303-287-8831
Arapahoe County Department of Human Services 303-636-1130
Boulder County Social Services, Child Protection Services 303-441-1200
Family Advocacy, Care, Education & Support (FACES) 720-570-9333
Jefferson County Division of Human Services 303-271-1388
RAPE ASSISTANCE (24 HOUR)
Rape Assistance (24-hour) Denver Victims
Service Center 303-894-8000
Rape Assistance and Awareness Program 303-322-7273
VICTIM ASSISTANCE
Denver Victims Service Center 303-894-8000
General Emergency 911
WOMENS SERVICES
Gateway Battered Womens Shelter 303-343-1851
Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains 303-321-7526
SafeHouse Denver Inc. 303-318-9989
Susan G. Komen Breast Cancer Foundation, Denver Affiliate 303-744-2088
Violence Prevention Institute - Womens Crisis Center
of Douglas County
303-688-8484
SUBSTANCE ABUSE
Alcoholics Anonymous 303-322-4440
Arapahoe House 303-657-3700
Cocaine Anonymous 303-421-5120
Mile High Council on Alcoholism & Drug Abuse 303-825-8113
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inpatient, outpatient and emergency care.
Located at Parker Road and E-470 in
Crown Point, Parker Adventist serves the
health care needs of southeast Aurora,
Centennial, Parker, Elizabeth, Castle Rock
and other adjacent communities in
Arapahoe and Douglas counties.
Platte Valley Medical Center
1600 Prairie Center Pkwy.
Brighton, 80601
303-498-1600
www.pvmc.org
This acute care hospital provides inpatient
and outpatient services, community out-
reach programs and specialty care for
communities in northern Adams and southern
Weld counties. Clinical services include
emergency care, a family birthing unit,
intensive care, nutritional services, oncology,
pharmaceutical services, radiology and
physical medicine.
Porter Adventist Hospital
2525 S. Downing St.
Denver, 80210
303-778-1955
www.porterhospital.org
Porter is a general nonprofit hospital
specializing in cardiovascular care and
specialty surgery including urology,
orthopedics, spine, hand, eye and trans-
plant. A $110 million expansion was
completed in 2007. The project is part of
a $266 million investment Centura has
made in its four metro Denver Adventist
hospitals. In the first phase, Porter doubled
the size of its emergency room.
Presbyterian/
St. Lukes Medical Center (P/SL)
1719 E. 19th Ave.
Denver, 80218
303-839-6000
www.pslmc.com
With more than 80 specialties and 1,000
specialists and primary care physicians,
P/SL is the largest regional hospital, serving
Denver and the Rocky Mountain and Great
Plains regions. Licensed for 680 beds and
staffed by nearly 1,600 employees, P/SL
serves a seven state region. It is the most
advanced one-campus hospital in the
region with comprehensive care for adult
and pediatric patients. HealthONE
opened a $113 million expansion of the
P/SL campus in 2010 including a new
100,000-square-foot pediatric hospital
(see Rocky Mountain Hospital for Children
listing in this section) and a 120,000-
square-foot medical office building.
Rose Medical Center
4567 E. 9th Ave.
Denver, 80220
303-320-2121
www.rosemed.com
Well known as a Denver institution and a
9th Avenue landmark for more than 60
years, Rose has earned its reputation as
Denvers Baby Hospital, while becoming
a leader in womens and surgical services,
bariatrics, orthopedics, total joint replace-
ment and sports, internal, aesthetic and
family medicine. The Denver landmark is
consistently named one of the nations 100
Top Hospitals by Thomson Reuters, a lead-
ing provider of information and solutions to
improve the cost and quality of health care.
Sky Ridge Medical Center
10101 Ridgegate Pkwy.
Lone Tree, 80124
720-225-1000
www.skyridgemedcenter.com
Uniquely designed with patient and family
comfort in mind, Sky Ridge offers private
patient rooms, a tranquil healing garden,
an outdoor patio, multiple fireplace
seating areas, wireless access and
numerous other amenities. The first hospi-
tal to open in Douglas County, Sky Ridge
has expanded to meet the needs of the
community and is now a 186-bed facility
with a dedicated Spine & Total Joint
Center, comprehensive Cancer Center,
full-service Cardiac Care program,
Bariatric Center of Excellence, Rocky
Mountain Hospital for Children and
impressive Womens Center, including
robotic surgery and DIEP flap procedures.
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
strength compassion hope innovation expertise
Cenlura HeaIlh comIies vilh lhe CiviI Righls Acl of 1964 and Seclion 5O4 of lhe RehabiIilalion Acl of 1973, and no erson shaII be excIuded from arlicialion in, be denied benehls of, or
olhervise be sub|ecled lo discriminalion in lhe rovision of any care or service on lhe grounds of race, reIigion, coIor, sex, nalionaI origin, sexuaI reference, anceslry, age, famiIiaI slalus, disabiIily
or handica. Coyrighl 2O11 Cenlura HeaIlh. Iorler Advenlisl HosilaI is a member of Cenlura HeaIlh, CoIorado's Iargesl hosilaI and heaIlh care nelvork.
For more information about our services,
visit our award-winning website at SRUWHUKRVSLWDORUJ
or call 303-778-1955.
2525 S. Dovning Sl., Denver, C 8O21O
Nationally recognized for
nursing excellence.
Consistently ranked as a top hospital nationally for cardiac services
The only robotic institute in the Rocky Mountain region
Highest accreditation by the American College of Surgeons
Commission on Cancer
One of the only NAPBC accredited breast programs in Colorado
Porter Center for Joint Replacement: 99% patient
satisfaction according to an independent survey
State-of-the-art emergency department
Award-Winning Care
Porter Adventist Hospital
Porter Adventist Hospital is D PHPEHU of Centura Health,
Colorados largest hospital DQG health FDUH network.
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Delivering more babies than any other
hospital in south metro Denver, Sky Ridge
has not only clinical depth but a full array
of extra touches to make this special
moment even more memorable. The
hospital has also expanded geographi-
cally with imaging centers in Castle Rock
and Parker, providing greater access with-
in the communities it serves. With more
than 1,200 physicians representing virtu-
ally every speciality, Sky Ridge has the
people, state-of-the-art technology and
expertise to set the standard for health,
healing and comfort in the new century.
St. Anthony Central Hospital
4231 W. 16th Ave.
Denver, 80204
303-629-3511
www.stanthonyhosp.org
The new St. Anthony Hospital will open
on the St. Anthony Medical Campus
June 20, 2011. When the campus is
complete it will include OrthoColorado
Hospital (currently open), St. Anthony
Hospital , two wal kway- connected
medical office buildings and an 848
space parking garage. The campus
will provide state-of -the-art technology,
world-class medicine and extraordinary
health care.
St. Joseph Hospital
1835 Franklin St.
Denver, 80218
303-837-7111
www.exempla.org/care/facilities/ESJH
Denvers oldest private teaching hospital
delivers more than 10 percent of
Colorados babies each year. The hospitals
latest addition is the Russell Pavilion which
offers a number of services for health care
professionals and the community, and
provides better access to emergency
services and radiation oncology.
Swedish Medical Center
501 E. Hampden Ave.
Englewood, 80113
866-7-SWEDISH
www.swedishhospital.com
Swedish Medical Center, 368-bed Level I
Trauma Center, serves adult and pediatric
trauma and neurotrauma patients through-
out the Rocky Mountain region. It is also
an acclaimed referral center and a recog-
nized leader in the treatment of stroke.
Swedish is one of only a few hospitals in
the country that has both a traumatic brain
injury and spinal cord injury model
program, and its Level III NICU is the only
one in the region offering a family-style
layout to ensure patients and their families
the best experience possible.
University of Colorado Hospital
12605 E. 16th Ave.
Aurora, CO 80045
303-372-0000
www.uch.edu
University of Colorado houses the Rocky
Mountain regions only academic medical
center. University Hospital was also one
of the first 50 hospitals in the country to
achieve magnet status for excellence in
nursing services by the American Nurses
Credentialing Center (ANCC). It is a
teaching hospital affiliated with the
University of Colorado Health Sciences
Center, one of three campuses comprising
the University of Colorado system.
SPECIALIZED FACILITIES
A.C.U.T.E. Medical Center
777 Bannock St.
Denver, 80204
877-ACUTE-4-U
www.denverhealth.org
The Acute, Comprehensive, Urgent
Treatment for Eating Disorders Medical
Center (A.C.U.T.E.) at Denver Health is a
unique ICU/Medical unit for individuals
suffering from severe anorexia or bulimia
and associated medical complications. A
service for patients whose physical condi-
tions have become life-threatening,
A.C.U.T.E. is the only hospital program in
the nation providing medical treatment
with intensive ongoing psychiatric
collaboration. The center is specifically
designed for those who are physically ill
and in crisis.
Behavioral Health Services (BHS)
777 Bannock St.
Denver, 80204
303-436-5690
www.denverhealth.org
Denver Healths Behavioral Health Services
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
CHIROPRACTORS
Active Chiropractic 303-623-5337
Caring Hands Chiropractic 303-864-1285
North Lakewood Chiropractic & Rehab 303-238-6500
Pillar Wellness & Rehab 720-974-0392
DENTAL CARE
Barotz Dental 303-595-4994
University Dental Arts, P.C. 303-534-7797
HOME HEALTH CARE
Argus of Colorado Home Health 303-322-4100
Mountain Harvest Home Health Care 303-647-2343
PHYSICIANS GROUPS
New West Physicians 303-763-4900
Physician Health Partners 303-605-1500
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(BHS) assesses, evaluates and treats
patients with psychiatric and substance
abuse disorders. Services at BHS include
the adolescent hospital-based inpatient
service, community detoxification and
outpatient programs. BHS includes a
six-bed acute crisis service, 13-bed
adolescent inpatient, and a 44-bed
adult inpatient service. The outpatient
services provide substance treatment to
more than 800 people annually. Denver
C.A.R.E.S., a 100-bed detoxification
center located off campus, receives
27,000 admits per year.
Colorado Acute Specialty Care
1601 N. Lowell Blvd.
Denver, 80204
303-899-5166
www.lifecarehospitals.com/our_hospitals
_colorado.htm
Located in the Centura Senior Life Center,
this hospital provides medical care for
acute care patients with multiple condi-
tions. Colorado Acute Specialty Care
Hospital practices a transdisciplinary
approach to its therapies and services on
an individualized basis. Some of the
centers many services include oxygenation
monitoring, wounded care, a brain injury
program, pharmacological management,
pulmonary program, pain management
and respiratory monitoring.
Community Health Services (CHS)
777 Bannock St.
Denver, 80204
303-436-6266
www.denverhealth.org
Operated by Denver Health, CHS is the
second oldest and largest community
health center program in the United States.
In its 40-year history, CHS has expanded
into a network of eight community
health centers and 12 school-based
health clinics serving one out four resi-
dents in the City and County of Denver.
CHS has more than 320,000 patient
contacts annually. CHS is funded by a
federal grant and governed by a board
of directors appointed by the mayor of
Denver.
Craig Hospital
3425 S Clarkson St.
Englewood, 80113
303-789-8000
www.craighospital.com
The nationally known Craig Hospital
was named sixth for rehabilitation in
2008 by U.S. News & World Report.
The hospital is a 93-bed, private, not-
for-profit, free-standing, acute care and
rehabilitation center that provides a
comprehensive system of inpatient and
outpatient medical care, rehabilitation,
neurosurgical rehabilitative care, an
equipment company and long-term follow
up services. At any given time, Craig
has approximately 45-50 patients with
spinal cord injury, 25-30 with traumatic
brain injury, and 30-50 outpatients.
Craig Hospital is designated by the
National Institute on Disability Rehabilitation
and Research (NIDRR) as a model
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
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system center for both spinal cord injury
and traumatic brain injury.
Devereux Cleo Wallace
8405 Church Ranch Blvd.
Westminster, 80021
800-456-2536
www.devereux.org
This center specializes in the treatment
of psychiatric, emotional and behavioral
problems in children and adolescents. A
locked unit, the center is designed
primarily to treat psychiatric emergen-
cies. An alternative to the centers inpa-
tient program is partial hospitalization,
which provides a structured, therapeutic
program during the day. Residential
programs are also offered for long-term,
intensive treatment.
East West Health Centers
8200 E. Belleview Ave.
Suite 280 East Tower
Greenwood Village, 80111
303-694-5757
www.east-west-health.com
Integrating alternative and traditional
medicine, the center provides comple-
mentary Eastern and Western healing
approaches. Some of the facilitys many
services include acupuncture, chiropractic,
herbal medicine, homeopathic medicine,
nutrition counseling, psychology/behavioral
health, sports medicine, stress management
and womens health.
The Eating Disorder Center of Denver
950 S. Cherry St., Suite 1010
Denver 80246
866-771-0861
www.edcdenver.com
The Eating Disorder Center of Denver is
the only facility in Colorado that offers
partial hospitalization while providing the
highest level of care for adult males and
females with anorexia, bulimia and related
disorders. Its partial hospitalization
program provides comprehensive treat-
ment on an outpatient basis, seven days
a week, 11 hours a day. The center also
offers an evening intensive outpatient
program three days a week, four hours a
day, and outpatient services/aftercare for
those patients who do not require a more
intensive treatment program.
A multidisciplinary team of physicians,
clinicians and dietitians are dedicated to
helping patients bring about change
through empowerment. Working together,
the clinical team creates specialized treat-
ment plans that fit each patients physical,
emotional, social, spiritual and nutritional
needs. Patients learn to practice and
internalize recovery skills until they can
incorporate these behaviors into their way
of life. For more information and to schedule
a complimentary assessment, call 866-
771-0861 or visit the centers Web site at
www.edcdenver.com.
Hospice of Metro Denver (HMD)
501 S. Cherry St.
Denver, 80246
303-321-2828
www.hospiceofmetrodenver.org
Hospice of Metro Denver serves as the
guide within the hospice world to one out
of every five patients in Colorado, helping
patients regain their sense of control over
their lives and help them preserve their
dignity. As a licensed hospice and a
certified home health agency, HMD has
grown to be the largest hospice in the
Rocky Mountain region. It has established
a reputation of being the most trusted and
comprehensive hospice care provider
serving the ten-county Denver area.
Kindred Hospital Denver
1920 High St.
Denver, 80218
303-320-5871
www.kh-denver.com
Located in a four-hospital complex in
downtown Denver, Kindred Hospital is
certified as a long-term, acute care hospital.
Kindred Healthcare is known throughout the
Front Range and eastern slopes of
Colorado for its pulmonary outcomes and
ventilator management. Other services include
wound care, rehabilitation, brain injury,
nutrition services and pain management.
Mental Health Center of Denver (MHCD)
4141 E. Dickenson Place
Denver, 80222
303-504-6500
www.mhcd.org
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
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MHCD is a leader in the mental health
industry and serves individuals with
psychiatric emergencies or mental
health illnesses, as well as children of
families at risk. More than 7,000
individuals are served every year at
32 area sites. Features include outpatient
services, psychiatric services, voca-
tional rehabil itation, school - based
services, emergency services, residential
treatment, home-based crisis intervention,
parent counseling, deaf counseling
services and more.
National Jewish Health
1400 Jackson St.
Denver, 80206
303-388-4461
www.njc.org
For the 13th year in a row, National
Jewish Health was named best hospital
in the country for the treatment of respi-
ratory disease. U.S. News & World
Report continues to place it among the
top facilities in its Americas Best
Hospitals edition.
Planned Parenthood of
the Rocky Mountains
950 Broadway
Denver, 80203
303-321-PLAN
www.plannedparenthood.org/
rocky-mountains
Planned Parenthood provides afford-
able and confidential reproductive
health care services to women and
men, including birth control, emergency
contraception, annual exams, screening
for breast and cervical cancer, pregnancy
tests, testing and treatment for sexually
transmittable diseases, HIV testing and
referral, mid-life services, prenatal care
and abortion services. Staffed by highly
trained professionals, its health centers
offer evening and weekend hours.
Planned Parenthood has done more to
reduce the incidence of abortion and
unintended pregnancy than any other
health care provider or advocacy
group.
Samaritan Counseling Center
1385 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite A-210
Denver, 80222
www.samaritancounseling.org
This nonprofit counseling and education
center serves children, families, couples
and individuals of all faiths. The center
offers individual counseling, psychotherapy,
couple and family counseling, pre-mar-
riage counseling, professional and
community education, and psychological
testing and assessment. They also offer
consulting services for businesses, schools,
congregations and work groups.
Select Specialty Hospital
1719 E 19th Ave., Suite 5B
Denver, 80218
303-563-3700
www.selectmedicalcorp.com
This long-term acute care hospital treats
patients with serious, complex medical
conditions. Select Specialty Hospital
offers pulmonary care, wound care,
medical treatment with rehabilitation
services, as well as services for medically
complex conditions that require intensive
therapy and nursing care. Specialized
services include oncology, pediatric care,
burns, invasive monitoring, neurological,
trauma, telemetry and dialysis.
Spalding Rehabilitation Hospital
900 Potomac St.
Aurora, 80011
303-367-1166
www.spaldingrehab.com
For more than 40 years, Spalding has
brought together specialists from many
disciplines to help patients. The types of
injuries treated at Spalding include ortho-
pedic, brain injury, stroke, amputee and
other neurological or trauma-related con-
ditions. Each team is led by a physia-
trista physician specializing in physical
medicine and rehabilitation. Other
members of the team include rehabilitation
nurses, physical and occupational thera-
pists, speech-language pathologists, a
neuropsychiatrist, a neuropsychologist,
dietitians and other health care professionals.
Through a collaborative approach, each
team focuses on helping patients meet
their individual goals. Other specialty
designations include acquired brain injury,
adaptive driving evaluation and training,
audiological evaluation, the Commission
on Accreditation of Rehabilitation
Facilities certification in rehabilitation and
brain injury, Colorado Performance
Excellence Foothills Award, day rehabili-
tation program, interventional pain center,
speech/language pathology, and thera-
peutic pool/aquatic therapy, as well as
neurological, orthopedic, pulmonary,
stroke and vision rehabilitation.
Stout Street Clinic
2100 Broadway
Denver, 80205
303-296-4996
www.coloradocoalition.org
Opened in 1985, the Stout Street Clinic
is the main center of the Colorado
Coalition for the Homeless (CCH). The
mission of the clinic is to work collabora-
tively toward the prevention of homeless-
ness and the creation of lasting solutions
for at-risk families, children, and individuals
throughout Colorado. CCH advocates
for and provides a continuum of housing
and a variety of services to improve the
health, wellbeing and stability of those
it serves.
Veterans Affairs Medical Center
1055 Clermont St.
Denver, 80220
303-399-8020
www.va.gov/visn19/
The Veterans Affairs Eastern Colorado
Health Care System includes a major
referral medical center in Denver. The
medical center is affiliated with the
medical, pharmacy, and nursing schools
of the University of Colorado Health
Sciences Center. Residency programs are
maintained in internal medicine and
surgery and their subspecialties, as well
as psychiatry, neurology, physical medi-
cine and rehabilitation, anesthesia,
pathology, radiology and dentistry.
HEALTH CARE RESOURCES
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ME T R O D E NV E R R E L OC AT I ON GU I D E S P R I NG 2 0 1 1
ewcomers are excited to discover the variety of home styles and the diverse
neighborhoods in the metro Denver area. Encompassing seven counties across
approximately 4,500 square miles, the metro Denver area is home to a distinctive
mix of cities, towns and unincorporated communities.
The entire metro Denver area benefits from the beauty of the Rocky Mountains, the recreational activities
that naturally accompany that beautiful scenery and the sanctuary that being so near to nature brings to
those who live in the region. Because of its abundance of natural beauty, in fact, your next home in metro
Denver can be more than just a great place to live; it can also be an outstanding investment.
Housing and
Neighboorhoods
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Consider that the metro Denver median
sales price of single-family homes was
$224,900 in 2010, according to
Metrolist which is on par with metro
areas of similar size and population.
Homes here increase in value and can
provide substantial return over time.
Unique tax benefits also apply, and home-
owners can deduct both mortgage interest
and property taxes. Metro Denvers cost
of living is also lower than most major
cities and is on par with the national
average, compared with more than 300
urban areas.
MOUNTAIN COMMUNITIES
AND MUCH MORE
The metro Denver area offers a robust
housing market, with good levels of
appreciation. An excellent mix of both
executive and entry-level housing exists
throughout the metro area. The region
offers some of the best housing values of
any major metropolitan area.
Housing options within the metro area
range from urban lofts and downtown
high-rise buildings to horse properties and
rural acreage. Since Denver-area neigh-
borhoods can suit any lifestyle, it all
depends on your unique preferences for
your new home.
For example, Jefferson County in the
foothills of the Rocky Mountains offers
several mountain communities, including
Evergreen, Morrison, Conifer, Aspen
Park, Kittredge and Bergen Park. Just 30
miles west of Denver, the greater
Evergreen area is at about 7,500 feet
elevation and encompasses about 130
square miles of pine and aspen-laden
hills. It sprawls from the 14,260- foot
Mount Evans on the west, to the edge of
the high plains on the east, Conifer and
Aspen Park on the south, and Genesee
and Lookout Mountain on the north.
Offering a unique mountain lifestyle,
Evergreen offers its residents easy access
to a variety of mountain recreational
opportunities.
Located along U.S. 285, the small town
of Morrison has only about 500 resi-
dents. Tourism is its major industry. Visitors
come to the town to enjoy its restaurants,
outdoor recreation and rock concerts.
Other attractions include Bandimere
Speedway, a multi-use speedway, and
Dinosaur Ridge, a world-renowned outdoor
paleontology museum.
The City of Boulder in Boulder County is
another scenic mountain community located
in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. In
fact, the city has been described as the
city nestled between the mountains and
reality. Located 35 miles northwest of
downtown Denver, Boulder has an eleva-
tion of 5,430 feet and acres of vast open
space. One of Colorados centers of
commerce, education, research and
recreation, Boulder is home to the
University of Colorado. Attractions and
entertainment include concert series, festivals,
sidewalk cafes, galleries, street performers,
and hiking, biking and climbing within
minutes of downtown Boulder.
Nederland is another mountain community
located 17 miles west and 3,000 feet
above Boulder. The city is the largest town
along the Peak-to-Peak Scenic Byway that
runs more than 55 miles from Black
Hawk/Central City to Estes Parkone of
the most scenic drives in the state. Byway
motorists pass ghost towns, the Golden
Gate Canyon State Park, the Indian Peaks
Wilderness Area, Longs Peak (14,255
feet) and Rocky Mountain National Park.
Nederland residents can also cross-country
ski or snowshoe in the backcountry or
ski and snowboard at nearby Eldora
Mountain Resort.
Planned communities also dot many areas
of the city, including Riverfront Park in
Denvers Central Park neighborhood and
the redevelopment of the former
Stapleton International Airport. Co-hous-
ing options, town centers and lifestyle
communities are key elements in the rede-
velopment of the original Elitch Gardens
and the former Lowry Air Force Base
sites. Revitalization in the Cherry Creek,
Hilltop, Highlands and Washington
Park neighborhoods has also added
eclectic and innovative new housing.
AFFORDABLE AND
AVAILABLE HOUSING
There are plenty of new housing options
available in metro Denver, ranging from
executive housing to entry-level homes.
Housing costs have stabilized in recent
years in metro Denver, and some of the
best housing values of any major metro-
politan area are offered right here.
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
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HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
Many communities, employers and organ-
izations in metro Denver also provide
programs ranging from down payment
assistance to community advocacy programs
to increase the availability of affordably
priced homes. For example, the Home
Ownership Transformation (HOT) Initiative
provides counseling and access to low
down-payment mortgages.
DESIGNING YOUR OWN
DENVER CUSTOM HOMES
Custom homes are another option, but
where to start? Today, most research
begins on the Internet, and the Home
Builders Association of Metro Denver
(www.hbadenver.com) is an excellent local
resource. After some at-home research,
field trips are vital to choosing wisely, so
call a local realtor who specializes in new
home sales.
Building a custom home is much differ-
ent than buying or selling an existing
home, and its definitely a process, so
plan to browse a wide variety of
homes, styles, locations, and price
ranges until you find one thats a com-
fortable fit.
Its also important to ask lots of questions.
Will you be given access to an interior
designer as part of the building process?
Can you meet with the builders architect
or make custom changes to existing
plans? Does the builder reuse plans, or
does the company build one-of-a-kind
homes? Make your own list of questions
and keep notes. Visit interior design
centers, browse through magazines,
collect ideas and begin the adventure of
a lifetime. In the end, the payoff comes
when you wake up in the morning and
smile surrounded by a home designed
and built specifically for you.
REMODELING IN DENVER
Many cities across the country are experi-
encing a shift in population growth to the
urban core of metropolitan areas, and
Were inspired by classic Colorado architecture and passionate about craftsmanship. Yet we geek out on the latest technology
and sustainable building techniques. Sort of Yankee Workshop meets Silicon Valley. Talk to us about building your (surprisingly
affordable) energy-efcient new home. Solar included.
newtownbuilders.com
303-707-4444
Building in Stapleton, Tallyns Reach,
Bradburn and Shadow Grass Park.
Price, features, specications, availability and other terms and conditions are subject to change without notice.
WE BELIEVE EVERY HOME SHOULD HAVE SOLAR
INCLUDED. LIKE EVERY ONE OF OURS.

WE ARE NEW TOWN BUILDERS

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Ask friends, relatives and
people you trust for
recommendations and
ask if they can recommend
a reputable homebuilder.
After identifying several
builders in your area, visit
some of the homes they
have built. Ask people
how they like their homes
and the homebuilder.
Find out how long the firm
has been in business and
its reputation in the
business community.
TIPS for
CHOOSING
A BUILDER
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Denver is no exception. In fact, Denver
has many available infill lots those in a
developed area that are vacant or
available for reuse including the Lowry
and Stapleton communities near down-
town Denver, and they have proven ripe
for redevelopment.
Located near downtown Denver, Lowry is
a former Air Force base and has since
been successfully developed into a
community with residences, businesses,
recreation and educational facilities.
Stapleton, the former site of the Stapleton
Airport, has also undergone a transformation
to a master-planned community.
In addition to these large redeveloped
areas in central Denver, there are commu-
nities across the seven-county metro area
that are also experiencing revitalization
with homeowners taking advantage of all
the amenities that an established develop-
ment offers and rebuilding or remodeling
their homes. Some of these communities
include Cherry Hills, Hilltop, the area
around the parkway systems of Denver,
and in many other metro communities
especially older neighborhoods.
PROTECTING YOUR INVESTMENT:
DENVER HOUSING SERVICES
When relocating to a new neighborhood
or community, many types of home service
companies are needed. Some of the
services newcomers need might include
home insurance; warranties; pre-purchase
or moving services; home maintenance;
and security just to name a few.
HOME INSURANCE AND
WARRANTIES
When protecting your property, having
homeowners insurance or a home war-
ranty is important. Mortgage lenders
require homeowners insurance to protect
both your interests and theirs, and various
homeowners insurance policies exist that
can be tailored to meet the requirements
of your mortgage lender and your own
personal needs.
For example, most insurance companies
provide policies that cover burglaries,
vandalism or destruction by fire. Liability
and guest medical protection also may
need to be considered. If a neighbor is
injured in your home, coverage may help
pay for medical expenses.
Most insurance groups offer other
types of insurance policies in addition
to home insurance, such as special
discounts if home, life and auto insurance
are all covered through one company.
Independent insurance companies are
also an option.
PRE-PURCHASE AND
MOVING SERVICES
Buying and moving into a new home can
be a complicated process. Before making
an offer on a home, you should consider
obtaining the services of a home inspector
and an appraiser. Authorized inspectors
will examine your future home and note
any necessary repairs.
Paying for an inspection may save
you from buying a house that will
require ext ensive repairs. Lenders
require an appraisal of the house you
wish to purchase before they approve
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
One of the most difficult hurdles when remodeling your home
is either choosing between hiring the right professionals for
the project or deciding to do it yourself. Knudson Gloss
Architects in Boulder offers the following planning steps and gen-
eral rules of thumb when embarking on a remodeling project:
First, do a financial review. Consult your banker, a real
estate professional and/or a financial planner. Consider
your goals, and decide on a realistic budget for the project.
Next, interview professionals to create your project team.
You will initially need an architect to design and coordinate
building restrictions and codes, and a builder to review
budgets, prepare cost projections and schedules.
Make sure you have an extensive site survey done, mapping
existing site conditions such as the homes location, utilities
and vegetation.
Other professionals you may need include a structural
engineer, kitchen designer, interior designer and landscape
designer. Once youve assembled a team, review goals
and budgets. Inventory the existing home and property, and
develop a program with your builder and architect.
From these discussions and the design process, youll have a
plan of action and youll be well on your way to a new home.
REMODELING YOUR HOME
WHERE TO BEGIN?
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a loan. Licensed, professional appraisal
companies make sure that the value of
the home corresponds to the amount
being paid.
Once you are ready to move into your
new home, the American Moving and
Storage Association (AMSA) is a good
resource when youre looking for a mover.
AMSA provides many tips, guidelines
and certified professional movers for
performing quality moves. Since several
different types of estimates exist, make
sure you understand all charges before
signing a contract. For more information,
visit www.moving.org.
HOME MAINTENANCE
AND SECURITY
From home security and floor repair to
carpet cleaning and housekeeping, a
number of services are available to help
you maintain your home. Home security
services and equipment can help protect
your life and property and are helpful for
your own peace of mind. Research the
services of multiple companies to find
one that best suits your needs. Many
local companies offer locally monitored
call centers and professionals who can
give a fast, appropriate response.
If your floors need refinishing or repair,
metro Denver features a number of
reputable businesses including some
floor installation companies that may
offer floor repair services. Other home
services, such as carpet cleaning, maid
service, swimming pool installation,
pest control and home repair, are
available throughout the metro Denver
area. Check the local telephone directory
for listings.
For quality home services firms in metro
Denver, refer to our Index of Advertisers.
You can also call the Denver Metro
Chamber of Commerce at 303-534-
8500, or visit the Chambers Business
Directory at www.denverchamber.org for
recommendations for reputable services
companies.
The Home Builders Association (HBA) of
Metro Denver contributed to this article, and
the organization is an excellent source of
information for residents on buying,
building, or remodeling a home. For more
information, visit www.hbadenver.com.
DENVER COUNTIES, CITIES
AND COMMUNITIES
The Denver area is made up of seven
counties, including Adams, Arapahoe,
Boulder, Broomfield, Denver, Douglas
and Jefferson. In the following section is
a list of the areas seven counties, as
well the cities in each county. Because
there are 58 cities in the metro Denver
area, weve only listed those cities and
towns with populations of more than
10,000.
SOURCE: The Remodelers Council
of Metro Denver (RCMD)
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
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Rocky Mountain
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Regis
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Willis Case
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Colorado Christian
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Federal Correctional
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A B C D E F G
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2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
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5* housing DEN:Flintrock Falls Covers 3/24/11 8:18 PM Page 54
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55
BARR LAKE
STATE PARK
ORFOLK GLENN
PARK
C
Barr Lake
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Quincy
Reservoir
160th Ave t
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152nd Ave
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H I J
COUNTY
CITY, TOWN,
VILLAGE
MAP
KEY
PAGE
NUMBER
ADAMS ARVADA C5 56
ADAMS AURORA G7 56
ADAMS BRIGHTON H2 56
ADAMS COMMERCE CITY F5 56
ADAMS FEDERAL HEIGHTS D4 56
ADAMS NORTHGLENN E3 56
ADAMS THORNTON E3 56
ADAMS WESTMINSTER D4 56
ARAPAHOE AURORA G7 58
ARAPAHOE CENTENNIAL 58
ARAPAHOE ENGLEWOOD D9 58
ARAPAHOE GLENDALE E7 59
ARAPAHOE GREENWOOD VILLAGE E9 59
ARAPAHOE LITTLETON D10 59
BOULDER BOULDER A1 60
BOULDER ERIE D1 60
BOULDER LAFAYETTE C1 60
BOULDER LONGMONT 60
BOULDER LOUISVILLE B2 60
BOULDER SUPERIOR B3 60
BROOMFIELD BROOMFIELD C3 61
DENVER DENVER E7 62
DOUGLAS CASTLE ROCK 68
DOUGLAS PARKER H10 68
JEFFERSON ARVADA C5 70
JEFFERSON GOLDEN A7 70
JEFFERSON LAKEWOOD B7 71
JEFFERSON WESTMINSTER D4 71
JEFFERSON WHEAT RIDGE C6 71
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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
Adjacent to Denver to the east and north,
Adams County is a conglomerate of old
established municipalities, new master-
planned communities and rural farmsteads.
Denver International Airport; Riverside, the
regions pioneer cemetery; and the Rocky
Mountain Arsenal Wildlife Refuge are all
within county boundaries. The countys
primary cities are Aurora, Brighton,
Commerce City, Thornton and Westminster.
An economically diverse regional, Adams
County is home to agriculture, heavy industry,
transportation, and technology companies.
ARVADA
See information under
Jefferson County.
AURORA
See information under
Arapahoe County.
BRIGHTON
Located 20 miles northeast of downtown
Denver on the edge of the eastern
Colorado plains, Brighton offers a small-
town atmosphere and a rich history. The
city provides diverse neighborhoods,
including new home developments and
established homes with large acreage. The
county seat of Adams County, Brighton is
home to Platte Valley Medical Center. The
city has more than 20 community and
neighborhood parks and sports complexes,
four trail systems, open space properties
and a 55,000-square-foot recreation
center. | www.ci.brighton.co.us
COMMERCE CITY
Commerce City, an industrial and ware-
housing center, recently expanded its
boundaries creating a surge of new
home construction. The city offers
affordable housing options, including
single-family homes, condominiums and
townhomes. Some of Commerce Citys
largest employers are United Parcel
Service, Adams County School District,
Shamrock Foods and Navajo Trucking.
Residents enjoy the facilities and beauty
of 14 city parks and two major trail sys-
tems. | www.ci.commerce-city.co.us
FEDERAL HEIGHTS
Federal Heights is located north of Denver
along I-25 and U.S. 36. The citys neigh-
borhoods include Northborough, Legacy
Heights and Federal Plaza. The area has
several parks for outdoor fun, including Water
World, one of Americas largest family
waterparks, and several area shopping
centers. | www.ci.federal-heights.co.us
NORTHGLENN
Located nine miles north of Denver,
Northglenn was originally started as a
planned community in 1959. The plan
called for acres of open space for park and
recreation development along with resi-
dential, industrial, educational and
commercial plans. This residential develop-
ment eventually grew to include 7.5 square
miles of land and a population of more than
33,000. Northglenn offers residents a
well-planned trail system, 550 acres of
parks and open space, indoor and
outdoor swimming pools, tennis courts,
athletic fields, and a recreation center.
Northglenn has been named Tree City USA
11 times. | www.northglenn.org
THORNTON
Located about 10 miles north of downtown
Denver, Thornton is closer to the Denver
International Airport than any other community
in the metro area. Residents have easy
access to the more than 25 major resort
areas found in the nearby Rocky Mountains
for skiing, hiking, rafting and camping, and
beautiful, breathtaking views. Thornton has
nearly 1,000 acres of land developed or
designated for public parks, which include
athletic fields and courts, swimming pools,
recreation centers and gymnasiums. The
city enjoys the cultural amenities and educa-
tional opportunities offered in nearby
Denver. | www.cityofthornton.net
WESTMINSTER
See information under
Jefferson County
adams
COUNTY
www.co.adams.co.us
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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
Named in 1861 for the Arapaho
Native American tribe that inhabited
eastern Colorado, this eastern Denver
county is experiencing major growth.
Homes range from moderately priced
starter dwellings to upscale, executive
retreats. Two of the most affluent neigh-
borhoods in the metro area, Cherry
Hills Village and Greenwood Village,
are located in the southern portion of
the county. Responding to the regions
love of the outdoors, Arapahoe County
boasts 80 parks and five public golf
courses, and the Aurora and Cherry
Creek reservoirs add to the list of area
recreational activities.
AURORA
Aurora is Colorados third-largest city and
is spread across three counties
Arapahoe, Adams and Douglaswith
approximately 85 percent of its residents
making their homes in Arapahoe County.
Aurora offers housing for all income
levels, with new developments across the
city. More than two million people partic-
ipate in the 8,000 cultural and recreation-
al classes and activities offered by the
City of Aurora. Residents enjoy boating,
sailing, fishing, swimming, bicycling and
picnicking at three public reservoirs. The
city has 80 parks, seven public golf courses,
seven outdoor and three indoor swimming
pools, plus many other recreational facilities.
Educational opportunities are offered at
Community College of Aurora and T.H.
Pickens Technical Center. Also, the former
Fitzsimons Army Medical Center in Aurora
has been transformed into an academic
health campus for the University of Colorado
Health Sciences Center and the University
of Colorado. | www.ci.aurora.co.us |
www.aurorachamber.org
CENTENNIAL
Located in the southern metro Denver
area, Centennial is Colorados newest
city, incorporated in February 2001.
Centennial is close to the cities and
towns of Aurora, Englewood, Foxfield,
Greenwood Village, Littleton, Lone Tree,
Parker and the unincorporated
Highlands Ranch. Two public school
districtsLittleton Public Schools and
Cherry Creek School Districtserve
the city, and 14 parks and recreation
districts offer Centennial citizens oppor-
tunities for outdoor and indoor activities.
| www.centennialcolorado.com
ENGLEWOOD
Centrally located just south of the metro
Denver area, Englewood is a mix of
residential and business properties,
coupled with parks and open space.
Almost 60 percent of the land area is
residential property, and students attend
school in the Englewood, Sheridan,
Littleton and Cherry Creek school districts.
Besides the cultural and recreational
amenities in metro Denver, Englewood
offers championship golf courses, an
in-line hockey/skating park and an
expansive recreation center with indoor
track, pool, gym and fitness center. The
55-acre CityCenter Englewood is a
central public place that connects the
site with walkable streets, civic and
cultural uses, light rail transit station,
retail and office space, residential
housing, a public librar y, outdoor
performance space, art museum and
outdoor sculpture. The Pirates Cove
Family Aquatics Park opened in 2004,
ara
P
ahoe
COUNTY
www.co.arapahoe.co.us
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and the Swedish Medical Center and
Craig Hospital are also located here.
| www.ci.englewood.co.us
GLENDALE
Glendale is a high-density, mixed-use
community with a vibrant retail trade that
contributes to the citys strong economic
base. Residents enjoy being part of a
vibrant, cosmopolitan community, as well
as the advantages and conveniences of a
small city government. Completely
surrounded by the city of Denver,
Glendales central location offers easy
access to retail and entertainment oppor-
tunities. A city with a rich tradition of hos-
pitality and vitality, Glendale offers a
diverse range of amenities, and residents
value the citys urban village feeling. A
very walkable community, Glendale has
39 acres of parks and open space,
including the popular Cherry Creek bike
path that gives Glendale residents easy
access to more than 100 miles of trails in
the metro area. | www.glendale.co.us
GREENWOOD VILLAGE
Located south of Denver and Cherry Hills
Village, Greenwood Village is a residential
community that also includes nationally
recognized business parks. In fact, the
citys workforce is made up of approxi-
mately 70,000 employees and is focused
on maintaining and enhancing the high
quality of life for its residents and those who
work in the community. A trail system
meanders through the city and includes 20
parks with such amenities as playgrounds,
picnic areas, athletic fields and courts,
hike-and-bike trails, and ponds. The city
also operates the Curtis Arts & Humanities
Center, among other recreation centers. |
www.greenwoodvillage.com
LITTLETON
Located south of downtown Denver,
Littleton has a history that dates back
more than 110 years and offers a small-
town environment with all the benefits of
a large metro area. As one of several
cities that make up the Suburban Park
and Recreation District, Littleton is part
of a park and recreation system that
offers four times the national average for
parkland, and every major drainage
channel in the city has a trail built in it.
Higher educational opportunities are
available at Arapahoe Community
College, one of the states largest
community colleges, and Colorado
University offers classes at the Littleton
Library, making it possible to obtain a
masters degree without leaving the city.
The park district operates Littleton parks
that offer playgrounds, trails, a nature
center, recreation centers, swimming
pools, mini golf courses, ice arenas,
athletic fields and courts, and golf
courses. | www.littletongov.org
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
Situated on the eastern slope of the Rocky
Mountains, Boulder County covers 753
square miles with terrain ranging from the
plains at its eastern boundary to the moun-
tains rising to the west. Developed in the late
1800s, the area served the needs of those
attending and teaching at the University of
Colorado, and today the county is home to
many scientific and research facilities.
Boulder County offers a mix of urban
areas, rural and mountain communities,
and residents enjoy a very active outdoor
lifestyle with plenty of recreational choices,
and the county is known for its health
conscious and well-educated citizens.
BOULDER
Money magazine has rated Boulder as one
of the nations top small cities. Located
northwest of downtown Denver, Boulder
offers a quality of life that appeals to
people who are physically active, as well
as those who love the arts, education, and
solitude. The city is proud of its historic, well-
preserved buildings and its vibrant retail
and commercial businesses. Boulder has
more than 300 restaurants and entertain-
ment establishments, as well as a host of art
galleries and hike-and-bike paths. Boulder
is home to the annual Bolder Boulder 10K
race and Creek Festival, the Colorado
Shakespeare Festival, the Boulder County
Farmers Market and numerous other sports
and cultural activities. The city sits in the
shadows of the impressive Flatirons, and is
surrounded by 30,000 acres of open space.
In addition, the city has many urban parks,
two public outdoor pools, a reservoir for
boating and swimming, and a city-owned
golf course. Higher educational institutions
include the University of Colorado, Naropa
University and Front Range Community
College. | www.ci.boulder.co.us
ERIE
Located in Boulder and Weld counties less
than 25 minutes northeast of Denver, Erie
offers residents a small-town atmosphere
thats close to metro area amenities.
Downtown Erie, especially along Biggs
Street, is a restaurant destination for many
metro area residents and visitors. The historic
downtown business district also plays host to
some of Eries most colorful annual events
such as the Erie Town Fair and Oktoberfest.
The town also has a new 18-hole champi-
onship golf course, a skate park and seven
neighborhood parks. | www.ci.erie.co.us
LAFAYETTE
Lafayette is located 18 miles north of
Denver and 10 miles east of Boulder,
assuring access to major businesses and
amenities. However, the community main-
tains a small-town atmosphere and offers
major retail department stores, specialty
shops, 15 parks (from neighborhood play-
grounds to large community parks), a
championship golf course, community and
recreational centers, an indoor ice-skating
rink, a cultural arts center and other
attractions. | www.cityoflafayette.com
LONGMONT
Located in the northeast corner of Boulder
County, Longmont provides spectacular
views of the Rocky Mountains. Most of
the residences in the city are single-family
detached homes. Longmont has a high
number of people who both live and work
in the city, and it has one of the nations
highest concentrations of software-related
jobs. With more than 1,500 acres of
parks and open space, the city offers many
opportunities for recreational activities.
Longmont also is known for its many
restaurants. | www.ci.longmont.co.us
LOUISVILLE
Located 25 miles northwest of Denver and
six miles east of Boulder, Louisville is about
10 miles east of the Front Range of the
Rocky Mountains. Incorporated in 1882,
the city has a rich history, which is docu-
mented in the Louisville Historical Museum.
Approximately 1,700 acres of designated
open space is available to residents.
Amenities in the city include Avista Adventist
Hospital-Centura Health, 27 parks, 22
miles of trails, 10 ski areas within 110
miles, an 18-hole public golf course with a
clubhouse, a new skateboard park, and a
city recreation center with a swimming
pool and other recreational facilities.
Housing options include historic and
new neighborhoods with single-family
homes, condominiums, townhomes and
apartments. | www.ci.louisville.co.us
SUPERIOR
The Town of Superior is located northwest
of downtown Denver on U.S. 36about
a 30-minute driveand six miles east of
Boulder. Throughout most of the 1990s,
Superior was the fastest growing munici-
pality in Colorado. With more than 540
acres of parks and open space and 28
miles of trails that connect neighborhood
parks and the regional trail network,
Superior offers a small-town environment
with a rich history, an ideal location and
great access to Boulder County amenities. In
addition to master-planned residential
neighborhoods, Superior offers easy
access to major retail, restaurants,
specialty shops and services, including
an ice rink. | www.townofsuperior.com
boulder
COUNTY
www.co.boulder.co.us
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Located north of downtown Denver,
Broomfield became the metro Denver areas
newest city and county in 2001 when the
City of Broomfield became its own county
the 64th county in Colorado, and the
smallest. The city gets its name from the
broomcorn thats grown in the area a
7,000-year-old ancient, gluten-free grain
thats mostly used for birdseed here, and that
is a staple grain in India, Russia, the Ukraine,
Turkey and other countries.
The city of Broomfield had grown consid-
erably through annexations by the late
1990s and its started to cross into three
other counties: Adams, Jefferson and Weld.
City leaders wanted to separate and an
amendment passed in 1998 and Broomfield
became its own county in 2001.
Broomfield is located in the north metro
area between Denver and Boulder
along U.S. 36/Boulder Turnpike up to
the north I-25 corridor and beyond
Colorado 7. Its about a 20-minute
drive to both Denver and Boulder, and
less than 40 minutes to Denver
International Airport. The city also offers
a local, 24-hour general aviation airport
Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport
an advantage for the many businesses
in the area.
In fact, the area has become a thriving
high-tech center and is home to such
powerhouse companies as Oracle
(formerly Sun Microsystems); Ball
Aerospace; Level 3 Communications; and
office supply chain Staples, Inc. Its no
surprise that housing communities are
springing up throughout the county to
accommodate the influx of new business
and residents; Broomfield is one of the
states fastest-growing counties.
Residents will find plenty of educational
opportunities here, too. Broomfield
offers a wealth of public and private
K-12 schools, and nearby colleges,
universities, trade and technical schools
include Colorado University at Boulder
and in Denver; Metro State College; Front
Range Community College; University of
Northern Colorado in nearby Greeley;
Colorado State University in Fort Collins;
Denver University; Regis University;
University of Phoenix; and DeVry
University.
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broomfield
CITY & COUNTY
www.ci.broomfield.co.us
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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
Located in the heart of the Rocky
Mountain region, the city and county
of Denver are at the center of numerous
economic activities including business,
services, transportation, government,
product distribution, workforce, enter-
tainment, shopping, and cultural and
sporting events. At 5,280 feet above
sea level, Denver is known as the
Mile High City and is the core of
Colorados financial district and the
base for state government offices. The
city is also home to hospitals nationally
recognized for excellence in patient
care, and the regions thriving bio-
science research community is known
for clinical discovery.
With downtown, the I-70 industrial
corridor, the Central Platte Valley, and
surrounding neighborhoods and busi-
ness districts, Denver is clearly a city
where a varied economy supports a
diverse population. Central Denver is
an original area of the city and is rich
in history.
The neighborhoods of Capitol Hill,
Cheesman Park, Congress Park,
Glendale and Cherry Creek are conven-
ient to downtown and just minutes from
the Denver Zoo and the Denver
Museum of Nature and Science in
nearby City Park.
Metro Denver is also the cultural capital
of the Rocky Mountain region. The
Denver Performing Arts Complex the
largest arts complex in the world
gives visitors access to the symphony,
ballet, opera, theatre, and touring pro-
ductions. Metro Denver is also home to
avant-garde museums and family-
friendly attractions including the
Denver Zoo and the Denver Botanic
Gardens.
Like shopping? Not to worry here!
There are 21 shopping and lifestyle
centers with 500,000 square feet or
more, plus many smaller shopping districts
throughout the city.
denver
CITY & COUNTY
www.denvergov.org
THY NEIGHBORHOOD
Come nd your place here.
Homes from the $100s to $700s.
StapletonDenver.com
(303) 382-1800
People love living here and it shows. Stapleton
residents come out for the markets, concerts and
festivals throughout the seasons. Friendly porches and
colorful gardens display the pride and personality of
the community. And parent involvement has helped
Stapleton schools rank among the very best in the state.
Youll nd Stapleton just 10 minutes from downtown
Denver and 20 minutes from DIA... in the heart of it all.
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HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
More than 62,000 people live
within a one-mile radius of downtown
Denver, and historic regions and cultural
flavor are around every corner. And its
not surprising why.
After all, an urban lifestyle means youre
part of what makes life exciting. More
people are choosing to live in urban areas
or outlying areas that have preserved an
urban vitality and Denver is no excep-
tion. Enjoying urban living is a great way to
co-exist with the history, culture, richness
and constant motion of city life.
Whether you live right downtown, or in
one of the revitalized and up-and-coming
areas in the greater metro area, every-
thing is easily accessible: from concerts
to museums, sporting events to theatre,
wonderful cafs and restaurants to fun
nightclubs and jazz bars. There is
something fun to do and exciting to take
in around every corner.
ACCESSIBLE LIFESTYLE AND
LOTS OF GREENSPACE
One of the many virtues of urban living is
accessibility and Denvers got that
covered! The transportation systems in
Denvers urban areas include bike, light
rail, highway systems and mass transit
systems, all of which have experienced
extensive upgrades in recent years. No
matter which you choose, getting around
is convenient, fast and safe.
More than 80 acres of parks and open
space fill downtown Denver and the
urban areas, and nine theatres in the
Denver Performing Arts Complex make it
the second-largest performing arts center
in the world. With all these amenities and
clear appeal, its easy to see that urban
living in metro Denver can make life even
more exciting and enjoyable than youve
ever imagined!
A SAMPLING OF DENVERS
URBAN NEIGHBORHOODS
Denvers urban neighborhoods range
from revitalized urban corridors between
the skyscrapers to homes on quaint tree-
lined streets that are just minutes from
downtown. Heres an overview of some
key areas, as well as mentioned of areas
experiencing new activity and increased
interest in the urban lifestyle.
The Highlands
The Highlands stands on the west side of
I-25 and boasts a collection of row houses,
post-WWII era homes and Victorian man-
sions, as well as a culturally diverse com-
munity. The Highlands also features a
family-friendly community, with the largest
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EXPERIENCE
LIFE DOWNTOWN
DENVERS EXCITING
URBAN LIFESTYLE SCENE
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population of youth under five years old in
the city and county of Denver. Highlands
streets are tree-lined and beautiful, sweep-
ing over gentle hills. Located very close to
downtown, the Highlands still manages to
stay apart from the hustle and bustle, both
in feel and sensibility. Unique commercial
options include the many retailers and
restaurants around 32
nd
and 33rd streets.
Riverfront
Riverfront is experiencing exciting devel-
opment as it quickly becomes a favorite
urban living destination. Millions of
square feet of development are emerging
from what used to be industrial space
including railyards and warehouses.
Prominent landmarks in the Riverfront area
include Six Flags Elitch Gardens,
Downtown Aquarium, Pepsi Center
arena, the Childrens Museum of Denver
and Commons Park, the largest of dozens
of acres of parklands in this highly sought-
after new urban area just minutes from
downtown Denver.
Downtown (LoDo Lower Downtown)
LoDo, or Lower Downtown, is located
where General William Larimer founded
the city of Denver, back in 1858. LoDo is
particularly famous for its art galleries,
restaurants, nightclubs, jazz parlors and
specialty retail storesall located on the
ground floors of some of the most beautiful
historic buildings in Denver. LoDos
transformed structures have preserved the
brick and stone that give this region its
unforgettable flavor, and turned them into
luxurious high-endas well as afford-
ablehousing for its residents. LoDo
amenities and attractions include
Commons Park in the Central Platte
Valley, the Cherry Creek bike path, 16th
Street Mall, Coors Field (home of the
Colorado Rockies) and the countrys
largest brewpub, Wynkoop Brewing
Company.
Ballpark
Strolling down Larimer Street, one can find
an array of shops, bars, fine art galleries,
antique shops and more. The Ballpark
Historic District lies to the north of LoDo, and
was founded to preserve the historic
structures and architecture of this up and-
coming urban location. Its becoming
particularly known for its open-air markets,
including the Ballpark Market and Larimer
Street Market, both of which attract
residents and visitors from other parts of the
city, and feature arts and crafts, fresh
produce and special foods, live entertain-
ment, fun for the family and more.
Central Business District
Talk about lofts! The Downtown Denver
Central Business District includes some of
the heaviest redevelopment of recent years,
including properties such as the Buerger
Boston and Bank Lofts, Denver Dry Lofts and
the Chamber Apartments. The Central
Business District also has many apartment
complexes, including Denver Place
Apartments, Larimer Place and Barclay
Tower. With proximity to downtown ameni-
ties, such as the 16th Street Mall and all of
its many shops, restaurants, movie theatres,
galleries, nightclub venues and boutiques
not to mention steady pedestrian traffic and
urban neighborhood feelthe Central
Business District is a great urban living
choice.
Uptown
The charming Uptown neighborhood
offers a slower pace and is fast becoming
one of the most popular destinations for
living in Denvercomplete with neighbor-
hood public space, the confluence of
many of Denvers best hospitals, fabulous
shopping and eating choices, and a
combination of historic mansions and
new condo and loft projects. Uptown is
located just east of downtownclose, but
far enough to maintains a separate feel
that attracts those who want the urban
experience while living in a neighbor-
hood. Public space abounds. 17th Street
is called Restaurant Row for its many
diverse culinary options.
Golden Triangle
Golden Triangle is an artistically inspired
region south of downtown, where attrac-
tions include the Denver Art Museum, the
Central Denver Public Library and more
giving this region a unique flavor.
Residents enjoy its proximity to down-
town, while also having the amenities of
a Neighborhood Association, free Art
Bus to various art gallery openings and
more. The growth of this neighborhood
has skyrocketed in recent years thanks to
heavy development initiatives that include
the beautification of streets, greenery
additions, and overall ambience. The
Golden Triangle will likely become even
more sought-after as the art museum
continues its expansion, bringing more
residents into the lofts, condos, and
apartments located here.
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
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Capitol Hill
Capitol Hill is, perhaps, most famous for its
many mansions, constructed during the turn
of the 20th century by wealthy families,
including famous Titanic survivor Molly
Brownwhose house is on Pennsylvania
Street and is open for tours. The neighbor-
hood has an array of housing styles and
price ranges, from classic mansions to
modern high-rises and lofts, as well as
smaller homes and apartments. The
Colorado State Capitol building stands
over this district, and the area is also home
to the Fillmore Auditorium, as well as the
beautiful Cheesman Park. Residents will
also discover coffee shops, restaurants with
an array of cuisines, and many wonderful
shops throughout this densely populated
segment of downtown Denver.
Cherry Creek
Cherry Creek North is an upscale residential
neighborhood with galleries, shops, bou-
tiques, restaurants and more around
Fillmore Plazawhere residents can
participate in such community events such
as Films on Fillmore and the Cherry Creek
Arts Festival. Cherry Creek South offers
luxury condominium and townhome hous-
ing, as well as a bevy of parks and green-
ways. The Cherry Creek Shopping Center
is considered to be one of the best malls in
the world, and Cherry Creek is fast becoming
a favorite Denver visitor destination.
Highlands Ranch Town Center
The Highlands Ranch Town Center area
includes the Tattered Cover Bookstore,
the Highlands Ranch Library, Civic
Green Park and Amphitheater and the
Shakespeare Festival in the summer.
Highlands Ranch also offers great neigh-
borhood community features, including
four recreation centers with lots of
amenities, as well as many restaurants
and gathering spaces.
Stapleton
Stapleton is known for its New
Urbanism feel a form of urban design
that brings distinctive home options
together with a neighborhood feel in an
overall vision of sustainability. Stapleton
has become a model for the New
Urbanism worldwide because its an
environment in which homes and all
amenitiesincluding many parks and
plenty of open spacecombine to
create a classic and sustainable neigh-
borhood. Community integrity is key here
Stapleton is a small-town community in the
heart of an urban center.
Denver Tech Center
The Denver Tech Center (DTC) urban
village is located in the corporate
complex off of I-25, south of Denver. Its
many big businesses dont detract from its
own unique, community environment and
atmosphereif nothing else, it adds a
special flavor to the area. Living in DTC
offers access to beautiful buildings,
multiple housing options, and a variety of
nearby restaurants, entertainment venues
and shops.
Boulder
You cant mention downtown Boulder
without talking about the beautiful Flatiron
Mountains, which offer residents a clear
view from just about every street, and the
Rocky Mountains that are just behind
them. Boulder is a favorite tourist destina-
tion, but its downtown living offers a
quaint and self-contained community
atmosphere, complete with charming
stores, shops, boutiques, healthy restau-
rants, many entertainment options, and
much more.
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
J US T
THE
RI GHT
AMOUNT
OF
Urban homes priced from the
$400s to the $2 Millions
Well designed residences from
1,150 sq.ft. to over 5,000 sq.ft
Dedicated light rail access
Walk to restaurants, the
theatre and sporting venues
Luxuriously appointed finishes
P | 303. 860. 1000
W | OneLi ncol nParkDenver. com
D O W N T O W N D E N V E R
2 0 0 1 L I N C O L N S T R E E T
ONE L I NCOL N PA R K
CITY
Welcome Center Open
MON - SAT | 10-5
SUN | 11-5
DENVER RESOURCES
FOR URBAN LIVING
www.lodo.org
www.downtowndenver.com
www.urbanliving2000.com/denver.htm
www.dtcguide.com
www.cherrycreeknorth.com
www.boulderdowntown.com
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Founded in 1861, Douglas County is
a true pioneer town. The county was
named after Stephen A. Douglas, who
was known as the Little Giant
because of his well-known political bat-
tles with his own Democratic Party and
Republican Abraham Lincoln over
issues of slavery, the Kansas-Nebraska
Act and popular sovereignty.
Although Douglas County originally
stretched from the Rockies to the State
of Kansas border, its now the geo-
graphic center of Colorado. One of the
fastest growing counties in the United
States, Douglas County is the home to
the cities of Castle Rock, Larkspur, Lone
Tree and Parker, as well as Highlands
Ranch a l arge, mast er- pl anned
community. Located between Denver
and Colorado Springs, about 80 percent
of Douglas Countys workforce commutes
to these urban centers.
The early spirit of community and
passion espoused by founder Stephen
Douglas exists today, especially with
the formation of the Partnership of
Douglas County Government in 2002.
A nationally recognized model of col-
laborative statesmanship, the Partnership
includes the Towns of Castle Rock,
Larkspur and Parker, the Cities of
Castle Pines and Lone Tree, Douglas
County, the Douglas County School
District, Douglas County Libraries, and
the Highlands Ranch Metro District.
The group works collaboratively for the
good of its citizens and the county,
and results have included the creation
of the Douglas County Housing
Partnership and the Douglas County Youth
Initiative. Future initiatives will examine
current and future needs and potential
locations for various regional facilities.
Despite ongoing growth and develop-
ment, Douglas County is committed to
preserving the natural environment.
For that reason, significant portions of
the county are designated for agricul-
tural and open-space uses. In fact, the
county is about 843 square miles
douGlas
COUNTY
www.douglas.co.us
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and 71 square miles are permanently
protected land through the nationally
renowned Douglas County Open Space
Program.
Recreational areas include more than
146,000 acres and include Pike
National Forest, Roxborough State Park,
Castlewood Canyon State Park and the
Chatfield State Recreation Area, not to
mention numerous parks and trail areas.
The Park Meadows Mall and Prime
Outlets in Castle Rock attract locals and
tourists alike, as well as the Countys
many public and private golf courses,
cultural events, sports, and area festi-
vals. One of the Countys cultural high-
lights is The Wildlife Experience, an
educational and entertaining interactive
museum that connects visitors with
wildlife and habitats. A unique blend of
interactive exhibits, large format film,
fine art, natural history and community
educational programs and events, The
Wildlife Experience gives residents and
visitor information on the worlds
wildlife and ecosystems with large
format films in the Extreme Screen
Theater; interactive media in exhibits
and galleries; school tours; Meet the
Artist programs, and an online K-12
education curriculum.
CASTLE ROCK
Cradl ed i n t he Crowf oot Val l ey,
Castle Rock is located 30 miles south
of downtown Denver and about the
same distance north of Colorado
Springs. Settled in the 1870s and
incorporated in 1881, the citys his-
toric downtown is the center of sever-
al pl anned devel opment s. Cast l e
Rock offers a small-town atmosphere,
a low crime rate, a historic down-
town shopping district, 400 acres of
parks, a community recreation center,
a 6,942-yard municipal golf course
with spectacular mountain scener y,
and the Prime Outlets at Castle Rock.
| www.townofcastlerock.com
PARKER
Located 20 miles southeast of Denver,
Parker was founded in 1864 and
incorporated in 1981. The city sits at
an elevation of 5,900 feet above sea
level and is one of the fastest growing
communities in Colorado. Parker offers
residents a host of amenities, including
200 acres of developed parkland that
include an equestrian park, 12 miles
of concrete paved trails, more than
700 acres of open space, a state-of-
the-art recreation center, an arboretum,
and the historic Cherokee Ranch and
Castle, which includes a Scottish-style
castle with acres of open space. The
Parker Cultural Commission also fea-
tures a variety of family arts events. |
www.parkeronline.org
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
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Jefferson County is west of Denver,
along the foothills of the Rocky
Mountains, and is the areas second-
largest county. Golden, Lakewood,
Wheat Ridge, Arvada and Westminster
are partially located within its bound-
aries, providing established neighbor-
hoods, schools and community facilities.
Pike, Roosevelt and Arapahoe national
forests, Golden Gate Canyon and a
section of Chatfield State Recreation
Area offer county residents abundant
recreational activities.
The mountain communities of Conifer,
Evergreen and Genesee are in the
western section of the county and are
desirable locales for residents wanting
to live in the mountains and work in
Denver or Boulder. Of Jefferson Countys
772 square miles, 557 are mountain
areas and 217 are plains areas. The
county is home to the Molson Coors
Brewery, the Colorado School of
Mines, Dinosaur Ridge, Red Rocks
Amphitheater and many museums,
including Buffalo Bills Grave and
Museum. The county also has extensive
parks and open space system that
allows for mountain biking, horseback
riding, climbing, hiking and fishing.
ARVADA
Arvada is located near downtown
Denver, Denver International Airport and
mountain communities. Residents enjoy
beautiful views of mountains, lakes and
valleys with easy access to mountain
recreation. Arvada is known for its
quality parks and trail systems that link
downtown Denver to the foothills.
Designated as a Colorado Main
Street Community and listed on the
National Register of Historic Places,
Historic Olde Town Ar vada offers
eclectic shopping, dining and enter-
tainment. Arvada offers strong civic
leadership, a low crime rate, Red
Rocks Community College Ar vada
Campus, and is near many colleges
and universities, including the
University of Colorado at Boulder and
the Colorado School of Mines. The
Ar vada Center for the Arts and
Humanities offers a diverse facility for
professional theater, concerts, art exhibitions,
and arts and humanities classes for all
ages. | www.ci.arvada.co.us
GOLDEN
Located at the mouth of Clear Creek
Canyon in the foothills of the Rocky
Mountains, Golden is the seat of
Jefferson County and home to both the
Colorado School of Mines, a world-
renowned elite engineering school, as
well as the 131-year-old Molson Coors
Brewing Company. One of Colorados
oldest communities, Golden offers a
small-town environment with all the
amenities and attractions of a large
metropolitan area in nearby Denver,
which is just 13 miles west. Numerous
hike-and-bike trails are found within
and near the city and offer spectacular
views of the mountains, wildlife and the
metropolitan area. Golden offers many
museums and landmarks, including the
Clear Creek Whitewater Park for
www.co.jefferson.co.us
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recreational canoeing and kayaking;
the Splash at Fossil Trace, a family
aquatic park; and the Golden
Community Center, which offers various
recreation and leisure programs for all
ages. | www.ci.golden.co.us
LAKEWOOD
Lakewood is located just minutes from
Denver along the western edge of the
metro area and against the foothills of the
Rocky Mountains. The city has more than
80 parks, including Bear Creek Lake Park
the citys largest with 2,600 acres. This
park features walking paths, equestrian
trails, wildlife, picnic areas and a paved
bike path. The 2,400-acre Green
Mountain Park offers magnificent views of
the metro Denver area and the dramatic
Front Range of the Rockies. Also, the Fox
Hollow Golf Course and the Homestead
Golf Course offer championship courses.
Lakewood also offers historic and social
centers at its Heritage Center, Lakewood
Cultural Center and Washington Heights
Arts Center. It is also home to a light rail
line to be built under the RTD FasTracks
program, as well as the Solterra community,
host of the prestigious 2008 Parade of
Homes. | www.lakewood.org
WESTMINSTER
Located along U.S. 36, the city is centrally
positioned between Denver and Boulder
and enjoys easy access to entertainment
and recreation throughout the metro area.
Well known for its quality of life,
Westminster offers residents superb recre-
ational amenities, beautiful neighbor-
hoods and numerous entertainment
opportunities and shopping areas.
Located in two counties, Adams and
Jefferson, Westminsters population is
almost equally divided between the two
counties, and the city is served by three
quality school districts. Westminster attrac-
tions include museums, historic buildings,
theaters, recreation centers, the Butterfly
Pavilion, Water World, golf courses,
parks, open space trails, iceskating, soccer,
swimming, and numerous shops and
restaurants. | www.ci.westminster.co.us
WHEAT RIDGE
Located in the northwestern area of the
metro Denver region, Wheat Ridge is a
residential community nestled on rolling
land with tree-lined streets. With its
location just adjacent to the I-70 corridor
between Denver and the Rocky
Mountains, the city is a great place to
live and do business or commute to
downtown Denver. Wheat Ridges
annual Carnation Festival reflects the
success of several carnation greenhouses
found in the area. Clear Creek runs
through the city and is accompanied
by a system of parks and greenbelts. |
www.ci.wheatridge.co.us
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
A small village tucked away in the hills
between Green Mountain and
Red Rocks. Featuring an expanded
selection of homes ranging from
the low $400s to over $2 million.
Models open Daily.
Just off West C-470 at Alameda Parkway.
303-790-6611 mysolterra.com
A Carma Community. 2011 Carma reserves the right to modify or change terms and information at any time without notice.
now this is more like it
If youre going to live in Colorado . . .
live in Colorado.
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HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
Youve chosen your new neighbor-
hood, enrolled the kids in school, met
your new neighbors, and you are starting
to get settled in to your new Denver
lifestyle. Now is a perfect time to design
your home with your own signature style.
It might sound crazy, but for many relocating
families, despite all the hectic activity that
accompanies moving to a new city, its
also the ideal time to spiff up a new home
with interior design, new furniture, and
landscaping. You have the fresh perspec-
tive that comes from seeing a new city for
the first time and, for many people,
moving to a new city is a chance at a
fresh start and they want their new
home to reflect that.
Luckily, Denver offers a wealth of profes-
sionals to help you beautify your home
inside and out, including interior designers,
home furnishing professionals, landscapers,
and gardening specialists.
INTERIORS THAT SUIT YOUR
PERSONALITY
Decorating a home can be an exciting
prospect whether youre looking for a
completely new look, a few accent
pieces, or just want to rearrange your
current living space. But its often a
good idea to also get someone elses
perspective.
When youre renovating a home or room,
the services of an interior design firm can
be a wise option, since interior designers
are professionally trained to create a func-
tional and quality interior environment. It
can also be a cost-effective option; most
designers are able to pass along industry
discounts to clients when they buy home
furnishings and more.
A professional designer can identify,
research and resolve issues in an effort to
create a healthy, safe and comfortable
physical environment. While both designers
and decorators are concerned with
aesthetics, style and mood, interior
designers have comprehensive training
and skills in space planning, building
codes, ergonomics, lighting quality and
quantity, as well as acoustics and sound
HOME, GARDEN
AND MORE
MAKING A HOUSE
into A HOME
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transmission. That expertise means that
your home will not only look attractive, it
will also fit your space planning needs.
DECIDING WHAT YOU WANT
Before contacting an interior designer,
take some time to think about what you
want and need. The more information you
can provide, the more successful your
designer will be in meeting your needs
and expectations.
The following are just a few questions to
ask yourself before getting started with
your project:
What is the space and who will use it?
What activities will take place there?
How long do you plan to be in the space?
What is your timeframe?
What is your budget?
What colors do you like?
Its important to also take into account the
positive and negative aspects of the
space. Photographs or pages torn from
magazines that reflect environments
you like, or that meets your aesthetic and
functional criteria, are always helpful to
designers.
THE RIGHT FIT:
INTERVIEWING DESIGNERS
Its critical to interview several designers to
find the one youll work with best in terms
of style, personality, and business philosophy.
Designing a space is an intimate and
personal endeavor, so its important that
you connect with the person that youll
likely be spending lots of time with to
make your house a home.
Take this opportunity to express your
vision and ideas for the project, too. You
will be working closely with the designer,
and you will want someone that you feel
will make the right choices according to
your specifications and will listen to your
ideas and concerns. The following are
good topics to cover with prospective
designers:
Inquire about the designers education,
training, experience, professional affili-
ations and other credentials. Ask to see
their portfolio and talk to former clients.
Discuss the designers fee structure.
Designers work with a variety of fee
structures, based on a number of
variables. A retainer, which is a sum of
money paid to the designer and
applied to the balance due at the termi-
nation of the project, may be required.
Ask about other services the designer
can provide and costs.
Discuss project duration or deadlines
and the designers availability for taking
on the project within your timeframe.
Establish parameters for updates and
ongoing communication between you
and the interior designer. Who else will
you be talking to in the office besides
your designer, for example? Make sure
you meet any assistants who will be
helping, too.
MAKING A DECISION
Once youve interviewed several designers,
compare their estimates and know that
the one that is least expensive may not
always be the best. At the end of the
day, it really comes down to personality
first, and then style. Decide on whom
youll work with best, and then youre
your decision.
Also, differences in each proposal reflect
variables such as level of service and
quality of merchandise, so be sure to ask
for details if you need them. Once you
hire a designer, make sure you have a
signed contract before any work begins
or you deliver any deposit money. Then
its time to address specific project needs
and goals and come up with a plan of
action and a timetable for completion.
The more input you provide, the easier it
is for your interior designer to respond
with additional ideas and to create
spaces that will meet your aesthetic,
functional and budgetary goals.
HOME FURNISHING AND
ACCESSORIES
Hundreds of furniture stores and furniture
accessory stores are located throughout
the metro Denver area. Your designer can
be a great resource here, especially once
he or she is familiar with your style and
the things you like.
Most major department stores offer an
entire floor of home furnishings and
often have good sales at certain times
of year with low-interest finance rates;
another option is furniture rental or
lease-to-own options. Some furniture
rental stores offer name-brand furniture
for the home and office, as well as
electronics, appliances and computers
for purchase, rental or lease-to-own.
Youll also find electronics and home
dcor accessories such as artwork,
lighting and home accent pieces.
Many furniture stores offer interior
design services for their customers as
well. Interested in a custom look? The
metro Denver has plenty of resource for
custom furniture, flooring, cabinetry,
doors and windows.
Youll also find unique and high-quality
home design accessories for the bed,
bath, and kitchen as well as artwork
at one of the many specialty shops in
the area. Your designer can be a great
resource here, too; just ask for recom-
mendations to find the store that will
best suit your needs, style, project
goals, and personality.
LANDSCAPING AND
GARDENING IN DENVER
According to the Colorado State University
Cooperative Extension, the average
elevation of the state of Colorado is
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
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6,800 feet. In fact, three-fourths of the
nations land above 10,000 feet is within
its borders, which can have a big impact
on your lawn and garden care.
For example, Colorados low humidity,
fluctuating temperatures, heavy calcareous
soils and drying winds often restrict
plant growth more than low tempera-
tures, so its best to select plants that
tolerate the areas soil and climate
conditions.
GREAT LANDSCAPING CAN
SAVE MONEY
Landscaping not only helps showcase the
beauty of your home, but when done
correctly, it can also help reduce your
overall energy cost. Consider that proper
landscaping around your home can
reduce heat gain in summer by as much
as 50 percent and heat loss in winter by
up to 25 percent. And that can translate
into considerable savings on your monthly
utility bills.
You can also control wind velocity near
your home with properly placed plants. A
sun pocket around trees and other plants
offers an excellent location for a patio or
greenhouse. If outside activities are popular,
properly placed shade trees, fences and
windbreak plantings reduce wind, provide
shade and create a sun pocket for warm
weather, perfect for recreational pursuits.
The trees you choose are important, too.
Not only do they also add beauty, but
they can also help cut energy costs, clean
the air, reduce noise, create privacy, and
increase a propertys value. Trees add
visual appeal to a patio, pool or play
area, or they can be used to separate
spaces and provide space enclosure.
And those trees with color or distinctive
features are attractive accents in your
overall landscaping picture.
The amount of moisture needed can help
determine which species are suitable for
your yard. Be sure not to plant your tree
where it is mismatched with the amount of
available light. Every locality has its prob-
lems with particular insects or diseases,
so avoid the species that are prone to
having these pests.
Ask a certified arborist, nursery professional,
urban forester, or extension agent about
which trees will thrive in your area. The
Colorado State University Cooperative
Extension has county offices prepared to
help with individual gardening needs. They
have a supply of leaflets that can provide
detailed information on the selection and
care of trees, shrubs, garden flowers,
vegetables and lawns. For more information,
view www.ext.colostate.edu.
Its easy to see that the metro Denver area
offers plenty of choices to make your
home a wonderful place to live and relax,
including interior designers, specialty
furniture stores, landscaping, and more.
Choose wisely and ask for advice, and
youll be enjoying your new interior and
exterior in no!
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
The Colorado Chapter of the American Society of Interior
Designers operates a referral service; call 303-765-0224 or
visit www.asidcolorado.org.
Contact the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce to
locate a qualified designer or other home professional;
the Chamber has a business directory on its website at
www.denverchamber.org, or call 303-534-8500 for assistance.
The Goode Touch Interiors is involved in every aspect of design-
ing your space, from conceptualization to the choosing of fab-
rics, furnishings, color and texture. Contact owner Marjorie
Goode at 303-730-9919, or visit www.thegoodetouch.com
Guys & Dolls Furniture in Aurora features a designer show-
room and sells bedroom furniture of all types, including bed-
ding, cribs, space-saving furniture and matching chest pieces.
Guys & Dolls also offers soft goods, catalog orders and a fur-
niture trade-in program. For information, call 720-748-4300,
or visit www.guysanddollsfurniture.com.
Guys Floor Service, Inc. features a state-of-the-art design cen-
ter that showcases a wide variety of flooring options including
hardwood, ceramic tile, carpet, granite, natural stone, marble
and vinyl. For information, call 303-371-8900 (Denver); 719-
534-0900 (Colorado Springs); or visit www.guysfloor.com.
TruGreen Chem-Lawn is a leader in environmental practices
and policies, and the companys lawn specialists have the lat-
est in lawn products and equipment to care for your grass,
trees and shrubs. Visit www.trugreen.com for information and
locations.
DENVER DESIGN RESOURCES
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Selecting and financing a home is an
exciting and adventurous experience
but it can also be a challenging one.
Weve compiled some information to help
those new to Denver overcome some of
the hurdles you may encounter and
point you in the right direction to get
additional information.
FINANCING A HOME
Before you start, there are many laws that
protect you from scams, unnecessary
expenses and discrimination in the
process of homebuying. The Fair Housing
Act prohibits discrimination in the sale,
rental and financing of dwellings, and in
other housing-related transactions based
on race, color, national origin, religion,
sex, handicap (disability) and familial status
(including children under the age of 18
living with parents or legal custodians,
pregnant women and people securing
custody of children under the age of 18).
It is illegal under the Real Estate Settlement
Procedures Act (RESPA) for anyone to pay
or receive a fee, kickback or anything of
value because they agree to refer settlement
service business to a particular person or
organization. For example, your mortgage
lender may not pay your real estate broker
$250 for referring you to the lender.
You can save yourself a lot of if you take
time to figure out how much mortgage you
can afford and if you get pre-approved.
You need to consider current loan interest
rates. The lower the interest rate, the more
expensive a home you can afford.
Homebuyers can get a general estimate of
what they can afford by going to
www.ginniemae.gov. Answer a few ques-
tions, and the calculator will provide a
general estimate of the maximum sale price
you may qualify for under Federal Housing
Administration (FHA), Veterans Association
(VA) and conventional loans. It also
estimates your down payment, closing
costs, total cash required at closing, monthly
mortgage payment, other monthly housing
costs and your remaining monthly income.
Remember, these are only estimates. You
should see a lender for more details.
HIRE SOMEONE TO HELP
All the details involved with buying a home,
particularly the financial ones, can be mind-
boggling. A good real estate professional
can guide you through the entire process
and make the experience much easier.
A real estate broker will be well-acquaint-
ed with all the important elements youll
want to know about a neighborhood you
may be consideringthe quality of
BUYING
YOUR
NEW
HOME
MORTGAGES
and FINANCES
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schools, the number of children in the
area, the safety of the neighborhood,
traffic volume and more. The realtor can
save you hours of wasted driving-around
time. When its time to make an offer on
a home, the realtor can point out ways to
structure your deal to save you money.
DO YOU NEED A CPA?
(CERTIFIED PUBLIC ACCOUNTANT)
Need professional advice on personal
finances and other matters? Its a good idea
to secure the services of a licensed CPA, who
can give you advice on how you can adjust
your finances in to help you meet your
personal goals such as buying a house
and other specialty financial and legal needs.
Besides tax preparation and auditing
services, CPAs can help you develop an
effective accounting system that works for
you. Other useful services include advice
on finances during marriage or divorce;
budgets and recordkeeping; retirement
plans; tips on paying for college; and
long-term, life and health insurance.
It is important to be able to trust your CPA
with your financial information, so be sure to
obtain information on your practitioners level
of experience and training, and ask for
references. For more information or to find a
qualified CPA, contact the Colorado Society
of Certified Public Accountants at 303-773-
2877 or view its website at www.cocpa.org,
or search the Business Directory on the
Denver Metro Chamber of Commerces
Website at www.denverchamber.org or call
303-534-8500.
BANKING IN METRO DENVER
The metro Denver area is a major financial
center for the entire Rocky Mountain region,
and most major banks have branches in the
metro Denver area, including Compass
Bank, FirstBank of Colorado, KeyBank,
UMB Bank Colorado, U.S. Bank and Wells
Fargo. In downtown Denver, 17th Street is
known as the Wall Street of the Rockies,
because its the address for many of the
regions major investment houses and
financial institutions.
Many businesses have a credit union affiliated
with the company. These credit unions are
federally regulated, not-for-profit, and they
exist for the convenience of its members.
Check with your employer to see if your
company has a credit union or access to
one. You can also search for banks and
credit unions in the Business Directory on the
Denver Metro Chamber of Commerces
website at www.denverchamber.org, or call
303-534-8500.
HOUSI NG AND NEI GHBORHOODS
You can save time if you have the following items with you when
you visit your lender. Depending on your lender, you may be
asked for other information.
1. Social Security numbers for both you and your spouse,
if both of you are applying for the loan.
2. Copies of your checking and savings account
statements for the past six months.
3. Evidence of any other assets like bonds or stocks.
4. A recent paycheck stub detailing your earnings.
5. A list of all credit card accounts and the
approximate monthly amounts owed on each.
6. A list of account numbers and balances due on
outstanding loans, such as car loans.
7. Copies of your last two years of income tax statements.
8. The name and address of someone who can
verify your employment.
WHAT YOU NEED TO
APPLY FOR A MORTGAGE
METRO DENVER HOUSING RESOURCES
Adams County Housing Authority
Arapahoe County HomeBuyer Program
City of Aurora Homeownership Assistance Program
City of Boulder Homeownership Programs
City of Longmont Homebuyers Programs
City of Westminster Down Payment Assistance Program
Colorado Housing and Finance Authority
Colorado Housing Assistance Corporation
Colorado Rural Housing Development Corporation
Commerce City Housing Authority
Del Norte Neighborhood Development Corporation
Southwest Improvement Council in Denver
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD)
Wheat Ridge Housing Authority
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Newcomers to the metro Denver area
will discover a wealth of renting and
leasing selections with amenities and
special features to meet the needs of every
lifestyle. In fact, the seven-county metro area
boasts nearly 100,000 apartment units at
complexes across the area, including a
number of new luxury apartments.
In addition to apartment complexes,
newcomers will find a variety of condo-
miniums, townhouses, lofts, high-rises and
single-family homes for rent or lease.
Furnished and unfurnished apartments
from efficiencies to units with three or
more bedrooms are available across the
region. Many complexes have amenities
such as fitness centers, tennis courts,
volleyball courts, basketball courts, video
rental centers, spas, Jacuzzis, swimming
pools, on-site laundry facilities, limited-
access gates, lush landscaping, covered
parking or garages, clubhouses, business
centers and playgrounds.
AMENITIES TO MAKE YOU
FEEL AT HOME
Some standard features in most metro
Denver apartment complexes include
stoves and refrigerators. Other interior
features may include basic cable service,
dishwasher, microwave, icemaker,
washer/dryer connections, multiple tele-
phone lines, high-speed Internet access,
alarm systems, fireplaces, patio or bal-
cony, extra storage space and architectural
accents.
Special amenities at some apartment
complexes may include aerobic classes,
a convenience store, concierges, maid
service, shuttle service, valet trash pickup
and bay windows. Monthly newsletters
and events such as holiday parties,
breakfast service or contests encourage
a community environment and give
residents an opportunity to get to know
their neighbors.
RENTING
and
LEASING
WHAT YOU
NEED to KNOW
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Condominiums and townhouses often
offer a more spacious or luxurious home
and offer similar amenities as apartments.
These properties may be leased or
purchased, and a leasing agent is often
assigned to a particular community.
LOFT LIVING
There are a number of lofts and high-
rises in downtown Denver. Lofts and
high-rise homes can be purchased or
leased and can offer a number of spe-
cial amenities in addition to those
offered at apartments, such as magnifi-
cent views, a variety of spacious floor
plans, cafs, restaurants, concierges,
maid and room service, game rooms,
grocery or convenience stores, dry
cleaners, heated pools and decks, day
spas and covered parking. Interior fea-
tures may include hardwood floors,
exposed architectural elements, and
ceilings up to 16-feet and large win-
dows. Need more information? Please
refer to our Urban Living article in this
section.
Although less common, single-family
homes are also available for rent in the
Denver area, offering more privacy and
space. Renters typically pay utilities
and a security deposit equal to one
months rent. Make sure you ask your
leasing agent or the property owner for
specific guidelines before you sign a
lease. A local real estate agent can be
a valuable resource if youre consider-
ing leasing a home.
RENTING AND LEASING
RESOURCES
Before starting your search for an apart-
ment or other rental home, make sure you
know what you want and what kind of
lifestyle youre looking for in your new
home. Consider questions like the type of
housing best suits your lifestyle; which
area of metro Denver do you want to live;
price range; amenities and features that
are most important; and what type of
neighborhood you want.
Also think about how many bedrooms
and baths you want; proximity to job
and major employment centers; ameni-
ties for children, including schools; any
applicable pet policies; proximity to
retail outlets, grocery stores and other
conveniences; whether there are washer/
dryer connections; and amenities like
fireplaces, fitness centers and covered
parking.
Set your priorities and key criteria
before you start your search, and youll
save all kinds of valuable time finding
your new home.
1. Be prepared. If certain rental properties are in high
demand and are selective in renting or leasing to applicants,
you will gain a competitive edge by having the following infor-
mation with you: a completed rental application; written refer-
ences from landlords, employers, friends and/or colleagues;
and a current copy of your credit report.
2. Carefully review all the important conditions of the tenancy
before you sign on the dotted line. Your lease or rental
agreement may contain a provision that you find unaccept-
able, such as restrictions on guests or pets, design alter-
ations or running a home business.
3. To avoid misunderstandings, keep copies of any correspondence
with the landlord and follow up any oral agreements with a
letter, outlining your understanding. For example, if you ask
your landlord to make repairs, put your request in writing
and keep a copy for yourself. If he agrees orally, send a let-
ter confirming this fact.
4. Purchase renters insurance to cover your valuables. Your
landlords insurance policy will not cover your losses.
5. Learn whether the building and neighborhood you are
considering are safe. Get copies of any state or local laws
that require safety devices such as deadbolts and window
locks; check out the propertys vulnerability to intrusion by a
criminal, and learn whether criminal incidents have already
occurred.
SOURCE: www.nolo.com
TIPS EVERY TENANT
NEEDS TO KNOW
DENVER RENTAL RESOURCES
www.lodo.org
www.ApartmentBluebook.com
www.ApartmentGuyz.com
www.ApartmentLocatorsPlus.com
www.ForRent.com
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ou need only look out a window to see whats so appealing about living and playing
in metro Denver. Stunning landscapes, a mild climate, and plentiful outdoor activities make
this a year-round recreational haven.With 300 annual days of sunshine, Denver resi-
dents dabble in everything from skiing to hiking, mountain biking to river rafting.
Perhaps thats why Colorado has the lowest obesity rate and why the PEW Research Center ranked
Denver the No. 1 city people most want to live.
Leisure and
Recreation
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Whether its freshwater fishing through-
out western Colorado, or skiing, hiking
or mountain biking in the world famous
Rocky Mountains, all recreational tastes
can be satisfied in the metro Denver
area. A mild climate with plenty of
sunshine and four distinct seasons
allows for a variety of activities throughout
the year.
Denver also has the largest public
parks system of any U.S. city.
Thousands of acres of open space dot
the area, allowing citizens to hike,
bike, and snowshoe right outside their
backyards. Parks and greenbelts are
located throughout the region and, for
those who prefer participating in team
sports, the area has recreational
leagues for just about every sport under
the sun.
Snow anyone? The spectacular Rocky
Mountains, with its world-class ski
resorts and scenery, are only minutes
away and are a huge part of the areas
appeal.
Got sports? We do! With seven profes-
sional sports teams and plenty of spectator
sports, residents could almost attend a
different game or event every night. From
football to baseball to soccer to hockey to
auto racing, and much more, Denver is a
sports fans dream.
For example, the Colorado Rockies
baseball team had a great season in
2007, making it to the National
League West finals and then to the
World Series. Most people still think of
the Denver Broncos in the John Elway
years, and the team continues to impress
with new young players on the roster.
Today, John Elway owns a Mile High
City car dealership, as well as two
successful restaurants (see our listing in
the Dining section for more information),
and is still very involved in the Broncos
community and as a dedicated Denver
community advocate and supporter.
Lacrosse is big here, too. The Colorado
Mammoth and the Colorado Outlaws
have only boosted the popularity of the
sport in Denver, with as many fans here
as for Denver Nuggets basketball games.
In fact, the Mammoth won the league
championship in 2006, and momentum
continues to grow as the teams gain more
community fans and support. Denver
even has a professional rugby team -
the Denver Barbarians - and thats a
sport thats also proven popular with
area residents.
When it comes to culture, Denver has all
the attractions you expect in a metropol-
itan hubfrom museums to cultural
events at the Denver Performing Arts
Complexthe largest such facility in the
country, amusement parks, zoos and
more. For example, the Childrens
Museum has been a popular and
beloved attraction for kids and their
grownups for more than 25 years,
offering fun, interactive and educational
learning experiences.
Denver also has an active theater, arts
and cultural community, in part because
of the citys arts and culture initiative. In
1988, voters in metro Denver created the
Scientific Cultural Facilities District
(SCFD) to provide a consistent source of
funding to both scientific and cultural
organizations.
Since then, the SCFD has funded more
than 300 organizations in the citys seven-
county metro area through a 0.1 percent
retail sales and use tax (one penny on
every $10). Nearly 900,000 out-of-state
visitors defray the cost by spending millions
of dollars on tourism, helping SCFD distrib-
ute more than $30 million annually to local
organizationsand helping the city contin-
ue its thriving support of the arts.
Theres plenty to see, do, appreciate, and
enjoy in the Mile High City. The following
is a sampling of just some of Denvers
many leisure activities and things to do.
Enjoy the city and all it has to offer
and go experience Denver today!
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LEI SURE AND RECREATI ON
Whether your interests are in the
theater, performing arts, visual arts,
museums, galleries, photography, or
dance, metro Denver offers all of itand
more. In fact, Denver metro area cultural
organizations employ approximately
7,700 people and, collectively, cultural
institutions are the sixth largest non-govern-
mental employer in the metro area.
In 1988, voters in metro Denver created
the Scientific Cultural Facilities District
(SCFD) to provide a consistent source of
funding to scientific and cultural organiza-
tions. Since then, SCFD has funded more
than 300 organizations in the seven-county
metro area via the 0.1 percent retail sales
and use tax (one penny on every $10).
Almost 900,000 out-of-state visitors
defray the cost by spending millions of
dollars on tourism, helping SCFD distribute
more than $30 million annually to local
organizations.
The cultural capital of the Rocky Mountain
region, Denvers Performing Arts Complex
compares to New York Citys Lincoln
Centerwith opera and ballet companies
staging both classical and contemporary
works. Long-standing neighborhood
theater companies showcase local talent
in old favorites and bring new plays to the
scene.
As for museums, the Denver Art Museum
regularly offers some of the worlds finest
permanent and traveling exhibits. See
Colorado artifacts from prehistoric times
to the present are in museums across the
region, and experience our history and
culture.
Many galleries collaborate monthly to
sponsor prominent artists and local
artisans, so make it an evening out with
dinner downtown before exploring
Denvers vibrant arts scene. Browse
through the following for a sampling of
metro Denvers thriving arts offerings.
MUSEUMS
Astor House Museum
822 12th St.
Golden, 80401
303-278-3557
www.astorhousemuseum.org
Located in historic downtown Golden, the
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ARTS and
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EXPERIENCE the ARTS
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Astor House Museum and Clear Creek
History Park offer a look at Colorado life
in the late 1800s. The house was a
boarding house for more than 100 years.
The three-acre history park is devoted to
hands-on history and includes original
1870s homestead cabins, an 1876
schoolhouse and a replica of a black-
smith shop.
Aurora History Museum
15151 E. Alameda Pkwy.
Aurora, 80012
303-739-6660
www.aurora-museum.org
Experience the city of Auroras history
from ancient times until the present
through artifacts and documents. Exhibits
include clothing and household items
from the 1930s and a toy collection from
the 1920s. Traveling exhibits cover such
topics as local archaeology, art, life on
the Great Plains, womens history and
Native American life. The museum also
hosts lectures, workshops and events.
Black American West Museum
and Heritage Center
3091 California St.
Denver, 80205
303-292-2566
www.blackamericanwest.org
Listen to tour guides tell the story of
African American pioneers in the West!
Located in the former home of Dr. Justina
Ford, Colorados first African American
female doctor, this museum has a collection
of more than 35,000 personal artifacts,
memorabilia, documents, clothing, letters,
photographs and oral histories.
Boulder History Museum
1206 Euclid Ave.
Boulder, 80302
303-449-3464
www.boulderhistorymuseum.org
Located in the 1899 Harbeck Bergheim
House on University Hill, the museum
showcases nearly 30,000 objects that
chronicle the history of life in Boulder
County from the 1800s until now.
Bowles House Museum
3924 W. 72nd Ave.
Westminster, 80030
303-426-1858
www.ci.westminster.co.us/city/history/
whs.htm
This 1872 homestead features artifacts
from the Westminster area, as well as
rotating exhibits. The Westminster
Historical Society operates the museum
and lectures at local schools.
Buffalo Bill Grave and Museum
987-1/2 Lookout Mountain Road
Golden, 80401
303-526-0744
www.buffalobill.org
A memorial for William F. Buffalo Bill
Cody, this museum features exhibits about
his life and Wild West shows. It includes
Western art, firearms and Western and
Indian artifacts - including Sitting Bulls
bow and arrows and Buffalo Bills show
outfits. The legends gravesite is onsite.
Byers-Evans House Museum
1310 Bannock St.
Denver, 80203
303-620-4933
www.coloradohistory.org
Built in 1883 by Rocky Mountain News
publisher William Byers, this historic home
was sold to William Gray Evans, a Denver
Tramway Company officer, in 1889. Enjoy
a guided tour through the brick Italianate
residence, filled with original Evans family
furnishings. A film features these two
prominent Denver families.
The Childrens Museum of Denver
2121 Childrens Museum Drive
Denver, 80211
303-433-7444
www.mychildsmuseum.org
Play and learn together as a family at the
Childrens Museum of Denver! This popular
attraction has served the metro Denver
community for the last 35 years - where
children newborn through age 8 and their
grownups learn through play. With inno-
vative and interactive exhibits, engaging
daily programming and exciting year-
round special events, theres always
something to do. With more than
27,000 children and visitors each year,
the Museum offers a dynamic learning
environment to explore, play, discover
and learn.
Colorado History Museum
1300 Broadway
Denver, 80203
303-866-3682
www.coloradohistory.org
See Colorados history, from its earliest
inhabitants to its pioneer families at this
museum through detailed dioramas,
historic photographs, artifacts and docu-
ments - plus special programs, galleries
and exhibits on life in the American West.
The museum also serves as the headquarters
for the Colorado Historical Society and is
home to an archaeological and historic
preservation library with a unique collection
of Native American and Colorado arts
and crafts.
Colorado Railroad Museum
17155 W. 44th Ave.
Golden, 80403
800-365-6263
www.crrm.org
Established in 1959, the Colorado
Railroad Museum is recognized as one of
the best privately supported rail museums
in the country. More than 70 historic
narrow and standard gauge locomotives
and cars are exhibited on 15 acres at the
foot of North Table Mountain. The collection
includes railroad equipment, artifacts,
documents, artwork and photographs,
with a special emphasis on Rocky
Mountain area railroads.
Colorado Sports Hall of Fame Museum
1701 Bryant St., Suite 500
Denver, 80204
720-258-3535
www.coloradosports.org
The Colorado Sports Hall of Fame
Museum takes visitors on a journey
through Colorado sports history. Located
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next to one of the primary entrances to
INVESCO Field at Mile High, the museum
also offers year-round access to the field.
Denver Firefighters Museum
1326 Tremont Place
Denver, 80204
303-892-1436
www.denverfirefightersmuseum.org
Located in an historic firehouse that was
built in 1909, this unique museum has
early firefighting equipment and artifacts
that date from 1866 - including a hand-
drawn apparatus, a rare steam pumper,
and three motorized fire trucks. Learn about
some of Denvers big fires, how firefighters
hone their skills, and how they use trained
horses and dogs. Educational programs
focus on fire safety and hands-on activities.
Denver Art Museum
100 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy.
Denver, 80204
720-865-5000
www.denverartmuseum.org
Founded in 1893, the Denver Art Museum
is the largest art museum between Kansas
City and the West Coast, featuring more
than 55,000 works of art - including an
internationally renowned American Indian
art collection. Other collections include pre-
Columbian and Spanish Colonial, Painting
and Sculpture, Asian, Architecture,
Design and Graphics, Modern and
Contemporary, Textile Art, European,
American and Western. The museum also
offers educational activities and events for
children and adults throughout the year.
The museum recently completed its first
major expansion in more than 30 years,
which nearly doubled its size. It now
features one of the nations most unique
structures, designed by Daniel Libeskind.
Denver Museum of Miniatures,
Dolls and Toys
1880 Gaylord St.
Denver, 80206
303-322-1053
www.dmmdt.com
Housed in the 1899 Pearce McAllister
Cottage, the museum features a collection
of miniatures, dolls and toys from around
the world that range from the 16th century
to modern times.
Denver Museum of Nature & Science
2001 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, 80205
303-322-7009
www.dmns.org
Hosting more than 1.7 million visitors
annually, this museum displays 775,000
objects in its permanent exhibits, which
include dinosaur fossils and prehistoric
objects, Egyptian mummies and artifacts,
a visitor center to the universe, hundreds
of gems and minerals from around the
world, health science exhibits, North
American Indian artifacts and reconstructed
dwellings, and more than 90 wildlife
habitat scenes from across the globe. The
museum also features world-class traveling
exhibits, a planetarium, IMAX theater,
library, scientific lectures, demonstrations,
and hands-on activities.
Foothills Art Center
809 15th St.
Golden, 80401
303-279-3922
www.foothillsartcenter.org
This 35-year-old art center is housed in
two historic buildings. Foothills I, the main
building, is known for its classic Victorian
architecture, stained glass windows and
bell tower. The 1872 First Presbyterian
Church was remodeled and joined to the
parsonage, so the present Foothills
comprises six gallery rooms under one
roof. An adjacent mansion, Foothills II, is
where small invitational shows are held,
and it contains the Gallery Shops. The art
center presents art programs and classes
and a variety of year-round exhibitions.
Forney Museum of Transportation
4303 Brighton Blvd.
Denver, 80216
303-297-1113
www.forneymuseum.com
The Forney features more than 500
exhibits dedicated to historical transporta-
tion. Its unique collection includes Amelia
Earharts Gold Bug Kissel, Prince Aly
Khans Rolls Royce, and Big Boy, the
worlds largest steam locomotive. There
are also displays of antique cars, loco-
motives, buggies, carriages, wagons,
trolleys and motorcycles.
The Geology Museum at the Colorado
School of Mines
Corner of 13th and Maple Street
Golden, 80401
303-273-3815
www.mines.edu/academic/
geology/museum
Got rocks? This museum houses an
extraordinary collection of mineral specimens
and historical mining artifacts, and visitors
can tour a reconstructed underground
gold mine.
LEI SURE AND RECREATI ON
DENVER ARTS RESOURCES
Arts to Zoo Cultural Connections 200 Grant St., Suite 305 303-715-1588 www.artstozoo.com
Colorado Business Committee for the Arts 130 W. 12th Ave. 303-282-5135 www.cbca.org
Colorado Council on the Arts 1380 Lawrence St., Suite 1200 303-866-2723 www.coloarts.state.co.us
Denver Metro Convention and Visitors Bureau 1555 California, Suite 300 303-892-1112 www.denver.org
Scientific and Cultural Facilities District 899 Logan St., Suite 500 303-860-0588 www.scfd.org
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Golden Pioneer Museum
923 10th St.
Golden, 80401
303-278-7151
www.goldenpioneermuseum.com
Founded in 1938, this museum houses
artifacts from nearby archeological sites
and pioneer days with emphasis on the
years 1859- 1930. The museums research
library contains historical and genealogical
volumes, documents and photographs.
Hiwan Homestead Museum
4208 S. Timbervale Drive
Evergreen, 80439
303-674-6262
www.co.jefferson.co.us
Hiwans restored 1890 to 1930-era, 17-
room log lodge paints an ideal picture of
early mountain summer home living. A local
history museum, the Hiwan also offers craft
and interpretive school programs, as well
as changing exhibits sponsored by the
Jefferson County Historical Society.
Leanin Tree Museum of Western Art
6055 Longbow Drive
Boulder, 80301
800-777-8716
www.leanintreemuseum.com
See more than 300 original paintings
and bronze sculptures from the private
collection of Edward P. Trumble, chairman
and founder of Leanin Tree Inc. It is the
only major collection of privately-held
works of American Western art that is free
and open to the public.
Louisville Historical Museum
1001 Main St.
Louisville, 80027
303-665-9048
www.ci.louisville.co.us
This museum occupies two historic buildings
constructed between 1904 and 1908. The
Jacoe Store is the main building and fea-
tures artifacts and historic photographs that
reflect Louisvilles early settlement and indus-
try, with an emphasis on the coal-mining
period from 1877 to 1955. The Tomeo
House is a replica of a coal miners house.
The Mizel Museum
400 S. Kearney St.
Denver, 80224
303-394-9993
www.mizelmuseum.org
The Mizel Museum features interactive
exhibits and multicultural, Judaical immi-
gration and holocaust exhibits. The museums
educational programs offer visitors a
glimpse at the ceremonies, festivals and
rites of passage of African American,
Asian Pacific, Hispanic/Latino, Jewish,
Muslim and Native American cultures.
The Molly Brown House Museum
1340 Pennsylvania St.
Denver, 80203
303-832-4092
www.mollybrown.org
This Victorian home, restored and open
for tours, was once the residence of
Denvers own unsinkable Molly Brown,
survivor of the sinking of the Titanic. The
houses artifacts date from when the
Browns lived there, 1894 to 1912, with
a focus on items the Browns would have
had in the house. A fashion collection dating
from 1867 to 1932 also is exhibited.
Morrison Heritage and Natural History
Museums
501 Colorado Highway 8
Morrison, 80465
303-697-1873
http://town.morrison.co.us/mnhm
The Morrison Natural History Museum
opened in 1990 and tells the story of
Morrisons 1877 dinosaur discoveries on
Dinosaur Ridge. The museum has exhibits
of real dinosaur bones and also houses
some of the areas live native reptiles and
amphibians. The Morrison Heritage
Museum explores Morrisons historic people,
places and events.
Museo de las Amricas
861 Santa Fe Drive
Denver, 80204
303-571-4401
www.museo.org
The museum collects, preserves and
interprets Latin American art, history and
cultures from ancient times to the present.
It has a permanent exhibition of 17th and
18th century paintings and sculptures
created in the Spanish colonies of the
New World during the Baroque Period,
as well as ancient art of the Americas.
Museum of Contemporary Art - Denver
1275 19th St.
Denver, 80202
303-298-7554
www.mcartdenver.org
Denvers first major contemporary arts
museum opened in 1996, and it is a
non-collecting museum that features a
continual exhibition of innovative artwork,
along with tours and workshops.
Internationally known architect David
Adjaye designed the museums new
home in April 2004.
Museum of Outdoor Arts
1000 Englewood Pkwy., Suite 2-230
Englewood, 80110
303-806-0444
www.moaonline.org
This museum without walls features
more than 60 works of art on display in
outdoor locations, and Greenwood
Plaza in Greenwood Village is a prime
showcase for the collection. In 2000,
the museums indoor gallery opened in
the Englewood Civic Center, offering
rotating exhibits, educational programs,
int egrat ed ar t s per formances and
special events.
Rocky Mountain Quilt Museum
1111 Washington Ave.
Golden, 80401
303-277-0377
www.rmqm.org
The museum presents 10 quilt exhibits
each year that feature both traditional
and contemporary designs, with a perma-
nent collection that is exhibited once a
year. The museum hosts special events,
offers a wide range of educational
programs, and has a shop with fine quilts
and quilt-related items.
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University of Denver Museum
of Anthropology
Sturm Hall 102
2000 E. Asbury Ave.
Denver, 80208
303-871-2688
www.du.edu/anthro/museum.htm
This anthropology museum on the University
of Denver campus has been acquiring both
archaeological and ethnographic objects
and records since the 1920s, and its
collection now has more than 165,000
objects. Site collections from more than
1,800 Colorado archaeological sites and
hundreds of other sites in 12 western states
form the majority of the museums holdings,
including evidence of the prehistoric
occupation of eastern Colorado.
The Wildlife Experience Museum
10035 S. Peoria
Parker, 80134
720-488-3300
www.thewildlifeexperience.com
This 101,000 square-foot wildlife conser-
vation museum, houses an extensive
collection of natural history, paintings,
sculpture, photography and film exhibits.
Rotating exhibits are devoted to specific
conservation efforts and offer a wide
range of wildlife subjects, themes and
learning experiences. The museum is
dedicated to promoting the understanding
of the natural world and its conservation
through art, education and community.
Wings Over the Rockies Air and
Space Museum
7711 E. Academy Blvd.
Denver, 80230
303-360-5360
www.wingsmuseum.org
Home to more than 35 historic air-
planes and space vehicles, the popular
Wings Over the Rockies museum features
aircraft and space-related exhibits,
educational programs and a research
librar y. Exhibits include the science
of flight, the histor y of avionics, and
a World War II uniform and artifact
collection.
MUSIC AND DANCE
Love music? Weve got you covered!
Denver offers a wide range of musical
performing arts venues and attractions.
Heres a sampling to explore:
Boulder Philharmonic Orchestra
2995 Wilderness Place, Suite 100
Boulder, 80301
303-449-1343
www.boulderphil.org
Founded in 1958, the Boulder Philharmonic
has grown from a community group into a
professional, critically acclaimed
orchestra. Director Theodore Kuchar
is the most recorded American con-
ductor of the past decade, and each
season the orchestra features master-
pieces, new works and prominent
guest artists. Orchestra members also
teach classes through the Boulder Arts
Academy and the Partners in Education
program, and musicians per form
classroom concerts for more than
5,000 Boulder Valley school children
annually.
Central City Opera
125 Eureka St.
Central City, 80427
303-292-6700
www.centralcityopera.org
The nations fifth-oldest opera company,
Central City Opera was founded in
1932 and performs in the 552-seat
1878 Central City Opera House. The
combination of diverse repertory and a
unique venue attracts internationally
recognized directors, conductors and
artists. Throughout the year, the opera
presents some 200 touring programs
including workshops for students and
educators, school residencies, previews,
concerts and classes for lifelong learners
in Colorado, Wyoming and Nebraska.
Cleo Parker Robinson Dance
119 Park Ave. West
Denver, 80205
303-295-1759
www.cleoparkerdance.org
A multicultural performing arts organization,
this studio includes a professional modern
dance ensemble, year-round dance
school, 300-seat theater, in-school lecture
demonstration series, international summer
dance institute, and an outreach program
for at-risk youth.
Colorado Ballet
1278 Lincoln St.
Denver, 80203
303-837-8888
www.coloradoballet.org
Established in 1961, Colorado Ballet is
one of the oldest, most successful arts
institutions in the state. The Ballets
repertoire includes classical ballets, as
well as world premieres by internationally
acclaimed choreographers. The ballet
has a company of 15 apprentice dancers
and 37 internationally acclaimed profes-
sional dancers.
Colorado Symphony Orchestra
999 18th St., Suite 2055
Denver, 80202
303-292-5566
www.coloradosymphony.org
The Colorado Symphony Orchestra is
composed of world-class musicians who
perform everything from the masters to
pops in more than 100 concerts each
year. Performances also feature such
music legends as Yo-Yo Ma, Van Cliburn,
and Burt Bacharach.
David Taylor Dance Theatre
9132 W. Bowles Ave.
Littleton, 80123
303-789-2030
www.dtdt.org
Colorados only professional contempo-
rary ballet company, DTDT features works
by nationally acclaimed choreographers
and dramatic, creative pieces by artistic
director David Taylor. Performances are
held in venues across metro Denver and
the nation. City Center Englewood is the
new home of its studio and offices; the
DTDT Dance Academy also offers classes
for all ages.
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The Denver Brass and Aries Brass Quintet
2253 Downing St.
Denver, 80205
303-832-4676
www.denverbrass.org
The Denver Brass, a 12-part chamber
brass, and the Aries Brass Quintet, the
recital quintet of The Denver Brass, perform
at concerts, celebrations and other
gatherings, as well as on tours. One of the
few professional ensembles of its kind in
the world, The Denver Brass produces its
trademark sound through 15 distinct brass
instruments. The Aries Brass Quintet is also
internationally recognized for its elegant
approach to brass chamber music.
Kim Robards Dance Company
and School
816 Acoma
Denver, 80204
303-825-4847
www.kimrobardsdance.org
A professional touring dance company, Kim
Robards Dance is one of the Western
regions most dynamic exponents of the mod-
ern dance movement. The KRD School offers
programs for ages 6 years through adults.
Opera Colorado
695 S. Colorado Blvd., Suite 20
Denver, 80246
303-893-4100
www.operacolorado.org
Col orados premiere grand opera
company for more than 20 years, Opera
Colorado presents performances of
grand opera in authentic languages with
projected English subtitle translations.
Featuring established international stars
and exciting young performers, the opera
offers a seasonal schedule and community
programs. Its travel program also brings
opera fans to opera performances in
cities around the world.
Swallow Hill Music Association
71 East Yale Ave.
Denver, 80210
303-777-1003
www.swallowhillmusic.org
Swallow Hill is Denvers home for folk, roots
and acoustic music since its founding more
than 27 years ago and is one of the largest
institutions of its kind in the nation. With
more than 2,100 members and volunteers,
Swallow Hill offers a place to celebrate
music rarely heard in the Rocky Mountain
region. Three concert venues and out-
sourced halls present more than 200
concerts a year, featuring some of the
worlds great artists as well as up-and-coming
new talent. The Julie Davis Music School at
Swallow Hill is a valuable and affordable
educational resource to the community with
more than 50 music instructors involved in
more than 240 adult classes and 70
childrens classes every year.
THEATER
Denver also offers a wealth of theater
options for arts patrons, from large compa-
nies to smaller neighborhood troupes.
Browse the following for a sample of theater
companies and performing arts venues.
Arvada Center for the Arts
and Humanities
6901 Wadsworth Blvd.
Arvada, 80003
720-898-7200
www.arvadacenter.org
The Arvada Center offers award-winning,
professional regional theater (both plays
and musicals); Denvers best childrens
theater; a wide variety of concerts;
classical and contemporar y dance
performances; nationally recognized
gallery exhibitions; a history museum;
more than 800 arts and humanities classes
for all ages. The centers state-of-the-art
theaters include a 500-seat indoor venue
and an outdoor amphitheater.
Aurora Fox Arts Center
9900 E. Colfax Ave.
Aurora, 80010
303-739-1970
www.ci.aurora.co.us
Operated by the city of Aurora, the center
presents plays, musicals, childrens theater,
concerts and guest artists for the public. The
Center also features performing arts classes
and a young actors workshop.
The Denver Performing Arts
Complex (DPAC)
Speer and Arapahoe Streets
Downtown Denver
720-865-4220
www.artscomplex.com
Connected by an 80-foot-tall glass roof,
The Denver Performing Arts Complex
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(DPAC) is the largest arts complex in the
world in one complex. The DPAC is a
four-block, 12-acre site with 10 perform-
ance spaces that is also home to a Tony
Award-winning theater company,
Broadway touring productions, contem-
porary dance and ballet, magnificent
chorales, a major symphony orchestra,
an internationally acclaimed opera and
much more.
The City and County of Denvers Theatres
and Arenas Division owns and operates
DPACs three largest theatersthe Ellie
Caulkins Opera House, the Buell Theatre
and Boettcher Concert Hall. DPAC also
houses the cabaret-style Garner Galleria
Theatre, the Tramway Theatre, the Helen
Bonfils Theatre Complex, The Stage,
Space, Ricketson and Jones theatresall
managed and booked by The Denver
Center for the Performing Arts (DCPA).
The Denver Performing Arts Complex is
also the host for the Colorado Ballet, the
Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Opera
Colorado and The Denver Center for the
Performing Arts theatrical divisions
Denver Center Attractions, Denver Center
Theatre Company and the National
Theatre Conservatory.
Festival Playhouse
5665 Old Wadsworth Blvd.
Arvada, 80003
303-422-4090
www.festivalplayhouse.com
Home of the Players Guild, the oldest
family-owned and operated community
theater in the country, the Festival
Playhouse offers performances for adults
and children throughout the year.
Germinal Stage Denver
2450 W. 44th Ave.
Denver, 80211
303-455-7108
www2.privatei.com/~gsden
Founded in 1973, this nonprofit, award-
winning theater is one of the longest-lived
and most respected small theaters in the
Rocky Mountain region. The company
performs in a 100-seat converted store-
front in historic North Denver and at festivals,
special events and on tour.
Miners Alley Playhouse
1224 Washington St., Suite 200
Golden, 80401
303-935-3044
www.minersalley.com
The Miners Alley Playhouse is a 120-seat
intimate venue featuring professional theater,
music and movie nights, and classes and
workshops for all ages. Formerly The
Morrison Theatre, the Playhouse moved to
Golden in 2003 and changed its name
after 14 years of presenting award-winning
productions in the city of Morrison.
Physically Handicapped Amateur
Musical Actors League (PHAMALY)
P.O. Box 44216
Denver, 80201
303-575-0005
www.phamaly-colorado.org
A theater group and touring company,
PHAMALY enables persons with disabili-
ties to showcase their talents and abilities
through live productions for businesses,
schools, churches, special events and
fundraisers. This award-winning group
celebrated its 16th season in 2005.
Red Rocks Amphitheatre
18300 W. Alameda Pkwy.
Morrison, 80465
303-295-4444
www.redrocksonline.com
Internationally recognized, this unique
venue is a 300-foot-high natural sand-
stone amphitheater located in the foothills
west of Denver. For more than 60 years,
its breathtaking views and natural surround-
ings have been drawing internationally
acclaimed musical performances. The
open-air amphitheater with its perfectly
acoustic surroundings is not duplicated
anywhere in the world.
CULTURAL CENTERS
Aurora Cultural Services
14949 E. Alameda Pkwy.
Aurora, 80012
303-739-6640
www.ci.aurora.co.us
The City of Auroras Cultural Services Division
offers visual arts, pottery, music, theater,
history programs, dance, special events, a
volunteer program, and an arts outreach
grant program. More than 400,000 people
participate in its programs or attend its events
annually. Facilities include Bicentennial Art
Center, Aurora Fox Arts Center and the
Aurora History Museum.
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Colorado Chautauqua Association
900 Baseline Road
Boulder, 80302
303-440-7666
www.chautauqua.com
This association preserves the site and
perpetuates the spirit of the historic
Chautauqua in Boulder by building
community through unique cultural,
educational, social and recreational
experiences. The association also hosts a
film and concert series from May to
September in Chautauqua venues.
Denver Film Society
1725 Blake St.
Aurora, 80202
303-595-3456
www.denverfilm.org
Founded in 1978, the society is one of the
premier cultural arts institutions in the Rocky
Mountain region. It offers year-round
cinematic programming and special
events that reach more than 150,000
film-lovers annually. Its season includes film
festivals throughout the year, including the
award-winning Starz Denver International
Film Festival. In partnership with the
University of Colorado at Denvers College
of Arts & Media, the society operates the
Starz Film Center, which showcases art
and independent cinema daily.
Lakewood Heritage, Culture and the Arts
470 S. Allison Pkwy.
Lakewood, 80226
303-987-7876
www.lakewood.org
The City of Lakewood offers a variety of
cultural programs, classes, exhibits,
performances and interactive learning
experiences. Its facilities include
Lakewoods Heritage Center, a 20th cen-
tury museum with more than 30,000
artifacts and an amphitheater; Washington
Heights Arts Center, a renovated early
20th century schoolhouse that hosts cultural
arts and dance classes for all ages; and
the Lakewood Cultural Center, which has
a 300-seat theater, gallery/exhibit space
and classrooms.
Longmont Museum and Cultural Center
400 Quail Road
Longmont, 80501
303-651-8374
www.ci.longmont.co.us/museum
The city of Longmonts historic museum
and cultural center are at home in a $6
million, 24,000-square-foot facility with
four exhibit galleries, three classrooms
and an outdoor courtyard. Educational
programs include summer camps in
history, art and science, and evening
lectures and concerts.
Mizel Center for Arts and
Culture at the JCC
350 S. Dahlia St.
Denver, 80246
303-316-6360
www.mizelcenter.org
The Mizel Center illuminates the human
experience through creative and cultural
programs in the performing, visual and
literary arts for the Jewish community
and the community at large. Major
programs include the Leah Cohen
Festival of Jewish Books and Authors,
the Mellon Financial Denver Jewish Film
Festival, and the Denver Childrens
Theatre. Craft a creative summer experi-
ence for your child at our theater and
art camps, or mix-n-match with JCC
sports camps. Visual arts and pottery
classes are available for adults.
Robert E. Loup Jewish
Community Center (JCC)
350 S. Dahlia St.
Denver, 80246
303-399-2660
www.jccdenver.org
For more than 80 years, the JCC has
offered social, recreational and educa-
tional programs to the community. The
center and its programs are open to
individuals and families regardless of
religion, ethnicity, gender, sexual orien-
tation or ability to pay. JCC offers pro-
grams for all ages and interests, including
fitness and tennis centers, day camps, a
preschool, programs and special
events.
Town Hall Arts Center
2450 W. Main St.
Littleton, 80120
303-794-2787
www.townhallartscenter.com
From theater productions to gallery
shows, Town Hall Arts Center is Littletons
cultural center for the performing and
visual arts.
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TICKET INFORMATION
The Denver Center for the Performing Arts 303-893-4100 www.denvercenter.org
Ticketswest 866-464-2626 www.ticketswest.com
Colorado Ballet 303-837-8888, ext. 2 www.coloradoballet.org
Colorado Symphony Orchestra 303-MAESTRO (623-7276) www.coloradosymphony.org
Opera Colorado 303-357-ARTS (2787) www.operacolorado.org
Swallow Hill Music Association 303-777-1003 www.swallowhillmusic.org
Tickets also can be obtained through Ticketmaster, 303-830-TIXS (8497), www.ticketmaster.com
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Metro Denver offers a variety of
attractions that appeal to everyone from
the young in years to the young at heart.
Visitors can experience the beauty of a
collection of live butterflies that originated
from places around the world at the
Butterfly Pavilion to the majesty of a herd
of buffalo in their natural habitat at the
Bison and Elk Herds, or take a prehistoric
journey at Dinosaur Ridge.
If you have a curiosity about animals from
across the globe, the Denver Zoo offers
more than 750 species and is just minutes
from downtown Denver; and The Wildlife
Experience in Parker features an extensive
collection of natural history and exhibits.
For plant lovers, the Denver Botanic
Gardens and The Hudson Gardens and
Event Center offer serene gardens and
plants from around the world. Pick up the
pace and visit an amusement park with
super-thrill rides or a water park with more
than 40 water attractions.
Whichever metro Denver attraction you
choose, you are destined to have fun and
often learn more about the world around
you.
DOWNTOWN DENVER
Colorado State Capitol
Broadway and Colfax Avenue
Denver, 80203
303-866-2604
www.state.co.us/gov_dir/leg_dir/
lcsstaff/capitoltour
Modeled after the nations Capitol in
Washington, D.C., the building was
made almost entirely of Colorado materials,
including granite, white marble, Fort
Collins Sandstone and Colorado Onyx, a
rare, rose-colored stone used on the
wainscoting and pillar facings. A gold
dome made from 200 ounces of pure
gold leaf tops the Capitol.
Downtown Aquarium Denver
700 Water St.
Denver, 80211
303-561-4450
www.downtownaquariumdenver.com
This entertainment and dining complex
showcases a public aquarium with more
than one million gallons of underwater
exhibits that feature ecosystems from
around the world. The aquarium houses
more than 500 species of animals and
an interactive Sting Ray Reef touch tank.
The complex includes the Aquarium
Restaurant, the Dive Lounge, the Nautilus
Ballroom and amusements for the entire
family.
Governors Residence at the
Boettcher Mansion
400 E. 8th Ave.
Denver, 80204
303-866-3682
www.colorado.gov/dpa/doit/
archives/residenc.html
The Colorado Governors Residence
includes museum-quality artwork and
furnishings, including the President Grant
chandelier, which previously hung in the
White House. The Colorado Historical
Society offers tours of the mansion.
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ATTRACTIONS
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THINGS TO
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Elitch Gardens
2000 Elitch Circle
Denver, 80204
303-595-4386
www.sixflags.com/elitchgardens
More than 45 rides, shows and attractions
are featured at this amusement and water
park.
United States Mint
320 W. Colfax Ave.
Denver, 80204
303-405-4757
www.usmint.gov
The United States Mint at Denver produces
more than 50 million coins daily. Group
tours are conducted on weekdays and
individuals, families and groups with 15
or fewer people should contact a member
of Congress for sponsorship before a tour
can be conducted. Contact the Mint for
more information.
Venice on the Creek
Speer Boulevard and 14th Street
Denver, 80204
303-893-0750
www.veniceonthecreek.com
Venice on the Creek boasts the only
punts similar to Italian gondolasin the
country and offers you the opportunity to
glide down Cherry Creek. Learn about
Denvers history on your ride or enjoy the
scenery along Cherry Creek and lower
downtown Denver. It also features land-
scaped pedestrian trails as well as ramps
that lead to the bank of Cherry Creek.
METRO AREA
Bison and Elk Herds
Genesee Park and Daniels Park
Denver
303-697-4545
www.denvergov.org/Mountain_Parks
Visitors can view two herds of bison
and elk in their natural habitat at two
area parks. Genesee Park, Denvers first
and largest mountain park, spans
2,300 acres and includes a 160- acre
wild elk and bison enclosure. Daniels
Park covers more than 1,000 acres, of
which 900 acres is a preserve and nat-
ural area for Denvers second herd. The
parks offer picnic areas and scenic
mountain views.
Butterfly Pavilion and Insect Center
6252 W. 104th Ave.
Westminster, 80020
303-469-5441
www.butterflies.org
Spanning five acres, the Butterfly Pavilion
is the first nonprofit, stand-alone insect
zoo in the country. It features more than
1,200 free-flying butterflies, outdoor
butterfly gardens, a nature trail, museum
shop and deli. Visitors can watch adult
butterflies emerge in a chrysalis viewing
area or touch insects from around the world,
including Chiles rose-haired tarantula
and Madagascars Hissing Cockroach.
View peppermint shrimp, hermit crabs
and other marine invertebrates in their
natural habitat, or feel inches tall in a
backyard with giant animatronic insects
and interactive exhibits.
Celestial Seasonings
4600 Sleepytime Drive
Boulder, 80301
303-581-1202
www.celestialseasonings.com
Celestial Seasonings, the largest manu-
facturer and marketer of specialty hot teas
in the country, offers tours through its art
gallery, herb garden and factory. Enjoy
samplings of more than 50 varieties of
teas and experience The Mint Room
where crates of peppermint and
spearmint are stored. A caf and gift
shop are on site.
Colorado State Parks
Colorado
303-470-1144
www.parks.state.co.us
In addition to offering magnificent scenic
views and a great outdoor experience,
Colorado State Parks offers a host of
activities for all ages, including camping,
biking, bird watching, boating, cross-
country skiing, fishing, horseback riding,
hunting, ice skating, jet-skiing, sailing
boating, sledding, snowmobiling, swim-
ming and many other activities and
attractions.
Coors Brewing Company
13th and Ford streets
Golden, 80401
303-277-2337
www.coors.com
A 45-minute tour through Molson Coors
brewery in Golden guides visitors through
the beer-making process from malting and
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brewing to packaging. The tour of the
largest single brewery in the world
includes a stop at a sampling area where
complimentary soft drinks and beer
samples are served. Beer samples are
served to visitors over 21 years of age
with a valid I.D.
Denver Botanic Gardens
1005 York St.
Denver, 80206
720-865-3500
www.botanicgardens.org
Recognized as one of the top five botanical
gardens in the nation, Denver Botanic
Gardens spans 23 acres and has more
than 32,000 plants from around the
world. Other sites are located in
Chatfield, Littleton and Mt. Goliath.
Denver Zoo
2300 Steele St.
Denver, 80205
303-376-4800
www.denverzoo.org
Started in 1896, the Denver Zoo has
grown to be one of the most visited
zoos in the country and Colorados
most popular cultural attraction.
Located on 80 acres, just minutes from
downtown Denver in City Park, the zoo
is recognized internationally as a
leader in exhibitry and continues to
grow as a leader in conservation and
education programs. Home to nearly
4,000 animals representing over 750
species, the zoo is open every day. In
2004, the zoo unveiled Predator
Ridge, a three-acre exhibit that features
Africas greatest predators.
The series of five exhibits recreates a
portion of the Samburu National Reserve
in Kenya. Visitors can wind through rock
outcroppings and brush to discover amazing
views of lions, African wild dog and
hyena. The zoo continues to create inno-
vative wildlife habitats such as Tropical
Discovery, Northern Shores and Primate
Panorama. Gates Wildlife Conservation
Education Center, a regional hub for
activities, introduces Coloradans of all
ages to the principles of conservation and
natural resources.
Dinosaur Ridge
16831 W. Alameda Pkwy.
Morrison, 80465
303-697-3466
www.dinoridge.org
Located just 15 miles west of downtown
Denver in the Morrison Fossil Beds
National Natural Landmark, Dinosaur
Ridge is an outdoor museum that features
Jurassic dinosaur bones and more than
300 Cretaceous dinosaur footprints. A
visitors center and gift shop are located
on-site.
Four Mile Historic Park
715 S. Forest St.
Denver, 80246
303-399-1859
www.fourmilepark.org
Four Mile Historic Park seeks to preserve
Colorados western rural heritage. It is
home to Four Mile House, Denvers
oldest house, which once served as a
stagecoach stop, wayside inn and
tavern for travelers on the Cherokee
Trail.
The 12-acre park offers school/youth
programs, senior field trips, special
events, guided museum and grounds
tours, a summer day camp and site
rental opportunities.
Heritage Square
18301 W. Colfax Ave.
Golden, 80401
303-279-2789
www.heritagesquare.info
This Western Victorian shopping and
entertainment complex has unique
shops and restaurants open year-round,
with special rides, games and merchants
open seasonally or on weekends.
Heritage Squares lodge and Victorian
house are avail abl e for special
events.
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The Hudson Gardens and
Event Center
6115 S. Santa Fe Drive
Littleton, 80120
303-797-8565
www.hudsongardens.org
The Hudson Gardens and Event Center
offers a multitude of concerts, educa-
tional programs and holiday events
throughout the year. Visitors will enjoy
the facilitys 21 gardens, which vary
from flower, herb and water gardens to
wetlands and the cascades. The gardens
span 30 acres and are arranged
around a garden railroad, ponds,
wildlife, sculptures and other natural
displays and hideaways.
Lakeside Amusement Park
I-70 and Sheridan
Denver, 80212
303-477-1621
www.lakesideamusementpark.com
This amusement park offers countless
rides, games and roller coasters for
adults, as well as 15 rides for children.
The park offers free parking and welcomes
picnics.
Mile High Flea Market
7007 E. 88th Ave.
Henderson, 80640
303-289-4656
www.milehighfleamarket.com
Open on Wednesday and on the
weekend, this indoor-outdoor market
caters from 20 to 40,000 customers
regularly.
Mother Cabrini Shrine
20189 Cabrini Blvd.
Golden, 80401
303-526-0758
www.den-cabrini-shrine.org
Owned by the Missionary Sisters of the
Sacred Heart of Jesus, this shrine is a
place of prayer, pilgrimage and devotion
to Saint Frances Xavier Cabrini. The area
includes a chapel, grotto, statue, artifacts,
barn and a stone house available for
meetings.
National Center for Atmospheric
Research (NCAR)
1850 Table Mesa Drive
Boulder, 80305
303-497-1174
www.ucar.edu
Discover how scientists study weather and
climate at NCARs Mesa Lab. Enjoy
science exhibits, an educational research
center, gift shop, weather trail, art galleries
and special public events. The site also is
a natural preserve for wildlife that roam the
area and in nearby mountain parks.
Tiny Town, Colorado
6249 S. Turkey Creek Road
Tiny Town, 80465
303-697-6829
www.tinytownrailroad.com
Touted as the oldest village and railroad in
the country, Tiny Town was created at the
site of the Denver-Leadville stagecoach stop
southwest of Denver in 1915. Today, the
onesixth- sized town has more than 100
colorful buildings and offers a train ride that
is powered by authentic steam locomotive.
Water World
West 88th Avenue and Pecos Street
Denver, 80260
303-427-7873
www.waterworldcolorado.com
Located on 64 acres, the park features
42 water attractions, including Speed
Slides, Lazy River and Thunder Bay.
Picnics are welcome and parking is
free. Other amenities include a gift
shop, tube rentals and lockers.
The Wildlife
Experience
10035 S. Peoria
Parker, 80134
720-488-3300
www.thewildlifeexperience.com
This wildlife conservation museum features
an extensive collection of natural history,
paintings, sculptures, photography and
film exhibits throughout the year.
The 101,000-square-foot center also
houses a restaurant, gift shop and
educational programs and classes.
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Nestled in the center of the Front
Range Urban Corridor, Denver and its out-
lying communities sit astride the border
between the Rocky Mountains to the west
and the High Plains in the east, blessing
residents and visitors alike with an
immensely diverse geography and an
equally numerous choice of outdoor activities
from which to choose and enjoy.
For many, Denver is considered a jump-
ing-off point for exploring and enjoying
the Rocky Mountains, and small wonder.
Colorado is home to the Rockies 30
highest major summits, as well as four
national parks, six national monuments,
two national recreation areas, two national
historic sites, three national historic trails,
a national scenic trail, 11 national
forests, two national grasslands, 41
national wilderness areas, two national
conservation areas, eight national wildlife
refuges, 44 state parks, a state forest,
323 state wildlife areas and numerous
other scenic, historic and recreational
attractions. Surrounding the city limits itself
are many opportunities for enjoying the
outdoors, such as golfing, skiing, camp-
ing, hiking, bicycling and fishing.
In fact, the outdoor lifestyle is so integral
to the identity of Colorado, that the
region has its own regional sports tele-
vision network. Altitude Sports and
Entertainment focuses on all things out-
doors and athletic in the Rockies, but
specifically in and around Denver. The state
also has garnered a well-deserved reputa-
tion for having an active, athletic population
with the lowest obesity rates in the United
States. The Winter X Games, an ESPN-
produced annual event profiling action
sports such as various skiing, snowboarding
and snowmobiling events, has been hosted
on-and-off in Colorado since 1998, and
since 2002 has taken place in Aspen.
A NOTE ON ALTITUDE: Denver isnt
called The Mile High City for nothing.
Visitors and newly arrived residents
especially those who are used to living at
or near sea levelshould not engage in
strenuous activity until they are fully accli-
mated to the region and are cleared by a
TAKE IT
OUTSIDE
HIKING, BIKING, RAFTING,
SKIING, GOLF and MORE
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doctor. Immediately engaging in such
activity puts one at the risk of altitude
sickness, when the body removes enough
carbon dioxide but doesnt take in
enough oxygen. Symptoms include loss of
appetite, nausea, vomiting, dizziness,
fatigue or weakness and persistent rapid
pulse, to name a few.
WHITE WATER RAFTING
Colorados rafting industry is especially
vibrant. In 2010, rafters logged an amazing
half-million user days (a paying guest on
a river for any part of a day) between
April and September, according to the
Summit Voice.
In all, Colorado rafting outfitters frequent
more than 20 rivers across eight major
basins in the state, with the Colorado and
Arkansas rivers attracted the most visitors
between 2009 and 2010 while main-
taining a capacity for more. Still, other
rivers in the state have use limits and have
seen their numbers stabilize. Overall, the
sheer number of rivers where whitewater
rafting is available presents a great deal
of opportunity for all Coloradans to
practice their affectation for rafting. In
fact, most people are within an easy
days drive of a rafting vacation that suits
their tastes. The rafting season in
Colorado begins when rivers start to flow
in May, peaking by mid-June at the latest.
Good water flow continues into the fall.
Rafting on desert rivers could begin as
early as late April, since they tend to start
running earlier than those rivers at higher
elevation. In either case, the bigger the
deasired whitewater, the earlier in the
season one should go.
For more information or to find a rafting outfitter,
visit www.coloradoraftingassociation.com.
WINTER SPORTS
Coloradoand the Denver area in
particularis considered by many to be
the winter sports capital of the United
States. Prime ski resorts, such as Vail,
Beaver Creek, Copper Mountain,
LEI SURE AND RECREATI ON
The metro Denver area offers plenty of opportunities for kids
and families to participate in team sports and other activities.
From sports leagues to Little League to outdoor adventures,
theres a lot to choose from to make your transition here a
smooth one and help kids make new friends.
For example, the YMCA of Metropolitan Denver offers organized
adult and youth sports, childcare, health and fitness programs,
Adventure Guides for parent-child bonding, day camps and
Youth in Government for youths interested in the political
process. Little League baseball and softball also are popular.
Other organizations, such as Big Brothers Big Sisters of
Colorado and the Boys & Girls Club of Metro Denver, have
mentoring services and after-school and summer programs to
encourage positive activity for children and young adults. The
Boy Scouts of America in Denver is also popular helping
kids helps character, and encouraging responsibility, citizenship,
and developing personal fitness.
Weve included many Denver-area youth and family organi-
zations and recreational resources here. For other organized
sports opportunities, local city parks and recreation departments
and area school districts are another great resource.
YOUTH SPORTS
AND RESOURCES
4 Parents Hotline
303-620-4444
Aspen Center
303-429-4440
Big Brothers Big Sisters
of Colorado
303-433-6002
Boy Scouts of America
Denver Area Council
303-455-5522
Boys & Girls Clubs of
Metro Denver
303-892-9200
Family Advocacy Care
Education & Support
720-570-9333
Front Range Earth Force
303-433-0016
Girl Scouts Mile Hi Council
303-778-8774
Junior Achievement
303-534-5252
Southwest Denver
Little League
303-736-3780
Urban League
of Metropolitan Denver
303-388-5861
Urban Peak
303-777-9198
YMCA of Metro Denver
720-524-2700
Young Life
303-472-8140
Youth for Christ USA
303-843-0370
Youth with a Mission
303-424-1144
Youth with a Vision
720-221-7088
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Keystone, Loveland Basin, Arapahoe
Basin, Breckenridge, Winter Park,
Steamboat and Aspen proliferate the
area. There, visitors can engage in such
outdoor sporting activities as snowmobiling,
sledding, snowboarding, ice skating,
indoor or outdoor swimming and of
course, skiing, as well as enjoying hot-
tubbing, game rooms and local entertain-
ment. Snowshoers and cross-country
skiers also can enjoy extensive networks
of trails that, depending on the resort,
generally are free.
Many ski resorts are no more than a two-
hour drive from the metro area. Many of
the resorts feature shuttles for people who
do not have the appropriate vehicle for
traversing snowy, wet roads. Another
way to maximize enjoyment of the resorts
would be to frequent the slopes outside
the busy season, which falls between the
holidays of Thanksgiving and New
Years.
GOLF
Since the Overland Golf Course first
opened in 1895, golfing has become a
veritable tradition in the Denver area.
Golfers enjoy a wondrous selection of
places to ply their pastime (please see the
adjoining listing of more than 100 private
and public golf courses and country clubs
in and around the metro area). In fact, the
Ladies Professional Golf Associations
U.S. Womens Open is held in Colorado
Springs, just an hours drive south of
Denver. The city is also the hometown of
PGA professional Jonathan Kaye.
The key to the excellent golfing in
Denver and Colorado as a whole is
the ever-changing landscape, which is
essential to the creation of golf courses
that are challenging and beautiful at
the same time. In all there are more
than 200 public and private courses in
the state, designed by world-famous
architects, with lush green fairways that
take advantage of the most scenic vistas
imaginable.
HIKING AND
MOUNTAIN BIKING
While the nearby Rocky Mountains
provide visitors with many hundreds of
miles of hiking trails to take in the
regions natural beauty and watch
wildlife, one does not need to travel so
far from Denver to enjoy a pleasant outdoor
walk or bike ride. Within the metro
area, there are more than 850 miles of
paved, off-road trails, which in turn
attach to dirt trails for both hiking and
mountain bike adventures. Less demanding
area bike trails easily take riders in and
out of urban and rural settings past
dozens of local attractions, such as the
Cherry Creek Shopping District, the REI
Flagship Store, the Chatfield Reservoir
State Recreation Area and Red Rocks
Amphitheatre and Park.
Denver Parks and Recreation can provide
bicycling, hiking and jogging path
suggestions about the areas 250 parks.
The department can be contacted either
by phone (720-913-0696) or through its
website (www.denvergov.org/parks).
For the more adventurous and demanding
mountain bicyclist and hiker, there is the
Colorado Trail, a 483-mile-long stretch
running from Waterton Canyon near
southwestern Denver to Durango. Built
and maintained by the non-profit
Colorado Trail Foundation and the
United States Forest Service, the trail is
considered by many to be the preeminant
outdoor adventure in the Denver area,
with the most common activities consisting
of day trips. It is popular with mountain
bikers and hikers alike, from those just
starting out to seasoned veterans and
provides a multitude of variation along its
length.
For those interested in long distance
biking, the Colorado Trail is world class.
According to the Colorado Trail
Foundation, It is possible to do the Trail
and detours via bike without any vehicular
support by re-supplying in Frisco,
Leadville, Buena Vista, and Silverton.
Allow maybe 15 to 20 days for the trip.
Cyclists can also travel the entire trail with
detours in a variety of supported ways,
lighten their load and trim their number of
days. A mountain bike is a great way to
travel the trail, but expect to push the bike
on some of the steeper, rockier pitches.
For more information on the Colorado
Trail, visit www.coloradotrail.org.
CYCLING RESOURCES
The following associations are great
resources and information on cycling in
the metro Denver area, including clubs,
organized rides, routes, and much
more.
American Cycling Association
303-458-5538
www.americancycling.org
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GOLF COURSES
PRIVATE LOCATION
PHONE
NUMBER
WEBSITE
HOLES/
PAR
USGA
RATING/SLOPE
LENGTH IN
YARDS
Bear Creek Golf Club Denver 303-980-8700 www.bearcreekgolfclub.net 18/72 74.3/146 7,611
Castle Pines Golf Club Castle Rock 303-688-6022 www.castlepinesgolfclub.com 18/72 75.8/150 7,559
Cherry Creek Country Club Denver 303-597-0300 www.cherrycreekcountryclub.com 18/72 73.0/141 7,405
Cherry Hills Country Club Englewood 303-761-9900 www.chcc.com 18/72 74.3/140 7,160
Columbine Country Club Littleton 303-794-6333 www.columbinecountryclub.org 18/72 72.8/133 7,250
Denver Country Club Denver 303-733-2444 www.denvercc.net 18/71 72.6/137 6,782
Glenmoor Country Club Englewood 303-781-3000 www.glenmoorcountryclub.org 18/71 71.3/134 6,777
Green Gables Country Club Denver 303-985-4433 www.greengablescc.org 18/71 73.9/138 7,100
Hiwan Golf Club Evergreen 303-674-3369 www.hiwan.com 18/70 72.8/143 7,006
The Inverness Golf Course Englewood 800-832-9053 www.invernesshotel.com 18/70 71.8/136 6,913
Lakewood Country Club Lakewood 303-233-4614 www.lakewoodcountryclub.net 18/71 71.4/136 6,6716
Links Golf Course Highlands Ranch 303-470-9292 www.highlandsranchgolf.com 18/62 60.9/98 4,800
Meridian Golf Club Englewood 303-799-8412 www.meridiangolfclub.com 18/72 73.3/139 7,292
Pinehurst Country Club Denver 303-466-2111 www.pinehurstcountryclub.com 27/106 71.0/130 9,969
Plum Creek Golf & C. Club Castle Rock 303-688-2612 www.plumcreekgolfandcc.net 18/72 73.6/137 6,942
The Ranch Country Club Westminster 303-460-9700 www.theranchcc.com 18/71 70.8/133 6,618
Red Rocks Country Club Morrison 303-697-4438 www.redrockscountryclub.com 18/71 70.8/127 6,714
Rolling Hills Country Club Golden 303-279-3334 www.rhillscc.org 18/71 72.3/138 6,963
South Glenn Country Club Littleton www.southglenncc.com 9/53 N/A 1,387
PUBLIC
Applewood Golf Course Golden 303-279-3003 www.Applewoodgc.com 18/71 67.4/112 5,992
Arrowhead Golf Club Littleton 303-973-9614 www.americangolf.com 18/70 70.9/134 6,682
Broadlands Golf Course Broomfield 303-466-8285 www.broadlandsgolf.com 18/72 72.9/125 7,263
Broken Tee Golf Course Englewood 303-762-2670 www.brokenteegolf.com 18/72 71.4/130 6,903
City Park Golf Course Denver 303-295-2095 www.cityofdenvergolf.com/citypark 18/72 70.6/122 6,318
CommonGround Golf Course Aurora 303-340-1520 www.commongroundgc.com 18/71 73/129 7,198
Evergreen Golf Course Evergreen 303-674-6351 www.cityofdenvergolf.com/evergreen 18/69 62.4/111 4,877
Foothills Golf Course Denver 303-409-2400 www.ifoothills.org 36/72 71.1/122 6,908
Fossil Trace Golf Club Golden 303-277-8750 www.fossiltrace.com 18/72 71.8/138 6,831
Fox Hollow Golf Course Lakewood 303-986-7888 www.ci.lakewood.co.us 27/72 72.6/135 10,363
Golf Courses at Hyland Hills Westminster 303-428-6526 www.golfhylandhills.com 45/73 73.1/131 7,100
Green Valley Ranch Golf Club Denver 303-371-3131 www.gvrgolf.com 18/72 72.7/131 7,241
Harvard Gulch Golf Course Denver 303-698-4078 cityofdenvergolf.com/harvardgulch 9/23 27.0/120 891
Highlands Ranch Golf Club Highlands Ranch 303-471-0000 www.highlandsranchgolf.com 18/72 71.6/123 7,076
Legacy Ridge Golf Course Westminster 303-438-8997 www.ci.westminster.co.us 18/72 73.4/139 7,157
Lone Tree Golf Club Littleton 303-799-9940 www.sspr.org 18/72 72.6/133 7,054
The Meadows Golf Club Littleton 303-409-2250 www.overlandsgolfcourse.com 18/72 72.2/135 7,011
Omni Interlocken Resort GC Broomfield 303-464-9000 www.omnihotels.com/golf/denver/ 27/72 73.3/136 7,040
Overland Golf Course Denver 303-777-7331 www.cityofdenver.com 18/74 72.7/118 6,676
Park Hill Golf Club Denver 303-333-5411 www.parkhillgc.com 18/72 70.0/123 6,592
Raccoon Creek Golf Course Littleton 303-932-0199 www.raccooncreek.com 18/72 72.6/128 7,045
Red Hawk Ridge Course Castle Rock 720-733-3500 www.redhawkridge.com 18/72 71.6/129 6,942
The Ridge at Castle Pines North Castle Rock 303-688-4301 www.theridgecpn.com 18/71 71.8/143 7,103
South Suburban Golf Course Centennial 303-770-5508 www.ssprd.org 18/72 70.1/131 6,815
Wellshire Golf Club Denver 303-757-1352 www.cityofdenvergolf.com/wellshire 18/71 71.1/129 6,542
West Woods Golf Club Arvada 720-898-7370 www.westwoodsgolf.com 27/72 72/135 7,035
Willis Case Golf Course Denver 303-455-9801 www.cityofdenvergolf.com/williscase 18/72 68.6/119 6,306
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Denver Bicycle Touring Club
www.dbtc.org
Team Evergreen Bicycle Club
303-674-6048
www.teamevergreen.org
BOATING
With so many parks in the area, its no
surprise that there are also plenty of lakes
and waterways for boating, swimming,
fishing, and more. The following is a
sampling of some of the Denver areas
most popular water destinations.
Aurora Reservoir
5800 S. Powhatan Road
Aurora, 80013
303-690-1286
www.auroragov.org
Bear Creek Lake Park
15600 W. Morrison Road
Lakewood, 80465
303-697-6159
www.ci.lakewood.co.us
Cherry Creek Marina & Yacht Club
4800 S. Dayton St.
Greenwood Village, 80111
303-779-6144
www.cherrycreekmarina.com
North Shore Marina at
Chatfield State Park
11500 N. Roxborough Park Road
Littleton, 80125
303-791-5555
www.parks.state.co.us
Quincy Reservoir
17900 E. Quincy Ave.
Aurora, 80015
303-693-5463
www.auroragov.org
Standley Lake Regional Park
9785 Eagle View Loop
Westminster, 80021
303-425-1097
www.ci.westminster.co.us
CLIMBING
Not quite ready to climb the Rockies? There
are plenty of indoor climbing walls in the
metro Denver area that offer opportunities to
safely learn climbing techniques before tra-
versing the natural rock face of the outdoors.
Paradise Rock Gym
6260 N. Washington St., Suite 5
Denver, 80216
303-286-8168
www.paradiserock.com
Recreational Equipment Inc. (REI)
1416 Platte St.
Denver, 80202
303-756-3100
www.rei.com
ROCKn & JAMn
9499 Washington St., Unit C
Thornton, 80229
303-254-6299
www.rocknandjamn.com
Thrillseekers Inc.
1912 S. Broadway
Denver, 80210
303-733-8810
www.thrillseekers.cc
Westminster City Park
10455 Sheridan Blvd.
Westminster, 80030
303-460-9690
www.ci.westminster.co.us
Wheat Ridge Recreation Center
4005 Kipling St.
Wheat Ridge, 80033
303-231-1300
www.ci.wheatridge.co.us
HUNTING AND FISHING
Colorado Division of Wildlife
6060 Broadway
Denver, 80216
303-297-1192
www.wildlife.state.co.us
In addition to the areas many parks, hike-and-bike trails and
other recreational opportunities, metro Denver offers an abun-
dance of health clubs and fitness facilities for residents and
guests who enjoy working out and staying fit.
With the latest in exercise equipment, unique and fun
classes, personal trainers, juice bars and more, Denver
offers a lot to residents when it comes to area fitness facilities.
For a list of fitness centers, refer to the Business Directory
on the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerces website:
www.denverchamber.org.
Another source to find local fitness centers is the International
Health, Racquet and Sportsclub Association (www.ihrsa.org),
where you can do a search for area fitness facilities. Youll get
a list of health and fitness clubs with information about services,
a mapped location and a link to each clubs website for
additional information. The site also offers a link to
www.healthclub.com, which lists health clubs and personal
trainers, provides personal fitness information, and more.
HEALTH RESOURCES
and FITNESS CENTERS
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ET THE MOST
OUT OF LIFE
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The Division of Wildlife manages 230
wildlife areas and oversees 6,000 miles
of streams and more than 2,000 lakes
and reservoirs. The Division of Wildlife
regulates fishing activities for fish found
in the waters of Colorado, including
rainbow trout and walleye, popular
species for fishing. A weekly report of
Colorados fishing conditions is pub-
lished on the divisions website. The
Division of Wildlife also regulates hunting
and enforces hunting regulations for big
game, small game and waterfowl. Deer,
elk, antelope and bear are among the
most popular animals sought by hunters.
A qualified hunter education course is
required prior to applying for a hunting
license. Combined, hunting and fishing
add up to a $3.2 billion-per-year industry
in Colorado.
SCUBA DIVING
Believe it or not, Denver even offers some
fun options for scuba enthusiasts from
swimming with exotic sealife to hosting
trips around the world.
A-1 Scuba & Travel Center
1800 W. Oxford Ave.
Englewood, 80110
303-789-2450
www.a1scuba.com
Denver Divers
557 Milwaukee St.
Denver, 80206
303-399-2877
www.denver-divers.com
Underwater Phantaseas Scuba Center
6860 S. Clinton Court
Englewood, 80112
303-220-8282
www.underwaterphantaseas.com
SNOWSKIING, MOUNTAIN
ADVENTURES & MORE
Fresh powder is within an hours drive from
Denver, making the region a skiers delight.
Colorado is home to 26 ski areas, ranging
from small, two-run slopes to world famous
resorts like Aspen, Steamboat Springs, Vail
and Telluride. Other outdoor sports
include cross-country skiing, snowboarding,
snowshoeing and snowmobiling not to
mention the many adventures to be had
just exploring the mountains.
From hunting to rock climbing, metro
Denvers proximity to the Rocky Mountains
offers visitors and residents an abundance
of outdoor recreational opportunities. For
those who enjoy skiing and snowboarding,
Colorados famed ski resorts are less than
two hours from Denver.
Water adventures in the area can be as
thrilling as whitewater rafting and river
running, or as relaxing as fishing or
sailing at one of the areas breathtaking
lakes. Other activities include wind surfing,
swimming and water skiing.
A mild climate year-round presents
many occasions to enjoy the natural
beauty of the Colorado Rockies. A hot
air balloon ride through Colorados
mountain range provides a unique
opportunity to see dramatic views of
the region. For a more intimate look at
nature, horseback riding or hiking
across area trails are popular alterna-
tives. Sightseeing tours on foot or by
jeep or van can range from leisurely
excursions through popular tourist spots
to up-close views of the top of Pikes
Peak and the foothills of the Rocky
Mountains.
POPULAR DENVER-AREA
SKI RESORTS
Arapahoe Basin
888-272-7246
www.arapahoebasin.com
Breckenridge
www.breckinridge.com
800-789-7669
Copper Mountain
www.coppercolorado.com
866-841-2481
Keystone
www.keystoneresort.com
877-625-1556
Loveland
www.skiloveland.com
800-736-3754
Vail
www.vail.com
877-204-4881
Winter Park
www.winterparkresort.com
800-979-0332
SKI RESOURCES
AND INFORMATION
Colorado Department of
Transportation Information Hotline
303-639-1111
www.dot.state.co.us
Daily Ski Conditions/Reports
(statewide)
303-825-7669
www.coloradoski.com
Road Conditions
(2 hour radius of Denver)
www.cotrip.org
DENVER PARKS
The Denver Parks and Recreation
Department, one of the nations largest
park systems, maintains more than 350
parks and pathways throughout the metro
area. Interactive programs and educational
resources are the focus of 29 recreation
centers located within Denver parks, with
learning opportunities for every age group.
Denver is unique in that it also owns an
extensive mountain parks system. The city
owns 14,000 acres of mountain parks
and 2,500 acres of natural areas.
Denvers mountain parks system has exten-
sive trails for hiking and biking, plus
picnic areas and other facilities open to
the public. The following are just some of
the areas premier parks:
LEI SURE AND RECREATI ON
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Your opportunities to play with the Colorado Lottery go well beyond just playing our
games. You can play with us by taking on a mountain trail, visiting a local park or
recreation center, or by simply taking a moment to appreciate the wildlife that live and
thrive on our Colorado mountains and plains. Thats because every time you play a Colorado Lottery game, you
help give back to our state and make Colorado an even more beautiful place to live and play. Over the years,
Coloradans have helped us put more than $2.2 billion into the development and preservation of Colorados parks,
recreation, outdoors and wildlife. So keep playing, Colorado. It makes us all winners.
CREATING MOUNTAINS
OF WAYS TO PLAY
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Aurora Reservoir
5800 S. Powhaton Road
Aurora, 80013
303-690-1286
www.auroragov.org
More than 820 acres of water offer great
fishing, sailing, swimming, and other
water activities. Gas-powered watercraft
is banned. A park pass is required for
park entry.
Bluff Lake Nature Center
7350 E. 29th Ave., Suite 300
Denver, 80238
303-468-3240
www.blufflakenaturecenter.org
Part of the former Stapleton International
Airport, Bluff Lake opened to the public in
1997 as a 123-acre wildlife refuge. Bluff
Lake links parks and habitat along the
Sand Creek corridor.
Chatfield State Park
11500 N. Roxborough Park Road
Littleton, 80125
303-791-7275
www.parks.state.co.us
Chatfield offers water sports, fishing,
hiking, birding and horseback riding
opportunities. Overnight campsites are
available by reservation. Chatfield also
has a marina and a hot-air balloon
launch area.
Cherry Creek Reservoir State Park
4201 S. Parker Road
Aurora, 80014
303-699-3860
www.parks.state.co.us
Bicyclists, hikers and water lovers alike
enjoy this natural area with its camping
space and marina.
City Park
17th Avenue and York Street
City Parks lush 314 acres includes a
lake, playgrounds, tennis courts and
gardens. The east end of the park is
home to the Denver Zoo and the Museum
of Nature and Science. City Park hosts a
summer concert series, Run for the Zoo
and the Black Arts Festival.
Civic Center Park
Broadway and Colfax Avenue
Designed by Frederick Law Olmstead Jr.,
Civic Center Park is located in the heart
of downtown Denver. The State Capitol is
to the east, the City and County Building
is to the west, and other civic institutions
surround the park. Many major public
events are held at the park annually.
Cook Park
South Monaco Parkway and
East Mexico Avenue
Amenities at this popular park include an
outdoor pool; rugby, soccer and softball
fields; a childrens playground, and a
recreation center.
Highline Canal Trail
This popular hiking, biking and horseback
riding trail begins at a diversion dam on
the South Platte River and runs 68
miles east-northeast through Douglas,
Arapahoe and Denver counties. The trail
ends at First Creek in the Green Valley
Ranch area just northeast of Denver.
Roxborough State Park
4751 Roxborough Drive
Littleton, 80125
303-973-3959
www.parks.state.co.us
Famous for its natural rock formations,
Roxborough offers hiking, cross-country
skiing, birding, and sightseeing in addi-
tion to a variety of educational programs.
Washington Park
S. Downing Street and E. Louisiana Avenue
A popular recreational site, amenities
include fishing, picnic areas, tennis
courts, a soccer field, half basketball
court, flower gardens, a pool, horseshoe
pit, lawn bowling/ croquet and a
walking/biking path. The City Ditch, a
national historic landmark, also flows
through the park, providing irrigation.
PARKS AND RECREATION RESOURCES
Adams County Parks and Community Resources 303-637-8000 www.co.adams.co.us
Arapahoe/Aurora Parks and Open Space 303-739-7160 www.auroragov.org
Boulder Parks and Recreation 303-413-7200 www.ci.boulder.co.us/parks-recreation
Broomfield Open Space and Trails 303-438-6335 www.ci.broomfield.co.us
Colorado Campground and Lodging Owners Association 970-247-5406 www.campcolorado.com
Colorado Parks and Recreation Association 303-231-0943 www.cpra-web.org
Colorado State Parks 303-866-3437 www.parks.state.co.us
Denver Parks and Recreation 720-913-0696 www.denvergov.org/parks
Douglas County Parks and Recreation 303-660-7495 www.douglas.co.us
Jefferson County Open Space 303-271-5925 www.co.jefferson.co.us
Sources: Fodors, Wikitravel, Denver.org, Colorado Trail Foundation, Wikipedia,
Denver Parks and Recreation, International Rafting Association, Colorado Rafting Association
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LEI SURE AND RECREATI ON
GOLDEN GATE CANYON
A relaxing mountain escape just 30
minutes from Denver, Golden Gate
Canyon State Park offers thousands of
acres of lush forest and more than 35
miles of trails for hiking, biking and
horseback riding.
THE SETTING
Golden Gate Canyon State Park is
nestled in more than 12,000 acres of
dense forest, rocky peaks and aspen-
rimmed meadows. This park has electrical
hook-ups and tent sites in two different
campgrounds. There are stocked fishing
ponds, picnic sites and the Panorama
Point Scenic Overlook, where visitors can
enjoy spectacular 100-mile views of the
Continental Divide.
The parks array of scenic trails meander
through meadows and aspen groves,
providing glorious autumn colors for
sightseers and photographers. Mountain
bikers and horseback riders can utilize the
19 miles of multiple-use trails, while hikers
can enjoy the parks 12 different trails
throughout the year.
With the exception of the Visitor Centers
Show Pond, fishing is permitted in any
stream or pond at Golden Gate Canyon
State Park. Hunting is controlled and
allowed only in the Jefferson County
portion of the park. Hunting season lasts
from the Tuesday after Labor Day through
the Friday before Memorial Day.
There are many scenic picnic sites that
provide a table and charcoal grill. These
are offered on a first-come first-serve
basis. With its breathtaking scenery,
Panorama Point is also a popular spot for
weddings.
THE FACILITY
There are various campsites in two
campgroundsReverends Ridge and
Aspen Meadowthat provide a unique
camping experience:
Reverends Ridge campground offers five
camper cabins and two yurts, which can
house six people each. There are also 97
sites that can accommodate trailers,
pickup campers and tents. Fifty-nine of
those have electrical hookups. Campground
facilities include flush toilets, shower and
laundry facilities and a dump station.
Each site is limited to a maximum of six
people. Some of the camp loops close for
the season in October.
Aspen Meadows campground is more
primitive, with 35 sites for tents only. This
campground usually closes for the season
around mid-October (weather dependent).
Facilities include a water pump, vault
toilets, and designated campsites with
table, fire rings, and high use tent pads.
Each site is limited to a maximum of six
visitors. Several sites accommodate
horses, so please check with the park for
more information.
Between Reverends Ridge and Aspen
Meadows is the new Harmsen Ranch
Guest House, a fully-furnished overnight
accommodation. This four-bedroom, two-
bath ranch is equipped with a full kitchen
and can accommodate up to eight guests.
The Visitor Center is located at the inter-
section of Golden Gate Canyon Road
(Highway 46) and Crawford Gulch Road.
It is open seven days a week, though hours
of operations vary by season.
CAMPING TIPS
Golden Gate Canyon State Park also
offers backcountry camping, meaning
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park visitors hike to your destination and
whatever you bring into the forest must
come back out with you. There are four,
three-sided shelters with roofs and wood
floors that can sleep six people without a
tent. There are also 20 backcountry tent
sites open year-round. There are no ameni-
ties provided to backcountry campers, so
be prepared for a rustic adventure.
The Harmsen Ranch Guest House also
includes an outdoor deck with a gas grill.
There is a large corral area with room for
eight horses, making the ranch a unique
spot for equestrians who are looking for
overnight facilities that also can accommo-
date their horses. There are also two elec-
trical RV sites located near the corral that
are available to rent with the house rental.
Keep checking the Web site for updates
as we open additional guest houses in the
coming years.
LOCATION
Golden Gate Canyon State Park
92 Crawford Gulch Rd.
Golden, CO 80403
The park can be accessed via Gap Road
from Highway 119, or up Golden Gate
Canyon Road off of Highway 93.
MUELLER STATE PARK
Nestled in the Pikes Peak region of
Colorado, Muller State Park is a 5,000-
acre playground for wildlife watchers and
winter enthusiasts.
THE SETTING
Located west of Colorado Springs in
Divide, Colo., Mueller State Park is full of
colorful history and cultural heritage.
Pioneers settled the lands in the mid-19th
century after Ute Indians had hunted the
grounds for centuries. Colorados Gold
Rush came right through this park to the
small towns of Cripple Creek and Victor.
With over 50 miles of trails, outdoor
enthusiasts are sure to enjoy the beautiful
landscapes and quiet surroundings of
Mueller State Park.
Mueller State Park is an outdoor oasis
because of its natural forest setting. Many
visitors enjoy the Watchable Wildlife
area where mule deer, elk, black bears
and hawks are regularly sighted.
With more than 50 miles of trails, Muller is
ideal for horseback riding, snowshoeing
and cross-country skiing. The trails vary in
length and difficulty, so theres something for
everyone, depending on your ability and
desire. The trails are not groomed during
the winter, so be sure to plan accordingly.
The variety of terrain provides exciting
opportunities for snow tubing and sled rid-
ing when there is sufficient snow.
For visitors who enjoy hunting, Mueller State
Park is located in Big Game Unit 581.
There are 800 acres adjoining the Dome
Rock State Wildlife Area open for hunting
during designated seasons established by
the Colorado Wildlife Commission.
THE FACILITY
Enjoy Muellers uncrowded trails in the
winter and stay at one of 16 electrical
campsites. Available on a first-come, first-
serve basis, these sites are located
Revenuers Ridge Campground with
access to modern bathrooms and vault
toilets. When accessible, a dry dump
station is also available to campers.
For a cozy, rustic experience, visitors can
stay in one of three camper cabins at
Mueller State Park. Located in the shadow
of Pikes Peak, these cabins offer a fully
equipped kitchen and bath, high vaulted
ceilings, an indoor gas fireplace, custom
furnishings and an outdoor deck with a
gas barbeque grill. The cabins are all
different sizesthe two-bedroom Pine
Cabin can accommodate four guests; the
three-bedroom Spruce Cabin can sleep
six; and the four-bedroom Ponderosa
cabin can accommodate eight visitors.
CAMPING TIPS
Pets are not permitted in the cabins, on
the trails or in the backcountry because
the area is a designated Watchable
Wildlife area.
Visit the historic mining towns of Victor
and Cripple Creek, located just 15 miles
south of the park on Highway 67. You
can take a mine tour, pan for gold or ride
on the narrow gauge railroad.
Extend your trip to the Pikes Peak region
by visiting Eleven Mile and Spinney
Mountain State Parks. Fishing condi-
tions are great at both parks and they
are conveniently located near Mueller
State Park
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Hike
Camp
Boat
Play
Playing the Colorado Lottery helps you enjoy Colorado State Parks. Over the past 27 years, proceeds from our
games have contributed more than $190 million to State Parks building and protecting our natural playground.
So keep playing, Colorado. Your support keeps our great outdoors great.
Fish
A GUIDE TO HELP YOU ENJOY
COLORADOS STATE PARKS.
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FEATURES
More than 50 miles of trails to explore
on skis, snowshoes and horseback
16 electrical campsites open for winter
camping and three cabins open year-
round
Breathtaking scenery in the shadow of
Pikes Peak
LOCATION
Mueller State Park
21045 Highway 67 South
Divide, CO 80814
ST. VRAIN STATE PARK
A peaceful, family-friendly destination
with modern camping facilities and tran-
quil ponds popular for fishing, birding
and photography just north of Denver.
THE SETTING
Only a short drive on I-25 from Denver or
Fort Collins, St. Vrain State Park is a nature
lovers paradise. With over 152 land acres
and 604 acres of water split among several
ponds, the park offers an abundance of
opportunities for outdoor activity.
Anglers, campers, photographers, birders
and walkers all will find plenty of space
to partake in their activity of choice year-
round. Non-motorized vessels or those
with trolling motors are permitted in the
ponds, keeping the waters calm and the
wildlife happy. Anglers will find excellent
trout fishing in the fall, as well as bluegill,
crappie, largemouth bass and catfish.
The parks serene atmosphere makes it a
great spot to teach children how to fish.
St. Vrain State Park has approximately 3.5
miles of flat, unpaved trails suitable for
biking and leisurely walking. Visitors should
make sure to stop at one of the shelters or
picnic tables often found underneath the
large cottonwood and willow trees to soak
in the breathtaking views of the Front Range
and, particularly, Longs Peak.
The largest Great Blue Heron rookery in
the state is found inside the park. Visitors
can also observe an abundance of
migrating waterfowl, songbirds and raptors.
During the winter, the park is home to
bald eagles.
THE FACILITY
St. Vrain State Park has eight campgrounds
with 87 campsites open for year-
round camping. Most sites are located on
or near the banks of the ponds and have
varying amenities. Sites 1-41 have electric
hookups with water nearby and a centrally-
located dump station. Campsites 42-87,
designated for motor homes and trailers,
have water, sewer and electric hookups at
each site. All campsites also include a grill,
picnic table and concrete pad.
Campers will find restrooms, pay showers
and a small meeting room at the Barbour
Ponds Camper Services Building, which
is centrally located to campsites 1-41.
CAMPING TIPS
The Barbour Ponds Camper Services
Building offers convenient coin-operated
showers and flush toilets.
Northern Colorados mild climate makes
for comfortable year-round camping at
any of the St. Vrain State Parks 87
campsites. Campsites often fill on
weekends, so reservations in advance
are recommended
Bring food and other necessary supplies
for a picnic under the mature cotton-
wood or willow trees. Most sites have
shelters and grills.
FEATURES
Seven of the parks 16 ponds boast
some of northern Colorados best warm
water fishing. Universally accessible
fishing piers and stone fishing platforms
located in Mallard, Sandpiper and Pelican
Ponds make casting a line even easier.
Birders flock to St. Vrain for the many
migratory bird species that pass
through the park. The ponds and trees
attract great blue herons, snowy egrets,
great egrets, great horned owls, red-
tailed hawks, kingfishers, bald eagles,
golden eagles, ospreys and others.
Flat, easy trails are perfect for a leisurely
stroll around the park and the
unpaved roads are suitable for
leisurely bicycling.
LOCATION
3525 State Highway 119
Firestone, CO 80504
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LEI SURE AND RECREATI ON
Why watch a game on television
when you can see it live in Americas top
sports city that boasts seven major sports
teams and three state-of-the-art stadiums?
With spectator sports that include hockey
(Colorado Avalanche); lacrosse (Colorado
Mammoth and Denver Outlaws); soccer
(Colorado Rapids); baseball (Colorado
Rockies); football (Denver Broncos); and
basketball (Denver Nuggets), finding
something to do is easy.
From football and baseball to lacrosse,
soccer, hockey, and auto racing, the
metro Denver area offers sports fans
countless opportunities throughout the
year to watch their favorite professional or
collegiate team. In fact, more than 6
million fans attend sporting events each
year in the metro area.
The Metro Denver Sports Commission
was formed in 1991 to attract the worlds
top sporting events to metro Denver.
Thanks to commission efforts, Denver has
hosted such events as the 2007 NCAA
Mens Ice Hockey Western Regional
Tournament and the 2008 NCAA Frozen
Four Hockey Tournament.
From professional to college, Denver
has it all. Browse the resources below,
and get ready to enjoy live action
excitement!
PROFESSIONAL SPORTS
VENUES
Metro Denver is home to sports venues
located in or near downtown, which have
revitalized the Central Platte Valley and the
Lower Downtown (LoDo) area into a vibrant
entertainment and shopping district.
1stBank Center
11450 Broomfield Lane
Broomfield, 80020
303-460-8800
www.1stbankcenter.com
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SPECTATOR
SPORTS
SOMETHING for
EVERY SPORTS FAN
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The state-of-the-art 1stBank Center
relaunched in March 2010. Formerly
known as the Broomfield Event Center,
1STBANK Center is the premiere mid-sized
event venue in the Denver area. The
venue can hold up to 6,500 people
and can accommodate live music,
family shows, sporting events, community
functions and more.
Coors Field
2001 Blake St.
Denver, 80205
303-762-5437
http://colorado.rockies.mlb.com/NASA
pp/mlb/col/ballpark/col_ballpark_hist
ory.jsp
Home to Major League Baseballs
Colorado Rockies, Coors Field holds
more than 50,000 fans and has been a
leader in attendance for Major League
Baseball games since it opened in 1995.
Seats in the first base and right field areas
provide breathtaking views of the Rocky
Mountains. Most stadium seats are painted
green, except for the upper decks 20th
row, which is painted purple to mark
5,280 feet, exactly one mile above sea
level. Amenities include private suites,
retail stores, picnic areas, an interactive
games area, specially designated Family
Sections and a clubhouse. Tours are
offered throughout the year.
INVESCO Field at Mile High
1701 Bryant St.
Denver, 80204
720-258-3000
www.invescofieldatmilehigh.com
The 1.8-million-square-foot INVESCO
Field at Mile High opened in 2001 and
has more than 76,000 seats. It is home
to the National Football Leagues Denver
Broncos, Major League Soccers
Colorado Rapids and the Denver
Outlaws, a new summer lacrosse team.
The playing surface is 100 percent grass,
and two public artworks adorn the stadiums
exterior. Fans are treated to traditional
and specialty concession stand fare, as
well as three large Mitsubishi video
displays located inside the stadiums seating
area and 530 TV monitors found
throughout the stadium.
A special feature on Level 5 of
INVESCO Field is the Ring of Fame,
which honors former Denver Broncos
players and administrators. Visitors also
can enjoy The Broncos, a sculpture
created in Florence, Italy by renowned
sculptor Sergio Benvenuti, which
depicts five larger-than-life broncos, a
mare and a colt running uphill in an
alpine mountain setting. The Counties
Gateway Plaza, located on the west
side of INVESCO Field, features six 40-
foot monuments placed on either side of
the plaza that serve as a tribute to the
six counties that helped to make the
stadium a reality.
Pepsi Center
1000 Chopper Circle
Denver, 80204
303-405-1100
www.pepsicenter.com
Considered one of the most flexible and
multifunctional arenas in the country, this
sports and entertainment venue is located
at the edge of downtown Denver and
hosts more than 220 sporting events,
concerts and special events every year.
Pepsi Center is home to the National
Basketball Associations Denver Nuggets,
National Hockey Leagues Colorado
Avalanche and National Lacrosse
Leagues Colorado Mammoth.
The Pepsi Center is also one of the few
sports venues in North America to offer
a separate team practice facility. The
Berger Funds NBA Practice Court is a
full-sized basketball court used by the
Denver Nuggets for all practice sessions.
Opened in 2000, the stadium is situated
on 4.6 acres, including 675,000
square feet of building space and five
levels. It also features luxury suites, club
seats, fine and casual dining facilities
and spectacular views of the Rocky
Mountains.
The Pepsi Center holds more than 19,00
fans for basketball games; more than
18,00 for hockey, arena football and
lacrosse games; and anywhere from 500
to 20,000 for concerts and other events.
Both the Regional Metropolitan Districts
public bus and light rail systems offer
stops at Pepsi Center.
DENVERS PROFESSIONAL
SPORTS TEAMS
Colorado Rockies
303-762-5437
http://rockies.mlb.com Major League
Baseball (MLB)
Season: AprilSeptember
More than 4.4 million fans attended the
Colorado Rockies games during their
inaugural season in 1993, breaking
Major League Baseballs single-season
attendance record that same year. The
Rockies went on to play in the 2007
World Series against the Boston Red Sox.
Denver Nuggets
303-405-1100
www.nuggets.com
National Basketball Association (NBA)
Season: NovemberApril
Those who enjoy the game of basketball
will feel right at home in Denver, where
fans are treated to the best experience
anywhere in the NBA. The Nuggets
name refers to the 19th century mining
boom in Colorado, when people rushed
to the area hoping to make their fortunes
by panning gold and silver nuggets.
Denver Broncos
303-649-9000
www.denverbroncos.com
National Football League (NFL)
Season: SeptemberJanuary
Through a 31-24 victory against the
Green Bay Packers, the Denver Broncos
won their first World Championship in
Super Bowl XXXII. A year later, the team
won its second title. To celebrate the
teams successes, team owner Pat Bowlen
created the Denver Broncos Ring of Fame
in 1984 to honor former players and
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administrators. You can see the Ring of
Fame on the Level 5 faade of INVESCO
Field at Mile High. Since its inception, 21
members have been inducted.
Colorado Avalanche
303-405-1100
www.coloradoavalanche.com
National Hockey League (NHL)
Season: OctoberApril
Since relocating to Colorado prior to the
1995-1996 season, the franchise has
advanced to postseason play each year,
including advancing to the Conference
Finals six times and winning the Stanley
Cup twice.
Colorado Mammoth Lacrosse
303-405-1100
www.coloradomammoth.com
National Lacrosse League (NLL)
Season: JanuaryApril
In seven-plus seasons, more than
990,000 Mammoth fans have packed
Pepsi Center. In 2006, the Colorado
Mammoth won the NLL 2006
Champions Cup. And in 2010, the team
celebrated its one-millionth fan.
Denver Outlaws Lacrosse
303-OUTLAWS/720-258-3600
www.denveroutlaws.com
Major League Lacrosse
Season: MayAugust
The Denver OutlawsColorados profes-
sional outdoor lacrosse teamjoined
Major League Lacrosse in 2006 as an
expansion team.
Colorado Rapids
303-405-1100
www.coloradorapids.com
Major League Soccer (MLS)
Season: AprilSeptember
This MLS soccer club was founded in
1995 and moved to its new home at
Dicks Sporting Good Park in 2007.
AUTO RACING
Bandimere Speedway
3051 S. Rooney Road
Morrison, 80465
303-697-6001
www.bandimere.com
National Hot Rod Association Championship
Drag Racing happens here every from
April through October.
Colorado National Speedway
4281 Weld County Road 10
Dacono, 80514
303-825-0116
www.coloradospeedway.com
The NASCAR Dodge Weekly Series, the
richest and most recognized short-track
series in the nation, is held from April
through September.
HORSE RACING
Horses have long been part of Denvers
history and today, this equine love
affair continues with nearly 65,000
horse owners in the state. In fact, show
or racehorses account for 40 percent of
Colorados horse population, and its
no surprise that summer weekends are
always busy times for area racetracks.
Arapahoe Park Racetrack
26000 E. Quincy
Aurora, 80016
303-690-2400
www.wembleyco.com/arapahoe_park.
Thoroughbred and quarter horse racing is
held every weekend from mid-June
through September.
COLLEGIATE SPORTS
Those who enjoy spectator sports can
find games throughout the year at
some of the many metro Denver area
colleges and universities who offer top-
ranked sports programs, including
Colorado School of Mines, Colorado
Christian University, Colorado State
University, Metropolitan State College/
Denver, Regis University, University of
Colorado at Boulder and the University
of Denver.
The large variety mens and womens
sports supported by area colleges and
universities include baseball, basket-
ball, lacrosse, cross country, football,
golf, soccer, softball, swimming, diving,
water polo, skiing, tennis, track and
field, volleyball and wrestling. For
information, please refer to the
Education section.
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JANUARY
The Annual Colorado Cowboy Poetry Gathering
Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities 720-898-7200 www.arvadacenter.org
Celebrate life in the West with four days of performances by more than 45 poets and
musicians.
Boulder Bach Festival
Various Boulder Locations 303-776-9666 www.boulderbachfest.org
This three-day festival celebrates the music of Baroque master Johann Sebastian Bach.
Colorado Asian Pacific Cultural Festival/Chinese New Year Celebration
George Washington High School 720-529-0980 www.denverchineseschool.org
Approximately 4,000 people and 15 organizations participate in this annual
event. Enjoy Asian-Pacific cuisine, cultural displays, dances, music, art, acrobatics
and games for children.
International Sportsmens Exposition
Colorado Convention Center 800-545-6100 www.sportsexpos.com
Hunting and fishing enthusiasts enjoy the latest products and services, expert demonstrations
and a family fun center at the areas largest sportsmens show.
National Western Stock Show, Rodeo & Horse Show
National Western Complex 303-297-1166 www.nationalwestern.com
Drawing more than 640,000 people, National Western features livestock exhibits, cattle
auctions, rodeo competitions and horse shows. The show was the first to host bucking bull
and Bell ringer Select bred female sales and the Gamblers Choice Opening Jumping.
FEBRUARY
The Be My Denver Valentine Treasure Hunt
Downtown Denver 303-875-7603 www.thedenverhunt.com
This annual adventure takes you throughout downtown Denver in search of clues. Find
romantic destinations, tour historic landmarks and win prizes.
Colorado Garden & Home Show
Colorado Convention Center 303-932-8100 www.gardeningcolorado.com
Colorados oldest and most prestigious garden and home show features home and garden
products, services, displays, seminars, demonstrations and shows.
MARCH
Colorado RV, Sports, Boat & Travel Show
National Western Complex 303-892-6800 www.bigasalloutdoors.com/css
Outdoor products, tips, presentations and activities are showcased by hundreds of
exhibitors.
Denver Auto Show
Colorado Convention Center 303-779-0140 www.denverautoshow.com
The Auto Show features foreign and domestic vehicles, including futuristic prototypes.
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Denver March Powwow
Denver Coliseum 303-934-8045 www.denvermarchpowwow.org
A weekend celebration of Native American customs through dances, contests, arts and
crafts, demonstrations and drum groups.
Denver St. Patricks Day Parade
27th and Blake streets 303-368-9861 www.saintpatricksdayparade.com/denver.htm
Only New York City rivals Denver for the largest St. Patricks Day parade. Denvers parade
features colorful floats, marching bands and dancers.
Spring Home & Patio Show
National Western Complex 303-892-6800 www.bigasalloutdoors.com/ps
This show exhibits the latest in home and garden products and offers how-to sessions.
APRIL
Doors Open Denver
www.denvergov.org/tabid/436791/Default.aspx
This free weekend event invites citizens to experience Denvers built environment in a new
way from the inside. Tour Denvers architectural gems and lesser-known treasures on your
own or participate in expert tours led by members of the architectural community.
Easter Sunrise Service
Red Rocks Amphitheatre 303-825-4910 www.redrocksonline.com
As dawn breaks, a non-denominational sunrise service is held in spectacular natural surroundings.
MAY
Bolder Boulder
Boulder 303-444-7223 www.bolderboulder.com
Usually held on Memorial Day, this 10K race garners international attention and participation.
Cinco de Mayo Festival
Civic Center Park 303-534-8342 www.newsed.org/cinco.htm
One of the largest cultural events in Colorado, Cinco de Mayo features live entertainment,
art displays, food and drink, and many childrens activitiesall with a Mexican flare.
Denver Botanic Gardens Plant Sale
Denver Botanic Gardens 720-865-3500 www.botanicgardens.org
More than 85,000 plants specific to Colorado gardening are for sale with proceeds
benefiting the Denver Botanic Gardens.
Denver Public Schools Shakespeare Festival
Denver Performing Arts Complex 303-423-8278 www.shakespeare.dpsk12.org
Street and stage performances by students from 81 schools focus on excerpts from the
works of Shakespeare. Renaissance music and dance also are featured.
Indian Market and Powwow
The Fort Restaurant 19192 Highway 8, Morrison 303-839-1671 www.tesorofoundation.org
Enjoy a weekend of traditional Native American tribal dance competitions, demonstrations and
art. Art experts will judge the submissions of the countrys premier Native American artists.
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METRO DENVER IN EVERY SEASON
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JUNE
Arvada Center Summer Concert Series
The Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities 720-898-7200 www.arvadacenter.org
The Center presents its annual Summer Concert Seriesan eclectic mix of music presented
outdoors under the dazzling Rocky Mountain skies. Providing an intimate setting where no
audience member is farther than 100 feet from the stage, the Arvada Center hosts 12 concerts
featuring a variety of music styles, from Cajun to western swing and jazz to bluegrass.
CHUN Capitol Hill Peoples Fair
Civic Center Park 303-830-1651 www.peoplesfair.com
This fair has been celebrating the historic Capitol Hill neighborhood for more than 30 years.
It boasts arts and crafts, food and continuous entertainment.
Colorado Renaissance Festival
I-25 S., Exit 172 and 173 Larkspur 303-688-6010 www.coloradorenaissance.com
A 16th century village and marketplace is recreated for eight weekends in June and July.
Elephant Rock Cycling Festival
Douglas County Events Center Castle Rock 303-282-9020 www.elephantrockride.com
Held the first Sunday in June, this festival features bike tours of various lengths. Activities begin
with a pre-ride Pasta Power-Up and end in a celebration at The Douglas County Fairgrounds.
Denver Botanic Gardens Summer Concert Series
Denver Botanic Gardens 720-865-3500 www.botanicgardens.org
This outdoor concert series is a great way for families to listen to first-class music while
picnicking on the lawn.
Denver International Buskerfest
16th Street Mall 303-282-5073
More than 30 costumed street performers (buskers) from around the world provide free
performances during this weekend event.
Greek Festival
Assumption Greek Orthodox Cathedral 303-388-9314 www.assumptioncathedral.org/festival
Denvers Greek community hosts this three-day celebration, featuring Greek food, live music,
entertainment and gift items.
Juneteenth
Five Points Neighborhood 303-832-3770
This cultural festival commemorates the end of slavery and celebrates African-American history.
JULY
Cherry Creek Arts Festival
Cherry Creek North 303-355-2787 www.cherryarts.org
This is one of the nations largest juried art festivals with great food, music, art shows, painting
classes and hundreds of artists in all mediums, from ceramics, painting and digital art to
jewelry, metalwork, photography and sculpture. The music continues on Saturday and Sunday
until 10 p.m. So grab a cool beverage and spend a hot summer night at Cherry Creek.
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Colorado Dragon Boat Festival
Sloans Boat Festival 303-722-6852 www.coloradodragonboat.org
A celebration of Asian culture that includes a race of ornate dragon boats on the second day.
Denver Black Arts Festival
Lawson (Sonny) Park 303-860-0040 www.denbaf.org
Learn about all forms of African-American culture through artwork, ethnic foods, drum and
drill teams, steppin, oral storytelling and African, Caribbean and modern dance.
Independence Day Celebration
Four Mile Historic Park 303-399-1859 www.fourmilepark.org
An old-fashioned Fourth of July is enjoyed in Denvers living history park with music
from the Denver Concert Band, visits from historical figures, food and rides in horse-drawn
carriages.
KidSpree Aurora
Bicentennial Park 303-326-8FUN www.auroragov.org/kidspree
Colorados largest free outdoor festival just for kids features more than 60 hands-on activities
and entertainers.
AUGUST
Adams County Fair & Rodeo
Adams County Regional Park Brighton www.adamscountyfair.com
Held the first weekend in August, the fair includes rodeos, artisans and top-name musicians.
Colorado Scottish Festival & Rocky Mountain Highland Games
Highland Heritage Park Highlands Ranch 303-238-6524 www.scottishgames.org
Highland games, dances, bagpipes and all things Scottish are enjoyed at this
annual festival.
Douglas County Fair and Rodeo
Douglas County Fairgrounds Castle Rock 303-688-4597 www.douglas.co.us/eventscenter
This traditional county fair has food vendors, game booths, entertainment, rides and a rodeo.
Western Welcome Week
Littleton locations 303-794-4870 www.westernwelcomeweek.com
Littletons 11-day heritage celebration boasts arts and crafts, food, live performances
and fireworks.
SEPTEMBER
A Taste of Colorado
Civic Center Park 303-295-6330 www.atasteofcolorado.com
Enjoy a culinary extravaganza, with demonstrations, entertainment, rides and arts and crafts
booths.
AIDS Walk Colorado
Cheesman Park 303-837-0166 www.coloradoaidsproject.org
This 10K walk benefits the Colorado AIDS Project and other AIDS organizations.
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Castle Rock Artfest
Wilcox Square 303-688-4597 www.castlerockartfest.com
Enjoy artwork from around the country, as well as food, music, entertainment and a kids area.
Denver Gem and Mineral Show
Denver Merchandise Mart www.denvermineralshow.com
Rare and popular beads, fossils, gems, jewelry and minerals are exhibited.
Festival Italiano Food and Wine Festival at Belmar
www.belmarcolorado.com
The annual Festival Italiano Food and Wine Festival at Belmar features more than 70 of the finest
Italian food, wine and artisan vendors from the area who sell ceramics, gelato, sausage, baked
goods, pasta, flowers, herbs, sculpture, antique maps, produce, pizza and much more.
Great American Beer Festival
Colorado Convention Center 303-447-0816 www.beertown.org/events/GABF/index.htm
The Association of Brewers Great American Beer Festival features 1,600 of the nations
best beers from 320 American breweries. The festival offers one of the largest array of
beers, as well as the biggest selection of beers ever gathered together on the globe.
Oktoberfest
Larimer Square 303-685-8124 www.oktoberfestdenver.com
Celebrate all things German in Denvers model of the Oktoberfest in Munich, Germany.
OCTOBER
Cider Days Harvest Festival
www.lakewood.org
Celebrate the autumn season at the 33rd Annual Cider Days harvest festival! Cider Days
includes booths serving cider by the glass or gallon. Festival-goers can also bring apples
(or buy them at the event) and use our presses to make fresh apple cider to take home.
Denver Day of Impact
Metro Denver Region 303-282-1234 www.metrovolunteers.org
Corporations, families and individuals volunteer their time on this day to feed the hungry,
build shelters, care for the environment and help those who need it most.
Denver International Film Festival
Starz Film Center and Denver Performing Arts Complex 303-595-3456 www.denverfilm.org
More than 200 films representing some 40 countries unfold in this award-winning, 11-day event.
Jack-O-Launch at PumpkinFest
DeLaney Farm 303-326-8FUN www.auroragov.org/pumpkinfest
In this competition, teams use homemade launching mechanisms to hurl pumpkins hundreds of
feet through the air. The festival also features a pumpkin patch, hayrides, live music and more.
Pumpkin Festival at Chatfield Nature Preserve
Chatfield Nature Preserve 720-865-3500 www.botanicgardens.org
Pick your favorite pumpkin and enjoy food, rides, crafts, nature trails and more at this fall
event.
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Metro Denvers annual calendar is filled with festivals and events, many cele-
brating the areas rich ethnic heritage. To request to have an event added in
next years calendar, call the Metro Denver Chamber of Commerce, 303-534-
8500. For a detailed list of community events, visit www.denver365.org.
METRO DENVER EVENTS
NOVEMBER
Denver Botanic Gardens Holiday Sale
Denver Botanic Gardens 720-865-3565 www.botanicgardens.org
Gifts for plant lovers are featured, including herbal oils and unusual craft items and ornaments.
Holidays on Larimer Square
Larimer Square 303-685-8143 www.larimersquare.com
The day after Thanksgiving, Larimer Square is magically transformed and adorned with
thousands of twinkling lights. Activities include a spectacular tree-lighting ceremony
and performances by local school choirs and bands.
Mile High United Way Turkey Trot
Washington Park 303-433-8383 www.unitedwaydenver.org
This Thanksgiving four-mile foot race and one-mile family fun run raises funds for United Way.
DECEMBER
Art Market Show and Sale
Arvada Center for the Arts and Humanities 720-898-7200 www.arvadacenter.org
More than 140 acclaimed Colorado artists feature original artwork and contemporary
crafts in 6,000 square feet of gallery space. Items on exhibit and for sale include jewelry,
ceramics, paintings, furniture, contemporary textiles and more.
Blossoms of Light
Denver Botanic Gardens 720-865-3609 www.botanicgardens.org
Denver Botanic Gardens turns into a winter wonderland of lights and winter plant
arrangements.
Colorado Christmas
Boettcher Concert Hall 303-292-5566 www.coloradosymphony.org
More than 300 performers from the Colorado Symphony Orchestra, Symphony Chorus
and Childrens Chorale perform favorite holiday music.
Parade of Lights
Downtown 303-295-6330 www.denverparadeoflights.com
An evening Parade of Lights transforms city streets and is a holiday tradition for many families.
Zoo Lights
Denver Zoo 303-376-4800 www.denverzoo.org
Zoo lights is the largest lighting event in the state with more than 1 million colored lights illumi-
nating more than 35 acres. Enjoy animated light sculptures, holiday music and seasonal treats.
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hether youre interested in hitting the mall for a day of retail therapy,
discovering a great new boutique, or picking out the perfect outfit for a
special occasion, there are plenty of options across the metro Denvers
seven-county area. Regional malls feature popular retail chains, trendy and
unique specialty shops, and a variety of service establishments for whatever
you need in your new home.
Pop out for a few hours, or turn a shopping expedition into a day-long jaunt with movie theaters and
other nearby entertainment options, and then enjoy a meal from a host of international, traditional and
local cuisine at any of Denvers many restaurants (see our Dining section for more information).
Denver has 14 major shopping centers with 500,000 square feet of space or more and many shop-
ping districts with several new projects planned. Both long-time residents and newcomers will discover a
diverse selection of dining and shopping options across the region. The following is a listing of major
shopping areas across the metro Denver area; weve also included website addresses when available.
Shopping
and Dining
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MAJOR AREA MALLS AND
SHOPPING CENTERS
16th Street Mall
16th St.
Denver, 80202
303-534-6161
www.downtowndenver.com/bid/
bid16thstreetmall.htm
Covering 16 blocks on 16
th
Street, this
pedestrian mall includes the Denver
Pavilions and other retail shops, residential
and office buildings, hotels and services.
A free shuttle serves the area.
Cherry Creek North
299 Milwaukee St.
Denver, 80206
303-394-2903
Cherry Creek North is home to more than
320 independently owned businesses, a
unique collection of boutiques, spas,
restaurants, galleries and other specialty
shops located in the heart of central
Denver.
Cherry Creek Shopping Center
3000 E. 1st Ave.
Denver, 80206
303-388-3900
www.shopcherrycreek.com
Cherry Creek Shopping Center is one of
the regions most popular shopping desti-
nations with 160 restaurants and stores,
including Elways, a the Colorado steak-
house co-owned by Denver Broncos Hall
of Fame quarterback John Elway. Popular
Cherry Creek stores include Saks Fifth
Avenue, Neiman Marcus, Cartier, Tiffany
& Co., Tommy Bahama, Louis Vuitton,
Polo/Ralph Lauren, and Anthropologie.
Denver Pavilions
16th Street Mall and Glenarm
Denver, 80202
303-260-6000
www.denverpavilions.com
This popular 350,000-square-foot outdoor
mall features a movie theater, nightclub,
restaurants and retail stores that include
Barnes & Noble, Hard Rock Cafe and
Niketown.
Larimer Square
1430 Larimer
Denver, 80202
303-534-2367
www.larimersquare.com
Located in the heart of downtown Denver,
Larimer Square is an area thats not only
rich in history, but also features fine shop-
ping and dining. As the Mile High Citys
oldest and most historic block, its build-
ings tell the story of the city, offering a
charming environment for shopping and
spending the day. A true destination,
Larimer Square features clothing stores,
specialty shops, nightclubs, a host of
restaurants, a day spa and a gallery.
Marketplace at Northglenn
104th Avenue and I-25
Denver, 80204
303-595-9919
www.northglenn.org
This outdoor shopping center has approxi-
mately 650,000 square feet of space and
more than 40 stores, including Lowes,
Borders Books and Sports Authority.
Tamarac Square
7777 E. Hampden Ave.
Denver, 80231
303-745-5927
www.tamaracsquare.com
With nearly 200,000 square feet, this
European- style mall offers more than 46
shops, 16 restaurants and a six-screen
Regency Theatre. Denvers largest Ace
Hardware store is also located here. Enjoy
art exhibits, fashion shows, holiday features
and other special events throughout the year.
Aspen Grove Lifestyle Center
7301 S. Santa Fe Drive
Littleton, 80120
303-794-0640
www.shopaspengrove.com
Aspen Grove is an outdoor shopping
experience with more than 300,000
square feet of space and such trendy
stores as American Eagle Outfitters, Cafe
de France, White House/Black Market
and Yankee Candle Company.
Aurora Mall
14200 E. Alameda Ave.
Aurora, 80012
303-344-4120
www.shopauroramall.com
The closest shopping center to Denver
International Airport, Aurora Mall has
98,600 square feet and more than 140
specialty stores, restaurants and services.
Highlights include a carousel, a movie
theater, and anchor stores such as
Dillards, JCPenney, Macys and Sears.
Belmar
Alameda Avenue and
Wadsworth Boulevard
Lakewood, 80226
303-742-1520
www.belmarcolorado.com
One of Denvers newest shopping hotspots,
Belmar is a 103-acre downtown district
in the city of Lakewood that was honored
as one of 10 finalists for Denver
Regional Council of Governments 2011
Live/Work/Play Award. This Continuum-
developed nationally recognized mixed-use
project took an old mall (Villa Italia) and revi-
talized it into a destination that now com-
bines retailers, boutiques, restaurants, cafes,
theaters, offices, residences, artist studios,
parks and plazasall within 22 city blocks.
Future plans include a full-service hotel.
Catering to the urban lifestyle, Belmars
streets, green areas and public art program
are designed to encourage pedestrian traffic,
promote community building, and empha-
size the importance of public spaces.
Colorado Mills
14500 W. Colfax Ave.
Lakewood, 80401
303-384-3000
www.coloradomills.com
There are nearly 200 stores many of them
outlets - at this 200-acre, 1.2-million square-
foot mall in nearby Lakewood, which fea-
tures free kids activities, a carousel, a United
Artists theater, miniature golf course and year-
round special events. Anchor stores include
Saks Fifth Avenue OFF 5th, Neiman Marcus
Last Call, Sports Authority, Off Broadway
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Shoes, Eddie Bauer Outlet, Burlington, and
Super Target, while specialty stores include
Ann Taylor Factory Store, Brooks Brothers
Factory Store, Banana Republic Factory
Store, Victorias Secret, Nautica, Gap Outlet,
NIKE Factory Store, American Eagle
Outfitters, Aeropostale, Oakley Vault, St. John
Company Store, Gymboree and more.
Downtown Boulder
Pearl Street and Broadway
Boulder, 80302
303-449-3774
www.dbi.org
Downtown Boulder offers hundreds of
stores, specialty shops, restaurants and
service establishments. Pearl Street Mall,
an outdoor pedestrian mall, offers a nice
mix of popular chain stores such as
Banana Republic and Abercrombie &
Fitch and locally owned shops. Even
better, theres free parking on weekends.
FlatIron Crossing
One W. FlatIron Circle
Broomfield, 80021
866-FLATIRON
www.flatironcrossing.com
The views of the FlatIrons of Boulder are
reason enough to visit this 1.5-million-
square-foot, indoor/outdoor shopping
center that also features a pond and sand-
box for the kids, and a skating rink thats
open in winter. Enjoy more than 200
shops and restaurants, including Coach,
Coldwater Creek, Bebe, BC Surf & Sport,
Banana Republic, J. Crew, J Jill, Papyrus,
LOFT, and The Container Store. Anchor
stores include Nordstrom, Dicks Sporting
Goods, Dillards, and Macys.
Outlets at Castle Rock
5050 Factory Shops Blvd.
Castle Rock, 80108
303-688-4494
www.outletsatcastlerock.com
This 43-acre, almost 478,000-square-
foot open-air mall attracts more than 4.2
million shoppers each year and was
named one of the top ten preferred shopping
areas by visitors in a recent tourism
survey. The Outlets at Castle Rock is
home to 120 premium brands, including
Polo Ralph Lauren, Gap Outlet, Banana
Republic Factory Store, Columbia
Sportswear, Childrens Place, Calvin
Klein, Eddie Bauer, Timberland, Tommy
Hilfiger and others. The mall also features
a savings cards for extra discounts
(available at customer service), as well
as shopping packages that offer even
more discounts.
Park Meadows
8401 Park Meadows Center Drive
Littleton, 80124
303-792-5384
www.parkmeadows.com
Dubbed a retail resort, the 1.6million
square-foot Park Meadows mall is
housed in a building that looks like a
mountain lodge with soaring open
spaces and wood timber construction.
The mall has more than 185 shops,
including such anchor stores as
Nordstrom, Dillards and JCPenney, and
such amenities as foreign currency
exchange, wireless Internet access, a
nursing lounge for moms, safety escorts,
soft seating areas, weekend valet parking,
and wheelchair service.
Southlands
E. Smoky Hill Road and E-470
Aurora, 80016
303-771-4004
www.shopsouthlands.com
Located in southeast Denver, Southlands is
an outdoor lifestyle center with a four-
block Main Street and community plaza
thats surrounded by retailers, restaurants,
services, and entertainment, including
AMC Southlands 16 Theatre, Barnes &
Noble, Eddie Bauer, Chicos, Coldwater
Creek, Gap, Charming Charlie,
McCabes Irish Bistro & Pub, Sports
Authority, Teds Montana Grill and more.
Southwest Plaza
8501 W. Bowles Ave.
Littleton, 80123
303-973-5300
www.southwestplaza.com
Southwest Plaza has approximately 1.3
million square feet of retail space and
more than 150 specialty retail, dining,
and entertainment options, including such
anchor stores as Dillards, Macys,
JCPenney, Sears, Dicks Sporting Goods,
and Borders Books-Music- Caf.
Twenty Ninth Street
Arapahoe Avenue and 28th Street
Boulder, 80301
303-444-0722
www.twentyninth.com
Anchored by Macy, Home Depot, and
Staples, this outdoor shopping district has
views of the Boulder Flatirons and features
local and national upscale specialty
stores, restaurants, 150,000 square feet
of class A office space and various
entertainment venues.
Twin Peaks Mall
1250 S. Hover Road
Longmont, 80501
303-651-6454
www.twinpeaksmall.com
Twin Peaks covers more than 750,000
square feet and features a movie theater,
80 stores and 10 restaurants. Anchor stores
include Dillards, Sears and JCPenney.
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Denvers location in the center of the
country is reflected in its cuisine a com-
bination of appealing Western culinary
charm, such as steak and barbeque
and local flavors, and the innovative
international cuisine that a world-class
city demands. Its also a cuisine thats
skyrocketed in status over the last few
years, with Denver area chefs recognized
for national acclaim in a variety of ways.
Consider that six Denver chefs were
nominated for the James Beard House
Foundation Awards in 2010, and that
many area restaurants have also been
nominated for James Beard Foundation
awards. Other Denver chefs have been
featured on the Food Network, including
the Food Network Challengewhich has
Denver master baker Keegan Gerhard as
its host and on the Travel Channels
Man v. Food program.
STEAKS AND MORE
Got beef? Denvers location means its
no surprise that its a city known for its
steakhouses. Whether your craving is
for ribeyes, T-bones, tenderloin, or
porterhouse, this is one city thats got
you covered. Try local favorites like
Elways (named for ex-Bronco John Elway),
the Denver Chophouse, The Capital
Grille, or The Broker, or go for national
chains with Denver charm like Mortons
of Chicago.
Of course, authentic western cuisine is
also big here with big game on the
menu at any number of innovative restau-
rants. Try elk and bison and soak in history
at the Buckhorn Exchange founded in
1893, its Denvers oldest restaurant or
dine on buffalo, elk, quail, salmon and
more in the rustic ambiance of The Fort
an authentic replica of an adobe fur fort
LETS EAT
DENVERS delicous
DINING SCENE
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thats been featured in both Bon Apptit
and National Geographic Traveler.
BREWPUBS AND
CASUAL NOSHING
Got beer? This city definitely does. Did
you know that Denver brews more beer
than any other U.S. city? With 80 differ-
ent beers brewed daily and the Coors
Brewery in nearby Golden (founded in
1873), its no surprise that the Great
American Beer Festival is held here each
fall, as well as such local events as the
Denver Beer Fest. Sip on some tasty suds
at Wynkoop Brewing Co. the largest
brewpub in the United States. Try a sam-
pling from the Falling Rock Tap House
its easy with this brewpubs selection of
more than six dozen taps.
LOCAL FLAVORS AND CREATIVE
CULINARY CHOPS
Colorados agricultural bounty and
Denvers thriving famers market scene
mean that going local is easy to do, with
delicious results. Many area restaurants are
creating innovative dishes with the freshest
produce, fruits, meat cheese and eggs that
the region has to offer. The areas flavors
are varied, too from Pacific-Rim fusion
and comfort food to ethnic hotspots and
traditional French, Italian and more.
Try Frascas in nearby Boulder an
Italian favorite and consistently named as
one of the areas top 10 restaurants;
Mizuna in Governors Park acclaimed
Denver chef Frank Bonnanos flagship
restaurant (he also owns Luca Di Italia,
Osteria Marco, and Bones an Asian-
fusion noodle restaurant); or Table 6
Chef Scott Parkers classic American
bistro known for its creative cuisine and
vegetarian entrees.
No matter what youre craving, Denvers
restaurant scene is sure to satisfy. Browse
our sampling of listings, and enjoy the
citys variety whenever you dine out.
DINING GUIDES
The following is are helpful area dining
guides, go-to restaurant review sources,
local restaurant-related programming
(radio and television shows), as well as
national sites that feature Denver-area
restaurant listings and reviews.
5280
www.5280.com
Denver is 5,280 feet above sea level,
which is how this popular city lifestyle
magazine got its name. Beyond its
reputation as a valuable resource for all
things Denver, it also has a comprehensive
restaurant section, including reviews, open-
ings, closings, and more. It also publishes
an annual Top of the Town issue thats
available on local newsstands and online,
and there are more than 300 restaurant
reviews on the magazines website.
Boulder Magazine
www.getboulder.com
Boulders city magazine also features an
extensive listing of area restaurants, with
reviews, profiles, and more.
Citysearch Denver
www.denver.citysearch.com
This national franchise of city guides also
includes Denver. Find top picks in a
variety of dining categories, and reviews
of not only restaurants, but also nightlife
and entertainment venues.
Colorado Restaurant Association
www.coloradorestaurant.com
This nonprofit offers an online dining guide
of more than 4,500 member restaurants
SHOPPI NG AND DI NI NG
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featuring all kinds of cuisine. Search by
cuisine, city, price, or amenities.
Denver.com
www.denver.com/restaurants/
Part of an online chain of national guides
to U.S. cities, this site offers a comprehensive
listing of local restaurants in the Denver
metro area. Visitors can search by area
and cuisine, as well as book a table
directly through OpenTable.com, a
national restaurant reservation service.
The Denver Post
www.denverpost.com
Denvers city newspaper features an exten-
sive and interesting food section, including
reviews, a huge range of categories and
search options, and much more.
The Gabby Gourmet
www.gabbygourmet.com
Restaurant critic and media personality Pat
Miller, aka the Gabby Gourmet, offers
dining articles and reviews on the website,
as well as on a Saturday afternoon radio
show. Miller also publishes an annual
Gabby Gourmet Guide to Denver restau-
rants thats available in local bookstores.
The Restaurant Show
www.studio1430.com
Radio call-in show with host Warren
Byrne that covers local dining options;
airs on Wednesdays from 5-7 pm and
Saturdays from 9 to noon on Studio
1430/KWEZ.
Westword
www.westword.com/restaurants
An exhaustive section on restaurants in
Denver, including weekly restaurant
reviews and a Best of Denver with readers
choices for favorite eating and drinking
establishments.
A SAMPLING OF METRO
DENVER RESTAURANTS
No matter what youre craving, Denvers
restaurant scene is sure to satisfy! Browse
our sampling of listings to get an idea of
the citys cuisines, price points, and variety
whenever you dine out.
1515 Restaurant
1515 Market St.
Denver, 80202
303-571-0011
www.1515restaurant.com
An independent fine dining restaurant,
1515 offers a contemporary American
menu with European flair. Menu creations
include the critically acclaimed
Barramundi, Buffalo Steak and the
Colorado Lamb, as well as special
seasonal menus. 1515 also has an
award winning, 400-plus bottle wine list
and on-site sommelier, is a winner of
Wine Spectators Award of Excellence
from 2001 to 2010, and is an AAA-
rated Three Diamond restaurant.
The 9th Door
1808 Blake St.
Denver, 80202
303-292-2229
www.theninthdoor.com
The 9th Door is a Spanish wine and tapas
restaurant located in the citys trendy LoDo
section, featuring small plates of traditional
Spanish fare tapas favorites, as well as
new-style tapas with intense flavors and a
variety of textures. Try guacate flash-fried
avocado with fresh pico de gallo;
Membrillo, Manchego, y Serrano
bite-sized, pan-seared Serrano ham topped
with quince jam and aged Manchego
cheese; or Ensalada de Pera arugula,
grilled pear, goat cheese, toasted walnuts,
dressed with sherry vinaigrette.
BDs Mongolian Barbeque
1620 Wazee St.
Denver, 80202
303-571-1824
www.gomongo.com
BDs Mongolian Barbeque, a national
chain restaurant, gives Denver diners its
take on stir-fry, letting diners create their
own feast from a variety of choice meats
and seafood, fresh veggies and flavor-
packed sauces, and then chefs cook it
Mongolian-style on a large, flat grill while
you wait.
Bennys Restaurant
301 E. 7th Ave.
Denver, 80203
303-894-0788
www.bennysrestaurant.com
A fixture in Denvers Capitol Hill area
since 1987, Bennys is a neighborhood
hangout known for authentic Mexican
food, affordable prices, and a fun atmos-
phere. Winner of multiple Best of
awards from various Denver publications,
Bennys authentic Mexican food is made
fresh on the premises every day. The
restaurant also has a tequila bar featuring
margaritas, wine and beer.
Blue Bonnet Cafe
457 S. Broadway
Denver, 80209
303-778-0147
www.bluebonnetrestaurant.com
One of the citys most popular Mexican
restaurants for the last 40 years, the fami-
ly-owned Blue Bonnet Caf is known for
its great patio, handmade chips and
salsa, chimichangas, award-winning
margaritas, flautas, chile rellenos, pollo
adovado, fish tacos, and carnitas all
made from scratch.
The Buckhorn Exchange
1000 Osage St.
Denver, 80204
303-534-9505
www.buckhornexchange.com
Known as Denvers original steakhouse,
The Buckhorn Exchange is located in the
citys oldest neighborhood just five minutes
from downtown. This National Historic
Landmark and Western Museum has been
serving the finest in Old West fare since
1893, including Prime grade steaks,
buffalo prime rib, elk, salmon, quail,
game hen, and succulent baby-back pork
ribs. Youll also find exotic appetizers such
as alligator tail, rattlesnake and buffalo
sausage, as well as the house specialty
Rocky Mountain Oysters.
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The Capital Grille
1450 Larimer St.
Denver, 80202
303-539-2500
www.thecapitalgrille.com
Rich African mahogany paneling and art
deco chandeliers are just a few elegant
details at the upscale Capital Grille, a
recent recipient of the American Culinary
Federations Achievement of Excellence
Award. The menu includes nationally
renowned dry aged steaks, fresh
seafood, and an award-winning wine list
of more than 5,000 bottles.
Denver Palm Restaurant
Tabor Center, 1672 Lawrence St.
Denver, 80202
303-825-7256
www.thepalm.com
This Denver location of the nationally
known original New York restaurant
founded in 1926 features an extensive
lunch and dinner menu, as well as Bar
Bites, special business lunch menus, and
private dining. The dinner menu reflects
the restaurants Italian-American heritage
and includes such classics as prime aged
steaks, jumbo Nova Scotia lobsters,
chicken parmigiana and veal martini.
Dixons Downtown Grill
1610 16th St.
Denver, 80202
303-573-6100
www.dixonsrestaurant.com
Dixons Downtown Grill serves breakfast,
brunch, lunch, dinner, and drinks and
all have received some kind of award or
another from Denver residents, local
restaurant critics, and local publications.
The restaurants creative American
cuisine includes such menu items as a
grilled artichoke appetizer served with
clarified butter and lemon aioli; pan-seared
salmon over a stack of roasted new
potatoes, baby spinach and marinated
onions with a chipotle-stone ground
mustard sauce; and sage chicken breast
sauted with tomatoes and wild mushrooms,
finished in a burgundy tomato glaze and
topped with a mixture of sage and goat
cheese.
Earls Downtown Denver
1600 Glenarm Place
Denver, 80202
303-595-3275
www.earlsdowntowndenver.com
Known for its diverse menu and convenient
downtown location, Earls Downtown
Denver is located next to Cooks Fresh
Market and close to such nearby
attractions as the Colorado Convention
Center, Coors Field, Invesco Field and
others making it ideal for dinner or
drinks before an event. Menu items
include a Leroys crispy dry ribs; a wedge
salad with house-made bleu cheese dressing;
and a hot chicken Caesar salad, plus
pastas, burgers, wok items and more.
Elways
2500 E. 1st Avenue, #101, Cherry Creek
303-399-5353
1881 Curtis Street, Denver
303-312-3107
www.elways.com
With two locations downtown in the
Ritz-Carlton Denver and in Cherry Creek
Elways is the result of a culinary and
business partnership between former
Denver Bronco John Elway and longtime
friend Tim Schmidt. The menu includes
USDA hand cut prime steaks, finfish, crus-
taceans, and more with a menu that
changes to meet market availability.
Euclid Hall Bar & Kitchen
1317 14th Street
Denver, 80202
303-595-4255
www.euclidhall.com
With a motto of Crafted, Not Cranked
Out, Euclids is the third restaurant from
the team of Jennifer Jasinski and Beth
Gruitch, who also own Rioja and Bistro
Vendme. Located in Euclid Hall, an
1883 building that once housed the
venerable Soapy Smiths bar, Euclids is a
Denver favorite and American tavern with
pub food from around the world, including
house-made sausages, po boys, poutine,
and schnitzels plus an extensive beer
selection and creative cocktails.
Heidis Brooklyn Deli
78 E. Allen St.
Castle Rock, 80108
303-663-9223
www.heidisbrooklyndeli.com
Founded in Denver and now a nationally
franchised chain, Heidis Brooklyn Deli
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brings the flavors of New York to the
Rocky Mountains and beyond. The menu
includes such traditional favorites as Philly
Cheesesteak and Reuben sandwiches,
plus every kind of variety of sandwich you
can dream up and then some.
Highland Tap & Burger
2219 W. 32nd Avenue
Denver, 80211
720-287-4493
www.highlandtapdenver.com
Highland Tap & Burger features a casual
pub style atmosphere to watch a
game, get something other than a
bunch of fried food and processed
meats and enjoy a pint of Colorado
Craft beer. Go for lunch, dinner,
happy hour, or weekend brunch; there
are great specials all week long and a
creative and eclectic menu that features
such surprises as an Avery I.P.A. Mac
N Cheese with Fontina, aged white
cheddar, parmesan and toasted homemade
rustic breadcrumbs, and house-made
salad dressings.
Illegal Petes
1530 16th St., Suite 101
Denver, 80202
303-623-2169
www.illegalpetes.com
With multiple locations throughout Denver
and Boulder, Illegal Petes features
inexpensive Mexican food (tacos,
quesadillas, nachos, queso, burritos, salads,
and more) in a fun, relaxed atmosphere.
Islamorada Fish Company
7974 E. 49th Ave.
Denver, 80238
720-385-3500
www.fishcompany.com
Islamorada Fish Company restaurants are
found in Bass Pro Shops

around the
country and at freestanding locations
like the one in Denver. Menu selections
focus on the original Key West restau-
rants seafood dishes, and also include
steaks, hickory-fired rotisserie chicken and
exotic appetizers.
Katie Mullens Irish Restaurant & Pub
16th Street Mall at 1550 Court Place
Denver, 80202
303-573-0336
www.katiemullens.com
Katie Mullens is Denvers newest Irish bar,
located next to the Sheraton Hotel on the
16th Street Mall and featuring a mix of
Irish and American cuisine, four bars, and
four themed experiences in more than
11,500 square feet. Its also 100 percent
Irish-owned, with a commitment to bring a
real, authentic Irish dining and socializing
experience to customers.
Lavish Lounge
1448 Market Street
Denver, 80202
303-880-0237
www.lavishloungedenver.com
Part of a larger chain of bars and
restaurants, Lavish Restaurant & Lounge is
a luxurious lounge and eatery in Denvers
nightlife scene, featuring live music, an
exotic drink menu and world-class small
plate menu items.
Mad Greens
1600 Stout St., Suite 100
Denver, 80202
303-464-7336
www.madgreens.com
Based in and founded in Denver in
2004, Mad Greens Inspired Eats has
eight locations throughout Denver with
a menu that focuses on chef-designed
salads, build-your-own salads, Panini
and soups for a fun and healthy alter-
native to fast food and casual sit-down
restaurants.
The Market at Larimer Square
1445 Larimer St.
Denver, 80202
303-534-5140
www.coloradoeats.com
Mark and Gary Greenberg transformed a
grocery store into Denvers most recogniz-
able deli and espresso bar in 1983, and
it has since become a Denver favorite.
Whether looking for a place to work and
drink a great cup of coffee, a place to
grab a sandwich, a place to meet some
friends, or a place to relax, The Market
is known for its bakery and full-service
breakfast and deli menu.
Mellow Mushroom
1201 16th Street, Ste. 108
Denver, 80202
720-328-9114
www.mellowmushroom.com
This national chain may have started in
Atlanta, but each of its locations is locally
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owned and operated, and Denvers
location has been around since 1974
making it a community fixture and local
favorite. With all kinds of pizza,
munchies, salads, calzones, hoagies,
beer, and more, its a casual option thats
worth the visit.
The Oceanaire Seafood Room
1400 Arapahoe St.
Denver, 80202
303-991-2277
www.theoceanaire.com
Designed to resemble a 1930s ocean liner,
the Oceanaire features seafood flown in
daily from around the world, like Alaskan
halibut, fresh Copper River salmon, true
Dover sole, or bluefin tuna. The menu is
printed daily; theres also an oyster bar,
cocktail lounge, and prix fixe specials.
Ocean Prime
1465 Larimer Street
Denver, 80202
303-825-3663
www.oceanprimedenver.com
Another upscale Denver seafood favorite,
Ocean Prime features the highest quality
ingredients available, local and regional
flavors, and a made-from-scratch menu with
daily seafood selections; wild and naturally
harvested fish recommended by the
Monterey Bay Aquariums Seafood Watch;
and USDA Prime steak cuts that are aged
for maximum tenderness and flavor.
Pats Downtown Bar & Grill
1624 Market St.
Denver, 80220
303-534-1333
www.patscheesesteaks.com
Locally owned, Pats is a Denver favorite
that regularly wins awards for great food,
including Best Cheesesteak, Best Salami
Sandwich, and Top Philly Steak Sandwich.
Rialto Cafe
934 16th St.
Denver, 80202
303-893-2233
www.rialtocafe.com
Located in the heart of downtown Denver
on the popular 16th Street Mall, Rialto
Caf features expertly prepared American
foods and has been voted Best in Denver
in several categories for such creative
dishes as Kobe sliders with Bearnaise
sause. There are plenty of options, too,
with menus for breakfast, brunch, lunch,
dinner, a theater Prix Fixe menu, happy
hour, wine & cocktails, group packages,
and even a gluten-free menu.
Rio Grande Mexican Restaurant
1525 Blake St.
Denver, 80202
303-623-5432
www.riograndemexican.com
Founded in Fort Collins in 1986 and a
Colorado mainstay ever since, the Rio
Grande has locations all over the state,
including Denver, and is known for
great Mexican food and such signature
margaritas as the Rio Marg.
Rock Bottom Brewery
1001 16th St.
Denver, 80265
303-534-7616
www.rockbottom.com
One of the many CraftWorks-owned
eateries and brewpubs (others include
Old Chicago and the Gordon Biersch
Brewery Restaurants), the Rock Bottom
Restaurant & Brewery features craft beer
made on-site and made-from-scratch
creative cuisine that ranges from the tradi-
tional Fish & Chips, Steak & Fries and
burgers to the unique Lobster & Shrimp
Tacos and Ponzu Salmon.
Smiling Moose Deli
1517 Wynkoop Street, Denver
303-297-3354
727 Colorado Blvd, #A, Denver
303-333-3354
www.smilingmoose.com
This Colorado-based chain features a hot
breakfast, sandwiches, wraps, salads,
and soups throughout the day, including a
signature Cheeseburger Grinder, The
Bambino sandwich with hot pastrami and
melted Swiss cheese, and the hearty
Italian Capicola Stack plus a build-your-
own sandwich option with your choice of
a dizzying array of ingredients.
Snooze, an A.M. Eatery
2262 Larimer St.
Denver, 80205
303-297-0700
www.snoozeeatery.com
Founded in 2006 and specializing only in
breakfast and lunch, Snooze is a Colorado-
based local favorite with locations in
Denver and Fort Collins. Specialties include
a Breakfast Pot Pie with homemade
rosemary sausage gravy, a flaky puff
pastry, topped with an egg, any style, and
hash browns; and the Sandwich I Am an
Udis soft pretzel roll filled with scrambled
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eggs, cheddar cheese and a sausage patty,
served with a side of smoked cheddar
hollandaise & house hash browns.
Strings
1700 Humboldt St.
Denver, 80218
303-831-7310
www.stringsrestaurant.com
Located in Denvers Uptown neighborhood,
Strings is one of Denvers hippest restaurants
with a menu that focuses on new American
cuisine, including creative noodle dishes
and fresh seafood like Cashew Crusted
Seabass with saffron couscous and vanilla
beurre blanc. Lunch and dinner specials
change daily, and theres also a lighter bar
& and menu with happy-hour specials.
Tastes Wine Bar & Bistro
4267 Tennyson St., Denver
303-952-9590
1033 E. 17th Avenue, Denver
303-459-2311
www.denverwinebars.net
With two locations, Tastes Wine Bar &
Bistro is all about, well, taste. The menu
features just that, whether its wine from
Australia, cheese from France, meats
from Germany, tapas from Spain, coffee
from Italy, or chocolates from Belgium.
The restaurants philosophy is simple:
Everything on the menu is paired with a
beverage, and every beverage is
paired with food which takes the
guesswork out of eating and instead
helps guests focus more on enjoying.
Teds Montana Grill
1401 Larimer St.
Denver, 80202
303-893-0654
www.tedsmontanagrill.com
The national franchise founded by media
mogul and environmentalist Ted Turner
and restaurateur George McKerrow, Jr.,
Teds Montana Grill is features fresh,
made-from-scratch comfort food using
Certified Angus Beef, National Bison
Association-certified bison, chicken and
seafood. Favorites include steaks, meatloaf,
crab cakes, pecan-crusted trout, cedar
plank salmon, burgers, chicken grills and
vegetable sides.
Texas de Brazil Churrascuria
8390 E. 49th Ave., Suite 1800
Denver, 80238
720-374-2100
www.TexasdeBrazil.com
This national chain is an authentic
Brazilian-American churrascuria (steak-
house) that combines the cuisine of
Southern Brazil with the generous spirit
of Texas. Highlights include 50- to
60- it em seasonal salad area with
appetizers, soups, salads, side items,
and house-baked Brazilian cheese
bread. Flip your table card to green,
and meat on a stick appears at your
table, including beef, lamb, pork,
chicken, and Brazil ian sausage.
Vegetarians need not worry; the seasonal
salad selection will satisfy even the
pickiest eater.
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ts not surprising that theres never much of a recreational lull in metro Denver whether
youre young, or simply young at heart. Regardless of age, there is something for
ever yone especially active older adults who want to keep up with favorite activities
or try new ones.
Cradled in the scenic foothills of the Rocky Mountains, metro Denver is a cosmopolitan metropolis with
a highly acclaimed cultural arts center, championship professional sports teams and a host of attractions
for all ages, as well as cozy neighborhoods with small-town atmospheres and mountain communities
Active Adults
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with breathtaking views. All provide the
perfect setting for an active lifestyle.
RECREATION AND MORE
Those who choose to retire here will find
an abundance of recreational activities
from hiking and biking to boating, hunt-
ing, fishing, among other activities. Golf
is big here, too with more than 100
courses in the metro Denver. The area
also has one of the nations largest park
systems.
Take the time to enjoy the many cultural
arts options here, including world-class
opera, ballet, symphony and theater.
Admirers of visual arts will find museums
across the region, including one of the
largest art museums in the nation, a
popular family attraction that showcase
dinosaur fossils, a museum of Buffalo Bill
memorabilia, those with early Colorado
artifacts, and much more. For more
information, refer to the Leisure section of
this publication for a snapshot of popular
metro Denver activities, including sports,
arts and culture.
Whether you prefer to live in the thick of
activity in metro Denver, or if youd rather
settle into a small community in the metro
Denver area and take advantage of nearby
city amenities, there are plenty of oppor-
tunities to be social and stay active.
ACTIVE COMMUNITIES FOR ALL
The diversity and active lifestyle of metro
Denvers older adult population is reflected
in the many types of senior living commu-
nities located across the region, including
active adult communities; independent
living communities; retirement homes; and
continuing care retirement facilities.
With the baby boomers hitting retirement
age and more people retiring in their
early 50s, active adult communities
have only increased in popularity. These
communities are usually traditional neigh-
borhoods with homes beginning in the
$200s.
With golf courses, community centers,
fitness facilities, nearby churches, shopping,
health care facilities and entertainment,
theres no shortage of things to do. Most
of these communities do not accept
children, and one of the adults living in
the house must be 50 or older.
Whether you are approaching 50 or about
to hit 90, metro Denver has plenty of active
adult housing to choose from, no matter
what your lifestyle needs. Ask your real
estate agent for more information about
housing thats specific to your needs.
TRAVEL, FITNESS AND
FUN IN METRO DENVER
There are lots of opportunities for travel,
fitness and fun throughout the metro
Denver area, whether youre in the city or
living in one of the areas charming and
popular mountain communities. For
example, Denvers Outdoor Recreation
department offers a Rocky Mountain
Ramblers program for active adults and
seniors who enjoy hiking in the high country
and foothills of the Rockies.
Youll get the opportunity to trek through
the Mesa Cortina Trail in Silverthorne, or
visit the Deer Mountain Summit in Rocky
Mountain National Park with professionally
trained staff. Transportation is provided
for all outdoor activities, and trips are
planned throughout the year, including a
soak in Hot Sulphur Springs in the fall.
GO EXPLORE
Planning outings on your own is simple with
Denvers many parks and recreational
facilities. Try jogging or hiking on one of
Denvers many trails; fishing at the city park
lakes; or camping at the Chief Hosa Lodge
and Campground in Genesee Park.
Many metro area cities also have senior
community centers that offer a wide range
of activities. For example, the senior
community centers in Lakewood and
Westminster offer fitness, dancing and
competitive sports programs, as well as
art and computer classes for fun at a more
leisurely pace. In addition, area community
centers have specialty classes that cover
several different topics. You can expand
your knowledge on finance and real
estate, learn a new language, or find out
how to travel on a budget. There are also
many health and wellness seminars,
clinics and classes, and many offer health
screenings and host special speakers.
In addition to sports programs and arts
and crafts classes, the City of Aurora has
an active senior center that offers numer-
ous fitness classes such as pilates, yoga
and Tai Chi. Day trips are planned
throughout the year to music halls, muse-
ums, shopping centers and area festivals.
Outdoor excursions include visits to the
Golden Gate Canyon State Park, Old
Arvada, and Buckley Air Force Base.
Special trips range from three-day week-
end jaunts to 10-day trips across Italy,
and groups include bridge, a nonfiction
book club, gardening, and a film club.
To learn more about other metro area
activities and attractions, visit the Leisure
section for Recreation, Spectator Sports, Arts
and Culture, Attractions, and Annual Events,
and the Shopping and Dining section for
great restaurants and a guide to local shop-
ping destinations. Interested in helping
others? Explore the Volunteer Opportunities
section, where youll find a wealth of resources.
RESOURCES FOR
ACTIVE ADULTS
American Association of
Retired Persons
866-554-5376
www.aarp.org/co
Education, resources and various community
service programs.
Association for Senior Citizens
303-455-9642
www.associationforseniorcitizens.com
Resource for information on senior pro-
grams, as well as a food bank, medical
equipment, and financial assistance.
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Benefits Checkup
www.benefitscheckup.org
A service of the National Council on
Aging in Washington, D.C., seniors can
find programs to help pay for the cost of
prescription drugs, health care, utilities
and other essential items and services.
Catholic Charities
Archdiocese of Denver
303-742-0828
www.catholiccharitiesdenver.org
Provides information, referrals and special
services for seniors and their families.
The Legal Center for People
with Disabilities & Older People
303-722-0300
www.thelegalcenter.org
A statewide advocacy program for
residents of long-term care facilities, The
Legal Center protects and promotes the
rights of people with disabilities and older
people in Colorado through direct legal
representation, advocacy, education and
legislative analysis.
Denver Regional Council of
Governments, Aging Services Division
303-455-1000
www.drcog.com
Helpful information and services for those
aged 55 or older.
Elder Abuse Hotline
800-773-1366
A resource to report elder abuse, or to get
more information on elder abuse.
Elderly Housing Choices
303-831-4046
Aiding the elderly with housing needs.
H2U Health, Happiness, You
www.H2Ucolorado.com
HealthONE sponsors the H2U Health,
Happiness, You program for those 50 and
older. Benefits include a bimonthly
magazine with health, nutrition and activity
news; monthly newsletters; VIP services at
participating HealthONE hospitals; access
to interactive online health tools and assess-
ments; and local/national discounts on
products, services and entertainment venues.
Mature Living Choices
800-222-5771
www.maturelivingchoices.com
A comprehensive guide for active seniors
that are searching for living options.
Mile High United Way
303-433-8383
www.unitedwaydenver.org
Provides information on senior services,
programs and volunteer opportunities,
including a full listing of county and area
senior housing centers.
CareConnect
Boulder & Broomfield Counties
303-443-1933
www.careconnectbc.org
CareConnect promotes the security,
comfort and independence of seniors and
adults with disabilities. The group also
runs the RSVP Volunteer Program for those
over the age of 55, providing matching
services to more than 150 charitable
organizations throughout Boulder County.
Sign up is easy, and all volunteers are
eligible for such perks as supplemental
insurance and mileage reimbursement.
Alzheimers Association
Rocky Mountain Chapter
303-813-1669
www.alzrockymtn.org
Offers support and education for families
dealing with age-related illnesses.
Salvation Army Intermountain Division
www.imsalvationarmy.org
Operates adult day care centers and five
low cost, older adult residences through-
out the metro Denver area. Senior adult
camping also is available.
Senior Hub, Inc.
303-426-4408
www.seniorhub.org
Support and referral services for senior resi-
dents in the north Denver metropolitan area.
Seniors! Inc.
303-300-6900
www.seniorsinc.org
Dedicated to promoting independence
and enriching the quality of life of seniors
in Colorado.
Seniors Resource Center
303-238-8151
www.srcaging.org
Provides services and support for seniors
in Adams, Clear Creek, Denver, Gilpin,
Jefferson and Park counties.
Volunteers of America Colorado
303-297-0408
www.voacolorado.org
Special programs and volunteer opportuni-
ties for older adults, including nutritional and
health services, housing, the foster grand-
parent program, the handyman program.
ACTI VE ADULTS AND SENI OR L I VI NG
e
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camminare tra la natura
()'(,!.$3 2!.#( #/,/2!$/ s 777,)6%6%2/.!#/-
2011 Verona Homes. All Rights Reserved.
[
OUTDOOR /I NDOOR LI VI NG
]
ex
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raordinary
When you live at Verona, you reside with one of Colorados most scenic trails
meandering alongside your Tuscan inspired, low-maintenance luxury home.
Select from The Villas from the mid $400s or The Manors from the mid $200s.
Extraordinary place, exceptional style.
Verona extraordinary experiences of a lifetime 777,)6%6%2/.!#/-
A 55+ Private Enclave Community
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M E T R O D E N V E R R E L O C AT I O N G U I D E S P R I N G 2 0 1 1
he Metro Denver Relocation Guide is designed to provide those new to the Denver area with a
wealth of information. As excited as you may be with your relocation decision, it is still a challenge
to settle into any new community. With this article, I will share with you my relocation tips, based on
more than 30 books and extensive personal experience, to smooth your adjustment into Denver.
LEARN ABOUT YOUR NEW CITY
You may find yourself lodged in a hotel or temporary housing until your belongings arrive, and thats a
nice opportunity to become familiar with Denver. The Metro Denver Relocation Guide is the perfect place
to start learning about what this wonderful city has to offer. You can also find additional information at
the Denver Metro Chamber of Commerce www.denverchamber.org, the Visitors Center, hotels/motels/airports,
and real estate offices (see the Helpful websites sidebar on the opposite page).
Getting Settled
beverlyroman
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A walking or bus tour, while fun for the
whole family, actually serves to help you
become acclimated and learn about the
city. You can also visit local points of inter-
est, such as museums, parks and exhibits;
enjoy a concert; and try out restaurants
featuring local cuisine. Check out any
services, activities or organizations that
are of particular interest to your family.
SPOUSE CAREER
CONSIDERATIONS
One of the biggest challenges of moving
is relocating a career. If you, as a spouse,
are transferring your job to a home office,
then a computer, telephone, e-mail
account and fax machine may be all that
you will need to get started. However, if
your job was not portable, you might con-
sider a new career, part-time or tempo-
rary employment or perhaps even start
your own business.
Evaluate your skills, accomplishments and
greatest strengths when you are planning
your next endeavor. A few resources to tap
are your spouses employer, local organiza-
tions, real estate offices with Partner
Career Assistance Programs, independent
career counselors, your university/college
alma mater and of course the Sunday
edition of the local papers. If you are
searching for a job, start networking by
telling those you meet that you are looking.
If you have chosen to take a break from
your career, consider volunteering your
time and talent. Volunteering to a charita-
ble organization is a wonderful effort as
well as a way to meet new people and
learn more about the community.
Volunteer activities add depth to rsums,
but the experience needs to be document-
ed so that the service equates to business
expertise. Before you again become fully
employed, use any free time to enjoy your
new community. Refer to the Advice for
Volunteers website for guidance in selecting
a volunteer position and Monster.com for
spouse assistance in the Helpful Websites
sidebar.
SUCCESSFULLY RELOCATING
YOUR SMALLEST MOVERS
The majority of relocating families have
dependent children. If you are moving
with children, you probably researched
schools before moving; however, personal
school visits will transform the unknown
into reality. Visits to new schools to sur-
vey the classrooms and meet teachers
will go a long way to allay your, and
your childrens, worries about the new
environment.
Listen carefully to each childs concerns
every move can bring new issues to the
surface. Encourage your children to
maintain contact with former friends, even
while trying to make new friends.
Exchanging photos, having e-mail access
and possibly a cell phone with a camera
feature can help bridge the gap between
old and new friends during the early
weeks in a new location.
DEALING WITH CHALLENGES
Keep in mind that every stage and
every age can bring new challenges.
Children who sailed through the last
move could be in an entirely different
place emotionally and physically for this
move, so parents cannot assume that a
child will ease into the current move.
Routinely share accomplishments and
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
HELPFUL WEBSITES
American Medical Association www.ama-assn.org
Monster.com www.monster.com
American School Directory www.asd.com
National Association of Child Care
Resource and Referral Agencies
www.naccrra.org
Elder Care Locator www.eldercare.gov
American Animal Hospital Association
(AAHA) Hospital Locator
www.healthypet.com
Advice for Volunteers www.serviceleader.org
Parents Without Partners, Inc. www.parentswithoutpartners.org
9* getting settled DEN-2:Flintrock Falls Covers 3/24/11 9:29 PM Page 131
challenges with each other and talk
about ways to overcome difficulties.
Children need to know that, although
the parents are responsible for uprooting
them, you both have challenges to face,
and you need to work together as a
family to solve them.
The following signs may indicate that
children are struggling with the adjust-
ment: sudden reading difficulties,
changes in attention span or study habits,
weight loss or gain, altered enthusiasm
or energy levels, strained relationships
with you or their siblings, or disturbed
sleep patterns. Stay closely involved
with your children during the early
months in a new location so you know
how they are feeling, what they are
thinking and who their new friends are.
Consider volunteering or get involved
with the school so that you can see for
yourself how your children are managing.
Both adults and children need the stability
and comfort of established routines,
so keep the same rules, bedtimes,
mealtimes, allowances and expectations
that you had before moving. Refer to
the Tips for Settling In sidebar for more
great info to help both you and the
kids.
CHILDREN AND SAFETY
When children are in an unfamiliar envi-
ronment, they can easily forget basic safety
rules. The following are always a good
reminder:
Keep close to a parent, and take an
adults hand in crowded areas
Carry personal identification and phone
numbers to contact parents at all times
Know where to meet in case families
become separated
Review street crossing safety guidelines
Make sure children understand how to
get help safely, if they get lost
MEDICAL AND SAFETY
PRECAUTIONS
It is a fact that moving places additional
stress on individuals and, consequently,
they are more vulnerable to accidents or
illness, not to mention unexpected flare-
ups of chronic health conditions. If an
emergency occurs, every second counts;
therefore, as a precaution, locate hospitals,
pharmacies and physicians that will meet
your familys needs before an emergency
arises.
Learn the procedures, telephone numbers
and access codes for emergency care
and always carry medical identification
with you. Also, in an emergency, you
may forget your new telephone number
and/or address; so, before an emergency
arises, program them into your cell phone
and place written notes near each tele-
phone in your home, as well as basic
directions to your residence. Directions
will not only be useful for family members
in the early days at your new home,
but they will also assist babysitters and
visiting relatives.
EMBRACE THE MOVE
Whether or not you have children, or you
are married, single or retired, relocating
to a new community can ultimately
become a wonderful and enriching
experience. The suggestions in this article
have worked for many relocating families,
and they can also help your family
become comfortable in your new home.
As an aside, when people learn that Ive
moved 19 times, the response is often
What place did you like best? My
answer is always the same: Where my
family was. I wish you all the best!
About the Author | Beverly D. Roman found-
ed BR Anchor Publishing in 1990 and has writ-
ten more than 30 international and domestic
relocation books. Two of her books won the
Employee Relocation Councils Achievement
Award for Special Purpose Programs. Her inter-
national newsletter has supported corporations
and the military in over 140 countries for more
than18 years. Beverly served from 2002-
2004 as founding chairperson for Families in
Global Transition, Inc. (FIGT) an organization
that focuses on the most critical issues associat-
ed with international cultural transitions.
Contact her at broman@branchor.com,
904-641-1140 or visit www.branchor.com.
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
Write down three or four
goals to achieve in your
new city.
Continue all your special
family celebrations and
traditions.
Share some of your
familys special recipes
and cultural aspects with
new acquaintances and
neighbors.
Keep a log of new
experiences and
accomplishments.
Give everyone in the
family manageable
moving chores (taking
care of practical matters
will take the edge off
homesickness).
Join an athletic or special
interest group.
Get involved in community
and religious organizations,
especially those that sponsor
activities, volunteer efforts
and programs for newcomers.
Learn about the local
government, issues and
politics.
Take one day at a time.
TIPS for
SETTLING IN
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Theres no doubt that a city thats easy
to get around in will be one that visitors
for both business and pleasure will come
back to often and Denver fits the bill. Its
central U.S. location has turned the city
into a hub for business, distribution of
goods and services, travel and leisure.
Consider that, in 2010, the city hosted 75
conventions in the Colorado Convention
Center, plus 423 other meetings, resulting
in an economic impact for the city of $653
million. A network of transportation options
and roadways offer metro Denver residents
and visitors alike an easy commute, and
convenient access to area businesses,
shopping, entertainment, recreational activ-
ities and services.
AIR TRAVEL
Boulder Municipal Airport
3300 Airport Road
Boulder, 80301
303-404-3108
www3.ci.boulder.co.us/airport
Located three miles northeast of Boulders
central business district, Boulder Municipal
Airport serves the citys general aviation
needs. No commercial aircraft operates at
the airport; offers business-related and recre-
ational flying, mail and newspaper transport,
flight training, and support services for med-
ical, law enforcement, and fire and rescue.
Centennial Airport
7800 S. Peoria St.
Englewood, 80112
303-790-0598
www.centennialairport.com
Centennial Airport serves as a major local
reliever airport for Denver International
Airport, which means it accepts smaller,
private aircraft. A major hub for corporate
aircraft, Centennial offers charter, air
ambulance, check transport, and air
cargo services.
Denver International Airport (DIA)
8500 Pea Blvd.
Denver, 80249
303-342-2000
www.flydenver.com
With the capacity to serve 50 million pas-
sengers per year, the Denver International
Airport (DIA) is the citys primary link to
destinations across the globe. It is the fifth
busiest airport in the country, the 10th
busiest in the world, and one of the
largest encompassing 53 square miles
with six runways and 89 gates. Sixteen
commercial airlines currently offer nonstop
daily service to more than 140 domestic
and international destinations.
Front Range Airport
5200 Front Range Pkwy.
Watkins, 80137
303-261-9103
www.ftg-airport.com
Adams Countys Front Range Airport lies
six miles southeast of Denver International
Airport and has three runways for
general aviation aircraft and a railway
track operated by Union Pacific. The
airports 190-foot air traffic control
tower is the nations tallest general
aviation control tower.
Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport
11755 Airport Way
Broomfield, 80021
303-271-4850
http://co.jefferson.co.us/airport
Rocky Mountain Metropolitan Airport is
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
GETTING
AROUND
in METRO DENVER
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situated between Boulder and Denver
and offers services for charter and private
planes. Owned and operated by
Jefferson County, this airport provides 24-
hour customs service and employs
approximately 300 people.
GROUND TRANSPORTATION
Greyhound Bus Lines
1055 19th St.
Denver, 80202
303-293-6555
www.greyhound.com
Just a few blocks from the Regional
Transportation Districts Market Street
Station, the terminal for Greyhound and
other private bus lines is located at 20th
and Curtis streets.
SuperShuttle Denver
4929 Ironton St.
Denver, 80239
303-370-1300
www.supershuttledenver.com
SuperShuttle Denver provides residential
and office pick-up and drop-off service
to and from the Denver International
Airport.
PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION
Regional Transportation District (RTD)
1600 Blake St.
Denver, 80202
303-299-6000
www.rtd-denver.com
Denvers Regional Transportation District
(RTD) provides transit service throughout
metro Denver, including 140 bus routes
that service 10,000 stops; 35 miles of
light rail service (see sidebar on T-REX
Project); and nearly 80 Park-n-Ride loca-
tions. Other services include the skyRide
shuttle service to and from Denver
International Airport, and special services
for children, seniors, disabled persons,
business commuters, and recreational
purposes.
TAXI SERVICES
Find taxi services at Denver International
Airport, as well as at locations throughout
the city. Generally available 24 hours a
day, seven days a week, the largest taxi
service companies in the area include:
Metro Taxi Denver
303-333-3333
www.metrotaxidenver.com
Yellow Cab of Denver
303-777-7777
www.yellowtrans.com
Freedom Cabs Denver & Boulder
303-444-4444
www.freedomcabs.com
RAIL TRANSPORTATION
Amtrak Union Station*
1800 21
st
Street
Denver, 80202
800-872-7245
www.amtrak.com
Amtrak offers daily departures from Denver
with connections in Chicago, Omaha, Salt
Lake City and Emeryville/San Francisco.
*The stations permanent home by spring
2014 will be at Union Station, when con-
struction there is completed.
Denver Union Station
1701 Wynkoop St.
Denver, 80202
303-534-6333
www.denverunionstation.org
Denver Union Station is a vital link in
getting people to where they want to go
in metro Denver. Currently under rede-
velopment, the historic station will
eventually serve as a 24-hour hub for
commuter and light rails (including
Amtrak and the East, Gold, North
Metro, and Northwest commuter rail
lines), buses, taxis, shuttles, vans, limos,
bicycles and pedestrians.
MAJOR ROADWAYS
www.dot.state.co.us
Metro Denver is continually working to
develop and expand its transportation
system, including the construction of the
areas first beltway and toll road system;
the T-REX project in 2006 (see sidebar);
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
WHERE IN
THE U.S.?
Distance from Denver
to Other Major Cities
Albuquerque 447 miles
Atlanta 1,404 miles
Boston 1,971 miles
Chicago 1,004 miles
Dallas 794 miles
Miami 2,065 miles
New York 1,777 miles
Philadelphia 1,728 miles
Phoenix 822 miles
Salt Lake City 533 miles
San Francisco 1,275 miles
Seattle 1,331 miles
Books by Beverly D. Roman
provide cost-effective and
practical relocation advice
for the entire family.
Proven relocation techniques
for adults, teens, preteens
and young children.
Valuable resources, checklists,
safety advice and much more!
Smooth Your Move with
BRAnchor Publishing
MOVING?
Order online at www.branchor.com
or call 1.800.735.9209

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and the FasTracks program a multi-billion
dollar comprehensive transit expansion
plan to build 122 miles of new commuter
rail and light rail, 18 miles of bus rapid
transit, 21,000 new parking spaces at
light rail and bus stations, and enhanced
bus service for easier bus/rail connec-
tions across an eight-county district. The
following is an overview of the citys
major highways and byways.
INTERSTATES/HIGHWAYS
Metro Denver provides an efficient net-
work of streets, freeways and highways.
In addition, I-225 serves the southeast
quadrant of metro Denver.
U.S. 285 and U.S. 6 connect the western
foothills and metro Denver.
U.S. 36, also known as the Boulder
Turnpike, provides quick northwest access
between downtown Denver and Boulder.
Metro Denver is at the crossroads of three
major interstatesI-25 is the north-south
route, while both I-70 and I-76 provide
east-west access.
BELTWAY
About three-quarters of the beltway around
metro Denver has been completed, and an
Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) study is
currently underway to look at options for
completing the last beltway portion in
northwestern Jefferson County. As of March
2011, the beltway includes:
C-470 (26 miles) extends from I-25 in
the southern metro area to I-70 near
Golden. The C-470 Corridor has
emerged as one of metro Denvers
major economic corridors, providing a
vital connection between the mountains
and the southern suburbs and Front
Range.
E-470 (toll road, 47 miles) runs along
the eastern perimeter of the metro
area and extends from C-470 at I-25
(south of Denver), runs east and then
north through Aurora, passes along
the western edge of the Denver
International Airport, and turns west,
terminating at I-25 on the north end
of the metro area.
Northwest Parkway (toll road, 11 miles)
connects with E-470 and I-25 at 157th
Avenue in metro Denver.
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
The face of Denver transportation is even better
with the launch of light rail. The Transportation
Expansion Project (T-REX Project) was completed
in November 2006, bringing this convenient and
environmentally friendly mass transportation
option to those in the metro Denver area.
The result of a unique collaboration between the
Colorado Department of Transportation and the
Regional Transportation District, the $1.67 billion
venture opened the Southeast Light Rail line,
designed to speed travel along the southeast
corridor of Interstates 25 and 225. This rail route
added 19 miles of light rail and improved 17
miles of highway through southeast Denver,
Aurora, Greenwood Village, Centennial, and
Lone Tree. It also links metro Denvers largest
employment centers: the Central Business District
in downtown Denver and the Denver Tech Center.
Specifically, the rail lines provide service along
the west side of I-25 from Lincoln Avenue to the
existing I-25 & Broadway light rail station, and
along the center of I-225 from the I-25/I-225
interchange to Parker Road in Aurora. The four
Southeast Light Rail lines (E, F, G, and H) connect
to the Regional Transportation Districts (RTDs)
existing C and D lines at the I-25 & Broadway
station, extending service to downtown Denver,
lower downtown Denver (LoDo), Englewood, and
Littleton.
The project also allowed the Regional Transportation
District to add new bus routes, revise existing
routes, and introduce six new call-n-Rides (a
curb-to-curb transportation service) in the southeast
Denver area. The project also features an Art-
n-Transit public art exhibit along the lines, offering
a creative connection between neighborhoods and
transit. All in all, the project estimates that 33,800
riders per day use the rail lines, and anticipates that
number will increase to 38,100 per day by 2020.
For information, updates, and schedules, visit
www.rtd-denver.com/lightRail_subHome.shtml.
TRANSFORMING TRANSPORTATION
with T-REX and LIGHT RAIL
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GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
With 300 annual days of sunshine,
the nations largest public park system, a
thriving economic and business climate,
and plenty of opportunities for skiing,
hiking, mountain biking, river rafting, and
more, its no wonder that so many families
choose to move to metro Denver each year.
Colorados historic focus on low taxes,
coupled with metro Denvers high house-
hold incomes, has kept the regions cost
of living at or near the national average.
Metro Denver ranks slightly above the
national average for cost of living, but
well below many other major cities.
Metro Denvers utility rates are also
among the lowest of any major U.S. city.
The information weve compiled will help
those new to Denver make a smooth tran-
sition, so you can start to enjoy all that the
Mile High City has to offer.
CAR REGISTRATION AND DRIVERS
LICENSE INFORMATION
Vehicle Registration/Inspection
Those new to Colorado must get new
license plates within 30 days of establishing
residency or employment. Out-of-state
students and military personnel dont have
to get Colorado license plates if they
have valid plates from their home state.
The county handles all motor vehicle
registrations, mailing annual notices to
remind residents to register. Car registra-
tion requirements include a valid emis-
sions sticker, vehicle identification number
verification, lien holder information, title,
and current registration.
County Motor Vehicle Offices
Adams ........................303-654-6010
Arapahoe....................303-795-4500
Boulder .......................303-413-7710
Broomfield ...................303-464-5888
Denver .......................303-376-2200
Douglas.......................303-660-7440
Jefferson ......................303-271-8100
Drivers License
Colorado requires that new residents apply
for a state drivers license within 30 days of
relocating. If your current drivers license is
valid, youll need to pass a brief written exam
and eye test. Licenses must be renewed
every five years. Out-of-state students and
military personnel are not required to obtain
a Colorado drivers license if they have a
valid home state license.
Colorado Division of Motor Vehicles
1881 Pierce St.
Lakewood, 80214
303-205-5600
www.revenue.state.co.us/mv-dir
Full-Service Offices
Aurora
14391 E. Fourth Ave
303-344-8400
Boulder
2850 Iris Ave.
303-442-3006
Denver
1865 W. Mississippi Ave.
303-937-9507
Longmont
917 S. Main St.
303-776-4073
NEWCOMER
INFORMATION
EVERYTHING YOU
NEED TO KNOW
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Northglenn
500 Malley Drive
720-929-8636
Parker
17737 Cottonwood Drive
303-627-0985
Limited-Service Offices
Broomfield
5139 W. 120th Ave.
720-887-8396
Lakewood
1881 Pierce St.
303-205-5609
Littleton (Oakbrook Shopping Center)
311 E. County Line Road
303-795-5954
CONSUMER AND BUSINESS
ASSISTANCE RESOURCES
Attorney Generals Office of
Consumer Protection
303-866-5304
Better Business Bureau
303-758-2100
Colorado Division of
Consumer Protection
303-692-3620
Colorado Office of Economic Development
and International Trade
303-892-3840
Colorado Office of
Small Business Development
303-592-5920
Colorado Business Assistance Center
303-592-5920
POLITICAL REPRESENTATION
For comprehensive Colorado city, state
and local government information, refer to
www.colorado.gov. For local city infor-
mation, refer to www.denvergov.org.
CITY & STATE
Mayor Guillermo (Bill) V. Vidal
720-865-9000
www.denvergov.org/mayor
Governor John Hickenlooper (D)
303-866-2471
www.colorado.gov/GOVERNOR
CONGRESSIONAL REPRESENTATIVES
District 1
Diana DeGette (D)
202-225-4431
District 2
Jared Polis (D)
202-225-2161
District 3
Scott Tipton (R)
02-225-4761
District 4
Cory Gardner (R)
202-225-4676
District 5
Doug Lamborn (R)
202-225-4422
District 6
Mike Coffman (R)
202-225-7882
District 7
Edwin Perlmutter (D)
202-225-2645
SENATORS
Mark Udall (D)
202-224-5941
Michael Bennett (D)
202-224-5852
LEGAL AID
Boulder County Legal Services
303-449-7575
Colorado Legal Services
303-837-1313
Justice Information Center
303-832-1220
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
PUBLIC SAFETY INFORMATION
Emergency, Police and Fire 911
Adams County Sheriff 303-654-1850
Arapahoe County Sheriff 303-795-4711
Boulder County Sheriff 303-441-4444
Broomfield County Police 303-438-6400
Colorado State Patrol 303-239-4500
Denver Police (city and county) 720-913-2000
Douglas County Sheriff 303-660-7505
Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) 303-705-7300
Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) 303-629-7171
Jefferson County Sheriff 303-277-0211
Rocky Mountain Poison and Drug Center 800-222-1222
USDA Forest Service Rocky Mountain Region 303-275-5350
USEFUL COUNTY PHONE NUMBERS
Adams 303-659-2120
Arapahoe 303-795-4400
Boulder 303-441-3131
Broomfield 303-469-3301
Denver 720-913-4900
Douglas 303-660-7400
Jefferson 303-279-6511
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DENVER LIBRARIES
(District offices/main branch libraries)
Arapahoe Library District
12855 E. Jamison Circle
Englewood, 80112
303-798-2444
www.arapahoelibraries.org
Aurora Public Library
14949 E. Alameda Pkwy.
Aurora, 80012
303-739-6600
www.auroralibrary.org
Boulder Public Library
1000 Canyon Blvd.
Boulder, 80302
303-441-3100
www.boulder.lib.co.us
Denver Public Library
10 W. 14th Ave. Pkwy.
Denver, 80204
720-865-1111
www.denver.lib.co.us
Douglas County Libraries
100 S. Wilcox
Castle Rock, 80104
303-688-7620
www.douglas.lib.co.us
Englewood Public Library
1000 Englewood Pkwy.
Englewood, 80110
303-762-2550
www.englewoodgov.org
Jefferson County Public Library
10200 W. 20th Ave.
Lakewood, 80215
303-232-7114
www.jefferson.lib.co.us
Mamie Doud Eisenhower
Public Library
3 Community Park Road
Broomfield, 80020
720-887-2300
www.ci.broomfield.co.us/library
Rangeview Library District
8992 N. Washington St.
Thornton, 80229
303-288-2001
www.adams.lib.co.us
DENVER NEWSPAPERS
The f ol l owi ng i s a l i st of l arge
Denver- area newspapers. Refer to
www.50states.com/news/colorado.htm
for a comprehensive list of Colorado
newspapers, as well as smaller Denver
area suburban newspapers.
Boulder Daily Camera
303-442-1202
www.dailycamera.com
Denver Business Journal
303-837-3500
www.bizjournals.com/denver
The Denver Post
303-832-3232
www.denverpost.com
The Denver Rocky Mountain News
303-954-3000
www.rockymountainnews.com
Westword
303-296-7744
www.westword.com
POST OFFICES
Check the federal government listings in
the white pages for the post office nearest
you. The General Mail Facility, located
near the Stapleton development, is open
24 hours.
General Mail Facility
303-853-6758
U.S. Postal Service (locations)
800-275-8777
www.usps.com
RECYCLING/TRASH PICKUP
In the city and county of Denver, resi-
dents can sign up for recycling and
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
All U.S. citizens 18 years of age and older are eligible to vote in
Colorado. Proof of residency in the state for at least 30 days prior to
the election is required, and registration must be completed at least
29 days before the election. For voter registration locations, contact
your local county clerks office or election commission office.
Residents may also register to vote at any drivers license office or
public assistance agency throughout the state.
VOTER INFORMATION
Annual licensing and vaccination are required for dogs and cats
living in the region, although regulations vary from county to county.
Contact your local Animal Control office for specifics.
Denver Division of Animal Care and Control.............303-698-0076
Dumb Friends League............................................303-751-5772
Colorado Humane Society & SPCA..........................720-241-7111
Metro Denver Shelter Alliance.................................303-539-7267
State Board of Veterinary Medicine..........................303-894-7755
PET INFORMATION
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view pickup schedules for trash, recy-
cling and large items online at
www.denvergov.org/recycle. In addi-
tion, e-mail reminders can be set up to
arrive automatically the day before
each scheduled pickup.
Residents are provided trash collection
services by dumpster service, manual
collection and automated barrel collec-
tion. Dumpsters are provided in neigh-
borhoods with alleyways.
In manual collection areas, crews
physically pick up trash containers
from the alley or curb and empty them
into a truck. With automated barrel
collection, the city issues residents
100-gallon trash barrels, and crews
empty these barrel s in special l y
equipped trucks. Trash containers must
be stored out of public view until col-
lection day.
Residents outside of the city and county
of Denver must contract for trash collec-
tion service, and those services vary,
depending on location.
Check the Yellow Pages for a listing of
waste removal contractors. In some
cases, a waste removal contractor may
already be set up for your area.
Contact your city for information about
trash collection and recycling services.
Colorado Recycles
303-695-6010
Denver Recycles
720-865-6805
Denver Waste Management
303-446-3400
UTILITIES
Phone Service
Ten-digit dialing is necessary through-
out metro Denver; and all addresses
are in Colorado unless other wise
noted.
Digital Cable, High-Speed Internet a
nd Digital Home Phone
Comcast
888-824-4010
www.comcast.com
Qwest
800-475-7526
www.qwest.com
Electric
Intermountain Rural Electric
Association (IREA)
303-688-3100
Xcel Energy-Public Service
Company of Colorado
303-615-5000
Telephone
Qwest Communications
800-475-7526
Satellite TV
DIRECT SAT TV
(an authorized DIRECTTV dealer)
800-319-8407
www.directsattv.com
DISH Network
800-284-7116
www.dishnetwork.com
Water
Arapahoe County Water and
Water Authority
303-790-4870
Denver Water
303-628-6000
VETERANS AND MILITARY
INFORMATION AND SERVICES
Air Force
800-525-0102
Air National Guard
866-462-6264
Army
303-894-9725
Colorado Veterans Services
303-914-5549
Division of Veterans Affairs
303-894-7474
Recruiting District Enlisted
Programs Administration
303-866-1979
WEATHER INFORMATION
Air Quality Bulletin
303-782-0211
Colorado Road Conditions
303-639-1111
Weather Information
303-494-4221
GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
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Home energy audits are an excellent way
to assess home energy use and, as a
result, make changes to cut your energy
waste. Those small changessuch as
installing compact fluorescent lighting,
low-flow showerheads, and adding
insulation around water heaterscan
slash annual energy costs by 10 to 30
percent. Bigger energy makeoverssuch
as adding attic and wall insulation and
more efficient air conditionerscan cut
bills by 35 to 50 percent.
The Environmental Protection Agency
offers a great guide to do-it yourself home
audits at www.energystar.gov. For a
thorough energy audit, however, hire a
professional.
An Xcel Energy Home Energy Audit begins
with a review of your attic, insulation, doors,
windows, furnace or boiler, appliances and
more. Auditors look for:
Drafty windows
Insufficient insulation
Insufficient appliances
Poor ventilation
Inefficient heating and cooling systems
In a couple of hours, an auditor can
interview a homeowner, walk through the
house, and find places to recommend
changesplus outlining costs and savings.
Tools of the trade include blower doors
that measure the extent of air leaks in the
home, and infrared cameras that reveal
the zones that lack insulation or air leak
pathways.
This is a great way for a homeowner to
get specific energy-saving advice for their
home, says Jackie Ducharme, Home
Energy Audit program manager. Many
times they dont know where to start and
this provides a top down list of things they
can do to start saving money.
Common problems include furnace filters
that need replacement, doors that need
weather stripping, water heaters set too
hot, and electronic devices that suck
phantom power from socketseven
when turned off. Recommendations may
include upgrading to ENERGY STAR
rated appliances or more efficient heating
and cooling equipment.
Xcel Energy offers more comprehensive
home programs and rebates. For information,
visit www.responsiblebynature.com.
save with a little help
from your friends
A STANDARD AUDIT INCLUDES:
A comprehensive home audit
Acustomized energy bill analysis
to help you understand how
much energy your home uses
A comprehensive audit report
including a list of recommenda-
tions showing where you can
save the most energy and money
A comparison of costs and
savings for any suggested
improvements
Answers to your specific questions
ABLOWERDOORAUDIT INCLUDES:
A comprehensive home audit
A blower door test, which helps
us determine where air is
entering your home
Acustomized energy bill analysis
to help you understand how
much energy your home uses
A comprehensive audit report
including a list of recommenda-
tions showing where you can
save the most energy and money
A comparison of costs and
savings for any suggested
improvements
Answers to your specific questions
AN INFRARED AUDIT INCLUDES:
A comprehensive home audit
A blower door test, which helps
us determine where air is
entering your home
An infrared scan of your home
to help pinpoint the problem
areas, particularly areas not
visible to the eye
Acustomized energy bill analysis
to help you understand how
much energy your home uses
A comprehensive audit report
including a list of recommen-
dations showing where you
can save the most energy and
money
A comparison of costs and
savings for any suggested
improvements
Answers to your specific questions
HOME ENERGY AUDITS
AT A GLANCE
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2 0 1 1 X C E L E N E R G Y I N C .
The simple, convenient way to nd
your homes energy weaknesses:
Let somebody else do it.
Visit ResponsibleByNature.com
for details.
A professional home energy auditor can nd the secret places where
your home is wasting energyand suggest ways to improve.
Its easy. And best of all, Xcel Energy covers 60% of the cost of a
Home Energy Audit. Schedule yours today.
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GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
It takes a village to build a community
and a city and there are plenty of
opportunities for those new to Denver that
want to give back to their new home and
help others. Whether youve just moved
here, are considering Denver as a place
to make a new home, or just want to help
out and meet new people, youll quickly
discover that there are a variety of options
to fit your personality, skills, and passions.
New to volunteer work? You might want
to consider offering your help on a short-
term basis at a few different places before
making a long-term commitment to one or
more. Youll find that your choice of volun-
teer opportunities can be quite diverse,
from service to hospitals, cultural arts
venues, and animal facilities to nature
centers and parks. There are also a lot of
opportunities to help with human services,
such as delivering meals to the elderly,
helping in homeless shelters, and assisting
with children.
STRENGTHENING COMMUNITIES:
HUMAN SERVICES
Theres nothing quite as rewarding as
helping others in need, and those who
have a strong desire to do so will soon
discover that there are a variety of human
services organizations in the metro
Denver area that always need the
assistance of caring and willing volunteers.
The area organizations listed below help
to coordinate volunteers for agencies and
nonprofit groups.
Metro Volunteers
303-282-1234
www.metrovolunteers.org
Volunteer at a local nonprofit, and you
can Change Yourself and Change the
World. Thats the tagline of Metro
Volunteers, the expert resource center on
volunteerism in the metro Denver area. In
the Denver community, Metro Volunteers
helps give volunteerism its visibility and
voice.
Mile High United Way
303-433-8383
www.unitedway.org
Mile High United Way partners with
more than 80 community organizations to
help people in metro Denver, and volun-
teers are an integral part of the organiza-
tions operation. Metro Denver residents
help assess community needs, raise and
distribute contributions, set policy, examine
the budget, and promote the organiza-
tions message in the community. The
groups community agenda has five priority
areas, including School Readiness to
support affordable early childhood
education; Youth Success to promote and
encourage positive role models and
after-school activities; Reducing Family,
School and Community Violence through
crisis intervention and violence prevention
programs; Tools for Success that include
continuing education, affordable housing,
and a reliable support system with asset-
building opportunities; and Emergency
LEND A
HELPING
HAND
VOLUNTEERING in METRO DENVER
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Assistance to help families and individuals
with food, shelter, affordable health care,
and transitional housing.
Volunteers of America
303-297-0408
www.voacolorado.org
The Volunteers of America Colorado
Branch offers 30 human service programs
within the metro Denver area and are
always in need of volunteers for ongoing
projects. The VOA service areas include
active and homebound elderly; those
affected by AIDS; homeless men and
women; battered women and their
children; families in crisis; and at-risk
teenagers.
The VOA also has projects for groups
of volunteers from church, business and
civic organizations. Group projects
include hosting canned food drives for
low-income families and older adults;
delivering Meals on Wheels to home-
bound seniors; preparing and serving
meals to homeless women staying at
the VOA Theodora House Shelter; and
adopting and decorating rooms at
Brandon, a shelter for battered women
and their children.
VOLUNTEER OPPORTUNITIES
The following includes a partial listing of
the metro Denver organizations that
accept volunteers:
Big Brothers Big Sisters of Colorado, Inc.
303-433-6002
www.bbbscolo.org
Bonfils Blood Center
303-341-4000
www.bonfils.org
Clayton Early Learning
303-355-4411
www.claytonearlylearning.org
Colorado Coalition of the Homeless
303-293-2217
www.coloradocoalition.org
The Colorado Health Foundation
303-953-3600
www.coloradohealth.org
Colorado Nonprofit Association
303-832-5710
www.coloradononprofits.org
Colorado Special Olympics, Inc.
303-592-1361
www.specialolympicsco.org
Colorado Youth at Risk
303-623-9140
www.coloradoyouthatrisk.org
Community Shares of Colorado
303-861-7507
www.cshares.org
Denver Rescue Mission
303-313-2425
www.denverrescuemission.org
Donor Awareness Council
303-388-8605
www.donor-awareness.org
Dumb Friends League
National animal welfare organization
303-671-5212
www.ddfl.org
Food Bank of the Rockies
303-371-9250
www.foodbankrockies.org
Habitat for Humanity
303-454-8965
www.habitatcolorado.org
Hope Communities
303-860-7747, Ext. 133
www.hopecommunities.org
Junior League
of Denver
303-692-0270
www.jld.org
Leaders Challenge
303-460-7100
www.leaderschallenge.org
Outward Bound
303-825-9414
www.outwardbound.org
Project Angel Heart
303-830-0202
www.projectangelheart.org
Rocky Mountain USO
719-201-6016
www.uso.org
Special Olympics Colorado
303-592-1361
www.specialolympicsco.org
YMCA of Metro Denver
720-524-2700
www.denverymca.org
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No matter what your spiritual prefer-
ence, Denver offers a number of options
for those of all faiths.
Denver also offers many nondenominational
places of worship, as well as a large
selection of faith-based community organi-
zations. For more information, refer to the
sidebar on Religious Organizations.
BAPTIST
The American Baptist Churches of the
Rocky Mountains, which covers Wyoming,
Colorado, New Mexico, eastern Idaho
and eastern Utah, is made up of 103
congregations and serves about 28,000.
The organization supports churches, organ-
izes missions and stewardship, and pro-
motes Christian education, church renewal
and evangelism, as well as organizes spiri-
tual celebrations, seminars, missions and
ministries throughout the year.
The Colorado Baptist General Convention
includes more than 300 Southern Baptist
churches and missions from across the state
of Colorado. Worshipers congregate in
both traditional and non-traditional settings,
including churches, homes, workplaces, ski
slopes, and barns. Locally, the organization
supports womens ministries, establishment
of ethnic churches, evangelism, church
health, and volunteer ministries, among
other causes.
The Rocky Mountain Baptist Conference,
which is affiliated with the Baptist
General Conference, incl udes 51
members from Colorado, Wyoming
and western Nebraska who work
together to promote church mobiliza-
tion, development, and leadership
hosting events throughout the year. In
general, Colorado Southern Baptists
support more than 5,000 missionaries
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RELIGIOUS
RESOURCES
SPIRITUALITY
in METRO DENVER
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in the United States, Canada, Guam
and the Caribbean, with about 5,000
additional missions serving more than
150 nations around the world.
CATHOLIC
The Archdiocese of Denver serves the
northern area of Colorado, with 155
parishes located throughout metro Denver,
and a thriving school system that serves
nearly 15,000 students in 37 elementary
schools, 2 archdiocesan secondary
schools, 3 private elementary schools
and 6 private secondary schools. The
Archdiocese also offers two seminary
schools.
The Archdiocese is also home to a
number of ministries, including the Black
Catholic Ministry, Hispanic Ministry, the
Catholic Deaf Community, Marriage
and Family Life, and the Youth, Young
Adult and Campus Ministry. Other social
ministries address poverty, education,
alcohol and substance abuse, and rural
life. The archdiocese is affiliated with
Catholic Relief Services, which works in
more than 90 countries to foster interna-
tional awareness and promote peace
and justice.
The Catholic Charities Archdiocese of
Denver supports other local community
efforts, providing services to Colorado
residents of all faiths from metro Denver
to northern Colorado and the western
slope. Services include parenting classes,
adult services, child care programs,
counseling, disabled services, emergency
assistance, employment services, English
as a Second Language, foster care,
HIV/AIDS ministry, housing, homeless-
ness, immigration services, pregnancy
counseling, senior services and youth
services.
EPISCOPAL
The Episcopal Diocese of Colorado
includes approximately 116 congregations
that serve 81 communities in the state.
The organization hosts events throughout
the year, including the annual Diocesan
Convention, adult prayer groups and
ministries, and childrens and youth
programs. The Diocese also plans
camps, conferences, picnics, tutoring
sessions, Sunday schools, pageants,
classes and parent-child retreats
throughout the year.
METHODIST
At least 47 Colorado churches are
members of the Rocky Mountain
Conference of the United Methodist
Church, which includes Colorado, Utah
and southeastern Wyoming. Considered
a part of the western jurisdiction of the
United Methodist Church, the Western
Jurisdiction Conference holds meetings for
members every four years for fellowship,
worship, and taking care of official
church business.
The Rocky Mountain Conference offers
youth, young adult, men and womens
ministries; camping, music and worship
arts; leadership training; the church and
society ministries; mission volunteers;
global and native ministries; and network-
ing grants. In addition, the Conference
Council on Retreats and Camps of the
Rocky Mountain Conference hosts camps
and retreats for church members.
Community service ministries in Denver
and other urban areas include support for
HIV/AIDS, among other community
needs.
MORMON
There are about 60,000 Mormons in
the Denver-Boulder- Greeley, Colorado
Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical
Area (CMSA). The Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-Day Saints operates the
Denver Colorado Temple, which serves
members from 29 stakes (territorial juris-
dictions) in Colorado, Wyoming, South
Dakota and Kansas. Opened in 1986,
the 29,117 square-foot temple is located
on 7.5 acres in Centennial, Colorado
and offers four ordinance rooms and six
sealing rooms.
Family History Centers in the metro
Denver area, which are branches of the
Family History Library in Salt Lake City,
Utah, give church members access to
genealogy information. There are 52
family history centers in Colorado, and
12 are located in the metro Denver
area.
OTHER FAITHS AND
SPIRITUAL SUPPORT
The metro Denver area also offers
options for a number of other Christian
and non-Christian faiths, including
Greek Orthodox, Lutheran, Pentecostal,
Presbyterian, Seventh-Day Adventist,
and Unitarian Universalist, as well as a
number of non-denominational churches.
All of these faiths offer opportunities to
worship, religious education, community
volunteerism and support, and partici-
pation in specific faith-based events,
such as conferences and community
gatherings.
The Colorado Council of Churches
includes 19 churches of varying faiths,
such as Baptist, Catholic, Episcopal,
Lutheran, Methodist, nondenomination-
al, Presbyterian and Unitarian
Universalist. The council organizes
events, such as the annual Easter sunrise
service, to unite the metro Denver areas
different faiths in worship. The council
al so seeks t o provide af fordabl e
housing, respond to any hate-based
activity, support youth ministry, and work
toward a more peaceful and healing
approach to the criminal justice system
by bringing victims, community mem-
bers and offenders together. In addition,
the council serves as a way to help
member churches reach out to the
Colorado legislature on proposed bills
t hat address af f ordabl e housi ng,
criminal/restorative justice, education,
the environment, poverty, racism and
other forms of abuse.
NON-CHRISTIAN FAITHS
Metro Denver also offers a number of
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non-Christian faith and worship opportuni-
ties, including Bah, Buddhist, Hindu,
Jewish, Muslim, Jain, Sikh, Tao, and
Zoroastrian.
BAH
There are 18 Bah congregations that
serve the Denver-Boulder-Greeley,
Colorado CMSA. The Bah Center of
Metro Denver offers classes, concerts,
prayer groups, workshops, interfaith meet-
ings, and other gatherings. The Center
also operates a bookstore for those inter-
ested in learning more about the Bah
faith.
BUDDHIST
The Denver Buddhist Cultural Society runs
the Fo Guang Shan Temple of Colorado
that is dedicated to the cultivation of
spiritual development for Buddhists as
well as the propagation and promotion of
Chinese culture and the fostering of cultural
exchange between Eastern and Western
cultures.
The temple offers areas for meditation,
meetings and social functions, as well as
a library, dining hall and other facilities.
Study groups, lectures and classes are
offered at the temple. The Society also
formed a Colorado Youth Group in 2000
to promote positive activity and experi-
ences among Buddhist youth.
Through the Buddhas Light International
Association and other groups in
Colorado, many activities, classes and
events are available throughout the
region including dinners, volunteer
opportunities, classes for traditional
areas of study, vegetarian cooking
classes, Tai Chi, Shao-Lin Kung Fu and
yoga. The Buddha Dharma Education
Association (www.buddhanet.net) is a
good resource on Buddhism and for
locations of Buddhist temples and groups.
HINDU
The Hindu Temple of Colorado provides
a forum for worship and celebrations and
for cultural, religious and spiritual
development activities based on Hindu,
Vedic and Sanatan-Dharma tradition.
The International Society for Krishna
Consciousness (ISKCON) is also located
in Denver and holds several annual
events, including festivals presenting
dramas, bharat natyam dancing, bhajans,
and other programs. The Society also
offers a free vegetarian feast on Sunday
evenings that is open to the general pub-
lic. The Boulder Krishna House in nearby
Boulder also offers Saturday evening
chants, free vegetarian feasts, discussions
on Vedic philosophy, sunrise meditations
on Saturday mornings, and kirtan on
Thursday evenings.
JEWISH
There are more than 80,000 members
of the Jewish faith in the metro Denver
area. The Allied Jewish Federation of
Colorado also offers a number of com-
munity resources, including senior housing,
area congregations, schools, syna-
gogues, museums, youth groups, hospi-
tals, volunteer opportunities, musical
entertainment, and other support. The
Federation also hosts and promotes
singles and community events, including
the annual Boulder Jewish Festival;
offers special assistance to those new to
the state or to the metro Denver area;
and organizes missions to Israel and
other areas. The Allied Jewish
Federation of Colorado also operates
the Jewish Resource Center, Jewish
Philanthropy Center, Jewish Womens
Philanthropy Center, and the Israel,
National & Overseas Center.
MUSLIM
There are approximately 13,000 Muslims
and nine congregations in the Denver-
Boulder-Greeley, Colorado CMSA.
Members of the Muslim faith can find
opportunities to worship through the
Colorado Muslim Society, the Islamic
Center of Ahl-Al-Beit in Denver, and the
Islamic Center of Boulder, with two loca-
tions in Boulder.
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GETTI NG SETTLED I N METRO DENVER
RELIGIOUS ORGANIZATIONS
Allied Jewish Federation of Colorado Denver 720-934-5365 www.jewishcolorado.org
American Baptist Churches of the Rocky Mountains Lakewood 303-988-3900 www.abcrm.org
Assumption Greek Orthodox Cathedral of Denver Denver 303-388-9314 http://goa.goarch.org/goa/denver
The Bahs of Denver, Colorado Denver 303-744-6456 www.denverbahai.org
The Boulder Krishna House Boulder 303-447-0269 www.boulderkrishnahouse.com
Catholic Archdiocese of Denver Denver 303-722-4687 www.archden.org
Catholic Charities Denver 303-742-0828 www.ccdenver.org
Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints
Denver Temple
Littleton 303-730-0220
www.lds.org/temples/main/
0,11204,1912-1-76-1,00.html
Colorado Baptist General Convention Centennial 888-771-2480 www.saturatecolorado.com
Colorado Council of Churches Denver 303-825-4910 www.coloradocouncilofchurches.org
Colorado Muslim Society Denver 303-696-9800 www.denvermosque.org
Community of Christ Denver 303-426-5900 www.cofchristrm.org
Denver Buddhist Cultural Society Denver 303-935-3889 www.denverbuddhism.org
Denver Islamic Center (Masjid Al-Noor) Denver 303-759-1985 www.milacolorado.org
Episcopal Diocese of Colorado Denver 303-837-1173 www.coloradodiocese.org
First Denver Friends Church Denver 303-455-7604 www.denverfriends.org
Hindu Temple of Colorado Littleton 303-948-9693 www.hindutempleofcolorado.org
ISKCON (The International Society for
Krishna Consciousness)
Denver 303-333-5461 www.krishnadenver.com
Islamic Center of Boulder Boulder 303-444-6345 www.bouldermuslims.com
Jehovahs Witnesses of Colorado
Greenwood
Village
303-220-0860 www.watchtower.org
Lutheran Church of Aurora Aurora 303-364-7416 www.hope-aurora.org
Mile Hi Church Lakewood 303-237-8851 www.milehichurch.org
Presbytery of Denver Denver 303-777-2453 www.denpres.org
Rocky Mountain Baptist Conference Denver 303-388-2525 www.rmbc.com
Rocky Mountain Synod/
Evangelical Lutheran Church in America
Denver 303-777-6700 www.rmselca.org
Tri-State/Denver Buddhist Temple Denver 303-295-1844 www.tsdbt.org
Unitarian Universalist Association
Mountain Desert District
Denver 303-756-1378 www.mdduua.org
United Church of Christ
Rocky Mountain Conference
Denver 303-984-9118 www.rmcucc.org
United Pentecostal Church Landmark Tabernacle Denver 303-988-7226 www.landmarktabernacle.org
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