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JOHNSON CONTROLS, INC.

ANALYSIS OF BIM
PART 2
ANANTADITYA AIMA 7/4/2011

This part focuses on the linkup between BIM and Energy Modeling. The JCs internal work with respect to energy modeling is highlighted in the report and a project based on eQUEST which is an energy modeling tool has been discussed. Also a comparison of various energy modeling tools has been included in this report.

PART 2

TOPICS TO BE COVERED :

1. Introduction to COEE and Energy Solutions Team at Johnson Controls..........................................

2. Description of Energy Modeling and its link up with BIM................................................................

3. Comparison of Energy Modeling tools............................................................................................

4. E Quest as an Energy Modeling tool as it is used in JC....................................................................

5. Complete description of the live Project based on Energy Modeling of Court House building......

COEE : CENTRE OF EXCELLENCE IN ENGINEERING

Center for Excellence in Engineering ( COEE ) provides engineering services to countries in the entire Asia Pacific Region in the areas of building controls such as HVAC, fire and security , Energy Management and Facility Management services. COEE was established in 2000 as a captive engineering center of Building Efficiency. It employs over 200 engineers across various disciplines .It has two locations in India one in Mumbai and the other centre in Pune for better business continuity and planning . COEE has self sufficient training centers and software testing labs. It has completed over 5000 projects and is currently supporting Energy Solutions and Remote Operations for over 4 years now. CoEE is an engineering and technology solution organization that helps many businesses of Building Efficiency. CoEE has worked on some of Johnson Controls largest projects globally.

COEE HAS OFFERINGS COVERING THE ENTIRE SPECTRUM OF BE LIFECYCLE PERSPECTIVE 1. Facility Life Cycle

Facility Life Cycle

2. BE Portfolio

Systems

Service

BE Portfolio

Energy Solutions

3. COEE Offering

CURRENTLY COEE IS SUPPORTING SEVERAL ASPECTS OF ENERGY SOLUTIONS PROJECTS GLOBALLY

ENERGY MODELING : Energy Modeling is an indispensable part of BIM and is the need of the hour as sustainability in the field of building designing and construction is a key issue nowadays. Energy Modeling is done for the various parameters in a facility including the constructional materials used, the orientation of the building with respect to geographical position, modeling of the different equipment like HVAC, lighting equipment, the window and door location and material for it, the type of flooring , roofing, etc. It focuses on sustainable designs of buildings with the reductions in emission levels. At JC sustainability and building efficiency is the key.

ENERGY MODELING AT COEE : Energy Solution Teams at Pune and Mumbai are involved with the projects related to Energy Modeling eQuest is widely used as the Energy Modeling tool at JC. It is recommended by DOE of America The Energy Modeling is done for commercial buildings. It involves either retrofitting the existing facility or modeling for a new facility Customers include : Hospitals, Malls, Hotels, Schools, Banks and other commercial buildings across Asia from countries like India, Thailand, Indonesia, Philippines, Malaysia, Singapore

Under Energy Modeling the following can be the objectives for the COEE :1.) Model energy consumption by matching the existing operational practices / strategies & correlate with actual consumption variations 2.) Model the building & match the current utility consumptions by making appropriate operations strategies, Apply ECM (Energy Conservation Measures) for replacement of existing systems with energy efficient ones.

ENERGY MODELING AND BUILDING INFORMATION MODELING :The present trend is that the BIM companies that is to say the companies which are the BIM tool suppliers are now actually going on acquiring the energy modelling business as the the two together offer a complete sustainable solution for building design. As an example one may note that Hevacomp software which used to predict energy loads and usage in buildings, had interfaced more closely with building information modeling tools from its new owner, Bentley Systems. Predicting how a building will perform before it is built is the tantalizing promise of building information modeling (BIM) design software. There are some fundamental differences, however, between an energy model and a model used to generate construction documents and threedimensional views of a design, so the vision of real-time feedback on energy performance during design is not yet a reality. Two major BIM software companies, Autodesk and Bentley Systems, have taken a step toward fulfilling that vision in early 2008 by acquiring companies with energy modeling capabilities. In January 2008 Bentley Systems announced that it had acquired Hevacomp, Ltd., a leading provider of mechanical-system load calculations and system sizing for engineers in the U.K. Hevacomp has recently expanded its capabilities to include carbon calculations and to provide energy-use simulations based on the EnergyPlus engine from the U.S. Department of Energy. Our effective part is to make the interface very simple so that ordinary engineers can use it without special training, said Tony Baxter, former managing director of Hevacomp and now Bentleys director of product management for building services and energy analysis. With Bentley as its owner, Hevacomp will now be moving actively into the U.S. and other markets, according to Baxter. Once modifications to address differences in climate and design approaches between the U.S. and U.K. markets are completed, Bentley and Hevacomp will offer Americans a user-friendly interface for the powerful EnergyPlus platform. (A promised EnergyPlus plug-in for Google SketchUp, when it is finally released, may serve this function for architectural elements but not for mechanical systems.) Even as they work to integrate Hevacomp software into Bentleys BIM tools, the companies have no intention of making the relationship exclusive. Were working on smart data connectivity, noted Noah Eckhouse, Bentleys director of business development, but we have no desire to make it a closed system were believers in interoperability. Hevacomps energy-simulation software is available to users of its mechanical-design software for an additional 1,700 (about $3,300) per site (any number of users at one location). At the November 2007 Greenbuild conference, Autodesk presented its vision of real-time performance feedback in a futuristic video of a design process. Working to realize that vision, in
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February 2008 it announced an agreement to purchase Green Building Studio. This Santa Rosa, California company pioneered the concept of energy modeling as a Web service, and its gbXML protocol is widely used to translate information from BIM software to energy-modeling tools. The Web service approach represents a business model around analysis that youll see more of from Audodesk, promises Jay Bhatt, vice president for AEC at Autodesk. Green Building Studio is especially effective for analyzing choices made early in the design process, but Autodesk plans to continue developing its partnership with IES, Ltd., for more sophisticated simulation capabilities, according to Bhatt. At about the same time, Autodesk bought Carmel Software, a developer of mechanicalengineering software based in San Rafael, California. Carmels products include load calculations and system sizing for engineers as well some specialty tools, such as an indoorpollutant-concentration calculator. In the past Carmels tools have been connected to Autodesks Revit software via gbXML. Now Autodesk is working to integrate that software with its design tools. Autodesk has not yet decided whether Carmel software will remain available for purchase independently, according to Bhatt, but Autodesk has taken it off the market for the time being. It will be better featured inside the Audodesk platform than it ever could be on its own, Bhatt said. Bhatt noted that its integration of recently purchased stormwater-modeling software may serve as a model for its approach to the Carmel tools: the Intellisolve software that Autodesk bought in 2007 is no longer available as a separate product, but its capabilities are integrated into the just-released update of Revit Civil 3D. The company is also moving to provide lighting analysis with a new designers version of its 3ds Max film and videogame software. 3ds Max Design can be used to study both daylighting and electrical lighting in Revit models. While gbXML and other protocols have streamlined the data flow from design software to modeling tools, there is no way to automatically transfer changes made on the analysis side back into the design model. Through these acquisitions, Bentley and Autodesk seek to leapfrog that need for data to complete a round trip from one tool to another: referring to the vision illustrated in its video, Bhatt notes that there is no round trip in that conceptthe analysis is happening simultaneously with the design. While BIM is proving itself as a very powerful architectural design and coordination tool, research conducted by Newforma tells us that the limitations identified above represent recurring difficulties in the use of BIM for project-wide design and documentation. Our subsequent analysis shows that rather than being dependent on a single building model, project team members typically rely on a number of purpose-built models including: 3D conceptual design model (created using SketchUp for example) Detailed geometric design model (created using Bentley Architecture, Structural, and HVAC products for example) Structural finite element analysis model (created using STAAD for example)
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Structural steel fabrication model (created using Teklas Xsteel for example) Design coordination model (assembled from multiple sources of design information via NavisWorks, for example) Construction planning and sequencing model (created using Graphisofts Virtual Construction solutions for example) Hospital Equipment inventory model (creating using Codebook for example) Energy analysis model (created using DOE-2 or Energy Plus for example) Fire/life safety and egress model (created using IES virtual building environment for example) Cost model (created using Timberline for example Resource planning model (created using Primavera for example)

So the trend is towards integrating all these models to come out with a proper building project solution. We currently see BIM as the 3D design Model with detailed structural analysis which can then be used for carrying out energy analysis with costing, scheduling, resource planning as mentioned above.

ENERGY MODELING TOOLS COMPARISON :Abstract : For the past 50 years, a wide variety of building energy simulation programs have been developed, enhanced, and are in use throughout the building energy community. This report provides an up to date comparison of the features and capabilities of 20 major building energy simulation programs listed below. The comparison is based on information provided by program developers in the following categories which are also listed below. 1. BLAST 2. Bsim 3. DeST 4. DOE-2 IE 5. ECOTECT 6. Ener-Win 7. Energy Express 8. Energy 10 9. Energy Plus 10. eQuest 11. ESP 12. HAP 13. HEED 14. IDAICE 15. IES 16. Power Domus 17. SUNREL 18. Tas 19. TRACE 20. TRNSYS COMPARISON BASIS 1. General Modeling Features 2. Zone Loads 3. Building Envelope, Daylighting and Solar 4. Infilteration, Ventilation, Room-air and Multizone Airflow 5. Renewable Energy Systems 6. Electrical Systems and Equipment 7. HVAC Systems 8. HVAC Equipment 9. Environmental Emissions 10. Climate Data Availability 11. Economic Evaluation 12. Results Reporting

Abstract :- Contd The comparison has been taken from a paper : CONTRASTING THE CAPABILITIES OF BUILDING ENERGY PERFORMANCE SIMULATION PROGRAMS which is a joint report by 1. Drury B Crawly (U.S DOE, Washington DC, USA) 2. Jon W. Hand (Energy System Research Unit, University of Strathclyde, Scotland, UK 3. Michal Kummert University of Wisconsin-Madison Solar Energy Laboratory Madison, Wisconsin, USA 4. Brent T. GriffithNational Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA

This report was published in July 2005 This report is sponsored jointly by the United States Department of Energy, University of Strathclyde, and University of Wisconsin. None of the sponsoring organizations, nor any of their employees, makes any warranty, express or implied, or assumes any legal liability or responsibility for the accuracy, completeness, or usefulness of any information, apparatus, product, or process disclosed, or represents that its use would not infringe privately owned rights. Reference herein to any specific commercial product, process, or service by trade name, trademark, manufacturer, or otherwise does not necessarily constitute or imply its endorsement, recommendation, or favoring by any of the sponsoring organizations. The views and opinions of authors expressed herein do not necessarily state or reflect those of the sponsoring organizations.

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ENERGY MODELING TOOLS COMPARISON

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Table 1 General Modeling Features

Blast

BSim

DeST

DOE-2.1E

Eco Tect

Ener-Win

Energy Express

Energy-10

Energy Plus

eQUEST

ESP-r

HAP

HEED

IDA ICE

IAS <VE>

PowerDom us

SUNREL

Tas

TRACE

TRANSYS

1.Simulation Solution

Sequential Loads, system, plant calculation without feedback Simultaneo us loads, system and plant solution Space temperature based on loadssystems feedback Floating Room Temperatur e 2. Full Geometric Description Walls,

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roofs, floors Windows, skylights, doors, and external shading Multi-sided polygons Import building geometry from CAD programs Export building geometry to CAD programs Import/expo rt model to other simulation programs Number of surfaces, zones, systems, and equipment unlimited 3. Simple building models for HVAC system simulation Import

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calculated or measured loads Simple models (single lumped capacitance per zone)

Table 2 ZONE LOADS Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Heat balance calculation38 Building material moisture adsorption/desorption4 0 Element conduction solution method Frequency domain (admittance method) Time response factor (transfer functions)

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Table 2 ZONE LOADS Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Finite difference / volume method Interior surface convection Dependent on temperatur e

Dependent on air flow

Dependent on CFDbased surface heat coefficient Internal thermal mass Human thermal comfort49

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Fanger Pierce two-node MRT (Mean Radiant Temperatur Radiant discomfort5 1

Simultaneo us CFD solution PAQ (Perceived Air Quality)53 Automatic design day sizing calculations Dry bulb temperatur e Dew point temperatur e or relative humidity Userspecified55

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Table 3 Building Envelope, Daylightin g and solar

Blast

BSim

DeST

DOE-2.1E

Eco Tect

Ener-Win

Energy Express

Energy-10

Energy Plus

eQUEST

ESP-r

HAP

HEED

IDA ICE

IAS <VE>

PowerDom us

SUNREL

Tas

TRACE

TRANSYS

Solar analysis Beam solar radiation reflection from outside and inside window reveals Solar gain through blinds accounts for different transmittan ces for sky and ground diffuse solar Solar gain and daylighting calculation s account for inter-

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reflections from external building component s and other buildings Creation of optimized shading devices Shading surface transmittan ce Shading device scheduling Userspecified shading control Bidirectional shading devices Shading of sky IR by obstruction s Insolation analysis

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timeinvariant and/or user stipulated6 2

distribution computed at each hour64

distribution computed at each timestep67 Beam solar radiation passes through interior windows (doubleenvelope) Track insolation losses (outside or other zones) Advanced fenestration

Controllabl e window blinds

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Betweenglass shades and blinds

Electrochro mic glazing

Thermochr omic glazing Datasets of window types74

WINDOW 5 calculation s

WINDOW 4.1 data import Dirt correction factor for glass solar and visible transmittan ce Movable storm windows Bi-

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directional shading devices Window blind model82 Userspecified daylighting control Window gas fill as single gas or gas mixture General Envelope Calculations Outside surface convection algorithm o BLAST/T ARP o DOE2 o MoWiTT o ASHRAE simple

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Sky model

Isotropic87

Anisotropic 89 Userselectable Daylighting illumination and controls Interior illumination from windows and skylights Stepped or dimming electric lighting controls93 Glare simulation and control

Table 4 Infiltration, Ventilation, Room Air and Multizone Airflow Single zone infiltration

Blast

BSim

DeST

DOE-2.1E

Eco Tect

Ener-Win

Energy Express

Energy-10

Energy Plus

eQUEST

ESP-r

HAP

HEED

IDA ICE

IAS <VE>

PowerDomus

SUNREL

Tas

TRACE

TRANSYS

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Automatic calculation of wind pressure coefficients Natural ventilation10 9 Hybrid natural and mechanical ventilation Window opening for natural ventilation controllable1 12 Multizone airflow (via pressure network model) Displacement ventilation Mix of flow networks and CFD domains Contaminants , mycotoxins (mold growth)

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Table 5 Renewable Energy Systems

Blast

BSim

DeST

DOE-2.1E

Eco Tect

Ener-Win

Energy Express

Energy-10

Energy Plus

eQUEST

ESP-r

HAP

HEED

IDA ICE

IAS <VE>

PowerDom us

SUNREL

Tas

TRACE

TRANSYS

Trombe wall Rock bin thermal storage Solar thermal collectors Glazed flat plate Unglazed flat plate (heating and cooling) Evacuated tube Unglazed transpired solar collector High temperature concentratin g

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collectors12 3 Userconfigured solar systems124 Integral collector storage systems Photovoltai c power Hydrogen systems126 Wind power

Table 6 Electrical Systems and Equipment Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Electric load distribution and management On-site generation and utility electricity management including demand Renewable

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components127 Power generators Internal combustion engine generator Combustion turbine Microgeneration130 integrated with thermal simulation Grid connection

Electric conductors131 Building power loads134

Table 7 HVAC Systems Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Discrete HVAC components1 35 Idealized HVAC systems Userconfigurable HVAC

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systems Air loops140 Fluid loops141 Run-around, primary and secondary fluid loops with independent pumps and controls Fluid loop pumping power143 Pipe flowpressure networks145 Air distribution system146 Multiple supply air plenums Simplified demandcontrolled ventilation Ventilation rate per occupant and floor area

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Ventilation air flow schedule Userdefined ventilation control strategy150 CO2 modeling CO2 zone concentration s, mechanical and natural air path transport CO2 based demandcontrolled ventilation DX system o Heating/coolin g coils o Coil latent capacity degradation16 1 Furnace162 Air-to-air packaged heat pump

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TRANSYS

TRACE

Tas

SUNREL

PowerDom us IAS <VE>

IDA ICE

HEED

HAP

ESP-r

eQUEST

Energy Plus

Energy-10

Energy Express Ener-Win

Eco Tect

DOE-2.1E

DeST

BSim

Blast

Electric heating coil

Gas heating coil

Water cooling coil

Water heating coil

Water-to-air packaged heat pump

Table 8 HVAC Equipment

Coils

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Detailed fin/tube water cooling coil DX coil o Bypass factor cooling empirical o Multispeed cooling empirical o Heating empirical o Coil frost control Water-to-air heat pump165 Radiative/convect ive unit Baseboard (electric) Baseboard (hydronic) Low temperature radiant o Hydronic167 o Electric169 High temperature radiant (gas,

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electric) Desiccant dehumidifier (solid) Humidifier Steam (electric) Humidifier water consumption Humidity control171 Cooling coils in combination with air-to-air heat exchanger for improved dehumidification performance

Table 8 HVAC Equipme nt

Blast

BSim

DeST

DOE-2.1E

Eco Tect

Ener-Win

Energy Express

Energy-10

Energy Plus

eQUEST

ESP-r

HAP

HEED

IDA ICE

IAS <VE>

PowerDom us

SUNREL

Tas

TRACE

TRANSYS

High humidity control (DX or chilled

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water coils) Fans Constant volume Variable volume Exhaust Pumps Constant speed Variable speed Multistage Directcouple to power source

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Table 9 Environment al Emissions Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Power plant energy emissions On-site energy emissions Major greenhouse gases (CO2, CO, CH4, NOx) Carbon equivalent of greenhouse gases Criteria pollutants (CO, NOx, SO2, PM, Pb) Ozone precursors (CH4, NMVOC, NH3) Hazardous pollutants (Pb, Hg) Water use in

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power generation High- and low-level nuclear waste Pollutant emissions factors206

Table 10 Climate Data Availability Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Weather data provided With the program207 Separately downloadable Generate hourly data from monthly averages Estimate diffuse radiation from global

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radiation

Weather data processing and editing Weather data formats directly read by program Any userspecified format EnergyPlus/ES P-r215 European Test Reference Year216 Typical Meteorological Year217 Typical Meteorological Year 2220 Solar and Wind Energy Resource Assessment222 Weather Year for Energy Calculations 2223

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Solar and Meteorological Surface Observation International Weather for Energy Calculations22 5 Japan AMeDAS weather data226 DOE-2 text format BLAST text format ESP-r text format ECOTECT WEA format

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Table 11 Economic Evaluatio n

Blast

BSim

DeST

DOE-2.1E

Eco Tect

Ener-Win

Energy Express

Energy-10

Energy Plus

eQUEST

ESP-r

HAP

HEED

IDA ICE

IAS <VE>

PowerDom us

SUNREL

Tas

TRACE

TRANSYS

Energy Costs Simple energy and demand charges Complex energy tariffs227 Scheduled variation in all rate component s User selectable billing dates Life-cycle costs Componen t and equipment cost estimating

Standard

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lifecycle costing

Table 12 Results Reporting Blast BSim DeST DOE-2.1E Eco Tect Ener-Win Energy Express Energy-10 Energy Plus eQUEST ESP-r HAP HEED IDA ICE IAS <VE> PowerDom us SUNREL Tas TRACE TRANSYS

Standard reports Userdefined reports Userselectable report format Commaseparated value Text Word Tabseparated value

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HTML Graph Statistics Load, system, and plant variables reportable at time step with daily, monthly, and annual aggregation Standardize d binned variable report Timebinned variable Variable versus variable Meters Energy end-uses233 Peak demand

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Peak demand period userselectable23 4 Consumptio n by energy source Component s userassignable to any meter Multiple levels of submetering Auto-sizing report Automatic generation of energy balance checks237 Visual surface output (walls, windows, floors, roofs)

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Energy Modeling of A Court House Building Project in Hawaii


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eQUEST As An Energy Modeling Tool : eQUEST allows us to perform detailed analysis of todays state-of-the-art building design technologies using todays most sophisticated building energy use simulation techniques but without requiring extensive experience in the "art" of building performance modeling. This is accomplished by combining a building creation wizard, an energy efficiency measure (EEM) wizard, and a graphical results display module with a simulation "engine" derived from an advanced version of the DOE-2 building energy use simulation program. After two decades of continuous development and enhancement, DOE-2 is the most widely recognized and trusted building energy simulation program available today. eQUEST will guide us through the creation of a detailed DOE-2 building model, allow us to automatically perform parametric simulations of our design alternatives, and provide with intuitive graphics that highlight the performance of proposed design alternatives within a fraction of the time previously required for professional-level analysis. The Building Creation Wizard : Sophisticated energy use simulation programs have been in existence for more than two decades. Unfortunately, those programs have always required detailed knowledge of both the ART of building energy use analysis and the SCIENCE of the particular energy analysis program itself. The result has been that only specialists could reliably use the sophisticated simulation programs. The level of effort and associated expense generally meant that simulation analysis occurred only once during the design process, most frequently nearer the end of the process, when the most detailed inputs were available. Such a process was not only expensive it did little to facilitate collaborative energy efficient design (i.e., involving several design team members) throughout the entire design process (i.e., from schematic through final design). The Building Creation Wizard acts as an expert modeling advisor. eQUEST 3.0 helps to overcome past barriers to simulation by incorporating two building creation wizards: the Schematic Design Wizard (the Schematic Wizard) and the Design Development Wizard (the DD Wizard), as well as an Energy Efficiency Measure wizard (the EEM Wizard). Its like having an expert advisor, operating between you and the DOE-2 energy simulation program. Either Wizard will guide you through a series of steps designed to allow you to fully describe the principal energyrelated features of our design. The wizards then create a detailed description of the proposed design as required DOE-2. At each step of describing your building design, the wizards provide easy-to-understand choices of component and system options.
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Two types of building wizards in eQuest : -

Design Development Wizard

Design Development Wizard

1. Schematic Design Wizard : The sequence of steps the wizard takes you through allows you to describe buildings architectural features and its heating, ventilating, and airconditioning (HVAC) equipment. The steps are organized so that the most general project information is requested first (Figure 1), followed by more detailed architectural and HVAC information (Figures 2 and 3).

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Fig 2

Fig 1

When to use the Schematic Design Wizard? The Schematic Wizard is designed to support the earliest design phase, when information is most limited. Although time may also be limited, with even a little practice, you will find that you can explore the energy impacts of numerous design features in an hour or less. The Schematic Wizard is also well suited for smaller, simpler structures. Other features include the following:
Building geometry can rely on predefined generic shapes, orcustom user input via a drawing tablet, including importing &tracing DWG plan files. Fig 3 Currently, the Schematic Wizard is limited to one building shell and one footprint, i.e., only one structure with all floors in the structure sharing the same basic footprint shape and thermal zoning pattern. Up to two different types of HVAC systems can be described in any one Schematic Wizard project (e.g., built-up chilled water plus rooftop DX units). There are 60+ HVAC system types to choose from. The description of internal loads relies on generic, code-based activity area types having default lighting and equipment power densities. Defaults, categorized by building type , are provided for ALL wizard inputs

Design Development Wizard (DD Wizard) ? The Design Development Wizard (the DD Wizard) is designed for later, more detailed design (i.e., during the Design Development phase), when more detailed information is available. It is also better suited for larger, more complicated structures, or for use with more detailed internal loads, schedules, and HVAC system assignment requirements. Users may begin their projects using the DD Wizard, or, if they began their building simulation project using the Schematic Wizard, they can elect at any time to continue their project analysis and development using the DD Wizard, e.g., as more detailed project information becomes available. Other features include the following:
In DD Wizard users can describe multiple building shell components, each with similar or very different geometry, shell properties, and HVAC zoning and/or systems. Separate building shell components may be stacked ( eg to form setback mid- or high-rise designs), or placed adjacent to one another ( eg to form separate wings or a campus of separate structures). There is no limit on the number of HVAC system types that can be used in a single project. The description of internal loads can use generic, code-based activity area types ( as in the Schematic design), or users may provide much more detailed, even zone-by-zone, descriptions of internal loads and HVAC system assignments. Building schedule information is in the form of hour-by-hour descriptions of building occupancy and equipment usage profiles.

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The Energy-Efficiency Measures (EEM) Wizard helps us quickly, easily,and reliably explore the energy performance of your preferred design alternatives: The greatest value that energy simulation can provide to the building design professional is reliable guidance in determining the energy performance of design alternatives. After creating a new building description (i.e., using the Building Wizard), you can launch the EEM Wizard to quickly describe up to nine design alternatives to your base building description. You can then automatically simulate any or all of these alternative cases and view the simulation results as either individual or comparative graphs or in a detailed parametric tabular report. Using the EEM Wizard, designers can easily weigh the energy impacts and tradeoffs of their design options. Building energy performance simulation was never so quick, easy, and reliable. Once a simulation has been completed, you visualize the results through a number of graphical formats. Overall building estimated energy use can be seen on an annual or monthly basis. Detailed performance of individual building components may also be examined. Figure 5, for example, shows the monthly electrical and gas consumption for a single building simulation and the fraction of that consumption attributed to each of the end-use categories. Figure 6, on the other hand, provides a pair of comparison graphics with associated tabular results that show the monthly electrical and gas consumption for each of five building EEM simulations.

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The output of the tool with or without energy measures comes in the form below from which one can know the electricity consumption and the energy use pattern in the facility for a period of an year. This also enables to identify the areas where the bill can be reduced with the installation of energy saving equipment etc.

Figure:

Monthly electrical and gas consumption, by end use

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Figure: 3D View of eQUEST Model

Computer Requirements: To use eQUEST you need a PC with the following: Windows 95, 98, ME, NT, 2000, or XP (Windows 2000 or XP is recommended), having at least 64 Megabytes of RAM, 100 Megabytes of free hard drive space and a display capable of 800x600 resolution at 256 colors (or greater). You should also have internet access to allow the download of additional weather files and updates to new versions of eQUEST as they become available.

eQUEST Availability, Cost, and Technical Support: eQUEST is provided FREE by courtesy of the State of California's Energy Design Resources program and is available for downloading from www.energydesignresources.com. Technical support is available via email at equest@doe2.com.

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Interoperability: eQUEST has recently added DWG import capabilities. This provides users with the ability to import DWG files (and soon, DXF files), then use them as a guide to trace the shape of the building footprint and zoning in a drawing module.

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THE COURT HOUSE PROJECT


INTRODUCTION: After learning to operate the eQUEST software and few of its features it was time to actually model a building and do its energy analysis. So I was given a project by my guide under the guidance of MR Tulshiram Waghmare who works in the Energy Solutions Team of COEE. The task was to energy model the building of the courthouse and the customer had actually submitted the structural designs, engineering drawings of the facility which was already standing. Now with the help of such drawings I had to extract the information which had to be used as the input in eQUEST. After inputting the the required information in the design development wizard of the program, the next step was to simulate the energy performance and estimate the energy demand for the year. After this there were few energy efficiency measures which I had introduced to finally come out with reduced energy consumption in 4 scenarios. Information from the drawings and designs submitted by the customer included: 1. The address of the facility necessary for loading the weather file which takes into account the temperatures for the location on the daily basis. 2. The orientation of the facility with respect to the geographical axis for estimating the insolation in every room. 3. The building area and the number of floors. 4. The building footprint, which involves the various zones which need air conditioning 5. Floor height 6. Roof and wall dimensions and the construction material for them. 7. Floor construction material used along with the type of finish. 8. The windows location and glass properties. 9. Door dimensions and material properties. 10. Building operation schedule. 11. Allocation of AHU and FCU (the air conditioning equipment with its properties) 12. Interior lighting loads and profiles 13. Office equipment loads and profiles. The Energy Measures taken involved : 1. Internal lighting changed from usual to CFLs. (success) 2. Window Glass changed from Single/Tint clear to double/tint clear. (success) 3. AHU system changed and added on with thermostat control with cooling temperature raised from 70 F to 80 F package. (success)
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4. Chilled water control set point temperature increased from 44 to 48 F with max limit of 58 F. (success)

RESULTS: 1. Baseline Result:

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2. Lighting Power EEM:

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3. Window Glass Type EEM

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4. Thermostat Management EEM :

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5. CHW Control EEM :

REFERENCES: 1. Presentations of Johnson Controls COEE division given to me by my guides. 2. Article published by Nadiv Malin on BIM Companies Acquiring Energy Modeling Capabilities dated 04/03/08 (Link : http://greensource.construction.com/news/080403BIMModeling.asp)
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3. A joint report on Contrasting The Capabilities of Building Energy Performance Simulation Programs by Drury B Crawly (U.S DOE, Washington DC, USA), Jon W. Hand (Energy System Research Unit, University of Strathclyde, Scotland, UK, Michal Kummert, University of Wisconsin-Madison Solar Energy Laboratory Madison, Wisconsin, USA, Brent T. Griffith, National Renewable Energy Laboratory Golden, Colorado, USA . Dated July 2005 4. eQUEST help files within the software itself.

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