Sie sind auf Seite 1von 65

JAMES, EPISTLE OF.

The epistle of James stands in the canon of the NT as the first of the catholic
or general epistles: that is, letters addressed not to a specific church or person, but to a widely defined audience. Canon History Author, Date, and Place of Composition Situation of Author and Readers Christianity of the Epistle James and Jesus James and Paul Content and Distinctive Ideas Faith and Action Consistency in Action Mutual Concern Language and Text Canon History The epistle appears fairly late in the history of the NT canon. It is first quoted with attribution by Origen of Alexandria (ca. 185254 C.E.). The claims of Eusebius (Hist. Eccl. 6.14.1) and Cassiodorus (Inst. 8) that it had been earlier commented on by Clement of Alexandria are not substantiated by any reference to the epistle in Clements surviving writings. It is probable that Origen came to know the epistle not from its use in his native Alexandria but in Palestine where he later settled, since it is quoted, though without attribution, in the pseudo-Clementine Epistles to Virgins, which are thought to be of 3d-century Palestinian provenance, and since the church of Jerusalem took a pride in preserving links with James, its traditional founder. After Origen the epistle came into use in the church of Alexandria: Eusebius classes it among the disputed books of the NT, that is those not in universal use in the Church (Hist. Eccl. 3.25.3, 2.23.2425), but its place is unqualified by Athanasius in the canon list of his 39th Festal Letter of 367 C.E. It is not until the latter part of the 4th century that it begins to be similarly known and quoted in the Western church. It is absent both from the Muratorian Canon, thought to represent the scriptures of the church of Rome ca. 200, and from the Cheltenham List, similarly thought to represent the church in Africa ca. 359; but its place in the West is established through its use by Hilary of Poitiers, Augustine, and Jerome, and it appears in the lists affirmed by the Councils of Hippo in 393 and Carthage in 397. It is probable that the Western church came to know the epistle through leaders who had contact with the churches of Egypt and Palestine, though the Eastern church of Syria continued to be ignorant of it, or to ignore it. James appears in the authorized Syriac translation, the Peshitta, ca. 412 C.E., but contemporary writers Theodore of Mopsuestia and Theodoret make no reference to it. Once generally established in the canon, however belatedly, the epistles place remained secure until Luthers celebrated attack on it as an epistle of straw in his 1522 Preface to the NT. Because of what he saw to be Jamess rejection of the Pauline doctrine of justification by faith, Luther denied that the epistle had apostolic authority; and in his translation of the NT he relegated it from its canonical position to the end, together with his equally disliked Hebrews, Jude, and Revelation. Despite Luther, however, James has maintained its position in the Protestant, as well as the Catholic, Bible. Author, Date, and Place of Composition Origen refers to the author simply as James or James the apostle (fr. 126 in Jo.). Eusebius assumes that this James is the one referred to in the NT as the Lords brother (Gal 1:19), the leader of the church in
NT New Testament ca. circa (about, approximately)
C.E. common (or Christian) era

A. B. C. D. 1. 2. E. 1. 2. 3. F. A.

B.

Hist. Eccl. Eusebius, Historia ecclesiastica (= Church History) 3d third

Jerusalem (Acts 15:13, 21:18), and there is no reason to suppose that Origen thought otherwise, although reference to James as the brother of the Lord comes only in Rufinuss Latin translation of his Commentary on Romans, 4.8. There is no other serious contender among the Jameses of the NT. Jerome, who agonized about the degree of relationship between James and Jesus, identified James of Jerusalem with James the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18), whom he also argued was Jesus cousin, and this has been widely accepted in Catholic tradition. The question is whether the James of the epistles address is genuinely James of Jerusalem, or whether his name is being used as a pseudonym by an unknown author to give his writing authority. Arguments in favor of the traditional authorship include (a) the simplicity of the introduction of James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1), which a pseudonymous author might have been expected to embellish; (b) the authors reverence for the perfect law, the law of liberty (1:25, cf. 2:812), which is consistent with the tradition of Jamess loyalty to the Jewish Torah and concern for its observance (Acts 15:1321, 21:1824; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 2.23.47, quoting Hegesippus); (c) some linguistic similarities between the epistle and the speech and letter of James in Acts 15; (d) reference to the early and the late rain (5:7), a phenomenon of the Palestinian climate. Against the traditional authorship are (a) the quality of the written Greek of the epistle, which is higher than might have been expected of the family of a Galilean artisan, even though they would most probably have spoken the language; (b) the paucity of reference to Jesus himself which would be surprising for one who was so closely associated with him in his lifetime, even though the Gospels are unanimous that Jesus brothers were unsympathetic to his ministry (Mark 3:21, 3135 and par.; John 7:39), and who was also a witness of his resurrection (1 Cor 15:7); (c) the discussion of faith and works without reference specifically to works of the law (2:1426). The arguments on each side are of varying weight, and some may be readily countered: As, for instance, the supposed Palestinian reference may derive from a knowledge of the OT (e.g. Deut 11:14; Joel 2:23) rather than from actual experience; while the literary quality of the epistles Greek might be due to Jamess using a secretary, or to a two-stage process of composition whereby some original sermons of James have been edited by another author. The last argument is, however, the most telling against the traditional authorship. The claim that a man is justified by works and not by faith alone (2:24) unmistakably recalls the terms of the Pauline debate about the role of the law in salvation (as in Rom 2:95:1; Gal 2:153:24), and James of Jerusalemwho knew Paul personally and was himself so loyal to the Jewish lawmust have appreciated the content and terms of that debate. If the traditional authorship is maintained, then the epistle must be dated before Jamess death, which is variously reported as in 62 C.E. during the interregnum between Festus and Albinus as procurators of Judea (Joseph. JW 20.200) or as in 67 C.E. immediately before Vespasians invasion of Palestine (Hegesippus, in Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 2.23.18). It would remain to be decided whether the epistle belongs to the early period of Jamess leadership of the church in Jerusalem, in the 40s or early 50s, or to the later troubled times preceding the Jewish revolt. If the authorship is pseudonymous, then the question is wide open, for the epistle contains no reference to external events by which it might be dated. Some have found internal indications of an early date in supposedly primitive features such as the simple, undeveloped Christology; allusions to the words of Jesus independent of their fixed form in the written gospels; the absence of developed forms of church leadership and organization, leaders being described simply as elders (5:14) and a meeting either taking place in or

cf. confer, compare par. paragraph; (gospel) parallel OT Old Testament e.g. exempli gratia (for example) Joseph. Josephus JW Josephus, The Jewish War (= Bellum Judaicum)

being described as synagg (2:2). On the other hand, a later date, into the second generation or even 2d century of Christianity, has been argued from some of the same material: from what is seen as growing institutionalization, in which charismatic gifts are vested in church officials (5:1415, the elders who heal; cf. 3:1 where to teach is to choose to take on that role, not to exercise a spiritual gift); from indications of a settled community, conforming to the values of the surrounding society in welcoming a rich visitor to its meeting (2:24); and also from a waning of eschatological expectation seen in the translation of the idea of a trial to be endured from apocalyptic tribulation to psychological experience (1:1215, cf. 1:24) or to everyday afflictions (1:27, 5:1011). All of these considerations are not only speculative in themselves, but unreliable for dating purposes, since matters such as the development of institutions and the survival of oral tradition may be dictated by quite other considerations than merely the passage of time: for example, the cultural inheritance and environment of the community. External evidence provides a more reliable guide to the documents date. If the author has adopted the pseudonym of James of Jerusalem, he is not likely to have done so in Jamess lifetime, but when he had become a revered figure of the past. In that case, the death of James would provide the terminus a quo for the epistle, and its quotation by Origen the terminus ad quem. It may be possible to narrow this bracket. Although Origen is the first to quote the epistle verbatim and with acknowledgment, there are considerable parallels in language and ideas between James and the Shepherd of Hermas, concentrated in certain sections of that lengthy work (Mandates 5, 9 and 12), and these have led some scholars to conclude that the author of the Shepherd was also familiar with the epistle. The date of the Shepherd is itself debatable, since Hermas is presented in the book as a contemporary of Clement of Rome, ca. 96 C.E. (Vis. 2.4.3), but the author is identified by the Muratorian Canon as the brother of Pius, bishop of Rome from 13954 C.E. A date in the early decades of the 2d century is usually preferred. See HERMAS THE SHEPHERD. So far as dating James is concerned, then, we cannot confidently suggest anything more precise than the last three decades of the 1st century or the beginning of the 2d. The address of James to the twelve tribes in the Dispersion (1:1) is impossibly wide for a real destination in geographical terms. It might serve to identify the readers racially or religously as Jewish Christians, or it may be an idealized description of them as the new Israel. This epistle is not a letter sent from one place to another like the letters of Paul; rather the author has adopted the letter form as a literary convention, to address the community to which he belonged. He and his readers are to be located together. If James of Jerusalem is the author, then the place of origin is of course Palestine. If pseudonymous authorship is adopted, Palestine may still be claimed on such arguments as (a) the memory of James was most potent there, so that the choice of precisely that pseudonym is readily understandable; (b) contact with the oral tradition of the teaching of Jesus would be more readily available in the place of his actual ministry; (c) James emphasizes Gods choice of and rewards for the poor and his retribution on the rich (1:911, 2:27, 5:16), which would be relevant to the church of Palestine whose real poverty occasioned Pauls charitable collection from his gentile churches and is likely to have been exacerbated by the Jewish revolt (Gal 2:10; 1 Cor 9:115; Rom 15:2527); (d) it is likely that Origen came to know the epistle after his move to Palestine, and it may well have been preserved in its place of origin while remaining unknown elsewhere; (e) the allusion to the Palestinian climate already referred to (5:7). The early and the late rain is also experienced in Syria, which is another frequently suggested place of origin, and support for this is also found in similarities between James and the gospel of Matthew (e.g. James 5:12, cf. Matt 5:3337), which is widely thought to have originated in Antioch. This argument, however, proceeds from an unknown to an unknown, and the continued neglect of the epistle by the church in Syria after it had been recognized in all other areas of the Church must militate against it. If the evidence that James was known to the author of the Shepherd of Hermas is accepted, then Rome becomes a probable place of origin, since it is certainly there that the Shepherd was written, and this would be consistent with similarities between James and other Roman documents, 1 Peter and 1 Clement. The subsequent disuse of the epistle in the Western church and its reappearance in Palestine would be explained by the general nature of the documents contents, which might only have a lasting appeal to those concerned to preserve links with the authority of James of Jerusalem. C. Situation of Author and Readers
2d second 1st first

If the date and place of origin of the epistle cannot be conclusively identified, much more can be said about the general situation and environment of author and readers. The epistle envisages an established, settled community which holds meetings (2:2); has as leaders its own elders (5:14); and also recognizes individuals as teachers (3:1), a category in which the author appears to include himself. (Teachers might, of course, be included among the elders rather than having a separate ministry, cf. 1 Tim 5:17). The members of the community would no doubt regard themselves as among the poor, but they are assumed to have the means to relieve each others needs (2:1516), and resentment of the rich does not prevent them welcoming a rich visitor to their meetings; indeed the vehemence of the authors attack on the rich in 2:67 and 5:13 may indicate that they were rather too ready to do so. They are not subject to persecution: the oppression and abuse referred to in 2:67 is more likely to reflect the legal and economic pressures that can be put on the disadvantaged by those more powerful in their society than an attack launched on the faith per se. The assumption that their meetings are open to visitors means that they have not been forced into a ghetto nor have they created a closed community as a defensive reaction. Not subject to external attack, they are also untroubled by internal divisions either on doctrinal and ideological or on economic and social grounds (contrast the church in Corinth which experienced all these). Tensions are those of personal relationships in a small society: anger (1:1920), jealousy (4:12), slander and criticism (4:1112). They need to be roused from inactivity to positive action (1:2227, 2:1417, 3:1318) rather than deterred from any misguided enthusiasm. This community is variously located in the country and the town: there is reference to agricultural conditions in 5:4, 7, and to trading activity in 4:1315. The former may, however, be understood in terms of biblical allusion rather than of actual experience. An urban environment is more probable in general because Christianity first established itself in cities and towns, only gradually spreading into the countryside; and in particular because James clearly belongs to the multicultural environment of the Hellenistic cities. The author employs catchphrases from popular philosophy (1:21, the implanted word; 3:6, the cycle of nature); metaphors with little biblical background but common in Greek and Latin literature (3:34, horses and ships; 3:7, the four orders of nature; 4:14, the mist); the technical vocabulary, if somewhat inaccurately used, of astronomy (1:17); and the language of popular pious superstition (4:15, If the Lord wills . . .) and magic (2:19, 4:7, the shuddering and flight of demons are known in the magical papyri). Judaism, which took its place in this world, is also obviously part of his cultural heritage. He affirms the central Jewish proposition that God is one, in the terms of its central prayer (2:19, cf. Deut 6:4, part of the Shema), and warns of Gehenna, the place of punishment (3:6). He draws freely on the OT for quotation (2:8, 2:11, 2:23, 4:6), for example (2:21, 2:25, 5:1011, 5:1718), and in the telling allusions that an author can make in the confidence that his readers will catch them (1:10, the flower of grass, from Isa 40:6 LXX; 3:9, men . . . made in the likeness of God, from Gen 1:26; 5:4, the ears of the Lord of hosts, Sabath, from Isa 5:9 LXX). The epistle is often characterized as a document of Jewish Christianity, but it is not clear from its contents that the author and readers were themselves Jews. Despite the puzzle of the unidentified quotation of 4:5, the appeal to the OT is straightforwardly to the text, without requiring any explanation from Jewish exegetical tradition. Jamess praise of the perfect law, the law of liberty (1:25, cf. 2:12), and his insistence that it be kept in full (2:10) may readily be paralleled in Jewish literature, but his appeal to actual tenets of the law is confined to the decalogue (2:11), and to Lev 19:18, singled out as the royal law most probably on the authority of Jesus (2:8). This may be contrasted with the implications drawn from the principle of the wholeness of the Law by Paul (Gal 5:3) and Matthew (5:1819, 22:40). James shows no interest in the cultic observances that served to affirm Jewish identity in the Hellenistic world: the observance of the sabbath and the food laws, and the practice of circumcision which was a key issue in Pauls debate with Judaizing Christianity. It could be argued that, as a Jew, the author of James took these matters for granted; but against this has to be set his failure, already noted, to appreciate that the faith-works controversy had any implications for the Jewish law. His use of synagg in 2:2 is sometimes appealed to as indicating that Jamess community met in a Jewish synagogue, or, as Jewish Christians, had constructed their own synagogue after the model with which they were familiar; but, leaving aside the question of whether any Christian community could have had its own building at this time, the word is widely used in the general

LXX Septuagint

sense of an assembly of persons, or a meeting as the occasion of an assembly, either of which would make sense in this context. Even the adoption of James of Jerusalem as his pseudonymous authority does not mark the author out as a Jewish Christian, for although James was the leader of Jewish Christianity, and documents like the pseudoClementine Homilies and Recognitions show that he was revered by later heterodox Jewish Christians as their founding father, he is similarly revered in gnostic literature not obviously influenced by Judaism (Gos. Thom. 12; Ap. Jas. and 1 and 2 Apoc. Jas., NHC 1.2, 5.3,4), and his leadership is remembered and commemorated in the mainstream of Christian tradition (Clem. Alex. in Eusebius, Hist. Eccl. 2.1.3, 23.1; Epiphanius, Haer. 78.7). James is a pseudonym which might be adopted by a Christian author of any background who desired to address his specific community in terms, and with an authority, appropriate to the Church at large. The twelve tribes in the Dispersion, too, could never be a literal address to Diaspora Jewry, since the reconstitution of the twelve tribes had long been part of eschatological hope only (e.g. Isa 11:1116; Zech 10:612; 2 Esdr 13:3947), but is most readily understandable as an ideal description of the Church in its role as the new, or true, Israel in the world (cf. Gal 6:16; Heb 4:9; 1 Pet 2:910; and for gentile Christian churches as the dispersion, cf. 1 Pet 1:1 and the addresses of 1 Clement, the Epistle of Polycarp, and the Martyrdom of Polycarp.) James shows, then, something of the ethos of Judaism: its monotheism, its appeal to the holy book, and its broad moral concern, without the clear marks of belonging to the Jewish community. It is probable that the background of author and readers is to be found among the god-fearers: those non-Jews who were attracted to what they saw as the Jewish philosophy; who stood on the fringe of the synagogues of the Diaspora, though possibly also of Palestine as well (cf. Luke 7:25), without being full proselytes; and who formed, it seems, a ready audience for Christian preaching (Acts 10:2, 22, 13:16, 26, 16:14, 17:4, 17, 18:7). They would bring that ethos into their Christianity, together with forms of organization with which they had been familiar in the synagogues, but without any concern to be involved in debates touching on Jewish identity, to which they had never committed themselves. D. Christianity of the Epistle The Jewish characteristics of James are thrown into prominence by its lack of a strong Christian coloring. Jesus Christ is referred to only twice, in 1:1 and 2:1, which some older scholars even suggested excising as glosses to reveal an originally Jewish tract. This expedient, which has no justification from textual evidence, is not to be adopted, since the evidence of Christian character is considerably more extensive than those two explicit references. In both of them, Jesus is identified as the Lord or our Lord, using the title by which Christians acclaimed the risen Jesus (Acts 2:36; Rom 10:9; Phil 2:811). In 2:1 he is further described as the Lord of glory in a syntactically difficult phrase which might also be translated as the glorious Lord or the Lord, the glory; the association of Jesus with glory may relate either to his role as the revealer of the glory of God (cf. John 1:14; 2 Cor 4:6; Heb 1:3), or to his coming in glory at the last judgment (Matt 25:31; 2 Thess 1:710). In 5:78 the coming of the Lord certainly refers to the return of Jesus, since the word used, parousia, coming, is a technical term for that event in early Christian literature (e.g. 1 Thess 2:19; 1 Cor 15:23; Matt 24:3; 1 John 2:28; 2 Pet 1:16). Jamess community is termed the church, ekklsia, (5:14), in the characteristic self-designation of the Christian community, considered both as a local group and an (at least potentially) universal phenomenon (Matt 16:18, 18:17; 1 Cor 1:2, 12:28; Phlm 2, Col 1:18); and its elders anoint in the name of the Lord as other Christian healers acted in the name of Jesus (Acts 3:6, 4:30, 16:18; Mark 16:17). The allusion in 1:18 to Gods having brought us forth by the word of truth is probably to be understood as Jamess echoing the language of rebirth in which other Christians expressed their understanding of the experience of conversion and baptism (John 3:38; Titus 3:5; 1 Pet 1:3, 23; baptismal ideas and language may also be found in Jas 1:21 and 2:7); and parallels between James and 1 Peter have been taken to show their sharing in a common pattern of Christian catechetical teaching (1:24 and 1 Pet 1:67; 1:18, 21 and 1 Pet 1:232:2; 4:68 and 1 Pet 5:59). The two most interesting areas of discussion in assessing the Christianity of James are, however, his use of the teaching of Jesus and his involvement in controversy with Paul. 1. James and Jesus. James nowhere cites the teaching of Jesus as such, but his prohibition of oaths in 5:12 unmistakably recalls Jesus prohibition in Matt 5:3337. Although reticence in the use of oaths was counseled both by Jewish teachers and Greek philosophers, there is no certain evidence of a comparable
NHC Nag Hammadi Codex

absolute ban on their use, which would seem therefore to be unique to Jesus. If James may confidently be seen to draw on the teaching of Jesus here, then he may arguably do so in contexts where the similarity of language and distinctiveness of content are not so marked. Thus in 2:8 he identifies Lev 19:18 as the royal law to be fulfilled, as Jesus also singled it out in Mark 12:31 (with parallels in Matt 22:39 and Luke 10:27). R. Akiba (ca. 50132 C.E.) also singled out Lev 19:18 as the most comprehensive principle of the law, so Jesus may not have been unique in doing so in his day, but Jamess description of the commandment may indicate that he regarded it as the law of the kingdom of God which Jesus preached. His encouragement to ask . . . and it will be given (1:5) recalls Jesus instruction to do so in Matt 5:711 and Luke 11:913; and his reminder that God has chosen those who are poor in the world to be . . . heirs of the kingdom (2:5) echoes Jesus beatitude on the poor, who are promised the kingdom in Matt 5:3 and Luke 6:20. Because the closest parallel between James and the teaching of Jesus occurs in material peculiar to Matthews gospel, while all the others are with material present in Matthew as well as other gospels, it is often argued that James has a special connection with Matthew, either in terms of a literary knowledge of and dependence on that gospel or of belonging to the community or tradition from which the gospel also came. This is unlikely. Even in the closest parallel there are significant differences in wording between Jas 5:12 and Matt 5:3337, while in the other parallels James is not markedly closer to Matthews version than to the other gospels (in the beatitude on the poor he is closer to Lukes simple blessing of the poor than to Matthews spiritualized poor in spirit). More generally, Matthew is clearly engaged in debate about the relation between Judaism and Christianity, hostile to the Jewish leadership yet concerned to maintain the integrity of the law; thus the prohibition of oaths is given a polemical edge in an attack on Jewish casuistry, and the great commandment is seen to involve all the law and the prophets (Matt 22:40). These concerns do not color Jamess teaching, and he and his community would not therefore seem to be in the same situation as Matthews. Jamess contact with the teaching of Jesus is more likely to have been with a continuing oral tradition than through dependence on any of the written gospels, since the various similarities, though striking, do not amount to exact verbal correspondence. If so, there are three points of particular interest. (a) His contact is with material across the range of what are usually identified as the sources of the Synoptic Gospels. The singling out of Lev 19:18 belongs to the Markan tradition; the encouragement to ask and receive, and the beatitude on the poor, to that common to Matthew and Luke (Q ); the prohibition of oaths to Matthew alone. This might indicate that the gospel material was more widely transmitted, and sources less insulated from each other, than their separate identification sometimes seems to imply. (b) While Jamess material may be independent of gospel fixity and derived from oral tradition, it is not therefore necessarily the moreoriginal form, for he has related it to his own interests. Thus he identifies the gift to be asked of God as specifically the gift of wisdom (1:5contrast Lukes Holy Spirit, 11:13, and Matthews good gifts, 5:11, but compare Jamess interest in wisdom in 3:1318)and raises the possibility of the request that is not answered (1:68, cf. the same concern in 4:34). (c) The comparisons between James and the Gospels show two ways in which the teaching of Jesus might be used. In the context of the Gospels, the teaching is obviously attributed to Jesus and carries his authority, whether or not it was uniquely (or even authentically) his. There is no such attribution of the teaching in James. Although he is most probably aware, especially in 2:8, that he is drawing on Jesus words, it is not important to him to single them out as having a distinctive authority; rather they contribute to the general stock of Christian ethical instruction along with material from other sources and the authors own insights. We may compare the practice of Paul, for whom it was sometimes important to invoke a word of the Lord as such (1 Cor 7:10), but who would also draw the teaching of Jesus without discrimination into the course of his own argument (Rom 13:7; cf. Mark 12:17; Rom 13:9; cf. Mark 12:31). 2. James and Paul. James does not refer directly to Paul any more than he does to Jesus, but when, in the course of his discussion of the necessary association of faith and works (2:1426), he conducts that discussion in terms of justification and of the example of Abraham (2:2125), his argument inevitably recalls that of Paul in Romans 34 and Galatians 23. The differences between the two may be seen polarized in Pauls conclusion that we hold that a man is justified by faith and not by works (Rom 3:28, cf. Gal 2:15) and Jamess that a man is justified by works and not by faith alone (2:24). It is sometimes suggested that Jamess argument is prior to Pauls and that Paul wrote in part to answer it, but while Pauls
Q Qere; Q-source; Qumran texts (e.g., 4QTestim)

argument on justification does not require Jamess to explain it, the strongly polemical tone of Jamess language indicates that he knows a position which he is concerned to refute: and not by faith alone. It is, however, unlikely that James was familiar with Pauls argument as Paul himself presented it, for he ignores a number of important points. (a) Paul talks specifically about works done in obedience to and fulfilment of the Jewish law, while James makes no such reference to the law, but thinks of works of charity in general. (b) Paul attacks such works when done with a view to gaining justification from God, which he deems to be impossible; James commends works as part of the response of faith in God. (c) Although both appeal to the example of Abraham and the statement of his justification in Gen 15:6, Paul relates Abrahams justifying faith to his acceptance of the promises of Gen 15:5; James relates it to Abrahams willingness to sacrifice his son in Genesis 22, thus missing Pauls carefully made point that Abrahams justification preceded, and had nothing to do with, his circumcision and implicit acceptance of the law in Gen 17:927 (Rom 4:1011). (d) James does not deal with Pauls other major proof-text, Hab 2:4 (Rom 1:17; Gal 3:11); and conversely Jamess other example, Rahab (2:25), is not derived from Paul. In spite of the apparent similarity of their language, James does not seem to know what Pauls argument was really about, and it is highly improbable that he had either read Pauls letters or heard Pauls own exposition of his views. Whether he thinks that the position he is himself concerned to refute has Pauline authority is another matter. The absolute detachment of faith from works in relation to justification seems to have been an original insight of Pauls, and justification as the language of salvation is as associated with him in the NT as it has been by later generations. The term appears in Acts only in Lukes record of Pauls speech in the synagogue at Pisidian Antioch (Acts 13:3839); and in the Pastoral Epistles, written under the pseudonym of Paul, in a summary statement of salvation, perhaps in an attempt to Paulinize an existing credal formula (Titus 3:7). This latter passage shows that Pauls rejection of justification by works could be reinterpreted outside the context of the Judaizing argument to relate to righteous works in general which might be thought to earn salvation, and this reapplication is also found in 1 Clem. 32:4, whose author is clearly familiar with Pauls argument in Romans. James has heard the language used even more generally, to support a religious attitude which emphasized the pious expression of trust in God and regarded works of active charity as of little importance, if not indeed to be actually discouraged. It is probable that those who thus appealed to justification by faith as their slogan did so on what they saw to be Pauls authority, and that James knew this; if so, the debate must have been conducted in an area of the Church where Paul was remembered and revered (as, for instance, Clement shows that he was in Rome a generation after his death). Jamess Christianity, then, is characterized by a strong ethical concern, reinforced by the certainty of having entered a new life, and also by the certainty of eschatological rewards and punishment. The authority of Jesus as risen Lord is acknowledged, and his teaching drawn upon. There is room for ideological dispute in his community, over the relative importance of charity in the life of faith, but no evidence of any speculative interest in doctrinal matters. This is not a Christianity likely to produce either heresy or creative theology, but was no doubt congenial to those who had been attracted to a similar concern in Judaism, but were now offered a community centered on its own Lord and of which they could more fully and readily become part. E. Content and Distinctive Ideas Analyses of the structure of the epistle range between the detection of an underlying plan or pattern into which each section may be seen to fit, and regarding it as a collection of disparate material assembled from oral sources and linked together only by stitch-words or verbal echoes. The first suffers from the very general nature of much of Jamess material which seems artificially forced into too tight and comprehensive a scheme; the second ignores the presence of themes which run through the five chapters. It is better to see the author as developing some leading ideas in a variety of expressions and connections. His main concern is with Christian behavior, its consistency, and its community context. There should be consistency between faith and action; consistency in different activities; a common concern for each other. (There does not appear to be any impulse to mission outside the community.) 1. Faith and Action. The testing of faith produces wholeness of character (1:24). Since God tempts no one, the overcoming of temptation is the subduing of ones own destructive desires (1:1215). To appropriate the baptismal word of salvation is to renounce evil deeds (1:21). To hold the faith of the Lord Jesus Christ is to exclude partiality (2:1). Faith must issue in works to be a living faith (2:1426). God-given
1 Clem. 1 Clement

wisdom reveals itself in characteristic action (3:1318, cf. 1:5). To follow ones own passions is to seek the friendship of the world and thus to be at enmity with God (4:14); the remedy being a wholehearted repentance and return to him (4:610). Plans for the future should be made subject to divine permission (4:1315), and endurance of the present is rendered possible by the hope of the coming of the Lord (5:78), and by the example of former men of faith (5:1011). James returns frequently to the subject of prayer. As action should be consistent with faith, so prayer, as the expression of faith, should be wholehearted and related to action. God is one: an article of faith to which the demons rightly respond with terror (2:19), and as the one God he is the only giver of good gifts (1:17), giving generously and unreservedly (1:5). Requests to him should therefore be made wholeheartedly, with no doubt about his ability or willingness to give (1:58); and should be for objects consistent with his character (4:24). James sees no problem in unanswered prayer; it is to be explained by the inadequacy of the prayer, either untrusting or misdirected. He applies to the man whose prayer thus fails his most characteristic pejorative adjective double-minded, dipsychos (1:8, cf. 4:8; a term unparalleled in the LXX or the NT, though found in other early Christian literature, notably the Shepherd of Hermas, Mandate 9, and perhaps related to the Jewish analysis of man as having two impulses). Even where prayer expresses a proper confidence in God, it should be accompanied by action if it is to be worth anything (2:1516). True and fervent prayer is, however, powerfully effective, as in the example of Elijah (5:1718). Prayer and praise are the proper response of the individual to suffering or joy (5:13), and James encourages prayer within the community for its members, both in the specific case of sickness (5:1415) and in general as a remedy for sins (5:16). 2. Consistency in Action. As Christian behavior should be consistent with Christian faith, so it should be consistent in itself. Those who hear the word should also be doers of it (1:2225). The law (whatever its contents in practice) should be kept in full, with each commandment given weight; and all persons should be treated alike under it (2:811). It is intolerable to bless God and curse men made in his image (3:911). James is especially concerned with sins of speech, where he sees inconsistency as most blatant; this relates of course to his concern with prayer, but he expresses his concern at large. It is best to be swift to hear but slow to speak (1:19). True religion involves bridling the tongue (1:26, cf. 3:24). Teachers, who deal in words, are at greatest risk, and few should assume this responsibility (3:1). Speaking evil of each other in the community, whether in slander or criticism, is to be condemned (4:1112). Speech should be a straightforward and truthful matter, where yes means yes and no no, without need of the dangerous reinforcement of oaths (5:12). James gives vent to his conviction of the seriousness of sins of speech in a highly rhetorical description of the tongue, smallest but most powerful member of the body: It is a fire; a world of wickedness; untamable, polluting, poisonous, inflamed by hell (3:58). 3. Mutual Concern. The pursuit of consistency and integrity is not, however, a quest for personal and individual purity: Jamess concern is for Christian behavior in the community. As prayer for God to relieve hardship should be accompanied by efforts to do so oneself (2:1516), so true religion involves both the care of widows and orphans and keeping oneself uncorrupted by the world (1:27). The epistle closes with the vision of a mutually supportive community, confessing sins to one another and praying for one another, each watchful for anyone who goes astray, since to reclaim him is for the benefit of both (5:16, 1920). Rich and poor are among the most basic of social divisions, and Jamess concern for the poor and hostility to the rich may relate to his desire to encourage the ideal of Christian community as much as to the empirical experience of his own group. He regards the rich as almost by definition excluded from the Church. The lowly brother may be confident of his future exaltation, but the rich man (surely not a brother) can only look forward to humiliation and ultimate annihilation (1:911). Although the rich visitor is not to be excluded from the Christian meeting, those who are tempted to welcome him over-enthusiastically are reminded of the usual role of the rich as their oppressors (2:17). Prosperous traders are reminded of their essential impermanence (4:1316); and, in a passage of dramatic invective like his tirade against the tongue, James calls upon the rich to weep and howl, to recognize the corruption of their treasure, and to await their inevitable fate in the last days or the day of slaughter (5:15). In his equation of the rich as wicked and the poor as Gods chosen, James is following a long-standing convention running from the OT (e.g. Psalms 10, 49, 140) into the self-understanding of the Qumran community and some early Christian groups. It should be noted though that he does not idealize poverty per se, but indicates that it is the poor who are in fact righteous, who are the object of Gods favor. Thus it is the poor brother who will be exalted, not simply the poor man (1:9); the poor are chosen to be rich in faith and to inherit the kingdom (2:5); the oppression of the poor by the rich which calls for vindication is epitomized in the death of the unresisting righteous

man (5:6). Here as elsewhere James is an interpreter and not merely an inheritor of tradition, and through his varied material runs his conviction of the need for the Christian man to be whole in word and deed, singleheartedly serving both the one God and his brethren. F. Language and Text The author uses the Greek language with fluency and a certain sense of style. Although not of the quality of classical literature, his writing shows grammatical ability and is virtually free of solecisms and colloquialisms. He opens with Greeting, using the infinitive chairein as is usual in a Hellenistic letter (1:1, cf. 1 Macc 10:18, 25, 12:6; Acts 23:26); uses the rhetorical age nun (4:13, 5:1); and gives the correct oath form of the accusative of the thing sworn by (5:12), by contrast with Matthews semitic idiom of en plus the dative. He has a wide vocabulary, including some words not found elsewhere in the NT or the LXX (e.g. sea creature, enalios, 3:7; daily, ephmeros, 2:15; dejection, katpheia, 4:9). His style shows a fondness for alliteration, as in peirasmois peripeste poikilois (1:2, you meet various trials) and mikron melos estin kai megala auchei (3:5, the tongue is a little member and boasts of great things); and for the cadence of words with similar endings, as in exelkomenos kai deleazomenos (1:14, lured and enticed) and anemizomeno kai ripizomeno (1:6, driven and tossed by the windthe former word even may have been coined by James for this effect, as he may also have coined the evocative chrysodaktylios, gold-ringed, 2:2). Alliteration and cadence are both found in Jamess admittedly imperfect hexameter: pasa dosis agath kai pan drma teleion (1:17, every good endowment and every perfect gift). This sensitivity to, and ability to make effective use of, the sound of the Gk language tells against any theory that the epistle has been translated from an Aramaic or Hebrew original. We have already illustrated his use of biblical quotation and allusion, and his familiarity with the LXX has influenced his language more generally. Most semitic idioms are to be explained by the authors knowledge of the LXX. Thus he uses the compounds prospolmpsia and prospolmpteo (2:1, 9, partiality and to show partiality, derived from the LXX prospon lambanein), and compound phrases like poiein eleos (2:13, to show mercy); poits logou (1:22, a doer of the word, cf. 4:11, poits nomou, a doer of the law); prospon ts geneses (1:23, natural face); and en pasais tais hodois autou (1:8, in all his ways, cf. 1:11). As he can draw on vivid Hellenistic imagery in his rhetorical attack on the tongue (3:28), so he can adopt an archaic or biblical style in his prophetic denunciation of the rich (5:16). There is no need to resort to theories of multiple authorship or different editors to explain this variety of style: It simply requires an author who is sufficiently at ease with his language. (Luke can similarly adapt his style to include the poetic and archaic birth-narratives of Luke 12 and the almost classically heroic account of Pauls shipwreck in Acts 27.) The textual history of the epistle reflects its canon history. It was in the church of Alexandria that James first came into regular use, and it has early and strong support in mss of the Egyptian text-type: Among the papyri the fragmentary 3d-century papyri 20 and 23 and 5th-century papyrus 54 contain some verses each of the epistle, while the 6th or 7th-century papyrus 74 has a substantial part of the whole; the major 4th and 5th-century uncials Sinaiticus, Vaticanus (B), Alexandrinus (A), and Ephraem (C) all have it, Vaticanus being generally regarded as the best witness to the text. From Origen onwards quotations by Alexandrian authorities are also available to the textual critic, as also the Sahidic and later the Bohairic Coptic versions. Conversely, the long disuse of the epistle in the Western Church is apparent in its lack of representation in Gk mss of the Western text, and there is, of course, no quotation by the early Western fathers, whether in Greek or Latin. The Old Latin version is found in the 9th-century Codex Corbeiensis (ff) and Speculum Pseudo-Augustini (m), and peculiarities there indicate that James was translated separately from, and probably later than, the other catholic epistles which earlier achieved popularity in the West. Augustine was to complain of the unusual badness of the Latin translation available to him (Retractationes 2.32), but the epistle came firmly into Latin textual history with the Vulgate, under the authority of Jerome. In Syria, canon history begins with the Peshitta, and so also the history of the Syriac text; the 9th-century mss K and
Gk Greek mss manuscripts B Codex Vaticanus A Codex Alexandrinus C Codex Ephraemi

L of the Koine or Lucianic text-type present James as it would have come to be read in the Greek-speaking church of Syria, and on into the Byzantine text of the Middle Ages. The long neglect of the epistle may have served to insulate its text against copying error and emendation, for major textual variants are few. (It is always possible, of course, that errors could have been made at an early stage, left uncorrected, and so become entrenched with no textual variance to indicate them.) Some occur where Jamess language is obviously obscure or unfamiliar and scribes have tried to make the best of it: at 1:17, with the somewhat pretentious astronomical language; and at 5:8, where the early and late have been variously specified as rain or fruit by copyists more or less familiar with climatic conditions or biblical idiom. At 2:19 some have failed to catch the echo of the Shema, Deut 4:6, God is one, and found instead a simple statement of monotheism, there is one God. At 2:3 the poor man is offered a whole range of options as to where to place himself inconspicuously; at 4:4 adulterers have been pedantically added to adulteresses; and at 5:20 the epistles seemingly abrupt ending has been rounded off with a final Amen. Although not always easily soluble, none of these textual questions seriously affects the authors essential meaning.
1

JAMES, EPSTOLA DE. A epstola de James permanece no cnon do NT como as primeiras das
epstolas catlicas ou gerais: Isto , cartas tratadas no uma igreja ou pessoa especfica, mas para um pblico extensamente definido. A. Histria de Cnon B. Criar, Data, e Lugar de Composio C. Situao de Autor e Leitores D. Cristianismo da Epstola 1. James e Jesus 2. James e Paul E. Contedo e Idias Distintivos 1. F e Ao 2. Consistncia em Ao 3. Preocupao mtua F. Idioma e Texto A. Histria de Cnon A epstola aparece bastante tarde na histria do cnon de NT. primeiro citou com atribuio por Origen de Alexandria (CA. 185254 c.e.). As reivindicaes de Eusebius (Hist. Eccl. 6.14.1) e Cassiodorus (Inst. 8) Que ele tinha estado anteriormente comentado em por Clemente de Alexandria no so substanciadas por qualquer referncia para a epstola em Clemente est sobrevivendo escrita. provvel que Origen veio para saber a epstola no de seu uso em sua Alexandria nativa mas em Palestine onde ele mais velho povoado, desde que citado, entretanto sem atribuio, nas Epstolas de Pseudo Clementine para Virgens, acredita-se que seja de 3d-provenincia de sculo palestino, e desde a igreja de Jerusalm tomou um orgulho em preservar vnculos com James, seu fundador tradicional. Depois que Origen a epstola entrou em usar na igreja de Alexandria: Eusebius o classifica entre os livros disputados do NT, isto aqueles no em uso universal na Igreja (Hist. Eccl. 3.25.3, 2.23.2425), mas seu lugar est inbil por Athanasius na lista de cnon de sua 39 Carta Festiva de 367 c.e. No at a parte posterior do sculo 4 que comea a ser semelhantemente conhecido e citou na igreja Ocidental. ausente ambos do Cnon de Muratorian, pensou representar as escrituras da igreja de Roma CA. 200, e do Cheltenham Lista, semelhantemente pensou representar a igreja na frica CA. 359; Mas seu lugar no Oeste estabelecido por seu uso por Hilary de Poitiers, Augustine, e Jerome, e ele aparece nas listas afirmadas pelos Conselhos de Hippo em 393 e Cartago em 397. provvel que a igreja Ocidental veio para conhecer a epstola por lderes que tiveram contactaram com as igrejas do Egito e Palestine, entretanto a igreja do leste da Sria continuou a ser ignorante disto, ou ignorar isto. James aparece na traduo de Syriac autorizado, a Peshitta, CA. 412 c.e., Mas escritores contemporneos Theodore de Mopsuestia e Theodoret no faz nenhuma referncia para isto.

Freedman, D. N. (1996, c1992). The Anchor Yale Bible Dictionary (3:621). New York: Doubleday.

Uma vez geralmente estabelecido no cnon, porm retardadamente, o lugar da epstola permaneceu assegura at ataque celebrado do Luther nele como uma epstola de palha em sua 1522 Prefacia para o NT. Por causa do que ele viu ser rejeio do James da doutrina de Pauline de justificao por f, Luther negou que a epstola teve autoridade apostlica; E em sua traduo do NT ele encaminhado ele de sua posio cannico at o fim, junto com seu igualmente repugnou hebreus, Jude, e Revelao. Apesar de Luther, porm, James manteve sua posio nos protestantes, como tambm os catlicos, Bblia. B. Autor, Data, e Lugar de Composio Origen se refere ao autor simplesmente como James ou James o apstolo (fr. 126 em Jo.). Eusebius assume que este James o se referiu a no NT como o irmo do Senhor (Gal 1:19), o lder da igreja em Jerusalm (Atos 15:13, 21:18), e no existe nenhuma razo para supor que Origen pensou caso contrrio, embora referncia para James como o irmo do Senhor vem s em traduo de latino do Rufinus de seu Comentrio em Romanos, 4.8. No existe nenhum outro contendor srio entre o Jameses do NT. Jerome, que agonizou sobre o grau de relao entre James e Jesus, James Identificado de Jerusalm com James o filho de Alphaeus (Mark 3:18), quem ele tambm discutiu era primo do Jesus, e isto tem sido extensamente aceito em tradio catlica. A pergunta se o James do endereo da epstola genuinamente James de Jerusalm, ou se seu nome est sendo usado como um pseudnimo por um autor desconhecido para dar seu escrevendo autoridade. Os argumentos a favor da autoria tradicional incluem (a) a simplicidade da introduo de James, um empregado de Deus e do Senhor Jesus Cristo (1:1), que um autor pseudnimo poderia ter sido esperado embelezar; (b) A reverncia do autor para a lei perfeita, a lei de liberdade (1:25, cf. 2:812), que consistente com a tradio de lealdade do James para o Torah judeu e preocupao para sua observncia (Atos 15:1321, 21:1824; Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 2.23.47, citando Hegesippus); (c) algumas semelhanas lingsticas entre a epstola e a fala e carta de James em Atos 15; (d) Proveja referncia para o cedo e o tarde chova (5:7), um fenmeno do clima palestino. Contra a autoria tradicional so (a) a qualidade da escrita grega da epstola, que mais alta que poderia ter sido esperada da famlia de um arteso de Galilean, embora eles mais provavelmente teriam falado o idioma; (b) O paucity de referncia para Jesus ele mesmo que ficaria assombroso para um que era muito prximo associado com ele em sua vida, embora os Evangelhos so unnimes que irmos do Jesus eram insensveis para seu ministrio (Mark 3:21, 3135 e paridade.; John 7:39), e que tambm era uma testemunha de sua ressurreio (1 Cor 15:7); (c) a discusso de f e trabalhos sem prover referncia especificamente para trabalhos da lei (2:1426). Os argumentos em cada lado so de peso variado, e alguns podem ser prontamente countered: Como, por exemplo, a referncia de Palestino suposto pode derivar de um conhecimento do OT (por exemplo Deut 11:14; Joel 2:23) em lugar de experincia real; Enquanto a qualidade literria da grega da epstola poderia ser devido a James est usando um secretrio, ou para um processo de duas fases de composio por meio de que alguns sermes originais de James foram editados por outro autor. O ltimo argumento , porm, o mais dizendo contra a autoria tradicional. A reivindicao que um homem justificado por trabalhos e no por f s (2:24) unmistakably recorda as condies do Pauline debate sobre o papel da lei em salvao (como em Rom 2:95:1; Gal 2:153:24), e James de Jerusalmquem conheceu Paul pessoalmente e era ele mesmo to leal para a lei judiadeve ter apreciado o contedo e condies daquele debate. Se a autoria tradicional mantida, ento a epstola deve ser obsoleto na frente da morte do James, que variavelmente reportado como em 62 c.e. Durante o interregnum entre Festus e Albinus que procuradores de Judea (Joseph. JW 20.200) ou como em 67 c.e. Imediatamente antes de invaso do Vespasian de Palestine (Hegesippus, em Euseb. Hist. Eccl. 2.23.18). Permaneceria ser decidido se a epstola pertence ao primeiro perodo de liderana do James da igreja em Jerusalm, nos anos 40 ou cedo 50s, ou para os tempos problemticos mais velhos precedendo a revolta judia. Se a autoria pseudnima, ento a pergunta escancarada, para a epstola no contm nenhuma referncia para eventos externos pelos quais poderia ser obsoleto. Alguns acharam indicaes interno de uma primeira data em supostamente primitivo caractersticas como as simples, Christology Pouco desenvolvido; Insinuaes para as palavras de Jesus independente de sua forma fixa nos evangelhos escritos; A ausncia de formas desenvolvidas de liderana de igreja e organizao, lderes sendo descrito simplesmente como ancies (5:14) e uma reunio ou acontecendo em ou sendo descrita como synagg (2:2). Por outro lado, uma data mais velha, na segunda gerao ou at 2d sculo de Cristianismo, foi discutidos de algum do mesmo material: De que visto como crescente institutionalization, em que presentes carismticos so

investidos em oficiais de igreja (5:1415, os ancies que curam; Cf. 3:1 onde ensinar ser para escolher empreender aquele papel, no exercitar um presente espiritual); de indicaes de uma comunidade povoada, ajustando com os valores da sociedade circundante em dar boas-vindas uma visita rica para sua reunio (2:24); e tambm de um minguar de expectativa escatolgica visto na traduo da idia de uma tentativa para ser suportado de tribulao apocalptico at experincia psicolgica (1:1215, cf. 1:24) ou para aflies dirias (1:27, 5:1011). Todas estas consideraes no so s especulativos neles mesmos, mas incertos para datarem propsitos, desde importa como o desenvolvimento de instituies e a sobrevivncia de tradio oral podem ser ditados por bastante outras consideraes que meramente a passagem de tempo: Por exemplo, a herana e ambiente culturais da comunidade. A evidncia externa fornece um guia mais confivel para a data do documento. Se o autor adotou o pseudnimo de James de Jerusalm, ele no provvel ter feito muito em vida do James, mas quando ele se tornou uma figura venerada do passado. Naquele caso, a morte de James forneceria o trmino um quo para a epstola, e sua cotao por Origen o anncio de trmino quem. Pode ser possvel estreitar este parntese. Embora Origen seja o primeiro a citar a epstola literalmente e com reconhecimento, existem considervel parallels em idioma e idias entre James e o Pastor de Hermas, concentradas em certas sees daquele trabalho longo (Mandatos 5, 9 e 12), e estes levaram alguns estudiosos para concluir que o autor do Pastor tambm era familiar com a epstola. A data do Pastor propriamente discutvel, desde que Hermas apresentado no livro como uma contempornea de Clemente de Roma, CA. 96 c.e. (Vis. 2.4.3), mas o autor identificado pelo Cnon de Muratorian como o irmo de Pius, bispo de Roma de 13954 c.e. Uma data no incio de dcadas do 2d sculo est normalmente preferida. Veja HERMAS ' O PASTOR. At agora como datando James est preocupado, ento, ns confiantemente no podemos sugerir qualquer coisa mais preciso que as ltimas trs dcadas do sculo 1 ou o incio do 2d. O endereo de James para as doze tribos na Disperso (1:1) impossivelmente largo para um destino real em condies geogrficas. Poderia servir para identificar os leitores racially ou religously que cristos judeus, ou ele pode estar uma descrio idealizada delas como o novo Israel. Esta epstola no uma carta enviou de um lugar outro para gostar das cartas de Paul; Bastante o autor adotou a carta formar como uma conveno literria, tratar a comunidade para que ele pertenceu. Ele e seus leitores so para ser localizados juntos. Se James de Jerusalm o autor, ento o lugar de origem claro que Palestine. Se autoria pseudnima adotada, Palestine pode ainda ser reivindicado em tais argumentos como (a) a memria de James era mais potente l, de forma que a escolha de justamente aquele pseudnimo prontamente compreensvel; (b) Contacte com a tradio oral do ensino de Jesus seria mais prontamente disponvel no lugar de seu ministrio real; (c) James enfatiza escolha do Deus de e recompensas para as pobres e sua retribuio na rica (1:911, 2:27, 5:16), que seria relevante para a igreja de Palestine cuja pobreza real ocasionou coleo caridosa do Paul de seu gentile igrejas e provvel ter sido exacerbado pela revolta judia (Gal 2:10; 1 Cor 9:115; Rom 15:2527); (d) provvel que Origen veio para saber a epstola depois de seu movimento para Palestine, e ele pode bem foi preservado em seu lugar de origem enquanto desconhecido restante em outro lugar; (e) A insinuao para o clima palestino j se referiu a (5:7). A cedo e a final de chuva tambm est experimentada na Sria, que outro freqentemente sugeriu lugar de origem, e suporte para isto tambm achado em semelhanas entre James e o evangelho de Matthew (por exemplo James 5:12, cf. Matt 5:3337), que est extensamente pensado para ter originado em Antioch. Este argumento, porm, resultado monetrio de um desconhecido at um desconhecido, e o continuado negligenciar da epstola pela igreja na Sria depois que tinha sido reconhecido em todas outras reas da Igreja deve militar contra isto. Se a evidncia que James era conhecido para o autor do Pastor de Hermas aceito, ento Roma se torna um lugar provvel de origem, desde que est certamente l que o Pastor era escrito, e isto seria consistente com semelhanas entre James e outros documentos romanos, 1 Peter e 1 Clemente. O desuso subseqente da epstola na igreja Ocidental e sua reapario em Palestine seriam explicados pela natureza geral do contedo do documento, que poderia s ter uma atrao duradoura para aqueles preocupados para preservar vnculos com a autoridade de James de Jerusalm. C. Situao de Autor e Leitores Se a data e lugar de origem da epstola no podem estar finalmente identificados, muito mais pode ser ditos sobre a situao e ambiente geral de autor e leitores. A epstola enfrenta uma comunidade estabelecida, povoada que segura reunies (2:2); tem como lderes seus prprios ancies (5:14); e tambm reconhea indivduos como professores (3:1), uma categoria em que o autor parece incluir ele mesmo. (Os

professores poderiam, claro, ser includos entre os ancies em lugar de ter um ministrio separado, cf. 1 Tim 5:17). Os membros da comunidade no considerariam eles mesmos como entre os pobres, mas eles so assumidos para ter o querer para aliviar um ao outro necessidades (2:1516), e ressentimento do rico no previne eles dando boas-vindas uma visita rica para suas reunies; Realmente a veemncia do ataque do autor no rico em 2:67 e 5:13 pode indicar que eles eram bastante muito prontos para fazer isso. Eles no so sujeito a perseguio: A opresso e abuso se referiram a em 2:67 mais provvel refletir as presses legais e econmicas que podem ser colocadas as desvantajosas por aquela mais poderosa em sua sociedade que um ataque lanado na f por se. A suposio que suas reunies so abertas a visitas significa que eles no foram forados em um ghetto nem tem eles criados uma comunidade fechada como uma reao defensiva. No sujeito a ataque externo, eles tambm so calmos por divises internas ou em doutrinais e ideolgicas ou em chos econmicos e sociais (contrastem a igreja em Corinto que experimentou todo estes). Tenses so aquelas de relaes pessoais em uma sociedade pequena: Raiva (1:1920), cime (4:1 2), calnia e crtica (4:1112). Eles precisam ser despertados de inatividade at ao positiva (1:2227, 2:1417, 3:1318) em lugar de intimidado de qualquer entusiasmo extraviado. Esta comunidade est variavelmente localizada no pas e a cidade: Existe referncia para condies agrcolas em 5:4, 7, e para atividade de comrcio em 4:1315. O antigo pode, porm, seja entendida em termos de insinuao bblica em lugar de experincia real. Um ambiente urbano mais provvel em geral porque Cristianismo primeiro estabeleceu propriamente nas cidades e cidades, s gradualmente espalhando na zona rural; E em particular porque James claramente pertence ao ambiente multicultural das cidades helensticas. O autor emprega frases de propaganda de filosofia popular (1:21, a palavra implantada; 3:6, o ciclo de natureza); metforas com fundo bblico pequeno mas comum em literatura grega e latina (3:3 4, cavalos e navios; 3:7, as quatro ordens de natureza; 4:14, a nvoa); o vocabulrio tcnico, se um pouco inexadamente usado, de astronomia (1:17); e o idioma de superstio piedosa popular (4:15, Se o Senhor quer . . .) e mgico (2:19, 4:7, o estremecer e vo de demnios so sabidos no mgico papyri). Judasmo, que tomou seu lugar neste mundo, tambm obviamente parte de sua herana cultural. Ele afirma a proposio judia central que Deus um, nas condies de sua orao central (2:19, cf. Deut 6:4, parte da Shema), e adverte de Gehenna, o lugar de castigo (3:6). Ele desenha livremente no OT para cotao (2:8, 2:11, 2:23, 4:6), por exemplo (2:21, 2:25, 5:1011, 5:1718), e no dizer insinuaes que um autor pode fazer na confiana que seus leitores pegaro eles (1:10, a flor da grama, de Isa 40:6 LXX; 3:9, homens . . . feitos na semelhana de Deus, de Gen 1:26; 5:4, as orelhas do Senhor de anfitries, Sabath, de Isa 5:9 LXX). A epstola est freqentemente caracterizada como um documento de Cristianismo judeu, mas no claro de seu contedo que o autor e leitores eram eles mesmos judeus. Apesar do quebra-cabea da cotao no identificada de 4:5, a atrao para o OT straightforwardly para o texto, sem exigir qualquer explicao de tradio exegtica judia. Elogio do James da lei perfeita, a lei de liberdade (1:25, cf. 2:12), e sua insistncia que mantido por completo (2:10) prontamente pode ser paralleled em literatura judia, mas sua atrao para doutrinas reais da lei limitada para o decalogue (2:11), e para Lev 19:18, cantou fora como a lei real mais provavelmente na autoridade de Jesus (2:8). Isto pode ser contrastado com as implicaes tiradas do princpio da inteireza da Lei por Paul (Gal 5:3) e Matthew (5:1819, 22:40). James no mostra a nenhum interesse nas observncias cultas que serviram para afirmar identidade judia no mundo helenstico: A observncia do sbado sagrado e as leis de comida, e a prtica de circunciso a qual era um assunto chave em debate do Paul com Cristianismo de Judaizing. Podia ser discutido isto, como um judeu, o autor de James tomou estes assuntos para os concedidos; Mas contra este tem que ser deixado seu fracasso, j notou, apreciar que a controvrsia de trabalhos de f teve quaisquer implicaes para a lei judia. Seu uso de synagg em 2:2 est s vezes apelado para como indicando que comunidade encontrada do James em uma sinagoga judia, ou, como cristos judeus, construram sua prpria sinagoga depois do modelo com que eles estavam familiarizados; Mas, saindo de lado a pergunta de se qualquer comunidade Crist podia ter tido seu prprio edifcio neste momento, a palavra extensamente usada na sensao geral de uma assemblia de pessoas, ou uma reunio como a ocasio de uma assemblia, qualquer um de qual faria sentido neste contexto. At a adoo de James de Jerusalm como sua autoridade pseudnima no traar o autor como um cristo judeu, para embora James fosse o lder de Cristianismo judeu, e documentos gostam dos Sermes de Pseudo Clementine e Reconhecimentos mostram que ele era venerado por cristos judeus heterodoxos mais velhos como seu pai de fundao, ele est semelhantemente venerado em gnostic literatura no obviamente influenciado por Judasmo (Vai. Thom. 12; Ap. Jas. E 1 e 2 Apoc. Jas., NHC 1.2, 5.3,4), e sua liderana lembrada e comemorada na popular de tradio Crist (Clem. Alex. Em Eusebius, Hist. Eccl. 2.1.3, 23.1;

Epiphanius, Haer. 78.7). James um pseudnimo que poderia ser adotado por um autor Cristo de qualquer fundo que desejou tratar sua comunidade especfica em condies, e com uma autoridade, apropriada para a Igreja em grande. As doze tribos na Disperso, tambm, podiam nunca ser um endereo literal para Diaspora Jewry, desde o reconstitution das doze tribos longas tinham sido parte de esperana escatolgica somente (por exemplo Isa 11:1116; Zech 10:612; 2 Esdr 13:3947), mas mais prontamente compreensvel como uma descrio ideal da Igreja em seu papel como o novo, ou verdade, Israel no mundo (cf. Gal 6:16; Heb 4:9; 1 Acaricie 2:910; E para gentile igrejas Crists como a disperso, cf. 1 Acaricie 1:1 e os endereos de 1 Clemente, a Epstola de Polycarp, e o Martrio de Polycarp.) James mostra, ento, algo do ethos de Judasmo: Seu monotheism, sua atrao para o livro santo, e sua preocupao moral larga, sem as marcas claras de pertencer a comunidade judia. provvel que o fundo de autor e leitores para ser achado entre o deus-fearers: aqueles no judeus que eram atrados para o que eles viram como a filosofia judia; Que insistiu na franja das sinagogas da Diaspora, entretanto possivelmente tambm de Palestine tambm (cf. Luke 7:25), sem estar proslitos cheios; E que formou, parece, um pronto pblico para Cristo orando (Atos 10:2, 22, 13:16, 26, 16:14, 17:4, 17, 18:7). Eles trariam aquele ethos em seu Cristianismo, junto com formas de organizao com que eles tinham estado familiarizados nas sinagogas, mas sem qualquer preocupao para ser envolvida em debates que tocam em identidade judia, para que eles nunca comprometeram-se. D. Cristianismo da Epstola As caractersticas judias de James so lanadas em proeminncia por sua falta de uma colorao Crist forte. Jesus Cristo referido a s duas vezes, em 1:1 e 2:1, que alguns estudiosos mais velhos at sugeridos extirpar como lustra revelar uma rea originalmente judia. Este expediente, que no tem nenhuma justificao de evidncia textual, no ser adotado, desde a evidncia de carter Cristo consideravelmente mais extensa que aquelas duas referncias de explcito. Neles dois, Jesus identificado como o Senhor ou nosso Senhor, usando o ttulo pelos quais cristos aclamaram o Jesus subidos (Atos 2:36; Rom 10:9; Phil 2:811). Em 2:1 ele adicional descrito como o Senhor de gloriar-se um syntactically frase difcil que poderia tambm ser traduzida como o Senhor glorioso ou o Senhor, a glria; a associao de Jesus com glria pode relacionar qualquer um para seu papel como o revealer da glria de Deus (cf. John 1:14; 2 Cor 4:6; Heb 1:3), ou para seu entrando glria no ltimo julgamento (Matt 25:31; 2 Thess 1:710). Em 5:78 o resultar do Senhor certamente se refere ao retorno de Jesus, desde a palavra usada, parousia, vindo, um termo tcnico para aquele evento em primeira literatura Crist (por exemplo 1 Thess 2:19; 1 Cor 15:23; Matt 24:3; 1 John 2:28; 2 Acaricie 1:16). Comunidade do James chamado a igreja, ekklsia, (5:14), na designao prpria de caracterstica da comunidade Crist, considerada ambos como um grupo local e um (pelo menos potencialmente) fenmeno universal (Matt 16:18, 18:17; 1 Cor 1:2, 12:28; Phlm 2, Col 1:18); e seus ancies untam no nome do Senhor como outros curandeiros Cristos agido no nome de Jesus (Atos 3:6, 4:30, 16:18; Mark 16:17). A insinuao em 1:18 para Deus est tendo nos trazido adiante pela palavra de verdade provavelmente ser entendido quando James est ecoando o idioma de renascimento em que outros cristos expressos sua compreenso da experincia de converso e batismo (John 3:38; Titus 3:5; 1 Acaricie 1:3, 23; As idias e idioma batismais podem tambm ser achados em Jas 1:21 e 2:7); e parallels entre James e 1 Peter foi tomado mostrar a seu compartilhando em um padro comum de ensino catequtico Cristo (1:24 e 1 Acaricie 1:67; 1:18, 21 e 1 Acaricie 1:232:2; 4:68 e 1 Acaricie 5:59). O dois a maioria de reas interessante de discusso em avaliar o Cristianismo de James so, porm, seu uso do ensino de Jesus e seu envolvimento em controvrsia com Paul. 1. James e Jesus. James em nenhuma parte cita o ensino de Jesus como tal, mas sua proibio de juramentos em 5:12 unmistakably recorda proibio do Jesus em Matt 5:3337. Embora reticncia no uso de juramentos era aconselhada ambas por professores judeus e filsofos gregos, no existe nenhuma certa evidncia de uma proibio absoluta comparvel em seu uso, que pareceria ento para ser sem igual para Jesus. Se James pode ser confiantemente visto para desenhar no ensino de Jesus aqui, ento ele pode discutivelmente fazer muito em contextos onde a semelhana de idioma e distinctiveness de contedo no esto to marcados. Deste modo em 2:8 ele identifica Lev 19:18 como a lei real para ser cumprida, como Jesus tambm cantou isto fora em Mark 12:31 (com parallels em Matt 22:39 e Luke 10:27). R. Akiba (CA. 50132 c.e.) Tambm cantou fora Lev 19:18 como o princpio mais completo da lei, ento Jesus pode no ter sido sem igual em fazer muito em seu dia, mas descrio do James da ordem pode indicar que ele considerou isto como a lei do reino de Deus que Jesus orou. Seu encorajamento para perguntar . . . e receber (1:5) instruo do recordaes Jesus fazer muito em Matt 5:711 e Luke 11:913; E sua lembrana

que Deus escolheu aqueles que so pobres no mundo para ser . . . herdeiros do reino (2:5) beatitude do ecos Jesus no pobre, que so prometidos o reino em Matt 5:3 e Luke 6:20. Porque o mais ntimo paralelo entre James e o ensino de Jesus acontece em material peculiar para evangelho do Matthew, enquanto todos os outros so com presente de material em Matthew como tambm outros evangelhos, est freqentemente discutido que James tem uma conexo especial com Matthew, ou em termos de um conhecimento literrio de e dependncia naquele evangelho ou de pertencer a comunidade ou tradio de que o evangelho tambm veio. Isto improvvel. At no mais ntimo paralelo existem diferenas significantes em teor entre Jas 5:12 e Matt 5:3337, enquanto no outro parallels James no notadamente mais ntimo para verso do Matthew que para os outros evangelhos (na beatitude na pobre ele mais ntimo para bno simples do Luke do pobre que para espiritualizado pobre do Matthew em esprito). Mais geralmente, Matthew toma claramente parte em debate sobre a relao entre Judasmo e Cristianismo, hostil para a liderana judia ainda preocupada para manter a integridade da lei; Deste modo a proibio de juramentos recebe uma extremidade polmica em um ataque em casustica judia, e a grande ordem vista para envolver toda a lei e os profetas (Matt 22:40). Estas preocupaes no colorem ensino do James, e ele e sua comunidade ento no pareceriam estar na mesma situao que do Matthew. O contato do James com o ensino de Jesus mais provvel ter sido com uma tradio oral contnua que por dependncia em quaisquer dos evangelhos escritos, desde as vrias semelhanas, entretanto notveis, no totalize em correspondncia verbal exata. Nesse caso, existem trs pontos de interesse particular. (a) Seu contato com material atravs do alcance dos que esto normalmente identificados como as fontes dos Evangelhos de Synoptic. O cantar fora de Lev 19:18 pertence a tradio de Markan; O encorajamento para perguntar e receber, e a beatitude na pobre, para aquele comum para Matthew e Luke (Q ); a proibio de juramentos para Matthew s. Isto poderia indicar que o material de evangelho era mais extensamente transmitido, e fontes menos separadas de um ao outro, que sua identificao separada s vezes parece implicar. (b) Enquanto material do James pode ser independente de evangelho fixity e derivado de tradio oral, no ento necessariamente a forma mais-original, para ele o relacionar para seus prprios interesses. Deste modo ele identifica o presente para ser perguntado de Deus como especificamente o presente de sabedoria (1:5esprito santo do Contraste Luke, 11:13, bons presentes do e Matthew, 5:11, mas comparem interesse do James em sabedoria em 3:1318)e levanta a possibilidade do pedido que no respondido (1:68, cf. A mesma preocupao em 4:34). (c) As comparaes entre James e os Evangelhos mostram a dois modos em que o ensino de Jesus poderia ser usado. No contexto dos Evangelhos, o ensino est obviamente atribudo para Jesus e leva sua autoridade, se ou no exclusivamente era (ou at authentically) seu. Existe nenhuma tal atribuio do ensino em James. Embora ele seja mais provavelmente ciente, especialmente em 2:8, que ele est desenhando em palavras do Jesus, no importante ele para nico eles fora como tendo uma autoridade distintiva; Bastante eles contribuem para o estoque geral de instruo tica Crist junto com material de outras fontes e as prprias perspiccias do autor. Ns podemos comparar a prtica de Paul, para quem era s vezes importante invocar uma palavra do Senhor como tal (1 Cor 7:10), mas que tambm desenharia o ensino de Jesus sem discriminao no curso de seu prprio argumento (Rom 13:7; Cf. Mark 12:17; Rom 13:9; Cf. Mark 12:31). 2. James e Paul. James no se refere diretamente a Paul mais que ele faz para Jesus, mas quando, no curso de sua discusso da associao necessria de f e trabalhos (2:1426), ele conduz aquela discusso em termos de justificao e do exemplo de Abrao (2:2125), seu argumento inevitavelmente recordaes que de Paul em Romanos 34 e Galatians 23. As diferenas entre as duas podem ser vistas polarizadas em concluso do Paul que ns seguramos que um homem justificado por f e no por trabalhos (Rom 3:28, cf. Gal 2:15) e do James que um homem justificado por trabalhos e no por f s (2:24). s vezes sugerido que argumento do James esteja antes de do Paul e que Paul escreveu em parte para responder isto, mas enquanto argumento do Paul em justificao no exige James para explicar isto, o tom fortemente polmico de idioma do James indica que ele sabe uma posio que ele est preocupado para refutar: E no por f s. , porm, improvvel que James estava familiarizado com argumento do Paul como Paul sobre o qual ele mesmo apresentou isto, para ele ignorar vrios pontos importantes. (a) Paul conversa especificamente sobre trabalhos feitos em obedincia para e fulfilment da lei judia, enquanto James faz nenhuma tal referncia para a lei, mas pensa sobre trabalhos de caridade em geral. (b) Paul ataca tais trabalhos quando feitos com o fim de ganhar justificao de Deus, que ele julga ser impossvel; James recomenda trabalhos como parte da resposta de f em Deus. (c) Embora ambas as atrao para o exemplo de Abrao e a declarao de sua justificao em Gen 15:6, Paul relaciona Abrao est justificando f para sua aceitao das promessas de

Gen 15:5; James relaciona isto para vontade do Abrao sacrificar seu filho em Gnese 22, deste modo cuidadosamente feito ponto do Paul perdido que justificao precedida do Abrao, e no teve nada a ver com, sua circunciso e aceitao implcita da lei em Gen 17:927 (Rom 4:1011). (d) James no lida com Paul outro texto de prova importante, Hab 2:4 (Rom 1:17; Gal 3:11); e reciprocamente James outro exemplo, Rahab (2:25), no derivado de Paul. Apesar da semelhana aparente de seu idioma, James no parece conhecer o que argumento do Paul era realmente, e altamente inverossmil que ele ou leu cartas do Paul ou ouviu prpria exposio do Paul de suas vises. Se ele pensa que a posio ele que ele mesmo concerniu refutar tem autoridade de Pauline outro assunto. A separao absoluta de f de trabalhos em relao a justificao parece ter sido uma perspiccia original de do Paul, e justificao que o idioma de salvao como associado com ele no NT como tem sido por geraes mais velhas. O termo aparece em Atos s em registro do Luke de fala do Paul na sinagoga em Pisidian Antioch (Atos 13:3839); e nas Epstolas Pastorais, escrito debaixo do pseudnimo de Paul, em uma declarao sumria de salvao, talvez em uma tentativa para Paulinize um existente credal frmula (Titus 3:7). Esta passagem posterior mostra que rejeio do Paul de justificao por trabalhos podia ser reinterpretada fora do contexto do argumento de Judaizing se relacionar a trabalhos ntegros em geral que poderiam ser pensados para ganhar salvao, e este reapplication tambm achado em 1 Clem. 32:4, cujo autor claramente familiar com argumento do Paul em Romanos. James ouviu o idioma usado at mais geralmente, sustentar uma atitude religiosa que enfatizou a expresso piedosa de confiana em Deus e considerou trabalhos de caridade ativa a partir de pouca importncia, se no realmente para estar realmente desencorajada. provvel que aqueles que deste modo apelada para justificao por f como seu slogan fez muito em que eles viram ser autoridade do Paul, e que James soube isto; Nesse caso, o debate deve ter sido conduzido em uma rea da Igreja onde o Paul era lembrado e venerado (como, shows por exemplo, Clemente que ele estava em Roma uma gerao depois de sua morte). Cristianismo do James, ento, caracterizado por uma preocupao tica forte, reforada pela certeza de ter entrado uma nova vida, e tambm pela certeza de recompensas e castigo escatolgicos. A autoridade de Jesus como Senhor subido reconhecido, e seu ensino utilizado. H lugar para disputa ideolgica em sua comunidade, acima da importncia relativa de caridade na vida de f, mas nenhuma evidncia de qualquer interesse especulativo em assuntos doutrinais. Isto no um Cristianismo provvel para produzir ou heresia ou teologia criativas, mas no estava nenhuma dvida congenial para aqueles que tinham sido atrados para uma preocupao semelhante em Judasmo, mas estava agora oferecido uma comunidade centrou sozinho Senhor e dos quais eles podiam mais completamente e prontamente se torna parte. E. Contedo e Idias Distintivos As anlises da estrutura do alcance de epstola entre a descoberta de um plano ou padro subjacentes em que cada seo pode ser vista para ajustar, e relativo a ele como uma coleo de material discrepante ajuntada de fontes orais e ligou junto s por ponto-palavras ou ecos verbais. Os primeiros sofra da natureza muito geral de muito do material do James que parece artificialmente forado em muito apertado e completo um esquema; O segundo ignore a presena de temas que examinam os cinco captulos. melhor para ver o autor como em desenvolvimento algumas idias principais em uma variedade de expresses e conexes. Sua preocupao principal com comportamento Cristo, sua consistncia, e seu contexto de comunidade. Deveria existir consistncia entre f e ao; Consistncia em atividades diferentes; Uma preocupao de comum para um ao outro. (L no parece ser qualquer impulso para misso fora da comunidade.) 1. F e Ao. A prova de f produz inteireza de carter (1:24). Desde Deus tenta ningum, o superar de tentao est o subjugar de se prpria desejos destrutivos (1:1215). Destinar a palavra batismal de salvao para renunciar aes do mal (1:21). Segurar a f do Senhor que Jesus Cristo para excluir parcialidade (2:1). F deve emitir em trabalhos para ser uma f viva (2:1426). Deus-dada sabedoria revela propriamente em ao caracterstica (3:1318, cf. 1:5). Seguir se prprias paixes para buscar a amizade do mundo e deste modo estar em inimizade com Deus (4:14); o remdio sendo um wholehearted arrependimento e retornar a ele (4:610). Planos para os futuros deviam ser feitos sujeito a permisso para divina (4:1315), e resistncia do presente prestada possvel pela esperana do resultar do Senhor (5:78), e pelo exemplo de antigos homens de f (5:1011). James retorna freqentemente para o assunto de orao. Como ao devia ser consistente com f, ento orao, como a expresso de f, devia ser wholehearted e relacionado a ao. Deus um: Um artigo de f para que os demnios corretamente respondem com terror (2:19), e como o um Deus ele o nico doador de

bons presentes (1:17), dando generosamente e unreservedly (1:5). Pedidos para ele devia ento ser feito sinceramente, sem dvida sobre sua habilidade ou vontade para dar (1:58); e deviam ser para objetos consistentes com seu carter (4:24). James no v nenhum problema em orao sem resposta; para ser explicado pela insuficincia da orao, ou untrusting ou desencaminhado. Ele se aplica ao homem cuja orao deste modo falha seu a maioria de dobro de adjetivo de caracterstica pejorativa-importada, dipsychos (1:8, cf. 4:8; Um termo inigualado no LXX ou o NT, entretanto achada em outra primeira literatura Crist, notavelmente o Pastor de Hermas, Mandato 9, e talvez relacionado a anlise judia de homem como tendo dois impulsos). At onde a orao expressa uma confiana adequada em Deus, devia ser acompanhado por ao se for valer a pena qualquer coisa (2:1516). Orao verdadeira e fervente , porm, poderosamente efetivo, como no exemplo de Elijah (5:1718). Orao e elogio so a resposta adequada do individual para sofrimento ou joy (5:13), e James encoraja orao dentro da comunidade para seus membros, ambos no caso especfico de nusea (5:1415) e em geral como um remdio para pecados (5:16). 2. Consistncia em Ao. Como comportamento Cristo devia ser consistente com f crist, ento devia ser consistente nele mesmo. Aqueles que ouve a palavra tambm devia ser fazedores disto (1:2225). A lei (qualquer seu contedo em prtica) devia ser mantida por completo, com cada peso de ordem dada; E todas as pessoas deviam ser tratadas semelhantes debaixo disto (2:811). intolervel para abenoar Deus e homens de maldio feitos em sua imagem (3:911). James est especialmente preocupado com pecados de fala, onde ele v inconsistncia como mais descarada; Este relaciona claro que para sua preocupao com orao, mas ele expressa sua preocupao em grande. melhor para ser rpido para ouvir mas lento para falar (1:19). Religio verdadeira envolve bridling a lngua (1:26, cf. 3:24). Professores, que negociar com palavras, esto em maior risco, e poucos deviam assumir esta responsabilidade (3:1). Falando do mal de um ao outro na comunidade, se em calnia ou crtica, para ser condenada (4:1112). Fala devia ser um assunto direto e verdadeiro, onde sim significa sim e no no, sem necessidade do reforo perigoso de juramentos (5:12). James d abertura para sua condenao da seriedade de pecados de fala em uma descrio altamente retrica da lngua, mais pequena mas a maioria de membro poderoso do corpo: um fogo; um mundo de maldade; indomvel, poluindo, venenoso, inflamado por inferno (3:58). 3. Preocupao mtua. A perseguio de consistncia e integridade no , porm, uma indagao para pureza pessoal e individual: A preocupao do James para comportamento Cristo na comunidade. Como orao para Deus aliviar sofrimento devia ser acompanhado por esforos para fazer muito a si mesmo (2:15 16), religio to verdadeira envolve ambas as ao cuidado de vivas e rfos e mantendo a si mesmo incorrupto pelo mundo (1:27). A epstola entra em luta com a vista de uma comunidade mutuamente encorajadora, confessando pecados um com o outro e rezando para um ao outro, cada alerto para qualquer um que perde-se, desde reformar ele para o benefcio de ambos (5:16, 1920). Rico e pobre esto entre as mais bsicas de divises sociais, preocupao do e James para o pobre e hostilidade para a rica pode se relacionar a seu desejo para encorajar o ideal de comunidade Cristo tanto sobre a experincia emprica de seu prprio grupo. Ele considera o rico como quase por definio excluda da Igreja. O irmo humilde pode ser confiante de sua exaltao futura, mas o homem rico (seguramente no um irmo) pode s esperar ansiosamente humilhao e ltima aniquilao (1:911). Embora a visita rica seja no ser excluda do cristo encontrando, aqueles que so tentados para bem-vindo ele acima deentusiasticamente so lembrados do papel habitual do rico como seus opressores (2:17). Comerciantes prsperos so lembrados de seu essencial impermanence (4:1316); e, em uma passagem de injria dramtica como sua tirada contra a lngua, James chama no rico para lamentar e uivar, reconhecer a corrupo de seu tesouro, e aguardar seu destino inevitvel nos ltimos dias ou o dia de matana (5:15). Em sua equao da rica como m e a pobre como escolhido do Deus, James est seguindo uma conveno existente h muito correndo do OT (por exemplo Salmos 10, 49, 140) em compreenso do eu prprio da comunidade de Qumran e alguns primeiros grupos Cristos. Devia ser notado entretanto que ele no idealiza pobreza por se, mas indica que o pobre que so de fato ntegros, que so o objeto de favor do Deus. Deste modo ele o irmo pobre que ser exaltado, no simplesmente o homem pobre (1:9); o pobre so escolhidos ser ricos em f e herdar o reino (2:5); a opresso da pobre pela rica que pede vindicao compendiada na morte do unresisting homem ntegro (5:6). Aqui como em outro lugar James um intrprete e no meramente um herdeiro de tradio, e por seu material variado corre sua condenao da necessidade para o homem Cristo ser inteiro em palavra e ao, singleheartedly servindo ambos o um Deus e seus irmos. F. Idioma e Texto

O autor usa o idioma grego com fluncia e uma certa sensao de estilo. Embora no da qualidade de literatura clssica, sua escrita mostra a habilidade gramatical e virtualmente livre de solecisms e coloquialismos. Ele abre com Saudao, usando o infinitivo chairein como habitual em uma carta helenstica (1:1, cf. 1 Macc 10:18, 25, 12:6; Atos 23:26); usa a freira de idade retrica (4:13, 5:1); e d a forma de juramento correto do acusativo da coisa confiada plenamente em (5:12), por contraste com linguagem semita do Matthew de en mais o dativo. Ele tem um vocabulrio largo, inclusive algumas palavras no achadas em outro lugar no NT ou o LXX (por exemplo criatura do mar, enalios, 3:7; Diariamente, ephmeros, 2:15; Abatimento, katpheia, 4:9). Seu estilo mostra a um carinho para aliterao, como em peirasmois peripeste poikilois (1:2, voc encontra vrios testes) e mikron melos estin kai megala auchei (3:5, a lngua est um pouco membro e gaba-se de grandes coisas); e para a cadncia de palavras com finais semelhantes, como em exelkomenos kai deleazomenos (1:14, atrado e atrado) e anemizomeno kai ripizomeno (1:6, dirigido e lanado pelo ventoa antiga palavra at pode ter sido cunhada por James para este efeito, como ele pode tambm cunhar o evocativo chrysodaktylios, ourotocado, 2:2). Aliterao e cadncia so ambas achados em admitidamente defeituoso hexameter do James: Pasa dosis agath kai panela drma teleion (1:17, todo bom dom e todo presente perfeito). Esta sensibilidade para, e habilidade de fazer uso efetivo, o som do idioma de Gk diz contra qualquer teoria que a epstola foi traduzida de um arameu ou original hebreu. Ns j ilustramos seu uso de cotao e insinuao bblica, e sua familiaridade com o LXX influenciou seu idioma mais geralmente. A maioria de linguagens semitas so para ser explicadas pelo conhecimento do autor do LXX. Deste modo ele usa as combinaes prospolmpsia e prospolmpteo (2:1, 9, parcialidade e mostrar a parcialidade, derivado do LXX prospon lambanein), e componha frases como poiein eleos (2:13, mostrar a clemncia); poits logou (1:22, um fazedor da palavra, cf. 4:11, poits nomou, um fazedor da lei); prospon ts genes (1:23, rosto natural); e en pasais tais hodois autou (1:8, em todos os seus modos, cf. 1:11). Como ele pode desenhar em imagem helenstica vvido em seu ataque retrico na lngua (3:28), ento ele pode adotar um estilo arcaico ou bblico em sua denncia proftica da rica (5:16). no h necessidade de recorrer para teorias de autoria mltipla ou editores diferentes para explicar esta variedade de estilo: Simplesmente exige um autor que est suficientemente vontade com seu idioma. (Luke semelhantemente pode adaptar seu estilo para incluir as narrativas de nascimento potico e arcaico de Luke 12 e a conta quase classicamente herico de naufrgio do Paul em Atos 27.) A histria textual da epstola reflete sua histria de cnon. Estava na igreja de Alexandria que James primeiro entrou em uso regular, e tem suporte cedo e forte em mss do texto egpcio-tipo: Entre o papyri o fragmentrio 3d-sculo papyri 20 e 23 e papiro de sculo 5 54 contm alguns versos cada da epstola, enquanto a 6 ou papiro de sculo 7 74 tem uma parte significativa do todo; O importante 4 e sculo 5 uncials Sinaiticus, Vaticanus (B), Alexandrinus (A), e Ephraem (C) todos tm isto, Vaticanus estando geralmente considerado como a melhor testemunha para o texto. De Origen onwards cotaes por citaes de Alexandrian tambm esto disponveis para o crtico textual, como tambm o Sahidic e mais tarde as verses de Bohairic cptico. Reciprocamente, o desuso longo da epstola na Igreja Ocidental aparente em sua falta de representao em Gk mss do texto Ocidental, e existe, claro, nenhuma cotao pelos primeiros pais Ocidentais, se em gregos ou latino. A verso latina Velha achada no Cdice de sculo 9 Corbeiensis (ff) e Speculum Pseudo Augustini (m), e peculiaridades l indicam que James era separadamente traduzido de, e provavelmente mais tarde que, as outras epstolas catlicas que popularidade anteriormente alcanadas no Oeste. Augustine era para reclamar da maldade incomum da traduo latina disponvel para ele (Retrataes 2.32), mas a epstola veio firmemente em histria de latino textual com o Vulgate, debaixo da autoridade de Jerome. Na Sria, histria de cnon comea com a Peshitta, e ento tambm a histria do texto de Syriac; O sculo 9 mss K e L do texto de Koine ou Lucianic-tipo James presente como teria vindo para ser lido na igreja de gregos de falar da Sria, e em o texto bizantino da Idade Mdia. O longo negligencie da epstola pode ter servido para separar seu texto contra copiar erro e emendation, para variantes textuais grandes so poucos. ( sempre possvel, claro, aqueles erros podiam ter sido feitos em uma primeira fase, sada no corrigida, e ento fique fortificado sem discrepncia textual para indicar eles.) Alguns acontecem onde o idioma do James obviamente obscurece ou pouco conhecido e escriturrios tentaram fazer os melhores disto: s 1:17, com o idioma um pouco pretensioso astronmico; E s 5:8, onde o cedo e tarde tenha estado variavelmente especificado como chuva ou fruta por copistas mais ou menos familiares com condies climticas ou linguagem bblicas. s 2:19 alguns falharam em pegar o eco da Shema, Deut 4:6, Deus um, e achou ao invs uma declarao simples de monotheism, existe um

Deus. s 2:3 o homem pobre oferecido um alcance inteiro de opes sobre onde colocar ele mesmo imperceptivelmente; s 4:4 adlteros tm sido pedantically adicionados a adlteras; e s 5:20 o final aparentemente abrupto da epstola terminou com um final Amm. Embora no sempre facilmente solveis, nenhuma destas perguntas textuais seriamente afeta o significado essencial do autor. James, Letter of. Author. According to the salutation this letter was written by James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1). But who was this James? Of the several James mentioned in the NT, only two have ever been proposed as the author of this letterJames, the son of Zebedee, and James, the Lords brother. It is not likely that the son of Zebedee wrote it because he was martyred very early (A.D. 44), and there is no indication that he had attained a leadership role in the early church that would warrant his writing a general letter. The traditional view identifies the author with James, the brother of our Lord, and the head of the Jerusalem church (Acts 12:17; 15:13; 21:18; 1 Cor 15:7; Gal 2:912). This identification is supported by: (1) the similarity of the language of the letter with that of James speech and the circular letter of Acts 15; (2) the consistency of the historical reports of the life and character of the Lords brother with what is found in the letter; (3) the distinct Judaistic flavor of the letter; and (4) the fact that no other James fits the situation as well as the Lords brother. Date, Origin, and Destination. A wide range of opinion exists on the date of James. Those who accept the traditional authorship date it either in the middle 40s or early 60s (shortly before the death of its author). It has been dated as late as A.D. 150 by those who hold that it was written by an unknown James or that the author was writing in the name of James, the Lords brother. Although it is impossible to be certain about the time of writing, there are several factors which point to an earlier date. The social conditions revealed in the letter, especially the sharp cleavage between rich and poor (1:911; 2:17; 5:16), a situation which was markedly changed after A.D. 70, point to an early date. The strong expectation of the return of Jesus Christ also suggests an early date (5:7, 8). There is nothing in the Christian literature of the 2nd century that can match the simple and powerful teaching about the end times found in this letter. Other evidence includes the rather primitive church organization revealed in the book (2:16), the absence of the debate concerning the inclusion of the Gentiles, and the fact that it is addressed to the whole church (1:1) and yet primarily to Jews (a situation that existed in the church only before Pauls first missionary journey). But the most crucial passage for dating the letter is the one on faith and works (2:1426). Whoever wrote these verses must have been acquainted with Pauls teaching. Yet it is impossible to believe that he is trying to refute Paul. This would involve an almost inconceivable misunderstanding of Pauls doctrine of justification by faith. The passage is best explained as having come about as the result of a misunderstanding of Paul, not by James, but by his readers. Such a misunderstanding would have been more likely at the beginning of Pauls public ministry. The Book of Acts records his first extended public preaching as taking place at Antioch (Acts 11:26). This yearlong ministry preceded the famine visit to Jerusalem of about A.D. 46 (cf. Acts 11:2729) and the persecution by Herod Agrippa of A.D. 44. How long it was before the misunderstanding of Pauls doctrine of justification by faith came to the attention of James, we do not know. However, since Jews (both Christian and non-Christian) from all over the Mediterranean world were continually moving in and out of Jerusalem, it probably was not long. A date of about A.D. 45, immediately following the Herodian persecution, would best fit all the conditions. Although a number of suggestions have been made from time to time about the origin of the book, there can be little doubt that the letter was written in Palestine. The author makes allusions that are Near Eastern generally and Palestinian particularly (cf. the early and late rain 5:7; the spring of brackish water, 3:11; the fig, olive, and vine, 3:12; and the scorching heat 1:11). The only direct section of the letter which might help in discovering who the readers are is found in 1:1: to the twelve tribes in the Dispersion. This is usually taken to mean Christian Jews living outside of Palestine. The basic difficulty with this position is that the twelve tribes is a term which traditionally
NT New Testament cf. compare

meant the entirety of the Jewish nation (cf. Ecclus 44:23; Assyrian Moses 2:45; Bar 1:2; 62:5, etc.; Acts 26:7), which, no matter how widely it had been scattered, could never have its entire existence outside of Palestine. Furthermore, had James been writing to that part of the Jewish nation which was living in the diaspora (dispersion), he could easily have made that clear. Thus it seems best to take the twelve tribes in a symbolical sense and understand it as a reference to the Christian church, conceived of as the new Israel. An examination of the rest of the contents of the letter indicates clearly that James is writing to Jews who are primarily Christians (cf. 2:1). However, there is one section (5:16) that seems to be addressed to non-Christians, and may represent a prophetic attempt to reach non-Christians who were attending Christian assemblies (cf. 1 Cor 14:23, 24). In the shorter disconnected passages of the letter, it is impossible to discover anything about the readers circumstances. Most of these exhortations are general and relate to social and spiritual conditions one might find among any group of Christians in any age. The more extended passages that deal with social conditions (2:112; 5:111) do provide information about the readers situation. James is addressing poor Christians who are employed as farm laborers by wealthy landowners. A few rich may be included among his Jewish Christian readers (cf. 4:1317), but James is primarily concerned with the poor. His statements denouncing the rich are reminiscent of the OT prophets, especially Amos. Purpose and Theological Teaching. The letter of James was written: (1) to strengthen Jewish Christians undergoing trial (1:24, 1315; 5:7 11); (2) to correct a misunderstanding of the Pauline doctrine of justification by faith (2:1426); and (3) to pass down to first-generation Christians a wealth of practical wisdom. James theology is not dogmatic; it omits the great theological themes that dominate Pauls writings and play such an important role in the rest of the books of the NT. James makes no mention of the incarnation, and the name of Christ appears only twice (1:1; 2:1). No mention is made of Christs sufferings, death, or resurrection. James theology is practical, and has a decided Jewish flavor. The distinctive Christian features, of course, are there. James has simply baptized rabbinical ideas into Christ. The outstanding theological themes of the letter are: Temptation (Trials). The typically Jewish teachingsjoy in trials and the use of trial for the building and perfecting of characterare both found in the letter (1:24). James also discusses the origin of temptation (vv 1315). Here the author comes into conflict with contemporary Jewish theology. The rabbinical solution to the problem of the origin of sin was that there was an evil tendency in man which enticed man to sin. The rabbis reasoned that since God is the Creator of all things, including the evil impulse in man, man is not responsible for his sin. No, says James, Let no one say when he is tempted, I am tempted by God; for God cannot be tempted with evil and he himself tempts no one; but each person is tempted when he is lured and enticed by his own desire (vv 13, 14). Law. The entire letter is concerned with ethical teaching with no mention of the central gospel truths of Christs death and resurrection. James presupposes the gospel and presents the ethical side of Christianity as a perfect law. He seems to be reassuring his Jewish Christian readers that for them there is still law (the priceless possession of every Jew). The law (ethical teaching of Christianity) is a perfect law (1:25), because it was perfected by Jesus Christ. It is also a law of freedom (1:25), that is, a law (ethical responsibility) which applies to those who have freedom, not from law, but from sin and self through the word of truth. Thus law is a Palestinian Christian Jews way of describing the ethical teaching of the Christian faith, the standard of conduct for the believer in Jesus Christ. This tendency to describe Christian ethical teaching as law is found in 2:813, a passage which arises out of a rebuke against the favoritism that James readers were showing toward the rich. This favoritism was being condoned by an appeal to the law of love to ones neighbor. So James writes: If you really fulfil the royal law, you do well (v 8). The royal law is to be understood with the statement in verse 5, where James reminds his readers that God has chosen those who are poor in the world to be rich in faith and heirs
etc. and so forth OT Old Testament vv verse (pl. vv)

of the kingdom which he has promised to those who love him. The royal law, then, is for those who are of Gods kingdom; it is the rule of faith for those who have willingly subjected themselves to Gods rule. The identification of law with the ethical side of Christianity runs through the entire letter. Faith and Faith vs. Works. Faith plays an important role in the theology of James. It is the basic element of piety (1:3; cf. 2:5), belief in Godnot merely in his existence, but in his character as being good and benevolent in his dealings with mankind (1:6; cf. v 13). Faith includes belief in the power of God, in his ability to perform miraculous acts, and is closely associated with prayer (5:15, 16; cf. 1:6). James has a dynamic concept of faith and clearly goes beyond Judaism when he speaks of faith directed toward the Lord Jesus Christ (2:1). Similarities exist between the concept of faith in James and in the teachings of Jesus. For our Lord also, faith meant access to the divine power and is often associated with healing (cf. Mt 21:22; Mk 5:34; 11:24). The best known passage in which faith is mentioned is 2:1426, where it is contrasted with works. From a study of this passage it is hard to conclude that the author is attempting to refute Paul. The two stand basically in agreement. For both James and Paul faith is directed toward the Lord Jesus Christ; such faith will always produce good works. The faith of which James speaks is not faith simply in the Hebraic sense of trust in God which results in moral action. This is not recognized as true faith by James (cf. if a man says he has faith, 2:14), and Paul would agree with him. James use of the word works differs significantly from Pauls. For James, works are works of faith, the ethical outworking of true spirituality and include especially the work of love (2:8). (Paul would probably call such works the fruit of the Spirit.) When Paul uses the word works he usually has in mind the works of the law, that is, works righteousnessthe attempt by man to establish his own righteousness before God. It is against such theological heresy that Pauls strongest polemics are addressed in the letters to the Galatians and Romans. It is best then to understand 2:1426 as a refutation, not of Paul, but of a misunderstanding of his doctrine of justification by faith. Wisdom. James concept of wisdom also reveals the Jewish background of the letter. Wisdom is primarily practical, not philosophical. It is not to be identified with reasoning power or the ability to apprehend intellectual problems; it has nothing to do with the questions how or why. It is to be sought by earnest prayer and is a gift from God (1:5). Both of these ideas find their roots in the wisdom literature of the Jews (cf. Wis of Sol 7:7; Prv 2:6; Ecclus 1:1). The wise man demonstrates his wisdom by his good life (3:13), whereas the wisdom that produces jealousy and selfishness is not Gods kind of wisdom (3:15, 16). Doctrine of the Endtime. Three important endtime themes are touched upon in the letter. THE KINGDOM OF GOD. Mention of the kingdom of God grows out of a discussion of favoritism in the first half of chapter 2. No favoritism is to be shown to the rich, for God has chosen those who are poor in the world to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom which he has promised to those who love him (2:5). This echoes our Lords teaching in Luke 6:20: Blessed are you poor, for yours is the kingdom of God. The kingdom is the reign of God partially realized in this life, but fully realized in the life to come (cf. promised, 2:5). It is almost synonymous with salvation or eternal life. JUDGMENT. This is the dominant endtime theme of the letter. In 2:12, the readers are admonished to speak and act, remembering that they will be judged under the law of liberty, and they are reminded that judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy. Judgment, in other words, will be administered according to works. In 3:1, James addresses teachers and reminds them that privilege is another basis on which God judges. The theme of judgment again appears in 5:16, and here the author reaches prophetic heights . Gods judgment will fall on the wealthy land owners who have lived self-indulgent, irresponsible lives. Not only have they cheated their poor tenant farmers, they have evencondemned and murdered innocent men, who were not opposing you (v 6 NIV). All this has made them ripe for judgment (you have fattened your hearts in a day of slaughter, v 5). The final passage on judgment (5:9) is addressed to those being exploited by the unscrupulous rich. James word of exhortation is that they are not to grumble against each other. Judging is Gods business and the Judge is close at hand.

NIV The New International Version

THE SECOND COMING. The hope of Christs coming is presented as the great stimulus for Christian living. Every kind of suffering and trial must be endured because the coming of Christ is at hand (5:8). This expectancy is powerful and immediate and like that found in the Thessalonian letters. Content. In the true spirit of Wisdom literature, James touches upon many subjects. His short, abrupt paragraphs have been likened to a string of pearlseach is an entity in itself. Some transitions exist, but they are often difficult to find as James moves quickly from one subject to another. The author begins by identifying himself as the servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, and his readers as the twelve tribes in the diaspora, that is, the whole Christian church, which, when James wrote, was overwhelmingly Jewish (1:1). His first word is one of encouragement. Trials are to be counted as joy because they are Gods way of testing the believer, and they produce spiritual maturity. If the reason for trial is not clear, God can and will give the answer. He is a lavish giver of wisdom to those who really want it (1:58). A poor Christian should be proud of his exalted position in Jesus Christ, and a rich Christian should be glad that he has discovered there are more important things than wealth. Riches are transitorylike quickly wilting flowers under the hot Palestine sun (1:911). God promises the man who endures trial life which is life indeed. One must not blame God for temptation, for it is contrary to his very nature to either be tempted or to tempt man. Temptation has its origin in mans selfish desirea desire which, when brought to full fruition, produces death (vv 1215). God is not the origin of temptation but the source of all good in the life of man. He has given to man his best gift, the gift of new life, and this has come through the gospel (1:1618). The proper attitude toward the word of truth is receptivity, not anger, and an effective listening to that word involves spiritual preparation of heart and mind. Such a reception of the word brings salvation (1:19 21). The word is to be acted upon, not merely listened to. To be a passive hearer is to be like a man who sees himself in a mirror and because he takes such a fleeting glance, forgets what he sees. An active hearer, one who takes a long look in the mirror of Gods Word, will become a doer, and God will bring great blessing into his life (1:2225). True religion is an intensely practical thing. It involves such things as controlling ones tongue, looking after the needs of orphans and widows, and adopting a nonworldly life-style (1:26, 27). Favoritism and faith in Jesus Christ do not go together. It is wrong to show deference to a rich man when he comes into the assembly and ignore the poor man. God has chosen poor people to be heirs of his kingdom. Furthermore, to show favoritism to the rich does not make sense, since they are the very ones who drag Christians into court and blaspheme the name of Christ (2:17). If by showing deference to the rich, the royal law, to love ones neighbor as oneself, is fulfilled, well and good. But to show favoritism is sin and such sin will be judged by God. In order to be a law-breaker one has only to break one law (2:813). Can a faith that does not produce works save a man? What good is a faith that does not respond to human need? Such a faith is dead. Someone will object by saying that there are faith Christians and works Christians. But this is not so. True faith is always demonstrated by works. It is not enough to have orthodox beliefs. Even the demons are theologically orthodox! Abraham, by offering up Isaac, is an example of how true faith and worship go together. Even Rahab, the prostitute, demonstrated her faith by protecting the spies at Jericho. So faith and works are inseparable (2:1426). Excavations of the ruins at Jericho, the city where Rahab, exercising her faith, received the messengers and sent them out another way (Jas 2:25). Not many people should become spiritual teachers because of the awesome responsibility involved. All of us are subject to mistakes, and especially mistakes of the tongue, because the tongue is almost impossible to control. It is like a destructive blaze set by hell itself. The tongue is also inconsistent; it is used both to praise God and to curse men. Such inconsistency ought not to be (3:112). True wisdom will always evidence itself in ethical living, whereas false wisdom produces jealousy and selfish ambition (3:1318). Strife and conflict arise out of illegitimate desires. Failure to have what one wants arises either from not asking God for it or from asking for the wrong thing. To be a friend of the world is to be an enemy of God,

for God is a jealous God and will brook no rivals. He also opposes the proud but offers abundant grace to the humble (4:19). To speak against a brother or to judge him is to speak against Gods Law and to judge it. The Christians proper role is to be a doer of the Law, not a judge. The role of judge belongs to God alone (4:11, 12). Life is at best uncertain. Therefore plans for traveling or doing business should be made with the realization that all are subject to the will of God. To do otherwise is to be boastful and arrogant. When what is right is clearly known and one fails to do it, that is sin (4:1317). Judgment is coming to the rich because they are hoarding their wealth instead of using it for good purposes. God is not unmindful of the cries of the poor farm laborers whom the rich have cheated and unjustly condemned. He is preparing the selfish, unscrupulous rich for a day of awful judgment (5:16). In the midst of suffering and injustice the poor are to be patient for Christs coming, as a farmer must be patient as he waits for God to send the rains to cause his crop to grow and ripen. The return of Christ is at hand and therefore complaining and judging one another must cease. Job is a good example of patience and endurance in suffering. One need not use oaths to guarantee the truthfulness of his statements. A single yes or no is sufficient (5:712). Suffering should elicit prayer, cheerfulness, and praise. When a believer is sick, he should call the elders of the church to pray for him and anoint him with oil. God has promised to answer such prayers. If the sickness is due to personal sin, and that sin is confessed, God will forgive. Elijah is a classic example of how the prayer of a righteous man has powerful results (5:1318). If a fellow Christian sees that his brother has strayed from the truth and is able to bring him back into fellowship with Christ and his church, the consequences will be: (1) he shall save the sinner from death, and (2) God will forgive the erring brother (5:19, 20). WALTER W. WESSEL
2

James, Carta de. Autor. De acordo com a saudao esta carta era escrita por James, um empregado de Deus e do Senhor Jesus Cristo (1:1). Mas quem era este James? Do vrios James mencionou no NT, s dois j foi proposto como o autor desta cartaJames, o filho de Zebedee, e James, o irmo do Senhor. No provvel que o filho de Zebedee escreveu isto porque ele era martirizado muito cedo (d.C. 44), e no existe nenhuma indicao que ele atingiu um papel de liderana no incio de igreja que autorizaria sua escrita uma carta geral. A viso tradicional identifica o autor com James, o irmo de nosso Senhor, e a cabea da igreja de Jerusalm (Atos 12:17; 15:13; 21:18; 1 Cor 15:7; Gal 2:912). Esta identificao sustentada: (1) A semelhana do idioma da carta com aquela de fala do James e a carta circulara de Atos 15; (2) A consistncia dos relatrios histricos da vida e carter do irmo do Senhor com que achado na carta; (3) O Judaistic distinto tempera da carta; E (4) o fato que nenhum outro James ajusta a situao como tambm o irmo do Senhor. Data, Origem, e Destino. Uma grande variedade de opinio existe na data de James. Aqueles que aceita a autoria tradicional o datar ou no meio 40s ou cedo 60s (logo antes da morte de seu autor). Foi datado to tarde quanto d.C. 150 por aqueles que seguram que era escrito por um James desconhecido ou que o autor estava escrevendo no nome de James, o irmo do Senhor. Embora ele seja impossvel estar certo sobre o tempo de escrever, existem vrios fatores que apontar para uma data antiga. As condies sociais reveladas na carta, especialmente a diviso afiada entre rica e pobre (1:911; 2:17; 5:16), uma situao que esteve notadamente mudados depois de d.C. 70, aponte para uma primeira data. A expectativa forte do retorno de Jesus Cristo tambm sugere uma primeira data (5:7, 8). no existe nada na literatura Crist do sculo 2 que pode combinar o ensino simples e poderoso sobre os tempos de fim achado nesta carta. Outra evidncia inclui a bastante primitivo organizao de igreja revelada
WALTER W. WESSEL Ph.D., University of Edinburgh. Professor of New Testament and Greek, Bethel Theological Seminary West, San Diego, California.
2

Elwell, W. A., & Beitzel, B. J. (1988). Baker encyclopedia of the Bible. Map on lining papers. (1090). Grand Rapids, Mich.: Baker Book House.

no livro (2:16), a ausncia do debate relativo incluso do Gentiles, e o fato que tratado para a igreja inteira (1:1) e ainda principalmente para judeus (uma situao que existida na igreja s antes de Paul ser primeira jornada missionria). Mas a passagem mais crucial para datar a carta a em f e trabalhos (2:14 26). Quem escreveram estes versos devem ter ensino do Paul conhecido. Ainda impossvel acreditar que ele esteja tentando refutar Paul. Este envolveria um engano quase inconcebvel de doutrina do Paul de justificao por f. A passagem melhor explicada como tendo acontecido como o resultado de um engano de Paul, no por James, mas por seus leitores. Tal engano teria sido mais provvel no princpio de ministrio pblico do Paul. O Livro de Age registros seu primeiro estendido que pblico orando como acontecendo em Antioch (Atos 11:26). Este yearlong ministrio precedeu a visita de escassez para Jerusalm de cerca de d.C. 46 (cf. Atos 11:2729) e a perseguio por Herod Agrippa de d.C. 44. Quanto tempo era antes do engano de doutrina do Paul de justificao por f veio para a ateno de James, ns no sabemos. Porm, desde judeus (ambos Cristos e no-cristo) de por toda parte o mundo mediterrneo continuamente estava movendo dentro e fora de Jerusalm, provavelmente no era longo. Uma data de cerca de d.C. 45, imediatamente seguindo a perseguio de Herodian, iria melhor ajuste todas as condies. Embora vrias sugestes foram feitas de vez em quando sobre a origem do livro, pode haver pequena dvida que a carta era escrita em Palestine. O autor faz insinuaes que so Prximas do leste geralmente e palestino particularmente (cf. O cedo e tarde chova 5:7; A fonte da gua salgado, 3:11; O figo, azeitona, e vinha, 3:12; E o calor abrasador 1:11). A nica seo direta da carta que poderia ajudar em descobrir que os leitores sejam ser achados em 1:1: Para as doze tribos na Disperso. Isto est normalmente tomado para significar judeus Cristos vivendo fora de Palestine. A dificuldade bsica com esta posio est que as doze tribos um termo que tradicionalmente significou a totalidade da nao judia (cf. Ecclus 44:23; Moiss assrio 2:45; Tranque 1:2; 62:5, etc.; Atos 26:7), que, no importam como extensamente tinha sido disperso, podia nunca ter sua existncia inteira fora de Palestine. Alm disso, tido James estado escrevendo para aquela parte da nao judia que estava vivendo no diaspora (disperso), ele podia facilmente fazer to claro. Deste modo parece melhor para tomar as doze tribos em um symbolical sensao e entender isto como uma referncia para a igreja Crist, concebida de como o novo Israel. Um exame do resto do contedo da carta indica claramente que James est escrevendo para judeus que so principalmente cristos (cf. 2:1). Porm, existe uma seo (5:16) que parea ser tratado para no cristos, e podem representar uma tentativa proftica para alcanar no cristos que estavam freqentando assemblias Crists (cf. 1 Cor 14:23, 24). Nas menores passagens desconectadas da carta, impossvel descobrir qualquer coisa sobre as circunstncias dos leitores. A maior parte destas exortaes so gerais e se relacionam a condies sociais e espirituais poderiam se achar entre qualquer grupo de cristos em qualquer idade. As passagens mais estendidas que lidam com condies sociais (2:112; 5:111) fornea informaes sobre a situao dos leitores. James est endereando cristos pobres que so empregados como operrios de fazenda por proprietrios de terras ricos. Alguns ricos podem ser includos entre seus leitores Cristos judeus (cf. 4:13 17), mas James est principalmente preocupado com o pobre. Suas declaraes denunciando o rico so rememorativos os profetas de OT, especialmente Amos. Propsito e Ensino Teolgicos. A carta de James era escrita: (1) Para fortalecer cristos judeus sofrendo tentativa (1:24, 1315; 5:7 11); (2) corrigir um engano da doutrina de Pauline de justificao por f (2:1426); e (3) passar at primeiros-cristos de gerao uma riqueza de sabedoria prtica. A teologia do James no dogmtica; omite os temas teolgicos grandes que dominam escrita do Paul e tocam um papel to importante no resto dos livros do NT. James no faz nenhuma meno da encarnao, e o nome de Cristo aparece s duas vezes (1:1; 2:1). Nenhuma meno feita de padecimentos do Cristo, morte, ou ressurreio. A teologia do James prtica, e tem um sabor judeu decidido. As caractersticas Crists distintivas, claro, esto l. James simplesmente batizou idias rabnicas em Cristo. Os temas teolgicos excelentes da carta so: Tentao (Testes). Os ensinos tipicamente judeujoy em testes e o uso de tentativa para o edifcio e aperfeioando de carterso ambos achadas na carta (1:24). James tambm discute a origem de tentao (vv 1315). Aqui o autor entra em conflito com teologia judia contempornea. A soluo rabnica para o problema da origem de pecado era que existia uma propenso do mal em homem que atraiu homem para pecar. Os rabinos debatidos aquele desde Deus o Criador de todas as coisas, inclusive o impulso do mal

em homem, homem no responsvel por seu pecado. No, diga James, Deixe ningum dizer quando ele for tentado, eu sou tentado por Deus '; Para Deus no pode ser tentado com do mal e ele prprio tenta ningum; Mas cada pessoa tentada quando ele for atrado e atrado por seu prprio desejo (vv 13, 14). Lei. A carta inteira est preocupada com ensino tico sem meno das verdades de evangelho central da morte e ressurreio do Cristo. James pressupe o evangelho e apresenta o lado tico de Cristianismo como uma lei perfeita. Ele parece estar reassegurando seus leitores Cristos judeus que para eles existe ainda lei (a possesso inestimvel de todo judeu). A lei (ensino tico de Cristianismo) uma lei perfeita (1:25), porque era aperfeioado por Jesus Cristo. Tambm uma lei da liberdade (1:25), isto , uma lei (responsabilidade tica) que se aplica a aqueles que tm liberdade, no de lei, mas de pecado e auto pela palavra de verdade. Deste modo lei modo do judeu Cristo palestino de descrever o ensino tico da f crist, o padro de conduta para o partidrio de Jesus Cristo. Esta propenso para descrever ensino tico Cristo como lei achados em 2:813, uma passagem que surge fora de uma repreenso contra o favoritismo que leitores do James estavam mostrando em direo aos ricos. Este favoritismo estava sendo tolerado por uma atrao para a lei de amor para se vizinho. Ento James escreve: Se voc realmente fulfil a lei real, voc faz bem (v 8). A lei real para ser entendida com a declarao em verso 5, onde James lembra a seus leitores que Deus escolheu aqueles que so pobres no mundo para ser rico em f e herdeiros do reino que ele prometeu aqueles que o amam. A lei real, ento, para aqueles que so de reino do Deus; a regra de f para aqueles que de boa vontade sujeitaram eles mesmos para regra do Deus. A identificao de lei com o lado tico de Cristianismo examina a carta inteira. F e F vs. Trabalhos. A f desempenha um papel importante na teologia de James. o elemento bsico de devoo (1:3; Cf. 2:5), convico em Deusno meramente em sua existncia, mas em seu carter como sendo boa e benevolente em seus procedimentos com a humanidade (1:6; Cf. V 13). F inclui convico no poder de Deus, em sua habilidade de apresentar atos milagrosos, e est prximo associado com orao (5:15, 16; Cf. 1:6). James tem um conceito dinmico de f e claramente vai alm de Judasmo quando ele falar de f dirigida em direo ao Senhor Jesus Cristo (2:1). As semelhanas existem entre o conceito de f em James e nos ensinos de Jesus. Para nosso Senhor tambm, f significou acesso ao poder divino e est freqentemente associado com curativo (cf. MT 21:22; Mk 5:34; 11:24). A passagem mais conhecida em que f mencionada 2:1426, onde contrastado com trabalhos. De um estudo desta passagem duro de concluir que o autor est tentando refutar Paul. O dois esteja basicamente de acordo. Para ambas as f de James e Paul dirigido em direo ao Senhor Jesus Cristo; Tal f sempre produzir bons trabalhos. A f do qual James fala no f simplesmente no Hebraic sente de confiana em Deus que resulta em ao moral. Isto no reconhecido como f verdadeira por James (cf. Se um homem diz que ele tem f, 2:14), e Paul concordaria com ele. O uso do James dos trabalhos de palavra difere significativamente de do Paul. Para James, trabalhos so trabalhos de f, a tica trabalhando mais que de espiritualidade verdadeira e incluir especialmente o trabalho de amor (2:8). (Paul provavelmente chamaria tais trabalhos a fruta do Esprito.) Quando Paul usar os trabalhos de palavra que ele normalmente tem em mente os trabalhos da lei, isto , retido de trabalhosa tentativa por homem para estabelecer sua prpria retido na frente de Deus. contra tal heresia teolgica que polmicas mais fortes do Paul so tratadas nas cartas para o Galatians e Romanos. melhor ento entender 2:1426 como uma refutao, no de Paul, mas de um engano de sua doutrina de justificao por f. Sabedoria. O conceito do James de sabedoria tambm revela o fundo judeu da carta. A sabedoria principalmente prtica, no filosfica. para no ser identificado com o poder de razoamento ou a habilidade de temer problemas intelectuais; no tem nada a ver com as perguntas como ou por que. para ser buscado por orao de srio e um presente de Deus (1:5). Ambas destas idias acham suas razes na literatura de sabedoria dos judeus (cf. Wis de Sol 7:7; Prv 2:6; Ecclus 1:1). O homem sbio demonstra sua sabedoria por sua boa vida (3:13), considerando que a sabedoria que produz cime e egosmo no tipo do Deus de sabedoria (3:15, 16). Doutrina do Endtime. Trs importantes endtime temas so falado sobres na carta. O Reino de Deus. A meno do reino de Deus cresce fora de uma discusso de favoritismo no primeiro metade de captulo 2. Nenhum favoritismo para ser mostrado para o rico, para Deus escolheu aqueles que so pobres no mundo para ser rico em f e herdeiros do reino que ele prometeu aqueles que o amam (2:5).

Este ensino de ecos do nosso Senhor em Luke 6:20: Santificado so voc pobre, para seu o reino de Deus. O reino o reinado de Deus parcialmente percebido nesta vida, mas completamente percebeu na vida para vir (cf. Prometeu, 2:5). quase sinnimo com salvao ou vida eterna. Julgamento. Isto o dominante endtime tema da carta. Em 2:12, os leitores so prevenidos para falar e agir, lembrando que eles sero julgados debaixo da lei de liberdade, e eles so lembrados aquele julgamento est sem clemncia para uma que no mostrou a nenhuma clemncia. Julgamento, em outras palavras, ser administrado de acordo com os trabalhos. Em 3:1, James trata professores e lembra a eles aquele privilgio outra base em que juzes de Deus. O tema de julgamento novamente aparece em 5:16, e aqui o autor alcana julgamento do Deus de alturas proftico atacar os proprietrios de terra ricos que viveram auto-vidas indulgentes, irresponsveis. Eles no s enganastes seus fazendeiros de inquilino pobre, eles atcondenaram e assassinaram homens inocentes, que no estavam opondo voc (v 6 niv). Tudo isso fez eles pronto para julgamento (voc engordou seus coraes em um dia de matana, v 5). A passagem final em julgamento (5:9) tratado para aqueles sendo explorado pelo sem escrpulos rico. A palavra do James de exortao que eles so no murmurar contra um ao outro. Julgar negcios do Deus e o Juiz fechar mo. A Segunda Vinda. A esperana de Cristo est vir para apresentada como o grande incentivo para Cristo vivo. Todo tipo de sofrimento e tentativa devem ser suportados porque o resultar de Cristo est mo (5:8). Esta expectao poderosa e imediata e assim achadas nas cartas de Thessalonian. Contedo. No esprito verdadeiro de literatura de Sabedoria, James fala sobre muitos assuntos. Seus pargrafos pequenos, abruptos foram comparados para uma srie de prolasque cada uma entidade nele mesmo. Algumas transies existem, mas eles so freqentemente difceis de achar como James move depressa de um sujeito a outro. O autor comea identificando ele mesmo como o empregado de Deus e do Senhor Jesus Cristo, e seus leitores como as doze tribos no diaspora, isto , a igreja Crist inteira, que, quando James escreveu, era opressivamente judeu (1:1). Sua primeira palavra um de encorajamento. Os testes so para ser contados como joy porque eles so modo do Deus de testar o crente, e eles produzem maturidade espiritual. Se a razo para tentativa no clara, Deus pode e d a resposta. Ele um doador prdigo de sabedoria para aqueles que realmente querem isto (1:58). Um pobre Cristo devia orgulhar-se de sua posio exaltada em Jesus Cristo, e um rico Cristo devia estar contente que ele descobriu que existem coisas mais importantes que riqueza. A riqueza so transitriascomo depressa murchando flores debaixo do sol de Palestine quente (1:911). Deus promete que o homem que suporta vida de ensaia que vida realmente. No se deve culpar Deus para tentao, para ao contrrio de sua muito natureza ou ser tentado ou tentar homem. A tentao tem sua origem em desejo egosta do homemum desejo que, quando trouxe para gozo cheio, morte de produtos (vv 1215). Deus no a origem de tentao mas a fonte de toda boa na vida de homem. Ele deu a homem seu melhor presente, o presente de nova vida, e este foi bem sucedido para o evangelho (1:1618). A atitude adequada em direo palavra de verdade receptivity, no raiva, e uma compreenso efetiva para aquela palavra envolve preparao espiritual de corao e mente. Tal recepo da palavra traz salvao (1:1921). A palavra para ser agida, no meramente escutada . Para ser um ouvinte passivo para ser como um homem que v ele mesmo em um espelho e porque ele toma um olhar to passageiro, esquece o que ele v. Um ouvinte ativo, um que toma um olhar longo no espelho de Palavra do Deus, se tornar um fazedor, e Deus trar grande bno em sua vida (1:2225). A religio verdadeira uma coisa intensamente prtica. Envolve tais coisas como controlando se lngua, cuidando das necessidades de rfos e vivas, e adotando um nonworldly estilo de vida (1:26, 27). O favoritismo e f em Jesus Cristo no vo junto. Est errado para mostrar a deferncia para um homem rico quando ele entrar na assemblia e ignorar o homem pobre. Deus escolheu pessoas pobres para ser herdeiros de seu reino. Alm disso, mostrar a favoritismo para o rico no faz sentido, desde que eles so os muito uns que arrastam cristos em tribunal e blasfemam o nome de Cristo (2:17).

Se por deferncia de exibio para a rica, a lei real, amar se ser vizinho como a si mesmo, cumprido, bem e bom. Mas mostrar a favoritismo pecado e tal pecado ser julgado por Deus. A fim de ser um transgressor da lei se tem s para quebrar uma lei (2:813). Uma f que pode no produzir trabalhos salvarem um homem? Que boa uma f que est no responder para necessidade humana? Tal f est morta. Algum lega objeto dizendo que existem cristos de f e cristos de trabalhos. Mas isto no isso. A f verdadeira est sempre demonstrada por trabalhos. No suficiente ter convices ortodoxas. At os demnios so theologically ortodoxo! Abrao, por oferecimento em cima Isaac, um exemplo do quo f e adorao verdadeiras vo junto. At Rahab, a prostituta, demonstrada sua f protegendo os espies em Jericho. Ento f e trabalhos so inseparveis (2:1426).

Escavaes das runas em Jericho, a cidade onde o Rahab, exercitando sua f, recebeu os mensageiros e mandou a eles fora outro modo (Jas 2:25). No muitas pessoas deviam se tornar professores espirituais por causa da responsabilidade incrvel envolvida. Todos ns so sujeito a enganos, e especialmente enganos da lngua, porque a lngua quase impossvel controlar. como uma chama destrutiva fixar por inferno propriamente. A lngua tambm incompatvel; usado ambos para louvar Deus e amaldioar homens. Tal inconsistncia devia para no ser (3:112). A sabedoria verdadeira sempre comprovar propriamente em tico vivo, considerando que sabedoria falsa produz cime e ambio egosta (3:1318). A discusso e conflito surgem fora de desejos ilegtimos. O fracasso ter o que quer se que surgir ou de no perguntar Deus por ele ou de pedir a coisa errada. Para ser um amigo do mundo para ser um inimigo de Deus, para Deus um Deus ciumento e lega riacho nenhum rival. Ele tambm ope o orgulhoso mas oferece graa abundante para a humilde (4:19). Para falar contra um irmo ou julgar ele para falar contra Lei do Deus e julgar isto. O papel adequado do cristo para ser um fazedor da Lei, no um juiz. O papel de juiz pertence a Deus s (4:11, 12). A vida est em melhor incerta. Ento planos para ambulantes ou fazendo negcios deviam ser feitos com a realizao que todos so sujeito ao legar de Deus. Para fazer caso contrrio para ser orgulhoso e arrogante. Quando o que direito ser claramente conhecido e uma falhas para fazer isto, isto pecado (4:1317). O julgamento est vindo para o rico porque eles esto acumulando sua riqueza em vez de usarem isto para sempre propsitos. Deus no unmindful dos gritos dos operrios de fazenda pobre quem a rica enganaram e injustamente condenaram. Ele est preparando o egosta, sem escrpulos rico por um dia de julgamento terrvel (5:16). No meio de sofrer e injustia a pobre so para ser pacientes para Cristo estar vindo, como um fazendeiro deve ser paciente como ele espera por Deus para enviar as chuvas para causar sua colheita para crescer e amadurecer. O retorno de Cristo est mo e ento reclamando e julgando um ao outro deve cessar. O trabalho um bom exemplo de pacincia e resistncia em sofrer. No se precise use juramentos para garantir a veracidade de suas declaraes. Umas nicas sim ou no suficiente (5:712). O sofrimento devia produzir orao, alegria, e elogio. Quando um crente est doente, ele devia chamar os ancies da igreja para rezar para ele e o untar com leo. Deus prometeu responder tais oraes. Se a nusea devido a pecado pessoal, e aquele pecado confessado, Deus perdoar. Elijah um exemplo clssico de como a orao de um homem ntegro tem resultados poderosos (5:1318). Se um da mesma categoria Cristo veja que seu irmo tem strayed da verdade e pode o devolver em companheirismo com Cristo e sua igreja, as conseqncias sero: (1) Ele deve salvar o pecador da morte, e (2) Deus perdoar o errar irmo (5:19, 20). Walter W. Wessel JAMES, LETTER OF The images in the book of James cluster around key themes, including the tongue, faith and works, the rich and poor, the unregenerate self and salvation, and the Christian life and hope. The Tongue. The most elaborate and interactive images in James are related to the theme of the tongue. The tongues evil inclination and the powerful consequences of its use are portrayed with personification

and a variety of metaphors. The tongue is a braggart boasting of great exploits (Jas 3:5). It is also a small fire that can create a great forest fire-a fire that receives its evil powers from gehenna, or hell, and can destroy the fabric of life (Jas 3:56). It is a world of unrighteousness or iniquity within the body that stains the entire body, an evil sphere of influence that destroys moral purity (Jas 3:6). It is a restless evil, full of deadly poison, constantly looking for ways to harm others (Jas 3:8 NRSV). The need to control the tongue and the intimate connection of the tongue to the whole body are depicted with vivid images. To control the tongue is to control the body as a bit and bridle in a horses mouth control its body (Jas 1:26; 3:23) or as a pilots use of a rudder steers a large ship (Jas 3:4). To be perfect and religious is to be able to bridle the tongue (Jas 1:26; 3:2). The difficulty, if not the impossibility, of controlling the tongue is illustrated by contrasting the animal world, which has been tamed by humankind, to humankind, which cannot tame its own tongue (Jas 3:78). Images from nature highlight the inconsistency of the tongue in producing both blessing and cursing, a violation of its created purpose of producing blessing only (Jas 3:10). A spring does not issue both fresh and brackish water, and salt water cannot yield fresh (Jas 3:1112). Plants in nature produce their own kind of fruit. Fig trees cannot produce olives or grapevines produce figs (Jas 3:12). Perversely, though, people use the same tongue to utter cursing and blessing. Faith and Works. In his famous discussion of the relationship between faith and works, James employs a number of images for faith without works. Such faith is dead, just as the body without the spirit is dead (Jas 2:17, 26). It is also barren (Jas 2:20). To demonstrate the futility of faith without works, James pictures the poor, whose needs for food and clothes are glibly dismissed with the words Go in peace; keep warm and eat your fill (Jas 2:1417). James also uses an ancient metaphor of the mirror as self-improvement, based on moral examples reflected to us for imitation. To simply hear the word and not do it is to be like those looking in a mirror (moral example) who quickly forget what they saw when they walk away from it (do not imitate). Perseverance in the perfect law of liberty (moral example) is required in order to be hearers who do not forget but act (Jas 1:2325). Rich and Poor. Many images in James cluster around the theme of the rich (see WEALTH) and the poor (see POVERTY). The rich should not boast, because they are short-lived mortals who disappear like a flower in the field that blooms one day and is withered the next by the scorching heat (Jas 1:911). The transitory nature of riches is depicted as something that rots and as moth-eaten clothes (Jas 5:2) and as the rusting of gold and silver (Jas 5:3; see CORRUPTION; DECAY). This rusting wealth laid up by the rich in spite of the needs of the poor tells against the rich in judgment, as portrayed in the image of the rust eating their flesh (Jas 5:3) and of the rich having fattened their hearts for the day of slaughter like livestock (Jas 5:5). Gods awareness of the plight of the poor is depicted by the image of a court in which the church is warned not to favor the verdict of the rich by giving them a seat of honor in the proceedings (Jas 2:111; see LEGAL IMAGES), and by the image of the unjustly withheld wages of the poor who harvested the crops of the rich crying out to the ears of God (Jas 5:4). To remain unstained or morally pure is partially defined as caring for the widows and orphans, two of ancient societys poorest groups (Jas 1:27). Other Images. Many images are used to characterize the human plight, Gods work in salvation, the Christian hope and the Christian life. There is no place for boasting in this life because it is so short and fragile, like a flower scorched by the sun and withered (Jas 1:911) or a mist that appears for a little while and disappears (Jas 4:14). Personal desires are personified as fishermen who tempt, lure and entice fish, and as a mother who gives birth to sin, which in turn gives birth to death (Jas 1:1415). Cravings are at war within a person (Jas 4:1). Salvation is birth by the word of truth so that we can become firstfruits of Gods creatures (Jas 1:18). It is also pictured as ridding ourselves of the rank growth of wickedness as we would strip off dirty garments in order to welcome the implanted word that has the power to save our souls (Jas 1:21). A personified mercy triumphs over judgment (Jas 2:13). The Christian hope is to be justified by faith and become a friend of God like Abraham (Jas 2:23), blessed with every perfect gift from the Father of lights-the God who controls the heavenly worlds and keeps the universe regulated (Jas 1:17). It is also to be rich in faith and heirs of the kingdom (Jas 2:5). While awaiting the Judge who is standing at the doors (Jas 5:9), Christians are to be patient like a farmer awaiting rain (Jas 5:7).

NRSV NRSV. New Revised Standard Version

The Christian life is expressed in such images as becoming a servant or slave of God (Jas 1:1), resisting temptation and receiving a crown of life (Jas 1:12), bridling the tongue (Jas 1:26; 3:25), remaining pure and undefiled before God through care for the poor and oppressed, being unstained by the world (Jas 1:27), possessing a gentleness born of wisdom (Jas 3:13), having a harvest of righteousness sown in peace (Jas 3:18), resisting the devil who flees (Jas 4:7), drawing near to God and God in turn drawing near, cleansing the hands and purifying the heart (Jas 4:8), and being humble before God, described as laughter turned to mourning and joy to dejection (Jas 4:910). The law is paradoxically a law of liberty (Jas 1:25; 2:12). It is also a royal law because is comes from Christ the king (Jas 2:8). Christians are the twelve tribes of the Dispersion (Jas 1:1), wandering in the hostile world outside their true homeland, a place where it is possible to wander from the truth (Jas 5:19 20). The Christian who doubts is like the wave of the sea moved at the mercy of the wind, double-minded, unstable (Jas 1:6, 8; 4:8), having cravings at war within (Jas 4:1) and being a friend with the world, which is enmity with God (Jas 4:4). The epistle of James, though written in prose, is so laden with images and metaphors that it ranks as poetic prose. The moral core around which these images exist is the need for faith to express itself in works. The author is interested in the practical outworkings of faith, and he accordingly gives us a series of pictures of what faith looks like-in the confronting of trial, in regard to speech and obedience to Gods law, in response to gradations in peoples social standing and to people in economic need, in the exercise of patience and prayer for the sick (see DISEASE AND HEALING). See also FAITH; POVERTY; TONGUE; WEALTH. BIBLIOGRAPHY D. Y. Hadidian, Palestinian Pictures in the Epistle of James, ExpT 63 (1952) 22728; L. T. Johnson, The Mirror of Remembrance (James 1:2225), CBQ 50 (1988) 63245; A. B. Spencer, The Function of the Miserific and Beautific Images in the Letter of James, Evangelical Journal 7 (1989) 314.
3

JAMES, CARTA DE As imagens no livro de James crescem em cachos temas ao redor chave, inclusive a lngua, f e trabalhos, os ricos e pobres, o unregenerate auto e salvao, e a vida Crist e espera. A Lngua. O mais elabore e imagens interativas em James so relacionados ao tema da lngua. A inclinao do mal da lngua e as conseqncias poderosas de seu uso so retratadas com personificao e uma variedade de metforas. A lngua um fanfarro gabar-se de grandes faanhas (Jas 3:5). Tambm um fogo pequeno que pode criar um grande fogo de floresta-um fogo que recebe seus poderes do mal de gehenna, ou inferno, e pode destruir o tecido de vida (Jas 3:56). um mundo de unrighteousness ou iniquity dentro do corpo que mancha o corpo inteiro, uma esfera do mal de influncia que destri pureza moral (Jas 3:6). um mau inquieto, cheio de mortal veneno, procurando constantemente por caminhos prejudicar outros (Jas 3:8 NRSV). A necessidade para controlar a lngua e a conexo ntima da lngua para o corpo inteiro so pintados com imagens vvidas. Para controlar a lngua para controlar o corpo como um pouco e rdea em boca do cavalo controla seu corpo (Jas 1:26; 3:23) ou como uso do piloto de um leme guia um navio grande (Jas 3:4). Ser perfeito e religioso para poder rdea a lngua (Jas 1:26; 3:2). A dificuldade, se no a impossibilidade, de controlar a lngua ilustrada contrastando o mundo animal, que foi domesticado por gnero humano, para gnero humano, que no pode domesticar sua prpria lngua (Jas 3:78). As imagens de natureza destacam a inconsistncia da lngua em produtora ambas as bno e amaldioando, uma violao a seu propsito criado de bno produtora somente (Jas 3:10). Uma fonte no emite ambas gua fresca e salgado, e gua salgada no pode render fresco (Jas 3:1112). Plantas em natureza produz seu prprio tipo de fruta. As rvores de figo no podem produzir azeitonas ou videiras

ExpT ExpT. Expository Times CBQ CBQ. Catholic Biblical Quarterly


3

Ryken, L., Wilhoit, J., Longman, T., Duriez, C., Penney, D., & Reid, D. G. (2000, c1998). Dictionary of biblical imagery (electronic ed.) (433). Downers Grove, IL: InterVarsity Press.

produzirem figos (Jas 3:12). Perversely, entretanto, pessoas usam a mesma lngua para articular amaldioando e abenoando. F e Trabalhos. Em sua discusso famosa da relao entre f e trabalhos, James emprega vrias imagens para f sem trabalhos. Tal f est morta, da mesma maneira que o corpo sem o esprito est morto (Jas 2:17, 26). Tambm estril (Jas 2:20). Demonstrar a futilidade de f sem trabalhos, Retratos de James o pobre, cujas necessidades para comida e roupas so glibly despedidos com as palavras Entram paz; Mantenha morno e coma seu encher (Jas 2:1417). James tambm usa uma metfora antiga do espelho como melhoria prpria, baseados em exemplos morais refletidos para ns para imitao. Simplesmente para ouvir a palavra e no faz para ser como aqueles olhando em um espelho (exemplo moral) que depressa esquecer o que eles viram quando eles forem embora disto (no imitem). Perseverana na lei perfeita de liberdade (exemplo moral) exigidos a fim de ser ouvintes que no esquecem mas ajam (Jas 1:2325). Ricas e Pobres. Muitas imagens em James crescem em cachos em torno do tema do rico (vejam Riqueza) e a pobre (vejam Pobreza). A rica no deviam ostentar, porque eles so pequenos-vividos mortals que desaparece gosta de uma flor no campo que floresce um dia e est murcho o prximo pelo calor abrasador (Jas 1:911). A natureza transitria de riqueza pintada como algo que apodrece e como traacomidas roupas (Jas 5:2) e como o enferrujar de ouro e prata (Jas 5:3; Veja Corrupo; Decadncia). Este enferrujando riqueza ficada de cama pela rica apesar das necessidades das pobres diz contra o rico em julgamento, como retratada na imagem da ferrugem comendo sua carne (Jas 5:3) e do rico tendo engordado seus coraes pelo dia de matana como gado (Jas 5:5). Conscincia do deus do empenho do pobre pintada pela imagem de um tribunal em que a igreja advertida para no favorecer o veredicto do rico dando a eles uma cadeira de honra nos atos (Jas 2:111; Veja Imagens Legais), e pela imagem do salrio injustamente retido do pobre que colheu as colheitas das ricas clamando as orelhas de Deus (Jas 5:4). Permanecer puro ou moralmente puro est parcialmente definida como atenciosas para as vivas e rfos, dois de grupos mais pobres da sociedade antiga (Jas 1:27). Outras Imagens. Muitas imagens so usadas para caracterizar o empenho humano, Trabalho do deus em salvao, o cristo espera e a vida Crist. No existe nenhum lugar para jactncia nesta vida porque to pequeno e frgil, como uma flor abrasada pelo sol e murcho (Jas 1:911) ou uma nvoa que aparece para um pouco enquanto e desaparece (Jas 4:14). Desejos pessoais so personificados como fishermen que tenta, isca e atrai peixe, e como uma me que d a luz a pecar, que na sua vez d a luz a morte (Jas 1:1415). Cravings esto em guerra dentro de uma pessoa (Jas 4:1). A salvao nascimento pela palavra de verdade de forma que ns podemos nos tornar firstfruits de criaturas do Deus (Jas 1:18). Tambm pictured como libertando ns mesmos do classificar crescimento de maldade como ns desnudaramos-nos fora de artigos de vesturio sujos em ordem para bem-vinda a palavra implantada que tem o poder para salvar nossas almas (Jas 1:21). Uns triunfos de clemncia personificada acima de julgamento (Jas 2:13). A esperana Crist para ser justificada por f e se torna um amigo de Deus como Abrao (Jas 2:23), santificado com todo presente perfeito do Pai de luzes-o Deus que controla os mundos divinos e mantm o universo regulado (Jas 1:17). Tambm ser rico em f e herdeiros do reino (Jas 2:5). Enquanto aguardando o Juiz que est de p nas portas (Jas 5:9), cristos so para ser pacientes como um fazendeiro aguardando chuva (Jas 5:7). A vida Crist expressa em tais imagens como tornando um empregado ou escravo de Deus (Jas 1:1), resistindo tentao e recebendo uma coroa de vida (Jas 1:12), bridling a lngua (Jas 1:26; 3:25), permanecendo puro e undefiled na frente de Deus por gostarem do pobre e oprimido, sendo puro pelo mundo (Jas 1:27), possuindo uma gentileza nascida de sabedoria (Jas 3:13), tendo uma colheita de retido semeada em paz (Jas 3:18), resistindo o diabo que foge (Jas 4:7), aproximar-se para Deus e Deus na sua vez aproximar-se, limpando as mos e purificando o corao (Jas 4:8), e sendo humilde na frente de Deus, descrito como riso girado para luto e joy para abatimento (Jas 4:910). A lei paradoxalmente uma lei de liberdade (Jas 1:25; 2:12). Tambm uma lei real porque vir de Cristo o rei (Jas 2:8). cristos so as doze tribos da Disperso (Jas 1:1), vagando no mundo hostil fora de sua ptria verdadeira, um lugar onde possvel vagar da verdade (Jas 5:1920). As Crists que dvidas est como a onda do mar moveu merc do vento, dobro-importado, instvel (Jas 1:6, 8; 4:8), tendo cravings em guerra dentro (Jas 4:1) e sendo um amigo com o mundo, que inimizade com Deus (Jas 4:4). A epstola de James, entretanto escrita em prosa, to carregada com imagens e metforas que graus como prosa potica. O caroo moral ao redor que estas imagens existem a necessidade para f expressar propriamente em trabalhos. O autor est interessado no prtico outworkings de f, e ele conseqentemente d a ns uma srie de retratos do que f parece com-no confrontar de tentativa, com respeito a fala e

obedincia para lei do Deus, em resposta para graduaes em posio social das pessoas e para as pessoas em necessidade econmica, no exerccio de pacincia e orao para a doente (veja Doena e Cura). Veja tambm F; Pobreza; Lngua; Riqueza. Bibliografia D. Y. Hadidian, Retratos palestinos na Epstola de James, ExpT 63 (1952) 22728; L. T. Johnson, O Espelho de Recordao (James 1:2225), CBQ 50 (1988) 63245; A. B. Spencer, A Funo das Imagens de Miserific e Beautific na Carta de James, Dirio Evanglico 7 (1989) 314.

JAMES, EPISTLE OF (1.) Author of, was James the Less, the Lords brother, one of the twelve
apostles. He was one of the three pillars of the Church (Gal. 2:9). (2.) It was addressed to the Jews of the dispersion, the twelve tribes scattered abroad. (3.) The place and time of the writing of the epistle were Jerusalem, where James was residing, and, from internal evidence, the period between Pauls two imprisonments at Rome, probably about A.D. 62. (4.) The object of the writer was to enforce the practical duties of the Christian life. The Jewish vices against which he warns them are, formalism, which made the service of God consist in washings and outward ceremonies, whereas he reminds them (1:27) that it consists rather in active love and purity; fanaticism, which, under the cloak of religious zeal, was tearing Jerusalem in pieces (1:20); fatalism, which threw its sins on God (1:13); meanness, which crouched before the rich (2:2); falsehood, which had made words and oaths play-things (3:212); partisanship (3:14); evil speaking (4:11); boasting (4:16); oppression (5:4). The great lesson which he teaches them as Christians is patience, patience in trial (1:2), patience in good works (1:2225), patience under provocation (3:17), patience under oppression (5:7), patience under persecution (5:10); and the ground of their patience is that the coming of the Lord draweth nigh, which is to right all wrong (5:8). Justification by works, which James contends for, is justification before man, the justification of our profession of faith by a consistent life. Paul contends for the doctrine of justification by faith; but that is justification before God, a being regarded and accepted as just by virtue of the righteousness of Christ, which is received by faith.
4

James, Epstola de

(1.) Autor de, era James o Menos, o irmo do Senhor, um dos doze apstolos. Ele era uma das trs colunas da Igreja (Gal. 2:9). (2.) Era tratado para os judeus da disperso, as doze tribos dispersas no estrangeiro. (3.) O lugar e o tempo da escrita da epstola eram Jerusalm, onde James estava residindo, e, de evidncia internas, o perodo entre dois encarceramentos do Paul em Roma, provavelmente por volta de D.C. 62. (4.) O objeto do escritor era para obrigar os encargos aduaneiros prticos da vida Crist. Os vcios judeus contra que ele adverte eles so, formalismo, que fez o servio de Deus consiste em washings e formalidades externas, considerando que ele lembra a eles (1:27) que ele consiste bastante em amor e pureza ativa; Fanatismo, que, debaixo do capote de zelo religioso, estava rasgando Jerusalm em pedaos (1:20); fatalism, que lanou seus pecados em Deus (1:13); meanness, que abaixou antes do rico (2:2); falsidade, que fez palavras e juramentos tocarem-coisas (3:212); partidarismo (3:14); do mal falando (4:11); jactncia (4:16); opresso (5:4). A grande lio que ele ensina eles como cristos pacincia, pacincia em tentativa (1:2), pacincia em bons trabalhos (1:2225), pacincia debaixo de provocao (3:17), pacincia debaixo de opresso (5:7), pacincia debaixo de perseguio (5:10); e o cho de sua pacincia que o resultar do Senhor draweth perto, que est para direito todo errado (5:8). Justificao por trabalhos, que James combate, justificao na frente de homem, a justificao de nossa profisso de f por uma vida consistente. Paul combate para a doutrina de justificao por f; Mas isto justificao na frente de Deus, um ser considerado e aceitou como s em virtude da retido de Cristo, que recebida por f.

JAMES, LETTER OF
A NT epistle, often ascribed to James, Jesus younger brother, leader of the church in Jerusalem (Acts 12:17; 15:1321; 21:18; Gal. 1:19; 2:9, 12). Other men named James in the Gospels have also been proposed as the
4

Easton, M. (1996, c1897). Easton's Bible dictionary. Oak Harbor, WA: Logos Research Systems, Inc.

author. Following Jerome, the Roman Catholic tradition identifies the author as James, the son of Alphaeus (Mark 3:18; Acts 1:13). Also, it has been suggested that the letter is pseudonymous. It is argued that James, the son of a Galilean artisan whose native tongue was Aramaic, could not have written this letter with its elegant Greek and conscious literary style modeled on the LXX. Evidence for James the Lords brother being the author is strong, indicating that the letter is probably not a pseudonymous work relying on his authority. Galilee was not a literary backwater, and the possibility of Jesus disciples being literate and influenced by Hellenistic ideas is now considered more possible. James use of a professional secretary in the production of the letter may also explain the Greek style. James ministered to the circumcised (Gal. 2:9), and the letter seems to be addressed to a Jewish-Christian audience. This is indicated by frequent quotation and allusion to the OT and Jewish tradition, the monotheistic confession that God is one (Jas. 2:19), and the assembly in 2:2 being literally synagogue. Also, there is little evidence of a developed or self-consciously Christian theology. These features suggest an author writing at an early date in a Jewish context such as the Jerusalem church. According to Josephus, James was stoned to death by order of the Jewish high priest Ananus II in 62 C.E. (Ant. 20.197203), while according to Eusebius he was killed just before Vespasian invaded Jerusalem in 67 (HE 2.23.18). On the basis of the conclusion that the author is James the brother of Jesus, the letter must be dated before these events, perhaps in the 50s. The letters content reflects a disintegration in the social fabric of the region addressed, reminiscent of Jerusalem and Judea in the years preceding the war with Rome (66 73). Violence, anger, and killing are a key concern of the letter (1:1921; 3:134:3). The only internal evidence for place of writing is the reference to earlier and latter rains (5:7), which are characteristic of the weather along the eastern coast of the Mediterranean Sea which affected Jerusalem. The audience is poor and oppressed. Members are dragged into court by the rich (2:6) and taken advantage of by wealthy landowners (5:46). The audience is addressed as the twelve tribes in the Dispersion (1:1), a title which designates the church as the regathered and new Israel (cf. Matt. 19:28; Rev. 7:48). In the NT the Dispersion is a metaphor for Christians living outside their heavenly home, i.e., on earth (1 Pet. 1:1). According to Luke, after the death of Stephen in Jerusalem, the Jewish Christians (Hellenists) there were scattered (diaspe r) and traveled as far as Phoenicia, Cyprus, and Antioch (Acts 11:19). James may be addressing these dispersed members of his church who once lived in Jerusalem. Outwardly the Epistle resembles a letter, beginning with the standard salutation and greeting (1:1). However, it lacks personal reminiscences, reference to specific problems, and a closing. It is not a personal letter like those of Paul, but a more general or catholic letter meant to address more than one church. More specifically James is protreptic literature, trying to persuade an audience to live a life of virtue. It has also been classified as parenesis (moral instruction) and diatribe (dialogue and question and answer in pursuit of truth). The central portions of James are composed according to the Greco-Roman pattern of elaboration for the complete argument (2:113, 1426; 3:112). Parenetic materials and diatribal features are incorporated into this pattern. The letter relies heavily upon the OT, the wisdom tradition, and the Jesus tradition. James alludes to the OT (1:10; 3:9; 5:4), quotes it (2:8, 11, 23; 4:6), and uses it for examples (2:21, 25; 5:1011, 1718). Wisdom is a religious stance and worldview characteristic of godly people looking for understanding and insight for living, often relying on parenesis (e.g., Proverbs, Job). Although James does not quote Jesus, he does base many of his teachings on what Jesus said as transmitted in the oral tradition (2:5; cf. Matt. 5:3, 5; 5:12; cf. Matt. 5:3337). Theological Emphases Wisdom James identifies two types of wisdom: heavenly and earthly. Heavenly wisdom is nonviolent, whereas earthly wisdom is violent (3:1318). Heavenly wisdom is a gift of God (1:5; cf. v. 17). Temptation to evil is
NT New Testament LXX Septuagint OT Old Testament Ant. Antiquities of the Jews

not from God, but has its source in the human heart (1:1216), with Satan having some role in temptation as well (4:7). Life is frail and contingent (1:911; 4:1316). The righteous suffer in this world through social and economic disadvantage. They are rejected and despised by the world, and oppressed by the ungodly who have power. The righteous sufferers look to God for vindication and exaltation (5:1011). The rich are not pious (1:911; 2:17; 5:16), but rather the poor (2:5), especially the widows and orphans (1:2627) and landless laborers (5:16). They have Gods ear (5:4), receive Gods grace (4:6), and are heirs of the kingdom as part of eschatological reversal (2:5; 5:1011). James does not espouse poverty for its own sake, but does say that the worlds verdict that the poor are worthless is not Gods verdict. The rich are to help the needy (1:2227), not just spout pious platitudes (2:1417). Law, Faith, and Works James teaches that profession of faith is borne out in works (1:1926; 2:113). Both the perfect law, the law of liberty in 1:25 and the royal law in 2:8 refer to the law to love ones neighbor (Lev. 19:18). Love of others is the basis for action (2:12) and is especially to be demonstrated in meeting the needs of the poor (1:27; 2:1516). Perfection Perfection is not being free from defects. Rather, it comes from the OT understanding of perfection as obedience to the divine commands. Perfection in the faith is not mere assent to creeds (2:19) or profession of sentiment (2:1516). Rather, faith is perfected by works (2:22) and enduring suffering (1:34). Keeping the perfect law is done with deeds of kindness (1:25) and loving ones neighbor (2:810). Bridling the tongue is central to being a perfect person (1:26; 3:2). The opposite of being perfect is being double-minded, sinful, and disordered (1:8; 3:16; 4:8). Eschatology James affirms the imminent coming of Jesus as Judge (5:79). There will be reward to those who endure temptation (1:12), persevere in the perfect law (1:25), and use the tongue properly and show mercy to others (2:1213). There will be judgment for those who do not use the tongue properly and do not do good works (2:1213; 4:1112). Judgment also falls upon teachers who misuse their position (3:1), the rich who neglect the needs of the poor (5:16), and those whose word cannot be trusted (5:12). As part of the wisdom tradition with its concern for practical living, James contains much ethical material including instruction on control of speech (1:26; 3:112; 4:1112; 5:9); the relationship between rich and poor (2:113; 5:16); the poor as the focus of good deeds (1:27; 2:1516); and love, mercy, and humility as characterizing relationships with others (2:8; 3:1318). Bibliography. J. B. Adamson, James, The Man and His Message (Grand Rapids, 1989); A. Chester, James, in The Theology of the Letters of James, Peter, and Jude, ed. A. Chester and R. Martin (Cambridge, 1994); L. T. Johnson, The Letter of James. AB 37A (New York, 1995); R. P. Martin, James. WBC 48 (Waco, 1988); E. Tamez, The Scandalous Message of James (New York, 1990); D. F. Watson, James 2 in Light of Greco-Roman Schemes of Argumentation, NTS 39 (1993): 94121; The Rhetoric of James 3:112 and a Classical Pattern of Argumentation, NovT 35 (1993): 4864. DUANE F. WATSON
5

AB Anchor Bible WBC Word Biblical Commentary NTS New Testament Studies NovT Novum Testamentum DUANE F. Associate Professor of New Testament Studies; Chair, Department of Religion and Philosophy, Malone College, Canton, OH
5

Freedman, D. N., Myers, A. C., & Beck, A. B. (2000). Eerdmans dictionary of the Bible (670). Grand Rapids, Mich.: W.B. Eerdmans "This outstanding source is the place to find definitions, personal names and their derivation, places, and concepts from the Bible. Six hundred leading scholars from a wide spectrum of theological perspectives have

James, Carta de
Uma epstola de NT, freqentemente atribudo para James, Irmo mais jovem do Jesus, lder da igreja em Jerusalm (Atos 12:17; 15:1321; 21:18; Gal. 1:19; 2:9, 12). Outros homens chamados James nos Evangelhos tambm foi proposto como o autor. Jerome seguinte, a tradio catlica romana identifica o autor como James, o filho de Alphaeus (Mark 3:18; Atos 1:13). Tambm, foi sugerido que a carta seja pseudnima. discutido que James, o filho de um arteso de Galilean cuja lngua nativa era arameu, podia no ter escrito esta carta com seu estilo de elegante grego e consciente literria modelada no LXX. Comprove para James o irmo do Senhor sendo o autor forte, indicando que a carta provavelmente nem um trabalho pseudnimo contando com sua autoridade. Galilee no era uma poa literria, e a possibilidade de discpulos do Jesus sendo instruda e influenciada por idias helensticas agora considerada mais possvel. O uso do James de um secretrio profissional na produo da carta pode tambm explicar o estilo grego. James ministered para o circuncidado (Gal. 2:9), e a carta parece ser tratada para um judeu-Cristo pblico. Isto indicado por cotao e insinuao freqente para o OT e tradio judia, a confisso monotesta que Deus um (Jas. 2:19), e a assemblia em 2:2 ser literalmente sinagoga. Tambm, existe pequena evidncia de uma desenvolvida ou auto-teologia conscientemente Crist. Estas caractersticas sugerem que um autor que escreve em uma primeira data em um contexto judeu como a igreja de Jerusalm. De acordo com o Josephus, James estava bbedo para a morte por ordem do padre alto judeu Ananus II em 62 c.e. (Formiga. 20.197203), enquanto de acordo com o Eusebius ele foi morto logo antes de Vespasian invadiu Jerusalm em 67 (ELE 2.23.18). Em base da concluso que o autor James o irmo de Jesus, a carta deve ser obsoleto antes destes eventos, talvez nos anos 50. O contedo da carta reflete uma desintegrao no tecido social da regio tratada, rememorativa Jerusalm e Judea nos anos precedendo a guerra com Roma (6673). Violncia, raiva, e matana so uma preocupao chave da carta (1:1921; 3:13 4:3). A nica evidncia interna para lugar de escrita a referncia para chuvas mais cedo e posteriores (5:7), que so caracterstica do tempo ao longo da costa do leste do Mar Mediterrneo que Jerusalm afetada. O pblico pobre e oprimido. Os membros so arrastados em tribunal pelo rico (2:6) e aproveitados-se de por proprietrios de terras ricos (5:46). O pblico tratado como as doze tribos na Disperso (1:1), um ttulo que designa a igreja como o regathered e novo Israel (cf. Matt. 19:28; Rotao. 7:48). No NT a Disperso uma metfora para cristos viver do lado de fora sua divina casa, isto , na Terra (1 Acaricie. 1:1). de acordo com o Luke, depois da morte de Stephen em Jerusalm, os cristos judeus (Hellenists) existiam disperso (diasper) e viajavam at onde Phoenicia, Chipre, e Antioch (Atos 11:19). James pode estar endereando estes dispersaram membros de sua igreja que uma vez viveu em Jerusalm. Exteriormente a Epstola se assemelha a uma carta, comeando com a saudao e saudao normal (1:1). Porm, ele reminiscncias de faltas pessoais, provejam referncia para problemas especficos, e uma concluso. No uma carta pessoal como aqueles de Paul, mas uma carta mais geral ou catlica querida para tratar mais de uma igreja. Mais especificamente James protreptic literatura, tentando persuadir um pblico para viver uma vida de virtude. Tambm tem sido secreto como parenesis (instruo moral) e diatribe (dilogo e pergunta e resposta em perseguio de verdade). As pores centrais de James so compostas de acordo com o padro de Greco romano de elaborao para o argumento completo (2:113, 1426; 3:112). Materiais de Parenetic e diatribal caractersticas so incorporados neste padro. A carta confia fortemente no OT, a tradio de sabedoria, e a tradio de Jesus. James alude para o OT (1:10; 3:9; 5:4), citaes isto (2:8, 11, 23; 4:6), e use isto por exemplos (2:21, 25; 5:1011, 1718). Sabedoria uma posio religiosa e worldview caracterstica das pessoas religiosas procurando por compreenso e perspiccia para viver, freqentemente contando com parenesis (por exemplo, Provrbios, Trabalho). Embora James no cite Jesus, ele funda muitos de seus ensinos em que Jesus disse como transmitida na tradio oral (2:5; Cf. Matt. 5:3, 5; 5:12; Cf. Matt. 5:3337). Emphases teolgico

come together to provide almost 5,000 articles that reflect current biblical scholarship, archaeological discoveries, trends, and issues. A must for every library."--"Outstanding Reference Sources," American Libraries, May 2002.

Sabedoria James identifica dois tipos de sabedoria: Divino e terrestre. A sabedoria divina no violenta, considerando que sabedoria de terrestre violenta (3:1318). Sabedoria divina um presente de Deus (1:5; Cf. V. 17). Tentao para do mal no de Deus, mas tem sua fonte no corao humano (1:1216), com Satans tendo um pouco de papel em tentao tambm (4:7). Vida delicada e contingente (1:911; 4:1316). A ntegra sofra neste mundo por desvantagem social e econmica. Eles so rejeitados e menosprezados pelo mundo, e oprimido pelo descrente que tem poder. Os sofredores ntegros contam com Deus para vindicao e exaltao (5:1011). A rica no so piedosos (1:911; 2:17; 5:16), mas bastante as pobres (2:5), especialmente as vivas e rfos (1:2627) e landless operrios (5:16). Eles tm orelha do Deus (5:4), recebam graa do Deus (4:6), e so herdeiros do reino como parte de reverso escatolgica (2:5; 5:1011). James no casa pobreza para sua prpria causa, mas diz que o veredicto do mundo que o pobre so desprezvel no veredicto do Deus. O rico so para ajudar o necessitado (1:22 27), no s borbote piedoso platitudes (2:1417). Lei, F, e Trabalhos James ensina aquela profisso de f borne fora em trabalhos (1:1926; 2:113). Ambas a lei perfeita, a lei de liberdade em 1:25 e a lei real em 2:8 se referem a lei para amar se ser vizinho (Lev. 19:18). Amor de outros a base para ao (2:12) e ser especialmente demonstrado em encontrar as necessidades das pobres (1:27; 2:1516). Perfeio A perfeio no est estando livre de defeitos. Bastante, vem do OT que entende de perfeio como obedincia para os comandos divinos. A perfeio na f no consentimento mero para credos (2:19) ou profisso de sentimento (2:1516). Bastante, f aperfeioada por trabalhos (2:22) e duradouro sofrendo (1:34). Mantendo a lei perfeita feita com aes de generosidade (1:25) e amorosa vizinho (2:810). Bridling a lngua central para estar uma pessoa perfeita (1:26; 3:2). O oposto de ser perfeito est sendo dobro-importado, pecador, e disordered (1:8; 3:16; 4:8). Eschatology James afirma o iminente resultando de Jesus como Juiz (5:79). existir recompensa para aqueles que suportam tentao (1:12), perseverem na lei perfeita (1:25), e usem a lngua corretamente e mostra a clemncia para outros (2:1213). existiro julgamento para aqueles que no usam a lngua corretamente e no fazem bons trabalhos (2:1213; 4:1112). Julgamento tambm cai em professores que abusam sua posio (3:1), a rica que negligenciem as necessidades das pobres (5:16), e aquela cuja palavra no pode ser confiada (5:12). Como parte da tradio de sabedoria com sua preocupao para prtica viva, James contm material muito tico inclusive instruo em controle de fala (1:26; 3:112; 4:1112; 5:9); a relao entre rica e pobre (2:113; 5:16); o pobre como o enfoque de boas aes (1:27; 2:1516); e o amor, clemncia, e humildade que caracterizando relaes com outros (2:8; 3:1318). Bibliografia. J. B. Adamson, James, O Homem e Sua Mensagem (Correntezas Principais, 1989); A. Chester, James, na Teologia das Cartas de James, Peter, e Jude, ed. A. Chester e R. Martin (Cambridge, 1994); L. T. Johnson, A Carta de James. AB 37A (Nova Iorque, 1995); PG. de R. Martin, James. WBC 48 (Waco, 1988); E. Tamez, A Mensagem Escandalosa de James (Nova Iorque, 1990); D. F. Watson, James 2 levando em conta Esquemas de Greco romanos de Argumentao, NTS 39 (1993): 94121; A Retrica de James 3:112 e um Padro Clssico de Argumentao, NovT 35 (1993): 4864. Duane F. Watson

JAMES, EPISTLE OF

CHARACTERISTICS OF THE EPISTLE.


1. JEWISH:
The Epistle of James is the most Jewish writing in the New Testament. The Gospel according to Matthew was written for the Jews. The Epistle to the Hebrews is addressed explicitly to them. The Apocalypse is full of the spirit of the Old Testament. The Epistle of Jude is Jewish too. Yet all of these books have more of the distinctively Christian element in them than we can find in the Epistle of James. If we eliminate two or three passages containing references to Christ, the whole epistle might find its place iust as properly in the Canon of the Old Testament as in that of the New Testament, as far as its substance of doctrine and contents is concerned. That could not be said Of any other book in the New Testament. There is no mention of the incarnation or of the resurrection., the two fundamental facts of the Christian faith. The word gospel does not occur in the epistle There is no suggestion that the Messiah has appeared and no presentation of the possibility of redemption through Him. The teaching throughout is that of a lofty morality which aims at the fulfillment of the requirements of the Mosaic law. It is not strange therefore that Spitta and others have thought that we have in the Epistle of James a treatise written by an unconverted Jew which has been adapted to Christian use by the interpolation of the two phrases containing the name of Christ in 1:1 and 2:1. Spitta thinks that this can be the only explanation of the fact that we have here an epistle practically ignoring the life and work of Jesus and every distinctively Christian doctrine, and without a trace of any of the great controversies in the early Christian church or any of the specific features of its propaganda. This judgment is a superficial one, and rests upon superficial indications rather than any appreciation of the underlying spirit and principles of the book. The spirit of Christ is here, and there is no need to label it. The principles of this epistle are the principles of the Sermon on the Mount. There are more parallels to that Sermon in this epistle than can be found anywhere else in the New Testament in the same space. The epistle represents the idealization of Jewish legalism under the transforming influence of the Christian motive and life. It is not a theological discussion. It is an ethical appeal. It has to do with the outward life for the most part, and the life it pictures is that of a Jew informed with the spirit of Christ. The spirit is invisible in the epistle as in the individual man. It is the body which appears and the outward life with which that body has to do. The body of the epistle is Jewish, and the outward life to which it exhorts is that of a profoundly pious Jew. The Jews familiar with the Old Testament would read this epistle and find its language and tone that to which they were accustomed in their sacred books. James is evidently written by a Jew for Jews. It is Jewish in character throughout. This is apparent in the following particulars: 1. The epistle is addressed to the 12 tribes which are of the Dispersion (11). The Jews were scattered abroad through the ancient world. From Babylon to Rome, wherever any community of them might be gathered for commercial or social purposes, these exhortations could be carried and read. Probably the epistle was circulated most widely in Syria and Asia Minor, but it may have gone out to the ends of the earth. Here and there in the ghettos of the Roman Empire, groups of the Jewish exiles would gather and listen while one of their number read this letter from home. All of its terms and its allusions would recall familiar home scenes. 2. Their meeting-place is called your synagogue (2:2). 3. Abraham is mentioned as our father (2:21). 4. God is given the Old Testament name, the Lord of Sabaoth (5:4). 5. The law is not to be spoken against nor judged, but reverently and loyally obeyed. It is a royal law to which every loyal Jew will be subject. It is a law of liberty, to be freely obeyed (2:8-12; 4:11). 6. The sins of the flesh are not inveighed against in the epistle, but those sins to which the Jews were more conspicuously liable, such as the love of money and the distinction which money may bring (2:2-4), worldliness and pride (4:4-6), impatience and murmuring (5:7-11), and other sins of the temper and tongue (3:1-12; 4:11, 12). 7. The illustrations of faithfulness and patience and prayer are found in Old Testament characters, in Abraham (2:21), Rahab (2:25), Job (Jas 5:11),and Elijah (Jas 5:17, 18). The whole atmosphere of the epistle is Jewish. 2. AUTHORITATIVE: The writer of this epistle speaks as one having authority. He is not on his defense, as Paul so often is. There is no trace of apology in his presentation of the truth. His official position must have been recognized and unquestioned. He is as sure of his standing with his readers as he is of the absoluteness of his message. No Old Testament lawgiver or prophet was more certain that he spoke the word of the Lord. He has the vehemence of Elijah and the assured meekness of Moses. He has been called the Amos of the New

Testament, and there are paragraphs which recall the very expressions used by Amos and which are full of the same fiery eloquence and prophetic fervor. Both fill their writings with metaphors drawn from the sky and the sea, from natural objects and domestic experiences. Both seem to be countrybred and to be in sympathy with simplicity and poverty. Both inveigh against the luxury and the cruelty of the idle rich, and both abhor the ceremonial and the ritual which are substituted for individual righteousness. Malachi was not the last of the prophets. John the Baptist was not the last prophet of the Old Dispensation. The writer of this epistle stands at the end of that prophetic line, and he is greater than John the Baptist or any who have preceded him because he stands within the borders of the kingdom of Christ. He speaks with authority, as a messenger of God. He belongs to the goodly fellowship of the prophets and of the apostles. He has the authority of both. There are 54 imperatives in the 108 verses of this epistle. 3. PRACTICAL: The epistle is interested in conduct more than in creed. It has very little formulated theology, less than any other epistle in the New Testament; but it insists upon practical morality throughout. It begins and it closes with an exhortation to patience and prayer. It preaches a gospel of good works, based upon love to God and love to man. It demands liberty, equality, fraternity for all. It enjoins humility and justice and peace. It prescribes singleness of purpose and stedfastness of soul. It requires obedience to the law, control of the passions, and control of the tongue. Its ideal is to be found in a good life, characterized by the meekness of wisdom. The writer of the epistle has caught the spirit of the ancient prophets, but the lessons that he teaches are taken, for the most part, from the Wisdom literature of the Old Testament and the Apocrypha. His direct quotations are from the Pentateuch and the Book of Proverbs; but it has been estimated that there are 10 allusions to the Book of Proverbs, 6 to the Book of Job, 5 to the Book of Wisdom, and 15 to the Book of Ecclesiasticus. This Wisdom literature furnishes the staple of his meditation and the substance of his teaching. He has little or nothing to say about the great doctrines of the Christian church. He has much to say about the wisdom that cometh down from above and is pure, peaceable, gentle, easy to be entreated, full of mercy and good fruits, without partiality, without hypocrisy (Jas 3:15-17). The whole epistle shows that the author had stored his mind with the rich treasure of the ancient wisdom, and his material, while offered as his own, is both old and new. The form is largely that of the Wisdom literature of the Jews. It has more parallels with Jesus the son of Sirach than with any writer of the sacred books. The substance of its exhortation, however, is to be found in the Synoptics and more particularly in the Sermon on the Mount. Its wisdom is the wisdom of Jesus the son of Joseph, who is the Christ. These are the three outstanding characteristics of this epistle In form and on the surface it is the most Jewish and least Christian of the writings in the New Testament. Its Christianity is latent and not apparent. Yet it is the most authoritative in its tone of any of the epistles in the New Testament, unless it be those of the apostle John. John must have occupied a position of undisputed primacy in the Christian church after the death of all the other apostles, when he wrote his epistles. It is noteworthy that the writer of this epistle assumes a tone of like authority with that of John. John was the apostle of love, Paul of faith, and Peter of hope. This writer is the apostle of good works, the apostle of the wisdom which manifests itself in peace and purity, mercy and morality, and in obedience to the royal law, the law of liberty. In its union of Jewish form, authoritative tone, and insistence upon practical morality, the epistle is unique among the New Testament books.

AUTHOR OF THE EPISTLE.


The address of the epistle states that the writer is James, a servant of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ (Jas 1:1). The tradition of the church has identified this James with the brother of our Lord. Clement of Alexandria says that Peter and James and John, who were the three apostles most honored of the Lord, chose James, the Lords brother, to be the bishop of Jerusalem after the Lords ascension (Euscb., HE, II, 1). This tradition agrees well with all the notices of James in the New Testament books. After the death of James the brother of John, Peter was thrown into prison, and having been miraculously released, he asked that the news be sent to James and to the brethren (Acts 12:17). This James is evidently in authority in the church at this time. In the apostolical conference held at Jerusalem, after Peter and Paul and Barnabas had spoken, this same James sums up the whole discussion, and his decision is adopted by the assembly and formulated in a letter which has some very striking parallels in its phraseology to this epistle (Acts 15:6-29). When Paul came to Jerusalem for the last time he reported his work to James and all the elders present with him (Acts 21:18). In the Epistle to the Galatians Paul says that at the time of one of his visits to Jerusalem he saw none of the apostles save Peter and James the Lords brother (Gal 1:18, 19). At another visit he received the right hand of fellowship from James and Cephas and John (Gal 2:9). At a later time certain who came from James

to Antioch led Peter into backsliding from his former position of tolerance of the Gentiles as equals in the Christian church (Gal 2:12). All of these references would lead us to suppose that James stood in a position of supreme authority in the mother-church at Jerusalem, the oldest church of Christendom. He presides in the assemblies of the church. He speaks the final and authoritative word. Peter and Paul defer to him. Paul mentions his name before that of Peter and John. When he was exalted to this leadership we do not know, but all indications seem to point to the fact that at a very early period James was the recognized executive authority in the church at Jerusalem, which was the church of Pentecost and the church of the apostles. All Jews looked to Jerusalem as the chief seat of their worship and the central authority of their religion. All Christian Jews would look to Jerusalem as the primitive source of their organization and faith, and the head of the church at Jerusalem would be recognized by them as their chief authority. The authoritative tone of this epistle comports well with this position of primacy ascribed to James. All tradition agrees in describing James as a Hebrew of the Hebrews, a man of the most rigid and ascetic morality, faithful in his observance of all the ritual regulations of the Jewish faith. Hegesippus tells us that he was holy from his mothers womb. He drank no wine nor strong drink. He ate no flesh. He alone was permitted to enter with the priests into the holy place, and he was found there frequently upon his knees begging forgiveness for the people, and his knees became hard like those of a camel in consequence of his constantly bending them in his worship of God and asking forgiveness for the people (Euseb., HE, II, 23). He was called James the Just. All had confidence in his sincerity and integrity, and many were persuaded by him to believe on the Christ. This Jew, faithful in the observance of all that the Jews held sacred, and more devoted to the temple-worship than the most pious among them, was a good choice for the head of the Christian church. The blood of David flowed in his veins. He had all the Jews pride in the special privileges of the chosen race. The Jews respected him and the Christians revered him. No man among them commanded the esteem of the entire population as much as he. Josephus (Ant., XX, ix) tells us that Ananus the high priest had James stoned to death, and that the most equitable of the citizens immediately rose in revolt against such a lawless procedure, and Ananus was deposed after only three months rule. This testimony of Josephus simply substantiates all that we know from other sources concerning the high standing of James in the whole community. Hegesippus says that James was first thrown from a pinnacle of the temple, and then they stoned him because he was not killed by the fall, and he was finally beaten over the head with a fullers club; and then he adds significantly, Immediately Vespasian besieged them (Euscb., HE, II, 23). There would seem to have been quite a widespread conviction among both the Christians and the Jews that the afflictions which fell upon the holy city and the chosen people in the following years were in part a visitation because of the great crime of the murder of this just man. We can understand how a man with this reputation and character would write an epistle so Jewish in form and substance and so insistent in its demands for a practical morality as is the Epistle of James. All the characteristics of the epistle seem explicable on the supposition of authorship by James the brother of the Lord. We accept the church tradition without hesitation.

THE STYLE OF THE EPISTLE.


1. PLAINNESS:
The sentence construction is simple and straightforward. It reminds us of the English of Bunyan and DeFoe. There is usually no good reason for misunderstanding anything James says. He puts his truth plainly, and the words he uses have no hidden or mystical meanings. His thought is transparent as his life. 2. GOOD GREEK: It is somewhat surprising to find that the Greek of the Epistle of James is better than that of the other New Testament writers, with the single exception of the author of the Epistle to the Hebrews. Of course this may be due to the fact that James had the services of an amanuensis who was a Greek scholar, or that his own manuscript was revised by such a man; but, although unexpected, it is not impossible that James himself may have been capable of writing such Greek as this. It is not the good Greek of the classics, and it is not the poor and provincial Greek of Paul. There is more care for literary form than in the uncouth periods Of the Gentile apostle, and the vocabulary would seem to indicate an acquaintance with the literary as well as the commercial and the conversational Greek Galilee was studded with Greek towns, and it was certainly in the power of any Galilean to gain a knowledge of Greek .... We may reasonably suppose that our author would not have scrupled to avail himself of the

opportunities within his reach, so as to master the Greek language, and learn something of Greek philosophy. This would be natural, even if we think of James as impelled only by a desire to gain wisdom and knowledge for himself; but if we think of him also as the principal teacher of the Jewish believers, many of whom were Hellenists, instructed in the wisdom of Alexandria, then the natural bent would take the shape of duty: he would be a student of Greek in order that he might be a more effective instructor to his own people (Mayor, The Epistle of James, ccxxxvi). The Greek of the epistle is the studied Greek of one who was not a native to it, but who had familiarized himself with its literature. James could have done so and the epistle may be proof that he did. 3. VIVIDNESS: James is never content to talk in abstractions. He always sets a picture before his own eyes and those of his readers. He has the dramatic instinct. He has the secret of sustained interest. He is not discussing things in general but things in particular. He is an artist and believes in concrete realities. At the same time he has a touch of poetry in him, and a fine sense of the analogies running through all Nature and all life. The doubting man is like the sea spume (1:6). The rich man fades away in his goings, even as the beauty of the flower falls and perishes (1:11). The synagogue scene with its distinction between the rich and the poor is set before us with the clear-cut impressiveness of a cameo (2:1-4). The Pecksniffian philanthropist, who seems to think that men can be fed not by bread alone but by the words that proceed magnificently from his mouth, is pilloried here for all time (2:15, 16). The untamable tongue that is set on fire of hell is put in the full blaze of its world of iniquity, and the damage it does is shown to be like that of a forest fire (3:1-12). The picture of the wisdom that comes from above with its sevenfold excellences of purity, peaceableness, gentleness, mercy, fruitfulness, impartiality, sincerity, is worthy to hang in the gallery of the worlds masterpieces (3:17). The vaunting tradesmen, whose lives are like vanishing vapor, stand there before the eyes of all in Jerusalem (4:13-16). The rich, whose luxuries he describes even while he denounces their cruelties and prophesies their coming day of slaughter, are the rich who walk the streets of his own city (5:16). His short sentences go like shots straight to the mark. We feel the impact and the impress of them. There is an energy behind them and a reality in them that makes them live in our thought. His abrupt questions are like the quick interrogations of a cross-examining lawyer (2:4-7, 14, 16; 3:11, 12; 4:1, 4, 5, 12, 14). His proverbs have the intensity of the accumulated and compressed wisdom of the ages. They are irreducible minimums. They are memorable sayings, treasured in the speech of the world ever since his day. 4. DUADIPLOSIS: Sometimes James adds sentence to sentence with the repetition of some leading word or phrase (1:1-6, 1924; 3:2-8). It is the painful style of one who is not altogether at home with the language which he has chosen as the vehicle of his thought. It is the method by which a discussion could be continued indefinitely. Nothing but the vividness of the imagery and the intensity of the thought saves James from fatal monotony in the use of this device. 5. FIGURES OF SPEECH: James has a keen eye for illustrations. He is not blind to the beauties and wonders of Nature. He sees what is happening on every hand, and he is quick to catch any homiletical suggestion it may hold. Does he stand by the seashore? The surge that is driven by the wind and tossed reminds him of the man who is unstable in all his ways, because he has no anchorage of faith, and his convictions are like driftwood on a sea of doubt (1:6). Then he notices that the great ships are turned about by a small rudder, and he thinks how the tongue is a small member, but it accomplishes great things (3:4, 5). Does he walk under the sunlight and rejoice in it as the source of so many good and perfect gifts? He sees in it an image of the goodness of God that is never eclipsed and never exhausted, unvarying for evermore (1:17). He uses the natural phenomena of the land in which he lives to make his meaning plain at every turn: the flower of the field that passes away (1:10, 11), the forest fire that sweeps the mountain side and like a living torch lights up the whole land (3:5), the sweet and salt springs (3:11), the fig trees and the olive trees and the vines (3:12), the seed-sowing and the fruitbearing (3:18), the morning mist immediately lost to view (4:14), the early and the latter rain for which the husbandman waiteth patiently (5:7). There is more of the appreciation of Nature in this one short epistle of Jas than in all the epistles of Paul put together. Human life was more interesting to Paul than natural scenery. However, James is interested in human life just as profoundly as Paul. He is constantly endowing inanimate things with living qualities. He represents sin as a harlot, conceiving and bringing forth death (1:15). The word of truth has a like power and conceives and brings forth those who live to Gods praise (1:18). Pleasures are like joyful hosts of enemies

in a tournament, who deck themselves bravely and ride forth with singing and laughter, but whose mission is to wage war and to kill (4:1, 2). The laborers may be dumb in the presence of the rich because of their dependence and their fear, but their wages, fraudulently withheld, have a tongue, and cry out to high heaven for vengeance (5:4). What is friendship with the world? It is adultery, James says (4:4). The rust of unjust riches testifies against those who have accumulated them, and then turns upon them and eats their flesh like fire (5:3). James observed the man who glanced at himself in the mirror in the morning, and saw that his face was not clean, and who went away and thought no more about it for that whole day, and he found in him an illustration of the one who heard the word and did not do it (1:23, 14). The epistle is full of these rhetorical figures, and they prove that James was something of a poet at heart, even as Jesus was. He writes in prose, but there is a marked rhythm in all of his speech. He has an ear for harmony as he has an eye for beauty everywhere. 6. UNLIKENESS TO PAUL: The Pauline epistles begin with salutations and close with benedictions. They are filled with autobiographical touches and personal messages. None of these things appear here. The epistle begins and ends with all abruptness. It has an address, but no thanksgiving. There are no personal messages and no indications of any intimate personal relationship between the author and his readers. They are his beloved brethren. He knows their needs and their sins, but he may never have seen their faces or visited their homes. The epistle is more like a prophets appeal to a nation than a personal letter. 7. LIKENESS TO JESUS: Both the substance of the teaching and the method of its presentation remind us of the discourses of Jesus. James says less about the Master than any other writer in the New Testament, but his speech is more like that of the Master than the speech of any one of them. There are at least ten parallels to the Sermon on the Mount in this short epistle, and for almost everything that James has to say we can recall some statement of Jesus which might have suggested it. When the parallels fail at any point, we are inclined to suspect that James may be repeating some unrecorded utterance of our Lord. He seems absolutely faithful to his memory of his brothers teaching. He is the servant of Jesus in all his exhortation and persuasion. Did the Master shock His disciples faith by the loftiness of the Christian ideal He set before them in His great sermon, Ye therefore shall be perfect, as your heavenly Father is perfect (Mt 5:48)? James sets the same high standard in the very forefront of his ep.: Let patience have its perfect work, that ye may be perfect and entire, lacking in nothing (1:4). Did the Master say, Ask, and it shall be given you (Mt 7:7)? James says, If any of you lacketh wisdom, let him ask of God ....; and it shall be given him (1:5). Did the Master add a condition to His sweeping promise to prayer and say, Whosoever .... shall not doubt in his heart, but shall believe that what he faith cometh to pass; he shall have it (Mk 11:23)? James hastens to add the same condition, Let him ask in faith, nothing doubting: for he that doubteth is like the surge of the sea driven by the wind and tossed (1:6). Did the Master close the great sermon with His parable of the Wise Man and the Foolish Man, saying, Every one that heareth these words of mine, and doeth them, shall be likened unto a wise man. And every one that heareth these words of mine, and doeth them not, shall be likened unto a foolish man (Mt 7:24, 26)? James is much concerned about wisdom, and therefore he exhorts his readers, Be ye doers of the word, and not hearers only, deluding your own selves (1:22). Had the Master declared, If ye know these things, blessed are ye if ye do them (Jn 13:17)? James echoes the thought when he says, A doer that worketh, this man shall be blessed in his doing (1:25). Did the Master say to the disciples, Blessed are ye poor: for yours is the kingdom of God (Lk 6:20)? James has the same sympathy with the poor, and he says, Hearken, my beloved brethren; did not God choose them that are poor as to the world to be rich in faith, and heirs of the kingdom which he promised to them that love him? (2:5). Did the Master inveigh against the rich, and say, Woe unto you that are rich! for ye have received your consolation. Woe unto you, ye that are full now! for ye shall hunger. Woe unto you, ye that laugh now! for ye shall mourn and weep (Lk 6:24, 25)? James bursts forth into the same invective and prophesies the same sad reversal of fortune, Come now, ye rich, weep and howl for your miseries that are coming upon you (5:1). Cleanse your hands, ye sinners; and purify your hearts, ye doubleminded. Be afflicted, and mourn, and weep: let your laughter be turned to mourning, and your joy to heaviness (4:8, 9). Had Jesus said, Judge not, that ye be not judged (Mt 7:1)? James repeats the exhortation, Speak not one against another, brethren. He that .... judgeth his brother .... judgeth the law: .... but who art thou that judgest thy neighbor? (4:11, 12). Had Jesus said, Whosoever shall humble himself shall be exalted (Mt 23:12)? We find the very words in James, Humble yourselves in the sight of the Lord, and he shall exalt you (4:10). Had Jesus said,

I say unto you, Swear not at all; neither by the heaven, for it is the throne of God; nor by the earth, for it is the footstool of his feet. .... But let your speech be, Yea, yea; Nay, nay: and whatsoever is more than these is of the evil one (Mt 5:34-37)? Here in James we come upon the exact parallel: But above all things, my brethren, swear not, neither by the heaven, nor by the earth, nor by any other oath; but let your yea be yea, and your nay, nay; that ye fall not under judgment (5:12). We remember how the Master began the Sermon on the Mount with the declaration that even those who mourned and were persecuted and reviled and reproached were blessed, in spite of all their suffering and trial. Then we notice that James begins his epistle with the same paradoxical putting of the Christian faith, Count it all joy, my brethren, when ye fall into manifold trials (1:12, the American Revised Version margin). We remember how Jesus proceeded in His sermon to set forth the spiritual significance and the assured permanence of the law; and we notice that James treats the law with the same respect and puts upon it the same high value. He calls it the perfect law (1:25), the royal law (2:8), the law of liberty (2:12). We remember what Jesus said about forgiving others in order that we ourselves may be forgiven; and we know where James got his authority for saying, Judgment is without mercy to him that hath showed no mercy (2:13). We remember all that the Master said about good trees and corrupt trees being known by their fruits, Do men gather grapes of thorns, or figs of thistles? (Mt 7:16-20). Then in the Epistle of James we find a like question, Can a fig tree, my brethren, yield olives, or a vine figs? (3:12). We remember that the Master said, Know ye that he is nigh, even at the doors (Mt 24:33). We are not surprised to find the statement here in James, Behold, the judge standeth before the doors (5:9). These reminiscences of the sayings of the Master meet us on every page. It may be that there are many more of them than we are able to identify. Their number is sufficiently large, however, to show us that James is steeped in the truths taught by Jesus, and not only their substance but their phraseology constantly reminds us of Him.

DATE OF THE EPISTLE.


There are those who think that the Epistle of James is the oldest epistle in the New Testament. Among those who favor an early date are Mayor, Plumptre, Alford, Stanley, Renan, Weiss, Zahn, Beyschlag, Neander, Schneckenburger, Thiersch, and Dods. The reasons assigned for this conclusion are: 1. the general Judaic tone of the ep., which seems to antedate admission of the Gentiles in any alarming numbers into the church; but since the epistle is addressed only to Jews, why should the Gentiles be mentioned in it, whatever its date? and 2. the fact that Paul and Peter are supposed to have quoted from James in their writing; but this matter of quotation is always an uncertain one, and it has been ably argued that the quotation has been the other way about. Others think that the epistle was written toward the close of Jamess life. Among these are Kern, Wiesinger, Schmidt, Bruckner, Wordsworth, and Farrar. These argue 1. that the epistle gives evidence of a considerable lapse of time in the history of the church, sufficient to allow of a declension from the spiritual fervor of Pentecost and the establishment of distinctions among the brethren; but any of the sins mentioned in the epistle in all probability could have been found in the church in any decade of its history. 2. James has a position of established authority, and those to whom he writes are not recent converts but members in long standing; but the position of James may have been established from a very early date, and in an encyclical of this sort we could not expect any indication of shorter or longer membership in the church. Doubtless some of those addressed were recent converts, while others may have been members for many years. 3. There are references to persecutions and trials which fit the later rather than the earlier date; but all that is said on this subject might be suitable in any period of the presidency of James at Jerusalem. 4. There are indications of a long and disappointing delay in the Second Coming of the Lord in the repeated exhortation to patience in waiting for it; but on the other hand James says, The coming of the Lord is at hand, and The judge standeth before the doors (5:7-9). The same passage is cited in proof of a belief that the immediate appearance of the Lord was expected, as in the earliest period of the church, and in proof that there had been a disappointment of this earlier belief and that it had been succeeded by a feeling that there was need of patience in waiting for the coming so long delayed.

It seems clear to us that there are no decisive proofs in favor of any definite date for the epistle. It must have been written before the martyrdom of James in the year 63 AD, and at some time during his presidency over the church at Jerusalem; but there is nothing to warrant us in coming to any more definite conclusion than that Davidson, Hilgenfeld, Baur, Zeller, Hausrath, von Soden, Julicher, Harnack, Bacon and others date the epistle variously in the post-Pauline period, 69-70 to 140-50 AD. The arguments for any of these dates fall far short of proof, rest largely if not wholly upon conjectures and presuppositions, and of course are inconsistent with any belief in the authorship by James.

HISTORY OF THE EPISTLE.


Eusebius classed Jas among those whose authenticity was disputed by some. James is said to be the author of the first of the so-called Catholic Epistles. But it is to be observed that it is disputed; at least, not many of the ancients have mentioned it, as is the case likewise with the epistle that bears the name of Jude, which is also one of the seven so-called Catholic Epistles. Nevertheless, we know that these also, with the rest, have been read publicly in most churches (Historia Ecclesiastica, II, 23). Eusebius himself, however, quotes Jas 4:11 as Scripture and Jas 5:13 as spoken by the holy apostle. Personally he does not seem disposed to question the genuineness of the epistle. There are parallels in phraseology which make it possible that the epistle is quoted in Clement of Rome in the 1st century, and in Ignatius, Polycarp, Justin Martyr, the Epistle to Diognetus, Irenaeus, and Hermas in the 2nd century. It is omitted in the canonical list of the Muratorian Fragment and was not included in the Old Latin version. Origen seems to be the first writer to quote the epistle explicitly as Scripture and to assert that it was written by James the brother of the Lord. It appears in the Peshitta version and seems to have been generally recognized in the East. Cyril of Jerusalem, Gregory of Nazianzus, Ephraem of Edessa, Didymus of Alexandria, received it as canonical. The 3rd Council of Carthage in 397 AD finally settled its status for the Western church, and from that date in both the East and the West its canonicity was unquestioned until the time of the Reformation. Erasmus and Cajetan revived the old doubts concerning it. Luther thought it contradicted Paul and therefore banished it to the appendix of his Bible. James, he says, has aimed to refute those who relied on faith without works, and is too weak for his task in mind, understanding, and words, mutilates the Scriptures, and thus directly contradicts Paul and all Scriptures, seeking to accomplish by enforcing the law what the apostles successfully effect by love. Therefore, I will not place his Epistle in my Bible among the proper leadingbooks (Werke, XIV, 148). He declared that it was a downright strawy epistle, as compared with such as those to the Romans and to the Galatians, and it had no real evangelical character. This judgment of Luther is a very hasty and regrettable one. The modern church has refused to accept it, and it is generally conceded now that Paul and James are in perfect agreement with each other, though their presentation of the same truth from opposite points of view brings them into apparent contradiction. Paul says, By grace have ye been saved through faith .... not of works, that no man should glory (Eph 2:8, 9). We reckon therefore that a man is justified by faith apart from the works of the law (Rom 3:28). James says, Faith, if it have not works, is dead in itself (2:17). Ye see that by works a man is justified, and not only by faith (2:24). With these passages before him Luther said, Many have toiled to reconcile Paul with James .... but to no purpose, for they are contrary, `Faith justifies; `Faith does not justify; I will pledge my life that no one can reconcile those propositions; and if he succeeds he may call me a fool (Colloquia, II, 202). It would be difficult to prove Luther a fool if Paul and James were using these words, faith, works, and justification, in the same sense, or even if each were writing with full consciousness of what the other had written. They both use Abraham for an example, James of justification by works, and Paul of justification by faith. How can that be possible? The faith meant by James is the faith of a dead orthodoxy, an intellectual assent to the dogmas of the church which does not result in any practical righteousness in life, such a faith as the demons have when they believe in the being of God and simply tremble before Him. The faith meant by Paul is intellectual and moral and spiritual, affects the whole man, and leads him into conscious and vital union and communion with God. It is not the faith of demons; it is the faith that redeems. Again, the works meant by Paul are the works of a dead legalism, the works done under a sense of compulsion or from a feeling of duty, the works done in obedience to a law which is a taskmaster, the works of a slave and not of a son. These dead works, he declares, can never give life. The works meant by James are the works of a believer, the fruit of the faith and love born in every believers heart and manifest in every believers life. The possession of faith will insure this evidence in his daily conduct and conversation; and without this evidence the mere profession of faith will not save him. The justification meant by Paul is the initial justification of the Christian life. No doing of meritorious deeds will make a man worthy of salvation. He

comes into the kingdom, not on the basis of merit but on the basis of grace. The sinner is converted not by doing anything, but by believing on the Lord Jesus Christ. He approaches the threshold of the kingdom and he finds that he has no coin that is current there. He cannot buy his way in by good works; he must accept salvation by faith, as the gift of Gods free grace. The justification meant by James is the justification of any after-moment in the Christian life, and the final justification before the judgment throne. Good works are inevitable in the Christian life. There can be no assurance of salvation without them. Paul is looking at the root; James is looking at the fruit. Paul is talking about the beginning of the Christian life; James is talking about its continuance and consummation. With Paul, the works he renounces precede faith and are dead works. With James, the faith he denounces is apart from works and is a dead faith. Paul believes in the works of godliness just as much as James. He prays that God may establish the Thessalonians in every good work (2 Thess 2:17). He writes to the Corinthians that God is able to make all grace abound unto them; that they, having always all sufficiency in everything, may abound unto every good work (2 Cor 9:8). He declares to the Ephesians that we are his workmanship, created in Christ Jesus for good works, which God afore prepared that we should walk in them (Eph 2:10). He makes a formal statement of his faith in Romans: God will render to every man according to his works: to them that by patience in well-doing seek for glory and honor and incorruption, eternal life: but unto them that are factious, and obey not the truth, but obey unrighteousness, shall be wrath and indignation, tribulation and anguish, upon every soul of man that worketh evil, of the Jew first, and also of the Greek; but glory and honor and peace to every man that worketh good, to the Jew first, and also to the Greek (Rom 2:6-10). This is the final justification discussed by James, and it is just as clearly a judgment by works with Paul as with him. On the other hand James believes in saving faith as well as Paul. He begins with the statement that the proving of our faith works patience and brings perfection (1:3, 1). He declares that the prayer of faith will bring the coveted wisdom (1:6). He describes the Christian profession as a holding the faith of our Lord Jesus Christ, the Lord of glory (2:1). He says that the poor as to the world are rich in faith, and therefore heirs to the kingdom (2:5). He quotes the passage from Genesis, Abraham believed God, and it was reckoned unto him for righteousness (2:23), and he explicitly asserts that Abrahams faith wrought with his works, and by works was faith made perfect (2:22). The faith mentioned in all these passages is the faith of the professing Christian; it is not the faith which the sinner exercises in accepting salvation. James and Paul are at one in declaring that faith and works must go hand in hand in the Christian life, and that in the Christians experience both faith without works is dead and works without faith are dead works. They both believe in faith working through love as that which alone will avail in Christ Jesus (Gal 5:6). Fundamentally they agree. Superficially they seem to contradict each other. That is because they are talking about different things and using the same terms with different meanings for those terms in mind.

MESSAGE OF THE EPISTLE TO OUR TIMES.


1. TO THE PIETIST:
There are those who talk holiness and are hypocrites; those who make profession of perfect love and yet cannot live peaceably with their brethren; those who are full of pious phraseology but fail in practical philanthropy. This epistle was written for them. It may not give them much comfort, but it ought to give them much profit. The mysticism that contents itself with pious frames and phrases and comes short in actual sacrifice and devoted service will find its antidote here. The antinomianism that professes great confidence in free grace, but does not recognize the necessity for corresponding purity of life, needs to ponder the practical wisdom of this epistle. The quietists who are satisfied to sit and sing themselves away to everlasting bliss ought to read this epistle until they catch its bugle note of inspiration to present activity and continuous good deeds. All who are long on theory and short on practice ought to steep themselves in the spirit of James; and since there are such people in every community and in every age, the message of the epistle will never grow old. 2. TO THE SOCIOLOGIST: The sociological problems are to the front today. The old prophets were social reformers, and James is most like them in the New Testament. Much that he says is applicable to present-day conditions. He lays down the right principles for practical philanthropy, and the proper relationships between master and man, and between man and man. If the teachings of this epistle were put into practice throughout the church it would

mean the revitalization of Christianity. It would prove that the Christian religion was practical and workable, and it would go far to establish the final brotherhood of man in the service of God. 3. TO THE STUDENT OF THE LIFE AND CHARACTER OF JESUS: The life of our Lord is the most important life in the history of the race. It will always be a subject of the deepest interest and study. Modern research has penetrated every contributory realm for any added light upon the heredity and the environment of Jesus. The people and the land, archaeology and contemporary history, have been cultivated intensively and extensively for any modicum of knowledge they might add to our store of information concerning the Christ. We suggest that there is a field here to which sufficient attention has not yet been given. James was the brother of the Lord. His epistle tells us much about himself. On the supposition that he did not exhort others to be what he would not furnish them an example in being, we read in this epistle his own character writ large. He was like his brother in so many things. As we study the life and character of James we come to know more about the life and character of Jesus. Jesus and James had the same mother. From her they had a common inheritance. As far as they reproduced their mothers characteristics they were alike. They had the same home training. As far as the father in that home could succeed in putting the impress of his own personality upon the boys, they would be alike. It is noticeable in this connection that Joseph is said in the Gospel to have been a just man (Mt 1:19 the King James Version), and that James came to be known through all the early church as James the Just, and that in his epistle he gives this title to his brother, Jesus, when he says of the unrighteous rich of Jerusalem, Ye have condemned and killed the just man (5:6 the King James Version). Joseph was just, and James was just, and Jesus was just. The brothers were alike, and they were like the father in this respect. The two brothers seem to think alike and talk alike to a most remarkable degree. They represent the same home surroundings and human environment, the same religious training and inherited characteristics. Surely, then, all that we learn concerning James will help us the better to understand Jesus. They are alike in their poetical insight and their practical wisdom. They are both fond of figurative speech, and it seems always natural and unforced. The discourses of Jesus are filled with birds and flowers and winds and clouds and all the sights and sounds of rural life in Palestine. The writings of James abound in reference to the field flowers and the meadow grass and the salt fountains and the burning wind and the early and the latter rain. They are alike in mental attitude and in spiritual alertness. They have much in common in the material equipment of their thought. James was well versed in the apocryphal literature. May we not reasonably conclude that Jesus was just as familiar with these books as he? James seems to have acquired a comparative mastery of the Greek language and to have had some acquaintance with the Greek philosophy. Would not Jesus have been as well furnished in these lines as he? What was the character of James? All tradition testifies to his personal purity and persistent devotion, commanding the reverence and the respect of all who knew him. As we trace the various elements of his character manifesting themselves in his anxieties and exhortations in this epistle, we find rising before us the image of Jesus as well as the portrait of James. He is a single-minded man, steadfast in faith and patient in trials. He is slow to wrath, but very quick to detect any sins of speech and hypocrisy of life. He is full of humility, but ready to champion the cause of the oppressed and the poor. He hates all insincerity and he loves wisdom, and he believes in prayer and practices it in reference to both temporal and spiritual good. He believes in absolute equality in the house of God. He is opposed to anything that will establish any distinctions between brethren in their place of worship. He believes in practical philanthropy. He believes that the right sort of religion will lead a man to visit the fatherless and widows in their affliction, and to keep himself unspotted from the world. A pure religion in his estimation will mean a pure man. He believes that we ought to practice all that we preach. As we study these characteristics and opinions of the younger brother, does not the image of his and our Elder Brother grow ever clearer before our eyes?

LITERATURE.
Works on Introduction: by Zahn, Weiss, Julicher, Salmon, Dods, Bacon, Bennett and Adeney; MacClymont, The New Testament and Its Writers; Farrar, The Messages of the Books, and Early Days of Christianity; Fraser, Lectures on the Bible; Godet, Biblical Studies. Works on the Apostolic Age: McGiffert, Schaff, Hausrath, Weizsacker. Commentaries: Mayor, Hort, Beyschlag, Dale, Huther, Plummer, Plumptre, Stier. Doremus Almy Hayes

JAMES, EPSTOLA DE
CARACTERSTICAS DA EPSTOLA.
1. JUDEU:
A Epstola de James a escrita mais judia no Novo Testamento. O Evangelho de acordo com o Matthew era escrito para os judeus. A Epstola para os hebreus explicitamente tratado para eles. O Apocalipse est cheio do esprito do Testamento Velho. A Epstola de Jude judia tambm. Ainda todos estes livros tm mais do elemento distintamente Cristo neles que ns podemos achar na Epstola de James. Se ns eliminarmos dois ou trs passagens contendo referncias para Cristo, a epstola inteira poderia achar seu lugar iust como corretamente no Cnon do Testamento Velho como naquele do Novo Testamento, at onde sua substncia de doutrina e contedo est preocupado. Isso no podia ser dito De qualquer outro livro no Novo Testamento. No existe nenhuma meno da encarnao ou da ressurreio., Os dois fatos fundamentais da f crist. O evangelho de palavra no acontece na epstola no existe nenhuma sugesto que os Messias apareceu e nenhuma apresentao da possibilidade de redeno por Ele. O ensino ao longo de aquela de uma moralidade alta que aponta para a realizao dos requisitos da lei de Mosaico. No estranho ento que Spitta e outros pensaram que ns temos na Epstola de James um tratado escrito por um unconverted judeu que foi adaptado para uso Cristo pelo interpolation das duas frases contendo o nome de Cristo em 1:1 e 2:1. Spitta pensa que isto pode ser a nica explicao do fato que ns temos aqui uma epstola praticamente ignorando a vida e trabalho de Jesus e toda doutrina distintamente Crist, e sem um rastro de qualquer das grande controvrsias no incio de igreja Crist ou quaisquer das caractersticas especficas de sua propaganda. Este julgamento um superficial, e restos em indicaes superficiais em lugar de qualquer avaliao do esprito e princpios subjacentes do livro. O esprito de Cristo est aqui, e no h necessidade de etiquetar isto. Os princpios desta epstola so os princpios do Sermo no Monte. Existem mais parallels para aquele Sermo nesta epstola que pode ser achada em qualquer lugar outro no Novo Testamento no mesmo espao. A epstola representa a idealizao de judeu legalism debaixo do transformar influncia do motivo e vida Crist. No uma discusso teolgica. uma atrao tica. Tem que fazer com a vida externa para a maior parte, e a vida ele retratos aquele de um judeu informados com o esprito de Cristo. O esprito invisvel na epstola como no homem individual. o corpo que aparece e a vida externa com que aquele corpo tem que fazer. O corpo da epstola judeu, e a vida externa para que exorta ser aquele de um profundamente judeu piedoso. O judeus familiar com o Testamento Velho leriam este epstola e acha seu idioma e tom que para que eles estavam acostumado em seu livros sagrado. James evidentemente escrito por um judeu para judeus. judeu em carter ao longo de. Isto aparente nos pormenores seguinte: 1. A epstola tratada para as 12 tribos que so da Disperso (11). Os judeus eram dispersos no estrangeiro pelo mundo antigo. De Babilnia at Roma, onde quer que qualquer comunidade delas poderia ser juntada para propsitos comerciais ou sociais, estas exortaes podiam ser levadas e leu. Provavelmente a epstola era circulada mais extensamente na Sria e sia Secundria, mas ele pode ter sado para os fins da Terra. Aqui e l no ghettos do Imprio Romano, grupos dos exilados de judeus juntariam e escutariam enquanto um de seu nmero l esta carta de casa. Todas as suas condies e suas insinuaes recordariam cenas de casas familiares. 2. Seu ponto de encontro chamado sua sinagoga (2:2). 3. Abrao mencionado como nosso pai (2:21). 4. Deus recebe o nome de Testamento Velho, o Senhor de Sabaoth (5:4). 5. A lei no ser falada contra nem julgado, mas reverently e lealmente obedecido. uma lei real para que todo judeu leal ser assunto. uma lei de liberdade, estar livremente obedecido (2:8-12; 4:11).

Orr, J., M.A., D.D. (1999). The International standard Bible encyclopedia : 1915 edition (J. Orr, Ed.). Albany, OR: Ages Software.

6. Os pecados da carne no so inveighed contra na epstola, mas aqueles pecados para que os judeus eram mais visivelmente sujeitos a, como o amor de dinheiro e a distino que dinheiro pode trazer (2:2-4), mundanidade e orgulho (4:4-6), impacincia e murmrio (5:7-11), e outros pecados do temperamento e lngua (3:1-12; 4:11, 12). 7. As ilustraes de fidelidade e pacincia e orao so achadas em personagens de Testamento Velho, em Abrao (2:21), Rahab (2:25), Trabalho (Jas 5:11,and) Elijah (Jas 5:17, 18). A atmosfera inteira da epstola judia. 2. AUTORIZADO: O escritor desta epstola fala como se tendo autoridade. Ele no est em sua defesa, como Paul muito freqentemente . No existe nenhum rastro de desculpa em sua apresentao da verdade. Sua posio oficial deve ter sido reconhecida e indiscutida. Ele como certos de seus de p com seus leitores como ele do poder absoluto de sua mensagem. Nenhum legislador de Testamento ou profeta Velhos estava mais certo que ele falou a palavra do Senhor. Ele tem a veemncia de Elijah e a mansido segura de Moiss. Ele foi chamado o Amos do Novo Testamento, e existem pargrafos que recordar as muito expresses usadas por Amos e que esto cheios da eloqncia gnea mesma e fervor proftico. Ambos enchem sua escrita com metforas tiradas do cu e o mar, de objetos naturais e experincias domsticas. Ambos parecem ser countrybred e estar em condolncia com simplicidade e pobreza. Ambos os inveigh contra o luxo e a crueldade da inativa rica, e ambos detestam o cerimonial e a cerimnia que so substitudos para retido individual. Malachi no era o ltimo dos profetas. Joo Batista no era o ltimo profeta da Dispensao Velha. O escritor desta epstola est no fim daquela linha proftica, e ele maior que Joo Batista ou qualquer que o precedeu porque ele permanece dentro das bordas do reino de Cristo. Ele fala com autoridade, como um mensageiro de Deus. Ele pertence ao companheirismo agradvel dos profetas e dos apstolos. Ele tem a autoridade de ambos. Existem 54 imperativos nos 108 versos desta epstola. 3. PRTICO: A epstola est interessada em conduta mais que em credo. Tem muito pequeno formulou teologia, menos que qualquer outra epstola no Novo Testamento; Mas ele insiste em moralidade prtica ao longo de. Comea e entra em luta com uma exortao para pacincia e orao. Ora um evangelho de bons trabalhos, baseado em amor para Deus e o amor para homem. Exige liberdade, igualdade, fraternidade para todo. Ordena humildade e justia e paz. Prescreve singleness de propsito e stedfastness de alma. Exige obedincia para a lei, controle das paixes, e controle da lngua. Sua ideal para ser achado em uma boa vida, caracterizada pela mansido de sabedoria. O escritor da epstola pegou o esprito dos profetas antigos, mas as lies que ele ensina ser tomados, para a maior parte, da literatura de Sabedoria do Testamento Velho e a Apocrypha. Suas cotaes diretas so do Pentateuch e o Livro de Provrbios; Mas tem sido estimado que existem 10 insinuaes para o Livro de Provrbios, 6 para o Livro de Trabalho, 5 para o Livro de Sabedoria, e 15 para o Livro de Ecclesiasticus. Esta literatura de Sabedoria fornece o grampo de sua meditao e a substncia de seu ensino. Ele tem pequeno ou nada para dizer sobre as grandes doutrinas da igreja Crist. Ele tem muito para dizer sobre a sabedoria que cometh abaixo de acima de e puro, pacfico, gentil, fcil ser pedido, cheia de clemncia e boas frutas, sem parcialidade, sem hipocrisia (Jas 3:15-17). A epstola inteira mostra que o autor armazenou sua mente com o tesouro rico da sabedoria antiga, e seu material, enquanto ofereceu como seu prprio, ambos velho e novo. A forma largamente aquela da literatura de Sabedoria dos judeus. Tem mais parallels com Jesus o filho de Sirach que com qualquer escritor dos livros sagrados. A substncia de sua exortao, porm, para ser achada no Synoptics e mais particularmente no Sermo no Monte. Sua sabedoria a sabedoria de Jesus o filho de Joseph, que o Cristo. Estas so as trs caractersticas excelentes desta epstola Em forma e na superfcie o mais judeu e menos Cristo da escrita no Novo Testamento. Seu Cristianismo oculto e no aparente. Ainda ele o mais autorizado em seu tom de quaisquer das epstolas no Novo Testamento, a menos que ele seja aqueles do apstolo John. John deve ter ocupada uma posio de primazia indisputada na igreja Crist depois da morte de todos os outros apstolos, quando ele escreveu suas epstolas. notvel que o escritor desta epstola assume um tom de gosta de autoridade com aquele de John. John era o apstolo de amor, Paul de f, e Peter de esperana. Este escritor o apstolo de bons trabalhos, o apstolo da sabedoria que manifesta propriamente em paz e pureza, clemncia e moralidade, e em obedincia para a lei real, a lei de liberdade.

Em sua unio de forma judia, tom autorizado, e insistncia em moralidade prtica, a epstola sem igual entre os Novos livros de Testamento.

AUTOR DA EPSTOLA.
O endereo dos estados de epstola que o escritor James, um empregado de Deus e do Senhor Jesus Cristo (Jas 1:1). A tradio da igreja identificou este James com o irmo de nosso Senhor. Clemente de Alexandria diz que Peter e James e John, que eram os trs apstolos mais honrado do Senhor, escolheu James, o irmo do Senhor, ser o bispo de Jerusalm depois da ascenso do Senhor (Euscb., ELE, II, 1). Esta tradio concorda bem com todos os anncios de James nos Novos livros de Testamento. Depois da morte de James o irmo de John, Peter era lanado na priso, e ter estado milagrosamente lanada, ele perguntou que as notcias ser enviada para James e para os irmos (Atos 12:17). Este James evidentemente em autoridade na igreja neste momento. No apostolical conferncia segura em Jerusalm, depois de Peter e Paul e Barnabas falaram, este mesmo James resume a discusso inteira, e sua deciso adotada pela assemblia e formulada em uma carta que tem algum muito notvel parallels em seu phraseology para esta epstola (Atos 15:6-29). Quando Paul veio para Jerusalm pela ltima vez ele reportou seu trabalho para James e todos os ancies apresentam com ele (Atos 21:18). Na Epstola para o Galatians Paul diz que na hora de uma de suas visitas para Jerusalm ele viu nenhum dos apstolos salvam Peter e James o irmo do Senhor (Gal 1:18, 19). Em outra visita ele recebeu a mo direita de companheirismo de James e Cephas e John (Gal 2:9). Mais tarde certo que veio de James at Antioch levou Peter em apostatar de sua antiga posio de tolerncia do Gentiles como equipara na igreja Crist (Gal 2:12). Todas estas referncias nos levariam a supor que James permaneceu em uma posio de autoridade suprema na igreja de me em Jerusalm, a igreja mais velha de cristandade. Ele preside nas assemblias da igreja. Ele fala a palavra final e autorizada. Peter e Paul concordam o com. Paul menciona seu nome antes daquele de Peter e John. Quando ele era exaltado para esta liderana que ns no sabemos, mas todas as indicaes parecem apontar para o fato que em um muito primeiro perodo James estava a autoridade de executivo reconhecido na igreja em Jerusalm, que era a igreja de Pentecost e a igreja dos apstolos. Todos os judeus contados com Jerusalm como a cadeira principal de sua adorao e a autoridade central de sua religio. Todos os judeus Cristos contariam com Jerusalm como a primitivo fonte de sua organizao e f, e a cabea da igreja em Jerusalm seria reconhecida por eles como sua autoridade principal. O tom autorizado deste epstola comports bem com esta posio de primazia atribuda para James. Toda tradio concorda em descrever James como uns hebreus dos hebreus, um homem da moralidade mais rgida e asctica, fiel em sua observncia de todos os regulamentos rituais da f judia. Hegesippus diz a ns que ele era santo de tero da sua me. Ele no bebeu nenhum vinho nem bebida forte. Ele no comeu nenhuma carne. Ele s era permitido para entrar com os padres no lugar santo, e ele era achado l freqentemente em seu perdo de joelhos mendicante para as pessoas, e seus joelhos ficaram duros como aqueles de um camelo por causa de seu constantemente curvando eles em sua adorao de Deus e perguntando perdo pelas pessoas (Euseb., ELE, II, 23). Ele era chamado James o Somente. Todos tiveram confiana em sua sinceridade e integridade, e muitos eram persuadidos por ele acreditar no Cristo. Este judeu, fiel na observncia de tudo que os judeus seguraram sagrado, e mais dedicado para o templo-adorao que os mais piedosos entre eles, era uma boa escolha para a cabea da igreja Crist. O sangue de David fluiu em suas veias. Ele teve todo o orgulho dos judeus nos privilgios especiais da corrida escolhida. Os judeus o respeitaram e os cristos o veneraram. Nenhum homem entre eles comandaram a estima da populao inteira tanto como ele. Josephus (Formiga., XX, iX) diz a ns que Ananus o padre alto teve James apedrejou para a morte, e que o mais eqitativo dos cidados imediatamente rosa em revolta contra um procedimento to sem lei, e Ananus era deposto depois de s trs meses regra. Este testemunho de Josephus simplesmente substancia tudo que ns sabemos de outras fontes relativo ao alto de p de James na comunidade inteira. Hegesippus diz que James foi primeiro lanado de um pinculo do templo, e ento eles bbedos ele porque ele no foi morto pela queda, e ele foi finalmente batido acima da cabea com uma mais cheia est clube; E ento ele significativamente adiciona, Imediatamente Vespasian sitiou eles (Euscb., ELE, II, 23). L pareceria ter sido bastante uma condenao difundida entre ambos os cristos e os judeus que as aflies que caram na cidade santa e as pessoas escolhidas nos anos seguintes eram em parte uma visitao por causa do grande crime do assassinato deste homem justo. Ns podemos entender como um homem com esta reputao e carter escreveriam uma epstola to judeu em forma e substncia e to insistente em suas demandas por

uma moralidade prtica como a Epstola de James. Todas as caractersticas da epstola parecem explicvel na suposio de autoria por James o irmo do Senhor. Ns aceitamos a tradio de igreja sem vacilao.

O ESTILO DA EPSTOLA.
1. SIMPLICIDADE:
A construo de orao simples e direta. Lembra a ns dos ingleses de Bunyan e DeFoe. Existe razo normalmente intil para engano qualquer coisa que James diz. Ele pe sua verdade claramente, e as palavras ele usa no tem nenhum escondido ou significados msticos. Seus pensados estar transparente como sua vida. 2. BOM GREGO: Fica um pouco assombroso para achar que os gregos da Epstola de James melhor que aqueles dos outros Novos escritores de Testamento, com a exceo nica do autor da Epstola para os hebreus. Claro que isto pode ser devido ao fato que James teve os servios de um amanuensis que era um estudioso grego, ou que seu prprio manuscrito era revisado por tal homem; Mas, embora inesperado, no impossvel que James ele mesmo pode ter sido capaz de escrever tal grego como isto. No o bom grego do clssicos, e ele no o pobre e provinciano grego de Paul. Existe mais gosta de forma literria que nos perodos rudes Do apstolo de Gentile, e o vocabulrio pareceria indicar um conhecido com o literrio como tambm o comercial de TV e o Galilee socivel grego era studded com cidades gregas, e estava certamente no poder de qualquer Galilean ganhar um conhecimento de grego .... que Ns razoavelmente podemos supor que nosso autor no teria scrupled para ajudar ele mesmo das oportunidades dentro de suas alcanam, para dominar o idioma grego, e aprenda algo de filosofia grega. Isto seria natural, ainda que ns pensamos sobre James como impelido s por um desejo para ganhar sabedoria e conhecimento por ele mesmo; Mas se ns pensarmos dele tambm como o professor principal dos crentes judeus, muitos dos quais eram Hellenists, instrudas na sabedoria de Alexandria, ento a natural curvada tomaria a forma de encargo aduaneiro: Ele seria um aluno de grego para que ele poderia ser um instrutor mais efetivo para suas prprias pessoas (Prefeito, A Epstola de James, ccxxxvi). Os gregos da epstola est a estudada grega de uma que no era uma nativa para isto, mas que familiarizou ele mesmo com sua literatura. James podia ter feito muito e a epstola pode ser prova que ele fez. 3. VIVACIDADE: James nunca contedo para conversar em abstraes. Ele sempre fixa um retrato antes de seus prprios olhos e aqueles de seus leitores. Ele tem o instinto dramtico. Ele tem o segredo de interesse sustentado. Ele no est discutindo coisas em geral mas coisas em particular. Ele um artista e acredita em realidades concretas. Ao mesmo tempo ele tem um toque de poesia nele, e uma sensao boa das analogias examinando toda Natureza e toda vida. O duvidar homem como o mar spume (1:6). O homem rico enfraquece longe em suas idas, at como a beleza da flor cai e perece (1:11). A cena de sinagoga com sua distino entre a rica e a pobre fixada antes de ns com o claro impressiveness de um camafeu (2:1-4). O filantropo de Pecksniffian, que parece pensar que aqueles homens podem ser no alimentados por po s mas pelas palavras que prosseguem magnificamente de sua boca, pilloried aqui por todo o tempo (2:15, 16). A lngua indomvel que fixada queimando de inferno posto na chama cheia de seu mundo de iniquity, e o danificar mostrado para ser assim de um fogo de floresta (3:1-12). O retrato da sabedoria que vem de acima de com seu sevenfold excelncias de pureza, peaceableness, gentileza, clemncia, fruitfulness, imparcialidade, sinceridade, merecedor para pendurar na galeria das obras-primas do mundo (3:17). O vangloriar tradesmen, cujas vidas so como desaparecendo vapor, esteja l antes dos olhos de toda em Jerusalm (4:13-16). A rica, cujos luxos ele descreve at enquanto ele denuncia suas crueldades e profetiza que seu vindo dia de matana, so o rico que caminha para as ruas de sua prpria cidade (5:1-6). Suas oraes pequenas vo gostar de tiros diretamente para a marca. Ns sentimos o choque e a impresso deles. Existe uma energia atrs deles e uma realidade neles que faz eles viverem em nosso pensado. Suas perguntas abruptas so como as interrogaes rpidas de uma cruz-examinando advogado (2:4-7, 14, 16; 3:11, 12; 4:1, 4, 5, 12, 14). Seus provrbios tm a intensidade da acumulada e comprimida sabedoria das idades. Eles so mnimos irreduzveis. Eles so declaraes memorveis, entesouradas na fala do mundo desde ento seu dia. 4. DUADIPLOSIS:

s vezes James adiciona orao para condenar com a repetio de alguma palavra ou frase principal (1:16, 19-24; 3:2-8). o estilo doloroso de um que no est completamente em casa com o idioma que ele escolheu como o veculo de seu pensado. o mtodo pela qual uma discusso podia ser indefinidamente continuada. Nada alm da vivacidade da imagem e a intensidade do pensamento salva James de monotonia fatal no uso deste dispositivo. 5. FIGURAS DE FALA: James tem um olho agudo para ilustraes. Ele no cego para as belezas e maravilhas de Natureza. Ele v o que est acontecendo em toda mo, e ele rpido para pegar qualquer homiletical sugesto que pode segurar. Ele aguarda a beira-mar? A onda que dirigida pelo vento e lanou lembra a ele do homem que instvel em todos os seus modos, porque ele no tem nenhum ancoradouro de f, e suas condenaes so como madeira flutuante em um mar de dvida (1:6). Ento ele nota que os grandes navios so girados sobre por um leme pequeno, e ele pensa como a lngua um membro pequeno, mas ele realiza grandes coisas (3:4, 5). Ele caminha debaixo da luz solar e regozija nele como a fonte de tantos presentes bons e perfeitos? Ele v nele uma imagem da bondade de Deus que nunca est eclipsado e nunca exausto, invarivel eternamente (1:17). Ele usa os fenmenos naturais da terra em que ele vive de fazer sua plancie de significado em toda virada: A flor do campo que falece (1:10, 11), o fogo de floresta que varre o lado de montanha e gosta de uma tocha viva iluminar o todo aterrissar (3:5), a doura e sal pula (3:11), as rvores de figo e as rvores de azeitona e as vinhas (3:12), a colocao-semeando e o fruta-porte (3:18), a nvoa matutina imediatamente perdida para visualizar (4:14), a cedo e a chuva posterior para que o husbandman waiteth pacientemente (5:7). Existe mais da avaliao de Natureza em esta aqui epstola pequena de Jas que em todas as epstolas de Paul pem junto. A vida humana era mais interessante para Paul que paisagem natural. Porm, James est interessado em vida humana da mesma maneira que profundamente que Paul. Ele constantemente est dotando coisas inanimadas com qualidades vivas. Ele representa pecado como uma rameira, concebendo e dando luz morte (1:15). A palavra de verdade tem poder de um gostar de e concebe e d luz aqueles quem vivem para elogio do Deus (1:18). Prazeres so como anfitries joviais de inimigos em um torneio, quem enfeitam eles mesmos corajosamente e montam adiante com cantar e riso, mas cuja misso para empreender guerra e matar (4:1, 2). Os operrios podem ser mudos na presena da rica por causa de sua dependncia e seu medo, mas seu salrio, fraudulentamente reteve, tenha uma lngua, e clamar cu alto para vingana (5:4). Que amizade com o mundo? adultrio, James diz (4:4). A ferrugem de riqueza injusta testemunha contra aqueles que acumularam eles, e ento gira neles e come sua carne como fogo (5:3). James observou o homem que glanced nele mesmo no espelho de manh, e viu que seu rosto no era limpo, e que foi embora e no pensou no mais sobre ele para aquele dia inteiro, e ele achou nele uma ilustrao da pessoa que ouviu a palavra e no fez isto (1:23, 14). A epstola est cheia destas figuras retricas, e eles provam que James era algo de um poeta no fundo, at como Jesus era. Ele escreve em prosa, mas existe um ritmo marcado em toda a sua fala. Ele tem uma orelha para harmonia como ele tem um olho para beleza em todos lugares. 6. UNLIKENESS PARA Paul: As epstolas de Pauline comeam com saudaes e entram em luta com bnes. Eles so cheios com toques autobiogrficos e mensagens pessoais. Nenhuma destas coisas aparecem aqui. A epstola comea e fins com toda rudeza. Tem um endereo, mas nenhum ao de graas. No existe nenhuma mensagem pessoal e nenhuma indicao de qualquer relao pessoal ntima entre o autor e seus leitores. Eles so seus irmos amado. Ele sabe suas necessidades e seus pecados, mas ele pode nunca ver seus rostos ou visitou suas casas. A epstola mais como atrao do profeta para uma nao que uma carta pessoal. 7. SEMELHANA PARA Jesus: Ambas a substncia do ensino e o mtodo de sua apresentao lembram a ns dos discursos de Jesus. James diz menos sobre o Mestre que qualquer outro escritor no Novo Testamento, mas sua fala mais assim do Mestre que a fala de qualquer uma deles. Existem pelo menos dez parallels para o Sermo no Monte nesta epstola pequena, e por quase tudo que James tem que dizer que ns podemos recordar um pouco de declarao de Jesus que poderia ter sugerido isto. Quando o parallels falhar em qualquer ponto, ns somos propensos para suspeitar que James pode estar repetindo alguma expresso vocal no registrada de nosso Senhor. Ele parece absolutamente fiel para sua memria de ensino do seu irmo. Ele o empregado de Jesus em toda sua exortao e persuaso.

Fez o Mestre choca f dos Seus discpulos pelo loftiness do Cristo ideal que Ele fixa antes deles em Seu grande sermo, Ye ento deve ser perfeito, como seu Pai divino perfeito (MT 5:48)? James fixa a bem no vanguarda de padro alto mesmo de seu ep.: Deixe pacincia ter seu trabalho perfeito, aquele ye pode ser perfeito e inteiro, carente em nada (1:4). Fez o Mestre diz, Pergunte, e ele deve receber voc (MT 7:7)? James diz, Se alguma de vocs lacketh sabedoria, deixe ele perguntar a Deus ....; e devem receber ele (1:5). Fez o Mestre adiciona uma condio para Seu varrido promete orao e diz, Whosoever .... no deve duvidar em seu corao, mas deve acreditar naquele o que ele f cometh para passar; Ele deve ter isto (Mk 11:23)? James apressa adicionar a mesma condio, Deixe ele perguntar a f, nada duvidando: Para ele aquele doubteth como a onda do mar dirigido pelo vento e lanado (1:6). Fez o Mestre fecha o grande sermo com Sua parbola do Homem Sbio e o Homem Tolo, dizendo, Todas aquelas heareth estas palavras meu, e doeth eles, devem ser comparados at um homem sbio. E todas aquelas heareth estas palavras minhas, e doeth eles no, devem ser comparados at um homem tolo (MT 7:24, 26)? James est muito preocupado sobre sabedoria, e ento ele exorta seus leitores, ye fazedores da palavra, e no ouvintes somente, iludindo seu prprio selves (1:22). Teve o Mestre declarado, Se ye sabe estas coisas, santificadas so ye se ye faz eles (Jn 13:17)? James ecoa o pensamento quando ele disser, Um fazedor que worketh, este homem deve ser santificado em seu fazendo (1:25). Fez o Mestre diz para os discpulos, Santificados so ye pobre: Para seu o reino de Deus (Lk 6:20)? James tem a mesma condolncia com a pobre, e ele diz, Hearken, meu irmos amado; Deus No escolheu eles que so pobre sobre o mundo para ser rico em f, e herdeiros do reino que ele prometeu eles que o ame? (2:5). Fez o Mestre inveigh contra o rico, e diga, Aflio at voc que rico! Para ye recebeu seu consolao. Aflio at voc, ye que esto cheio agora! Para ye deve fome. Aflio at voc, ye que ri agora! Para ye deve lamentar e lamentar (Lk 6:24, 25)? James irrompe no mesmo injria e profetiza que o reverso triste mesmo de fortuna, Vindo agora, ye rico, lamente e uive para seu misrias que esto encontrando acidentalmente para voc (5:1). Limpe seu mos, ye pecadores; E purifique seu coraes, ye doubleminded. Ser afligido, e lamente, e lamente: Deixe seu riso ser girado para luto, e seu joy para peso (4:8, 9). Teve Jesus disse, No julgue, aquele ye no julgado (MT 7:1)? James repete o exortao, No fale um contra outro, irmos. Ele aquele .... judgeth seu irmo .... judgeth o lei: .... Mas quem a arte tu aquele judgest thy vizinho? (4:11, 12). Teve Jesus disse, Whosoever deve humilhar ele mesmo deve ser exaltado (MT 23:12)? Ns achamos o muito palavras em James, Humilde vocs mesmos vista do Senhor, e ele deve exaltar voc (4:10). Teve Jesus disse, eu digo at voc, No injurie todo; Nem pelo cu, para ele ser o trono de Deus; Nem pelo Terra, para ele ser o banqueta de seu ps. .... Mas deixe seu fala ser, Yea, yea; No, no: E qualquer mais que estes do do mal (MT 5:34-37)? Aqui em James ns encontramos acidentalmente para o exato paralelo: Mas acima de tudo coisas, meu irmos, no jure, nem pelo cu, nem pelo Terra, nem por qualquer outro juramento; Mas deixe seu yea ser yea, e seu no, no; Aquele ye no cai debaixo de julgamento (5:12). Ns lembramos como o Mestre comeou o Sermo no Monte com a declarao que at aqueles que lamentaram e eram perseguidos e ultrajavam e reproached eram santificados, apesar de todo seu sofrimento e tentativa. Ento ns notamos que James comea a sua epstola com a mesma paradoxal pondo da f crist, Conta isso tudo joy, meus irmos, quando ye cair em testes mltiplos (1:12, a margem de Verso Revisada Americana). Ns lembramos como Jesus prosseguiu em Seu sermo para partir o significado espiritual e o seguro permanence da lei; E ns notamos que James trata a lei com o mesmo respeito e pe nele o valor alto mesmo. Ele chama isto a lei perfeita (1:25), a lei real (2:8), a lei de liberdade (2:12). Ns lembramos o que Jesus disse sobre perdoar outros para que ns mesmos podem ser perdoados; E ns sabemos onde o James conseguiu sua autoridade para dizer, Julgamento sem clemncia est para ele aquele hath no mostrou a nenhuma clemncia (2:13). Ns lembramos de tudo que o Mestre disse sobre boas rvores e rvores corruptas sendo sabido por suas frutas, Homens juntam uvas de espinhos, ou figos de cardos? (MT 7:16-20). Ento na Epstola de James ns achamos pergunta de um gostar de, Pode uma rvore de figo, meus irmos, renda azeitonas, ou uns figos de vinha? (3:12). Ns lembramos que o Mestre disse, Saiba ye que ele perto, at nas portas (MT 24:33). Ns no ficamos surpreendidos por achar a declarao aqui em James, Veja, o juiz standeth antes das portas (5:9). Estas reminiscncias das declaraes do Mestre nos encontram em toda pgina. Pode ser que existem muitos mais deles que ns podemos identificar. Seu nmero suficientemente grande, porm, mostrar a ns que James steeped nas verdades ensinadas por Jesus, e no s sua substncia mas seu phraseology constantemente lembra a ns dele.

DATA DA EPSTOLA.

Existem aqueles que pensam que a Epstola de James a epstola mais velha no Novo Testamento. Entre aqueles que favorece uma primeira data so Prefeito, Plumptre, Alford, Stanley, Renan, Weiss, Zahn, Beyschlag, Neander, Schneckenburger, Thiersch, e Dods. As razes atriburam para esta concluso so: 1. O General Judaic afinar do ep., Que parece pr-datar admisso do Gentiles em quaisquer nmeros alarmantes na igreja; Mas desde a epstola tratada s para judeus, por que o Gentiles devia ser mencionado nisto, qualquer sua data? E 2. O fato que Paul e Peter deveriam ter citado de James em sua escrita; Mas este assunto de cotao sempre um incerto, e ele tem estado habilmente discutido que a cotao tem sido o outro modo. Outros pensem que a epstola era escrita em direo ao fechar de vida do James. Entre estes so Kern, Wiesinger, Schmidt, Bruckner, Wordsworth, e Farrar. Estes discutem 1. Que a epstola d testemunho a um lapso considervel de tempo na histria da igreja, suficiente permitir a uma declinao do fervor espiritual de Pentecost e o estabelecimento de distines entre os irmos; Mas quaisquer dos pecados mencionaram na epstola em toda probabilidade podia ter sido achada na igreja em qualquer dcada de sua histria. 2. James tem uma posio de autoridade estabelecida, e aqueles para quem ele escreve no so convertidos recentes mas membros em longos permanecendo; Mas a posio de James pode ter sido estabelecida de uma muito primeira data, e em um encclica deste tipo ns no podamos esperar qualquer indicao de menor ou sociedade mais longa na igreja. Indubitavelmente alguns daqueles trataram eram convertidos recentes, enquanto outros podem ter sido membros por muitos anos. 3. Existem referncias para perseguies e testes que ajustam o mais tarde em lugar da data antiga; Mas tudo isto dito neste assunto poderia ser apropriado em qualquer perodo da presidncia de James em Jerusalm. 4. Existem indicaes de uma demora longa e desapontadora na Segunda Resultando do Senhor na exortao repetida para pacincia em esperar para isto; Mas por outro lado James diz, o resultar do Senhor est mo, e O juiz standeth antes das portas (5:7-9). A mesma passagem citada como prova de uma convico que a aparncia imediata do Senhor era esperada, como no perodo mais antigo da igreja, e em prova que existiu uma decepo desta convico antiga e que tinha sido tido sucesso por um sentimento que existia necessidade de pacincia em esperar para a demora de vinda to longa. Parece claro para ns que no existe nenhuma prova decisiva a favor de qualquer data definida para a epstola. Deve ter sido escrito antes do martrio de James no ano 63 DC, e em algum momento durante sua presidncia acima da igreja em Jerusalm; Mas no existe nada para nos autorizar em vir para mais concluso definida que Davidson, Hilgenfeld, Baur, Zeller, Hausrath, von Soden, Julicher, Harnack, Toucinho e outros datam a epstola variavelmente no perodo Ps-Pauline, 69-70 a 140-50 DC. Os argumentos para quaisquer destas datas caem longes com falta de prova, descanse largamente se no completamente em conjeturas e pressuposies, e claro que so incompatveis com qualquer convico na autoria por James.

HISTRIA DA EPSTOLA.
Eusebius classificou Jas entre aqueles cuja autenticidade eram disputadas por algum. James parece ser o autor das primeiras das Epstolas catlicas denominadas. Mas para ser observado que disputado; Pelo menos, no muitos do ancients mencionou isto, como o caso igualmente com a epstola que agenta o nome de Jude, que tambm uma das sete Epstolas catlicas denominadas. No obstante, ns sabemos que estes tambm, com o resto, foi lido publicamente na maioria das igrejas (Historia Ecclesiastica, II, 23). Eusebius ele mesmo, porm, citaes Jas 4:11 como Escritura e Jas 5:13 como falado pelo apstolo santo. Pessoalmente ele no parece disposto para questionar a autenticidade da epstola. Existem parallels em phraseology que fazer isto possvel que a epstola citada em Clemente de Roma no sculo 1, e em Ignatius, Polycarp, Justin Martiriza, a Epstola para Diognetus, Irenaeus, e Hermas no sculo 2. omitido na lista cannica do Fragmento de Muratorian e no era includo na verso latina Velha. Origen parece ser o primeiro escritor para citar o explicitamente de epstola como Escritura e afirmar que era escrito por James o irmo do Senhor. Aparece na verso de Peshitta e parece ter estado geralmente reconhecido no Leste. Cyril de Jerusalm, Gregory de Nazianzus, Ephraem de Edessa, Didymus de Alexandria, recebeu isto to

cannico. O 3 Conselho de Cartago em 397 DC finalmente povoou sua condio para a igreja Ocidental, e daquela data em ambos o Leste e o Oeste seu canonicity era indiscutido at o tempo da Reforma. Erasmus e Cajetan reavivaram as dvidas velhas relativo a isto. Luther pensou que contradisse Paul e ento baniu isto para o apndice de sua Bblia. James, ele diz, visou refutar aqueles que contaram com f sem trabalhos, e muito fraco para sua tarefa em mente, entendendo, e palavras, mutila as Escrituras, e deste modo diretamente contradiz Paul e todas as Escrituras, buscando realizar obrigando a lei o que os apstolos com sucesso efeito por amor. Ento, eu no colocarei sua Epstola em minha Bblia entre o adequado leadingbooks (Werke, XIV, 148). Ele declarou que era um completamente strawy epstola, como comparada com como aqueles para os Romanos e para o Galatians, e ele no teve nenhum carter evanglico real. Este julgamento de Luther um muito precipitado e lamentvel. A igreja moderna recusou aceitar isto, e est geralmente concedido agora que Paul e James esto em acordo perfeito um com o outro, entretanto sua apresentao da mesma verdade de pontos de vista opostos traz eles em contradio aparente. Paul diz, Por graa tem ye sido economizado por f .... no de trabalhos, que nenhum homem devia glria (Eph 2:8, 9). Ns consideramos ento que um homem justificado por f separadamente dos trabalhos da lei (Rom 3:28). James diz, F, se ele no tiver trabalhos, est morto nele mesmo (2:17). Ye v aquele por trabalha um homem justificado, e no s por f (2:24). Com estas passagens antes dele Luther dizer, Muitos labutaram reconciliar Paul com James .... mas em vo, para eles ser contrrios, `Faith justifica '; `Faith no justifica '; Eu garantirei minha vida que ningum pode reconciliar aquelas proposies; E se ele tiver sucesso que ele pode me chamar um bobo (Colloquia, II, 202). Seria difcil de provar Luther um bobo se Paul e James estiveram usando estas palavras, f, trabalhos, e justificao, na mesma sensao, ou ainda que cada estava escrevendo com conscincia cheia do que o outro escreveu. Eles ambos os uso Abrao para um exemplo, James de justificao por trabalhos, e Paul de justificao por f. Como que pode ser possvel? A f significada por James a f de uma ortodoxia morta, um consentimento intelectual para os dogmas da igreja que no resulta em qualquer retido prtica em vida, tal f como os demnios tm quando eles acreditarem no ser de Deus e simplesmente tremer antes Dele. A f significada por Paul intelectual e moral e espiritual, afeta o homem inteiro, e o leva em unio consciente e vital e comunho com Deus. No a f de demnios; a f que redime. Novamente, os trabalhos significados por Paul so os trabalhos de um morto legalism, os trabalhos feitos debaixo de uma sensao de compulso ou de um sentimento de encargo aduaneiro, os trabalhos feitos em obedincia para uma lei a qual um mestre, os trabalhos de um escravo e no de um filho. Estes trabalhos mortos, ele declara, nunca pode dar vida. Os trabalhos significados por James so os trabalhos de um crente, a fruta da f e amam nascido em todo corao e manifesto do crente em toda vida do crente. A possesso de f assegurar esta evidncia em sua diariamente conduta e conversao; E sem esta evidncia a profisso mera de f no o salvar. A justificao significada por Paul a justificao inicial da vida Crist. No fazendo de aes meritrias faro um homem merecedor de salvao. Ele entra no reino, no em base de mrito mas em base de graa. O pecador no convertido fazendo qualquer coisa, mas acreditando no Senhor Jesus Cristo. Ele aborda o limite do reino e ele acha que ele no tem nenhuma moeda que atual l. Ele no pode comprar sua entrada por bons trabalhos; Ele deve aceitar salvao por f, como o presente de graa livre do Deus. A justificao significada por James a justificao de qualquer depois de-momento na vida Crist, e a justificao final antes do trono de julgamento. Bons trabalhos so inevitvel na vida Crist. No pode haver nenhuma garantia de salvao sem eles. Paul est olhando para a raiz; James est olhando para a fruta. Paul est conversando sobre o incio da vida Crist; James est conversando sobre sua continuao e consumao. Com Paul, os trabalhos ele renuncia precede f e esto trabalhos mortos. Com James, a f ele denuncia separadamente de trabalhos e est uma f morta. Paul acredita nos trabalhos de godliness da mesma maneira que muito que James. Ele reza aquele Deus pode estabelecer o Thessalonians em todo bom trabalho (2 Thess 2:17). Ele escreve para os corntios que Deus pode fazer toda graa abundar at eles; Que eles, tendo sempre toda suficincia em tudo, pode abundar at todo bom trabalho (2 Cor 9:8). Ele declara para o Ephesians que ns somos seu artesanato, criados em Cristo Jesus para sempre trabalhos, que Deus afore preparou que ns devamos entrar eles (Eph 2:10). Ele faz uma declarao formal de sua f em Romanos: Deus prestar para todo homem de acordo com seus trabalhos: Para eles aquela por pacincia em bem-fazendo buscar para glria e honra e incorruption, vida eterna: Mas at eles que so factious, e no obedea a verdade, mas obedea unrighteousness, deve ser ira e indignao, tribulao e angstia, em toda alma de homem que worketh mau, dos judeus primeiros, e

tambm dos gregos; Mas glria e honra e paz para todo homem que worketh bem, para os judeus primeiros, e tambm para os gregos (Rom 2:6-10). Isto a justificao final discutido por James, e da mesma maneira que claramente um julgamento por trabalhos com Paul como com ele. Por outro lado James acredita em f de economia como tambm Paul. Ele comea com a declarao que o provar de nossa f trabalha pacincia e traz perfeio (1:3, 1). Ele declara que a orao de f trar a sabedoria desejada (1:6). Ele descreve a profisso Crist como uma propriedade A f de nosso Senhor Jesus Cristo, o Senhor de glria (2:1). Ele diz que o pobre sobre o mundo so ricos em f, e ento herdeiros para o reino (2:5). Ele cita a passagem de Gnese, Abrao acreditou Deus, e era considerado at ele para retido (2:23), e ele explicitamente afirma que f forjada do Abrao com seus trabalhos, e por trabalhos eram f fez perfeita (2:22). A f mencionada em todas estas passagens a f do professar Cristo; no a f que o pecador exercita em aceitar salvao. James e Paul esto um em declarar aquela f e trabalhos devem ir de mos dadas na vida Crist, e aquela na experincia do cristo ambas as f sem trabalhos est morta e trabalhos sem f esto trabalhos mortos. Eles dois acreditam em f que trabalha por amarem como que s ajudar em Cristo Jesus (Gal 5:6). Fundamentalmente eles concordam. Superficialmente eles parecem contradizer um ao outro. Isto porque eles esto conversando sobre coisas diferentes e usando as mesmas condies com significados diferentes para aquelas condies em mente.

MENSAGEM DA EPSTOLA PARA NOSSOS TEMPOS.


1. PARA O PIETIST:
Existem aqueles que conversam santidade e so hipcritas; Aqueles que faz profisso de amor perfeito e ainda no pode viver peaceably com seus irmos; Aqueles que esto cheios de piedoso phraseology mas falha em filantropia prtica. Esta epstola era escrita para eles. No pode dar a eles muito conforto, mas ele devia dar a eles muito lucro. O misticismo que contedo propriamente com armaes e frases piedosos e vem para pequeno em sacrifcio real e servio dedicado achar seu antdoto aqui. O antinomianism que professa grande confiana em graa livre, mas no reconhece a necessidade para pureza correspondente de vida, precisa ponderar a sabedoria prtica desta epstola. O quietists que so satisfeito para se sentar e cantar eles mesmos longe para felicidade de perptuo devia ler esta epstola at que eles peguem sua nota de corneta de atividade de inspirao para presente e contnuas boas aes. Todo que so longos em teoria e pequena em prtica devia ngreme eles mesmos no esprito de James; E desde existem tais pessoas em toda comunidade e em toda idade, a mensagem da epstola nunca envelhecer. 2. PARA O SOCILOGO: Os problemas sociolgicos esto para a frente hoje. Os profetas velhos eram reformadores sociais, e James a maioria de gosta deles no Novo Testamento. Muito que ele diz aplicvel para condies atuais. Ele anuncia os princpios certos para filantropia prtica, e as relaes adequadas entre mestre e homem, e entre homem e homem. Se os ensinos desta epstola eram postos em prtica ao longo da igreja que significaria o revitalization de Cristianismo. Provaria que a religio Crist era prtica e executvel, e iria longe estabelecer a fraternidade final de homem no servio de Deus. 3. PARA O ALUNO DA VIDA E CARTER DE Jesus: A vida de nosso Senhor a vida mais importante na histria da corrida. Sempre ser um assunto do interesse e estudo mais fundo. A pesquisa moderna penetrou todo reino contributrio para qualquer adicionou luz na hereditariedade e o ambiente de Jesus. As pessoas e a terra, arqueologia e histria contemporneas, foram cultivadas intensivamente e extensivamente para qualquer modicum de conhecimento eles poderiam adicionar a nossa loja de informaes relativo ao Cristo. Ns sugerimos que existe um campo aqui para que ateno suficiente ainda no foi dada. James era o irmo do Senhor. Sua epstola diz a ns muitos sobre ele mesmo. Na suposio que ele no exortou outros para ser o que ele no forneceria eles um exemplo em ser, ns lemos nesta epstola seu prprio escrito de carter grande. Ele era como seu irmo em tantas coisas. Como ns estudamos a vida e carter de James ns vamos para conhecer mais sobre a vida e carter de Jesus. Jesus e James tiveram a mesma me. De seus eles tiveram uma herana comum. At onde eles reproduziram caractersticas da sua me que eles eram semelhantes. Eles tiveram a mesma casa treinando. At onde o pai naquela casa podia ter sucesso em pr a impresso de sua prpria personalidade nos meninos, eles seriam semelhantes. notvel nesta conexo que Joseph dito no Evangelho para ter sido um homem justo (MT

1:19 a Verso de Rei James), e que James veio para ser sabido por toda a primeira igreja como James o Somente, e aquela em sua epstola ele d este ttulo para seu irmo, Jesus, quando ele disser da injusta rica de Jerusalm, Ye condenou e matou o homem justo (5:6 a Verso de Rei James). Joseph somente era, e James somente era, e Jesus somente era. Os irmos eram semelhantes, e eles eram como o pai neste respeito. Os dois irmos parecem pensar semelhante e conversa semelhante para um a maioria de grau notvel. Eles representam o mesmo ambiente de casa e ambiente humano, o mesmo treinamento religioso e herdaram caractersticas. Seguramente, ento, tudo que ns aprendemos relativo a James nos ajudar os melhores para entender Jesus. Eles so semelhantes em sua perspiccia potica e sua sabedoria prtica. Eles so ambos aficionada por fala figurativa, e parece sempre natural e no forado. Os discursos de Jesus so cheios com pssaros e flores e ventos e nuvens e todas as vises e sons de vida rural em Palestine. A escrita de James abunda em referncia para as flores de campo e a grama de prado e os mananciais de sal e o vento em chamas e o cedo e a chuva posterior. Eles so semelhantes em atitude mental e em agilidade espiritual. Eles tm muito em comum no equipamento material de seu pensado. James estava bem versado na literatura apcrifa. Ns no razoavelmente podemos concluir que Jesus era da mesma maneira que familiares com estes livros como ele? James parece ter adquirido um domnio comparativo do idioma grego e ter tido um pouco de conhecido com a filosofia grega. Jesus no teria estado tambm fornecido nestas linhas como ele? Qual era o carter de James? Toda tradio testemunha para sua pureza pessoal e devoo persistente, comandando a reverncia e o respeito de todo quem o conheceu. Como ns localizamos os vrios elementos de seu carter manifestando eles mesmos em suas ansiedades e exortaes nesta epstola, ns achamos subindo antes de ns a imagem de Jesus como tambm o retrato de James. Ele um nico-importado homem, firme em f e paciente em testes. Ele lento para ira, mas muito rpida para descobrir quaisquer pecados de fala e hipocrisia de vida. Ele est cheio de humildade, mas pronto para campeo a causa da oprimida e a pobre. Ele odeia toda insinceridade e ele ama sabedoria, e ele acredita em orao e pratica isto em referncia para ambos bem temporal e espiritual. Ele acredita em igualdade absoluta na casa de Deus. Ele oposto para qualquer coisa isso estabelecer quaisquer distines entre irmos em seu lugar de adorao. Ele acredita em filantropia prtica. Ele acredita naquele o tipo certo da religio levar um homem para visitar o rfo e vivas em sua aflio, e manter ele mesmo sem mancha do mundo. Uma religio pura em sua estimao significar um homem puro. Ele acredita que ns devamos praticar tudo que ns oramos. Como ns estudamos estas caractersticas e opinies do irmo mais jovem, a imagem no faz de seu e nosso Irmo Mais velho cresce j clareia antes de nossos olhos?

LITERATURA.
Trabalhos em Introduo: Por Zahn, Weiss, Julicher, Salmo, Dods, Toucinho, Bennett e Adeney; MacClymont, O Novo Testamento e Seus Escritores; Farrar, As Mensagens dos Livros, e Incio de Dias de Cristianismo; Fraser, Conferncias na Bblia; Godet, Estudos Bblicos. Trabalhos na Idade Apostlica: McGiffert, Schaff, Hausrath, Weizsacker. Comentrios: Prefeito, Hort, Beyschlag, Vale, Huther, Plummer, Plumptre, Stier. Fenos de Doremus Almy JAMES, LETTER OF First letter of the General Epistles. PREVIEW Author Date, Origin, and Destination Purpose of Writing and Theological Teaching Content Author According to the salutation, this letter was written by James, a slave of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ (Jas 1:1, NLT). But who was this James? Of the several mentioned in the NT, only two have ever been proposed as the author of this letterJames the son of Zebedee, and James the Lords brother. The James who wrote this epistle was probably not James the son of Zebedee, for he was martyred too early (AD 44) to have written it (see Acts 12:12). Most scholars have identified this James as Jesus brother

NLT New Living Translation

(Mk 6:3; Gal 1:19), the prominent elder of the church in Jerusalem (Acts 15:13, 19; 21:1725; Gal 2:12). The whole character of the epistle coincides with what we know of this Jamess legalism and Jewishness.
Ancient Papyrus Manuscript of James James 1:15-18 from papyrus Oxyrhynchus 1229 (c. 200)P23

As an elder of Jerusalem writing to the 12 tribes of the dispersion (which came as a result of the persecution noted in Acts 11:19), James set forth the gospel in its relation to the law, which the Jews revered. As Pauls epistles are a commentary on the doctrines flowing from the death and resurrection of Christ, so Jamess epistle has a close connection with Christs teaching during his life on earth, especially his Sermon on the Mount. In both the Sermon on the Mount and the Epistle of James, the law is represented as fulfilled in love, and the very language is remarkably similar (cf. Jas 1:2 with Mt 5:12; Jas 1:4 with Mt 5:48; Jas 1:5 and 5:1415 with Mt 7:711; Jas 2:13 with Mt 5:7 and 6:1415; Jas 2:10 with Mt 5:19; Jas 4:4 with Mt 6:24; Jas 4:11 with Mt 7:12; Jas 5:2 with Mt 6:19). The whole spirit of this epistle breathes the same gospel-righteousness that the Sermon on the Mount inculcates as the highest realization of the law. Jamess own character as the Just suited this coincidence (cf. Jas 1:20; 2:10; 3:18 with Mt 5:20). It also fitted him for presiding over a church still zealous for the law (Acts 21:1824; Gal 2:12). If any could win the Jews to the gospel, he was the most likely one because he presented a pattern of OT righteousness, combined with evangelical faith (cf. also Jas 2:8 with Mt 5:44, 48). Date, Origin, and Destination Many scholars confirm an early date for Jamess epistle, even as early as AD 4549, because the whole orientation of the epistle fits the early history of the church, an era in which many Jewish Christians had not made a complete severance from Judaism. Thus, James uses the terms the twelve tribes (Jas 1:1) and the synagogue (2:2, Greek); he speaks as an OT prophet (5:1ff.) and as one fond of OT proverbs (cf. Jas 1:5 with Prv 2:6; Jas 1:19 with Prv 29:20; Jas 3:18 with Prv 11:30; Jas 4:1316 with Prv 27:1; and Jas 5:20 with Prv 10:12). Jamess message, as was noted earlier, closely follows Jesus sermons. His message does not deal with the Jewish/Gentile problems that arose in the 50s and 60s. Moreover, he, unlike Peter, Jude, and John (in their epistles), did not deal with false teachings. All these facts point to an early date. This date is probably before AD 50, when the first Jerusalem Council assembled to discuss the Jewish/Gentile problem (Acts 15:1ff.). Also, the date is probably after AD 44, the time of the persecution instigated by Herod Agrippa (12:1). This persecution would have caused many Jewish Christians to leave Jerusalem and thereby be the dispersed (Jas 1:1). Thus, James should be dated AD 45 49. As such, the Epistle of James was the first NT book to be written. If these dates are not accurate, then we are, at least, sure that it was written before AD 61 or 62, the time of Jamess martyrdom, according to Josephus. Although a number of suggestions have been made from time to time about the origin of the book, there can be little doubt that the letter was written in Palestine. The author makes allusions that are Near Eastern generally and Palestinian particularly (cf. the early and late rain, 5:7; the spring of brackish water, 3:11; the fig, olive, and vine, 3:12; and the scorching heat, 1:11). The contents of the letter indicate clearly that James was writing to Jewish Christians. They are called the twelve tribes, a title of Israel (1:1); their Christianity is assumed in 2:1; their place of meeting is called a synagogue (2:2); and they are told about the compassion of the Lord Almighty (5:4)a name for God used in the OT. In the shorter, disconnected passages of the letter, it is impossible to discover anything about the readers circumstances. Most of these exhortations are general and relate to social and spiritual conditions one might find among any group of Christians in any age. The more extended passages that deal with social conditions (2:112; 5:111) do provide information about the readers situation. James is addressing poor Christians who are employed as farm laborers by wealthy landowners. A few rich may be included among his Jewish Christian readers (cf. 4:1317), but James is primarily concerned with the poor. His statements denouncing the rich are reminiscent of the OT prophets, especially Amos. Purpose of Writing and Theological Teaching The letter of James was written (1) to strengthen Jewish Christians undergoing trial (Jas 1:24, 1315; 5:711); (2) to correct a misunderstanding of the Pauline doctrine of justification by faith (2:1426); and (3) to pass down to first-generation Christians a wealth of practical wisdom. Jamess theology is not dogmatic; it omits the great theological themes that dominate Pauls writings and play such an important role in the rest of the books of the NT. James makes no mention of the Incarnation,

c circaapproximately

and the name of Christ appears only twice (1:1; 2:1). No mention is made of Christs sufferings, death, or resurrection. Jamess theology is practical and has a decided Jewish flavor. The distinctive Christian features, of course, are there. James has simply mingled the two to produce a Jewish-Christian document. The outstanding theological themes of the letter are as follows: Temptations and Trials The typically Jewish teachingsjoy in trials and the use of trials for the building and perfecting of characterare both found in the letter (1:24). James also discusses the origin of temptation (vv 1315). Here the author comes into conflict with contemporary Jewish theology. The rabbinical solution to the problem of the origin of sin was that there was an evil tendency in man that enticed man to sin. The rabbis reasoned that since God is the Creator of all things, including the evil impulse in people, they are not responsible for their sins. No, says James. And remember, no one who wants to do wrong should ever say, God is tempting me. God is never tempted to do wrong, and he never tempts anyone else either. Temptation comes from the lure of our own evil desires (vv 1314, NLT). Law The entire letter is concerned with ethical teaching; there is no mention of the central gospel truths of Christs death and resurrection. James presupposes the gospel and presents the ethical side of Christianity as a perfect law. He seems to be reassuring his Jewish-Christian readers that for them there is still law (the priceless possession of every Jew). The law (ethical teaching of Christianity) is a perfect law (1:25) because it was perfected by Jesus Christ. It is also a law of freedomthat is, a law that applies to those who have freedom, not from law, but from sin and self through the word of truth. Thus law is a Palestinian-Christian Jews way of describing the ethical teaching of the Christian faith, the standard of conduct for the believer in Jesus Christ. This tendency to describe Christian ethical teaching as law is found in 2:813, a passage that arises out of a rebuke against the favoritism that Jamess readers were showing toward the rich. This favoritism was being condoned by an appeal to the law of love to ones neighbor. So James writes, It is good when you truly obey our Lords royal command (2:8, NLT). The royal command is for those who are of Gods kingdom; it is the rule of faith for those who have willingly subjected themselves to Gods rule. The identification of law with the ethical side of Christianity runs through the entire letter. Faith and Works Faith plays an important role in the theology of James. The basic element of piety (1:3; cf. 2:5) is belief in Godnot merely belief in his existence but belief in his character as being good and benevolent in his dealings with mankind (1:6). Faith includes belief in the power of God and in his ability to perform miraculous acts; it is closely associated with prayer (5:1516; cf. 1:6). James has a dynamic concept of faith and clearly goes beyond Judaism when he speaks of faith directed toward the Lord Jesus Christ (2:1). Similarities exist between the concept of faith in James and that concept in the teachings of Jesus. For the Lord Jesus, also, faith meant gaining access to the divine power and is often associated with healing (cf. Mt 21:22; Mk 5:34; 11:24). The best-known passage in which faith is mentioned is James 2:1426, where it is contrasted with works. From a close study of this passage, it can be determined that James is not contradicting Paul. For both James and Paul, faith is directed toward the Lord Jesus Christ; such faith will always produce good works. The faith of which James speaks is not faith in the Hebraic sense of trust in God that results in moral action. This is not recognized as true faith by James (cf. if a man says he has faith, 2:14), and Paul would agree with him. Jamess use of the word works differs significantly from Pauls. For James, works are works of faith, the ethical outworking of true spirituality and include especially the work of love (2:8). (Paul would probably call such works the fruit of the Spirit.) When Paul uses the word works, he usually has in mind the works of the law whereby people attempt to establish their own righteousness before God. It is against such theological heresy that Pauls strongest polemics are addressed in the letters to the Galatians and Romans. Wisdom Jamess concept of wisdom also reveals the Jewish background of the letter. Wisdom is primarily practical, not philosophical. It is not to be identified with reasoning power or the ability to apprehend intellectual problems; it has nothing to do with the questions how or why. It is to be sought by earnest prayer and is a gift from God (Jas 1:5). Both of these ideas find their roots in the Wisdom Literature of the Jews (cf. Prv 2:6; Wisd of Sol 7:7; Ecclus 1:1). The wise man demonstrates his wisdom by his good life (Jas 3:13), whereas the wisdom that produces jealousy and selfishness is not Gods kind of wisdom (vv 1516). Doctrine of the End Time Three important end-time themes are touched upon in the letter.

THE KINGDOM OF GOD Mention of the kingdom of God grows out of a discussion of favoritism in the first half of chapter 2. No favoritism is to be shown to the rich, for James asks, Hasnt God chosen the poor in this world to be rich in faith? Arent they the ones who will inherit the kingdom God promised to those who love him? (2:5, NLT). This echoes our Lords teaching in Luke 6:20: God blesses you who are poor, for the Kingdom of God is given to you (NLT). The kingdom is the reign of God partially realized in this life but fully realized in the life to come (cf. promised, Jas 2:5). JUDGMENT This is a dominant end-time theme of the letter. In 2:12, the readers are admonished to speak and act, remembering that they will be judged under the law of liberty, and they are reminded that judgment is without mercy to one who has shown no mercy. In other words, judgment will be administered according to works of love. In 3:1, James addresses teachers and reminds them that privilege is another basis on which God judges. The theme of judgment again appears in 5:16, and here the author reaches prophetic heights. Gods judgment will fall on the wealthy landowners who have lived self-indulgent, irresponsible lives. Not only have they cheated their poor tenant farmers; they have even condemned and killed good people who had no power to defend themselves against you [the landowners] (5:6, NLT). All this has made them ripe for judgment (your hearts are nice and fat, ready for the slaughterv 5, NLT). The final passage on judgment (5:9) is addressed to those who are exploited or suffering. Jamess word of exhortation is that they are not to grumble against each other. Judging is Gods business, and the Judge is close at hand. THE SECOND COMING The hope of Christs coming is presented as the great stimulus for Christian living. Every kind of suffering and trial must be endured because the coming of Christ is at hand (5:8). This expectancy is powerful and immediatelike that found in the Thessalonian letters. Content In the true spirit of Wisdom Literature, James touches upon many subjects. His short, abrupt paragraphs have been likened to a string of pearlseach is an entity in itself. Some transitions exist, but they are often difficult to find and James moves quickly from one subject to another. The author begins by identifying himself as the slave of God and of the Lord Jesus Christ, and his readers as the twelve tribes in the dispersion (see NLT mg)that is, the Jewish Christians who left Jerusalem and Israel due to persecution. His first word is one of encouragement. Trials are to be counted as joy because they are Gods way of testing the believer, and they produce spiritual maturity. If the reason for a trial is not clear, God can and will give the answer. He is a lavish giver of wisdom to those who really want it (1:58). A poor Christian should be proud of his exalted position in Jesus Christ, and a rich Christian should be glad that he has discovered there are more important things than wealth. Riches are transitory, like quickly wilting flowers under the hot Palestine sun (1:911). God promises life to those who endure trials. One must not blame God for temptation, for it is contrary to his very nature either to be tempted or to tempt people. Temptation has its origin in peoples selfish desirea desire that, when brought to full fruition, produces death (1:1215). God is not the origin of temptation but the source of all good. He has given people his best gift, the gift of new life, and this has come through the gospel (vv 1618). The proper attitude toward the Word of Truth is receptivity, not anger, and effective listening to that word involves spiritual preparation of heart and mind. Such a reception of the word brings salvation (1:19 21). The word is to be acted upon, not merely listened to. To be a passive hearer is to be like a man who sees himself in a mirror, and because he takes such a fleeting glance, forgets what he sees. An active hearer, one who takes a long look in the mirror of Gods Word, will become a doer, and God will bring great blessing into his life (vv 2225). True religion is an intensely practical thing. It involves such things as controlling ones tongue, looking after the needs of orphans and widows, and adopting a nonworldly lifestyle (1:2627). Favoritism and faith in Jesus Christ do not go together. It is wrong to show favoritism to a rich man when he comes into the assembly and to ignore a poor man. God has chosen poor people to be heirs of his kingdom. Furthermore, to show favoritism to the rich does not make sense, since they are the very ones who drag Christians into court and blaspheme the name of Christ (2:17). If, by showing deference to the rich, the royal lawto love ones neighbor as oneself is fulfilled, well and good. But to show favoritism is sin,
mg A variant reading noted in the margin or footnote of a translation

and such sin will be judged by God. In order to be a lawbreaker one has only to break a single law (vv 8 13). Can a faith that does not produce works save a person? What good is a faith that does not respond to human need? Such a faith is dead. Someone will object by saying that there are faith Christians and there are works Christians. But this is not so. True faith is always demonstrated by works. It is not enough to have orthodox beliefs. Even the demons are theologically orthodox! Abraham, by offering up Isaac, is an example of how true faith and works go together. Even Rahab the prostitute demonstrated her faith by protecting the spies at Jericho. So faith and works are inseparable (2:1426). Not many people should become spiritual teachers, because of the awesome responsibility involved. All of us are subject to mistakes, especially mistakes of the tongue, because the tongue is almost impossible to control. It is like a destructive blaze set by hell itself. The tongue is also inconsistent; it is used both to praise God and to curse men. Such inconsistency ought not to be (3:112). True wisdom will always evidence itself in ethical living, whereas false wisdom produces jealousy and selfish ambition (3:1318). Strife and conflict arise out of illegitimate desires. Failure to have what one wants arises either from not asking God for it or from asking for the wrong thing. To be a friend of the world is to be an enemy of God, for God is a jealous God and will brook no rivals. He also opposes the proud but offers abundant grace to the humble (4:110). To speak against a brother or sister, or to judge them, is to speak against Gods law and to judge it. The Christians proper role is to be a doer of the law, not a judge. The role of judge belongs to God alone (4:11 12). Life is uncertain. Therefore, plans for traveling or doing business should be made with the realization that all are subject to the will of God. To do otherwise is to be boastful and arrogant. When what is right is clearly known and one fails to do it, that is sin (4:1317). Judgment is coming to the rich because they are hoarding their wealth instead of using it for good purposes. God is not unmindful of the cries of the poor whom the rich have cheated and unjustly condemned. He is preparing the selfish, unscrupulous rich for a day of awful judgment (5:16). In the midst of suffering and injustice, the poor are to be patient for Christs coming, as the farmer must be patient as he waits for God to send the rains to cause his crops to grow and ripen. The return of Christ is at hand and therefore complaining and judging one another must cease. Job is a good example of patience and endurance in suffering. One need not use oaths to guarantee the truthfulness of his statements. A single yes or no is sufficient (5:712). Suffering should elicit prayer, cheerfulness, and praise. When believers are sick, they should call the elders of the church to pray for them and anoint them with oil. God has promised to answer such prayers. If the sickness is due to personal sin, and if that sin is confessed, God will forgive. Elijah is a classic example of how the prayer of a righteous man has powerful results (5:1318). If a Christian sees that another Christian has strayed from the truth and is able to bring him or her back into fellowship with Christ and his church, the consequences will be (1) that the sinner will be saved from death, and (2) that God will forgive the erring Christian (5:1920). See also Brothers of Jesus; James (Person).
7

JAMES, CARTA DE Primeira carta das Epstolas Gerais. PR-ESTRIA Autor Data, Origem, e Destino Propsito de Escrita e Ensino Teolgicos Contedo

Elwell, W. A., & Comfort, P. W. (2001). Tyndale Bible dictionary. Tyndale reference library (665). Wheaton, Ill.: Tyndale House Publishers.

Autor de acordo com a saudao, esta carta era escrita por James, um escravo de Deus e do Senhor Jesus Cristo (Jas 1:1, nlt). Mas quem era este James? Do vrios mencionado no NT, s dois j foi proposto como o autor desta cartaJames o filho de Zebedee, e James o irmo do Senhor. O James que escreveu esta epstola provavelmente no era James o filho de Zebedee, para ele ser martirizado muito cedo (anncio 44) ter escrito isto (veja Atos 12:12). A maioria de estudiosos identificaram este James como irmo do Jesus (Mk 6:3; Gal 1:19), a proeminente mais velha da igreja em Jerusalm (Atos 15:13, 19; 21:1725; Gal 2:12). O carter inteiro da epstola coincide com que ns sabemos deste legalism do James e Jewishness.

Manuscrito de papiro antigo de James James 1:15-18 de papiro Oxyrhynchus 1229 (C. 200)P23

Como uma mais velha de Jerusalm escrevendo para as 12 tribos da disperso (que veio como resultado da perseguio notada em Atos 11:19), James partir o evangelho em sua relao para a lei, que os judeus venerados. Como epstolas do Paul so um comentrio nas doutrinas que fluem da morte e ressurreio de Cristo, ento epstola do James tem uma conexo ntima com ensino do Cristo durante sua vida na Terra, especialmente seu Sermo no Monte. Em ambos o Sermo no Monte e a Epstola de James, a lei representada como cumpriu apaixonado, e o muito idioma notavelmente semelhante (cf. Jas 1:2 com MT 5:12; Jas 1:4 com MT 5:48; Jas 1:5 e 5:1415 com MT 7:711; Jas 2:13 com MT 5:7 e 6:1415; Jas 2:10 com MT 5:19; Jas 4:4 com MT 6:24; Jas 4:11 com MT 7:12; Jas 5:2 com MT 6:19). O esprito inteiro desta epstola respira a mesma retido de evangelho que o Sermo no Monte inculca como a realizao mais alta da lei. Prprio carter do James como a S vestido desta coincidncia (cf. Jas 1:20; 2:10; 3:18 com MT 5:20). Tambm o ajustou para presidir uma igreja quieta zeloso para a lei (Atos 21:1824; Gal 2:12). Se qualquer pudesse ganhar os judeus para o evangelho, ele era o mais provvel um porque ele apresentou um padro de retido de OT, combinada com f evanglica (cf. Tambm Jas 2:8 com MT 5:44, 48). Data, Origem, e Destino Muitos estudiosos confirmam uma primeira data para epstola do James, at logo que anncio 4549, porque a orientao inteira da epstola ajusta a primeira histria da igreja, uma era em que muitos cristos judeus no fizeram uma separao completa de Judasmo. Deste modo, James usa as condies as doze tribos (Jas 1:1) e a sinagoga (2:2, grega); ele fala como um profeta de OT (5:1ff.) E como um aficionados por provrbios de OT (cf. Jas 1:5 com Prv 2:6; Jas 1:19 com Prv 29:20; Jas 3:18 com Prv 11:30; Jas 4:1316 com Prv 27:1; E Jas 5:20 com Prv 10:12). Mensagem do James, como era notada mais cedo, prximo segue sermes do Jesus. Sua mensagem no lida com os problemas de Jewish/Gentile que surgiram nos anos 50 e 60s. Alm disso, ele, diferentemente de Peter, Jude, e John (em suas epstolas), no lidaram com ensinos falsos. Todo estes ponto de fatos para uma primeira data. Esta data provavelmente antes de anncio 50, quando o primeiro Conselho de Jerusalm ajuntada para discutir o problema de Jewish/Gentile (Atos 15:1ff.). Tambm, a data provavelmente depois de anncio 44, o tempo da perseguio instigada por Herod Agrippa (12:1). Esta perseguio teria causado muitos cristos judeus para deixar Jerusalm e assim estar a dispersada (Jas 1:1). Deste modo, James devia ser obsoleto anncio 4549. Como tal, a Epstola de James foi o primeiro NT registra ser escrito. Se estas datas no so precisas, ento ns somos, pelo menos, certo que era escrito na frente de anncio 61 ou 62, o tempo de martrio do James, de acordo com o Josephus. Embora vrias sugestes foram feitas de vez em quando sobre a origem do livro, pode haver pequena dvida que a carta era escrita em Palestine. O autor faz insinuaes que so Prximas do leste geralmente e palestino particularmente (cf. O cedo e tarde chova, 5:7; A fonte da gua salgado, 3:11; O figo, azeitona, e vinha, 3:12; E o calor abrasador, 1:11). O contedo da carta indica claramente que James estava escrevendo para cristos judeus. Eles so chamados as doze tribos, um ttulo de Israel (1:1); seu Cristianismo assumido em 2:1; Seu lugar de reunio chamado uma sinagoga (2:2); e eles so informados sobre a compaixo do Todo-poderoso de Senhor (5:4)um nome para Deus usado no OT. No menor, passagens desconectadas da carta, impossvel descobrir qualquer coisa sobre as circunstncias dos leitores. A maior parte destas exortaes so gerais e se relacionam a condies sociais e espirituais poderiam se achar entre qualquer grupo de cristos

em qualquer idade. As passagens mais estendidas que lidam com condies sociais (2:112; 5:111) fornea informaes sobre a situao dos leitores. James est endereando cristos pobres que so empregados como operrios de fazenda por proprietrios de terras ricos. Alguns ricos podem ser includos entre seus leitores Cristos judeus (cf. 4:1317), mas James est principalmente preocupado com o pobre. Suas declaraes denunciando o rico so rememorativos os profetas de OT, especialmente Amos. O propsito de Escrita e Ensino Teolgicos A carta de James era escrita (1) fortalecer cristos judeus sofrendo tentativa (Jas 1:24, 1315; 5:711); (2) corrigir um engano da doutrina de Pauline de justificao por f (2:1426); e (3) passar at primeiros-cristos de gerao uma riqueza de sabedoria prtica. A teologia do James no dogmtica; omite os temas teolgicos grandes que dominam escrita do Paul e tocam um papel to importante no resto dos livros do NT. James no faz nenhuma meno da Encarnao, e o nome de Cristo aparece s duas vezes (1:1; 2:1). Nenhuma meno feita de padecimentos do Cristo, morte, ou ressurreio. A teologia do James prtica e tem um sabor judeu decidido. As caractersticas Crists distintivas, claro, esto l. James simplesmente entrosou os dois para produzir um judeu-Cristo documento. Os temas teolgicos excelentes da carta so como segue: As tentaes e Testes Os ensinos tipicamente judeujoy em testes e o uso de testes para o edifcio e aperfeioando de carterso ambos achadas na carta (1:24). James tambm discute a origem de tentao (vv 1315). Aqui o autor entra em conflito com teologia judia contempornea. A soluo rabnica para o problema da origem de pecado era que existia uma propenso do mal em homem que atraiu homem para pecar. Os rabinos debatidos aquele desde Deus o Criador de todas as coisas, inclusive o impulso do mal nas pessoas, eles no so responsveis por seus pecados. No, diga James. E lembre, ningum que quer fazer errado devia j dizer, Deus est tentando me. Deus nunca est tentado para fazer errado, e ele nunca tenta qualquer outro qualquer um. A tentao vem da isca de nossos prprios desejos do mal (vv 1314, nlt). A lei A carta inteira est preocupada com ensino tico; No existe nenhuma meno das verdades de evangelho central da morte e ressurreio do Cristo. James pressupe o evangelho e apresenta o lado tico de Cristianismo como uma lei perfeita. Ele parece estar reassegurando seus judeus-Cristos leitores que para eles existe ainda lei (a possesso inestimvel de todo judeu). A lei (ensino tico de Cristianismo) uma lei perfeita (1:25) porque era aperfeioado por Jesus Cristo. Tambm uma lei da liberdadeque , uma lei que se aplica a aqueles que tm liberdade, no de lei, mas de pecado e auto pela palavra de verdade. Deste modo lei modo do palestino-Cristo judeu de descrever o ensino tico da f crist, o padro de conduta para o partidrio de Jesus Cristo. Esta propenso para descrever ensino tico Cristo como lei achados em 2:813, uma passagem que surge fora de uma repreenso contra o favoritismo que leitores do James estavam mostrando em direo aos ricos. Este favoritismo estava sendo tolerado por uma atrao para a lei de amor para se vizinho. Ento James escreve, bom quando voc verdadeiramente obedecer comando real do nosso Senhor (2:8, nlt). O comando real para aqueles que so de reino do Deus; a regra de f para aqueles que de boa vontade sujeitaram eles mesmos para regra do Deus. A identificao de lei com o lado tico de Cristianismo examina a carta inteira. A f e Trabalha F desempenha um papel importante na teologia de James. O elemento bsico de devoo (1:3; Cf. 2:5) convico em Deusno meramente convico em sua existncia mas convico em seu carter como sendo bom e benevolente em seus procedimentos com a humanidade (1:6). F inclui convico no poder de Deus e em sua habilidade de apresentar atos milagrosos; est prximo associado com orao (5:1516; Cf. 1:6). James tem um conceito dinmico de f e claramente vai alm de Judasmo quando ele falar de f dirigida em direo ao Senhor Jesus Cristo (2:1). As semelhanas existem entre o conceito de f em James e aquele conceito nos ensinos de Jesus. Para o Senhor Jesus, tambm, f significada ganhando acesso ao poder divino e est freqentemente associado com curativo (cf. MT 21:22; Mk 5:34; 11:24). A passagem mais conhecida em que f mencionada James 2:1426, onde contrastado com trabalhos. De um estudo ntimo desta passagem, pode ser determinado que James no est contradizendo Paul. Para ambos os James e Paul, f dirigida em direo ao Senhor Jesus Cristo; Tal f sempre produzir bons trabalhos. A f do qual James fala no f no Hebraic sente de confiana em Deus que resulta em ao

moral. Isto no reconhecido como f verdadeira por James (cf. Se um homem diz que ele tem f, 2:14), e Paul concordaria com ele. O uso do James dos trabalhos de palavra difere significativamente de do Paul. Para James, trabalhos so trabalhos de f, a tica trabalhando mais que de espiritualidade verdadeira e incluir especialmente o trabalho de amor (2:8). (Paul provavelmente chamaria tais trabalhos a fruta do Esprito.) Quando Paul usar os trabalhos de palavra, ele normalmente tem em mente os trabalhos da lei por meio de que as pessoas tentam estabelecer sua prpria retido na frente de Deus. contra tal heresia teolgica que polmicas mais fortes do Paul so tratadas nas cartas para o Galatians e Romanos. O conceito do sabedoria James de sabedoria tambm revela o fundo judeu da carta. A sabedoria principalmente prtica, no filosfica. para no ser identificado com o poder de razoamento ou a habilidade de temer problemas intelectuais; no tem nada a ver com as perguntas como ou por que. para ser buscado por orao de srio e um presente de Deus (Jas 1:5). Ambas destas idias acham suas razes na Literatura de Sabedoria dos judeus (cf. Prv 2:6; Wisd de Sol 7:7; Ecclus 1:1). O homem sbio demonstra sua sabedoria por sua boa vida (Jas 3:13), considerando que a sabedoria que produz cime e egosmo no tipo do Deus de sabedoria (vv 1516). A doutrina do Tempo de Fim Trs importantes fim-tempo temas so falado sobres na carta. O Reino de Meno de Deus do reino de Deus cresce fora de uma discusso de favoritismo no primeiro metade de captulo 2. Nenhum favoritismo para ser ser mostrado para o rico, para James perguntar, Deus No escolheu o pobre neste mundo para ser rico em f? Eles no so as pessoas que herdaro o Deus de reino prometeu aqueles quem o amam? (2:5, nlt). Este ensino de ecos do nosso Senhor em Luke 6:20: Deus abenoa voc que pobre, para o Reino de Deus recebe para voc (nlt). O reino o reinado de Deus parcialmente percebido nesta vida mas completamente percebeu na vida para vir (cf. Prometeu, Jas 2:5). O julgamento Isto um dominante fim-tempo tema da carta. Em 2:12, os leitores so prevenidos para falar e agir, lembrando que eles sero julgados debaixo da lei de liberdade, e eles so lembrados aquele julgamento est sem clemncia para uma que no mostrou a nenhuma clemncia. Em outras palavras, julgamento ser administrado de acordo com os trabalhos de amor. Em 3:1, James trata professores e lembra a eles aquele privilgio outra base em que juzes de Deus. O tema de julgamento novamente aparece em 5:16, e aqui o autor alcana alturas profticas. O julgamento do deus atacar os proprietrios de terras ricos que viveram auto-vidas indulgentes, irresponsveis. Eles no s enganastes seus fazendeiros de inquilino pobre; Eles at condenaram e mataram boas pessoas que no tiveram nenhum poder para defender eles mesmos contra voc [os proprietrios de terras] (5:6, nlt). Tudo isso fez eles pronto para julgamento (seus coraes so bons e gordura, pronta para a matanav 5, nlt). A passagem final em julgamento (5:9) tratado para aqueles que so explorados ou sofrendo. A palavra do James de exortao que eles so no murmurar contra um ao outro. Julgar negcios do Deus, e o Juiz fechar mo. O Segundo Vindo A esperana de Cristo est vir para apresentado como o grande incentivo para Cristo vivo. Todo tipo de sofrimento e tentativa devem ser suportados porque o resultar de Cristo est mo (5:8). Esta expectao poderosa e imediataassim achadas nas cartas de Thessalonian. Contedo No esprito verdadeiro de Literatura de Sabedoria, James fala sobre muitos assuntos. Seus pargrafos pequenos, abruptos foram comparados para uma srie de prolasque cada uma entidade nele mesmo. Algumas transies existem, mas eles so freqentemente difceis de achar e James move depressa de um sujeito a outro. O autor comea identificando ele mesmo como o escravo de Deus e do Senhor Jesus Cristo, e seus leitores como as doze tribos na disperso (vejam nlt mg)isto , os cristos judeus que deixaram Jerusalm e Israel devido a perseguio. Sua primeira palavra um de encorajamento. Os testes so para ser contados como joy porque eles so modo do Deus de testar o crente, e eles produzem maturidade espiritual. Se a razo para uma tentativa no clara, Deus pode e d a resposta. Ele um doador prdigo de sabedoria para aqueles que realmente querem isto (1:58).

Um pobre Cristo devia orgulhar-se de sua posio exaltada em Jesus Cristo, e um rico Cristo devia estar contente que ele descobriu que existem coisas mais importantes que riqueza. A riqueza so transitrias, como depressa murchando flores debaixo do sol de Palestine quente (1:911). Deus promete que vida para aqueles que suportam testes. No se deve culpar Deus para tentao, para ao contrrio de sua muito natureza ou ser tentado ou tentar pessoas. A tentao tem sua origem em desejo egosta das pessoasum desejo isto, quando trouxe para gozo cheio, morte de produtos (1:1215). Deus no a origem de tentao mas a fonte de todo bom. Ele deu a pessoas seu melhor presente, o presente de nova vida, e este foi bem sucedido para o evangelho (vv 1618). A atitude adequada em direo Palavra de Verdade receptivity, no raiva, e compreenso efetiva para aquela palavra envolve preparao espiritual de corao e mente. Tal recepo da palavra traz salvao (1:1921). A palavra para ser agida, no meramente escutada . Para ser um ouvinte passivo para ser como um homem que v ele mesmo em um espelho, e porque ele toma um olhar to passageiro, esquece o que ele v. Um ouvinte ativo, um que toma um olhar longo no espelho de Palavra do Deus, se tornar um fazedor, e Deus trar grande bno em sua vida (vv 2225). A religio verdadeira uma coisa intensamente prtica. Envolve tais coisas como controlando se lngua, cuidando das necessidades de rfos e vivas, e adotando um nonworldly estilo de vida (1:2627). O favoritismo e f em Jesus Cristo no vo junto. Est errado para mostrar a favoritismo para um homem rico quando ele entrar na assemblia e ignorar um homem pobre. Deus escolheu pessoas pobres para ser herdeiros de seu reino. Alm disso, mostrar a favoritismo para o rico no faz sentido, desde que eles so os muito uns que arrastam cristos em tribunal e blasfemam o nome de Cristo (2:17). Se, por deferncia de exibio para a rica, a lei real paraamar se ser vizinho como a si mesmo cumprido, bem e bom. Mas mostrar a favoritismo pecado, e tal pecado ser julgado por Deus. A fim de ser um transgressor da lei se tem s para quebrar uma lei nica (vv 813). Uma f que pode no produzir trabalhos salvarem uma pessoa? Que boa uma f que est no responder para necessidade humana? Tal f est morta. Algum lega objeto dizendo que existem cristos de f e existem cristos de trabalhos. Mas isto no isso. A f verdadeira est sempre demonstrada por trabalhos. No suficiente ter convices ortodoxas. At os demnios so theologically ortodoxo! Abrao, por oferecimento em cima Isaac, um exemplo do quo f e trabalhos verdadeiros vo junto. At Rahab a prostituta demonstrou sua f protegendo os espies em Jericho. Ento f e trabalhos so inseparveis (2:14 26). No muitas pessoas deviam se tornar professores espirituais, por causa da responsabilidade incrvel envolvida. Todos ns so sujeito a enganos, especialmente enganos da lngua, porque a lngua quase impossvel controlar. como uma chama destrutiva fixar por inferno propriamente. A lngua tambm incompatvel; usado ambos para louvar Deus e amaldioar homens. Tal inconsistncia devia para no ser (3:112). A sabedoria verdadeira sempre comprovar propriamente em tico vivo, considerando que sabedoria falsa produz cime e ambio egosta (3:1318). A discusso e conflito surgem fora de desejos ilegtimos. O fracasso ter o que quer se que surgir ou de no perguntar Deus por ele ou de pedir a coisa errada. Para ser um amigo do mundo para ser um inimigo de Deus, para Deus um Deus ciumento e lega riacho nenhum rival. Ele tambm ope o orgulhoso mas oferece graa abundante para a humilde (4:110). Para falar contra um irmo ou irm, ou julgar eles, para falar contra lei do Deus e julgar isto. O papel adequado do cristo para ser um fazedor da lei, no um juiz. O papel de juiz pertence a Deus s (4:1112). A vida incerta. Ento, planos para ambulantes ou fazendo negcios deviam ser feitos com a realizao que todos so sujeito ao legar de Deus. Para fazer caso contrrio para ser orgulhoso e arrogante. Quando o que direito ser claramente conhecido e uma falhas para fazer isto, isto pecado (4:1317). O julgamento est vindo para o rico porque eles esto acumulando sua riqueza em vez de usarem isto para sempre propsitos. Deus no unmindful dos gritos dos pobres quem os ricos enganaram e injustamente condenaram. Ele est preparando o egosta, sem escrpulos rico por um dia de julgamento terrvel (5:16). No meio de sofrer e injustia, a pobre so para ser paciente para Cristo estar vindo, como o fazendeiro deve ser paciente como ele espera por Deus para enviar as chuvas para causar suas colheitas para crescer e amadurecer. O retorno de Cristo est mo e ento reclamando e julgando um ao outro deve cessar. O trabalho um bom exemplo de pacincia e resistncia em sofrer. No se precise use juramentos para garantir a veracidade de suas declaraes. Umas nicas sim ou no suficiente (5:712).

O sofrimento devia produzir orao, alegria, e elogio. Quando crentes esto doentes, eles deviam chamar os ancies da igreja para rezar para eles e untar eles com leo. Deus prometeu responder tais oraes. Se a nusea devido a pecado pessoal, e se aquele pecado confessado, Deus perdoar. Elijah um exemplo clssico de como a orao de um homem ntegro tem resultados poderosos (5:1318). Se um cristo v que outro Cristo tem strayed da verdade e pode o trazer ou suas costas em companheirismo com Cristo e sua igreja, as conseqncias sero (1) que o pecador ser economizado da morte, e (2) aquele Deus perdoar o errar Cristo (5:1920). Veja tambm Irmos de Jesus; James (Pessoa).

JAMES, EPISTLE OF. This oldest of NT epistle is first among the General Epistle, as Eusebius
termed James and Jude in the 4th cen. possibly because of their general content or readership. Author. The writer of this epistle is generally considered to be James the brother of our Lord (see James 3). Since James is Jacob in the original, this may be called the Epistle of Jacob to the Twelve Tribes (Jas 1:11). Theme. The book treats of faith demonstrated, tested and perfected by works. This has been called the epistle of the holy living of practical Christianity, of Christian ethics, Christianity in coveralls. Style. The style is terse, vivid, abounding in aphorisms, antithetic. Since many thoughts are grouped together in short proverbial expressions, this epistle is regarded as the Proverbs of the NT. James imagery is drawn from nature, in contrast with Pauls which is drawn from activities of men. Some of the terms used aptly describe the country where the author lived: near the sea (1:6), with salt springs (3:12); a place of olives, vines, and figs, (3:12), burning sun and drought (1:11); early and latter rain (5:7); a place of Synagogues (2:2). There is an unusual double use of words (cf. patience, perfect, 1:34), and a contrasting of positive and negative statements (cf. perfect and entire, wanting nothing, 1:4). Characteristics. James begins and ends abruptly, lacks the autobiographical data of Paul, contains more references to nature than all Pauls epistles, and more parallels to Christs discourses than any other part of the NT. For striking similarities to the Sermon on the Mount, (cf.Mt 5:3437; 6:19; 7:1 with Jas 5:12; 5:2; 4:1112. James is closer in style to Peter than to Paul. For similarities to (I Peter cf. I Pet 1:7; 1:24; 1:23; 2:11; 5:56 with Jas 1:3, 11, 18; 4:1; 4:610. James contains no apostolic benediction, perhaps because it sternly condems non-Christians among its readers (4:4; 5:16). Although it has been criticized because it lacks in such NT words as gospel, redemption, incarnation, resurrection, ascension, it does speak of the Lord Jesus Christ (1:1; 2:1), the new birth (1:18), faith (2:1426) and the return of the Lord (5:78). Clearly addressed to the Jews (1:1; 2:1 21) and reminding the reader of Matthew the Jewish Gospel, James is sometimes called Jewish, but it reveals a noticeable absence of the Jewish elements which were done away in Christ: sacrifice, circumcision, priesthood, feast days, the sabbath. In contrast, it speaks of teachers and elders in the church (3:1; 5:14). Outline of James An outline is difficult to construct because of an apparent lack of logical order. Nevertherless, a structure is clearly evident. I. Believers and Outwards Circumstances, 1:12 II. Believers and Inward Desire, 1:1316 III. Believers and the Word of God, 1:1727 IV. Believers and Their Neighbors, 2:113 V. The Believers Faith and Works, 2:1426 VI. The Believers Tongue, 3:112 VII. Heavenly Wisdom, 3:1318 VIII. World, Flesh, and Devil, 4:17 IX. God and His Law, 4:817 X. The Last Days, 5:19 XI. Patience and Prayers in Trails, 5:1020 James begins and ends with a discussion of testings, patience, the prayer of faith. Certain words occur at approximately the same distance from each end of the epistle (cf. Scripture, rich adultery, tongue). The heart of James is the remarkable statement in (3:2) that a perfect man is one who can control his tongue. Just as an

old family doctor diagnoses a disease by having his patient stick out his tongue, James diagnoses spiritual disease by examining the tongue and its manifestations. This is the most prominent theme of the epistle. Prominent teachings. Prayer: for wisdom (1:57), unanswered (4:23), of faith (5:1318). The Word: begotten by (1:18), receiving (1:21) obeying (1:25). Three tests of religion: self-control, love, purity (1:26 27). Trials bring perfection now (1:14), the crown of life later (1:12). How to make the devil flee and bring God near (4:78). A definition of sin (4:17). The charge that (Jas 2:24) contradicts (Rom 3:28) falls before the fact that James refers to justification before men (2:18), while Paul refers to justification before God (Rom 4:2). James deprecates only that faith which a man may say he has, while lacking works to demonstrate its genuineness (2:20). Bibliography. F. J. A. Hort, The Epistle of St. James 1:14:7, London: Macmillan, 1909. Richard J. Knowling, The Epistle of St. James,WC, 2nd ed., London: Methuen, 1910. Joseph B. Mayor, The Epistle of St. James, 3rd ed., London: Macmillan, 1913. C.L. Mitton, The Epistle of James, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1966. James H. Ropes, The Epistle of James, ICC, New York: Scribners, 1916. Alexander Ross, The Epistles of James and John, NIC, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1954. M. H. Shepherd, Jr., The Epistle of James and the Gosple of Matthew, JBL, LXXV (1956), 4051. R. V. G. Tasker, The General Epistle of James, TNTC, Grand Rapids: Eerdmans, 1956. S. M. C.
8

JAMES, EPSTOLA DE. Esta mais velha de epstola de NT est primeira entre a Epstola Geral, como Eusebius chamou James e Jude no 4 cen. Possivelmente por causa de seu contedo geral ou readership. Autor. O escritor desta epstola geralmente considerado ser James o irmo de nosso Senhor (veja James 3). Desde que James Jacob no original, isto pode ser chamado a Epstola de Jacob para as Doze Tribos (Jas 1:11). Tema. O livro trata de f demonstrada, testada e aperfeioada por trabalhos. Este foi chamado a epstola do santo vivo de Cristianismo prtico, de tica Crist, Cristianismo em coveralls. Estilo. O estilo conciso, vvido, abundando em provrbios, antitticos. Desde que muitos pensamentos so agrupados juntas em resumo expresses proverbiais, esta epstola considerada como os Provrbios do NT. A imagem do James tirada de natureza, em contraste com Paul que tirado de atividades de homens. Algumas das condies habilmente usaram descrevem o pas onde o autor vivido: Prximo ao mar (1:6), com sal pula (3:12); um lugar de azeitonas, vinhas, e figos, (3:12), queimando sol e seca (1:11); chuva cedo e posterior (5:7); um lugar de Sinagogas (2:2). existe um uso duplo incomum de palavras (cf. Pacincia, perfeita, 1:34), e uma contrastante de declaraes positivas e negativas (cf. Perfeito e inteiro, no querendo nada, 1:4). Caractersticas. James comea e fins abruptamente, faltas os dados autobiogrficos de Paul, contm mais referncias para natureza que todas epstolas do Paul, e mais parallels para discursos do Cristo que qualquer outra parte do NT. Para semelhanas notveis para o Sermo no Monte, (cf.MT 5:3437; 6:19; 7:1 com Jas 5:12; 5:2; 4:1112. James mais ntimo em estilo para Peter que para Paul. Para semelhanas para (eu Peter cf. Eu Acaricio 1:7; 1:24; 1:23; 2:11; 5:56 com Jas 1:3, 11, 18; 4:1; 4:610.
James no contm nenhuma bno apostlica, talvez porque ele sternly condems no cristos entre seus leitores (4:4; 5:16). Embora foi criticado porque ele faltas em tais palavras de NT como evangelho, redeno, encarnao, ressurreio, ascenso, fala do Senhor Jesus Cristo (1:1; 2:1), o novo nascimento (1:18), f (2:1426) e o retorno do Senhor (5:78). Claramente tratados para os judeus (1:1; 2:1 21) e lembrando o leitor de Matthew o Evangelho judeu, James est s vezes chamado judeu, mas ele revela que uma ausncia notvel dos elementos judeus que eram feitos longe em Cristo: Sacrifcio, circunciso, sacerdcio, dias de banquete, o sbado sagrado. Em contraste, fala de professores e ancies na igreja (3:1; 5:14). Esboo de James

Pfeiffer, C. F., Vos, H. F., & Rea, J. (1975; 2005). The Wycliffe Bible Encyclopedia. Moody Press.

Um esboo difcil de construir por causa de uma falta aparente de ordem lgica. Nevertherless, uma estrutura claramente evidente. I. Crentes e Fora Circunstncias, 1:12 II. Crentes e Desejo Dentro, 1:1316 III. Crentes e a Palavra de Deus, 1:1727 IV. Crentes e Seus Vizinhos, 2:113 V. A F e Trabalhos do Crente, 2:1426 VI. A Lngua do Crente, 3:112 VII. Sabedoria divina, 3:1318 VIII. Mundo, Carne, e Diabo, 4:17 IX. Deus e Sua Lei, 4:817 X. Os ltimos Dias, 5:19 XI. Pacincia e Oraes em Trilhas, 5:1020 James comea e fins com uma discusso de provas, pacincia, a orao de f. Certas palavras acontecem em aproximadamente a mesma distncia de cada fim da epstola (cf. Escritura, adultrio rico, lngua). O corao de James a declarao notvel (:2) que um homem perfeito um que pode controlar sua lngua. Da mesma maneira que uma mdico da famlia velha diagnostica uma doena tendo seu paciente esticar sua lngua, James diagnostica doena espiritual examinando a lngua e suas manifestaes. Isto o tema mais proeminente da epstola. Ensinos proeminentes. Orao: Para sabedoria (1:57), sem resposta (4:23), de f (5:1318). A Palavra: Procriada por (1:18), recebendo (1:21) obedecendo (1:25). Trs testes da religio: Autocontrole, amor, pureza (1:2627). Testes trazem perfeio agora (1:14), a coroa de vitalcia mais tarde (1:12). Como fazer o diabo fugir e trazer Deus prximo (4:78). Uma definio de pecado (4:17). A carga isto (Jas 2:24) contradiz (Rom 3:28) quedas antes do fato que James se refere a justificao na frente de homens (2:18), enquanto Paul se refere a justificao na frente de Deus (Rom 4:2). James implora s aquela f que um homem pode dizer que ele tem, enquanto trabalhos carentes para demonstrar sua autenticidade (2:20). Bibliografia. F. J. A. Hort, A Epstola de St. James 1:14:7, Londres: Macmillan, 1909. Richard J. Conhecendo, A Epstola de St. James,WC, 2 ed., Londres: Methuen, 1910. Prefeito de Joseph B., A Epstola de St. James, 3 ed., Londres: Macmillan, 1913. C.L. Mitton, A Epstola de James, Correntezas Principais: Eerdmans, 1966. Cordas de James H., A Epstola de James, ICC, Nova Iorque: Do Scribner, 1916. Alexander Ross, As Epstolas de James e John, NIC, Correntezas Principais: Eerdmans, 1954. M. H. Tomar conta, Jr., A Epstola de James e o Gosple de Matthew, JBL, LXXV (1956), 4051. R. V. G. Tasker, A Epstola Geral de James, TNTC, Correntezas Principais: Eerdmans, 1956. S. M. C.