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Technology Integration Plan

Bobbie Keenan November 22, 2009 Applications of Instructional Technology ITEC 8530 Kenneth Clark

Title: Historical Fiction

Subject: Language Arts

Grade: 6

Topic: Finding the Facts in Historical Fiction Time Frame: 4 weeks (+ )


Established Goals: Information Literacy Standards for Student Learning Standard 5: The Student who is an independent learner is information literate and appreciates literature and other creative expressions of information. The student who is an independent learner applies the principles of information literacy to access, evaluate, enjoy, value, and create artistic products. That student actively and independently seeks to master the principles, conventions, and criteria of literature in print, non-print, and electronic formats. The student is able both to understand and enjoy creative work presented in all formats and to create products that capitalize on each formats particular strength. Indicators: Indicator 1. Is a competent and self-motivated reader Indicator 2. Derives meaning from information presented creatively in a variety of formats. Indicator 3. Develops creative products in a variety of formats. Georgia Performance Standards: Language Arts Grade 6 ELA6R1: The student demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. b. Identifies and analyzes sensory details and figurative language. c. Relates a literary work to historical events of the period. d. Applies knowledge of the concept that theme refers to the message about life and the world that the author wants us to understand whether implied or stated. e. Identifies and analyzes the elements of setting, characterization, plot, and the resolution of the conflict of the story. f. Identifies the speaker and recognizes the differences between first and third person narration. g. Defines and explains how tone is conveyed in literature through word choice, sentence structure, punctuation, rhythm, repetition, and rhyme. h. Responds to and explains the effects of sound, figurative language, and graphics in order to uncover meaning in literature: ii. Figurative language (i.e., simile, metaphor, hyperbole, personification) Big Idea: In addition to learning traditional literary skills, students will also independently work on finding fact in a historical fiction by utilizing various forms of resources including the internet and then compiling the information into a multimedia presentation.

Understandings:
Students will understand Historical fact can provide the back- drop to a fictional story. Authors use literary techniques to set the tone and feel of a piece of literature. The setting, characterization, plot and resolution of story are elements of a novel. How to search the internet effectively Fictional characters can provide a real world historical perspective. How to do a character analysis How to create a Power Point presentation The cause and effects of the Great Depression How Jim Crow Laws had an affect on the African American population. Jazz Musics role in the Depression. How Hoovervilles came to be as a result of the Great Depression.

Essential Questions:

How can information on Internet enhance a reading experience? Does history have an impact on literature? How can the truth be told through fiction? Why is historical fiction important? How accurate are facts used in historical fiction? What are some of the techniques authors of historical fiction use to make reading their stories feel authentic to the time period? What are some of the historical references made in Bud, Not Buddy?

Students will know


Elements of a novel (plot, setting, characterization, resolution) History can inspire literary works How to analyze a character in a novel How to cite sources off the internet

Students will be able to


Design a project related to a character in Bud, Not Buddy and an aspect of the Great Depression that is also covered in Bud, Not Buddy. Plan, compose, edit and revise documents. Describe how the

How to search the internet for relevant, factual, and historical information How to respond to literary material from a personal and creative point of view. How fictional characters deal with conflicts that relate to real-life situations. Relate fictional reading to information from another source.

development of theme, character, plot and setting contribute to the overall impact of a piece of literature. Access historical information from a variety of sources. Create a Power Point presentation.

Assessment Evidence

Performance Task 1- Document #1


Double Journal Entry Use your Double Entry Journal to react to the story Bud, Not Buddy. In the first column of your entry choose facts and a passage(s) from the chapter that stood out to you. In the second column, write your thoughts, reactions or personal connections to the passage(s). [Facet 1, Facet 2, Facet 4, Facet 5, Facet 6]

Double Journal Entry (Document #1)


Double Journal Entry Directions
This format will be used for all Double Entry Journal Assignments. Double Entry Journals should be typed in a Word document using the Table Tool to create the format and saved to your jump drive. Label each entry of your journal with the book title, author, chapter, and date.

Example:

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis Chapter 1 September 1, 2009 Facts Reaction Use this side to write facts. You can include Here you can react to facts you wrote on important details and plot points. the other side. Discuss your opinions. Make connections to other readings, classes youve taken before, or things that have happened to you. Try to do more than judge the quality of the writing or the plausibility of the story. You can be critical but talk about why youre being critical. Select one or more quotes from the chapter and cite the page number in parenthesis at the end of the quote. Example: (page 2)

Write a sentence or two that connects the quote to the chapter. Why is the quote important? How do you connect to the quote? Why did you choose it? You can also use this side to list unfamiliar vocabulary you came across in the chapter. Find the definition of the words and write a sentence using each word.

Student Self-Assessment Double Journal Entry Rubric

Category Title

4 - Excellent Includes entire title with proper mechanics. Includes authors full name spelled correctly.

3 - Good Includes the entire title with errors in the mechanics. Includes the authors full name spelled incorrectly. Includes Chapter, but the incorrect number. Two facts are recorded along with a properly cited quote. Student is able to make connections to their life or other readings.

2 - Acceptable Includes a partial title.

1 - Poor No title recorded.

Author

Includes only Authors name the authors last not recorded name and/or spells it incorrectly. Includes Chapter or number, but not both. A fact is recorded and a properly cited quote is recorded. Student requires prompting to make connections to his life or other readings. No Chapter or number recorded. No facts or quotes are recorded. Student cannot make connections to his life or to other readings.

Chapter Number

Includes Chapter and the correct number. Two or more facts are recorded including properly cited quotes from the story. Student is able to react to the facts from the reading (including quotes and vocabulary) and make connections to their life and other readings.

Facts

Reactions

Each Double Journal Entry is worth a maximum of 20 points. There are 19 chapters in the book, Bud, Not Buddy. Grading Scale for Double Entry Journals: 380 360 = A 359 - 339 = B 338 - 318 = C 317 - 297 = D Below 297 = F

Performance Task 2 (Document #2)


Character analysis Create a body biography analyzing one of the characters from Bud, Not Buddy. Draw a visual representation of character from Bud, Not Buddy. You can use symbols to depict your character or draw what you think is a likeness of the character. You may also use graphics found on the Internet that represent the character you chose. If you chose to use graphics from the Internet you must properly cite the resource. You may use the following link for examples on how to properly cite Internet resources. [Facet 1, Facet 2, Facet 3, Facet 4] http://www.teachervision.fen.com/internet/printable/6396.html?detoured=1 Once finished with your drawing/graphics scan/paste it into a word document. [Facet 3] In addition to the visual aspect of the project, you also need to write a description of your character. Tell me about your characters voice, their actions in the book, how they look, and what their thoughts and feelings are. [Facet 1, Facet 5] In your description, include quotes from the book that best describe your character. Be sure to cite the page where the quote appears in the book. Lastly, tell me your feelings about your chosen character. How do you relate to this character and what made you chose the character? What did you learn from this character analysis that you did not know before? [Facet 2, Facet 6]

Bud, Not Buddy Character Analysis Rubric (Document #2)


Category Required Elements (Counts Twice) Graphics/ Artwork 4 - Excellent The analysis includes all required elements as well as additional information The graphics/artwork is related to the character and makes the analysis easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a source citation. All items of importance are clearly labeled 3 - Good All required elements are included in the analysis All the graphics/artwork are related to the topic and most make the analysis easier to understand. All borrowed graphics have a source citation. Almost all items of importance are clearly labeled Work is neat throughout most of the project Student can accurately answer most questions related to facts in the analysis and process used to create it. 2 - Acceptable All but one of the required elements are included in the analysis All graphics/artwork relate to the topic. Most borrowed graphics have a source citation. 1 - Poor Several required elements were missing.

Graphics/Artwork do not relate to the topic OR borrowed graphics do not have a source citation.

Labels

Several items of importance are clearly labeled Work is sloppy and difficult to read. Student can accurately answer 75% of questions related to facts in the analysis and the process used to create it.

Neatness

The overall project is neat in appearance throughout. Knowledge Student can Gained accurately answer all questions related to facts in the character analysis and processes used to create it. Scoring 25 20 = A 19 14 = B 13 8 = C 75 =D Below 5 = F

Labels are too small to view OR no items of importance were labeled. Work is very sloppy and difficult to read. Student appears to have insufficient knowledge about the facts of the process used to create it.

Performance Task 3 (Document #3)


Create a PowerPoint presentation that combines the character you chose for your character analysis with an aspect of the Great Depression that had an effect on that character. [Facet 1, Facet 3] For example, if you chose Herman E. Calloway as your character you could discuss the Jim Crow Laws or Jazz music. If you chose Deza Malone as your character you could discuss homelessness and Hoovervilles. The presentation must have a minimum of 5 slides not including a title slide and bibliography slide. Have a summary of your chosen character including quotes from the book that support your summary. Be sure to cite the page the quote is found on. Research various websites (you can use the websites weve already looked at together in class) and include factual information that supports the fictional setting for your character. For example, if you chose Deza Malone, include real life examples of what life was like in one of the many Hoovervilles in the United States during the Great Depression. Also include appropriate graphics in your presentation. Remember, any resources you use from the Internet must be properly cited. The final slide prior to the Bibliography slide should be a summation of your thoughts on how Christopher Paul Curtis successfully or unsuccessfully combined historical fact with fictional characters. In your opinion did he succeed in combining the two? You will also be graded on the look and readability of your presentation, so keep that in mind when choosing colors and font sizes. [Facet 1, Facet 3, Facet 4, Facet 6]

Finding the Facts in Historical Fiction PowerPoint Presentation Rubric (Document #3)
Category Overall Content 4 Excellent All content throughout the presentation is accurate. There are no factual errors. 3 - Good Most of the content is accurate but there is one piece of information that might be inaccurate. Presentation Presentation shows shows some considerable originality originality and and inventiveness. inventiveness The content . The content and ideas are and ideas are presented in presented in a an interesting unique and way. interesting way. Information Most is organized information is in a clear, organized in a logical way. clear, logical It is easy to way. One anticipate the card or item type of of material that information might be on seems out of the next card. place. Font formats Font formats (color, bold, have been italic) have carefully been planned to carefully enhance planned to readability enhance readability and content. Sources of Most sources information of 2-Acceptable The content is generally accurate, but one piece of information clearly flawed or inaccurate. Presentation shows an attempt at originality and inventiveness on 1-2 cards. 1 - Poor Content is typically confusing or contains more than one factual error. Presentation is a rehash of other peoples ideas and/or graphics shows very little attempt at original thought. There is no clear plan for organization of information. Points

Originality/ Interpretation

Sequencing of Information

Use of Text & Formatting

Citations

Some information is logically sequenced. An occasional card or item of information seems out of place. Font formatting has been carefully planned to complement the content. It may be a little hard to read. Some sources of

Font formatting makes it very difficult to read the material.

One source of

Use of Graphics

Spelling and Grammar

are properly cited to determine credibility of the information presented. All graphics are attractive (size and colors) and support the theme/conten t of the presentation. Presentation has no misspellings or grammatical errors. Project includes all material needed to gain a comfortable understandin g of the topic.

information are cited to determine credibility of the information presented. A few graphics are not attractive but all support the theme/content of the presentation. Presentation has 1-2 misspellings but no grammatical errors. Project includes most material needed to gain a comfortable understanding of the material but is lacking one or two key elements.

information are cited to determine credibility of information presented. All graphics are attractive but few do not seem to support the theme/content of the presentation. Presentation has 1-2 grammatical errors but no misspellings. Project is missing more than two key elements.

information is cited to determine credibility of information presented. Several graphics are unattractive and detract from the content of the presentation. Presentation has more than grammatical and/or spelling errors. Project is lacking several elements and has inaccuracies.

Effectiveness

Total Points Scoring 32 28 = A 27 23 = B 22 18 = C 17 13 = D Below 12 = F

Performance Task 4 (Document #4) A test on general information from the novel, Bud, Not Buddy, as well questions covering the various literary devices used throughout the novel. [Facet 1, Facet 3] Other Evidence: Observation: The teacher will observe the daily activities like reading and class discussion to ensure each individual fully understands the task, and relevance of the task, given to them. There will be exercises related to the daily reading that will help reinforce their knowledge of various literary devices, help them build toward their final project in this unit, and ultimately grasp the big idea of finding the fact in historical fiction.

Bud, Not Buddy Novel Test (Document # 4)


1. From what point of view is this novel told? a. First person Buds point of view b. First person Bugs point of view c. Third person

Read the following excerpt from the novel:


A chain rattled, the lock came off and the door creaked open. Even though it was nighttime there was a whole different, scarier kind of dark in the shedan old smell leaked out and it seemed like was the perfect smell that all this gray would have. ( page 19 ) 2. What literary device is used? a. simile b. personification c. imagery d. flashback 3. Where does Bud keep his most valuable possessions?

Read the following excerpt from the novel:


Hed gone and ruined everybodys fun that day by getting in a big fight with my mother about the gigantic white twenty-five-gallon Texas cowboy hat that she was wearing. Momma used to tell me, That hardheaded man insisted, insisted mind you, that I wear that horrible hat. (page 39) 4. Which of the following literary devices is used in this passage? a. irony b. flashback c. foreshadowing d. simile 5. How does Bud end up getting breakfast at the mission? a. He sneaks by the angry man and up to the front of the line. b. He lies and tells them that he works at the mission. c. He crawls through the crowd and through the door. d. A couple pretends that he is their son, and goes in with them. 6. Why is it ironic that there is a sign up in the mission with a rich family in a nice car that says There is no place like America today! a. because it is hanging in a place where people are coming just to have food to eat b. because there is a great depression going on during this time c. because they are serving oatmeal at the mission d. both a and b

Read the following excerpt from the novel:


As soon as I got into the library I closed my eyes and took a deep breath. I got a whiff of the leather on all the old books, a smell that got real strong if you picked one of them up and stuck your nose real close to it when you turn the pages. Then there was the smell of the cloth that covered the brand-new books, the books that made a splitting sound when

you opened them. (page 54) 7. Which of the following literary device is used in this passage? a. simile b. flashback c. imagery d. irony

Read the following excerpt from the novel:


Bugs whispered, Shoot this aint no city, this is just another cardboard jungle. (page 65) 8. What type of figurative language is used in this passage? a. simile b. metaphor c. idiom d. personification 9. Hooverville is name after ________________________________.

Read the following excerpt from the novel:


When Deza smiled a little dimple jumped up in her brown cheek. (page 74) 10. What type of figurative language is used in this sentence? a. metaphor b. idiom c. simile d. personification 11. How did Lefty Lewis get Bud to come out from hiding in the bushes? a. He offers him a ride to Grande Rapids b. He offers him a brand new suitcase c. He shoots his gun into the air. d. He offers him food. 12. Why did Bud lock Lefty Lewis out of the car and take off down the road? a. He thought Lefty Lewis had a knife. b. He was afraid that Lefty would take him back to the home. c. He thought Lefty was a vampire. d. He wanted to see how well he could drive a car. 13. What was Buds mommas name? a. Miss Thomas b. Miss Hill c. Deza Malone d. Angela Janet 14. Which of the following best describes the internal conflict from the novel? a. Lefty Lewis is pulled over by a police officer. b. The police burned down Hooverville. c. Herman E. Calloway accepting the death of his daughter. d. Bud getting angry when Herman accuses him of stealing the rock. 15. Which of the following is the best overall tone of this novel? a. factual and formal b. profound and serious

c. lighthearted and touching d. sarcastic and stern 16. Which of the following would NOT be a theme for this novel? a. Bad things sometimes happen to good people. b. When one door closes, another one will always open. c. Everyone needs a place to belong. d. Beauty is in the eye of the beholder. 17. In the novel, the use of the first-person point of view allows the author to __________ a. share only Buds inner thoughts and feelings b. concentrate on creating unusual characters. c. share what many of the characters are thinking and feeling d. describe the storys setting in vivid details. 18. Throughout the novel, Buds dialect can best be described as __________________ a. formal b. foreign c. fancy d. informal 19. At the end of the novel, Bud makes the following discovery: a. Miss Thomas is his grandmother b. He has to return to flint c. Herman E. Calloway is his grandfather. d. Mr. Jimmy is his grandfather. 20. At the end of the novel, the reader can conclude that Bud will ___________________ a. move back to Flint b. try to get a job working at the Sweet Pea c. be happy being a part of the Dusky Devastators of the Depression d. continue to hate Herman E. Calloway

Directions: Match each character with the correct description.


21. _____ The lady who shows Bud kindness in Grand Rapids. 22. _____ The nickname Bud is given by the band. 23. _____ The man who drives Bud to Grand Rapids. 24. _____ The girl from Hooverville that tells Bud he will always carry his Momma inside of him. 25. _____ The person who gives Bud his first pair of trousers A. Deza Malone B. Mrs. Sleet C. Miss Thomas D. Sleepy LaBone E. Lefty Lewis

Learning Plan for Finding the Facts in Historical Fiction Unit


Where, Why & What

Goals: In addition to learning traditional literary skills, students will also independently work on finding fact in a historical fiction by utilizing various forms of resources including the internet and then compiling the information into a multimedia presentation. To understand essential questions in the unit: How can information on internet enhance a reading experience? Does history have an impact on literature? How can the truth be told through fiction? Why is historical fiction important? How accurate are facts used in historical fiction? What are some of the techniques authors of historical fiction use to make reading their stories feel authentic to the time period? What are some of the historical references made in, Bud, Not Buddy?

Expectations: To better understand these goals students will:

Read the historical fiction, Bud, Not Buddy. (Narrative Entry Point) Keep a double entry journal to reflect on ideas brought up in the readings. (Aesthetic Entry Point) Use a Venn Diagram to compare and contrast the historical settings in the novel and the students life. (Logical Entry Point) Create a Body Biography (character analysis) paired with an aspect of the Great Depression that is associated with the character in the novel. (Experiential Entry Point) Create a PowerPoint presentation connecting the historical fiction of Bud, Not Buddy to factual, historical information found on the internet. (Experiential Entry Point) Complete assignments that further illustrate how literary devices are used by an author to enhance a reading experience. (Foundational Entry Point) Accurately cite resources off the internet. (Logical Entry Point)

Access historical information. (Experiential Entry Point)

Relevance and Value: To appreciate literature and other creative expressions of information. Create products that capitalize on the various formats strengths. Demonstrates comprehension and shows evidence of a warranted and responsible explanation of a variety of literary and informational texts. Identifies and analyses sensory details and figurative language. Identifies the speaker and recognizes the differences between first and third narration. Relates a literary work to historical events of the period.

Prerequisite Skills: Students already do most of their daily work on personal lap tops and have adequate keyboarding skills, work with the program, Word, daily, and all have worked with PowerPoint in numerous other classes to present projects. Students have prior knowledge of literary devices (simile, metaphor, irony, imagery, etc.). The activities in this unit will be reinforcing that knowledge. Evaluate students knowledge of the Great Depression with a True or False questionnaire and KWL chart.

Hook & Hold As a result of the event of the Great Depression, over 250,000 children found themselves homeless. Many became nomads, traveling the highways and railways. While the character Bud, cant be labeled as a nomad, he is homeless early in the story and making his way across Michigan towards an uncertain future. Investigate the plight of children during the Great Depression and answer the following question in your journal. Do you think you could make it alone on your own? Why or why not? Include everything that you could carry that you would need to make it on your own.

Explore & Equip Provide the students with agendas (see calendar) that include the assignments they will be expected to complete by the end of the unit. List of websites that are relevant to the aspects of the Great Depression that are mentioned in Bud, Not

Buddy and even used as settings for investigation. Students are not limited to using only these websites for their assignments. Provide each student with a copy of Bud, Not Buddy Handout with MLA citation instructions for resources from the internet. Self-assessment rubrics for double journal entries and PowerPoint Presentation assignment. (see Stage 2) Have daily class discussions about readings. Have students do several homework assignments that focus on a particular aspect of the Great Depression mentioned in the story. Have students complete homework assignments and in class assignments that explain and clarify the use of various literary devices throughout the novel.

Rethinking, Reflections, & Revisions Students will write daily in their double entry journal. Specific topics or free writes in relation to the reading will be assigned. Students will be given a KWL chart two times during the unit to see what theyve learned as theyve progressed through the unit. Assignments, two quizzes and a final test will be given to monitor comprehension reading and grasp of various literary devices used in the novel. Continuous research will be conducted individually to enhance and build on the students knowledge of The Great Depression. Daily class discussion will be held to clarify any questions that might come up during the reading. Two final journal entries will be assigned asking the students to reflect on how reading Bud, Not Buddy helped them understand more about the impact of The Great Depression.

Encouraging Self-Evaluation Journal Entry Topics: Discuss your thoughts on the story Bud, Not Buddy. How did reading this book help you understand more about the Great Depression? Do you think that reading historical fiction can help you better understand historical events? Why or Why not? Double Journal Entry Rubric and PowerPoint Presentation Rubric will be provided to guide students and give them the ability check their progress as they go through their assignments.

Tailor to Students Needs Two different handouts with websites that will be used as part of their research for several projects in this

unit will be given to the students. One handout has websites with more in depth information. The second handout has websites, while the content is essentially the same as the more in depth websites the information is more pared down for the learners that arent as advanced and lower readers. Bud, Not Buddy will be read as a class, with the exception of three chapters that will be read as homework. I chose to do this not only to facilitate discussion, but as a way to engage the lower readers in class that have been known to become frustrated with reading novels this length. Ample classroom time has been set aside to complete the final PowerPoint presentation so the teacher can assist all students with any help they may need. Several homework assignments (Chapter 4 Worksheet and All That Jazz Activity) will be adjusted to accommodate advanced and lower learners.

Organize (See Student Agenda Calendars)

Week One Student Agenda

Activity
Journal

Monday Entry: Do you think you could make it alone on your own? Why or Why not? Include everything that you could carry that you would need to make it alone.

Classroom Activity

Introduce the unit and give out student agendas. Have students fill out a KWL chart on the Great Depression. Ask students six questions pertaining to their knowledge of events of the Great Depression. Choose two of the six, question topics to

Tuesday Entry: Describe the character, Bud (appearance, age, personality) and the setting of the book. Include examples from the book and cite pages. Response: Also can you relate to the character, Bud? Why or why not? Introduce the novel, Bud, Not Buddy. Read Chapters 1 & 2 as a class. Discuss from whose point of view the story is told.

Wednesday Entry: Give an example of a flashback in this chapter and cite the page. Response: Describe one of your own memories. Be as detailed as possible.

Thursday Entry: After reading Chapter 5, describe what you think Buds mother was like. Explain why and use quotes from the book to support your thoughts.

Friday Entry: At this point in the story, which character do you relate to the most, and why?

Read Chapters 3 & 4 as a class. Discuss the use of the literary devices, flashbacks and imagery in this chapter.

Read Chapters 5 & 6 as a class. Discuss the use of irony. Irony exercise.

Literary Device/Story Quiz. Read Chapter 7 as a class.

Computer Activity Homework

research. Review how to cite information from the internet. Research two chosen topics. Journal. In a Word Document, write five facts (can include pictures) about your two topics that either confirm or disprove your original True or False answer. Your findings must be properly cited.

Journal

Journal

Journal

Journal

In a Word Document, retell the events of Chapter 2 from Todds point of view or in third person.

Imagery chart and Figurative Language Chart.

Study for Quiz

Week Two Student Agenda Activity Journal Monday Entry: What do you think the rocks with numbers on them mean and why? Tuesday Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond. Wednesday Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond. Thursday Entry: Do you think riding the rails would have been a fun way to travel? Why or why not? Include quotes from the book to support your reasons. Read Chapters 13 & 14 as a class. Literary Device/Stor y Quiz Friday Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or character s that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond. Read Chapter 16 as a class. Discuss Internal and External Conflict in the story.

Have class fill out a second KWL chart. Read Chapter 8 as a class. Divide into groups of 2 (including the teacher) and use the Venn Diagram to compare and contrast Hoovervilles and their residents with your own family and neighborhood . Share your findings with the class. Computer The billboard Activity mentioned in Chapter 8 is in a famous photo from the Great Depression.

Classroo m Activity

Read Chapters 9 & 10 as a class. Discuss the use of extended metaphor (activity) and Onomatopoeia .

Read Chapters 11 & 12 as a class. Discuss the authors use of direct and indirect characterization .

Journal

Journal. Do a search on Pullman Porters. In a Word Document, explain why

Journal

Journal

Homework

Find the photo on the internet and insert it into a word document. Include the name of the photographer and the title of the photo. Cite your sources. Journal. Billboard activity.

being a Pullman Porter was a good job to have during the Depression. Include a picture and a job description. Cite sources. Study for Quiz.

Find 5 Pullman Porter examples of activity. onomatopoeia in Chapter 10. In a word document list the sentence each word appears in and underline the word. Cite the page the word is on, and tell how it is used in the story for effect.

Read Chapter 15

Read Chapter 17

Week 3 Student Agenda Activity Journal Monday Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond. Read Chapter 19 as a class. Discuss the use of extended metaphor on pages 200-202. Jazz Band activity. Tuesday Entry: Free Journal. Write about events or characters that stood out to you in this chapter, and respond. Wednesday Entry: Discuss your thoughts on the story Bud, Not Buddy. How did reading this book help you understand more about the Great Depression? Finalize the character analysis and save to file. Thursday Entry: Do you think that reading historical fiction can help you understand historical events? Why or Why not? Friday

Classroom Activity

Final Literary Device/Story Test. Begin work on character analysis and PowerPoint presentation.

Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly.

Computer Activity

Journal. Explore the PBS.org Jazz website. Create your own band after exploring the PBS.org website.

Journal

Character Analysis and PowerPoint Presentation

Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly.

Have students fill out a final KWL chart. Five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly is due. Five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly is due.

Homework

Character Analysis Draw Character or find graphics that represent the chosen character. Make note of all your sources.

Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly.

Create a five slide PowerPoint Presentation on your character and an aspect of the Great Depression that affected that character directly.

Turn in Jump Drive for Final Grades.

KWL Chart

Topic: The Great Depression


What I Know What I Want to Know What I Learned

What Do You Know About The Great Depression?


Circle whether you think these statements are true or false and then briefly write why you think its either true or false.

1. In the 1930s, riding the rails was a fun and efficient way to travel. True or False _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ____ 2. Hoovervilles were named in honor of President Herbert Hoover. True or False _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ____ 3. Being a Pullman Porter was a good job to have in the Great Depression. True or False _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ____ 4. Jazz musicians played country music in the 1930s. True or False _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ____ 5. It was easy to find a job in the Great Depression. True or False _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ____

Great Depression Websites

(Advanced) *The word advanced wouldnt appear on the handout. Youre not limited to use just these websites for your assignments. America in the 1930s http://xroads.virginia.edu/~1930s/front.html Riding the Rails http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/rails/index.html Herbert Hoovers Reaction to the Great Depression http://www.hoover.archives.gov/exhibits/Hooverstory/gallery06/gallery06.html The New Deal Network http://newdeal.feri.org/ The Great Depression and New Deal 1929-1940s http://iws.ccccd.edu/kwilkison/Online1302home/20th %20Century/DepressionNewDeal.html Digital History http://www.digitalhistory.uh.edu/learning_history/children_depression/human_meaning.c fm Photos of the Great Depression http://history1900s.about.com/library/photos/blyindexdepression.htm Photo Essay of the Great Depression http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm African-Americans in the Great Depression http://mtungsten.freeservers.com/ Hoovervilles http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1642.html Hooverville photos http://newdeal.feri.org/ron/ab02info.htm City Life During the Great Depression http://middle.usm.k12.wi.us/faculty/taft/Unit7/citylife.htm Jazz http://www.pbs.org/jazz/time/time_depression.htm PBSkids.org Jazz http://pbskids.org/jazz/ The Great Depression http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01794/pictures_page.htm

Great Depression Websites Youre not limited to use just these websites for your assignments. The Depression News http://www.sos.state.mi.us/history/museum/explore/museums/hismus/190075/depressn/index.html

How the Depression Affected Children http://newdeal.feri.org/eleanor/er2a.htm America in the 1930s http://xroads.virginia.edu/~1930s/front.html Riding the Rails Easy http://www.erroluys.com/RidingtheRails.htm Riding the Rails Easy http://web.olivet.edu/gradusers/nhenric1/Riding.html Photos of the Great Depression http://history1900s.about.com/library/photos/blyindexdepression.htm Photo Essay of the Great Depression http://www.english.illinois.edu/maps/depression/photoessay.htm Hooverville photos http://newdeal.feri.org/ron/ab02info.htm PBSkids.org Jazz http://pbskids.org/jazz/ The Great Depression http://library.thinkquest.org/03oct/01794/pictures_page.htm

Bud, Not Buddy Chapter 4 Worksheet Use the following chart to analyze the figurative language in this chapter. In the box labeled My Own, write your own sentence using this type of figurative language. Passage Type of Figurative Language What is being compared or what does this mean? My own

then I was inside the Amos house crouched down like a cat burglar. (p. 31) My heart started jumping around in my stomach as soon as I reached out for the shotgun. (p. 32) Todds bed stayed as dry as the desert.
(p. 34)

If J. Edgar Hoover and the FBI saw me now Id be in some real serious hot water! (p. 35) Discussion: *The worksheet for the lower students would have the Discussion question omitted. Bud says that his favorite saying in the whole world is He who laughs last laughs the best. Do you agree with this saying? Explain what this statement means and do you agree or disagree with it. _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ _______________________________________________________________________ ____

All That Jazz Activity (Advanced Student Version)


* Advanced Student Version wouldnt appear on the handout.

After exploring the PBS.org website, Jazz, create your own band. Write a paper with a minimum of three paragraphs. Include the following in your paper: Create a name for your band. Identify the members and the instruments they play. Talk about your travels and what kind of jazz your band plays. Finally, create a poster for your band using a single PowerPoint slide.

All That Jazz Activity After exploring the PBS.org website, Jazz, create your own band. Write a brief summary of your band. Include the following in your summary: Your bands name. The names of the members and the instruments they play. Where are some of the places your would play. Finally, create a poster for your band using a single PowerPoint slide.

References: Capotosto, Lauren, Evan Howard and Jennifer Baribault, Bud, Not Buddy. http://faculty.salisbury.edu/~elbond/budnotbuddy2.html#Evaluation (July 12, 2009) Fox, Debbie, Families-Then And Now Venn Diagram. http://alpha.learnnc.org/lp/media/lessons/DebbieFox2112003991/VennDiagram1.JPG (July 16, 2009) Hamilton, Joan and Cheryl Klausner, Making Adolescent Literature Matter eWorkshop. http://www.literacymatters.org/lessons/budnotbuddy.htm (July 5, 2009) Sutherland, Tammy D. and Shannon B. Temple, Teaching Unit: Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis. United States: S&T Publications, 2008. Page 8. Sandtpublications.com. Web. July 11, 2009

Reference Page for Photos as They Appear in the Podcast


PowerPoint Slides A PowerPoint presentation by Bobbie Keenan for Young Adult Literature FRMS 7331 Bud, Not Buddy Book Cover http://stacyrjoseph.blogspot.com/2008_04_01_archive.html Christopher Paul Curtis Photo http://www.readin.dcccd.edu/archive/2007/events/news.htm Hooverville Photos http://likeawhisper.wordpress.com/2008/09/22/ http://www.picturehistory.com/product/id/879 Union Workers Photo http://apps.detnews.com/apps/history/index.php?id=115 Jazz Club photos http://www.city-data.com/forum/austin/586300-austin-san-antonio-8.html Big Band Jazz Photo www.guardian.co.uk/music/musicblog/2009/mar/27/duke-ellington-jazz Jazz Art http://www.art.com/products/p12041903-sa-i1461732/eric-waugh-jazz-it-up-i.htm Duke Ellington http://rhapsodyinbooks.wordpress.com/2009/04/29/april-29-1899--birthday-of-edwardkennedy-duke-ellington/ Cab Calloway http://www.flickr.com/photos/rhythmjunkie/2254817532/ Count Basie http://library.umkc.edu/spec-col/ww2/postwarworld/bugle-boys.htm Dizzy Gillispie http://milesdavis.wordpress.com/2008/12/20/the-miles-davis-movie-who-is-going-toplay-dizzy-gillespie/ Billie Holiday http://explorepahistory.com/displayimage.php?imgId=426

Charlie Parker http://www.ebrookville.com/fchs/music/Jazz_Greats/bird.html Ella Fitzgerald http://thepopfix.com/2009/09/15/the-pop-fix-presents-top-100-singers-of-all-time/ Duke Ellington Poster http://friends.peoria.lib.il.us/community/howardcourtney/jazzposters.html Count Basie Poster http://theinvisibleagent.wordpress.com/2009/01/page/3/ Dizzy Gillespie Poster www.allposters.com/-sp/Dizzy-Gillespie-at-the-Royal-Roost-New-York-City-1948Posters_i388685_.htm Billie Holiday Poster http://www.vintageconcertposters.com/_main/Index.cfm? page=api/gallery/photo.cfm&id=279&gid=8