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Permission is granted to print and copy this document for non-commercial distribution and exclusive use by instructors in the CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks course as part of an official Cisco Networking Academy.

CCNA Discovery

Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

StadiumCompany Story
The Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks course uses the fictional StadiumCompany network upgrade story in the main text and media presentation and in Packet Tracer activities. StadiumCompany is a stadium management company that manages a large sports facility.

When the sports facility was built, the network that supported its business offices and security services provided state-of-the-art communications capabilities. Over the years, the company added new equipment and increased the number of connections without considering the overall business goals and long-term infrastructure design. Some projects went ahead without an understanding of the bandwidth, traffic prioritization, and other requirements needed to support this advanced and business-critical network. Now the StadiumCompany management wants to improve the customer experience by adding high-tech features and support for concerts, but the underlying network cannot support these additions. The StadiumCompany management understands that they do not have sufficient network expertise to support the network upgrade. The StadiumCompany decides to hire network consultants to provide design, project management, and implementation support. The project will be implemented in three phases. The first phase is to plan the project and prepare the high-level network design. The second phase is to develop the detailed network design. The third phase is to implement the design. After a few meetings, StadiumCompany hires the NetworkingCompany, a local network design and consulting firm to support the phase 1, high-level design. NetworkingCompany is a Cisco Premier Partner employing 20 network engineers who have various CCNA, CCDA, CCNP, CCDP, and CCIE certifications and significant industry experience. To create the high-level design, the NetworkingCompany first interviewed the staff at the stadium and developed a profile of the organization and the facility.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

StadiumCompany Organization
The StadiumCompany provides the network infrastructure and facilities at the stadium. The StadiumCompany has 170 full-time people: 35 managers and executives 135 salaried personnel Approximately 80 additional hourly workers are hired as needed to support events in the facility and security departments.
Stadium Management Offices

StadiumCompany Phones and PCs


All the managers and executives at the StadiumCompany use PCs and phones connected to a digital voice PBX. With the exception of the full-time grounds people and the janitors, all the salaried personnel also use PCs and phones. Fifty shared phones for the security staff are distributed throughout the stadium. There are also 12 analog phones, some that support faxes and others that provide direct access to the police and fire stations. The security group also has 30 security cameras implemented on a separate network.

Existing Facilities and Support


The StadiumCompany provides facilities and network support for two sports teams (Team A and Team B), a visiting team, a restaurant, and a concessions vendor.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

The stadium is approximately 725 feet wide by 900 feet long (approximately 220 meters wide by 375 meters long). There are two levels. Because of the size of the facility, multiple wiring closets connected with fiber-optic cabling are distributed throughout the stadium. The Team A and Team B locker rooms and player lounges are on the first level of the south side of the stadium. The team offices are on the second level and measure 50 feet x 200 feet (approximately 15 meters wide by 60 meters long) The office and locker room of the visiting team are also located on the first level. StadiumCompany offices are in the north side of the stadium on both levels. The office space on the first level measures 200 feet x 60 feet (approximately 60 meters wide by 18 meters long), and measures 200 feet x 50 feet (approximately 60 meters wide by 15 meters long) on the second level. Team A and Team B are in different sports leagues with different seasons. They both contract with the StadiumCompany for offices and services at the stadium.

Team A Organization
Team A has 90 people in the organization: 4 executives 12 coaches 14 support staff (including doctors, masseuse, secretary, assistants, finance and accounting) 60 players Team A has 15 offices in the stadium to support their non-player staff. Five of these offices are shared. There are 24 PCs and 28 phones installed in the offices. Team A also has a player locker room and a large player lounge and workout room. The non-player staff uses the facility year round. Players have access to the locker room and workout equipment both during the season and
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks


the off-season. There are 5 phones in the locker room, and 15 phones in the player lounge. There are rumors that Team A recently installed a wireless hub in the player lounge.

Team B Organization
Team B has 64 people in the organization: 4 executives 8 coaches 12 support staff (including doctors, masseuse, secretary, assistants, finance and accounting) 40 players Team B has 12 offices in the stadium to support their non-player staff. Three of the offices are shared. There are 19 PCs and 22 phones installed in the offices. They also have a player locker room and a large player lounge. The non-player staff uses the facility year round. Players have access to the locker room and workout equipment both during the season and the off season. There are 5 phones in the locker room, and 15 phones in the player lounge.

Visiting Team Support


The visiting team locker room and lounge has 10 phones. Each visiting team requires temporary support on the game day and for a few days before the game. The visiting teams also contract with the StadiumCompany for office support and services at the stadium.

Concession Vendor
A concession vendor manages the concessions provided at games and events. There are five full-time employees. They use two private and two shared offices with five PCs and seven phones. These offices are located on the south side of the stadium between the Team A and Team B office space. Two part-time employees take orders from the luxury boxes during events. The concession vendor uses seasonal hourly workers to support 32 permanent concession stands and other services distributed throughout the stadium. At this time, there are no phones or PCs in the concession areas.

Luxury Restaurant Organization


There is one luxury restaurant at the stadium that is open year round. In addition to the customer and kitchen areas, the restaurant contracts for office space from the StadiumCompany. The four managers have private offices. The two salaried financial and accounting staff share an office. Six PCs and phones are supported. Two additional phones are used for reservations in the customer area.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Luxury Skybox Support


There are 20 luxury skyboxes. The StadiumCompany provides a phone in each skybox that supports local calls and calls to the luxury restaurant and the concession vendor.

Press Area Support


The StadiumCompany provides a press box with three shared areas: The press print area typically houses 40 to 50 reporters during a game. There are 10 analog phones available in this shared area, and two shared data ports. It is known that one newspaper intern brings in a small wireless Access Point for games that she covers. The press radio area supports 15 to 20 radio announcers and has 10 analog phone lines. The press TV area typically supports 10 people. There are five phones available here.

Remote Site Support


The StadiumCompany currently has two remote locations: a ticketing office located in the downtown area, and a souvenir shop in a local shopping mall. The remote locations are connected using DSL service to a local Internet service provider (ISP).

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

The stadium is connected to the local ISP using ISP1, a managed services router owned by the ISP. The two remote sites have a connection to the same ISP supported by the ISP2 and ISP3 routers provisioned and managed by the ISP. This connection provides the remote sites access to the databases located on servers in the StadiumCompany management offices. The StadiumCompany also has a perimeter router named Edge Router that connects to the ISP1 router at the stadium.

StadiumCompany Plans
The StadiumCompany wants to add new services, such as video, to their network. They are also thinking about replacing the existing digital voice PBX. They would like better access to their existing security camera network. Two new remote sites are planned in the near future: A film production company that has been hired to provide video during and after the sporting events and concerts needs to connect to the stadium network to exchange files. Team A is expanding to a remote office location. They are requesting access to the same network resources that they use on the stadium LAN.

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1.2.1 1.2.3 1.3.1 1.3.2 1.3.4 1.4.1 1.4.2 1.5.1 1.5.3 3.1.1 3.1.3 3.1.4 3.2.4 3.3.3 3.4.3 5.2.2 5.3.2 5.3.4 5.5.3 6.1.1 6.1.2 6.1.3 6.2.3 6.2.5 7.1.4 7.2.2 7.2.3 7.2.4 7.2.5 7.3.2 7.3.4 8.1.2 8.2.5

3 2 3 2 3 4 2 2 2 5 2 3 4 2 3 3 2 2 2 4 2 2 4 3 3 3 2 2 2 3 3 3 4

What Happens at the Core Layer? Network Convergence What Happens at the Distribution Layer? Limiting the Scope of Network Failure Traffic Filtering at the Distribution Layer What Happens at the Access Layer? Network Topologies at the Access Layer What is a Server Farm? High Availability Creating a Network Diagram Developing a Modular Diagram Strengths and Weaknesses of the Existing Network Download and Install Cisco IOS Software Installing a New Hardware Option Wireless Site Survey and Planning Designing Distribution Layer Topology Defining Traffic Patterns and Application Support Creating the Logical Network Design for the WAN Updating the Logical Network Design Documentation Using Hierarchical Routing and Addressing Schemes Classful Subnets and Summarization Using VLSM when Designing IP Addressing Designating the Routing Strategy Designing the Addressing Scheme Validating LAN Technologies and Devices Creating the Test Plan Validating the Choice of Devices and Topologies Validating the Choice of Routing Protocol Validating the IP Addressing Scheme Creating the Test Plan Validating the Security Plan Testing WAN Connectivity with Simulation Software Troubleshooting Frame Relay Operation

Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka Activity - Packet Tracer - pka

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.2.1 Comparing Mesh Topologies

Objectives Compare the routing tables of a partial mesh topology with a full mesh topology. Observe the convergence of the network when an interface is shut down and brought back up. Examine the EIGRP packets in the Simulation Mode as the network converges. Background / Preparation You have been provided with a partial mesh and a full mesh topology to examine in this exercise. The interfaces have been addressed and EIGRP has been configured as the routing protocol. All necessary configuration commands have been entered into the routers and the networks are fully functional.

Step 1: Compare the routing tables of the partial mesh and full mesh topology
a. Use the Inspect tool to examine the routing table on HQP and HQF. b. Notice the difference in the number of routes in each table. c. Record the routes to 192.168.0.204 network on HQP and the routes to the 172.16.3.196 network on HQF. Routes to 192.168.0.204 _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ Routes to 172.16.3.196 _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks _______________________________________________________________________________________

Step 2: Examine the routing table and observe the convergence of a partial mesh topology
a. b. c. d. e. Shut down the interface S0/0/1 on BR2P and observe the routing table on HQP. Note that two routes to the 192.168.0.204 network were removed. Bring the interface S0/0/1 back up and observe the routing table on HQP. Observe the convergence of the network (it may take a minute for both routes to be re-installed). Examine the routing table on HQP again. Which interface is used to reach network 192.168.0.160? ______________________________________________________________________________________ On router BR2P, shut down the interface S0/0/0. How will HQP get to the 192.168.0.160 network now?

f.

______________________________________________________________________________________ g. Bring interface S0/0/0 on BR2P back up and observe the convergence of the network (it may take a minute). h. What happens to the routes to the 192.168.0.160 network that were in the routing table? ______________________________________________________________________________________ Repeat Step 2 process in the Simulation Mode with only the EIGRP filter active. Use the Capture / Forward button to examine the EIGRP packets and routing table as the network converges.

i.

Step 3: Examine the routing table and observe the convergence of a full mesh topology
a. b. c. d. e. Shut down the interface S0/0/1 on BR2F and observe the routing table on HQF. Note that two routes to the 172.16.3.196 network were removed. Bring the interface S0/0/1 back up and observe the routing table on HQF. Observe the convergence of the network (it may take a minute for both routes to be re-installed). Examine the routing table on HQF again. Which interface is used to reach network 172.16.3.128? _____________________________________________________________________________________ On router BR2F, shut down the interface S0/0/0. How will HQF get to the 172.16.3.128 network now?

f.

_____________________________________________________________________________________ g. Bring interface S0/0/0 on BR2F back up and observe the convergence of the network (it may take a minute). h. What happens to the routes to the 172.16.3.128 network that were in the routing table? _____________________________________________________________________________________ Repeat Step 3 process in the Simulation Mode with only the EIGRP filter active. Use the Capture / Forward button to examine the EIGRP packets and routing table as the network converges.

i.

Reflection
1. On router BR2P, when you shut down the interface S0/0/0, why was the one original route to the 192.168.0.160 network replaced with two routes? ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ 2. What are the advantages and disadvantages of a full mesh topology? _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.2.3 Observing Network Convergence

Objectives Connect and configure WAN connections. Configure EIGRP to advertise specific networks. Observe the convergence of the network through the CLI window when an interface is shut down and brought back up. Examine the EIGRP packets in the Simulation Mode as the network converges. Background / Preparation You have been provided a topology in which HQ, Branch1, Branch2, and Branch3 are pre-configured. A new router has been added to the topology (New_Branch) that is partially configured. You will need to connect New_Branch to HQ and Branch1, complete the configuration of the new router, and then examine the convergence of the network.

Step 1: Connect and configure WAN connections on New_Branch router


a. b. c. d. Connect interface S0/0/0 on New_Branch to S0/1/1 on HQ (DCE) Connect interface S0/0/1 on New_Branch to S0/1/1 on Branch1 (DCE) Configure interface S0/0/0 with the IP address 172.16.3.218/30 Configure interface S0/0/1 with the IP address 172.16.3.221/30

Step 2: Configure EIGRP to advertise specific networks on New_Branch router


a. Configure New_Branch with EIGRP and the autonomous system number 3.
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks b. Advertise specifically the directly connected networks. c. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Step 3: Observe the network convergence in the Realtime mode


a. While in the CLI window of New_Branch, you can observe the convergence in the Realtime mode. As the network converges you will see that EIGRP develops adjacencies. b. After the network has converged, shut down interface S0/0/0 on New_Branch. c. Observe the changes in the network. d. Bring interface S0/0/0 back up.

Step 4: Observe the network convergence in the Simulation mode


a. b. c. d. e. f. g. Click Simulation Mode. Set the Event List Filters to show only EIGRP packets. Go to CLI interface window of New_Branch. Shut down the interface S0/0/1. Click the Auto Capture / Play button to start the simulation. Re-open the CLI window and observe the effects. Allows the simulation to run for a brief period, then click the Auto Capture / Play button to pause the simulation. h. Examine some of the packets in the Event List.

Step 5: Observe the affects of an interface being brought up


a. Re-start the simulation by clicking the Auto Capture / Play button again. b. Bring interface S0/0/1 back up and observe the convergence through the CLI window, Event List, and topology. c. Stop the simulation.

Reflection
1. What output was shown in the CLI window once EIGRP had converged? ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ 2. When the WAN link between HQ and New_Branch went down, what happened to the EIGRP packets on the New LAN? _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.3.1 Demonstrating Distribution Layer Functions

Objective Demonstrate the functions performed by the Distribution Layer devices. Background / Preparation VLANs can be added to a network for security purposes and traffic control. Devices on separate VLANs are unable to communicate unless a router has been configured to help with this communication. Observe how packet filtering and route summarization traverse the network using simulation mode. Step 1: Setup Simulation filters to capture routing protocols a. b. c. d. e. f. Enter Simulation mode in Packet Tracer. Click the Edit Filters button. Select EIGRP. Click the Reset Simulation button. Click Auto Capture/Play. Observe the EIGRP updates.

Step 2: Test connectivity between the network devices using Realtime mode. a. From PC0 ping PC1, PC2, PC3, and PC4. b. From PC1 ping PC0, PC2, PC4, PC3 Step 3: Test connectivity between the network devices using Simulation mode a. Switch from Realtime mode to Simulation mode. b. Create a simple PDU from PC0 to PC1. Click Capture/Forward until the PDU has made the complete trip to PC1 and back. c. In the Event List, view the PDU events. d. Create another PDU from PC0 to PC2.
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Reflection a. Why cant PC0 communicate with PC1 but PC1 can communicate with PC0s default gateway?

b. What effect on connectivity would removing the subinterfaces have?

c.

Why must a router be in the topology to have communication between the VLANs?

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.3.2 Investigating Failure Domains

Objective
a. Observe the flow of network traffic in different topologies. b. Observe the change of flow in network traffic when a point of failure is introduced into the network.

Background / Preparation
This activity has three different topologies: a partial mesh, a star, and a full mesh. When this activity is started, you will need to allow time for each network topology to converge. This may take several minutes. Once the networks have converged, you will note the following: a. The partial mesh topology will have one link light on the PM4 switch that remains amber. b. The star topology will have all the link lights green. c. The full mesh topology will have three link lights amber; one on the FM1 switch and two on the FM3 switch. In the partial mesh and full mesh topology the network has redundant links. However, in order to avoid switching loops some of the links have been shutdown as noted by the amber link light. Note that the star topology does not have redundant links between switches. Why are all of the link lights green in this topology?

___________________________________________________________________________
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Good Distribution Layer design can limit the parts of the network that are affected by a network failure. The failure of a single device should not cause the network to go down. In this activity you will observe the flow of the network traffic in each topology. Then you will introduce a point of failure in each network topology by deleting a trunk link between two switches. Once the link is removed, you will need to allow time for the network to reconverge. After the network has re-converged, you will again observe the flow of traffic and note how the network failure affected the flow of traffic.

Step 1: Observe the flow of traffic on the partial mesh topology


a. Once the network has converged, enter simulation mode by clicking the Simulation tab. b. By default, Scenario 0 should be displayed in the Scenario window. Click the Auto Capture/Play button and observe the flow of traffic from PM3B to PM4B. c. When the Buffer Full window appears, click Clear Event List. d. Click the Reset Simulation button.

Step 2: Introduce a point of failure on the partial mesh topology


a. Delete the trunk link between PM2 and PM4. b. Change to simulation mode by clicking the Simulation tab. c. Play Scenario 0 again by clicking the Auto Capture/ Play button and observe the flow of traffic from PMB to PM4B. d. When the Buffer Full window appears, click Clear Event List. e. Click the Reset Simulation button.

Step 3: Observe the flow of traffic on the star topology


a. Click the dropdown arrow to the Scenario window and select Scenario 1. b. Play Scenario 1 by clicking the Auto Capture/ Play button and observe the flow of traffic from S2A to S4B. c. Click Clear Event List when the Buffer Full window appears and click the Reset Simulation button.

Step 4: Introduce a point of failure on the star topology


a. b. c. d. Delete the trunk link between Star1 and Star2. Since the star topology has no redundant links, the network will not need to re-converge. Play Scenario 1 again and observe the flow of traffic from S2A to S4B. Click Clear Event List when the Buffer Full window appears and click the Reset Simulation button.

Step 5: Observe the flow of traffic on the full mesh topology


a. Click the dropdown arrow to the Scenario window and select Scenario 2. b. Play Scenario 2 by clicking the Auto Capture / Play button and observe the flow of traffic from FM1A to FM3B. c. Click Clear Event List when the Buffer Full window appears and click the Reset Simulation button.

Step 6: Introduce a point of failure on the full mesh topology


a. b. c. d. e. Delete the trunk link between FM2 and FM3. Switch to the Realtime mode. Allow time for the network to converge. (This may take several minutes.) Play Scenario 2 again and observe the flow of traffic from FM1A to FM3B. Click Clear Event List when the Buffer Full window appears and click the Reset Simulation button.

Reflection
1. How was the effect of the network failure in the star topology different from the partial mesh and full mesh topologies? _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks 2. What effect did the removal of the link in the star topology have on the hosts that were attached to the Star2 switch? _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.3.4 Placing ACLs

Objectives
Verify network connectivity. Examine the Access Control Lists (ACLs) that are configured on the routers. Determine the appropriate interface to apply the ACLs. Examine the effects of the ACLs.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Background / Preparation
This activity demonstrates how the flow of network traffic is affected by applying an ACL to permit or deny traffic in the network. The network administrator has decided that all external web traffic goes only to the Web server. Also, in order to protect the data of their employees, the HR server is only accessible by HR employees. Therefore, ACLs will need to be implemented on the network. Another network technician has already configured the necessary ACLs on both the Gateway and Distribution2 routers. However, the ACLs have not been applied to an interface. You have been asked to apply the ACLs and verify that the appropriate traffic is permitted or denied.

Step 1: Verify network connectivity


a. Verify that all of the PCs can communicate with each other and with the servers. b. Verify that the Internet Host can access the Web server (192.168.0.3), Sales server (192.168.10.2) and HR server (192.168.40.2) using the browser.

Step 2: Examine the Access Control Lists that are configured on the routers
a. Access the Distribution2 router. Use the following commands to view the ACL that has been configured on the Distribution2 router: show running-config show access-lists 1 b. Access the Gateway router. Use the following commands to view the ACL that has been configured on the Gateway router: show running-config show access-lists 100

Step 3: Determine the appropriate interface to apply the ACLs


a. After examining the ACLs, determine on which interface the ACLs should be applied. b. The ACL must be applied to an interface or subinterface before it will affect the network traffic. c. The extended ACL should be placed closest to the source and the standard ACL should be closest to the destination. d. Remember that only one ACL per port, per protocol, per direction is allowed. e. Apply the ACL to the appropriate interface or subinterface. f. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Step 4: Examine the effects of the ACLs


a. Internet Host should be able to ping any device in the network, except HR1 or HR server. b. Internet Host should be able to access Web server (192.168.0.3) using the browser. c. Internet Host should not be able to access either the HR server (192.168.40.1) or Sales server (192.168.10.2) using the browser. d. HR2 should be able to access HR server (192.168.40.1) using ping or the browser. e. RandD2 should not be able to access HR server (192.168.40.1) using ping or the browser.

Reflection
1. How can ACLs be used to control the flow of network traffic? _______________________________________________________________________________________ 2. By default, what is always the last statement in an ACL? _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.4.1 Exploring Access Layer Functions

Objective

Describe the function of the Network Access Layer including equipment usually installed in the wiring closets.

Background / Preparation
Equipment installed at the Network Access Layer usually consists of Layer 2 switches. These switches connect to workgroup servers, workstations, and other end user equipment. The Network Access Layer switches then connect to Layer 3 devices, such as routers and multi-layer switches, at the Network Distribution Layer.

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CCNA Discovery
Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

A new office space is being created for users in the Sales and Marketing departments of an organization, the PCs have been set up and configured in the office area and a Layer 2 switch has been installed in the wiring closet. You will connect the switch to the end user devices and to the router in the Network Distribution Layer. You will then configure the switch and verify connectivity to key devices in the network.

Step 1: Connect the Access Layer switch.


a. Using the proper cable, connect FastEthernet0/1 on switch Access1B to FastEthernet0/1 on router Distribution1. b. Using the proper cable, connect PC Sales2 to the next interface on switch Access1B. c. Using the proper cable, connect PC Marketing2 to the next interface on switch Access1B.

Step 2: Configure the Access Layer switch.


a. Using the CLI on switch Access1B, configure the interface that connects to router Distribution1 to carry traffic for all VLANs. b. Using the CLI on switch Access1B, configure the interface that connects to PC Sales2 to carry traffic for only VLAN 11. c. Using the CLI on switch Access1B, configure the interface that connects to PC Marketing2 to carry traffic for only VLAN 21.

d. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Step 3: Verify connectivity.


a. From PC Sales2, ping server Sales at 192.168.10.2. Ping server HR at 192.168.40.2. Ping server Web at 192.168.0.3. All pings should be successful, if not verify the configuration. b. From PC Marketing2, ping server Sales at 192.168.10.2. Ping server HR at 192.168.40.2. Ping server Web at 192.168.0.3. All pings should be successful, if not verify the configuration. c. From the Web Browser on PC Sales2, request a web page from URL http://www.Discovery.com (in Packet Tracer the URL is case sensitive). The page should be displayed.

d. Switch to Simulation mode. From the Web Browser on PC Sales2 click the Go button to request the page again. Click the Auto Capture / Play button to observe the flow of traffic from the Access layer through the hierarchical network to the server farm.

Step 4: Reflection
a. Why are the Sales and HR servers connected to the network at the Access Layer?

b. If you wanted to restrict access to the HR server which hierarchical network layer would you place the necessary configuration?

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.4.2 Creating Topologies

Objective
Create a network with a star topology.

Background / Preparation
You have been given the task of designing a network using a star topology. The star topology is one with a central point of connectivity. The central device should be a switch.

Step 1: Create a network using a star topology.


a. Add a 2960 switch to the network topology between the Distribution2 router and the PCs. b. Connect the switch to the Distribution2 routers fa0/0 interface. c. Connect the switch to each of the PCs.

d. Enable the fa0/0 interface on the Distribution2 router. e. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

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CCNA Discovery
Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Reflection
a. What outcome would there be if a hub had been used instead of a switch? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

b. What is the advantage of using a star topology? ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.5.1 Observing and Recording Server Traffic

Objective

Observe and record the way in which traffic moves to and from the servers on the network.

Background / Preparation
An enterprise has installed servers containing sales and human resources information at the Access Layer of their network and an intranet web server and a DNS server in a server farm off of the Core Layer of the network. This activity will observe the flow of traffic between a typical PC at the Access Layer and three of the servers in the network.

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CCNA Discovery
Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 1: Verify connectivity to the servers in the network.


a. From the desktop of PC HR2, ping the HR server at IP address 192.168.40.2. b. From the desktop of PC HR2, ping the Sales server at IP address 192.168.10.2. c. From the desktop of PC HR2, ping the Web server at IP address 192.168.0.3.

Step 2: Observe and record the way traffic moves in the network.
a. Switch to Simulation mode. Click the Auto Capture / Play button to send a packet between PC HR2 and the HR server and back. Count the number of intermediate devices the packet passes through. b. Switch to scenario To Sales. Click the Auto Capture / Play button to send a packet between PC HR2 and the Sales server and back. Count the number of intermediate devices the packet passes through. c. Switch to scenario To Web. Click the Auto Capture / Play button to send a packet between PC HR2 and the Web server and back. Count the number of intermediate devices the packet passes through.

Step 3: Reflection
a. Based on your observations, what be would two advantages of putting all of the servers in the server farm? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

1.5.3 Using Redundant Links on Server Farm Devices


Objective
Determine how redundancy affects server availability.

Background / Preparation
The physical topology of the first network (Topology 1) has been designed without redundancy. To test the fault tolerance of the network, links should be removed to test the effect on the network and to determine if the network can recover from the removed link. The physical topology of the second network (Topology 2) has been designed and redundancy has been incorporated into the design. To test the fault tolerance of the network, links should be removed to test the effect on the network and to determine if the network can recover from the downed link.

Step 1: Examine the network and the status of the links in Topology 1

a. b. c. d.

Examine Topology 1. View the network and the active links within the network. Note which links are active and which links are blocked. Open PC1-A. At the command prompt, enter a command to send 100 ICMP requests to Server Web-A. The command format is ping n 100 192.168.2.3.

Step 2: Test single point of failure in network without redundancy


a. Since switches do not have power buttons, delete the link between Router-A and switch Server-A. 1. Click the red X located in the right panel of the Packet Tracer screen. 2. Click the cable between Router-A and switch Server-A. b. View the network and note the active links within the topology. c. There is no network redundancy and therefore a single point of failure within the network. There is no longer a route to the servers.

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CCNA Discovery
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Step 3: Examine the network and the status of the links in Topology 2

a. Examine Topology 2. b. View the network and note the active links within the topology. c. Open PC1-B. At the command prompt, enter a command to send 100 ICMP requests to Server Web-A. The command format is ping n 100 192.168.4.3. d. Open PC2-B. At the command prompt, enter a command to send 100 ICMP requests to Server Marketing-B. The command format is ping n 100 192.168.4.6.

Step 4: Test network redundancy


a. Delete the link between switch Server1-B and switch Server2-B. 1. Click the red X located in the right panel of the Packet Tracer screen. 2. Click the cross-over cable between switch Server1 and switch Server2. b. View the network and note the active links within the topology. c. Spanning Tree should recalculate and automatically begin using the alternate links. d. Delete the link between switch Server3-B and switch Server5-B. 1. Click the red X located in the right panel of the Packet Tracer screen. 2. Click the cross-over cable between switch Server3-B and switch Server5-B. e. View the network and note the active links within the topology. f. The topology should reconfigure and automatically begin using the alternative links.

Reflection
a. Using the network without redundant equipment, what advantage would be gained by adding 1 additional switch to the design? ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________ b. When a network is designed to have redundancy and Spanning Tree is disabled on the Layer 2 switches, what effect would it have on the network? _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

3.1.1 Investigating Existing Network Devices

Objective
Use router and switch commands to obtain information about an existing network.

Background / Preparation
You have been given the task of documenting a large campus network. When you arrive at the site you discover that the network administrator is not available and he has the only keys to the wiring closets and the cabinets containing the existing network documentation. Since information on the network is needed as soon as possible, you decide to discover as much information as possible using router and switch commands. You are given access to the administrators PC and are told that the Telnet access password for all devices is cisco and the password to enter privileged exec mode is class.

Step 1: Discover and document the first device.


a. Access the Admin PC and issue the ipconfig command from the command prompt to discover the default gateway. b. Telnet to the IP address of the gateway device and enter privileged exec mode using the passwords given above. c. Issue IOS commands such as show running-config, show ip route, show interfaces, show ip interface brief, show version and other commands to learn about the device.

d. Issue IOS commands such as show cdp neighbors and show cdp neighbors detail to discover information about connected devices. It may take a few minutes for the network to converge. If you do not see any neighboring devices initially, repeat the commands until you do. e. Document the information you gather in the appropriate table below. f. Close the Telnet session by issuing the exit command.

Step 2: Discover the remaining devices.


a. Packet Tracer works best when you successfully ping a device before attempting to Telnet to it. Issue the ping command to the IP address of one of the devices you discovered in Step 1. Repeat the ping command until it succeeds. b. Telnet to the IP address of the device and repeat the process in Step 1 to document the device. c. Do not overuse the resources of Packet Tracer, do not Telnet from device to device. Always exit to the command prompt before accessing the next device.

d. Repeat the process until all devices in the network are discovered and documented.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks e. As you work, sketch out a diagram of the network devices and their interconnections.

Device Tables:
Router Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Router Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Router Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Router Hostname _________________________


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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ Interface IP Address Subnet Mask Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

Switch Hostname _________________________ Model _________________________ IOS version ______________________________ IP Address _______________________ Subnet Mask __________________________ Default Gateway ________________________ Trunk Ports Connects to Device Connects to Interface

Active Access Ports

VLAN Number

VLAN Name

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Network Diagram:

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 3: Reflection
a. We used this technique to discover and document a campus LAN. Would the same technique work for an enterprise network that included WAN links? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. Could we use this technique in a network that included routers and switches from a manufacturer other than Cisco? Why or why not? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

3.1.3 Creating Modular Block Diagrams

Objective
Use a logical network diagram of the existing network to create a modularized view of the network.

Background / Preparation
Start with the logical diagram showing the critical network devices and representative user devices. Group the devices by their role within the network design hierarchy. The final step is to create the modular block diagram of the network.

Step 1: Group the devices by their role within the network design hierarchy.
a. Using the Palette tool (second button from the right on the Main Tool Bar), drag an ellipse to highlight the client devices in pink. b. Using the Palette tool, drag an ellipse to highlight the access layer devices in light blue. c. Using the Palette tool, drag an ellipse to highlight the distribution layer devices in light green.
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CCNA Discovery
Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

d. Using the Palette tool, drag an ellipse to highlight the core layer devices in yellow.

Step 2: Create the modular block diagram of the network.


a. Use the table on the next page to create the modular block diagram of the network by drawing and listing the devices in the appropriate column.

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CCNA Discovery
Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Modular Block Diagram:


Client Devices Access Distribution Core Services and Management

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CCNA Discovery
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Step 3: Reflection
a. Why is it important to group devices by their role within the network design hierarchy to analyze an existing network? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. What is an advantage of describing a network using a modular block diagram instead of in a narrative fashion? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

3.1.4 Determining Network Strengths and Weaknesses

Objective
Identify and document the strengths and weaknesses of the existing network.

Background / Preparation
In the previous activity you created a modular block diagram of the Film Company network. The next step is to examine the physical layout of the devices in the network, the cabling plant and the device configurations to identify and document the strengths and weaknesses of the existing network. Packet Tracer provides a limited physical view of the network where devices are placed in wiring closets in various buildings in various cities. The physical view in this activity represents the building containing the Film Company and the building containing their ISP located in the same city. The Film Company building contains
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CCNA Discovery
Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

a wiring closet containing the MDF and POP that serves the general office functions and a wiring closet for the production area. Since all devices must be placed in wiring closets, wiring closets containing typical client devices used by the general office staff and the production staff have been placed in the approximate center of their respective areas. There is a conference room that is also used by visitors with wireless laptop computers that is represented by a wiring closet in its center. Assume all cabling in the Film Company building is category 5 UTP.

Step 1: Examine the physical location of devices.


a. Switch from the Logical Workspace to the Physical Workspace, enter the Home City and note the extent of the wireless coverage around the Film Company building. b. Enter the Film Company building and note the extent of the wireless coverage within the building and the location of the wiring closets and work areas. c. Enter each of the wiring closets and note where the various client devices and network devices are located.

Step 2: Examine the device configurations.


a. Switch from the Physical Workspace to the Logical Workspace. b. Access each of the network devices in the Film Company network. Examine each device using commands such as show running-config, show version, show interfaces and other commands. c. Look for information on the speed of various links, passwords, traffic filtering and any other information you can gather.

Step 3: Evaluate the network.


a. Based on your observations from Steps 1 and 2, rate the network in the areas listed in the table on the next page on a scale of 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest).

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CCNA Discovery
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Network Ratings: Lowest 1 Hierarchical network design Firewall location Server location Bandwidth Quality of wiring Network equipment suitability Wireless security Suitability for advanced services like IP phones or video Redundancy and availability Failure domain size Physical security 2 3 4 Highest 5

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CCNA Discovery
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Step 4: Reflection
a. List the strengths of the existing network. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. List the weaknesses of the existing network. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

3.2.4 Installing Cisco IOS Software

Objectives
Verify the IOS image currently installed on the router. Transfer a new IOS image to the Cisco router. Verify that the new image is installed on the Cisco router. Specify an image boot order on the router. Verify that the proper image is loaded when the router reboots.

Background / Preparation
You have been asked to upgrade a Cisco 1841 router with the latest IOS image to support encryption. The network administrator has informed you that the necessary IOS image has already been downloaded to the Network_Server. It is your task to verify the current IOS image and install the new image through the TFTP server that is installed on the network server. You will also need to configure the router to use the new IOS image.

Step 1: Verify the IOS image currently installed on the router


a. Access the router through the CLI mode. b. Enter the privileged EXEC mode. c. Use the following command to verify current installed IOS: Router#show flash What is the file name of the IOS image? ___________________________________________________________ How many bytes of memory are available? ________________________________________________________

Step 2: Transfer the new IOS image to the Cisco router


a. It is always a good practice to ping the TFTP server before attempting to copy an IOS image from a server. b. Enter the following command to test the connectivity between the router and the TFTP server: Router#ping 192.168.1.10 Note that the first ping may fail, if so repeat the ping. If the problem still persist, it will be necessary to troubleshoot the problem. c. On an actual network before beginning this upgrade you would copy the existing IOS file to the TFTP server as a backup copy in case of problems. d. Enter the following command begin the process of transferring the new IOS image to the router: Router#copy tftp flash e. You will be prompted to enter the address or name of the remote host. Enter the IP address of the Network_Server (192.168.1.10) and press Enter. f. You will now be prompted to enter the name of the file you wish to transfer. Enter the following IOS file name: c1841-ipbasek9-mz.124-12.bin g. You will be prompted for the destination filename. The default filename will appear in brackets as shown: [c1841-ipbasek9-mz.124-12.bin]
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks h. Press Enter to accept the default name. i. The image should now begin transferring from the server and you should see output that resembles the following: Accessing tftp://192.168.1.10/c1841-ipbasek9-mz.124-12.bin.... Loading c1841-ipbasek9-mz.124-12.bin from 192.168.1.10: !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! [OK - 16599160 bytes] 16599160 bytes copied in 16.126 secs (230327 bytes/sec) Router#

Step 3: Verify that the new IOS image is installed


a. Use the following command to verify current IOS images that are installed: Router#show flash b. You should now see two IOS images in the output.

Step 4: Specify an image boot order on the router


a. Enter the global configuration mode. b. To specify the boot order of the IOS images enter the following commands: Router(config)#boot system flash c1841-ipbasek9-mz.124-12.bin Router(config)#boot system flash c1841-ipbase-mz.123-14.T7.bin c. These commands specify that the router will attempt to boot the new IOS image first. If for some reason the image is not located in flash, the router will then load the original IOS image. d. Exit to the privileged EXEC prompt. e. Enter the following command to verify the boot system commands: Router#show running-config

Step 5: Verify that the proper image is loaded when the router boots up
a. Save the current router configuration to NVRAM. b. Restart the router by entering the following command: Router#reload c. Allow the router to reboot completely, then enter the privileged EXEC mode. d. Use the following command to verify that the proper IOS image was loaded when the router rebooted: Router#show version e. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Reflection
a. Why would you want to have access to multiple IOS images on a router? ______________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________ b. What are two other locations that a router will look to obtain an IOS if it cannot locate one in flash? _____________________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

3.3.3 Installing Option Modules on a Router


Objective Familiarize yourself with the 1841 and 2811 routers and the various interface modules available for installation. Observe the changes in the number and designation of the various interfaces depending on where they are installed in the router. Background / Preparation The Cisco Integrated Service Router (ISR) is designed to fulfill different networking requirements. The modular interfaces on the ISR allow the installation of different modules. A network technician needs to become familiar with the ISR and the different modules that can be added to the device. Step 1: Examine the 1841 router and the default hardware a. Place an 1841 router on the Logical Workspace. b. Execute the show run command and view default hardware settings. c. Note there are 2 FastEthernet interfaces and 1 VLAN interface. What are the interface designations? Step 2: Add additional modules a. Power off the router. b. Add the HWIC-4ESW module to Slot 1. c. Power on the router. d. Execute the show run command and view the hardware settings. What are the interface designations? Step 3: Remove and add additional modules a. Power off the router. b. Move the HWIC-4ESW module to Slot 0. c. Power on the router. d. Execute the show run command and view the hardware settings. What are the interface designations? Step 4: Examine the 2811 router and the default hardware a. Add a 2811 router to the Logical Workspace. b. Execute the show run command and view the hardware settings. What are the interface designations? c. Note the interfaces and their designations. Step 5: Add additional modules to the 2811 router a. Power off the router. b. Add the HWIC-4ESW module to Slot 2. c. Power on the router. d. Execute the show run command and view the hardware settings. What are the interface designations? Step 6: Add additional modules to the 2811 router a. Power off the router. b. Add the HWIC-4ESW module to Slot 3. c. Power on the router. d. Execute the show run command and view the hardware settings. What are the interface designations?

Reflection a. The ability to add different modules allows for flexibility with networking devices. What type of connectivity will adding a WIC-2T module allow?
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ b. What would happen to your existing configuration if you move a module from Slot 1 to Slot 2? _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

3.4.3 Placing Wireless Access Points

Objective
Use available tools to perform a wireless site survey.

Background / Preparation
A wireless network consists of one or more wireless access points to provide coverage for wireless clients in an office environment. The goal of the site survey is to find the optimal number and placement of access points to provide coverage where it is needed and, for security reasons, to minimize coverage where it is not needed. We will use the tools available in Packet Tracer to simulate a site survey of a one story office building with two access points installed in the ceiling. The Linksys WRT300N wireless access routers are used to simulate access points installed in the ceiling, a PC with a Linksys WMP300N interface installed is used to simulate a laptop computer with wireless capability. Required file: Placing Wireless Access Points.pka

Step 1: Conduct the wireless site survey.


a. In the logical view of the network observe which access point the Wireless PC is associated with. b. Access the Wireless PC and choose the PC Wireless button on the Desktop tab. Click the Connect tab in the Linksys window and observe the signal strength from both access points. Minimize the Wireless PC window. c. Click the Physical Workspace tab in the upper left hand corner of the interface. Click the Home City. The crosshatch ovals represent areas of wireless coverage. Note the areas outside of the Corporate Office that have coverage.

d. Click the Corporate Office. Observe the areas of coverage inside the building and the placement of the access points and the Wireless PC. In a real environment the wireless coverage areas would be invisible. Mark the location of the access points on the Building Diagram below. Mark the location if the Wireless PC and note the signal strength for each access point.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks e. Move the Wireless PC to different locations around the office. For each location, access the Wireless PC window and click the Refresh button. Note on the Building Diagram, at each location, the access points (if any) and their signal strength. Minimize the Wireless PC window. f. Continue until the entire building is surveyed.

Step 2: Relocate the access points to their optimal location.


a. Move the access points to assure that all areas inside the building have wireless coverage and that coverage outside of the building is minimized. b. Verify your placement by spot checking key locations within the building using the techniques from Step 1 and adjust the placement as needed.

Building Diagram:

Step 3: Reflection
a. If the coverage shown in the Physical view represents the maximum power output of the access point, could the building be covered by a single access point? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. On real equipment, what else could be done to minimize coverage outside of the building? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks c. What types of problems would you encounter when you have overlapping coverage of access points using the same channel? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

5.2.2 Connecting Access and Distribution Layer Switches

Objective
Design and diagram the Distribution Layer topology to support given network business and technical requirements.

640-802 CCNA Exam Objectives


This activity contains skills that relate to the following CCNA exam objectives: Select the components required to meet a network specification. Select the appropriate media, cables, ports, and connectors to connect switches to other network devices and hosts. Describe enhanced switching technologies (including: VTP, RSTP, VLAN, PVSTP, 802.1q).

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CCNA Discovery
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Expected Results and Success Criteria


a. Before beginning this activity, read through the tasks you are expected to perform. What do you expect the result of performing these tasks will be? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. Why do you think that network administrators use redundant links in their network? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ c. Why is Spanning Tree Protocol necessary where there are redundant links? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

Background / Preparation
Equipment installed at the Network Distribution Layer usually consists of multi-layer, modular switches that connect to Layer 2 Access Layer switches through redundant links. These Distribution Layer switches then connect to Core Layer devices, also through redundant links. Spanning Tree Protocol allows these redundant connections without the problems associated with switching loops. Packet Tracer only supports devices typically found in the CCNA academy lab bundle, not the type of switches typically used at the Network Distribution Layer. We will use regular Layer 2 switches to represent these switches as we connect the redundant links between the Access and Distribution Layer switches and observe the operation of Spanning Tree Protocol.

Step 1: Connect the Access Layer switches to the Distribution Layer switches.
a. Using the proper cables, connect the first interface on switch Access1 to the first interface on switch Distribution1 and the second interface on switch Access1 to the first interface on switch Distribution2. b. Using the proper cables, connect the first interface on switch Access2 to the second interface on switch Distribution1 and the second interface on switch Access2 to the second interface on switch Distribution2. c. Using the proper cables, connect the first interface on switch Access3 to the third interface on switch Distribution1 and the second interface on switch Access3 to the third interface on switch Distribution2.

d. Using the proper cables, connect the first interface on switch Access4 to the fourth interface on switch Distribution1 and the second interface on switch Access4 to the fourth interface on switch Distribution2. e. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

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CCNA Discovery
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Step 2: Observe the operation of Spanning Tree Protocol.


a. Wait a few minutes for Spanning Tree Protocol to open up forwarding ports that are indicated by the green link lights. The ports whose link lights remain orange are blocked by Spanning Tree Protocol. b. Observe which ports are blocked. Enter Simulation mode to verify that packets from any switch can be sent to every other switch in the network. Be sure that all events are visible in the Event List, then click Auto Capture / Play.

Step 3: Reflection
a. Why do you think Spanning Tree Protocol blocked the links that it did? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. Would Spanning Tree Protocol be necessary if we used routers at the Network Distribution Layer? Why or why not? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

5.3.2 Examining WAN Connections

Objective The show commands are very powerful commands for troubleshooting and monitoring networks. They give a static image of the network at a given time. The use of a variety of show commands will give a clear picture of how the networking is communicating and transferring data. Background / Preparation The physical topology of the network has been designed using Frame Relay. To test the network connectivity, use a variety of show commands. Step 1: Examine the configuration of Branch1 and Branch2. a. Click Branch1 and use various show commands to view the connectivity to the network. b. Use the show running-config command to view the router configuration. c. Use the show ip interface brief command to view the status of the interfaces. d. Use the various show frame-relay map, show frame-relay pvc, and show frame-relay lmi commands to see the status of the Frame-relay circuit. e. Click Branch2 and use various show commands to view the connectivity to the network. f. Use the show running-config command to view the router configuration. g. Use the show ip interface brief command to view the status of the interfaces. h. Use the various show frame-relay map, show frame-relay pvc, and show frame-relay lmi commands to see the status of the Frame-relay circuit. Step 2: Examine the configuration of Main. a. Click Main and use a variety of show commands to view the connectivity to the network. b. Use the show running-config command to view the router configuration. c. Use the show ip interface brief command to view the status of the interfaces. d. To view the status of the frame-relay configurations use the show frame-relay lmi, show frame-relay map, and show frame-relay pvc commands.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Reflection a. In what situations would it be beneficial to use the various show commands? ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ b. What beneficial information can be obtained from the various show commands? ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

5.3.4 Observing Static and Dynamic Routing

Objective
Observe the network behavior using only static and default routing and compare it to the behavior of dynamic routing.

Background / Preparation
In this exercise, you will observe the adaptability of dynamic routing compared to static and default routing. The Ticket Sales Office network is currently configured using static and default routing.

Step 1: Test Connectivity Using Static and Default Routing.


a. Open a Command Prompt on PC0. b. Trace (tracert) a connection to the Edge1 FastEthernet 0/0 address. This should be successful.

Step 2: Bring down Frame Relay Network and Observe Routing.


a. On the BR2 router, shutdown the link to the Frame Relay network. b. Perform a trace from PC0 again to the Edge1 FastEthernet 0/0 address. What happens this time? __________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 3: Configure Dynamic Routing and Observe Routing


a. Configure EIGRP (AS 10) on the BR2 and Edge3 routers. Be sure to include all directly connected networks and turn off auto-summary. b. Do a third trace from PC0 to the Edge1 FastEthernet 0/0 interface. (It should be successful again.) c. Did the path change? If so, how? ___________________________________________________

d. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Reflection
1. What are the advantages of using dynamic routing? Static and default routing? ________________________________________________________________________________ ________________________________________________________________________________ 2. The static routes in this lab were set with an administrative distance of 130. What would have happened if they were set at 30? At 230? ________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

5.5.3 Implementing Access Control Lists

Objective
Test basic connectivity. Create and apply an Access Control List (ACL). Verify the application of the ACL.

Background / Preparation
As part of an IT staff, you have been asked to work with the network designer to define the firewall rule set to be implemented in the new network design. The firewall rule set dictates the exact types of network activity permitted. As the designer of a network, you are responsible for the first line of security on the network. The security policies will dictate which users and groups are permitted access to what resources, and what type of access is denied. When designing firewall rule sets and access control lists, the general policy is to deny all traffic that is either not specifically authorized or is not in response to a permitted inquiry. Each firewall rule set may require more than one ACL statement and may require both inbound and outbound placement. In this scenario, you will be creating a sampling of ACLs that might be applied in a firewall rule set.

Step 1: Verify network connectivity


a. Start this activity in Realtime mode. b. Observe the link lights on the connections. Before testing basic connectivity all links should be green. c. Verify that both PC devices can communicate with each other by using the command prompt on the PCs to ping all end devices (PCs and servers).

d. Verify that each PC can view the web pages of both servers.

Step 2: Create the Access Control Lists that will be configured on the Edge1 router
NOTE: There are many possible ways to write an ACL and the true test is does it work or not. However, for the purpose of this activity there is a specific way that the ACL must be written to show 100% Completion. Special considerations: Use any instead of 0.0.0.0 255.255.255.255. Use the name of the port rather than the number (ex. www instead of 80). Use 100 to identify the ACL.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks a. Deny all Web traffic from any source to the 10.0.10.0/24 network. b. Deny all FTP traffic from any source to the 10.0.10.0/24 network. c. Deny all telnet traffic from any source to the 10.0.10.0/24 network.

d. Permit TCP traffic from any source to any inside destination if the traffic has been established from an inside address. e. Permit an ICMP echo-reply to reach any inside destination from any source. f. Permit an ICMP unreachable message to reach any inside destination from any source.

g. Deny all other traffic.

Step 3: Examine the Access Control Lists that are configured on the routers
a. Click on the CLI tab on Edge1 to examine the ACLs that have been configured. b. Use the following commands to view the ACLs that have been configured on the routers: show running-config show access-lists 100

Step 4: Determine the appropriate interface to apply the ACLs


a. b. c. d. e. After examining the ACLs determine where the ACLs should be applied. The ACL must be applied to an interface before it will affect the network traffic. Remember that only one ACL per port, per protocol, per direction is allowed. Using the CLI mode, apply the ACL to the appropriate interface on the Edge1 router. Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Step 5: Examine the effects of the ACL


a. Verify that the appropriate traffic is permitted or denied. b. The Inside PC should be permitted to: Ping all devices (use the command prompt) Make HTTP request from the Web Server at 192.168.2.10 (use the Web browser on the Inside PC) Telnet to the Internet router at 172.16.1.1 (use the command prompt) password = cisco. Use the command exit to return to PC prompt. Use FTP to reach other devices (use Simulation mode and a Complex PDU to simulate the FTP traffic for the Complex PDU set the Select Application: FTP, Destination IP Address: 192.168.1.10, Source Port: 50000, One Shot Time: 1) c. The Outside PC should be denied the following: Ping to Edge1, Core, Inside PC, and Data Center (use the command prompt) Make HTTP request from the Data Center 10.0.10.20 (use the Web browser on the Inside PC). However, it should still be able to reach the Web Server at 192.168.2.10. Use FTP to reach other devices (use Simulation mode and a Complex PDU to simulate the FTP traffic for the Complex PDU set the Select Application: FTP, Destination IP Address: 10.0.10.10, Source Port: 50000, One Shot Time: 1) d. All other network traffic should be denied from reaching the 10.0.10.0 network.

Reflection
1. With the current ACL applied, would you be able to Telnet from the Outside PC to the Edge1 router at 172.16.1.2? Why? _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________ 2. Why is it always necessary to have at least one Permit statement in an ACL? _______________________________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

6.1.1 Designing and Addressing a Topology


Addressing Table
Device R1 Interface S0/0/0 S0/0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

R2 R3 R4 R2 HostA R2 HostB R2 Printer-A R2 HostC R2 HostD R3 HostA R3 HostB R3 Printer-B R3 HostC R3 HostD R4 HostA R4 HostB R4 Printer-C R4 HostC R4 HostD

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Learning Objectives
Determine the number of subnets needed. Determine the number of hosts needed for each LAN. Design a hierarchical addressing scheme. Assign addresses and subnet masks to device interfaces and hosts. Examine the use of the available network address space.

Introduction
In this lab, you have been given the IP addresses included in 192.168.8.0/22. Use this range of IP addresses to subnet and provide the IP addressing for the network. The network has the following addressing requirements: The R2 LAN will require 120 host IP addresses. The R3 LAN will require 120 host IP addresses. The R4 LAN will require 120 host IP addresses. The WAN links between each of the routers will require an IP address for each end of the link.

Task 1: Examine the network requirements.


Examine the network requirements and answer the questions below. Keep in mind that IP addresses will be needed for each LAN interface on each router. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. How many subnets are needed? What is the maximum number of IP addresses that are needed for a single subnet? How many IP addresses are needed for each of the LANs? How many IP addresses are needed for all of the connections between routers? What is the total number of IP addresses that are needed?

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 2: Design a hierarchical IP addressing scheme.


Step 1. Subnet 192.168.8.0/22.
Calculate the subnetworks based on the maximum number of IP addresses needed in the largest subnet. Keep the number of hosts per subnet as close as possible to the maximum number of hosts required. 1. What is the subnet mask for each subnetwork? 2. How many usable IP addresses are there for each subnetwork?

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Fill in the following chart with the subnet information. Subnet Number Subnet IP First Usable Last Usable Broadcast Address

0 1 2 3 4 5

Step 2. Assign the subnets to the network.


When assigning the subnets, keep in mind that routing will need to occur to allow information to be sent throughout the network. The subnets will be assigned to the networks to allow for route summarization on each of the routers. 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. Assign subnet 0 to the R1 to R2 WAN. Assign subnet 1 to the R2 LAN. Assign subnet 2 to the R1 to R3 WAN. Assign subnet 3 to the R3 LAN. Assign subnet 4 to the R1 to R4 WAN. Assign subnet 5 to the R4 LAN.

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 3: Assign and configure IP Addresses on the network devices.


Assign the appropriate addresses to the device interfaces. Document the addresses to be used in the Addressing Table provided. Configure network devices with the assigned IP address, subnet mask and gateway address, when applicable.

Step 1. Assign and configure addresses on the R1 Router.


1. Assign and configure the first valid host address in the R1 to R2 WAN subnet on the s0/0/0 interface. 2. Assign and configure the first valid host address in the R1 to R3 WAN subnet on the s0/0/1 interface. 3. Assign and configure the first valid host address in the R1 to R4 WAN subnet on the s0/1/0 interface.

Step 2. Assign and configure addresses on the R2 Router.


1. Assign and configure the second valid host address in the R1 to R2 WAN subnet on the s0/0/0 interface. 2. Assign and configure the first valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet on the LAN interface.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 3. Assign and configure addresses on the R3 Router.


1. Assign and configure the second valid host address in the R1 to R3 WAN subnet on the s0/0/0 interface. 2. Assign and configure the first valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet on the LAN interface.

Step 4. Assign and configure addresses on the R4 Router.


1. Assign and configure the second valid host address in the R1 to R4 WAN subnet on the s0/0/0 interface. 2. Assign and configure the first valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet on the LAN interface.

Step 5. Assign and configure addresses on the host devices (PCs and Printers) of R2.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Assign and configure the second valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet on R2 Host-A. Assign and configure the third valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet onR2 Host-B. Assign and configure the fourth valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet on Printer-A. Assign and configure the fifth valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet on R2 Host-C. Assign and configure the sixth valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet on R2 Host-D.

Step 6. Assign and configure addresses on the host devices (PCs and Printers) of R3.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Assign and configure the second valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet on R3 Host-A. Assign and configure the third valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet on R3 Host-B. Assign and configure the fourth valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet on Printer-B. Assign and configure the fifth valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet on R3 Host-C. Assign and configure the sixth valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet on R3 Host-D.

Step 7. Assign and configure addresses on the host devices (PCs and Printers) of R4.
1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Assign and configure the second valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet on R4 Host-A. Assign and configure the third valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet on R4 Host-B. Assign and configure the fourth valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet on Printer-C. Assign and configure the fifth valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet on R4 Host-C. Assign and configure the sixth valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet on R4 Host-D.

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 91%.

Task 4: Verify connectivity.


Check to see that all devices on directly connected networks can ping each other.

Task 5: Configure EIGRP routing protocol on each router.


Step 1. Configure EIGRP on router R1.
1. Configure EIGRP using autonomous system number 10. 2. Configure EIGRP to route for all three directly connected networks.

Step 2. Configure EIGRP on router R2.


1. Configure EIGRP using autonomous system number 10. 2. Configure EIGRP to route for both directly connected networks.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 3. Configure EIGRP on router R3.


1. Configure EIGRP using autonomous system number 10. 2. Configure EIGRP to route for both directly connected networks.

Step 4. Configure EIGRP on router R4.


1. Configure EIGRP using autonomous system number 10. 2. Configure EIGRP to route for both directly connected networks.

Task 6: Verify EIGRP routing.


Step 1. Verify EIGRP routing on router R1.
1. Check the routing table of router R1. 2. How many routes are in the routing table? 3. Are any of the routes summarized? If so, which ones are summarized?

Step 2. Verify EIGRP routing on R2, R3, and R4.


1. Check the routing tables of R2, R3, and R4. 2. How many routes are in each routing table? 3. Are any of the routes summarized? If so, which ones are summarized?

Task 7: Reflection
1. How many IP addresses in 192.168.8.0/22 are wasted in this design? 2. What change(s) could be made to this IP addressing scheme to be more efficient? 3. Would route summarization have occurred in a non-hierarchical design?

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 100%.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

6.1.2 Resolving Discontiguous Network Problems


Addressing Table
Device R1 Interface S0/0/0 S0/0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC IP Address 209.165.202.245 209.165.202.249 2092.168.202.253 192.168.40.33 209.165.202.246 192.168.40.65 209.165.202.250 192.168.40.97 209.165.202.254 192.168.40.34 192.168.40.35 192.168.40.36 192.168.40.37 192.168.40.38 192.168.40.66 192.168.40.67 192.168.40.68 192.168.40.69 192.168.40.70 192.168.40.98 192.168.40.99 192.168.40.100 192.168.40.101 192.168.40.102 Subnet Mask 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 255.255.255.224 Default Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 192.168.40.33 192.168.40.33 192.168.40.33 192.168.40.33 192.168.40.33 192.168.40.65 192.168.40.65 192.168.40.65 192.168.40.65 192.168.40.65 192.168.40.97 192.168.40.97 192.168.40.97 192.168.40.97 192.168.40.97

R2 R3 R4 R2 Host-A R2 Host-B Printer0 R2 Host-C R2 Host-D R3 Host-A R3 Host-B Printer1 R3 Host-C R3 Host-D R4 Host-A R4 Host-B Printer2 R4 Host-C R4 Host-D

Objectives
Verify RIPv2 is auto-summarizing the discontiguous networks. Describe the behavior of traffic directed to and from the discontiguous networks.
Page 1 of 3

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Disable auto-summarization in RIPv2. Test and verify full connectivity

Background / Preparation
In this lab activity, you will be given a preconfigured topology with discontiguous subnetworks. The routers are configured with RIPv2 and auto-summarization is running by default. The discontiguous networks are each of the three LANs separated by the WAN links. The default auto-summarization in RIPv2 is preventing traffic from routing properly throughout this topology. This activity has multiple windows of instructions. Select the ">" button to view the next portion of instructions.

Task 1: Examine the network requirements.


The addressing for the network has the following requirements: The link between R1 and R2 is currently configured with the 209.165.202.244/30 network. The link between R1 and R3 is currently configured with the 209.165.202.248/30 network. The link between R1 and R4 is currently configured with the 209.165.202.252/30 network. The R2 LAN and its devices are already configured with the 192.168.40.32/27 network. The R3 LAN and its devices are already configured with the 192.168.40.64/27 network. The R4 LAN and its devices are already configured with the 192.168.40.96/27 network.

Task 2: Verify connectivity to next-hop device.


You should not have connectivity between end devices on different subnets yet. However, you can test connectivity between two routers and between an end device and its default gateway.

Step 1. Verify WAN connectivity.


a. Verify that R2 can ping across the WAN link to R1. b. Verify that R3 can ping across the WAN link to R1. c. Verify that R4 can ping across the WAN link to R1.

Step 2. Verify that Host-A, Host-B, Host-C, Host-D, and Printer can ping their respective default gateways. If the pings are unsuccessful, check device configurations. Step 3. Verify end device connectivity.
a. b. c. d. e. f. g. Can router R1 ping the Fa0/0 interface on R2? Yes or No? Can router R1 ping the Fa0/0 interface on R3? Yes or No? Can router R1 ping the Fa0/0 interface on R4? Yes or No? Can router R1 ping R3 Host-A? Yes or No? Can router R1 ping R4 Host-A? Yes or No? Some of the pings should be successful. What is the pattern of successful pings (!) and failed pings (U)? Why is this so?

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 3: Verify RIP routes


Step 1. View the routing table of router R1.
a. List the routes that are included in the R1 routing table. b. Assume R1 is sending a packet to 192.168.40.34. What out-going interfaces on R1 are identified as a path to any IP address in the range of 192.168.40.0/24? c. Which of these out-going interfaces can be used to successfully send a packet to 192.168.40.34?

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 2. View the routing table of router R2.


a. List the routes that are included in the R2 routing table. b. Assume R2 is sending a packet to 192.168.40.98. What out-going interface on R2 would be used to send a packet to 192.168.40.98? c. Will router R2 be able to successfully route traffic destined for 192.168.40.98?

Step 3. View the routing table of router R3.


a. List the routes that are included in the R3 routing table. b. Assume R3 is sending a packet to 192.168.40.98. What out-going interface on R3 would be used to send a packet to 192.168.40.98? c. Will router R3 be able to successfully route traffic destined for 192.168.40.98?

Step 4. View the routing table of router R4.


a. List the routes that are included in the R4 routing table. b. Assume R4 is sending a packet to 192.168.40.34. What out-going interface on R4 would be used to send a packet to 192.168.40.34? c. Will router R4 be able to successfully route traffic destined for 192.168.40.34?

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 4: Resolve discontiguous network problem.


Step 1. On each router, disable automatic summarization in RIPv2. Step 2. View the routing table of each router.
a. b. c. d. What routes have been added to the R1 routing table? What routes have been added to the R2 routing table? What routes have been added to the R3 routing table? What routes have been added to the R4 routing table?

Task 5: Verify connectivity


Answer the following questions to verify that the network is operating as expected: a. From router R1, is it possible to ping R2 Host-A? b. From router R1, is it possible to ping R3 Host-A? c. From router R1, is it possible to ping R4 Host-A? The answers to the above questions should be yes. If any of the above pings failed on the initial try, repeat in order to help build the routing table.

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 100%.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

6.1.3 Applying VLSM Addressing


Addressing Table
Device R1 Interface Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a n/a

R2

R3

Objectives
Determine the number of subnets needed. Determine the number of hosts needed for each subnet. Design an appropriate addressing scheme using VLSM. Assign addresses and subnet mask pairs to device interfaces. Examine the use of the available network address space.

Background / Preparation
In this activity, you have been given the network address 192.168.1.0/24 to subnet and provide the IP addressing for the network shown in the Topology Diagram. VLSM will be used so that the addressing requirements can be met using the 192.168.1.0/24 network. The network has the following addressing requirements: The R1 LAN1 will require 50 host IP addresses. The R1 LAN2 will require 50 host IP addresses. The R2 LAN1 will require 20 host IP addresses. The R2 LAN2 will require 20 host IP addresses The R3 LAN1 will require 12 host IP addresses. The R3 LAN2 will require 12 host IP addresses. The link from R1 to R2 will require an IP address for each end of the link. The link from R1 to R3 will require an IP address for each end of the link.

The link from R2 to R3 will require an IP address for each end of the link. This activity has multiple windows of instructions. Select the ">" button to view the next portion of instructions.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Task 1: Examine the network requirements


Examine the network requirements and answer the questions below. Keep in mind that IP addresses will be needed for each LAN interface on each router. a. How many subnets are needed? b. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that are needed for a single subnet? c. How many IP addresses are needed for each of the R1 LANs? d. How many IP addresses are needed for each of the R2 LANs? e. How many IP addresses are needed for each of the R3 LANs? f. How many IP addresses are needed for each of the WAN links between routers? g. What is the total number of IP addresses that are needed? h. What is the total number of IP addresses that are available in the 192.168.1.0/24 network? i. Can the network addressing requirements be met using the 192.168.1.0/24 network? At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 2: Design an IP addressing scheme


Step 1. Determine the subnet information for the largest network segment or segments.
In this case, the two R1 LANs are the largest subnets. a. How many IP addresses are needed for each LAN? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet?

Step 2. Assign subnets to R1 LANs.


Start at the beginning of the 192.168.1.0/24 network. a. Assign the first available subnet to R1 LAN1. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R1 LAN1 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address c. Assign the next available subnet to R1 LAN2. d. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R1 LAN2 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address

Broadcast Address

Broadcast Address

Step 3. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments.
In this case, the two R2 LANs are the next largest subnets. a. How many IP addresses are needed for each LAN? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet?

Step 4. Assign subnet to R2 LANs. Start with the IP address following the R1 LAN subnets.
a. Assign the next available subnet to R2 LAN1. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R2 LAN1 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address c. Assign the next available subnet to R2 LAN2. d. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R2 LAN2 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address Broadcast Address

Broadcast Address

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 5. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments.
In this case, the two R3 LANs are the next largest subnets. a. How many IP addresses are needed for each LAN? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet?

Step 6. Assign subnets to R3 LANs.


Start with the IP address following the R2 LAN subnets. a. Assign the next available subnet to the R3 LAN1. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R3 LAN1 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address c. Assign the next available subnet to R3 LAN2. d. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R3 LAN2 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address

Broadcast Address

Broadcast Address

Step 7. Determine the subnet information for the links between the routers.
a. How many IP addresses are needed for each link? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet?

Step 8. Assign subnets to links. Start with the IP address following the R3 LAN subnets.
a. Assign the next available subnet to the link between the R1 and R2 routers. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. Link between R1 and R2 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Broadcast Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address Address c. Assign the next available subnet to the link between the R1 and R3 routers. d. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. Link between R1 and R3 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Broadcast Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address Address e. Assign the next available subnet to the link between the R2 and R3 routers. f. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. Link between R2 and R3 Subnet. Network Decimal Subnet Mask First Usable IP Last Usable IP Broadcast Address Subnet Mask Bits Address Address Address

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 3: Assign IP addresses to the network device interfaces


Step 1. Assign addresses to the R1 router.
a. b. c. d. Assign the first valid host address in the R1 LAN 1 subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. Assign the first valid host address in the R1 LAN 2 subnet to the Fa0/1 LAN interface. Assign the first valid host address in the link between R1 and R2 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface. Assign the first valid host address in the link between R1 and R3 subnet to the S0/0/1 interface.

Step 2. Assign addresses to the R2 router.


a. Assign the first valid host address in the R2 LAN1 subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface.
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks b. Assign the first valid host address in the R2 LAN2 subnet to the Fa0/1 LAN interface. c. Assign the last valid host address on the link between R2 and R1 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface. d. Assign the first valid host address on the link between R2 and R3 subnet to the S0/0/1 interface.

Step 3. Assign addresses to the R3 router.


a. b. c. d. Assign the first valid host address in the R3 LAN1 subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. Assign the first valid host address in the R3 LAN 2 subnet to the Fa0/1 LAN interface. Assign the last valid host address on the link between R1 and R3 subnet to the S0/0/1 interface. Assign the last valid host address on the link between R2 and R3 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface.

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 100%.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

6.2.3 Configuring a Multirouter EIGRP Network


Addressing Table
Device R1 Interface Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

209.165.202.1 209.165.202.5

255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252

R2

209.165.202.9 209.165.202.2

255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252

R3

209.165.202.6 209.165.202.10

255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252

Learning Objectives
Determine the number of subnets needed. Determine the number of hosts needed for each subnet. Design an appropriate addressing scheme using VLSM. Assign addresses and subnet mask pairs to device interfaces. Configure EIGRP on the network.

Introduction
In this activity, you have been given the network address 172.16.0.0/16 to subnet and provide the IP addressing for the network shown in the Topology Diagram. VLSM will be used so that the addressing requirements can be met using the 172.16.0.0/16 network. The network has the following addressing requirements: The R1 LAN 1 will require 8,000 host IP addresses. The R1 LAN 2 will require 4,000 host IP addresses. The R2 LAN 1 will require 2,000 host IP addresses. The R2 LAN 2 will require 1,000 host IP addresses. The R3 LAN 1 will require 500 host IP addresses. The R3 LAN 2 will require 200 host IP addresses. The serial link from R1 to R2 has been preconfigured with the 209.165.202.0/30 network. The serial link from R1 to R3 has been preconfigured with the 209.165.202.4/30 network. The serial link from R2 to R3 has been preconfigured with the 209.165.202.8/30 network.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Task 1: Examine the network requirements


Examine the network requirements and answer the questions below. Keep in mind that IP addresses will be needed for each LAN interface on each router. a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. j. How many subnets are needed? What is the maximum number of IP addresses that are needed for a single subnet? How many IP addresses are needed for the R1 LAN 1? How many IP addresses are needed for the R1 LAN 2? How many IP addresses are needed for the R2 LAN 1? How many IP addresses are needed for the R2 LAN 2? How many IP addresses are needed for the R3 LAN 1? How many IP addresses are needed for the R3 LAN 2? What is the total number of IP addresses that are needed? What is the total number of IP addresses that are available in the 172.16.0.0/16 network? k. Can the network addressing requirements be met using the 172.16.0.0/16 network? At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 2: Design an IP addressing scheme


Step 1. Determine the subnet information for the largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R1 LAN 1 is the largest subnet. a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R1 LAN 1? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 2. Assign the subnet to the R1 LAN 1. Start at the beginning of the 172.16.0.0/16 network. a. Assign the first available subnet to the R1 LAN 1. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R1 LAN 1 Subnet Network Address 192.168. Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 3. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R1 LAN 2 is the next largest subnet.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R1 LAN 2? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 4. Assign the subnet to R1 LAN 2. Start with the IP address following the R1 LAN 1 subnet. a. Assign the next subnet to R1 LAN 2. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R1 LAN 2 Subnet Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 5. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R2 LAN 1 is the next largest subnet. a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R2 LAN 1? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 6. Assign the subnet to R2 LAN 1. Start with the IP address following the R1 LAN 2 subnet. a. Assign the next subnet to R2 LAN 1. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R2 LAN 1 Subnet Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 7. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R2 LAN 2 is the next largest subnet.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R2 LAN 2? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 8. Assign the subnet to R2 LAN 2. Start with the IP address following the R2 LAN 1 subnet. a. Assign the next subnet to R2 LAN 2. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R2 LAN 2 Subnet Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 9. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R3 LAN 1 is the next largest subnet. a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R3 LAN 1? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 10. Assign the subnet to R3 LAN 1. Start with the IP address following the R2 LAN 2 subnet. a. Assign the next subnet to R3 LAN 1. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R3 LAN 1 Subnet Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 11. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R3 LAN 2 is the next largest subnet.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R3 LAN 2? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 12. Assign the subnet to R3 LAN 2. Start with the IP address following the R3 LAN 1 subnet. a. Assign the next subnet to R3 LAN 2. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R3 LAN 2 Subnet Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 3: Assign IP addresses to the network devices


Assign the appropriate addresses to the device interfaces. Step 1: Assign addresses to the R1 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the R1 LAN 1 subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. b. Assign the first valid host address in the R1 LAN 2 subnet to the Fa0/1 LAN interface. Step 2. Assign addresses to the R2 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the R2 LAN 1 subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. b. Assign the first valid host address in the R2 LAN 2 subnet to the Fa0/1 LAN interface. Step 3. Assign addresses to the R3 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the R3 LAN 1 subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. b. Assign the first valid host address in the R3 LAN 2 subnet to the Fa0/1 LAN interface. At the end of this task your completion rate should be 60%.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Task 4: Configure a routing protocol


In order to provide connectivity among the LANs, a routing protocol must be configured on each router. The routing protocol must meet these requirements: Classless routing operation that supports VLSM Small and infrequent routing table updates to reduce traffic Fast convergence in the event of a failure

What Cisco routing protocol meets these requirements? Step 1. Configuring the routing protocol on R1. a. What networks need to be advertised from the R1 Router? b. What commands would be used if these networks were advertised as subnets in AS number 1? Step 2. Configuring the routing protocol on R2. a. What networks need to be advertised from the R2 Router? b. What commands would be used if these networks were advertised as subnets in AS number 1? Step 3. Configuring the routing protocol on R3. a. What networks need to be advertised from the R3 Router? b. What commands would be used if these networks were advertised as subnets in AS number 1?

Task 5: Test the network design


What command would verify that all the networks have been advertised? Step 1. List the results of the show IP route command for R1. Step 2. List the results of the show IP route command for R2. Step 3. List the results of the show IP route command for R3. Step 4. Are all routes shown in their routing tables? At the end of this task your completion rate should be 100%.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

6.2.5 Assigning IP Addresses


Addressing Table
Device R1 Interface S0/0/0 S0/0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC NIC IP Address Subnet Mask Default Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A

R2 R3 R4 R2 Host-A R2 Host-B R2 Printer-A R2 Host-C R2 Host-D R3 Host-A R3 Host-B R3 Printer-B R3 Host-C R3 Host-D R4 Host-A R4 Host-B R4 Printer-C R4 Host-C R4 Host-D

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Learning Objectives
Determine the number of subnets needed. Determine the number of hosts needed for each subnet. Design an appropriate addressing scheme using VLSM. Assign addresses and subnet mask pairs to device interfaces.

Introduction
In this activity, you have been given the network address 172.16.0.0/16 to subnet and provide the IP addressing for the network shown in the Topology Diagram. VLSM will be used so that the addressing requirements can be met using the 172.16.0.0/16 network. Subnet 0 will also be used. The network has the following addressing requirements: The R2 LAN will require 8,000 host IP addresses. The R3 LAN will require 1,000 host IP addresses. The R4 LAN will require 250 host IP addresses. The link from R1 to R2 will require an IP address for each end of the link. The link from R1 to R3 will require an IP address for each end of the link. The link from R1 to R4 will require an IP address for each end of the link.

Task 1: Examine the network requirements


Examine the network requirements and answer the questions below. Keep in mind that IP addresses will be needed for each LAN interface on each router. a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. How many subnets are needed? What is the maximum number of IP addresses that are needed for a single subnet? How many IP addresses are needed for the R2 LAN? How many IP addresses are needed for the R3 LAN? How many IP addresses are needed for the R4 LAN? How many IP addresses are needed for each of the WAN links? What is the total number of IP addresses that are needed? What is the total number of IP addresses that are available in the 172.16.0.0/16 network? Can the network addressing requirements be met using the 172.16.0.0/16 network?

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 2: Design an IP addressing scheme


Step 1. Determine the subnet information for the largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R2 LAN is the largest subnet. a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R2 LAN? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet?

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 2. Assign the subnet to the R2 LAN. Start at the beginning of the 172.16.0.0/16 network. a. Assign the first available subnet to the R2 LAN. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R2 LAN Subnet Subnet Mask Bits Network Decimal Address Subnet Mask

Subnet Mask Bits

First Usable Last Usable Address Address

Broadcast Address

Step 3. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R3 LAN is the next largest subnet. a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R3 LAN? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 4. Assign the subnet to R3 LAN. Start with the IP address following the R2 LAN subnet. a. Assign the next subnet to R3 LAN. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R3 LAN Subnet Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 5. Determine the subnet information for the next largest network segment or segments. In this case, the R4 LAN is the next largest subnet. a. How many IP addresses are needed for the R4 LAN? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet?
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 6. Assign the subnet to R4 LAN. Start with the IP address following the R3 LAN subnets. a. Assign the next subnet to the R4 LAN. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. R4 LAN Subnet Network Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

Step 7. Determine the subnet information for the links between the routers. a. How many IP addresses are needed for each link? b. What is the smallest size subnet that can be used to meet this requirement? c. What is the maximum number of IP addresses that can be assigned in this size subnet? Step 8: Assign subnets to links. Start with the IP address following the R4 LAN subnets. a. Assign the next available subnet to the link between the R1 and R2 routers. b. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

c. Assign the next available subnet to the link between the R1 and R3 routers. d. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information. Network Address Decimal Subnet Mask Subnet Mask Bits First Usable Last Usable Address Address Broadcast Address

e. Assign the next available subnet to the link between the R1 and R4 routers. f. Fill in the chart below with the appropriate information.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Network Address

Decimal Subnet Mask

Subnet Mask Bits

First Usable Last Usable Address Address

Broadcast Address

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 0%.

Task 3: Assign IP addresses to the network devices


Assign the appropriate addresses to the device interfaces. Document the addresses to be used in the Addressing Table provided under the Topology Diagram. Step 1: Assign addresses to the R1 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the link between R1 and R2 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface. b. Assign the first valid host address in the link between R1 and R3 subnet to the S0/0/1 interface. c. Assign the first valid host address in the link between R1 and R4 subnet to the S0/1/0 interface. Step 2: Assign addresses to the R2 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. b. Assign the last valid host address on the link between R1 and R2 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface Step 3: Assign addresses to the R3 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. b. Assign the last valid host address on the link between R1 and R3 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface. Step 4: Assign addresses to the R4 router. a. Assign the first valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet to the Fa0/0 LAN interface. b. Assign the last valid host address on the link between R1 and R4 subnet to the S0/0/0 interface. Step 5: Assign addresses to the host devices (PCs and Printer) of R2. a. b. c. d. e. Assign the second valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet to R2 Host-A. Assign the third valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet to R2 Host-B. Assign the fourth valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet to R2 Printer-A. Assign the fifth valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet to R2 Host-C. Assign the sixth valid host address in the R2 LAN subnet to R2 Host-D.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 6: Assign addresses to the host devices (PCs and Printer) of R3. a. b. c. d. e. Assign the second valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet to R3 Host-A. Assign the third valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet to R3 Host-B. Assign the fourth valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet to R3 Printer-B. Assign the fifth valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet to R3 Host-C. Assign the sixth valid host address in the R3 LAN subnet to R3 Host-D.

Step 7: Assign addresses to the host devices (PCs and Printer) of R4. a. b. c. d. e. Assign the second valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet to R4 Host-A. Assign the third valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet to R4 Host-B. Assign the fourth valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet to R4 Printer-C. Assign the fifth valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet to R4 Host-C. Assign the sixth valid host address in the R4 LAN subnet to R4 Host-D.

At the end of this task your completion rate should be 100%.

Task 4: Verify connectivity


Verify that all hosts and printers can ping their respective default gateways and that the Serial interfaces can ping each other as well. There is no routing protocol running and no static routing. Devices will only be able to ping their directly connected neighbors. At the end of this task your completion rate should be 100%.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.1.4 Using Commands to Test Network Functionality

Objective
Describe various tools and methods used to validate that the design is working as anticipated.

640-802 CCNA Exam Objectives


This activity contains skills that relate to the following CCNA exam objectives: Verify network status and switch operation using basic utilities (including: ping, traceroute, telnet, SSH, arp, ipconfig), show and debug commands.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks Verify device configuration and network connectivity using ping, traceroute, telnet, SSH or other utilities. Verify network connectivity (including: using ping, traceroute, and telnet or SSH).

Expected Results and Success Criteria


a. Before beginning this activity, read through the tasks you are expected to perform. What do you expect the result of performing these tasks will be? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. Why do you think that it is important to verify the basic operation of the network even if it is just a prototype of the proposed network? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ c. How can these techniques be used to document a prototype network that was designed by somebody else? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

Background / Preparation
The router and switch IOS provide a number of commands in the CLI that provide detailed and summary information about the configuration and operation of the device. These are known as show commands. This activity will use Packet Tracer to practice using various show commands to explore the configuration of routers and switches in a configured prototype network.

Step 1: Console to a switch and explore the configuration


a. From PC1 establish a console connection to switch S1. Enter privileged exec mode, using the enable secret password of class. b. Issue the command show running-config and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ c. Issue the command show ip interface brief and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ d. Issue the command show version and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ e. Issue the command show cdp neighbors and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ f. Issue the command show cdp neighbors detail and list three additional pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ g. List an IP address you can use to reach router R1. ____________________________________________________________________________

Step 2: Telnet to a router and explore the configuration


a. From PC1 ping the IP address of router R1, telnet to router R1, the telnet password is cisco, and enter privileged exec mode, the enable secret is class. b. Issue the command show running-config and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ c. Issue the command show ip interface brief and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ d. Issue the command show interface and list five pieces of information the command displays.
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ e. Issue the command show version and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ f. Issue the command show ip route and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ g. Issue the command show ip protocols and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ h. Issue the command show ip eigrp neighbors and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ i. Issue the command show ip eigrp topology and list five pieces of information the command displays. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks j. Issue the command show cdp neighbors detail and list IP addresses you can use to reach neighboring devices. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

Step 3: Explore the remaining network devices


a. Repeat the above steps for the remaining routers and switch. Record the ip addresses assigned to each device on the diagram below.

b. Verify the flow of traffic through the network by issuing the tracert command from PC1 to the various devices in the network.

Step 4: Reflection
a. What are some other commands you can think of to discover more information about the network? ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ b. If the results of your testing are not as expected, what commands could be used to observe real-time traffic flowing through a device? ____________________________________________________________________________
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________

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7.2.2 Basic Connectivity Test Plan

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES INTRODUCTION EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM TEST 1. DESCRIPTION: BASELINE CONNECTIVITY TEST TEST 1. PROCEDURES: TEST 1. EXPECTED RESULTS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA: TEST 1. CONCLUSIONS APPENDIX 3 4 4 5 6 6 6 7 8

Attendees
Name Company Position

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. For example: The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate that the basic connectivity and routing protocol are configured correctly. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design.

Test 1: Baseline Connectivity Test


Verify physical and IP connectivity between devices on the prototype network. Collect operational baselines. Demonstrate IP connectivity between devices on the same VLANs. Demonstrate the routing protocol operates correctly and that the web server is accessible through the network.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req 2 2 Model 2960 Layer 2 switch 1841 ISR routers with 2 FastEthernet ports and 2 Serial ports Personal Computer enddevices Personal Computer Server Cat 5 or above straightthrough patch cables. Cat 5 or above cross-over patch cables V.35 DTE Serial Cables V.35 DCE Serial Cables
Any additional options or software required

Substitute Any 2950 or 2960 model switch Any multilayer switch or router with minimum 2 FastEthernet ports and one serial port. At least one PC and any other IP end-device (camera, printer, etc.) Any PC with web server software loaded none

IOS Software Rev. 12.2 or above 12.2 or above

none none

FastEthernet NIC FastEthernet NIC none

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system. Windows, MAC, or Linux operating system n/a

none

none

n/a

2 2

None None

None None

n/a n/a

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology. Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader.

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test.

Test 1. Description: Baseline Connectivity Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the baseline is to verify that the topology is up and running with the proper protocols and features.

Data to Record: Configurations Routing Tables CPU & Memory Ping Test Output

Estimated Time: 120 minutes

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. 1. Connect and configure the prototype network according to the Installation Checklist. 2. Console into one of the devices in the topology and ping all of the other devices in the topology. Record any anomalies. 3. Examine the show running-config and show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 4. Telnet to all of the other devices and get the same information. 5. Use the traceroute commands to verify that the traffic is taking the correct routes through the network. 6. Test IP connectivity between host devices on the same VLAN. 7. Verify EIGRP configuration using show ip route and show ip protocols, and show ip eigrp topology or show ip eigrp interfaces.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. An example of specific criteria is: A requirement that ping response times cannot exceed 100 ms. 1. All networking devices are connected and accessible through Telnet. 2. Hosts on a VLAN can ping successfully to other hosts on the same VLAN.

3. EIGRP routes are advertised correctly and are installed into the routing tables on all of the routers. 4. Web pages stored on the Discovery Server are available to both PCs.

Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.2.2 Building the Prototype Network

Addressing Table: Device R1 Interface Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 S0/0/0 VLAN1 VLAN1 NIC NIC NIC IP Address 172.18.4.1 172.18.0.5 172.18.0.9 172.18.4.2 172.18.0.13 172.18.0.10 172.18.0.14 172.18.0.6 172.18.0.17 172.18.8.1 172.18.0.18 172.18.4.3 172.18.8.2 172.18.4.10 172.18.8.10 172.18.4.25 Subnet Mask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 Default Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 172.18.4.1 172.18.8.1 172.18.4.1 172.18.8.1 172.18.4.2
Page 1 of 2

R2

R3 R4 S1 S2 PC1 PC2 Discovery Server

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Objective
Build and test a prototype network for use in the Stadium Prototype Test Plan.

Background / Preparation
In this exercise, you will use the installation checklist provided by the network designer to build the prototype network. Once the network is built and configured, you can perform the Basic Connectivity Test specified in the designers test plan. Download the Stadium Prototype Test Plan document. Complete the Stadium Prototype Test Plan document after the prototype network has been built. Required file: Stadium Prototype Test Plan

Step 1: Connect all devices shown in the topology diagram. Step 2: Using the diagram and address table, configure the hostnames and interface IP addresses on all of the devices. The Discovery Server is the DNS server for both PCs. Step 3: Configure basic security on the devices: Set a privileged mode password and require login on VTY ports. Step 4: Configure EIGRP routing for AS 1 on all routers and advertise all connected networks. Disable EIGRP default route summarization on all routers. Step 5: Perform Basic Connectivity Test according to the Stadium Prototype Test Plan.
Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

Page 2 of 2

7.2.3 Testing Redundancy in the Network Design Test Plan

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES INTRODUCTION EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM TEST 1. NETWORK REDUNDANCY TEST TEST 1. PROCEDURES: TEST 1. EXPECTED RESULTS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA: TEST 1. CONCLUSIONS APPENDIX 3 4 4 5 7 7 7 9 10

Attendees
Name Company Position

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate that the network can recover from failed links due to its redundant design. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design.

Test 1: Network Redundancy Test


Verify that redundant links allow successful recovery from failed links. Compare the operation of static routes with the operation of a dynamic routing protocol when a link fails.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req 4 4 Model 2960 Layer 2 switch 1841 ISR routers with 2 FastEthernet ports and 2 Serial ports Personal Computer enddevices Personal Computer Server Cat 5 or above straightthrough patch cables. Cat 5 or above cross-over patch cables V.35 DTE Serial Cables V.35 DCE Serial Cables
Any additional options or software required

Substitute Any 2950 or 2960 model switch Any multilayer switch or router with minimum 2 FastEthernet ports and one serial port. At least one PC and any other IP end-device (camera, printer, etc.) Any PC with web server software loaded none

IOS Software Rev. 12.2 or above 12.2 or above

none none

FastEthernet NIC FastEthernet NIC none

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system. Windows, MAC, or Linux operating system n/a

none

none

n/a

1 1

None None

None None

n/a n/a

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Device Designation R1 R1 R2 R2 R3 R3 R3 R4 R4 S1 S2 S3 S4 PC1 PC2 Discovery Server

Interface Fa0/0 Fa0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 * Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1

IP Address 172.18.4.1 172.18.0.5 172.18.4.2 172.18.0.13 172.18.0.14 172.18.0.6 172.18.0.17 172.18.8.1 172.18.0.18 172.18.4.3 172.18.4.4 172.18.4.5 172.18.8.2 172.18.4.10 172.18.8.10 172.18.4.25

Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology. Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader.

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test.

Test 1. Description: Network Redundancy Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the test is to verify network recovery after a failed link in both a switched and a routed environment and to compare the speed of recovery.

Data to Record: Configurations Routing Tables Spanning Tree Output CPU & Memory Ping Test Output Trace Route Output

Estimated Time: 120 minutes

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. Step 1: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP. 1. Console into one of the devices in the topology and ping all of the other devices in the topology. Record any anomalies. 2. Telnet to router R1 and examine the show running-config, and show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 3. Telnet to all of the other routers and get the same information. 4. Use the tracert between PC1 and PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 5. Verify EIGRP configuration using show ip protocols, show ip eigrp topology, and show ip eigrp interfaces. 6. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan. Step 2: Verify the configuration and operation of Spanning Tree Protocol. 1. Telnet to switch S1 and examine show running-config output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 2. Telnet to switches S2 and S3 and get the same information. 3. Wait a few seconds for the Spanning Tree topology to converge.

4. Verify Spanning Tree operation using show spanning-tree vlan 1. 5. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Step 3: Simulate a failure in the switched portion of the network and verify and observe recovery. 1. From PC1 issue the command ping -n 1000 172.18.4.25 to ping the Discovery server through the switched network. 2. To simulate a link failure, remove the link between S1 and S3. 3. Observe the output of the extended ping and when it begins to succeed again, press Ctrl-C to interrupt it. 4. Telnet to all three switches and issue the command show spanning-tree vlan 1. 5. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Step 4: Simulate a failure in the routed portion of the network and verify and observe recovery. 1. From PC1 issue the command ping -n 1000 172.18.8.10 to ping PC2 through the routed network. 2. To simulate a link failure, remove the link between R2 and R3. 3. Observe the output of the extended ping and after several more iterations, press Ctrl-C to interrupt it. 4. Use the tracert command from PC1 to PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 5. Telnet to all of the routers and issue the command show ip route. 6. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. An example of specific criteria is: A requirement that ping response times cannot exceed 100 ms. 1. Both the switched and routed portion of the network should automatically recover from the loss of a redundant link. 2. The routed portion of the network should provide faster recovery after the failure of a redundant link.

Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.2.3 Testing Redundancy in the Network Design

Objective
Develop methodologies for comparing devices and topologies.

Background / Preparation
The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate that the network can recover from failed links due to its redundant design. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design. Download and complete the Stadium Redundancy Test Plan document.

Required files: Stadium Redundancy Test Plan (Testing Redundancy in the Network Design Test Plan) and Installation Checklist (Network Redundancy Installation Checklist).

Step 1: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP. Step 2: Verify the configuration and operation of Spanning Tree Protocol. Step 3: Simulate a failure in the switched portion of the network, verify, and observe recovery. Step 4: Simulate a failure in the routed portion of the network, verify, and observe recovery.

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

Page 1 of 1

7.2.4 Routing Protocol Test Plan

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES INTRODUCTION EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM TEST 1. ROUTING PROTOCOL TEST TEST 1. PROCEDURES: TEST 1. EXPECTED RESULTS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA: TEST 1. CONCLUSIONS APPENDIX 3 4 4 5 7 7 7 9 10

Attendees
Name Company Position

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate that the basic connectivity and routing protocol are configured correctly. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design.

Test 1: Routing Protocol Test


Verify that EIGRP recovers successfully from failed links. Compare the operation of static routes with the operation of a dynamic routing protocol when a link fails.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req 4 4 Model 2960 Layer 2 switch 1841 ISR routers with 2 FastEthernet ports and 2 Serial ports Personal Computer enddevices Personal Computer Server Cat 5 or above straightthrough patch cables. Cat 5 or above cross-over patch cables V.35 DTE Serial Cables V.35 DCE Serial Cables
Any additional options or software required

Substitute Any 2950 or 2960 model switch Any multilayer switch or router with minimum 2 FastEthernet ports and one serial port. At least one PC and any other IP end-device (camera, printer, etc.) Any PC with web server software loaded none

IOS Software Rev. 12.2 or above 12.2 or above

none none

FastEthernet NIC FastEthernet NIC none

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system. Windows, MAC, or Linux operating system n/a

none

none

n/a

1 1

None None

None None

n/a n/a

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Device Designation R1 R1 R2 R2 R3 R3 R3 R4 R4 S1 S2 S3 S4 PC1 PC2 Discovery Server

Interface Fa0/0 Fa0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 * Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1

IP Address 172.18.4.1 172.18.0.5 172.18.4.2 172.18.0.13 172.18.0.14 172.18.0.6 172.18.0.17 172.18.8.1 172.18.0.18 172.18.4.3 172.18.4.4 172.18.4.5 172.18.8.2 172.18.4.10 172.18.8.10 172.18.4.25

Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology. Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader.

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test.

Test 1. Description: Routing Protocol Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the test is to verify the expected operation of the EIGRP routing protocol compared to static routes.

Data to Record: Configurations Routing Tables CPU & Memory Ping Test Output Trace Route Output

Estimated Time: 120 minutes

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. Step 1: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP. 1. Console into one of the devices in the topology and ping all of the other devices in the topology. Record any anomalies. 2. Telnet to router R1 and examine the show running-config, and show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 3. Telnet to all of the other routers and get the same information. 4. Use the tracert between PC1 and PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 5. Verify EIGRP configuration using show ip route, show ip protocols, show ip eigrp topology, and show ip eigrp interfaces. 6. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan. Step 2: Verify that EIGRP can recover from a routed link failure. 1. Telnet to Router R2. 2. Disable the link between R2 and R3 by shutting down interface fa0/1 on R2. 3. Wait a few seconds for the EIGRP topology to converge. 4. Examine the show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use.

5. Compare the command output with the previously recorded show ip route output for R2. 6. Use the tracert command on PC1 and PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 7. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Step 3: Remove EIGRP from R2 and configure static routes. 1. Telnet to router R2, 2. Enable the link between R2 and R3 by activating interface fa0/1 on R2. 3. Remove EIGRP from router R2 by using the no router EIGRP 1 command. 4. Add a static default route to Router R2 that uses Router R3 as the default gateway. ip route 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 172.18.0.4 5. Telnet to router R3, 6. Add a static route to router R3 using the ip route 172.18.4.0 255.255.255.0 172.18.0.13 to enable R3 to use R2 to reach the 172.18.4.0/24 network. 7. Use the show ip route command on routers R2 and R3 to verify that the static routes are entered correctly. 8. Use the tracert and ping commands to verify connectivity between PC1 and PC2. 9. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Step 4: Verify that static routes can recover from a link failure. 1. Telnet to router R2. 2. Disable the link between R2 and R3 by shutting down interface fa0/1 on R2. 3. Examine the show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 4. Compare the output with the previously recorded output from steps 1 and 2. 5. Use the tracert command on PC1 and PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 6. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. An example of specific criteria is: A requirement that ping response times cannot exceed 100 ms. 1. EIGRP recovers dynamically from the link failure and restores connectivity between PC1 and PC2. This can be verified by the output of the show ip route command and a successful trace route between PC1 and PC2. 2. Static routes in Router R2 and R3 do not recover from the link failure and connectivity between PC1 and PC2 is not restored.

Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.2.4 Testing a Multi-Router Network with Redundant Links

Objective
Develop methodologies for selecting and testing the appropriate routing protocol based on network requirements.

Background / Preparation
The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate that the basic connectivity and routing protocol are configured correctly. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design. Download and complete the Stadium Routing Protocol Test Plan document. Required files: Stadium Routing Protocol Test Plan

Step 1: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP. Step 2: Verify that EIGRP can recover from a routed link failure. Step 3: Remove EIGRP from R2 and configure static routes. Step 4: Verify that static routes can recover from a link failure.
Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

Page 1 of 1

7.2.5 Validating the IP Addressing Scheme Test Plan

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES INTRODUCTION EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM TEST 1. VALIDATING THE IP ADDRESSING SCHEME TEST TEST 1. PROCEDURES: TEST 1. EXPECTED RESULTS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA: TEST 1. CONCLUSIONS APPENDIX 3 4 4 5 7 7 7 9 10

Attendees
Name Company Position

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. The purpose of this test plan is to validate the IP addressing scheme and to examine the content of the core routing tables and test schemes to reduce the number of entries. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design.

Test 1: Validating the IP Addressing Scheme Test


Verify the IP address scheme and that all devices are fully reachable. Examine ways to reduce the size of the core routing tables by using route summarization.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req 4 4 Model 2960 Layer 2 switch 1841 ISR routers with 2 FastEthernet ports and 2 Serial ports Personal Computer enddevices Personal Computer Server Cat 5 or above straightthrough patch cables. Cat 5 or above cross-over patch cables V.35 DTE Serial Cables V.35 DCE Serial Cables
Any additional options or software required

Substitute Any 2950 or 2960 model switch Any multilayer switch or router with minimum 2 FastEthernet ports and one serial port. At least one PC and any other IP end-device (camera, printer, etc.) Any PC with web server software loaded none

IOS Software Rev. 12.2 or above 12.2 or above

none none

FastEthernet NIC FastEthernet NIC none

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system. Windows, MAC, or Linux operating system n/a

none

none

n/a

3 3

None None

None None

n/a n/a

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Device Designation R1 R1 R1 R2 R2 R2 R3 R3 R3 R4 R4 S1 S2 S3 S4 PC1 PC2 Discovery Server

Interface Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 S0/0/0 S0/0/1 S0/1/0 Fa0/0 S0/1/0 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1

IP Address 172.16.4.1 172.15.5.1 192.168.1.1 172.17.6.1 172.17.7.1 192.168.2.1 192.168.1.2 192.168.2.2 192.168.0.1 172.18.0.1 192.168.0.2 172.16.4.3 172.16.5.2 172.17.6.2 172.17.7.2 172.18.4.10 172.18.0.10 172.18.4.25

Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.0.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255. 0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.0.0 255.255.255.0

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology. Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader.

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test.

Test 1. Description: Validating the IP Addressing Scheme Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the test is to verify the IP addressing scheme and summarize routes to reduce the size of the core routing tables.

Data to Record: Configurations Routing Tables CPU & Memory Ping Test Output Trace Route Output

Estimated Time: 120 minutes

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. Step 1: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP. 1. Console into one of the devices in the topology and ping all of the other devices in the topology. Record any anomalies. 2. Telnet to router R1 and examine the show running-config, and show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 3. Telnet to all of the other routers and get the same information. 4. Use the tracert between PC1 and PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 5. Verify EIGRP configuration using show ip protocols, show ip eigrp topology, and show ip eigrp interfaces. 6. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan. Step 2: Configure the routers to allow automatic summarization. 1. Telnet to every router. 2. On each router, enter router configuration mode by issuing the command router eigrp 1. 3. Enter the command auto-summary to allow automatic summarization.

4. Exit configuration mode and save the running configuration. 5. Click the Power Cycle Devices button on the lower task bar to force the network to reconverge. Step 3: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP for the summarized network. 1. Start a log file and record the show running-config, and show ip route output. 2. Telnet to router R1 and examine the show running-config, and show ip route output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 3. Use the tracert between PC1 and PC2 to verify the path that the traffic is taking through the network. 4. On the routers, verify EIGRP configuration using show ip protocols, show ip eigrp topology, and show ip eigrp interfaces. 5. Record the results of this step in the Test1: Results and Conclusions section of this test plan.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. An example of specific criteria is: A requirement that ping response times cannot exceed 100 ms. 1. All devices in the network should be reachable in both configurations. 2. With automatic summarization enabled, the size of the routing tables on the core router should be reduced.

Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.2.5 Validating the IP Addressing Scheme

Objective
Apply and test an appropriate addressing scheme.

Background / Preparation
The purpose of this test plan is to validate the IP addressing scheme and to examine the content of the core routing tables and test schemes to reduce the number of entries. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design. Download and complete the Stadium IP Address Test Plan (Validating the IP Addressing Scheme Test Plan) document. Required files: Validating the IP Addressing Scheme.pka and Stadium IP Address Test Plan.

Step 1: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP. Step 2: Configure the routers to allow automatic summarization. Step 3: Verify the configuration and operation of EIGRP for the summarized network.
Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.
All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information. Page 1 of 1

7.3.2 Basic Connectivity Test Plan

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES INTRODUCTION EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM TEST 1. DESCRIPTION: BASELINE CONNECTIVITY TEST TEST 1. PROCEDURES: TEST 1. EXPECTED RESULTS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA: TEST 1. CONCLUSIONS APPENDIX 3 4 4 5 7 7 9 9 10

Attendees
Name Company Position

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. For example: The purpose of this test plan is to demonstrate that the basic connectivity and routing protocol are configured correctly. This prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design.

Test 1: Baseline Connectivity Test


Verify physical and IP connectivity between devices on the prototype network. Collect operational baselines. Demonstrate IP connectivity between devices on different VLANs. Demonstrate the routing protocol, VLAN, and STP configurations operate correctly and that all servers are accessible through the network.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req 5 5 Model 2960 Layer 2 switch 1841 ISR routers with 2 FastEthernet ports and 2 Serial ports Personal Computer enddevices Personal Computer Server Cat 5 or above straightthrough patch cables. Cat 5 or above cross-over patch cables V.35 DTE Serial Cables V.35 DCE Serial Cables
Any additional options or software required

Substitute Any 2950 or 2960 model switch Any multilayer switch or router with minimum 2 FastEthernet ports and two serial port. At least one PC and any other IP end-device (camera, printer, etc.) Any PC with web server and DNS software loaded none

IOS Software Rev. 12.2 or above 12.2 or above

none none

FastEthernet NIC FastEthernet NIC none

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system. Windows, MAC, or Linux operating system n/a

12

none

none

n/a

5 5

None None

None None

n/a n/a

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology. Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader.

Addressing Table
Device Designation R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R3 R3 R3 R4 R4 R4 R5 R5 R5 S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 PC1 PC2 PC3 Web 1A Web 1B DNS A DNS B Web 2A Web 2B Interface Fa0/0.1 Fa0/0.21 Fa0/0.22 Fa0/0.23 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DCE Fa0/0.1 Fa0/0.21 Fa0/0.22 Fa0/0.23 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DTE Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DCE Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DCE Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * DCE S0/1/1 * DCE VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 IP Address 172.18.2.1 172.18.21.1 172.18.22.1 172.18.23.1 172.18.0.17 172.18.0.13 172.18.0.25 172.18.2.2 172.18.21.2 172.18.22.2 172.18.23.2 172.18.0.21 172.18.0.10 172.18.0.26 172.18.0.18 172.18.0.1 172.18.0.9 172.18.0.22 172.18.0.5 172.18.0.14 172.18.1.1 172.18.0.2 172.18.0.6 172.18.2.3 172.18.2.4 172.18.2.5 172.18.2.6 172.18.1.2 172.18.23.10 172.18.1.10 172.18.1.11 172.18.21.3 172.18.21.4 172.18.22.3 172.18.22.4 172.18.23.3 172.18.23.4 Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 172.18.2.1 172.18.2.1 172.18.2.1 172.18.2.1 172.18.1.1 172.18.23.1 172.18.1.1 172.18.1.1 172.18.21.1 172.18.21.2 172.18.22.1 172.18.22.2 172.18.23.1 172.18.23.2

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test.

Test 1. Description: Baseline Connectivity Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the baseline is to verify that the topology is up and running with the proper protocols and features.

Data to Record: Configurations Routing Tables VLAN information Spanning Tree information CPU & Memory Ping Test Output

Estimated Time: 120 minutes

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. 1. Connect and configure the prototype network according to the Installation Checklist. 2. From PC1 and PC2 ping all of the other devices in the topology. Record any anomalies. 3. Telnet to all of the devices and examine the show running-config output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. 4. Use the tracert command between PC1 and PC2 and between PC2 and servers Web 1A and Web 2B to verify that the traffic is taking the correct routes through the network. 5. Test IP connectivity between host devices on the same VLAN. 6. Test IP connectivity between host devices in different VLANs 7. Verify EIGRP configuration using show ip route, show ip protocols, show ip eigrp topology, and show ip eigrp interfaces on all routers. 8. Verify VLAN and STP configuration using show vlan and show spanning-tree on all switches.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. An example of specific criteria is: A requirement that ping response times cannot exceed 100 ms. 1. All networking devices are connected and accessible through Telnet. 2. Hosts can ping all hosts on every VLAN. 3. EIGRP routes are advertised correctly and are installed into the routing tables on all of the routers. 4. STP is selecting the correct root bridge and blocking the expected port. 5. Web pages stored on all web servers are available to all PCs.

Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.3.2 Building the Prototype Network

Objective
Build and test a prototype network for use in the Stadium Prototype Test Plan.

Background / Preparation
In this exercise, you will use the installation checklist provided by the network designer to build the prototype network. Once the network is built and configured, you can perform the Basic Connectivity Test specified in the designers test plan. Download the Stadium Basic Connectivity Test Plan (Basic Connectivity Test Plan) document and the Installation Checklist (Prototype Network Installation Checklist) document. Complete the Stadium Basic Connectivity Test Plan document after the prototype network has been built..

Required files: Stadium Basic Connectivity Test Plan (Basic Connectivity Test Plan) and Installation Checklist (Prototype Network Installation Checklist).

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 1: Connect switches S1, S2, S3, and S4 to the routers and end devices as shown in the diagram. Step 2: Configure the hostnames, interface IP addresses, and default gateways on switches S1, S2, S3, and S4, PC1 and all of the servers. Step 3: Configure basic security on switches S1, S2, S3, and S4: Privileged mode secret password and require login on VTY ports. Step 4: Create VLAN21, VLAN22 and VLAN23 on switches S1, S2, S3, and S4, assign proper switchport roles to all connected interfaces assign the proper VLAN numbers to ports that connect to end user devices. Step 5: Configure interface Fa0/0 on routers R1 and R2 with the IP addresses shown in the table. Step 6: Set the STP priority on switch S3 to 4096 for all VLANs to make it the primary root bridge. Set the STP priority on switch S4 to 8192 for all VLANs to make it the secondary root bridge. Step 7: Perform Basic Connectivity Test according to the Stadium Prototype Test Plan.
Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

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7.3.4 Testing ACLs

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES INTRODUCTION EQUIPMENT DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM TEST 1. DESCRIPTION: ACCESS CONTROL LISTS TEST TEST 1. PROCEDURES: TEST 1. EXPECTED RESULTS AND SUCCESS CRITERIA: TEST 1. CONCLUSIONS APPENDIX 3 4 4 5 7 8 8 9 10

Attendees
Name Company Position

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. For example: The purpose of this test plan is to add access control lists to the prototype network to secure unauthorized access to the server farm and to demonstrate that the access control lists are configured correctly. This revised prototype network is used to test various aspects of the proposed design.

Test 1: Access Control Lists Test


Verify full connectivity from all PCs to all servers. Plan access control lists to prevent unauthorized access to the server farm. Configure access control lists on Distribution Layer devices and apply them to the proper interfaces in the proper direction. Verify proper operation of the access control lists by verifying that permitted traffic gets through to the servers and unauthorized traffic is blocked.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req 5 5 Model 2960 Layer 2 switch 1841 ISR routers with 2 FastEthernet ports and 2 Serial ports Personal Computer enddevices Personal Computer Server Cat 5 or above straightthrough patch cables. Cat 5 or above cross-over patch cables V.35 DTE Serial Cables V.35 DCE Serial Cables
Any additional options or software required

Substitute Any 2950 or 2960 model switch Any multilayer switch or router with minimum 2 FastEthernet ports and two serial port. At least one PC and any other IP end-device (camera, printer, etc.) Any PC with web server and DNS software loaded none

IOS Software Rev. 12.2 or above 12.2 or above

none none

FastEthernet NIC FastEthernet NIC none

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system. Windows, MAC, or Linux operating system n/a

12

none

none

n/a

5 5

None None

None None

n/a n/a

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Device Designation R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R1 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R2 R3 R3 R3 R4 R4 R4 R5 R5 R5 S1 S2 S3 S4 S5 PC1 PC2 PC3 Web 1A Web 1B DNS A DNS B Web 2A Web 2B

Interface Fa0/0.1 Fa0/0.21 Fa0/0.22 Fa0/0.23 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DCE Fa0/0.1 Fa0/0.21 Fa0/0.22 Fa0/0.23 Fa0/1 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DTE Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DCE Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * DTE S0/1/1 * DCE Fa0/0 S0/1/0 * DCE S0/1/1 * DCE VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1 VLAN1

IP Address 172.18.2.1 172.18.21.1 172.18.22.1 172.18.23.1 172.18.0.17 172.18.0.13 172.18.0.25 172.18.2.2 172.18.21.2 172.18.22.2 172.18.23.2 172.18.0.21 172.18.0.10 172.18.0.26 172.18.0.18 172.18.0.1 172.18.0.9 172.18.0.22 172.18.0.5 172.18.0.14 172.18.1.1 172.18.0.2 172.18.0.6 172.18.2.3 172.18.2.4 172.18.2.5 172.18.2.6 172.18.1.2 172.18.23.10 172.18.1.10 172.18.1.11 172.18.21.3 172.18.21.4 172.18.22.3 172.18.22.4 172.18.23.3 172.18.23.4

Subnet mask 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0 255.255.255.0

Gateway N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A N/A 172.18.2.1 172.18.2.1 172.18.2.1 172.18.2.1 172.18.1.1 172.18.23.1 172.18.1.1 172.18.1.1 172.18.21.1 172.18.21.2 172.18.22.1 172.18.22.2 172.18.23.1 172.18.23.2

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology. Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader.

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test.

Test 1. Description: Access Control Lists Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the test is to verify that access control lists are properly configured and applied to permit authorized traffic and to block unauthorized traffic.

Data to Record: Configurations Router configurations ACL information Ping Test Output Web page access information

Estimated Time: 120 minutes

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. Step 1: Verify full connectivity from all PCs to all servers. 1. From PC1 and PC2 ping all of the servers in the topology. Record the results. 2. From PC1 and PC2 access the following web pages: www.web1a.com, www.web1b.com, www.web2a.com, and www.web2b.com. Record the results. 3. From PC2, ping the Fa0/1 interface of routers R1 and R2 to verify connectivity and then telnet to routers R1 and R2 and get the show running-config output. Copy and paste the results into a document for later use. Step 2: Plan access control lists to prevent unauthorized access to the server farm. 1. Design an access control list numbered 101 to allow only web access from hosts on the internal network, 172.18.0.0/16, to any device and deny all other traffic. Design an access control list numbered 102 to allow only DNS access from hosts on the internal network, 172.18.0.0/16, to any device and deny all other traffic. Step 3: Configure and apply access control lists. 1. Telnet to routers R1 and R2 and add both access control lists and apply them on to the proper interfaces in the proper direction to protect the servers connected to that interface. Step 4: Verify proper operation of the access control lists. 1. From PC1 and PC2 ping all of the servers in the topology. Record the results. 2. From PC1 and PC2 access the following web pages: www.web1a.com, www.web1b.com, www.web2a.com, and www.web2b.com. Record the results. 3. Telnet to routers R1 and R2 and document the final cofiguration using show runningconfig, and show access-lists.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. An example of specific criteria is: A requirement that ping response times cannot exceed 100 ms. 1. Prior to configuring access control lists both PCs can ping all servers and access all web pages. 2. After configuring access control lists, PC2, representing a legitimate inside user, can not ping any server but can access all web pages. 3. After configuring access control lists, PC1, representing a PC set up to maintain switch configurations, can ping servers in its own VLAN, can not ping other servers, and can not access any web pages.

4. Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

7.3.4 Testing ACLs

Objective
Develop methodologies for comparing devices and topologies.

Background / Preparation
The purpose of this test plan is to add ACLs to the prototype network to secure unauthorized access to the server farm and to demonstrate that the ACLs are configured correctly. Download and complete the Stadium ACL Test Plan (Testing ACLs) document. Required files: Stadium ACL Test Plan (Testing ACLs).

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 1: Verify full connectivity from all PCs to all servers. Step 2: Plan ACLs to prevent unauthorized access to the server farm. Step 3: Configure and apply ACLs. Step 4: Verify proper operation of the ACLs.
Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

Page 2 of 2

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks: Prototyping the WAN

8.1.2 Configuring a WAN Connection Using PPP

Objectives
Simulate WAN connections. Demonstrate the benefits of using simulation software. Explore the effects of implementing new devices in a network topology. Use simulation software to test new configurations.

Background / Preparation
The XYZ Corporation is planning to expand soon. They are planning to open a new branch office that will connect to the main company network through the ISP. This will require router R0 in the existing network be upgraded and new equipment be purchased and configured. They would also like to add some wireless connectivity to the existing network. And finally, they wish to set up some basic security using access control lists (ACLs). The network administrator has provided you with a simulated model of the current network and a diagram of the new expanded network. You have been asked to modify the existing simulation to verify that the new devices and configurations will work as planned prior to purchasing new equipment and making changes to the live network.

Task 1
Step 1: Upgrade the WAN interfaces on router R0
a. Remove the NM-4A/S WAN module. b. Add a WIC-2T module in Slot0. c. Add a WIC-2T module in Slot1.

Step 2: Reconnect WAN links on router R0


a. Connect R0 S0/0/0 to R2 S0/0/1 (DCE).
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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

b. Connect R0 S0/0/1 (DCE) to R3 S0/0/1.

Step 3: Reconfigure WAN links on router R0


a. Configure interface S0/0/0 with the following: IP address 172.16.3.6/30 Encapsulation PPP b. Configure interface S0/0/1 with the following: IP address 172.16.3.9/30 Encapsulation PPP Clock rate 64000 c. Configure a default static route using S0/1/0 as the exit interface.

Step 4: Test network connectivity


a. Use the command prompt on PC0 to ping the Web Server and all other PCs. b. Troubleshoot if needed.

Task 2
Step 1: Set up additional devices for new branch network
a. b. c. d. Add a new 2811 router between the ISP and Switch5. Add a WIC-2T module in Slot0. Connect S0/0/0 on the new router to ISP S0/0/1 (DCE). Connect Fa0/0 on the new router to Switch5 Fa0/24.

Step 2: Connect the existing network to the ISP


a. Connect router R0 S0/1/0 to ISP S0/0/0 (DCE). b. Configure interface S0/1/0 on R0 with the following: IP address 10.1.1.2/30

Step 3: Configure the new router


a. Use the Config tab for the new router to change the display name to R5. b. Configure the hostname as R5. d. Configure interface S0/0/0 with the following: IP address 10.1.1.6/30 e. Configure interface Fa0/0 with the following: IP address 192.168.6.1/24 f. Configure a default static route using S0/0/0 as the exit interface.

Step 4: Test network connectivity


a. b. c. d. e. f. g. h. i. Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from ISP to R5. Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from ISP to PC5. Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from ISP to R0. Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC5 to R0. Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC5 to PC0 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC5 to PC1 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC5 to PC2 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC5 to PC3 (repeat if fails). Troubleshoot if needed.

Task 3
Step 1: Set up additional devices for new wireless network
a. Add a Linksys-WRT300N wireless router below router R3. b. Connect the Internet port on the Linksys device to R3 F0/1 (be careful about which type of cable you use).

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Step 2: Configure the new wireless network


a. On router R3 configure interface Fa0/1 with the following: IP address 192.168.7.1/24 b. On the wireless router configure the following: Change the display name to Wireless_Router4. Configure the Internet interface with the a Default Gateway of 192.168.7.1 and an IP address of 192.168.7.2/24. Configure the LAN interface with the IP address of 192.168.5.1/24.

Step 3: Test network connectivity


a. b. c. d. e. f. g. Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to the wireless router (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to R3 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to PC0 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to PC1 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to PC2 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to PC3 (repeat if fails). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC4 to PC5 (repeat if fails).

Task 4
Company XYZ wishes to set up some basic security using access control lists (ACLs). The ACL should permit all www traffic to the Web Server. Permit any return traffic that originated in the 192.168.3.0 network. Allow the ICMP protocol to receive echo replies and unreachable messages. The ACL should deny all other traffic.

Step 1: Set up basic security using access control lists (ACLs)


a. Add the following ACL to router R2: access-list 100 permit tcp any host 192.168.3.250 eq 80 access-list 100 permit tcp any any established access-list 100 permit icmp any any echo-reply access-list 100 permit icmp any any unreachable access-list 100 deny ip any any b. Apply the ACL to interface Fa0/0 on router R2.

Step 2: Test network connectivity


a. Verify that traffic originating from outside the 192.168.3.0 network is denied: Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets to PC2 from PC0 (should fail). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets to PC2 from PC1 (should fail). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets to PC2 from PC3 (should fail). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets to PC2 from PC4 (should fail). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets to PC2 from PC5 (should fail). b. Verify that traffic originating from inside the 192.168.3.0 network is permitted: Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC2 to PC0 (should be successful). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC2 to PC1 (should be successful). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC2 to PC3 (should be successful). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC2 to PC4 (should be successful). Use a Simple PDU to send icmp packets from PC2 to PC5 (should be successful). c. Verify that all www traffic is permitted to the Web Server: On PC0, open the Web Browser and type 192.168.3.250 in as the URL (should display the server web page). On PC1, open the Web Browser and type 192.168.3.250 in as the URL (should display the server web page). On PC2, open the Web Browser and type 192.168.3.250 in as the URL (should display the server web page). On PC3, open the Web Browser and type 192.168.3.250 in as the URL (should display the server web page).

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

On PC4, open the Web Browser and type 192.168.3.250 in as the URL (should display the server web page). On PC5, open the Web Browser and type 192.168.3.250 in as the URL (should display the server web page). d. Troubleshoot if needed.

Step 3: Verify completion of all tasks


Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Reflection
1. How could using simulation software such as Packet Tracer be beneficial to network personnel? ______________________________________________________________________________________________ ______________________________________________________________________________________________ 2. What are some limitations to using simulation software such as Packet Tracer? ______________________________________________________________________________________________

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Page 4 of 4

8.2.5 Stadium Redundancy Test Plan

Start Date Network Build (Setup) Testing Date

End Date

Table of Contents
ATTENDEES..................................................................................................................... 3 INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................... 4 EQUIPMENT ..................................................................................................................... 5 DESIGN AND TOPOLOGY DIAGRAM............................................................................ 6 TEST 1. DESCRIPTION: FRAME RELAY CONNECTIVITY TEST................................. 8 TEST 1. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS....................................................................... 9 TEST 2. DESCRIPTION: FLOATING STATIC ROUTES CONFIGURATION TEST .... 10 TEST 2. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS..................................................................... 11 TEST 3. DESCRIPTION: LINK FAILURE TEST........................................................... 12 TEST 3. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS..................................................................... 13 APPENDIX ...................................................................................................................... 14

Attendees
Name Company NetworkingCompany NetworkingCompany NetworkingCompany Position Account Manager Network Designer System Engineer

Introduction
An introduction to the testing explaining briefly what the purpose of the test is, and what should be observed. Include a brief description of testing goals. List all tests you intend to run. Purpose of this test:

Tests to run:

Test 1: Frame Relay Connectivity Test


Verify physical and IP connectivity between Edge2 and BR3 on the prototype network. Document operation.

Test 2: Floating Static Route Configuration Test


Demonstrate backup route interface configuration. Verify connectivity through backup route. Demonstrate backup static route configuration. Verify routing priority

Test 3: Link Failure Test


Demonstrate routing of traffic between separate Edge2 and BR3 with Frame network active. Demonstrate routing of traffic after Frame network is inactive. Demonstrate routing of traffic after Frame network is reactivated. Document operation.

Equipment
List all of the equipment needed to perform the tests. Be sure to include cables, optional connectors or components, and software.
Qty. Req Model
Any additional options or software required

Substitute

IOS Software Rev.

Personal FastEthernet Computer end- NIC devices

At least one PC and any other IP enddevice (camera, printer, etc.)

Windows, MAC or Linux operating system.

Design and Topology Diagram


Place a copy of the prototype network topology in this section. This is the network as it should be built to be able to perform the required tests, including IP Addressing and DLCI information. If this topology duplicates a section of the actual network, include a reference topology showing the location within the existing or planned network. Initial configurations for each device must be included in the Appendix.

Figure 1: Topology - Prototype test topology.

IP Address Plan: Device Name Edge2 Edge2 BR3 BR3 BR3 ISPX ISPX Interface Serial 0/1/1 Fa0/1 Serial 0/1/0 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 Fa0/0 Fa0/1 IP Address 172.18.0.9 172.18.0.249 172.18.0.10 172.18.225.249 172.18.225.1 172.18.225.250 172.18.0.250 Subnet Mask 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.128 255.255.255.252 255.255.255.252 100 DLCI 110

Additional Notes and Instructions: Add a description about this design here that is essential to provide a better understanding of the testing or to emphasize any aspect of the test network to the reader. ___________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________________

For each test to be performed state the goals of the test, the data to record during the test, and the estimated time to perform the test. Test 1 is given as an example.

Test 1. Description: Frame Relay Connectivity Test


Goals of Test: The goal of the baseline is to verify that the Frame Relay network is up and running with the proper protocols and features. Data to Record: Configurations Interface status Routing Tables CPU & Memory Ping Test Output

Estimated Time: 45 minutes total 30 minutes build 15 minutes test

Test 1. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. 1. Build the topology according to the diagram shown in Figure 1 without Ethernet backup link. Assign IP addresses according to the IP address plan. To configure the serial connections through the Frame Relay network, you will need to change the encapsulation type to frame relay. Then use the frame-relay map ip command to identify what circuit needs to be used to reach the distant IP address. Lastly, turn on the interface. For example, on the Edge2 router, you need to enter: Edge2(config)#interface Serial 0/1/1 Edge2(config)#encapsulation frame-relay Edge2(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 172.18.0.10 100 broadcast Edge2(config-if)#no shutdown Notice that you are using the BR3 Serial 0/1/0 address and connecting it to the local 100 DLCI. The broadcast will allow EIGRP multicast updates to use the link as well. The BR3 router Serial 0/1/0 will need to be configured in a like manner. 2. Create a basic configuration on each device. Include applicable passwords, device names, default routes, default gateways, and activate interfaces. 3. Console into one of the devices in the topology and ping all of the other devices in the topology. Record any anomalies. 4. Telnet to each device in the configuration and verify that each is reachable.

5. Start a log file and get the show running-config, show ip route, show processes cpu sorted, show interfaces and the first few lines of show memory . Save the log file for later analysis. Repeat for all devices in the topology.

Test 1. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. 1. All networking devices, except ISPX, are connected and accessible through Telnet. 2. Hosts can ping successfully to other hosts, except ISPX on the network.

Test 1. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Test 2. Description: Floating Static Routes Configuration Test


Goals of Test:

Data to Record: Routing tables CPU & Memory Ping Test Output

Estimated Time: 30 minutes total 15 minutes configure 15 minutes test

Test 2. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Test 2. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. 1. 2. _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

3. __________________________________________________________________________

Test 2. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Test 3. Description: Link Failure Test


Goals of Test:

Data to Record: Router Configuration IP Routing Table Information CPU & Memory Ping Test Output

Estimated Time: 20 minutes total 10 minutes configure 10 minutes test

Test 3. Procedures:
Itemize the procedures to follow to perform the test. ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________________________

Test 3. Expected Results and Success Criteria:


List all of the expected results. Specific criteria that must be met for the test to be considered a success should be listed. 1. 2. _________________________________________________________________________ _________________________________________________________________________

3. __________________________________________________________________________

Test 3. Results and Conclusions


Record the results of the tests and the conclusions that can be drawn from the results.

Appendix
Record the starting configurations, any modifications, log file or command output, and any other relevant documentation.

CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks: Prototyping the WAN

8.2.5 Testing Design Redundancy

Objectives
Using the test plan, configure the backup links and verify the failover works as expected.

Background / Preparation
In this exercise, you will configure a Frame Relay network and a backup link. Once the network is built and configured, you can perform a Frame Relay Connectivity Test, Floating Static Routes Configuration Test and a Link Failure Test specified in the designers test plan. Download and complete the Stadium Redundancy Test Plan document in addition to the PT activity. Required files: Stadium Redundancy Test Plan

Test 1 Frame Relay Connectivity Test


Configure Edge2 and BR3 hostnames and the LAN connection to Switch0. Use the address table in the Stadium Redundancy Test Plan. To configure the serial connections through the Frame Relay network, you will need to change the encapsulation type to frame relay. Then use the frame-relay map ip command to identify which circuit needs to be used to reach the distant IP address. Lastly, enable the interface. For example, on the Edge2 router, you need to enter: Edge2(config)#interface Serial 0/1/1 Edge2(config)#encapsulation frame-relay Edge2(config-if)#frame-relay map ip 172.18.0.10 100 broadcast Edge2(config-if)#no shutdown Notice that you are using the BR3 Serial 0/1/0 address and connecting it to the local 100 DLCI. The broadcast will allow EIGRP multicast updates to use the link as well. The BR3 router Serial 0/1/0 will need to be configured in a like manner. Configure EIGRP (AS 1) on Edge2 and BR3. Advertise only the networks connected to the FrameCloud and Switch0. On BR3, do not send advertisements out fa0/1.

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

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CCNA Discovery Designing and Supporting Computer Networks

Test 2 Floating Static Routes Configuration Test


On Edge2, configure fa0/1 using the addressing given in the Test Plan. On Edge2, configure floating static routes (AD=130) to 172.18.225.0/25 and 172.18.225.248/30 through the back-up network using the local interface argument. On BR3, configure fa0/0 using the addressing given in the Test Plan. On BR3, configure a floating default route (AD=130) through fa0/0.

Your completion percentage should be 100%. If not, click Check Results to see which required components are not yet completed.

Test 3 Link Failure Test


On Edge2, shutdown interface s0/1/1 and wait a few seconds. From Edge2, ping 172.18.225.1. Troubleshoot until it is successful. On Edge2, turn interface s0/1/1 back on and wait a few seconds. From Edge2, ping 172.18.225.1. Ensure the path is back through the Frame network.

All contents are Copyright 2008 Cisco Systems, Inc. All rights reserved. This document is Cisco Public Information.

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