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Virtual memory is a feature of an operating system that enables a process to use a memory (RAM) address space that is independent

of other processes running in the same system, and use a space that is larger than the actual amount of RAM present, temporarily relegating some contents from RAM to a disk, with little or no overhead. In a system using virtual memory, the physical memory is divided into equally-sized pages. The memory addressed by a process is also divided into logical pages of the same size. When a process references a memory address, the memory manager fetches from disk the page that includes the referenced address, and places it in a vacant physical page in the RAM. Subsequent references within that logical page are routed to the physical page. When the process references an address from another logical page, it too is fetched into a vacant physical page and becomes the target of subsequent similar references. If the system does not have a free physical page, the memory manager swaps out a logical page into the swap area - usually a paging file on disk (in Windows XP: pagefile.sys), and copies (swaps in) the requested logical page into the now-vacant physical page. The page swapped out may belong to a different process. There are many strategies for choosing which page is to be swapped out. (One is LRU: the Least Recently Used page is swapped out.) If a page is swapped out and then is referenced, it is swapped back in, from the swap area, Wikipedia on Answers.com:

Virtual memory
Top Home > Library > Miscellaneous > Wikipedia This article is about the computational technique. For the TBN game show, see Virtual Memory (game show). This article includes a list of references, but its sources remain unclear because it has insufficient inline citations. Please help to improve this article by introducing more precise citations where appropriate. (December 2010)

Virtual memory combines active RAM and inactive memory in disk form into a large range of contiguous addresses. In computing, virtual memory is a memory management technique developed for multitasking kernels. This technique virtualizes a computer architecture's various forms of computer data storage (such as random-access memory and disk storage), allowing a program to be designed as though there is only one kind of memory, "virtual" memory, which behaves like directly addressable read/write memory (RAM). Most modern operating systems that support virtual memory also run each process in its own dedicated address space, allowing a program to be designed as though it has sole access to the virtual memory. However, some older operating systems (such as OS/VS1 and OS/VS2 SVS) and even modern ones (such as IBM i) are single address space operating systems that run all processes in a single address space composed of virtualized memory. Systems that employ virtual memory:

use hardware memory more efficiently than do systems without virtual memory.[citation
needed]

make the programming of applications easier: o by hiding fragmentation, o by delegating to the kernel the burden of managing the memory hierarchy (there is no need for the program to handle overlays explicitly),

and, when each process is run in its own dedicated address space, by obviating the need to relocate program code or to access memory with relative addressing.

Memory virtualization is a generalization of the concept of virtual memory. Virtual memory is an integral part of a computer architecture; all implementations (excluding[dubious discuss] emulators and virtual machines) require hardware support, typically in the form of a memory management unit built into the CPU. Consequently, older operating systems, such as those for the mainframes of the 1960s, and those for personal computers of the early to mid 1980s (e.g. DOS),[1] generally have no virtual memory functionality,[dubious discuss] though notable exceptions for mainframes of the 1960s include:

The Atlas Supervisor for the Atlas. MCP for the Burroughs B5000. TSS/360 and CP/CMS for the IBM System/360 Model 67. Multics for the GE 645. The Time Sharing Operating System for the RCA Spectra 70/46.

and the Apple Lisa is an example of a personal computer of the 1980s which features virtual memory. Embedded systems and other special-purpose computer systems that require very fast and/or very consistent response times may opt not to use virtual memory due to decreased determinism; virtual memory systems trigger unpredictable interrupts that may produce unwanted "jitter" during I/O operations. This is because embedded hardware costs are often kept low by implementing all such operations with software (a technique called bit-banging) rather than with dedicated hardware. In any case, embedded systems usually have little use for complicated memory hierarchies. Contents

1 History 2 Paged virtual memory o 2.1 Page tables o 2.2 Paging supervisor o 2.3 Pinned pages 2.3.1 Virtual-real operation o 2.4 Thrashing 3 Segmented virtual memory 4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External links

History

In the 1940s and 1950s, all larger programs had to contain logic for managing primary and secondary storage, such as overlaying. Virtual memory was therefore introduced not only to extend primary memory, but to make such an extension as easy as possible for programmers to use.[2] To allow for multiprogramming and multitasking, many early systems divided memory between multiple programs without virtual memory, such as early models of the PDP-10 via registers. Paging was first developed at the University of Manchester as a way to extend the Atlas Computer's working memory by combining its 16 thousand words of primary core memory with an additional 96 thousand words of secondary drum memory. The first Atlas was commissioned in 1962 but working prototypes of paging had been developed by 1959.[2](p2)[3][4] In 1961, the Burroughs Corporation independently released the first commercial computer with virtual memory, the B5000, with segmentation rather than paging.[5][6] Before virtual memory could be implemented in mainstream operating systems, many problems had to be addressed. Dynamic address translation required expensive and difficult to build specialized hardware; initial implementations slowed down slightly access to memory.[2] There were worries that new system-wide algorithms utilizing secondary storage would be less effective than previously used application-specific algorithms. By 1969, the debate over virtual memory for commercial computers was over;[2] an IBM research team led by David Sayre showed that their virtual memory overlay system consistently worked better than the best manually controlled systems.[citation needed] The first minicomputer to introduce virtual memory was the Norwegian NORD-1; during the 1970s, other minicomputers implemented virtual memory, notably VAX models running VMS. Virtual memory was introduced to the x86 architecture with the protected mode of the Intel 80286 processor, but its segment swapping technique scaled poorly to larger segment sizes. The Intel 80386 introduced paging support underneath the existing segmentation layer, enabling the page fault exception to chain with other exceptions without double fault. However, loading segment descriptors was an expensive operation, causing operating system designers to rely strictly on paging rather than a combination of paging and segmentation.

Paged virtual memory


This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (December 2010) Nearly all implementations of virtual memory divide a virtual address space into pages, blocks of contiguous virtual memory addresses. Pages are usually at least 4 kilobytes in size; systems with large virtual address ranges or amounts of real memory generally use larger page sizes.

Page tables
Page tables are used to translate the virtual addresses seen by the application into physical addresses used by the hardware to process instructions; such hardware that handles this specific translation is often known as the memory management unit. Each entry in the page table holds a

flag indicating whether the corresponding page is in real memory or not. If it is in real memory, the page table entry will contain the real memory address at which the page is stored. When a reference is made to a page by the hardware, if the page table entry for the page indicates that it is not currently in real memory, the hardware raises a page fault exception, invoking the paging supervisor component of the operating system. Systems can have one page table for the whole system, separate page tables for each application and segment, a tree of page tables for large segments or some combination of these. If there is only one page table, different applications running at the same time use different parts of a single range of virtual addresses. If there are multiple page or segment tables, there are multiple virtual address spaces and concurrent applications with separate page tables redirect to different real addresses.

Paging supervisor
This part of the operating system creates and manages page tables. If the hardware raises a page fault exception, the paging supervisor accesses secondary storage, returns the page that has the virtual address that resulted in the page fault, updates the page tables to reflect the physical location of the virtual address and tells the translation mechanism to restart the request. When all physical memory is already in use, the paging supervisor must free a page in primary storage to hold the swapped-in page. The supervisor uses one of a variety of page replacement algorithms such as least recently used to determine which page to free.

Pinned pages
Operating systems have memory areas that are pinned (never swapped to secondary storage). For example, interrupt mechanisms rely on an array of pointers to their handlers, such as I/O completion and page fault. If the pages containing these pointers or the code that they invoke were pageable, interrupt-handling would become far more complex and time-consuming, particularly in the case of page fault interrupts. Hence, some part of the page table structures is not pageable. Some pages may be pinned for short periods of time, others may be pinned for long periods of time, and still others may need to be permanently pinned. For example:

The paging supervisor code and drivers for secondary storage devices on which pages reside must be permanently pinned, as otherwise paging wouldn't even work because the necessary code wouldn't be available. Timing-dependent components may be pinned to avoid variable paging delays. Data buffers that are accessed directly by, say, peripheral devices that use direct memory access or I/O channels must reside in pinned pages while the I/O operation is in progress because such devices and the buses to which they are attached expect to find data buffers located at physical memory addresses; regardless of whether the bus has a memory management unit for I/O, transfers cannot be stopped if a page fault occurs and then

restarted when the page fault has been processed. In IBM's operating systems for System/370 and successor systems, the term is "fixed", and pages may be long-term fixed, or may be short-term fixed. Control structures are often long-term fixed (measured in wall-clock time, i.e., time measured in seconds, rather than time measured in less than one second intervals) whereas I/O buffers are usually short-term fixed (usually measured in significantly less than wall-clock time, possibly for a few milliseconds). Indeed, the OS has a special facility for "fast fixing" these short-term fixed data buffers (fixing which is performed without resorting to a time-consuming Supervisor Call instruction). Additionally, the OS has yet another facility for converting an application from being long-term fixed to being fixed for an indefinite period, possibly for days, months or even years (however, this facility implicitly requires that the application firstly be swapped-out, possibly from preferred-memory, or a mixture of preferred- and non-preferred memory, and secondly be swapped-in to non-preferred memory where it resides for the duration, however long that might be; this facility utilizes a documented Supervisor Call instruction). Virtual-real operation In OS/VS1 and similar OSes, some parts of systems memory are managed in virtual-real mode, where every virtual address corresponds to a real address, specifically interrupt mechanisms, paging supervisor and tables in older systems, and application programs using non-standard I/O management. For example, IBM's z/OS has 3 modes (virtual-virtual, virtual-real and virtualfixed).[7][page needed]

Thrashing
When paging is used, a problem called "thrashing" can occur, in which the computer spends an unsuitable amount of time swapping pages to and from a backing store, hence slowing down useful work. Adding real memory is the simplest response, but improving application design, scheduling, and memory usage can help.

Segmented virtual memory


Some systems, such as the Burroughs B5500,[8] do not use paging; instead, they use segmentation, dividing virtual address spaces into variable-length segments. A virtual address here consists of a segment number and an offset within the segment. The Intel 80286 supports a similar segmentation scheme as an option, but it is little used. Segmentation and paging are meldable by dividing each segment into pages; systems with this memory structure, such as Multics and IBM System/38, are usually paging-predominant, segmentation providing memory protection.[9][10][11] In the Intel 80386 and later IA-32 processors, the segments reside in a 32-bit linear, paged address space. Segments can be moved in and out of that space; pages there can "page" in and out of main memory, providing two levels of virtual memory; few if any operating systems do so, instead using only paging. Early non-hardware-assisted x86 virtualization solutions combined paging and segmentation because x86 paging offers only two protection domains whereas a

VMM / guest OS / guest applications stack needs three.[12]:22 The difference between paging and segmentation systems is not only about memory division; segmentation is visible to user processes, as part of memory model semantics. Hence, instead of memory that looks like a single large vector, it is structured into multiple spaces. This difference has important consequences; a segment is not a page with variable length or a simple way to lengthen the address space. Segmentation that can provide a single-level memory model in which there is no differentiation between process memory and file system consists of only a list of segments (files) mapped into the process's potential address space.[13] This is not the same as the mechanisms provided by calls such as mmap and Win32's MapViewOfFile, because inter-file pointers do not work when mapping files into semi-arbitrary places. In Multics, a file (or a segment from a multi-segment file) is mapped into a segment in the address space, so files are always mapped at a segment boundary. A file's linkage section can contain pointers for which an attempt to load the pointer into a register or make an indirect reference through it causes a trap. The unresolved pointer contains an indication of the name of the segment to which the pointer refers and an offset within the segment; the handler for the trap maps the segment into the address space, puts the segment number into the pointer, changes the tag field in the pointer so that it no longer causes a trap, and returns to the code where the trap occurred, re-executing the instruction that caused the trap.[14] This eliminates the need for a linker completely[2] and works when different processes map the same file into different places in their private address spaces.

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CACHE MEMORY
Cache (pronounced cash) memory is extremely fast memory that is built into a computers central processing unit (CPU), or located next to it on a separate chip. The CPU uses cache memory to store instructions that are repeatedly required to run programs, improving overall system speed. The advantage of cache memory is that the CPU does not have to use the motherboards system bus for data transfer. Whenever data must be passed through the system bus, the data transfer speed slows to the motherboards capability. The CPU can process data much faster by avoiding the bottleneck created by the system bus. As it happens, once most programs are open and running, they use very few resources. When these resources are kept in cache, programs can operate more quickly and efficiently. All else being equal, cache is so effective in system performance that a computer running a fast CPU with little cache can have lower benchmarks than a system running a somewhat slower CPU with more cache. Cache built into the CPU itself is referred to as Level 1 (L1) cache. Cache that resides on a separate chip next to the CPU is called Level 2 (L2) cache. Some CPUs have both L1 and L2 cache built-in and designate the separate cache chip as Level 3 (L3) cache. Cache that is built into the CPU is faster than separate cache, running at the speed of the microprocessor itself. However, separate cache is still roughly twice as fast as Random Access Memory (RAM). Cache is more expensive than RAM, but it is well worth getting a CPU and motherboard with built-in cache in order to maximize system performance.

Disk caching applies the same principle to the hard disk that memory caching applies to the CPU. Frequently accessed hard disk data is stored in a separate segment of RAM in order to avoid having to retrieve it from the hard disk over and over. In this case, RAM is faster than the platter technology used in conventional hard disks. This situation will change, however, as hybrid hard disks become ubiquitous. These disks have built-in flash memory caches. Eventually, hard drives will be 100% flash drives, eliminating the need for RAM disk caching, as flash memory is faster than RAM

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In computer engineering, a cache ( /k/ kash[1]) is a component that transparently stores data so that future requests for that data can be served faster. The data that is stored within a cache might be values that have been computed earlier or duplicates of original values that are stored elsewhere. If requested data is contained in the cache (cache hit), this request can be served by simply reading the cache, which is comparatively faster. Otherwise (cache miss), the data has to be recomputed or fetched from its original storage location, which is comparatively slower. Hence, the more requests can be served from the cache the faster the overall system performance is. To be cost efficient and to enable an efficient use of data, caches are relatively small. Nevertheless, caches have proven themselves in many areas of computing because access patterns in typical computer applications have locality of reference. References exhibit temporal locality if data is requested again that has been recently requested already. References exhibit spatial locality if data is requested that is physically stored close to data that has been requested already.

Diagram of a CPU memory cache

[edit] Operation
Hardware implements cache as a block of memory for temporary storage of data likely to be used again. CPUs and hard drives frequently use a cache, as do web browsers and web servers.

A cache is made up of a pool of entries. Each entry has a datum (a nugget (piece) of data) - a copy of the same datum in some backing store. Each entry also has a tag, which specifies the identity of the datum in the backing store of which the entry is a copy. When the cache client (a CPU, web browser, operating system) needs to access a datum presumed to exist in the backing store, it first checks the cache. If an entry can be found with a tag matching that of the desired datum, the datum in the entry is used instead. This situation is known as a cache hit. So, for example, a web browser program might check its local cache on disk to see if it has a local copy of the contents of a web page at a particular URL. In this example, the URL is the tag, and the contents of the web page is the datum. The percentage of accesses that result in cache hits is known as the hit rate or hit ratio of the cache. The alternative situation, when the cache is consulted and found not to contain a datum with the desired tag, has become known as a cache miss. The previously uncached datum fetched from the backing store during miss handling is usually copied into the cache, ready for the next access. During a cache miss, the CPU usually ejects some other entry in order to make room for the previously uncached datum. The heuristic used to select the entry to eject is known as the replacement policy. One popular replacement policy, "least recently used" (LRU), replaces the least recently used entry (see cache algorithm). More efficient caches compute use frequency against the size of the stored contents, as well as the latencies and throughputs for both the cache and the backing store. This works well for larger amounts of data, longer latencies and slower throughputs, such as experienced with a hard drive and the Internet, but is not efficient for use with a CPU cache.[citation needed]

[edit] Writing Policies

A Write-Through cache with No-Write Allocation A Write-Back cache with Write Allocation

When a system writes a datum to the cache, it must at some point write that datum to the backing store as well. The timing of this write is controlled by what is known as the write policy.

There are two basic writing approaches:


Write-through - Write is done synchronously both to the cache and to the backing store. Write-back (or Write-behind) - Writing is done only to the cache. A modified cache block is written back to the store, just before it is replaced.

Write-back cache is more complex to implement, since it needs to track which of its locations have been written over, and mark them as dirty for later writing to the backing store. The data in these locations are written back to the backing store only when they are evicted from the cache, an effect referred to as a lazy write. For this reason, a read miss in a write-back cache (which requires a block to be replaced by another) will often require two memory accesses to service: one to write the replaced data from the cache back to the store, and then one to retrieve the needed datum. Other policies may also trigger data write-back. The client may make many changes to a datum in the cache, and then explicitly notify the cache to write back the datum.

Since that on write operations, no actual data are needed back, there are two approaches for situations of write-misses:

Write allocate (aka Fetch on write) - Datum at the missed-write location is loaded to cache, followed by a write-hit operation. In this approach, write misses are similar to read-misses. No-write allocate (aka Write-no-allocate, Write around) - Datum at the missed-write location is not loaded to cache, and is written directly to the backing store. In this approach, actually only system reads are being cached.

Both write-through and write-back policies can use either of these write-miss policies, but usually they are paired in this way:

A write-back cache uses write allocate, hoping for a subsequent writes (or even reads) to the same location, which is now cached. A write-through cache uses no-write allocate. Here, subsequent writes have no advantage, since they still need to be written directly to the backing store.

Entities other than the cache may change the data in the backing store, in which case the copy in the cache may become out-of-date or stale. Alternatively, when the client updates the data in the

cache, copies of those data in other caches will become stale. Communication protocols between the cache managers which keep the data consistent are known as coherency protocols.

[edit] Applications
[edit] CPU cache
Main article: CPU cache

Small memories on or close to the CPU can operate faster than the much larger main memory. Most CPUs since the 1980s have used one or more caches, and modern high-end embedded, desktop and server microprocessors may have as many as half a dozen, each specialized for a specific function. Examples of caches with a specific function are the D-cache and I-cache (data cache and instruction cache).

[edit] Disk cache


Main article: Page cache

While CPU caches are generally managed entirely by hardware, a variety of software manages other caches. The page cache in main memory, which is an example of disk cache, is managed by the operating system kernel. While the hard drive's hardware disk buffer is sometimes misleadingly referred to as "disk cache", its main functions are write sequencing and read prefetching. Repeated cache hits are relatively rare, due to the small size of the buffer in comparison to the drive's capacity. However, high-end disk controllers often have their own on-board cache of hard disk data blocks. Finally, fast local hard disk can also cache information held on even slower data storage devices, such as remote servers (web cache) or local tape drives or optical jukeboxes. Such a scheme is the main concept of hierarchical storage management.

[edit] Web cache


Main article: Web cache

Web browsers and web proxy servers employ web caches to store previous responses from web servers, such as web pages. Web caches reduce the amount of information that needs to be transmitted across the network, as information previously stored in the cache can often be reused. This reduces bandwidth and processing requirements of the web server, and helps to improve responsiveness for users of the web. Web browsers employ a built-in web cache, but some internet service providers or organizations also use a caching proxy server, which is a web cache that is shared among all users of that network.

Another form of cache is P2P caching, where the files most sought for by peer-to-peer applications are stored in an ISP cache to accelerate P2P transfers. Similarly, decentralised equivalents exist, which allow communities to perform the same task for P2P traffic, for example, Corelli. [2]

[edit] Other caches


The BIND DNS daemon caches a mapping of domain names to IP addresses, as does a resolver library. Write-through operation is common when operating over unreliable networks (like an Ethernet LAN), because of the enormous complexity of the coherency protocol required between multiple write-back caches when communication is unreliable. For instance, web page caches and clientside network file system caches (like those in NFS or SMB) are typically read-only or writethrough specifically to keep the network protocol simple and reliable. Search engines also frequently make web pages they have indexed available from their cache. For example, Google provides a "Cached" link next to each search result. This can prove useful when web pages from a web server are temporarily or permanently inaccessible. Another type of caching is storing computed results that will likely be needed again, or memoization. ccache, a program that caches the output of the compilation to speed up the second-time compilation, exemplifies this type. Database caching can substantially improve the throughput of database applications, for example in the processing of indexes, data dictionaries, and frequently used subsets of data. Distributed caching[3] uses caches spread across different networked hosts, for example, Corelli

[edit] The difference between buffer and cache


The terms "buffer" and "cache" are not mutually exclusive and the functions are frequently combined; however, there is a difference in intent. A buffer is a temporary memory location that is traditionally used because CPU instructions cannot directly address data stored in peripheral devices. Thus, addressable memory is used as an intermediate stage. Additionally, such a buffer may be feasible when a large block of data is assembled or disassembled (as required by a storage device), or when data may be delivered in a different order than that in which it is produced. Also, a whole buffer of data is usually transferred sequentially (for example to hard disk), so buffering itself sometimes increases transfer performance or reduces the variation or jitter of the transfer's latency as opposed to caching where the intent is to reduce the latency. These benefits are present even if the buffered data are written to the buffer once and read from the buffer once. A cache also increases transfer performance. A part of the increase similarly comes from the possibility that multiple small transfers will combine into one large block. But the main

performance-gain occurs because there is a good chance that the same datum will be read from cache multiple times, or that written data will soon be read. A cache's sole purpose is to reduce accesses to the underlying slower storage. Cache is also usually an abstraction layer that is designed to be invisible from the perspective of neighboring layers