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"Regret": A Swinburne Revision Author(s): Rikky Rooksby Source: Victorian Poetr y, Vol. 34 , No.

"Regret": A Swinburne Revision Author(s): Rikky Rooksby Source: Victorian Poetry, Vol. 34, No. 1 (Spring, 1996), pp. 117-120 Published by: West Virginia University Press

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R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the

R1KKYROOKSBY /117

R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the text.
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the text.
R1KKYROOKSBY / 1 1 7 3 See Erdman,pp. 816-818, for a concise description of the text.

3 See Erdman,pp.

816-818, for a concise

description

of the text. As

816-818, for a concise description of the text. A s Bentley puts it, "thereis no knownreferenceto

Bentley puts it,

"thereis no knownreferenceto Vala [or TheFour Zoas]

no knownreferenceto Vala [ o r TheFour Z o a s ] T h e lines
no knownreferenceto Vala [ o r TheFour Z o a s ] T h e lines
no knownreferenceto Vala [ o r TheFour Z o a s ] T h e lines
no knownreferenceto Vala [ o r TheFour Z o a s ] T h e lines

The lines E.B.B. dream, or actual

may be remembering are the following:

sight, /

It was a

vision of delight; /

"Whetherfair For free to his

was a vision of delight; / "Whetherfair For free to his charm'd e y e s

charm'd eyes were given / The spirits of the starry heaven" (11.186-189).

s of the s t a r r y heaven" (11.186-189). / W i t h
s of the s t a r r y heaven" (11.186-189). / W i t h
s of the s t a r r y heaven" (11.186-189). / W i t h

/ With half-closed

eyes in

(11.186-189). / W i t h half-closed eyes in correspondents andfriends by 1839. chance-discovered s p
(11.186-189). / W i t h half-closed eyes in correspondents andfriends by 1839. chance-discovered s p

correspondents andfriends by 1839.

h half-closed eyes in correspondents andfriends by 1839. chance-discovered s p o t / Gleamedlike a
h half-closed eyes in correspondents andfriends by 1839. chance-discovered s p o t / Gleamedlike a

chance-discovered spot/

Gleamedlike a vision of delight"(11.3-4).

s p o t / Gleamedlike a vision of delight"(11.3-4). Wittreich, ed., Nineteenth-Century Accounts o f
s p o t / Gleamedlike a vision of delight"(11.3-4). Wittreich, ed., Nineteenth-Century Accounts o f
s p o t / Gleamedlike a vision of delight"(11.3-4). Wittreich, ed., Nineteenth-Century Accounts o f

Wittreich,

ed.,

Nineteenth-Century Accounts

of

William Blake

ed., Nineteenth-Century Accounts o f William Blake (Gainesville: Scholars'Facsimilesand Reprints,1970), pp.

(Gainesville:

Scholars'Facsimilesand

Reprints,1970), pp. 147-194.

Scholars'Facsimilesand Reprints,1970), pp. 147-194. andArchitects, 6 vols. (London, 1 8 2 9 - 3 3 )

andArchitects, 6 vols. (London, 1829-33), 2:147-179. Repr. in Joseph A.

7

Allan

Cunningham,

Lives of the Most

Eminent

British Painters,

Sculptors

6 Wordsworth's poem,

published

in 1801, contains the lines, "On me the

rises still between / Thy page and me, -

E.B.B.andMitfordwere

a vision of delight?"(11.1-4).

5 Mitford's poem reads, in

part:"My little book, as o'er thy page so white,

idlest mood I lean, / Whose is the form that

4 L.E.L.'s"TheLostPleiad"was published in

TheVenetianBracelet (1829).

by

catalogue in Gilchrist's Life(1863)" (p. 459).

Blake's

contemporaries, and the first

printed mention of it is in the

and the first p r i n t e d mention of it is in the
and the first p r i n t e d mention of it is in the
and the first p r i n t e d mention of it is in the
and the first p r i n t e d mention of it is in the
and the first p r i n t e d mention of it is in the

"Regret": A SwinburneRevision

the " R e g r e t " : A SwinburneRevision RikkyRooksby Swinburnedid not revise
the " R e g r e t " : A SwinburneRevision RikkyRooksby Swinburnedid not revise
the " R e g r e t " : A SwinburneRevision RikkyRooksby Swinburnedid not revise

RikkyRooksby

e g r e t " : A SwinburneRevision RikkyRooksby Swinburnedid not revise his l i
e g r e t " : A SwinburneRevision RikkyRooksby Swinburnedid not revise his l i
e g r e t " : A SwinburneRevision RikkyRooksby Swinburnedid not revise his l i

Swinburnedid not revise his lished, in contrast to the habit of

poems after they had been pub-

such as Matthew Arnold.

a poet

after they had been pub- such as Matthew Arnold. a poet O n c e a

Once a poem had appeared in print, whether in

form, Swinburnedid not feel the need to tinker with

periodical or book

not feel the need to tinker with periodical or book it, except occa- sionally to change

it, except

occa-

the need to tinker with periodical or book it, except occa- sionally to change a title.

sionally to change a title. For example,

Lost Vigil" became "A Wasted Vigil,"

between 1867 and

1878 "A

i g i l , " between 1 8 6 7 and 1878 "A "Child's S

"Child's Song in Winter"be-

"A "Child's S o n g in Winter"be- came "Winter in Northumberland," and "The E n

came

"Winter in Northumberland," and "The

End of a Month"

and "The E n d o f a Month" ( 1 8 7 1 ) was

(1871) was changed

to "At a Month's End" (with stanza 28 being

End" ( w i t h stanza 28 b e i n g added). It is

added). It is striking

thereforeto come acrossa moresubstantialrevi-

c o m e a c r o s s a moresubstantialrevi- sion. The poem in

sion. The

poem in question is "Pastiche,"published in Poemsand

poem in question is "Pastiche,"published in Poemsand B a l l a d s , SecondSeries

Ballads, SecondSeries

nightly Reviewfor September1867 (p.

(1878). This lyric first appeared

271) under the

in the Fort- title "Regret"

2 7 1 ) under the in the Fort- title "Regret" and to myknowledge this versionhas

and to myknowledge

this versionhas never been reprinted:

this versionhas never been r e p r i n t e d : Regret Now
this versionhas never been r e p r i n t e d : Regret Now

Regret

versionhas never been r e p r i n t e d : Regret Now the
versionhas never been r e p r i n t e d : Regret Now the

Now the days are all gone over Of our singing, love by lover, Days of summer-coloured seas; Days of many melodies.

our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
our singing, love by lover, D a y s of summer-coloured s e a s ;
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p

11 8/ VICTORIANPOETRY

11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p a
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p a
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p a
11 8 / VICTORIANPOETRY Now the n i g h t s are all p a

Now the nights are all past over Of our dreaming, where dreams hover In a mist of fair false things, Nights with quiet folded wings.

t h i n g s , Nights with quiet folded wings. Now the kiss of
t h i n g s , Nights with quiet folded wings. Now the kiss of
t h i n g s , Nights with quiet folded wings. Now the kiss of

Now the kiss of child and mother, Now the speech of sister and brother, Are but with us as strange words, Or old songs of last year's birds.

w o r d s , Or old songs of last year's birds. Now all g
w o r d s , Or old songs of last year's birds. Now all g
w o r d s , Or old songs of last year's birds. Now all g

Now all good that comes or goes is As the smell of last year's roses, As the shining in our eyes Of dead summer in past skies.

our e y e s Of dead summer in p a s t skies. Pastiche Now
our e y e s Of dead summer in p a s t skies. Pastiche Now

Pastiche

y e s Of dead summer in p a s t skies. Pastiche Now the d
y e s Of dead summer in p a s t skies. Pastiche Now the d
y e s Of dead summer in p a s t skies. Pastiche Now the d

Now the days are all gone over Of our singing, love by lover, Days of summer-coloured seas Blown adrift through beam and breeze.

i f t t h r o u g h b e a m and breeze.
i f t t h r o u g h b e a m and breeze.
i f t t h r o u g h b e a m and breeze.

Now the nights are all past over Of our dreaming, dreams that hover In a mist of fair false things, Nights afloat on wide wan wings.

N i g h t s afloat on wide wan w i n g s .
N i g h t s afloat on wide wan w i n g s .
N i g h t s afloat on wide wan w i n g s .

Now the loves with faith for mother, Now the fears with hope for brother, Scarce are with us as strange words, Notes from songs of last year's birds.

s o n g s of last y e a r ' s birds. Now all
s o n g s of last y e a r ' s birds. Now all

Now all good that comes or goes is As the smell of last year's roses, As the radiance in our eyes

s , As the r a d i a n c e in our e y
s , As the r a d i a n c e in our e y

Shot

from summer's ere he dies.

e in our e y e s Shot from summer's ere he dies. Now the m
e in our e y e s Shot from summer's ere he dies. Now the m

Now the morning faintlier risen Seems no God come forth of prison, But a bird of plume-plucked wing, Pale with thoughts of evening.

a bird of plume-plucked wing, Pale with thoughts of evening. Now hath h o p e
a bird of plume-plucked wing, Pale with thoughts of evening. Now hath h o p e

Now hath hope, outraced in running, Given the torch up of his cunning And the palm he thought to wear Even to his own strong child - despair.1

thought to wear Even to his own strong child - despair.1 repay title is symptomatic of
thought to wear Even to his own strong child - despair.1 repay title is symptomatic of
thought to wear Even to his own strong child - despair.1 repay title is symptomatic of
thought to wear Even to his own strong child - despair.1 repay title is symptomatic of

repay

title is symptomatic of his whole approach."Regret" is a more emo'

of his whole approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n
of his whole approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n

Swinburne'srevisions

carefulexamination. The change of

approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
approach."Regret" is a more emo' Swinburne'srevisions carefulexamination. The c h a n g e of
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s

RIKKYROCKSBY lug

RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s p
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s p
RIKKYROCKSBY l u g t i o n a l l y naked and s p

tionally naked and specific title than "Pastiche," which immediately

distancesthe authorfromthe poem by implying that the primary im-

in its creation is imitation.The OED cites Swinburne's poem as

pulse

the earliestrecordeduse of the term.

o e m a s pulse the earliestrecordeduse of the term. "Regret" makes plain the central
o e m a s pulse the earliestrecordeduse of the term. "Regret" makes plain the central
o e m a s pulse the earliestrecordeduse of the term. "Regret" makes plain the central

"Regret" makes plain

the central

of the term. "Regret" makes plain the central e m o t i o n of

emotion of the lyric; "Pastiche" gives no such clue. The

first change

g i v e s no such clue. The first change c o m e s

comes in line three where

"Days of many melodies" is changed to

beam and breeze."The earlier version rein-

b r e e z e . " T h e earlier version rein- "Blown adrift

"Blown adrift through

forcesthe happyimage of the past; the revision

emphasizes the loss of

"days of summer-colouredseas"with "blownadrift."The revision of

line eight has a similareffect. "Nights with quiet folded wings" seems

with q u i e t folded w i n g s " seems "adrift," and
with q u i e t folded w i n g s " seems "adrift," and
with q u i e t folded w i n g s " seems "adrift," and
with q u i e t folded w i n g s " seems "adrift," and

"adrift," and the impression of a

s " seems "adrift," and the impression of a h e is also concernedto d e
s " seems "adrift," and the impression of a h e is also concernedto d e
s " seems "adrift," and the impression of a h e is also concernedto d e

he is also concernedto depersonalizeit, as the

d e p e r s o n a l i z e i t ,
d e p e r s o n a l i z e i t ,

Swinburneseems to be articulating a sense

of estrangement fromhis

i c u l a t i n g a sense of estrangement fromhis family w

family

which must have been acute during the winter of 1866-67

u r i n g t h e winter of 1 8 6 6 - 6

when

this poem was probably written. Writing to George Powell on

o e m was probably written. Writing to George Powell on December26, 1 8 6 6

December26, 1866, he complains that his art "isat a discounthere,"2

t h i s a r t "isat a discounthere,"2 a n d it is obvious

and it is obvious that neither

his parents nor sisters or brother ap-

had reappeared in the au-

nor sisters or brother a p - had reappeared in the au- proved o f PoemsandBallads

proved

of PoemsandBallads (1866), which

proved o f PoemsandBallads ( 1 8 6 6 ) , which tumn after being withdrawn

tumn

after being

withdrawn by Moxon and Co. in August. Admiral

b y Moxon and Co. in A u g u s t . Admiral Swinburnetold Ruskinon

Swinburnetold Ruskinon September17 that his son's writings "con-

and sorrow, and check the long-

tain passages that give us greatpain

ing desire to be pleased"(Letters,1:184-185). It is also possible that

of sister and brother"alludesto the loss of his clos-

"Nowthe

and brother"alludesto the loss of his clos- "Nowthe e s t sisterEdith in 1 8 6
and brother"alludesto the loss of his clos- "Nowthe e s t sisterEdith in 1 8 6
and brother"alludesto the loss of his clos- "Nowthe e s t sisterEdith in 1 8 6
and brother"alludesto the loss of his clos- "Nowthe e s t sisterEdith in 1 8 6

est sisterEdith

in 1863 throughconsumption. In the laterversion the

one - "Nowthe

In the laterversion the o n e - "Nowthe human relationship is replacedby loves with faith

human relationship is replacedby

o n e - "Nowthe human relationship is replacedby loves with faith for mother,/ N o

loves with faith for mother,/

Now the fearswith hope for brother" -

N o w the fearswith h o p e for brother" - a s t h

as though he were uncomfortable with the explicit

nature of the

uncomfortable with the e x p l i c i t nature of the o r

original statements.

c i t nature of the o r i g i n a l statements. The

The last stanza of "Regret" ends the poem

with an image of

"Regret" ends the poem with an i m a g e of memories of shared experience

memories of shared

experience -

"deadsummerin past skies" -

and

- "deadsummerin p a s t skies" - and l e a v e s t

leaves that to speak for itself. In the later version, Swinburneuses a

l a t e r v e r s i o n , Swinburneuses a m

more extreme verb -

"shot" - and

personifies

(and therefore poeti-

- and personifies ( a n d therefore p o e t i - c i

cizes, just as in stanzathree) the summer.He then addstwo stanzas.

the summer.He t h e n a d d s t w o stanzas. Stanza five

Stanza five is a description

drifting to night, "pale"echoing the "wan"of

built on a personification of hope defeated

The notion of

of a winter's day, no sooner risen than

stanzatwo. Stanzasix is

o s o o n e r risen than stanzatwo. Stanzasix is by its own "child,"despair.

by its own "child,"despair.

stanzatwo. Stanzasix is by its own "child,"despair. hope running a race and b e i n

hope running

a race and being "cunning" is not espe-

a race and b e i n g "cunning" is not espe- cially effective, but l

cially effective, but

logical meaning, since the disappointment of hope (and

the relation between it and despair has psycho-

it and d e s p a i r has p s y c h o

herein lies,

p a i r has p s y c h o - herein l i e

a purelyfigurative

speech

makes clear. This

is

the

most personal

moment in

"Regret."

So farSwinburneseemsto

be intensifying the feeling of loss. But

in stanzathree

change

sheltering; "afloat"echoes

peaceful,

lack of grounding is magnifiedby "widewan."

r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
r i n g ; "afloat"echoes peaceful, lack of g r o u n d i
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position

i2o/ VICTORIANPOETRY

i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position of
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position of
i 2 o / VICTORIANPOETRY for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position of

for Swinburne, its danger) can lead to the opposite position of de- spair. Swinburne'sstoicism would prefer to avoid both. Hope and de-

with other abstract nouns, like fear) become very notice-

able in the later poetry, as Swinburne's tendency to think in antith-

eses hardensinto a vice of

y to think in antith- e s e s hardensinto a vice of spair(along style. This

spair(along

in antith- e s e s hardensinto a vice of spair(along style. This unusualact of revision
in antith- e s e s hardensinto a vice of spair(along style. This unusualact of revision

style.

e s e s hardensinto a vice of spair(along style. This unusualact of revision reveals s

This unusualact of revision reveals something important about

o m e t h i n g i m p o r t a n

Swinburne's attitude toward

poetry. He liked "Regret"enough to

p o e t r y . He liked "Regret"enough to want to reprint it but

want to

reprint

it but not without

making these changes, even though

reprint it but not without making these changes, even though i t w a s not

it was not his usual

to do so. "Pastiche"is a far less personal

so. "Pastiche"is a far less p e r s o n a l p o e

poem than "Regret," which readsmorelike one of Symons' or Hardy's

of S y m o n s ' or H a r d y ' s
of S y m o n s ' or H a r d y ' s

"Regret" also remindsus that the elegiac mood which bore fruit in

a t the e l e g i a c mood which bore fruit in Poems

Poems and Ballads, Second Series was not solely the product of the

not s o l e l y the p r o d u c t of

poet's lonely thirties, but has its roots in the personal turmoilof the

its roots in the p e r s o n a l turmoilof the 1860s. shorter

1860s.

roots in the p e r s o n a l turmoilof the 1860s. shorter lyrics.

shorter

lyrics.

As ever, Swinburneis reluctant to be too revealing.

practice

reluctant to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes
reluctant to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes
reluctant to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes
reluctant to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes
reluctant to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes

Notes

to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes 1
to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes 1
to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes 1
to be too r e v e a l i n g . practice Notes 1

1 A. C. Swinburne,Poems, 6 vols. (London: Chatto and Windus, 1904),

6 vols. (London: Chatto and Windus, 1 9 0 4 ) , 3:90-91. 2 Lang, Cecil

3:90-91.

vols. (London: Chatto and Windus, 1 9 0 4 ) , 3:90-91. 2 Lang, Cecil Y.
vols. (London: Chatto and Windus, 1 9 0 4 ) , 3:90-91. 2 Lang, Cecil Y.

2 Lang,

Cecil Y.

The Swinburne Letters, 6 vols. (New Haven: Yale Univ.

t t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62),

Press,1959-62), 1:215. Hereaftercited asLetters.

t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1
t e r s , 6 vols. ( N e w Haven: Yale Univ. Press,1959-62), 1

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