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Course Syllabus

Course Syllabus

Course Information OPRE 6372.PJM Project Initiation Fall 2011

Professor Contact Information Dr. Sue Freedman Mr. Lothar Katz Dr. Thomas Sheives Mr. James Szot Mr. Gerald Turner

suefreedman@utdallas.edu katz@utdallas.edu tom.s@utdallas.edu jimszot@utdallas.edu (Instructor of Record) turner.g.a@att.net

Office hours by appointment – please email to schedule

Course Pre-requisites, Co-requisites, and/or Other Restrictions OPRE 6271 Project Overview and Strategic and Process Management

Course Description Projects are undertaken to help organizations convert strategy into products, services, and end results. Unfortunately, many projects are not totally successful because of the lack of clearly defined and well understood requirements.

This course begins with a discussion of project manager credentialing and professional ethics, explores project management in a global environment, bridges from strategy to project definition with discussions of project selection and project management tools, and focuses on determining and managing project requirements.

Important note: Modules from OB 6301, Introduction to Organizational Behavior, are intermixed with modules from this course. Concepts from these OB6301 modules are to be applied along with concepts from this course and the prerequisite course, OPRE6271, in your preparation of the Project Initiation Assignment.

Student Learning Objectives/Outcomes Students will demonstrate the knowledge to

Take responsibility for ethical and professional conduct

Apply project selection methods to evaluate the feasibility of projects

Assess project contribution to business strategy, purpose and plans

Determine and document project goals and performance requirements by working closely with project stakeholders

Define and document product or service deliverables

Select appropriate project management practices, tools and methodologies

Required Textbooks and Materials Textbooks (purchased by student or viewed online): Larson, E. and Gray,

Required Textbooks and Materials

Textbooks (purchased by student or viewed online):

Larson, E. and Gray, C. (2011). Project Management: The Managerial Process (5 th ed.).

New York: McGraw-Hill/Irwin. ISBN: 978-0071289290)

Heldman, K. (2009). PMP ® Project Management Professional Exam Study Guide (5 th

ed.). Indianapolis: Wiley (Sybex). UTD Library]

Mantel, S. J. et al. (2011). Project Management in Practice , 4 th ed. Hoboken, NJ: John Wiley & Sons. ISBN‐13: 978‐0470533017

Morris, P. and Jamieson, A. (2004). Translating Corporate Strategy into Project

Strategy: Realizing Corporate Strategy Through Project Management. Newtown Square,

PA: Project Management Institute. and Reference]

Project Management Institute. (2008). A Guide to the Project Management Body of

Knowledge, Fourth Edition. Newtown Square, PA: Project Management Institute. 978-1-933890-51-7 [download from PMI Standards]

Wiegers, K. E. (2003). Software requirements, 2 nd ed. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press. ISBN: 0-7356-1879-8 [Available as eBook from UTD Library]

ISBN: 978-0-07-742692-7 (International Edition

ISBN: 978-0-470-45558-6 [Available as eBook from

ISBN: 1-930699-37-9 [Available on PMI eReads

ISBN:

Articles and Cases (provided in class or download from Blackboard)

Katz, L. Case Study: Chattanooga Challenge. Richardson, TX: The University of Texas at Dallas

Other books you might be interested in Chatfield, C. and Johnson, T. (2010). Microsoft Project 2010 Step by Step. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press. ISBN:

Hooks, I. F., & Farry, K. A. (2001). Customer-centered products: Creating successful products through smart requirements management. New York: AMACOM. [Available as eBook from UTD Library and PMI eReads and Reference] – referenced during lecture

Howard, D. and Chefetz, G. (2010). Ultimate Study Guide: Foundations Microsoft

Project 2010. New York: Chefetz.

Wiegers, K. E. (2006). More about software requirements: Thorny issues and practical

advice. Redmond, WA: Microsoft Press.

from UTD Library] – referenced during lecture

ISBN: 978-1-934240-13-7.

ISBN: 0-7356-2267-1

[Available as eBook

Assignments & Academic Calendar

Assignments & Academic Calendar Title/Date Overview Objectives   Assignments Project Initiation

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

 

Assignments

Project Initiation

This assignment asks you to explore the strategic fit, technical requirements, and socio-cultural aspects of a potential project in your organization.

Students will demonstrate their ability to:

Complete the assignment in accordance with the instructions found on Blackboard Assignments.

Assignment

Assess project contribution to business strategy, purpose and plans

Determine and document project goals and requirements

Submit your completed document on Blackboard by 11:59PM, Wednesday, December 14, 2011.

 

Consider the socio-cultural impact of the project on stakeholders

(40 points)

Project Management Professional I

This module begins the process of preparing for the Project Management Institute’s Project Management Professional certification exam.

Non-PMPs Explore PMI’s approach to

Non-PMPs Read: Heldman, Introduction, Chapters 1, 2, and 12, pp. xxiii – 90, 497-524. Online Quiz: Complete the online quiz (Blackboard Assignments) by 11:59PM, Saturday, November 5, 2011 (15 points)

Modeling the process of project management

Jim Szot

Creating the project charter and preliminary scope statement

Independent Study

 

Applying professional responsibility

Students who have already earned the PMP ® credential will begin to prepare a research paper on a project management topic of their choice.

PMPs Identify a topic of interest and describe the research approach you intend to follow

PMPs Submit your topic proposal and research approach on Blackboard by 11:59PM,

Saturday, November 5, 2011. If revisions are required, obtain approval by November 12,

 

2011.

(15 points)

Title/Date Overview Objectives   Assignments Project Manager Credentialing and Professional Ethics

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

 

Assignments

Project Manager Credentialing and Professional Ethics

This module discusses project manager credentialing trends, requirements, and professional ethics.

Students will be able to describe the benefits and requirements for obtaining project management and related specialty credentials.

Required Reading:

Gray and Larson, Chapter 1, “Modern Project Management”

Mantel et al, Chapters 2, “The Manager, the Organization, and the Team”

Jim Szot

 

Students will be aware of the need to:

Friday, Oct. 14 AM

Ensure individual integrity and professionalism by adhering to legal requirements and ethical standards

Review the credentialing standards found on:

Enhance individual competence with continuous learning

http://www.aacei.org/

http://www.apm.org.uk/

Recommend approaches that strive for fair resolution to satisfy competing needs and objectives

http://www.ipma.ch

http://www.pmi.org

http://www.prince2.com

Respect personal, ethnic and cultural differences

Team Assignment

For the credentialing organization assigned to your team, prepare a presentation summarizing:

 

o

Credentials available

o

Purpose of credential

o

Requirements for earning

o

Benefits of earning

o

Ethical/professional conduct standards

Post on Blackboard by 11:59PM, Thursday, October 13, 2011 (7.5 points)

Project Management in a Global Environment

We explore how differences in cultural values and beliefs affect project management practices in areas such as project initiation, stakeholder management, progress monitoring, conflict prevention and resolution, and ongoing communication.

Students will be able to:

Required Reading:

Identify what cultural knowledge is critical for success in cross-cultural projects

Gray and Larson, Chapter 15, “International Projects”

Lothar Katz

Describe effective task balancing in global projects

Assignments (5 pts)

Friday, Oct. 14 PM

Describe techniques for preventing cultural friction

As a team, prepare answers to the “Case Study: Chattanooga Challenge” found on Blackboard and bring to class.

 

Come prepared to discuss and share your own international project work experiences

Title/Date Overview Objectives Assignments Introduction to   Organizational Behavior: History,

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

Assignments

Introduction to

 

Organizational

Behavior: History,

Culture, Ethics

Dr. Sue Freedman

 

See OB6301 Syllabus

Saturday, Oct. 15 AM

 
Title/Date Overview Objectives Assignments Project Selection In this module, we review the “thinking”

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

Assignments

Project Selection

In this module, we review the “thinking” and applicable processes for initiating and selecting projects. We thoroughly review the following questions:

Students will:

Required Reading:

Criteria

Explore the world of corporate & business projects and initiatives

Gray and Larson, Chapter 2, “Organizational Strategy and Project Selection”

Dr. Gerald Turner

Saturday, Oct. 15 PM

Understand how projects are “conceived” and why through qualitative and quantitative selection techniques

Mantel et al, Chapters 1, “The World of Project Management”

Morris and Jamieson, Chapter 2, Case Study - “How a Global Aerospace Company Moves Strategy into Projects”

Why launch projects?

Determine which techniques apply to certain

Exactly what is a project and how does this fit into the strategic planning and management process?

Who cares? Who are the key stakeholders and beneficiaries of this process?

business environments, situations and

scenarios and which do not

and why?

 

Review the rationale for financial and/or economic justification for projects and

programs for the corporation, business or strategic business unit – i.e., the “business case”

Please Review

PMBOK Chapter 3, “Project Management Processes for a Project,” pp. 37-70

Heldman, Chapter 2, “Using Project Selection Methods,” pp. 58-65

Introduce project charter concepts and

What business value does the company derive from successfully conceived, planned, selected, executed and managed projects?

How do we ensure the likelihood of success on key corporate & business projects

foundations

Prepare Gray and Larson, Film Prioritization business case analysis, pp. 56-60. Develop and submit your case analysis and recommendations at the

beginning of the class retaining a copy for your reference during in-class discussion.

Also, be prepared to discuss all challenges, issues, risks, constraints and “safety- mechanisms” associated with the project selection process applied to Global Aerospace. Particular emphasis will be given to facilitated class discussion and a group exercise on the assigned case.

 

(7.5 points)

Decision-making in Organizations

 

Dr. Sue Freedman

 

See OB6301 Syllabus

 

Friday, Nov. 11 AM

 
Title/Date Overview Objectives   Assignments Teams, Influence, and Socialization   Dr. Sue

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

 

Assignments

Teams, Influence, and Socialization

 

Dr. Sue Freedman

 

See OB6301 Syllabus

Friday, Nov. 11 PM

 

Requirements Overview – Elicitation

This module introduces the overall requirements development and management process and focuses in detail on the importance of eliciting good requirements.

Students will be able to:

Reading Assignment

Identify and define important elements of a repeatable, systematic process used to develop and manage different types of requirements

Wiegers, 2003, Chapters 1-5

Tom Sheives

In-class assignments

Saturday, Nov. 12 AM

Identify the types of requirements, and apply the characteristics of good requirements

Business analyst interview questions

 

Define the boundaries between project scope and product scope

 

Utilize IEEE and SEI standards

Define the spiral method of requirements development

Identify and analyze stakeholders, their roles and needs

Utilize requirement “eliciting” techniques

Develop and understand real business and user needs

Describe the difference between features, functions, and benefits

Describe the importance of correctly and completely identifying the problem to be solved

Title/Date Overview Objectives   Assignments Requirements This module provides techniques for

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

 

Assignments

Requirements

This module provides techniques for analyzing requirements to improve the overall success of the project.

Students will be able to:

Reading Assignments

Analysis and

Apply a method for analyzing requirements to improve the overall probability of success of the project

Identify and analyze priorities and risks for each requirement

Negotiation

Wiegers, 2003, Chapters 6-8

Tom Sheives

In-class assignments

Saturday, Nov. 12 PM

 

Comprehensive Quiz – in-class (10 points)

Resolve conflicting requirements

 

Allocate system requirements to components

Involve stakeholders in tradeoffs

Organizational Culture and Design

 

Dr. Sue Freedman

 

See OB6301 Syllabus

Thursday, Dec. 8 AM

 

Personality,

 

Perception, and

Communication

Dr. Sue Freedman

 

See OB6301 Syllabus

Thursday, Dec. 8 PM

 

Motivation, Rewards, and Job Design

 

Dr. Sue Freedman

 

See OB6301 Syllabus

Friday, Dec 9 AM

 
Title/Date Overview Objectives Assignments Project Planning In this module we discuss project planning

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

Assignments

Project Planning

In this module we discuss project planning tools and the use of Microsoft Project on up-coming individual and team assignments.

Subjects will be able to:

Individual Assignment

Tools

Jim Szot

Describe some of the commonly used project management tools and their advantages and limitations

Make a list of the tools that you have seen used in the practice of project management. Identify the benefits and limitations of each. Post Blackboard before 11:59 PM, Wednesday, December 7, 2011 and bring to class for discussion. (5 pts)

Download and install a copy of MS Project on your computer

Friday, Dec. 9 PM

 

Use the basic features of Microsoft Project to develop a project plan

Review the appropriate tutorials on Erik Larson’s web site:

MS Project 2007:

(http://faculty.bus.oregonstate.edu/Larso

n/New%20Faculty%20Page/project07/in

dex.htm)

MS Project 2010:

http://faculty.bus.oregonstate.edu/Larso

n/New%20Faculty%20Page/project10/in

dex.htm

Title/Date Overview Objectives   Assignments Requirements This module discusses techniques for

Title/Date

Overview

Objectives

 

Assignments

Requirements

This module discusses techniques for developing good written specific requirements and systematic methods for validating requirements.

Students will be able to:

Reading Assignments

Specification and

Validation

Wiegers, 2003, Chapters 9-10

Tom Sheives

Determine how to specify and document requirements

Apply templates in the documentation of requirements

In-class Assignments

Saturday, Dec. 10 AM

 

Address common problems in specifying requirements

Use tools for specifying requirements and specification guidelines

Identify and apply traceability techniques

Identify and apply the validation process and baseline requirements

Validate the “goodness” of requirements

Determine the testability of requirements – writing test cases – acceptance criteria

Understand the role of prototyping and/or model validation

Trace requirements to the source

Establish guidelines for baselines

Requirements

This module discusses the importance of change control, version control, and the steps to take to implement a good process in an organization.

Students will be able to:

Reading Assignments

Management and

Use components of requirements management

Steps to

Requirements

Improvement

Identify and apply the important elements of a change control process

Identify and apply good impact analysis techniques on change requests

In-class Assignments

Wiegers, 2003, Chapters 17-20

 

Comprehensive Quiz – in-class (10 points)

Tom Sheives

Saturday, Dec. 10 PM

Determine the importance of version control regarding requirements

Identify concepts in this course to apply to your own project environment

 

Understand how to assess current processes and environment

Determine the usefulness of tools in their environment and identify the kinds of tools which may be applicable

Grading Policy Graded assignments should be posted to Blackboard by midnight of the day listed.

Grading Policy

Graded assignments should be posted to Blackboard by midnight of the day listed. Assignment links disappear after the due date. If you cannot complete an assignment by the due date, it is your responsibility to contact the instructor associated with that assignment and to inform the instructor of record of this communication before the assignment becomes overdue. Note that faculty members have no obligation to accept late assignments or to discuss the possibility of extensions or extra-credit work, but may do so if you have a compelling reason and discuss it with them before the assignment is due.

Consult the OB 6301 syllabus to confirm OB 6301 assignments and due dates.

Assignments

Module

Percentage

Type

Due Date

Company description paper

Intro to OB: History, Culture & Ethics (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M1)

Individual

Oct. 9

Professional Certification Research and Presentation

Project Manager Credentialing and Professional Ethics (Szot)

7.5%

Individual

Oct. 13

Case preparation and class discussion

Executing Projects in a Global Environment (Katz)

5%

Team

Oct. 14

The Strategy that Wouldn’t Travel

Intro to OB: History, Culture & Ethics (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M1)

Team

Oct. 15

Project Selection Case

Project Selection Criteria (Turner)

7.5%

Individual

Oct. 15

Project Management Professional Quiz/ Research Approval

Course

     

(Szot)

15%

Individual

Nov. 5

Am I A Deliberate Decision Maker?

Decision Making in Organizations (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M2)

Individual

Nov. 11

Team and Team Process Worksheet

Teams, Influence and Socialization (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M3)

Individual

Nov. 11

Requirements Quiz 1 (in class)

Requirements Overview Req’ts Analysis (Sheives)

10%

Individual

Nov. 12

Collaborative

Organizational Culture and Design (Freedman)

     

Organization

OB 6301 (M4)

Individual

Dec. 4

Assessment

Karen Leary Case

Motivation, Rewards, and Job Design (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M6)

Team

Dec. 4

Self Assessments

Personality, Perception, and Communication (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M5)

Individual

Dec. 8

PPC Worksheet A & B

Personality, Perception, and Communication (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M5)

Team

Dec. 8

PM Tools

Project Planning Tools (Szot)

5%

Individual

Dec. 7

Requirements Quiz 2

Requirements Overview Req’ts Analysis (Sheives)

10%

Individual

Dec. 10

Assignments Module Percentage Type Due Date Project Initiation Assignment Course 40% Individual Dec. 14 Online

Assignments

Module

Percentage

Type

Due Date

Project Initiation

Assignment

Course

40%

Individual

Dec. 14

Online Assessment

Motivation, Rewards, and Job Design (Freedman)

OB 6301 (M6)

Individual

Dec. 18

Technical Support

For assistance with Blackboard, Adobe Connect, and other Project Management Program technology issues, e-mail Wei Wang [weiwang@utdallas.edu] and Debbie Samac [debbie@utdallas.edu]. Note that Wei and Debbie cannot help you with your UTD account, including email access issues.

If you experience any problems with your UTD account, send an email to assist@utdallas.edu or call the UTD Computer Helpdesk at 972-883-2911. Do not contact the UTD Computer Helpdesk for questions about or problems with Blackboard or Adobe Connect. They cannot help you – these products are supported by the Project Management Program.

Student Conduct & Discipline

University Policies

Student Conduct & Discipline University Policies The University of Texas System and The University of Texas

The University of Texas System and The University of Texas at Dallas have rules and regulations for the orderly and efficient conduct of their business. It is the responsibility of each student and each student organization to be knowledgeable about the rules and regulations which govern student conduct and activities. General information on student conduct and discipline is contained

in the UTD printed publication, A to Z Guide, which is provided to all registered students each

academic year.

The University of Texas at Dallas administers student discipline within the procedures of recognized and established due process. Procedures are defined and described in the Rules and Regulations, Series 50000, Board of Regents, The University of Texas System, and in Title V, Rules on Student Services and Activities of the university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures. Copies of these rules and regulations are available to students in the Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are available to assist students in interpreting the rules and regulations (SU 1.602, 972/883-6391) and online at http://www.utdallas.edu/judicialaffairs/UTDJudicialAffairs-HOPV.html

A student at the university neither loses the rights nor escapes the responsibilities of

citizenship. He or she is expected to obey federal, state, and local laws as well as the Regents’

Rules, university regulations, and administrative rules. Students are subject to discipline for violating the standards of conduct whether such conduct takes place on or off campus, or whether civil or criminal penalties are also imposed for such conduct.

Academic Integrity

The faculty expects from its students a high level of responsibility and academic honesty. Because the value of an academic degree depends upon the absolute integrity of the work done by the student for that degree, it is imperative that a student demonstrate a high standard of individual honor in his or her scholastic work.

Scholastic Dishonesty, any student who commits an act of scholastic dishonesty is subject to discipline. Scholastic dishonesty includes but is not limited to cheating, plagiarism, collusion, the submission for credit of any work or materials that are attributable in whole or in part to another person, taking an examination for another person, any act designed to give unfair advantage to a student or the attempt to commit such acts.

Plagiarism, especially from the web, from portions of papers for other classes, and from any other source is unacceptable and will be dealt with under the university’s policy on plagiarism (see general catalog for details). This course will use the resources of turnitin.com, which searches the web for possible plagiarism and is over 90% effective.

Copyright Notice

The copyright law of the United States (Title 17, United States Code) governs the making of photocopies or other reproductions of copyrighted materials, including music and software. Copying, displaying, reproducing, or distributing copyrighted works may infringe the copyright owner’s rights and such infringement is subject to appropriate disciplinary action as well as criminal penalties provided by federal law. Usage of such material is only appropriate when that usage constitutes “fair use” under the Copyright Act. As a UT Dallas student, you are required to follow the institution’s copyright policy (Policy Memorandum 84-I.3-46). For more information about the fair use exemption, see http://www.utsystem.edu/ogc/intellectualproperty/copypol2.htm

Email Use

Email Use The University of Texas at Dallas recognizes the value and efficiency of communication between

The University of Texas at Dallas recognizes the value and efficiency of communication between faculty/staff and students through electronic mail. At the same time, email raises some issues concerning security and the identity of each individual in an email exchange. The university encourages all official student email correspondence be sent only to a student’s U.T. Dallas email address and that faculty and staff consider email from students official only if it originates from a UTD student account. This allows the university to maintain a high degree of confidence in the identity of all individual corresponding and the security of the transmitted information. UTD furnishes each student with a free email account that is to be used in all communication with university personnel. The Department of Information Resources at U.T. Dallas provides a method for students to have their U.T. Dallas mail forwarded to other accounts.

Withdrawal from Class

The administration of this institution has set deadlines for withdrawal of any college-level courses. These dates and times are published in that semester's course catalog. Administration procedures must be followed. It is the student's responsibility to handle withdrawal requirements from any class. In other words, I cannot drop or withdraw any student. You must do the proper paperwork to ensure that you will not receive a final grade of "F" in a course if you choose not to attend the class once you are enrolled.

Student Grievance Procedures

Procedures for student grievances are found in Title V, Rules on Student Services and Activities, of the university’s Handbook of Operating Procedures.

In attempting to resolve any student grievance regarding grades, evaluations, or other fulfillments of academic responsibility, it is the obligation of the student first to make a serious effort to resolve the matter with the instructor, supervisor, administrator, or committee with whom the grievance originates (hereafter called “the respondent”). Individual faculty members retain primary responsibility for assigning grades and evaluations. If the matter cannot be resolved at that level, the grievance must be submitted in writing to the respondent with a copy of the respondent’s School Dean. If the matter is not resolved by the written response provided by the respondent, the student may submit a written appeal to the School Dean. If the grievance is not resolved by the School Dean’s decision, the student may make a written appeal to the Dean of Graduate or Undergraduate Education, and the deal will appoint and convene an Academic Appeals Panel. The decision of the Academic Appeals Panel is final. The results of the academic appeals process will be distributed to all involved parties.

Copies of these rules and regulations are available to students in the Office of the Dean of Students, where staff members are available to assist students in interpreting the rules and regulations.

Incomplete Grade Policy

As per university policy, incomplete grades will be granted only for work unavoidably missed at the semester’s end and only if 70% of the course work has been completed. An incomplete grade must be resolved within eight (8) weeks from the first day of the subsequent long semester. If the required work to complete the course and to remove the incomplete grade is not submitted by the specified deadline, the incomplete grade is changed automatically to a grade of F.

Disability Services

Disability Services The goal of Disability Services is to provide students with disabilities educational opportunities

The goal of Disability Services is to provide students with disabilities educational opportunities equal to those of their non-disabled peers. Disability Services is located in room 1.610 in the Student Union. Office hours are Monday and Thursday, 8:30 a.m. to 6:30 p.m.; Tuesday and Wednesday, 8:30 a.m. to 7:30 p.m.; and Friday, 8:30 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

The contact information for the Office of Disability Services is:

The University of Texas at Dallas, SU 22 PO Box 830688 Richardson, Texas 75083-0688 (972) 883-2098 (voice or TTY) disabilityservice@utdallas.edu

If you anticipate issues related to the format or requirements of this course, please meet with the Coordinator of Disability Services. The Coordinator is available to discuss ways to ensure your full participation in the course. If you determine that formal, disability-related accommodations are necessary, it is very important that you be registered with Disability Services to notify them of your eligibility for reasonable accommodations. Disability Services can then plan how best to coordinate your accommodations.

It is the student’s responsibility to notify his or her professors of the need for such an accommodation. Disability Services provides students with letters to present to faculty members to verify that the student has a disability and needs accommodations. Individuals requiring special accommodation should contact the professor after class or during office hours.

Religious Holy Days

The University of Texas at Dallas will excuse a student from class or other required activities for the travel to and observance of a religious holy day for a religion whose places of worship are exempt from property tax under Section 11.20, Tax Code, Texas Code Annotated.

The student is encouraged to notify the instructor or activity sponsor as soon as possible regarding the absence, preferably in advance of the assignment. The student, so excused, will be allowed to take the exam or complete the assignment within a reasonable time after the absence: a period equal to the length of the absence, up to a maximum of one week. A student who notifies the instructor and completes any missed exam or assignment may not be penalized for the absence. A student who fails to complete the exam or assignment within the prescribed period may receive a failing grade for that exam or assignment.

If a student or an instructor disagrees about the nature of the absence [i.e., for the purpose of observing a religious holy day] or if there is similar disagreement about whether the student has been given a reasonable time to complete any missed assignments or examinations, either the student or the instructor may request a ruling from the chief executive officer of the institution, or his or her designee. The chief executive officer or designee must take into account the legislative intent of TEC 51.911(b), and the student and instructor will abide by the decision of the chief executive officer or designee.

These descriptions and timelines are subject to change at the discretion of the Professor.