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ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (AY 2010/2011) 12 SEPTEMBER 2011

ANNUAL GENERAL MEETING (AY 2010/2011)

12 SEPTEMBER 2011
12 SEPTEMBER 2011
University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore CONTENTS

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

CONTENTS

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore CONTENTS

10 th Management Committee Report………………………………………………………… 3 Secretariat Committee Report………………………………………………………………….14 Finance Committee Report…………………………………………………………………… 20 Public Relations Committee Report………………………………………………………… 27

Logistics and Welfare Committee Report……………………………………………………31 Academic Committee Report………………………………………………………………… 34 Community Service Committee Report………………………………………………………43

Cultural Activities Committee Report………………………………………………………

Social Activities Committee Report……………………………………………………………51

Sports Committee Report……………………………………………………………………

Freshmen Orientation Programme Committee Report……………………………………62 Camp Committee Report……………………………………………………………………… 68 Orientation Week Committee Report…………………………………………………………74 Rag Committee Report………………………………………………………….……………….83 Flag Committee Report………………………………………………………………………….89 FOP Finale Committee Report………………………………………………………………….91 Publications Committee Report……………………………………………………………… 95

10 th Management Committee Contact List………………………………………………… 99

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 10 T H MANAGEMENT

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 10 T H MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE REPORT

10 TH MANAGEMENT COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

The Management Committee of the University Scholars Club is responsible for providing direction for the Club, representing USP students’ interests to the larger university, and driving Club events and initiatives forward. Over the last few years, Management Committees have also progressively adopted the role of systematizing programmes that are deemed beneficial for the Club in the long run. This year, particularly, the 10 th MC had the privilege of steering the club through USP’s ideological and physical transition to the Residential College in University Town.

2. Organisation

The 10 th Management Committee of USC was elected into office on 4 September 2010 by an unprecedented turnout of 235 voters. In its term, USC was served by some 100 unique office-bearers in 129 different positions across the Management, Standing and Working Committees (MC/SCs/WCs).

The members of the 10 th Management Committee are as follows:

President Vice-President &

Honorary General Secretary Honorary Financial Secretary Director of Public Relations Director of Community Service Director of Cultural Activities Director of Social Activities Director of Sports

Director of FOP

Honorary Club Advisor Honorary Asst Club Advisor

Auw Jian Jin Jeremy Lim Hui Fen Melissa Baey Xiang Ling Maria Tania Hapsari Harsono Lim Kai Heng Tan Tiong Wee Spencer Joel Tan Wun Chuan Amanda Aw Yong Zhi Xin Ang Xiao Wen Jolena

Associate Professor Albert Teo Ms Gurvinderjit Kaur

The President and Vice-President were chosen to represent the University Scholars Club in the 32nd NUSSU Council.

3. Calendar of Events

The following events were organized by the 10 th Management Committee and its standing and working committees:

September

Co-Option of Standing Committees

Mid-Autumn Festival

Introductory Classes Round 1

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore October  IFG

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore October  IFG Appreciation Dinner  USC

October

IFG Appreciation Dinner

USC Welfare Survey 2010

Working Committees Recruitment

Halloween Party

November

Launch of Nespresso Coffee

Exam Welfare Pack Distribution I

December

Christmas-New Year Party

FOP Mug Designing Sessions

Nature Walk

USC Futsal

USC Retreat

January

The January Thing: RC Edition

Cheerleading Pick-Up

Tennis Pick-Up

Launch of USC Newsletter:

 

The Chattering Box (January Issue)

 

Introductory Classes Round 2

Project Knight Information Session

Relaunch of USC Website

February

Buaya-Buayee

Chinese New Year Party

Valentine’s Day Sales

USC Productions 2011: Hay Fever

USC Newsletter: The Chattering Box (February

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Issue)   

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Issue)

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Issue)    Basketball Pickup  Soccer Pick-Up
 

Basketball Pickup

Soccer Pick-Up

March

USC Bazaar

Quidditch Pick-Up

Arts for Health

USC Goes Vogue

ISM Sharing Session

April

Exam Welfare Pack Distribution II

Chatterbox Memorial

Launch of Peer Mentorship Programme

May

Project CARE Begins

June

Scholaris

July

Freshmen Orientation Camp

Night Cycling

Orientation Week

Pre-Flag

Launch of USC Publication: Infusion

Residential College Welcome Dinner

Launch of House System

August

NUS Flag Day

NUS Rag Day

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore    FOP Finale

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

 

FOP Finale Night

September

Inter-Faculty Games

Chatterbox Resurrection

Annual General Elections

Annual General Meeting

4. Key Challenges transitioning into the RC

General Meeting 4. Key Challenges transitioning into the RC This year, the 10 t h MC

This year, the 10 th MC ran the Club toe-to-toe with USP’s transition to the Residential College. Hence, all of the MC’s structures and activities was threaded and permeated by RC considerations. A few highlights and challenges during our term are outlined below:

a. Renewed focus on community building

Throughout the year, the 10 th MC dialed down its role in policing and governance, and renewed the focus of USC on community building through student welfare and engagement of the administration, faculty and alumni.

Student welfare

One main thrust of this community-building initiative was student welfare, which can be split into general welfare, and the four pillars of community interests (Community Service, Cultural Activities, Sports, and Social Activities). We are encouraged by the levels of participation in these various welfare initiatives.

General: The President worked closely with the Asset Manager to oversee the general, day-to-day welfare needs of the Club, which included the Exam Welfare Pack Distributions (150 per semester), the USC Welfare Survey (194 respondents), the Welfare Corner, and the Nespresso machine (1000+ capsules sold). Responses were generally positive, and hence, it is recommended that these initiatives continue, but under the purview of the Vice-President who will supervise the day- to-day operations of the Club. The President will personally attend to more urgent welfare concerns such as cost of RC living and integration of non-resident USP students.

Four pillars of community interests: This was the first year where our student life activities were clearly classified into categories, appealing to distinct, interest- specific groups of people. We were able to repeat and consolidate a flagship suite of activities, such as Halloween, Buaya Buayee, The January Thing, USC Productions, FOP and Night Cycling. Moving forward, academic affairs will now become the fifth pillar of community interest, as we have observed its capacity to build community through bringing together USC members interested in academics. We are certain that welfare-centrism is a step in the right direction for USC in the new RC

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environment. University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Engaging the

environment.

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Engaging the larger USP community

University of Singapore Engaging the larger USP community Building upon previous MCs’ work, efforts were made

Building upon previous MCs’ work, efforts were made to engage the USP Administration, USP Faculty, and USP Alumni to strengthen bonds within our community. Ties have grown so strong to the point that it is almost taken for granted that staff and faculty were present for most of our corporate events, including The January Thing and the Residential College Welcome Dinner. It was also heartening to see droves of alumni come back to USP during Chatterbox Memorial to mingle with us and share their experiences. We are confident that the state of relationships within our USP community has reached a new high.

b. Integrated activities to ease the transition

Collaborations with PGP Pilot Committee

In anticipation of the potentially unfamiliar RC environment that would put community activities in both an academic and residential setting, the 10 th MC and the PGP Pilot Committee launched a few collaborative initiatives to give USC members a sense of this new dynamic. For instance, Halloween 2010 was held at two locations, starting with the Haunted House and other associated activities at Blk ADM, followed by the Night Walk and Movie Screening at the USP PGP blocks. Buaya Buayee also saw much stalking activity happen at Blk ADM as well as the PGP blocks. The January Thing and the Chatterbox Memorial were also organized to coincide with the PGP Dinners, so as to maximize economies of scale. We are glad that they were successful for our members.

Events held in the Residential College

Three main events – Orientation Week, the Residential College Welcome Dinner and Chatterbox Resurrection – were organized in the Residential College compound itself. Attendance at the Residential College Welcome Dinner reached a record high, with more than 450 students and USP admin/faculty coming together to dine and celebrate the start of this new phase of USP’s evolution. We believe that by anchoring activities in the college as soon as USP moved into the compound, USC was able to give our community a sense of familiarity and continuity in spite of the unfamiliar location.

c. Specific Residential College Issues

On top of considering the RC in its regular workload, the MC also addressed specific concerns raised by students pertaining to the RC.

Addressing bread-and-butter issues

After the release of the prices for accommodation and the meal plan, some members of the community became concerned that the steep price of RC living would discourage prospective freshmen from applying to USP, hence inducing change in the future demographic of USP students. A handful of current USP

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore students, who wanted to

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore students, who wanted to experience the RC but were hindered

students, who wanted to experience the RC but were hindered by the heavy financial burden, also aired their grouses. In response, the MC worked closely with the USP administration to solicit views from the community about financial aid, and thereafter lobby for a clearly visible financial aid package. It is strongly recommended that the MC continue to push to establish a steady stream of financial aid and scholarship provision, especially for the incoming batches of freshmen.

Increasing the housing demand uptake

Concurrent with the debate over cost of residential living concerns, the uptake rate from existing USP students was less than favourable. Hence, the MC conducted a survey of the population to determine the reasons behind the low housing demand uptake. The results showed that although the cost of the meal plan was a significant deterrent, a larger pool of respondents was not applying to stay for other reasons, such as proximity of NUS to home. It is recommended that while the USP Classes of 2012, 2013 and 2014 (who do not have to stay compulsorily) are still around, the MC fight for barriers to be lowered so that a larger proportion of existing USP students can experience residential living in the RC.

Establishing communication of information

While it was imperative that information about the RC was communicated to our members effectively, the task was challenging due to the lack of information being passed down to us from the university administration. We were able to organize a townhall, The January Thing: RC Edition, to facilitate dialogue between the USP administration and students, and allow an open airing of views and grievances. Unfortunately the session was not as transparent as we hoped. It is suggested that the 11 th MC institute an efficient and trustworthy system of providing information and gathering feedback.

d. Overall Club Organisation

Evaluating MC-level activities

In this past year, the nine members of the MC took it upon themselves to conceptualize and execute three main initiatives, namely, Nespresso, Scholaris, and the RC Welcome Dinner. There were a variety of reasons: the events were only initiated after the recruitment and budgeting cycle, leaving the MC to compensate for the manpower and funding gaps; the events’ had to be organized by the MC to reflect the importance of their objectives; or the urgency of the matter demanded a spontaneous and rapid MC response. We realized that these MC-level initiatives helped us to build camaraderie in the team, as we had to put aside our individual portfolios for the sake of attaining a larger purpose. However, it also placed unnecessary stress on the already limited time and energy that the MC had for organizing its flagship suite of activities. We recommend that the 11 th MC (1) minimize the number of activities for which manpower and funds are not allocated at the start of the year, and (2) collectively make an extremely prudent decision on how much they can commit in terms of MC-level activities.

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Integrating MC with FOP

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Integrating MC with FOP activities

University of Singapore Integrating MC with FOP activities With the increased importance of freshmen orientation in

With the increased importance of freshmen orientation in line with the move to the

RC, the Vice-President was appointed the concurrent FOP Director for FOP’11. The

Vice-President shaped the goals of FOP’11 with a broad club perspective in mind, and enabled interfacing between MC planning and FOP planning. The increased

importance of freshmen orientation also merited the involvement and integration of

MC members and portfolios with FOP activities.

During our term in office, the MC & FOP activities were only integrated to a certain extent. My report here will highlight the success of the 10 th MC-FOP integration whereas Melissa’s report (pg 65) will highlight the pitfalls of such an attempt. Firstly, Scholaris was co-organized by both the MC and the FOP team. Secondly, all

MC members were involved in various levels for FOP. Thirdly, the MC organized the

Residential College Welcome Dinner in conjunction with the Freshmen Induction Ceremony during Orientation Week. Despite the future separation of the FOP portfolio from the duties of the VP, the MC as a collective entity is expected to be ever ready to support all FOP affairs at all levels – planning, organizing, participating, or helping to supplement general logistical manpower.

Reviewing the Standing Committee structure

This year, the 10 th MC slightly tweaked the Standing Committee (SC) structure from

the previous MC (one or two Vice-Directors for each MC member); every SC was a

fully functional cell, consisting of an Administrator, a Financial Secretary, and a

Public Relations Secretary. While this structure certainly alleviated the workload on

the

MC by decentralizing the secretarial, financial and public relations functions of

the

MC into smaller committees, it had the downside of leaving individual SC

members less empowered to assist Directors with their direct decision-making responsibilities due to the fixed job scopes that their titles suggested. Perhaps the 11 th MC could consider three options: (1) retaining the fully functional cell structure with customization for certain portfolios, (2) reverting back to having only Vice- Directors sit on the SCs, or (3) having no overall consistency in the SC structure. There are benefits and costs to each option, and it is advisable that the 11 th MC thinks through the considerations very carefully before proceeding.

Other key, non-functional SC positions such as the Academic Secretary, Asset Manager, Publications Secretary, and the Business Secretary were also co-opted to supplement the needs of the MC. These individuals were not elected, but their portfolios demanded a whole-of-club perspective. It is recommended that this group of SC members continue to be recruited, developed and consulted for their

valuable opinions and contributions, most of which operate on the MC level in practice. In fact, the Academic Secretary position is now promoted to the MC level

for the 11 th MC. This category will also potentially include House Captains and other

leaders of special interest groups.

e. Residential College Student Advisory Committee

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore The Residential College

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore The Residential College Student Advisory Committee was

The Residential College Student Advisory Committee was formed by a group of volunteers from the 9 th MC to explore and strategize the various aspects of student leadership and involvement in the RC environment. Its work was continued in the 10 th MC, under certain distinct portfolios. The Peer Mentorship and Academic Advising initiative was seconded to the Academic Committee. Some of the achievements and follow-up actions of the Student Advisory Committee are highlighted:

House System and Student Leadership Structure

After one year of conceptualization and consultation with various stakeholders, the committee consisting of Jeremy Auw, Baey Xiang Ling and Jolena Ang proposed the creation of a House System and received majority support in a community referendum. It is our hope that the 11 th MC can take the House System forward and work out the melding of the House System with existing USC activities.

Housing Policy

Tania Harsono and Spencer Tan responsibly provided student input to the USP administration during the process of formulating housing policy in the RC. Most notably, they worked on usage of common spaces, housing allocation, financial aid, and the RA application. Nevertheless, due to the overwhelming number of concerns, they were not able to address everything. It is our hope that in the first year of staying in the RC, the 11 th MC addresses the teething issues and policy gaps that were not bridged this past year.

Peer Mentorship Programme

The Academic Committee, under the capable leadership of the Academic Secretary Amoz Hor, was able to conceptualize and launch the Peer Mentorship Programme in August 2011. This is indeed a commendable achievement. Please refer to the Academic Committee Report for more information.

Suggestions

On hindsight, these initiatives were indeed strategic moves to plug gaps that would otherwise have complicated matters for both USC and the USP administration in the RC. However, the additional workload placed on MC members resulted in us spreading our efforts too thinly among our various commitments. We recommend that the Student Advisory Committee be dissolved henceforth as a formal group, but that the 11 th MC identify unfinished business from this initiative and in one way or another integrate these responsibilities into the existing roles of MC members.

5. Key Challenges in the RC

a. Tradition vs Innovation

The value of moving forward

The programme’s discourse about the RC has certainly been about becoming more

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore progressive, exploring new

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore progressive, exploring new boundaries, and carving out a

progressive, exploring new boundaries, and carving out a fresh learning environment for ourselves. Likewise, USC must adopt a more open mindset and be ready to adapt to constantly changing circumstances. Notably, the Club must take ownership of the new spaces – Multi-Purpose Hall, Themed Rooms, Courtyard – and the new ideology – living and learning together.

The value of heritage

Nevertheless, as new initiatives spring forth around the new intellectual and physical architecture of the RC, we cannot forget our 10-year heritage as a programme and as a club. We have built up traditions that cue us to past USP culture, such as Halloween, USC Productions, and éclairs, and we should treasure this privilege, even more so because it is not available to other entities similar to us. It is our hope that we continue these traditions as a way to both commemorate USP history, and to create a sense of community that is larger than any particular group or batch of USP students.

Going beyond nostalgia to the rationale

Invoking traditions, however, goes beyond mere nostalgia, commemoration, or tradition for the sake of it. There is a reason why the tradition or event even existed in the first place, and before rehashing the tradition, or discarding it in favour of a new idea, due consideration must be paid to that reason. This is so as to build upon institutional memory instead of constantly “reinventing the wheel”.

b. Multiple Stakeholders

The USP community will now include stakeholders such as Exchange Students, Residential Fellows and Assistants, Housing Services Staff, Peer Mentors, and even a new categorization: Residents vs Non-Residents. In light of this, USC must strive to be a trustworthy sounding board at the heart of the community that integrates and connects different stakeholders in the RC.

A prospective first task: in view of the projected swell in the number of college activities, it is imperative that USC institute and coordinate a college-wide Master Calendar that serves to (1) de-conflict the various events, and (2) inform all USP students and Cinnamon Residents of the daily going-on(s).

c. Welfare

The 11 th MC should continue to focus on student welfare, both at the bread-and- butter level, as well as on the level of interest. While the 11 th MC may choose to surface concerns specific to residential living, it is also imperative that the MC be keenly sensitive to the needs of non-residents, such as the lack of access to the first floor of the Residential Block, as well as the various common spaces such as the Master’s Commons.

d. The issue of sustainability

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Preventing event fatigue

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Preventing event fatigue

National University of Singapore Preventing event fatigue Moving forward, as USC strives to appeal to diverse

Moving forward, as USC strives to appeal to diverse groups of people, it must also scale its events to optimize the resources given so as not to cause fatigue on both the part of organizers and participants. With the introduction of various groupings such as Peer Groups, Houses, Residential Neighborhoods, Interest Groups, and so on, many smaller-scale activities will eventually lead to a higher event load. Hence, it is recommended that the 11 th MC work towards focusing on organizing larger- scale events or longer-term events with wider appeal, and that other smaller groups would not have the resources to execute.

Alleviating the manpower crunch

In recent years, involvement in the Club at the planning level has been extremely encouraging. Hundreds of students passing through USC in the last few years have had at least one experience being a part of an organizing team for a Club event. However, it is anticipated that as the sphere of the Club’s responsibility continues to expand, more manpower capacity needs to commensurate. Moreover, as more opportunities open up in the RC, competition for manpower for the Club will intensify, leading to stresses on the projected activity load and requisite commitment for USC. In order to stay afloat, the 11 th MC must be aggressive in recruiting its committees, and continually engage its members to ensure that no one feels disconnected from the community.

Leveraging on interest groups

Further into the future, USC may benefit from decentralizing most of its activities to interest groups in the cultural, sporting and community service baskets, while leaving the MC to leverage on its resources to organize large social events. This would allow the Club to be driven more by passionate, specialist individuals from the ground-up rather than a small team of generalist MC members driving interest- based activities from the top-down.

6.

Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the following parties:

The USP Directors, consisting of Director Prof John Richardson, Deputy Directors A/P Kang Hway Chuan, A/P Albert Teo, Prof Philip Holden, Associate Directors Peggy and Yunsian, for their able leadership, courage and perseverance in navigating the challenges and obstacles during the move to the Residential College, and also for their unwavering support in every single Club initiative. Also, a special mention to our Rector, Prof Wang Gungwu, for imparting to us his wisdom and experience.

USP Staff, consisting of Vindy, Linda, Grace, Winah, Eric, Dennis, KK, Joo Chuan, Sor Hui, Ai Lian, Daniel, Cheryl, Ros, Rohayu, Anne, Kia Yen, Aloysius, Mun Hin and Gaik Hong, for their ever-readiness to talk to us, give us advice or assist us in our work. No other faculty or body in the university can match your care and support for USP students and their concerns. We are deeply appreciative.

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore USP Faculty, especially A/P

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore USP Faculty, especially A/P Barbara Ryan, Dr Johan

USP Faculty, especially A/P Barbara Ryan, Dr Johan Geertsema, A/P Peter Pang, and A/P Martin Henz for providing mentorship and guidance, for thinking about the community before self, and for correcting us when we steer off course.

The 10 th MC, for their unwavering support and solidarity especially during crucial decision-making moments, for going beyond the call of duty and being faithful to the vision that we set out to accomplish in the beginning of our term, and for being such united team members that respect one another in both consensus and conflict.

The SC and WC members, for your efforts and energies that brought all of our plans and ideas to fruition. Your personal motivations and initiatives are precisely what the USP community is about. Too often, efforts go unnoticed in USC. I assure you that your contributions toward building the community are not only remembered, but more importantly, have led the community to be where it is today.

Members of USC, for your support that encourages us, for your constructive criticism that sharpens us, and for your contributions to this community that convicts us. Thank you for building this community together with us.

7. Closing Remarks

Due to the multitude of changes that USC had to go through, we worked far beyond limits. But because of the rewards we see today, we know that every ounce of sacrifice was worth it. We have confidence that the 11 th MC, under its able President Ms. Tania Harsono, will bring USC to scale greater heights in building this community we have grown to love and cherish.

Prepared by:

Jeremy Auw President 10 th Management Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore SECRETARIAT COMMITTEE REPORT

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore SECRETARIAT COMMITTEE REPORT

SECRETARIAT COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

The Secretariat Committee oversees all administrative duties of the Club. The functions of the committee can be broadly divided into three main areas:

(i)

Human Resource: Coordinating the co-option of Standing Committees, the recruitment of Working Committees and the Annual General Elections

(ii)

Documentation: Minutes-taking, scheduling of meetings, allocating CCA points, archiving and organizing the Annual General Meeting

(iii)

Communication: Managing Scholars News and other feedback channels

2. Organisation

Management Committee:

Honorary General Secretary:

Standing Committee:

Assistant Honorary General Secretary:

Committee Administrators :

Baey Xiang Ling

Delle Chan Tan Wen-Yi (Academic) Cui Chun Hao (Business) Divya Georgie (Community Service) Michele Lim (Cultural Activities) Matthias Wong (FOP) Ng Hui Ying (Public Relations) Samdish Suri (Social Activities) Nigel Tan (Sports)

3. Highlights and Initiatives

3.1. Human Resource

3.1.1. Co-Option of Standing Committees

A centralized co-option exercise was carried out to fill the positions in the ten Standing Committees (SCs). The main aim was to enable synchronization of working timelines so that the SCs could be formed at around the same time. The 10 th Management Committee (MC) agreed that the opportunities should be offered to all club members, and the selection procedure should be transparent. Thus, we provided application forms and scheduled interviews for each applicant. At least four MC members were present at each interview. There were a total of 50 applicants for 39 positions.

Another important feature of the co-option process was the emphasis on “closing the loop”. We pro-actively approached applicants who were not successful in their applications to find other suitable Working Committee (WC) roles for them;

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore however, out of 12

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore however, out of 12 applicants who were rejected, only 6

however, out of 12 applicants who were rejected, only 6 ultimately took up WC positions.

3.1.2. Recruitment of Working Committees

The recruitment methods this year were largely similar to previous years. We sent out a document detailing the WC positions and job scopes, and set up a booth from

30 September 2010 to 5 th October 2010 (excluding 2 nd and 3 rd October as it was the weekend) for members to sign up. Posters were also put up around Blk ADM so as

to boost awareness of the WC Recruitment drive. By the end of both the SC & WC

recruitment, 98 unique individuals had filled up some 120 positions. Do note that this figure of 98 individuals excludes members of the Management Committee.

3.2. Briefing for Adminstrators

A short briefing was conducted for Administrators from the different USC

committees at the start of their term. This session helped to clarify what was expected of them throughout the rest of the academic year and set clear guidelines regarding email blasts requests, poster policies and archival duties.

3.3. Transition from RHAPS/CCA Points System to USC RAS

In academic year 2010/2011, the RHAPS (Revised Hall Admission Point System) or CCA Points System was abolished in lieu of the RAS (Residential Admission Scheme). The rationale behind such a change was that faculties, clubs and halls should have the right to determine how they want to allocate residential spaces to their members, rather than have an overarching system imposed upon them.

The USC RAS for AY11/12 was approved by the 10 th Management Committee as well

as the USP administration. This proposal was then sent to NUSSU for their official

records although it may and should be reviewed accordingly by future Honorary General Secretaries at the end of their term.

3.4. Scholars News

The Honorary General Secretary manages the USC Management email account, which is used to broadcast information and updates to club members.

3.5. Working Calendar, Master Calendar and USP Calendar

To prevent timing clashes between Club activities, we maintained two calendars to

constantly keep track of important dates. A Working Calendar was shared among the MC and was used to record both internal dates (e.g. meetings and deadlines) and Club events. A separate Master Calendar, showing only the Club events, was displayed in Chatterbox. In addition, USP Admin has their own USP calendar, and relevant USC dates were added by either the Honorary General Secretary or the Public Relations Director.

3.6. Document Templates

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Templates for minutes,

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Templates for minutes, letters, and archiving content pages

Templates for minutes, letters, and archiving content pages were created and disseminated to all USC committees through their administrators to ensure common standards in documentation and presentation.

3.7. Archiving

The Secretariat Committee made use of Dropbox (a programme which allows different users to share folders across various computers) to facilitate soft copy archiving. We believe that it is important for the new committees to have access to their predecessors’ knowledge and information so as to foster greater continuity across the years. To ensure that archiving would be done systematically and consistently, a set of archiving guidelines was provided to the various Administrators at the start of their term.

3.8. USC Annual General Elections

The USC Annual General Elections took place from 17 August 2011 to 12 September 2011. 14 candidates (excluding two withdrawals) ran for the eleven positions in the 11 th MC, while 255 members (an estimated 35% of our membership strength) casted their votes in the Open Election. Participation rates in the Annual General Elections improved from previous year, where a total of 235 votes were cast.

3.8.1. Publicity for Nominations

Publicity efforts for USC Elections 2011 could have been stronger. We made a USC 2011 Elections Guidebook to consolidate the information related to Elections, which was distributed to all USC members through Scholars News. The second attempt at publicity was a talk during Orientation Week to encourage freshmen to stand for Elections. A total of about 10-15 members turned up for the Information Session on 17 August 2011.

3.8.2. Extension of Nominations

Nominations were originally scheduled to close on 22 nd August 2011. However, due to the fact that the only two candidates running for the position of President and Vice-President pulled out of the elections process on 24 th August, the Elections Committee decided to extend nomination period till 27 th August 2011. 3 more candidates signed up during the extension period.

3.8.3. Nominations and Campaigning

There was a compulsory Briefing for Nominees on 22 August 2011. This session was done to explain the campaigning process and how eVoting system works. It also helped to establish communication between the nominees and the Elections Committee.

For campaigning this year, we retained the two compulsory components that were aimed at setting the backdrop for enlightened voting. Each candidate had to prepare a manifesto of up to two pages. Aside from three standard questions, the candidates were given the freedom to decide the content and design of their

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore manifestos. The second

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore manifestos. The second component was a Q&A session for

manifestos. The second component was a Q&A session for the candidates on 31 August 2011. This session was a platform for the electorate to interact with the candidates. Approximately 40 members attended the event and there was a continuous stream of questions throughout the session.

A new initiative that the Elections Committee 2011 undertook was to transcribe the Q&A session onto the USC website (usc.usp.nus.edu.sg/mc2011). This initiative was done so as to make informed voting more convenient for members who did not have classes in University Town, and also allow for fuller participation of students who were on overseas programs.

3.8.4. Voting

As per last year, voting took place on an online platform to replace conventional pen-and-paper voting. The voting platform was once again set up with the help of Mun Hin from USP Administration. In line with the emphasis on informed voting, the manifestos were also made available online through the USC website.

On the last day of voting, a reminder was also sent to the USC community via the email blast and facebook groups. This reminder might have led to the increase in the number of voters from the previous year.

3.9. USC Annual General Meeting

The USC Annual General Meeting was held on 12 September 2011. The outgoing committees presented their reports and the 10 th MC officially handed over to the 11 th MC.

4. Challenges and Recommendations

4.1. Scholars News & USC Website

During the term of the 10 th MC, the USC website was refurbished. At the same time however, an increase number of individuals gave feedback that they could not see USC email blasts properly when they forwarded all their NUS emails to their gmail accounts. While NUS IT care has been contacted to solve this issue, there remains a significant time lag till the problem is fixed. Instead of relying so much on the Scholars News for updates, perhaps the 11 th MC could look into making the USC website the key avenue for members to be updated with the latest happenings.

4.2. Calendars

The effectiveness of the calendars was undermined by the lack of constant updates. Even though the Administrators of the various committees were given access to the Working Calendar, and made responsible for updating the Working Calendar with the timelines of their respective committees, dates and timings were often not updated from their preliminary estimates.

It also felt like a duplication of efforts to have the Director of Public Relations fish out the relevant records and transfer them to the Master Calendar, while the USC website administrator takes charge of updating the event dates unto the website. I

17

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore recommend that the next

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore recommend that the next Honorary General Secretary takes

recommend that the next Honorary General Secretary takes full charge of the three calendars (Working, Master, Website) so as to minimize confusion and/or a repetition of efforts.

4.3. Archiving & Organisational Culture

We had intended to meet the various admin reps at regular intervals to discuss their archiving plans and backup their files as a safeguard. This was eventually happened only once throughout the academic year due to scheduling difficulties. Two rounds of archival collection happened, each at the end of the semester. Initiatives that took place during summer however, were only captured during the AGM reports.

It would be ideal if a culture whereby After Action Reviews (AARs) were done for every event and administrators take the initiative to send such records the Honorary General Secretary could be developed. Although records were kept for this academic year, it felt more like an obligation unto the administrators than them seeing the merits of archival.

4.4. Elections Matters

As alluded to earlier in segment 3.8.1, a more aggressive publicity campaign for nominations would be recommended. We had similar concerns as the previous year’s Elections Committee, that access to the eVoting system should only be limited to USP students via a secure login page. Thus, we had to seek help from Mun Hin to make use of existing NUS survey platforms once again. While Mun Hin graciously agreed to our request for help, the next Elections Committee should explore alternative means of conducting online voting, so as to prevent being overly dependent on the USP administration for assistance.

18

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 5. Acknowledgements Delle

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

5.

Acknowledgements

National University of Singapore 5. Acknowledgements Delle Chan: You have been a great Assistant Honorary

Delle Chan: You have been a great Assistant Honorary General Secretary. Thank you for your assistance during CCA points collation, AGM report compilation and all sorts of administration duties that I could not have managed by myself.

Tania Harsono: Thank you for loaning me your laptop on the very many occasions when I have trouble with the usc.management account on my own. Your infinite patience is much appreciated!

Melissa Lim & Jeremy Auw: Melissa, thank you for stepping up and helping out tremendously with the elections process. Jeremy, thank you for designing and conceptualising the USC Elections 2011 guidebook & also, for helping out with Internal Elections.

Yong Mun Hin (USP Admin): You went beyond your call of duty to help us with the eVoting system once again. Thank you for lending us your expertise and time.

Administrators: The unsung heroes – thank you for your hard work in fulfilling the administrative duties for your committees. Archiving would have been impossible without you!

Genim Tan: Thanks for entertaining my questions and providing advice on all things related to the Secretariat Committee.

10 th Management Committee: Thank you for an amazing term in office. Often times, things have felt crazy and overwhelming (read: burning cloth at unearthly hours) but I have learnt much through your energy and commitment to USC.

Amoz & David: Couldn’t have asked for better SC members to work with. Thank you for your enthusiasm and taking great initiative to lead your respective committees throughout the year. It’s been a joy working with two during my term.

Prepared by:

Baey Xiang Ling Honorary General Secretary 10 th Management Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

19

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore FINANCE COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

The University Scholars Club (USC) Finance committee is responsible for the club’s overall financial health. The committee oversees the flow of income and expenditures of the club in relations to the budget.

2. Organisation

2.1 Assistant Honorary Financial Secretary

As opposed to previous years’ practices, the Honorary Financial Secretary co-opted an assistant to aid in overseeing the Club’s finances. This is because the 10 th Management Committee had a total of 10 standing committees, each with different financial demands. The co-option of an assistant proved to be invaluable to the Honorary Financial Secretary. With the help from the Assistant, the financial demands of the different committees could be met fairly quickly and efficiently. Hence it is advised that the Honorary Financial Secretary of the 11t h Management Committee consider co-opting an assistant.

2.2 Finance Committee Structure

In order to effectively monitor the financial health of the club, the 10 th Finance Committee consists of Honorary Financial Secretary, Assistant Honorary Financial Secretary, Asset Manager, and various Financial Secretaries. The Finance Secretaries were responsible for their respective committee’s overall financial health and ensuring prudent spending. The role of Asset Manager was created this year to account for various assets owned by the club. On top of that, the Business Committee, being the revenue generating arm of the club, was subsumed under the Finance Committee this year to ensure a more wholesome financial management where the Business Committee would be able to respond to the financial needs of the club more effectively. With this in mind, the members of the Finance Committee are as follows:

Committee

Designation

Name

 

Honorary Financial Secretary

Maria Tania Hapsari Harsono

Finance

Assistant Honorary Financial Secretary

Chan Shiaw-Yan

Asset Manager

Low Yee Loong

Academic

Administrator (Academic)

Tan Wen-Yi

Public Relations

Financial Secretary (PR)

Cheng Haiwen

Community Service

Financial Secretary (Community Service)

Edlyn Tan

Cultural Activities

Financial Secretary (Cultural Activities)

Yolanda Zhang

Social Activities

Financial Secretary (Social Activities)

He Yining

Sports

Financial Secretary

Terence Peh

20

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore   (Sports)  

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore   (Sports)     Financial Secretary (FOP)
 

(Sports)

 
 

Financial Secretary (FOP)

Surya Effendy

Administrator (Camp)

Trudy Chua

FOP

Administrator (OWeek)

Lim Siow Yu

Administrator (Flag)

Tan Shengli

 

Administrator (Rag)

Leong Li Ting

Administrator (Finale)

Eunice Tan

The Business Committee members are Fahmi Hamzah, Cui Chunhao, Zeng Linlin, Irish Manipis, Fadhilah Abdul Rahman Zamawi, Lim Siow Yu, Therese Neo and Sarah Cheang.

The above structure was to facilitate the financial management throughout the club. The structure has proven to be fairly effective for certain committees. However, it was not the case for most committees, especially those which did not require much funding. The directors often handled the communication between the committee and the Honorary Financial Secretary for finance matters. The incoming Honorary Financial Secretary should look into improving communication within the Finance Committee.

Another challenge was to move away from the concept of Financial Secretary being a purely administrative role, to a more managerial role. The Financial Secretaries were supposed to not only process various reimbursements and deposit forms, but also to manage the committee’s budget and ensure prudence in spending. This is to aid the Honorary Financial Secretary in having a better overview and management of the club’s overall financial health. The incoming Honorary Financial Secretary may look into this matter so as to improve the financial management of the club.

3. Club’s Finances

The summary of the club finances is attached in Appendix A.

The summary includes various financial transactions carried out by USC through the Office of Financial Services (OFS). Some expenditure however was not captured for events organized in collaboration with the USP Administration. For instance, the USP Residential College Welcome Dinner was co-paid by USP. The food and beverages components of the event are not captured in the summary as the payment was directly handled and made by USP Administration.

Another expenditure not captured in Appendix A is the printing of Infusion and the Residential College edition of The Chattering Box (February 2011). This expenditure amounts close to $3,000 and it was fully paid by USP. The Publication Committee managed to reduce its spending substantially for printing of Infusion through sourcing of lower-priced supplier. This project, however, still depend on USP as its only source of funding. The next Management Committee should look into moving away from relying on USP contribution.

4. NUSSU Investment

21

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore On 25 t h

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore On 25 t h February 2011, NUSSU and its constituent

On 25 th February 2011, NUSSU and its constituent clubs, including USC, made an informed decision to commit their non-endowed funds to Short term Investible Funds managed by Investment Office (IVO). This non-endowed funds are accumulated surpluses from previous USC Management Committees which were used to be put under a fixed deposit which contract ended on 31 st December 2010. All capital amounts invested in this scheme is capital guaranteed by IVO and OFS. IVO and OFS warrant that the capital amount will earn a return in excess of the 3- month Singapore Dollar Fixed deposit rates pegged at the averages of 3 major Singapore Banks.

Out of a total of $20,737.18 of USC’s accumulated surplus, the 10 th Management Committee decided to put $20,000 into the NUSSU combined pool for Short term Investible Funds as of 1 st April 2011, while $737.18 was to be left in USC’s current account.

This decision to enter the investment opened up the possibility of making use of the interest income of the investment. The next Honorary Financial Secretaries will also have to budget for this scheme at the beginning of their terms.

5. USC Business Committee Events

5.1. USC Bazaaar

As of the previous year, USC organized two bazaars during which we raised fund by renting out the space to vendors. The first bazaar was hosted from 10 th to 11 th March 2011 at the Science Foyer, while the second bazaar was held from 22 nd to 24 th August 2011 at the Central Forum. The first bazaar only managed to raise $840 as the bazaar was only held for 2 days and there was insufficient planning due to lack of experience in organizing bazaars.

The second bazaar raised $2,415 throughout the 3 days. However, more planning could have been done for this event. During this bazaar, a regular vendor in NUS bazaars, Susan, agreed to take up the whole space at a lower price. However, no proper contract was signed and only a few days before the event, the list of vendors was sent to the committee showing less number of vendors than expected.

5.2. Le Chocolatier Boutique – USC Valentine’s Day Sales

This year’s Business Committee took up last year’s Business Committee’s initiative of selling pralines in Arts Linkway. However, it was not as profitable as last year’s sales due to an over-estimation of demand during the planning phase. There was a substantially lower demand for the pralines, probably due to the high price and the competition from adjacent stalls selling chocolate and sweets. The next committee may want to reconsider this endeavor as a part of their marketing endeavour.

6. Key Recommendations

6.1. The Need for Financial Prudence

22

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore While USC did not

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore While USC did not go into deficit in both Financial

While USC did not go into deficit in both Financial Periods, there was still a lack of financial prudence. Many of the expenses incurred by various projects could have been substantially lower if better planning had been done in estimating the amount of items needed and sourcing for better prices. Although the role of the Financial Secretaries was also to ensure financial prudence, some projects still did not manage to do so. The incoming Honorary Financial Secretary should look into enforcing this idea of prudent spending. This idea is even more crucial with the investment of reserves, which makes the reserves to be accessible to the club to be budgeted at the beginning of the year.

6.2. Regular Updates within the Finance Committee

This year the Finance Committee continued the use of Google Documents which allowed the Honorary Financial Secretary to track the performance of different committees’ finances. While it improved convenience, it was not the most intuitive way for some Finance Secretaries to record their committees’ finances in the documents. The incoming Honorary Financial Secretary may want to look into having an additional platform to ensure regular updates within the committee, such as monthly or bimonthly committee meeting.

6.3. Club Sponsorship

Although club sponsorship was identified as potentially one of the main sources of revenue for the club at the beginning of the year, the Business Committee was not successful in achieving this objective. The committee proceeded with this endeavour not knowing where to start from, and made use of our members’ personal network to pursue this matter. It will be advisable for the incoming Corporate Relations Director and Honorary Financial Secretary to start pursuing this matter by approaching companies or organisations which are familiar with USP. During the year, we also learnt that for companies or organisations to agree to be a club sponsor, proposals has to be sent and negotiation should be done before their budgeting period.

6.4. USC Merchandise

The committee did not manage to take up this initiative this year due to manpower constrains. The next Finance committee may want to look into reviving this initiative as it will be able to serve two objectives – to create a USP identity item for the community, and to raise some funds for various club activities.

23

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 7. Acknowledgements The

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

7.

Acknowledgements

National University of Singapore 7. Acknowledgements The Honorary Financial Secretary would like to thank the

The Honorary Financial Secretary would like to thank the following:

The USP Administration for their continuous support, financial and otherwise, for different USC events.

The 10 th Management Committee for their support, dedication and cooperation throughout the year.

The Finance and Business Committee for their support.

USC Production’s Public Relations Secretary, Joel Kang, and Sponsorship Secretary, Shirley Lee, for time and energy invested in securing substantial funding for Production.

FOP’s Public Relations Secretary, Augustin Chiam, and his team, for their commitment in making sure that FOP could go on without fear for not being able to pay the bill.

NUSSU Finance Committee for providing financial help for USC Production, as well as NUSSU Marketing Committee for securing in-kind sponsorship for our FOP and Exam Welfare Pack.

Miss Kwan Mei Sau, May and Ms Tan Pek Keow, Alice from Office of Financial Services, as well as Ms Deborah Dieu from Office of Student Affairs for their assistance.

All Club members who have in one way or another help the Finance Committee in executing its duty.

Prepared by:

Tania Harsono Honorary Financial Secretary 10 th Management Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

24

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore APPENDIX A – Summary

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore APPENDIX A – Summary of USC Finances 2010/2011 Financial

APPENDIX A – Summary of USC Finances 2010/2011

Financial Period 1 (1 st October 2010 to 31 st March 2011)

Income (after GST) Subscription Fee USP Contribution – USC Production Sales of tickets – USC Production NUSSU Contribution – USC Production Donation – USC Production Marketing – Business Marketing – FOP GST Rebate

$ 2,216.00

 
 

2,000.00

10,688.90

1,472.33

4,000.00

1,754.77

1,174.86

848.00

Interest Income – Fixed Deposit Total Income

Expenditure Secretariat Sports Cultural Activities Community Service Public Relations Business FOP Social Activities Total Expenditure

125.00

 

$24,279.86

$

59.90

117.80

17,774.10

480.00

33.00

1,449.55

1,650.43

505.15

 

$22,069.93

Net Income (Expenditure)

$ 2,209.93

25

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Financial Period 2 (1

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Financial Period 2 (1 s t April 2011 to 30

Financial Period 2 (1 st April 2011 to 30 th September 2011)*

Income Subscription Fee Marketing – Community Service Marketing – Business FOP Fees Marketing – FOP Sponsorship – FOP# USP Contribution – FOP

$ 4,455.71

724.30

1682.24

13,920.56

1,164.35

6,307.45

5,300.00

NUSSU Contribution – Rag Total Income

Expenditure Sports# Community Service Business Scholaris Freshmen Orientation Camp Orientation Week Flag Rag FOP Finale# Social

 

5,900.00

 

$39,454.61

$

700.00

201.30

340.00

554.30

10,041.34

3,343.30

960.00

13,999.25

7,000.00

1,559.25

Total Expenditure

$38,698.74

Net Income (Expenditure)

$

755.87

* Figures quoted are accurate as of 3 rd September 2011. # Estimated figure – the confirmed amount was still being processed as the report was written.

26

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE REPORT

PUBLIC RELATIONS COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

The USC Public Relations Standing Committee historically served as a centralised publicity body to promote the club image and its activities. Its key responsibilities were to produce promotional material for all club activities, publish USCs annual

publications,

website

(http://www.usc.usp.nus.edu.sg/).

and

update

and

maintain

the

USC

With the 10th Management Committee, the responsibility of producing promotional material for the entire club’s activities was decentralised and spread among the respective positions of Public Relations Secretaries. With a portion of its key responsibilities lifted, the Public Relations Standing Committee has sought to start a suite of events catered to exchange students that are on University Scholar’s Programme exchange programmes.

2. Organisation

The Public Relations Committee consists of the following members:

Management Committee:

Public Relations Director:

Standing Committee:

Administrator:

Financial Secretary:

Design Secretary:

External Relations Secretary:

Working Committee:

Webmaster:

Newsletter Editors:

Infusion Editor:

Lim Kai Heng

Ng Hui Ying Cheng Haiwen Jovin Loh Run Wen Madhumitha Ardhanari

Tan Jian Xiong David Dan Li Danielle Sim Han Yong Ming Cheng Haiwen Chen Jinwen

3. Highlights and Important Updates

3.1. Updating the Role of Public Relations

This academic year, the Public Relations (PR) Standing Committee (SC) aimed to shift itself away from pure publicity towards a more holistic public relations strategy. With the decentralisation of the production of promotional material for club activities, the PR SC was to use the additional bandwidth to better engage and integrate groups of the USP community that may not be usually targeted.

In this expanded role, the PR SC was to reach out to exchange students of the USP community, engaging them specifically and integrating them with the rest of the community. The decision to engage exchange students was made in light of the information that in the new Cinnamon College, there would be a larger proportion

27

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore of exchange students,

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore of exchange students, growing a minor stakeholder group of

of exchange students, growing a minor stakeholder group of about ten persons to a major stakeholder group of 100 persons easily.

Additionally, the PR SC will continue to manage the external image of USC, which includes vetting documents and other publicity materials. The PR SC also identified the need to strengthen the club’s online presence which it was to accomplish with the overhauling of the USC website and the active engagement through the official and unofficial facebook groups.

After discussions with the 10th MC, the the Mid-term Moratorium was deemed to overlap in scope with the January Thing, and was thus removed from the current years schedule.

3.2. USC Website

The USC website was completely reconfigured using the Wordpress engine for a more dynamic platform. More information on the website can be found in the publications section of the AGM.

3.3. The January Thing

Riding on the success of it’s previous incarnation, The January Thing was organised with the key goal of providing a platform for students, the USP administration, and the USP faculty to interact and find out more about the impending move to the Residential College. The event was combined with the Prince Georges Park start of semester dinner organised by the Residential Assistants thus removing the cost of food from the budget. The cooperation between RAs and the MC also helped ensure that the two target audiences would overlap and integrate.

3.4. Exchange Student Activities Suite

As part of the renewed effort to reach out to different groups of students, a suite of events were planned for exchange students particularly In light of the expanded numbers and role of exchange students in the Cinnamon Residential College. Intended as a pilot project for eventual implementation at a college-wide level, the suite of events were excellent in identifying possible pitfalls and avenues for improvement. Recommendations for the continuation of the Exchange Student Activities Suite will be stated in the following section.

4.

Recommendations

4.1. Decentralisation of Publicity

While the decentralisation of the production of promotional material to the respective Public Relations Secretaries to the various projects was a good direction, the perennial lack of talented and committed individuals became more pronounced with the need to fill up more positions with the relevant capabilities. As a result, the Design Secretary not only had to vet and oversee the general bulk of the promotional material for the club, but also take over the production of promotional material should another SC’s capability be compromised. Thankfully, this was the exception rather than the norm. The Design Secretary keeping in close contact with

28

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore the other Public Relations

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore the other Public Relations Secretaries was capable of

the other Public Relations Secretaries was capable of rerouting designing capabilities most of the time.

Decentralisation also freed up bandwidth for the PR SC to focus on other matters such as the Exchange Student Activities Suite. As such, I recommend that decentralisation of the production of promotional materials for the club’s activities stay as an enduring feature of MCs to come.

4.2. Exchange Student Activities Suite

The original suite of events planned for the exchange students not only failed to fully materialise, but failed also in capturing a critical mass of exchange students. This is the result of various factors. Besides the failure to properly anticipate and accommodate the already existent traveling plans of the exchange students, the inability to fully mobilise the exchange student’s buddies constricted the PR SC to a rather limited manpower in organising events. The purpose of the organising functioning as a pilot programme however was fulfilled excellently as many learning points have been won.

Rather than organising a full suite of events for the exchange students, a select few events should be organised to integrate the exchange students into the RC

community.

4.3. Targeted Action

Although this may be an reiteration of what may already be known, activities and initiatives should be packaged to engage the different communities in USP. This is especially relevant in light of the possible estrangement of non-resident USP students. It is thus imperative that these communities be highlighted:

(i) USP Alumni

(ii)

Senior USP students

(iii)

Junior USP students

(iv)

Sophomore USP students

(v)

Freshman USP students

(vi)

USP students residing in the RC

(vii)

USP students not residing in the RC

(viii)

USP Exchange students

a. Those going on exchange

b. Those here for USP exchange

c. Those in the RC but not on USP exchange

(ix) USP Administration

It is important recognise that these groups will overlap in other areas not explicit here, such as by faculty, major, personal interests and areas of community involvement. It is thus imperative to cater and tailor publicity efforts with the target group in mind.

Some possible things the next PR SC and the MC as a whole can embark are:

(i) Obtaining the email distribution lists separated into the aforementioned communities

29

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore (ii) Planning

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore (ii) Planning community-specific events (iii) Specifically

(ii) Planning community-specific events

(iii) Specifically measuring performance indicators such as

a.

The effectiveness of the MCs message

b.

The turnout rates of events

c.

The approval level of the MC by the general student population

5.

Acknowledgments

I would like to thank Ng Hui Ying, Madhumitha Ardhanari, Jovin Loh Run Wen, and Cheng Haiwen for helping out above and beyond their individual portfolios over the course of this academic year. Without them, none of the above events would have come to pass.

Special mention must also be given to the impeccable work of David Tan in creating the new USC website practically from scratch.

Prepared by:

Lim Kai Heng Director of Public Relations 10th Management Committee NUS StudentsUniversity Scholars Club

30

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore LOGISTICS & WELFARE

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore LOGISTICS & WELFARE COMMITTEE REPORT

LOGISTICS & WELFARE COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information & Organisation

As the Asset Manager, I am responsible for the management of the use of Chatterbox (ADM), the various rooms under the control of the club, student lockers, and other USC equipment. I also worked closely with the President to ensure that the welfare of the USP student body is being taken care of, which mainly included having to understand their concerns and addressing them. In addition, I provided the logistical support for various USC activities and ensure that all USC assets that are being borrowed and/or used are being accounted for.

2. Highlights

2.1. Exam Welfare Pack

Traditionally, USC gives out exam welfare packs to USP students before the reading week of each semester. In this academic year, NUSSU striked an agreement with all student clubs to combine their distribution of the exam welfare pack with the individual student club’s. The dates of distribution (typically in Week 12) of the welfare packs were thus fixed by NUSSU. NUSSU also made use of this opportunity to administer the NUSSU Welfare Survey to all who have collected the welfare packs.

USC decided to give out 150 welfare packs in total, for each distribution, on a first come first serve basis. The items that went into the welfare packs came from 3 different sources: (1) items that were purchased using the budget set aside by USC for the welfare packs. The list of items was jointly decided by the USC President and Asset Manager; (2) items provided by the USP administration that was to be given out in the welfare packs; (3) items provided by NUSSU that was to be given out in the welfare packs.

In view of the shift into RC, the next committee in charge might want to think about how to cope with the possible increase in demand for the exam welfare packs.

2.2. USC Welfare Survey

An integral part of different committees within USC is to serve the USP student population by planning activities for the students and introducing various welfare initiatives to the students. At the start of the term of office, after the handing and taking over of the USC Management Committee (MC), a welfare survey was conducted to find out the views of USP students with regard to the current activities organised by the student club and also to check if some of the new ideas that the management committee have are well received by USP students. The results of the survey were being analysed and used to make key decisions at the MC level as to what are some of the events or initiatives that the MC and their committees would work for.

31

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 2.3. Nespresso Coffee

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

2.3. Nespresso Coffee Machine

University of Singapore 2.3. Nespresso Coffee Machine As a new welfare initiative, USC brought in a

As a new welfare initiative, USC brought in a Nespresso Machine into Chatterbox. A survey was conducted in Chatterbox beforehand, to gather the views of USP students and assess whether or not it would be viable to bring in a Nespresso Coffee Machine into Chatterbox. The results of the survey reflected a borderline case, in terms of financial viability, for bringing in the coffee machine. Despite the risk of making a loss, it was decided that the coffee machine would be brought in.

Throughout the semester, coffee capsules were being sold to the USP community on coffee days on the first week of every month. Publicity emails were being sent out to the USP community before each coffee day to inform the community of the coffee sales and coffee-meisters (people in charge of selling the coffee capsules).

Towards the end of the academic year, the Nespresso Machine was poorly maintained, especially during the semester breaks, parts of the machine was lost and we did not manage to sell all the coffee capsules that USC ordered. All in all, though the Nespresso coffee machine initiative started off with good intentions, it has become a financial burden to USC. In view of the shift into RC, where coffee giant, Starbucks, is just around the corner, it seems even less viable to for USC to have a coffee machine that is being sustained on the sales of coffee capsules.

2.4. USC Welfare Corner

The welfare corner in Chatterbox provides food (mainly snacks) for USP students. Students can contribute food to the welfare corner that is to be shared by their peers, or they can get food from the welfare corner. The welfare corner acts on a policy whereby students may take food from the welfare corner and contribute to a welfare fund by putting money into a coin container. The amount they decide to contribute would be up to the individual’s discretion. The money collected through the welfare corner was then used to purchase other snacks for the corner.

The welfare corner has been self-sufficient and the idea has been well-received by USP students. Hence, it would be strongly encouraged for this initiative to be carried on.

2.5. USC Locker Rental

Lockers in Chatterbox (at Block ADM) were rented out each semester to USP students. The rental collected was used to fund other USC initiatives (e.g. welfare corner/exam welfare pack). As Asset Manager, I managed the rental and allocation of lockers. Priority for the lockers was given first to USP students who were not staying on campus. After which, the lockers are being allocated on a first come first serve basis. In view of the shift to the RC, new lockers might be provided for USC to rent out to students who are not staying in the RC.

2.6. The BIG MOVE to the USP Residential College

As the Asset Manager of USC, I worked closely with the USP administration to coordinate the move of all of USC assets to its new premises in the RC. The biggest challenge faced was the lack of space in the RC. Hence, key decisions had to be

32

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore made to decide on

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore made to decide on what is to be moved and

made to decide on what is to be moved and what is to be disposed off. Unlike in Block ADM, where the assets were all consolidated mainly in Chatterbox, in the RC, there are many smaller pocket of spaces, namely the 2 theme rooms, the practical workshop, the MPH and the new Chatterbox. It would be more challenging now to manage and track the movement of assets around the RC. Further, these different student spaces are spread out, which makes it even more difficult to track assets when students take things without asking. Currently, most of USC assets are being consolidated in the practical workshop until plans have been made to distribute them around the different spaces.

3. General Recommendations

Due to the lack of space, strict regulations need to be exercised so that the allocation of space is fair to all. There is also a need to prioritise carefully when issuing the different spaces for use to different USP students. In order to manage the use of the different student spaces in the RC, there is a need to first understand the requirements of the different committees under USC, so that clashes of interest can be minimised.

When managing USC assets, it is important that plans are made not just for pre- events, but also post-events. Proper control of assets is only possible when the clearing up is done properly and efficiently. To minimise loss of items, ensure that after each event, there is someone who is consolidating all the assets and is accountable for them. In order to ensure that this is effective, there should be close communication between the management committees and their standing committees and most importantly, the working committees.

4. Acknowledgements

I would like to thank the following people for their help and support to me during my term of service:

The USP management and administrative staff for their support and advice in various matters concerning the club and the welfare of the students.

The USC 10 th Management Committee, for their dedication in the various projects we worked on together, and for the understanding and support provided whenever needed.

Elvis Chong, Logistics Director, USC 9 th Management Committee, for the guidance and contributions whenever help is needed.

Prepared by:

Low Yee Loong Asset Manager 10 th Standing Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

33

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore ACADEMIC COMMITTEE REPORT

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

ACADEMIC COMMITTEE REPORT

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore ACADEMIC COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

Under the 10 th MC, the Academic Secretary was made to become a Standing Committee position under the Honorary General Secretary. This was to give the Academic Committee space to redefine its role in the community after it was decided that the Harvard Conference in Asia Project (HCAP) was not in line with the desired objectives of the Academic Committee and hence was removed from its portfolio.

The Academic Committee set itself the twin goals of bridging the knowledge gap between USP curriculum matters and students as well as using academic events as a platform for community building within USC.

Under the 10 th MC, the Academic Committee took on the following projects in chronological order:

Event/Project

Date

Meet-your-Major-Mates Facebook Launch

Oct 2010

Peer Mentorship Programme Pilot

Dec 2010 – Mar 2011

Advanced Curriculum Sharing

16

Feb 2011

ISM Sharing

23

Mar 2011

Meet-your-Major Mates at O-Week

27

Jul 2010

ISM Showcase

Forthcoming, 14 Sep

2011

2. Organisation

This year’s Academic Committee was fairly large (compared to the 2 members the year before) and comprised the following persons:

Position

Office Holder

Academic Secretary (Standing Committee)

Amoz Hor Jin Yi

Academic Administrator (Standing Committee)

Tan Wen-Yi

Academic Public Relations Secretary (Standing Committee)

Denys Tan

Honorary General Secretary (Management Committee)

Baey Xiang Ling

Working Committee Members

Benjamin Tan Han Yongming Hannah Bull Joe Chee Low Yee Loong Louis Ong Phoebe Elizabeth Lim

In addition to the structure above, the Academic Committee was organized into

34

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore project teams, supervised by

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore project teams, supervised by the SC of the Academic

project teams, supervised by the SC of the Academic Committee (project/event leaders underlined):

Project/Event

 

Members

Peer Mentorship

 

Amoz Hor, Denys Tan, Tan Wen-Yi, Baey Xiang Ling, Benjamin Tan, Han Yongming, Hannah Bull, Joe Chee, Low Yee Loong, Louis Ong, Phoebe Elizabeth Lim

Advanced Curriculum Sharing

Benjamin Tan, Han Yongming, Louis Ong

ISM Sharing

 

Denys Tan, Low Yee Loong, Joe Chee

ISM Showcase

 

Amoz Hor, Hannah Bull

Meet-your-Major-Mates

Phoebe Elizabeth Lim, Joe Chee

3.

Highlights

3.1. Pioneering the Peer Mentorship Programme (PMP)

The Academic Committee and the PMP were designed concurrently and hence have identical objectives: The PMP aimed to attach every freshman to a Peer Mentor of their faculty who would assist in their transition to university life, facilitate student access to curriculum information and resources as well as foster a sense of community.

The PMP was motivated from the desire to more formally institutionalize the above objectives (which was already happening informally and sometimes through M^3) coupled with the golden opportunity to leverage on the move to the residential college. The Academic Committee spent its first 2 semesters designing a pilot programme, planning and executing a full pilot version of the PMP with 6 pilot Peer Mentors and approximately 40 freshmen, evaluating the pilot with 6 feedback groups, extensive discussion with the Professor Holden (Academic Affairs), A/P Teo (Faculty Advisors), Peggy (Residential College matters), the SAC (Residential College matters), 10 th MC (Student Matters), FOP, gave 2 full proposal presentations in semester 1, and using the findings of the pilot to design the first run of the Peer Mentorship Programme, the Academic Committee launched the PMP together with the Administration in April 2011, recruiting 29 peer mentors over the 6 partner faculties in USP.

The Peer Mentorship Programme has been successfully handed over to Wong Yi Fong, the Peer Mentor Coordinator, and A/P Barabara Ryan, the PMP Faculty Supervisor. They no longer fall under the portfolio of the Academic Committee although sustained partnership between the PMP and the Academic Committee is expected.

For more information, you may approach Amoz for the Peer Mentorship Proposal and After Action Review documents.

35

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 3.2. Advanced Curriculum

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 3.2. Advanced Curriculum Sharing, ISM Sharing and ISM

3.2. Advanced Curriculum Sharing, ISM Sharing and ISM Showcase

The Academic Committee embarked on a series of sharings that had slightly different and evolving aims:

Event

Objectives

Advanced Curriculum Sharing (Week 5, AY10/11 Sem 2)

1. To provide information on USP Advanced Curriculum

2. To encourage students to plan ahead for their Advanced Curriculum

ISM Sharing (Week 10, AY10/11 Sem

2)

1. To instruct students on how to embark upon an ISM

2. To inspire students to pursue their individual passions through an ISM

ISM Showcase(Week 6, AY11/12 Sem 1)

1. To give students an idea of what an ISM can look like

2. To inspire students to pursue their individual passions through an ISM

 

3. To celebrate the academic diversity in USP

The Advanced Curriculum Sharing involved a briefing on Advanced Curriculum and sharings from students who fulfilled their advanced curriculum through different tracks. This was the format inherited from the previous Academic Committee, was attended by approximately 60 students. Notably however, all but 10 of them stayed once the Academic Inquiry track was covered. It has since become clear that the bulk of the audience were not freshmen deciding which Advanced Curriculum track to take, but by year 2 students and above who needed more information on an already decided track they were going to take. The ISM Sharing involved a briefing on ISMs and sharings by students who had done ISMs with a focus on their experiences and instructional anecdotes. It was attended by approximately 25 students.

The forthcoming ISM Showcase (yet to be renamed) will be a TED Talk-like session, featuring 5-6 student presenters and their ISMs. While the ISM Sharing’s focus was on the instructional aspects of doing an ISM, the focus for the ISM Showcase will be on the findings of the research in the hope of fulfilling the objectives listed above. It will be held in tandem with a USS session and the peer mentors are encouraged to attend the session with their peer group.

For more information, you may approach Amoz for the Proposal and After Action Review documents of the Advanced Curriculum Sharing and ISM Sharing.

3.3. Meet-your-Major-Mates (M^3)

Meet-your-Major-Mates is a network of USP students by their major. M^3 begun under the previous Orientation Week team (under the 9th MC) as “ a shout-out for seniors of all majors to come down to meet peers from their major (freshmen and seniors alike) to share their accumulated wisdom as well as to make friends.” (AGM AY 2009/2010)

Since the main actors which began M^3 are the same actors as those in the Academic Committee and directly involved with the PMP, it is not surprising that

36

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore both M^3 and PMP

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore both M^3 and PMP shared identical objectives. However, while

both M^3 and PMP shared identical objectives. However, while Peer Mentors were to be formally attached to a group of freshmen for at least a semester and need not have come from their major, M^3 was an informal collection of seniors and juniors connected by their major in USP. M^3, under the new mandate of the Academic Committee, was fashioned as much as possible to compliment the PMP.

Seeing the success of M^3 at O-Week last year, the Academic Committee sought to solidify some of the connections made by pushing each Major to form their own FB group. Up to date, 25 M^3 groups were formed on FB with varying levels of activeness.

M^3 also continued at O-Week following a briefing by Peer Mentors on USP and home faculty requirements as well as how to bid with CORS. For disputably varied reasons, it has been observed that while O-Week had a close to full attendance by freshmen, M^3 was much more poorly attended by seniors as compared to last year. We unfortunately do not have any numbers to back this up.

3.4. Curriculum Review Committee (CRC)

The Academic Secretary sat on the CRC with the Honorary General Secretary (instead of with the Vice-President last year) and continued to be a channel of feedback to the Administration regarding curriculum and academic matters. With the launch of PMP, the Academic Committee has pushed for the Peer Mentor Coordinator to sit on the CRC with the Academic Director.

4.

Recommendations

For recommendations for individual events, please refer to the highlights above, or for more details, please approach Amoz at amoz@nus.edu.sg for the relevant documentation.

4.1. New Projects/Events

With the PMP no longer falling under the purview of the Academic Committee, we hope that there will be more space for the Academic Committee to explore new ways of meeting the Academic Committee’s objectives. Some ideas that this year’s Academic Committee would like to propose are as follows:

Involvement in the Master’s Tea

Tea Sessions with Cultural Immersion Seniors

Tea Sessions with NOC Seniors

A USP Fair – an exhibition of the international programmes, research, ISMs etc undertaken by USP students

Developing Student Feedback Channels regarding academic or curriculum matters

Organizing an Academic Conference – such as Singapore Simi, organized under the Special Projects Committee under the 9 th MC.

Organizing GXT in USP

Peer Learning Sessions – much like the Cultural Activities Committee’s introductory classes, but with an academic twist

37

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Far from trying to

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Far from trying to limit the Academic Committee to projects

Far from trying to limit the Academic Committee to projects that this year’s Academic Committee can suggest, we strongly recommend coming up with and innovating new events/projects that will fulfil the objectives of bridging the knowledge gap between USP curriculum matters and students as well as using academic events as a platform for community building within USC.

4.2. Synergy of Events

With the Academic Committee organizing a slew of events, it is important to ensure that the events compliment and not conflict with each other. One area that requires looking into is to explore how the PMP and M^3 can be better synthesized since their objectives and form overlap pretty significantly.

4.3. Sharings on Advanced Curriculum

One finding from organizing the various sharings on Advanced Curriculum is that it

is better to separate the various Advanced Curriculum tracks. As mentioned above,

we strongly recommend having the more intimate tea session format for the NOC and Cultural Immersion track. As for the Academic Inquiry track, we recommend continuing with the use ISMs as the spearhead of the sharing in the USS framework.

4.4. Working with Peer Mentorship

The PMP is a very important partner for the Academic Committees to engage, seeing how they have the same objectives but are equipped with different tools. Engagement is important firstly to resolve clashes of interest; secondly to prevent duplication of effort and thirdly, to better both parties understandings of the academic and curriculum concerns of USC.

For example, the potential clashes of interests between M^3 and the PMP can be resolved if their eventual roles and forms are discussed more with each other. Another example is how the PMP is going to be using the ISM Showcase to share more about Advanced Curriculum with their peer groups. They had requested similar sessions that cover the other two Advanced Curriculum tracks and also requested for a fair that allows peer mentors more flexibility in using existing materials to discuss other Advanced Curriculum material.

4.5. Working with the Administration and Faculty

A very important group of people that the Academic Committee worked with is the

Administration, espeically Professor Philip Holden and Kia Yen. The Academic Committee practically ran through every project/event with them to ensure that they were in line with the greater USP objectives. In this process, the Academic Committee also better understood what the Administration is doing to fulfil objectives that are identical to the Academic Committee’s. Hence, we strongly recommend continuing the close working relation this year’s Academic Committee has developed.

The Academic Committee has also benefited with working with the rest of the USP Administration and Faculty such as Professor John Richardson and Dr Mabel Wong in the discussion of making the ISM Showcase part of USS.

38

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 4.6. Developing Student

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

4.6. Developing Student Feedback Channels

of Singapore 4.6. Developing Student Feedback Channels As the Academic Secretary/Director is expected to represent

As the Academic Secretary/Director is expected to represent student interests with regards to academic or curriculum matters, we would strongly recommend finding ways to gather feedback from the ground so that the interests that are represented are not just belonging to small minority, but of students in USP as a whole.

4.7. Projects/Events that Build Community

An important tenant of the Academic Committee, or any Events Director, is to organize events/projects that build community. The activities that the Academic Committee organize tend to have the advantage of reaching out to non-active (or non-Chatter, if the term still applies) members of USC. The two projects that the Academic Committee took on that was designed to fulfil these objectives were the PMP and the M^3, but there is much room to explore with this regard and existing projects can be tweaked to become more community-oriented. The Cultural Immersion Tea Sessions for example could be used to build a sub-community of people who’ve been to India/China/Japan and linking seniors up to potential juniors would be a pretty meaningful endeavour.

5.

Acknowledgments

The Academic Committee would like to thank the following people for their support:

Professor

First and foremost, we absolutely have to thank Professor Philip

Holden and

Holden and Kia Yen For their undying support in every

Kia Yen

event/project we organized - their enthusiasm, advice and firm belief in the Academic Committee has been so moving to us. They have attended and gotten involved with every project/event that we’ve organized, spoken at every sharing regarding the Advanced Curriculum, always agreed to meet us despite their busy schedules and also have been great friends to us. Thank you.

The USP

We would also like to thank the USP Administration for their

Administratio

support and friendship through the events/projects we organized.

n

Daniel for helping us get speakers for the Advanced Curriculum Sharing, Ai Lian for our discussion on the fair and tea sessions, Prof Teo for your advice on the Faculty Advisors, Peggy for discussing how to fit the PMP with the shift to the Residential College despite your busy schedule and Rohayu for helping us obtain éclairs (and other foods)! Thank you for the unending support and the food and friendship shared in the office and outside.

A/P Barbara

Dr Ryan not just for agreeing to be the PMP Faculty Supervisor but

Ryan

for sharing the vision, believing in us, encouraging us and mentoring us all. And somehow in the process of all of that, for being a friend. Thank you Dr Ryan.

Yi Fong

For being a most awesome first Peer Mentor Coordinator, setting

39

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore the groundwork, making new

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore the groundwork, making new territory and at the same time

the groundwork, making new territory and at the same time constantly engaging us and giving us feedback on how the Academic Committee and the PMP can support each other.

The Pilot Peer Mentors

Shawn, Min Xun, Zen Wea, David Cheah, Yan Shao, Li Ting, Yuan Yi, and Jerome for taking up the challenge to be pilot peer mentors, giving us constant feedback and really interesting suggestions, helping us shape the programme, giving it shape and form, setting your own precedence and for being supportive of the programme even in its infancy stage.

The Pilot Peer Mentees

(Too many to list.) For agreeing to be your guinea pigs in our new endeavour – we hope you got something out of it and that maybe you’ll be a peer mentor too!

The first batch of Peer Mentors

Aulia, Bridget, Ee Wei, Eddie, Elvis, Elysa, Gweyneth, Hazirah, Jackie, Joe Chee, Kelly, Liting, Marvin, Min Xun, Mingyang, Nigel, Sorna, Terence, Yee Long, Yi Fong, Yi Wen, Yinning, Yogaprakash, Yuan Yi and Zi Chun for agreeing to be the first batch of peer mentors! And at such short notice, thank you for helping to pave the way for what I hope will be a programme that will become definitive of USP.

Prof

For so readily agreeing to inculcate the ISM Showcase with USS

Richardson

and really believing in the aspirations of your students

and Dr Mabel Hannah Bull Thank you for so readily agreeing to make the ISM Showcase

happening despite not actually being a part of the Academic Committee (although you are now. Ha!) and really spearheading the effort.

The O-Week

We would like to thank especially Li Ann for being such a pleasure

Team

to work with for M^3 and for even jumping n board to help us

Speakers for

with the event despite it being beyond the call of duty. Thanks Li Ann!

Advanced

Alisha, Charis, Hazirah, Isabel and Ervin for the Advanced Curriculum Sharing and Shiaw Yan, Zachary, Jackie, Benedict ad

Curriculum

Zelig for the ISM Sharing; for agreeing to take time off to prepare

Sharing, ISM

and share your experiences and lessons learnt with the USP

Sharing and

community. Thus far, Marvin, Alexius and Hannah for agreeing so

ISM Showcase

readily to be part of a new endeavour that is the ISM Showcase

The 10 th MC

and agreeing to inspire people to do ISMs. For putting our projects in perspective with whatever else USC

The Student

was doing and supporting us formally, although more often than not informally as friends. Thank you.

Advisory

The SAC from both the 9 th and 10 th MC for helping us fit our projects/events with the shift to the Residential College and also

Committee

sharing with us your ideas that you gained from studying

(SAC)

residential colleges in the US.

40

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Yung Hei, Thank you

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Yung Hei, Thank you for all the ideas, advice and

Yung Hei,

Thank you for all the ideas, advice and wisdom you’ve passed

Academic

down to the next Academic Committee.

Director

under the 9 th

MC

Xiang Ling

For being an awesome boss!

Formal Acknowledgement: Thank you for giving us the MC direction and also giving us enough space to run with our ideas and synthesizing them with MC matters.

Less Formal Acknowledgement: For really taking your role a whole step further by attending every one of our meetings when you can make it (which was often) and for investing your time and energy by being directly involved in the projects/events we were doing when all you really had to be was a boss. And also, thank you for being such an awesome friend.

Benjamin Tan,

For being the most awesome working committee possible.

Han

Besides being mostly experienced year 2s (year 3s at the time of

Yongming,

writing), seasoned and very capable, I am glad that I got to work

Hannah Bull, Joe Chee, Low Yee Loong,

with a bunch of friends, some of whom are newly made and most of you, deepening the friendship we’ve already shared. I know of a few MC and SC members that are so jealous of the people I got

Louis Ong

to work with.

and

Phoebe

Elizabeth Lim Denys, Wen- Yi and Xiang

Thank you for being the most awesome standing committee possible. Really, you guys are the pillars of the Academic Committee. Thank you for looking out for and filling in the gap(s), always supporting each other, meeting at awkward places at sometimes awkward times, systemizing all the ideas into word, excel and keynotes documents, doing admin so well, looking into all the small details, considering the big picture constantly, standing in for me, taking on additional responsibilities and basically making everything we aspired to do in the Academic Committee work. Because of you guys, the Academic Committee has accomplished what it has today and none of it would have been remotely possible without you guys. It has really been my honour to work with you guys.

The USP

Last and certainly not the least, the whole USP community for

Community

either attending or supporting or getting involved with our projects/events. Thank you for being a pleasure to serve.

41

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore And to anyone whom

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore And to anyone whom we might have left out, thank

And to anyone whom we might have left out, thank you for your support and hard work.

Prepared by:

Amoz Hor Jin Yi Academic Secretary 10 th Standing Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

42

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMITTEE

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMITTEE REPORT

COMMUNITY SERVICE COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General

Information

Going into the second term of service, the Community Service Committee this year aimed to provide more opportunities for students through a long-term project and ad-hoc projects. The initial idea was to take on the previous committee’s project, Project KNIGHT. However, due to factors which will be explicated later in this report, the 2nd Community Service Committee adopted a new long-term project, Project CARE, and organized 2 ad-hoc community service sessions. The 2nd Community Service Committee also collaborated with the Freshmen Orientation Programme Committee and organized a fund-raiser by selling bubble-tea on campus.

2. Organisation

The second Community Service Committee consisted of the following persons:

Director:

Tan Wee Tiong, Spencer

Standing Committee Administrator:

Divya Georgie

Finance Secretary:

Edlyn Tan

Public Relations Secretary:

Rachel Lim

Working Committee Project KNIGHT/CARE Head:

Yvonne Lim

Ad-hoc Projects Head:

Louis Ong

Ad-hoc Projects Vice Head:

Kenneth Chong

3. Highlights

3.1. Ad Hoc Projects

The Committee worked together with Singapore General Hospital (SGH) on their Arts For Health programme. Volunteers went down to SGH twice to help out with the Arts for Health Concert. “Arts for Health” is a programme with aims to bring the Arts to patients in hope of providing them with a positive environment for a happier stay. Volunteers helped to set up, and invited patients down to the concert venue (within the hospital premises). They also interacted with the patients and helped with the logistics at the end of the concert.

3.2. Project KNIGHT

Project KNIGHT was a tutorship and mentorship scheme initiated by the inaugural Community Service Committee. Volunteers worked in pairs with a child whose parents are living with HIV or AIDS. Due to the popularity and potential benefits of the project, the second Community Service Committee decided to take it up as our term based project. However, we were aware that since Project KNIGHT was still a relatively new initiative, there were flaws to the system which resulted in a high

43

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore tutor drop-out rate and

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore tutor drop-out rate and unsatisfied tutees. The second

tutor drop-out rate and unsatisfied tutees. The second Community Service Committee then strived to improve the system, and proposed the revised system to the Communicable Disease Centre, our liaison agent. Recruitment started in January and we received a fairly positive response. However, after recruitment, CDC informed us that they have decided to discontinue the project, much to our disappointment. Therefore, our committee worked together with Professor Albert Teo for new ideas.

3.3. Project CARE

Project CARE was initiated towards the end of Semester 2. It is the 2 nd Community Service Committee’s term-based project. We worked closely with Professor Albert Teo and the Catholic Aids Response Effort (CARE). CARE runs a shelter for HIV positive patients who face rejection from society and their families. Project CARE then aims to bring volunteers to the shelter weekly to 1) conduct useful courses and 2) befriend them.

During our term over the summer vacation, we intended to conduct three courses. Volunteers were split into three groups and each group was headed by a leader. The respective groups then prepared for their courses which last over three weeks (1 lesson per week).

However, during the course of the project, we realised that the residents are more interested in talking and interacting with the volunteers. We also evaluated their needs as we went along and decided to conduct only two out of the three courses:

1. Financial Literacy

The financial literacy course was aimed to educate the residents about three concepts: basic saving habits, their CPF savings, as well as sources of financial aid. Volunteers gathered information and prepared slides and handouts for the residents.

2.

Cooking

The cooking course was aimed to bring the residents together to create simple dishes. The objectives were to equip the residents with basic cooking skills and to bond the residents together. Volunteers prepared the ingredients and at the end of the session, the residents and volunteers enjoyed the dishes which they have prepared.

3. IT literacy

This course was not carried out as the committee decided that it did not align with the residents’ needs.

On top of these courses, we also provided catered dinner during the first session for the residents and volunteers to get to know one another better. Additionally, volunteers also interact and befriend the residents during sessions with no courses.

3.1. Fund Raising

44

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore The Committee also

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore The Committee also collaborated with the 2011 FOP team to

The Committee also collaborated with the 2011 FOP team to raise funds by selling bubble-tea. The funds raised were the main source of income which sustained the committee throughout the year (together with subscription fees).

4.

Recommendations

4.1. General Handover Issues

We strongly recommend that the next Community Service Committee continues working on Project CARE. Firstly, we have learnt that a project like Project CARE is more sustainable as it is a term-based commitment rather than a year-long commitment. This tends to draw more participants with a lower drop-out rate. Secondly, we feel that the project has much potential. It is a starting point to increase students’ awareness about HIV. Lastly, the road has been laid for the next Community Service Committee should they take on this project and thus they can build on the foundations and have more time and resources for other meaningful projects as well.

4.2. Liaison with Beneficiaries

Through the course of the year, the Committee had many ideas with different beneficiaries. One of which was to engage the previous beneficiaries which USC engaged during Pre-Flag 2010. However, this idea fell through because liaison with the different beneficiaries took too long. A main reason was because we relied strongly on emails, which was generally ineffective. Therefore, we recommend that the next committee take a more pro-active stance when liaising with beneficiaries.

4.3. Publicity Efforts

The 2nd Community Service Committee had its own functional cell- a finance secretary and a public relations secretary. We feel that the next committee, should they adopt the same standing committee structure, could exploit this structure more and focus more on the publicity efforts of the committee’s events.

4.4. Volunteers’ Commitment and Engagement

The 2 nd Community Service Committee strongly recommends the next committee to take a firm stance on volunteers’ commitment. The commitment level of each programme or event has to be clearly made known to the volunteers. The committee should also find ways to engage the volunteers to gather feedback along the way. We have learnt that such feedback is valuable so that the programme or event can be tweaked along the way.

4.5. House system and Community Service

While coming up with ideas for ad-hoc events, we learnt that not all ad-hoc events suit everyone’s tastes. It is hard to organise an ad-hoc event which will attract a good turnout as everyone in the community has different interests. Therefore, it is recommended that the next Committee work together with the House System for ad-hoc events. The House system reaches out to a smaller group of students, in which the House Captain can gather feedback and decide what kind of ad-hoc

45

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore events suit the House

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore events suit the House best. The Community Service Committee

events suit the House best. The Community Service Committee can then focus on bigger events like term-based projects or fund-raisers.

4.6. Sponsorship

The 2 nd Community Service Committee reached out to different organisations for sponsorship but was not able to secure any. We strongly recommend for the next committee to work closely with the new Corporate Relations Director to secure sponsorships or grants. We feel that the two parties can have a closer working relationship. The next Corporate Relations Director also needs to take charge of the sponsorship procuring process with a more aggressive stance.

5.

Acknowledgements

As the Community Service Director, I have gained for myself many insights and lessons learnt. The past year would not have been possible if not for these people:

1. Professor Albert Teo: Thank you for your constant guidance and

recommendations, as well as believing in this committee to take on a new initiative.

2. Standing Committee members: Divya, Edlyn and Rachel, thank you for the

support given throughout the year, and for your never-give-up attitude.

3. Project CARE Head: Yvonne, thank you very much for assisting and

spearheading Project CARE, as well as the experience and advice as a previous Community Service Committee member.

4. Ad-hoc Events Head and Vice Head: Kenneth and Louis, for your willingness

to step up to the needs of the committee, thank you very much.

5. The Volunteers: Thank you for bringing our vision to life by participating in

our events and project.

6. Last but not least, the 10 th MC for your dedication and advice.

Prepared by:

Spencer Tan Director of Community Service 10 th Standing Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore CULTURAL ACTIVITIES

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore CULTURAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE REPORT

CULTURAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

The Cultural Activities Committee 10/11 was the inaugural Cultural Activities Committee, largely taking over from what had hitherto been called the Special Projects Committee. The refined designation allowed the committee to focus on organizing activities centering on the Arts for the USC Community, including the resumption of the Decibel series and the annual USC Production. The main objective for the 10/11 committee was to organize activities that maximized participation by USC members in three broad areas: Learning, Development and Showcase, which saw the creation of the year-long Introductory Classes.

2. Organisation

Management Committee:

Director of Cultural Activities: Joel Tan

Standing Committee:

Administrator: Michele Lim Financial Secretary: Yolanda Zhang Public Relations Secretary: Joel Kang Creative Director (Productions): Leonard Choo Creative Director (Projects & Interest Groups: Yvonne Lim

Working Committee:

Introductory Classes Director: Kishan Kumar Lookbook Director: Naomi Goh

Heading the Committee is the Cultural Activities Director who plans the broad direction of the Committee and its guiding principles, which then inform the committee’s activities. In the 10/11 committee, the Cultural Activities director also served as one of two Co-Producers for USC Productions.

The Cultural Activities Administrator serves as second-in-charge of the Committee, largely helping with administrative and organizational back-up: taking minutes, communicating with the entire committee, collecting and generating reports from the Working Committees. In the 10/11 committee, the C.A. Administrator also served as one of two Co-Producers for USC Productions.

Financial Secretary: oversaw the finances for all Cultural Activities Committee activities, liaising with the USC Honorary Financial Secretary to draw up and balance the committee’s budget.

The Public Relations secretary was in charge of publicizing the committee’s activities to the USC Community, though the main work for the PR Secretary was to create a comprehensive media-brief for USC Productions, and to court media partners to help advertise the show. This involved extensive work by way of contacting partners and designing publicity collaterals.

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore The Creative Director

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore The Creative Director (Productions) sits on the committee

The Creative Director (Productions) sits on the committee mainly to help the team come up with ideas for activities, lending insight and perspective. The main work of the Creative Director (Productions) in the 10/11 Committee was to direct USC Productions 2011, the committee’s largest undertaking.

The Creative Director (Interest Groups and Projects) sits on the committee to help the team come up with ideas for activities, lending insight and perspective. The main work of the Creative Director (Interest Groups and Projects) in the 10/11 committee was to start up the committee’s E-Arts Bulletin—a channel to promote arts-related activities to the larger USC community— as well as to manage Decibel and spearhead new activities, such as the Introductory Classes. The broader scope of the C.A. (Interest Groups and Projects) was to explore the possibilities of setting up and overseeing more arts-and-culture interest groups in USC.

The structure of the 10/11 Committee was planned mainly to incorporate the organization of the annual USC Production within the Standing Committee, in so doing allowing greater administrative control over the project. The Creative Director (Interest Groups and Projects) was therefore allowed a much freer vein to organize and oversee activities outside of Productions, even running concurrently with organization for the show.

3.

Highlights

3.1. USC Productions: Noel Coward’s “Hay Fever” (2011)

Presented at the Esplanade Theatre Studio on the 27 th and 28 th of February 2011, this was USC Productions’ biggest show to date, its first full-length show which additionally required the design and construction of an elaborate set, period costumes and props. The Committee set out to raise the bar not just for USC Productions but for University productions in general, and committed itself to producing a show on a large, ambitious scale in order to involve as many USC members as possible, and to present a unique challenge to the team. The project ultimately involved more than 30 USC members in a whole range of ways, from design, construction and logistics to acting, directing and stage-management. On top of that, extensive administrative support by way of Public Relations and Marketing proved a useful learning experience for thos involved. For many participants, this was their first experience in theatre, and many have returned for USProductions’ 2012 project.

The show was very well-received, enthusiastically described as one of the best University Productions many audience-members had watched, and by others as a truly accomplished performance that rivaled professional interpretations of Noel Coward. The main take-away for USC was the strengthening of the USC Productions brand-name, increased recognition of our work and a continuation of the work of previous production teams.

3.2. Introductory Classes

The Committee’s contribution to the USC suite of activities came in the form of a series of classes, taught by USC members, which were open to the entire community. These classes covered a wide range of subjects, including Cooking,

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Dance (Hip Hop and

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore Dance (Hip Hop and Jazz), Photography (I ndoor/Outdoor and

Dance (Hip Hop and Jazz), Photography (Indoor/Outdoor and Fashion) and Music (Theory). These were envisioned as enjoyable and safe spaces for USC members who’d always wanted to pick up new skills but either lacked the time or easy access. Overseen by the Creative Director (Interest Groups and Projects) and run by the Introductory Classes Working Committee, these after-school classes saw a healthy sign-up, with each class reaching out to about 10-15 people. They were very well- received and are highly recommended for continuation.

3.3. Decibel

The now-customary Decibel ran as a complement to major USC events (Buaya Buayee, Halloween etc), serving as a way to showcase USC talent, though primarily as a way for the Community to relax and have fun together. The 10/11 run of Decibel has helped establish this open-mic event as a USC staple.

4.

Recommendations

Innovate within boundaries. Every committee that comes in tries to improve on the work of the previous one, though this often comes at the expense of removing projects from the suite of activities. The 10/11 Committee’s primary recommendation is to be bold about creating new activities, but that this needs to be balanced against the current mix of personalities, interests and talents in USC. For the sake of continuity, the committee also strongly recommends running the same suite of activities for the next year, though this should not be at the expense of coming up with new ideas or injecting a new flavor to existing activities. At the heart of everything the Cultural Activities Committee does should be the community: maximum participation across the board is the bottom line.

The only changes the Committee recommends are mainly related to USC Productions, and concern the timeline, marketing strategies and logistics. However, the administration of USC Productions (now USProductions) has now been removed from the Cultural Activities Committee, and these recommendations are no longer salient in this report. With the administrative freedom that comes as a result of this, the Cultural Activities Committee can focus on developing the Introductory Classes, with a particular focus on incorporating them into the Residential College.

The Committee recommends considering more performance-based activities that can maximize the spaces and facilities offered by the Residential College.

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University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore 5. Acknowledgments The

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

5.

Acknowledgments

National University of Singapore 5. Acknowledgments The Committee wishes to thank the 10 t h MC

The Committee wishes to thank the 10 th MC for its support and good counsel, as well as the entire Hay Fever team, for showing incredible determination despite periods of great difficulty.

Michele, for always being there and for being the world’s best administrator.

Yolanda, for being so capable and for always wanting to do more.

Joel Kang, for the wonderful work and incredible know-how. Leonard, for being so talented and for bringing that to bear on Hay Fever.

Yvonne, for being the soul behind Decibel, and its biggest fan.

Kishan, who helped run the Introductory Classes, for his indefatigable spirit.

Prepared by:

Joel Tan Director of Cultural Activities 10 th Standing Committee NUS Students’ University Scholars Club

University Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore SOCIAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE

University Scholars Club

c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore

Scholars Club c/o University Scholars Programme, National University of Singapore SOCIAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE REPORT

SOCIAL ACTIVITIES COMMITTEE REPORT

1. General Information

The Social Activities Committee is responsible for promoting student bonding and fostering a greater sense of belonging to the USC community through its suite of events, namely: Halloween, Buaya Buayee and Chinese New Year celebrations.

2. Organisation

Management Committee:

Director of Social Activities: Amanda Awyong

Standing Committee:

Admistrator: Samdish Suri Financial Secretary: He Yining Public Relations Secretary: Cheryl Ng

Working Committee:

Creative Events Coordinator (Christmas, Buaya Buayee): Spencer Tan Creative Events Coordinator (Chinese New Year): Lin Tong Logistics Coordinator (Christmas): Tania Harsono Logistics Coordinator (Buaya Buayee): Darren Yeo Logistics Coordinator (Chinese New Year): Eunice Tan

3. Highlights

3.1. Halloween (29 th October 2010)

For this event, we followed the general frame that the previous year’s committee had. We had a haunted house at level 6 and used chatterbox as a holding area. Chatterbox had food and other entertainment such as werewolves. Tickets which