BMC BladeLogic Server Automation

Administration Guide

Supporting
BMC BladeLogic Server Automation version 8.1
February 2011

www.bmc.com

Contacting BMC Software
You can access the BMC Software website at http://www.bmc.com. From this website, you can obtain information about the company, its products, corporate offices, special events, and career opportunities.

United States and Canada
Address BMC SOFTWARE INC 2101 CITYWEST BLVD HOUSTON TX 77042-2827 USA Telephone 713 918 8800 or 800 841 2031 Fax 713 918 8000

Outside United States and Canada
Telephone (01) 713 918 8800 Fax (01) 713 918 8000

© Copyright 2002-2011 BladeLogic, Inc. BMC, BMC Software, and the BMC Software logo are the exclusive properties of BMC Software, Inc., are registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and may be registered or pending registration in other countries. All other BMC trademarks, service marks, and logos may be registered or pending registration in the U.S. or in other countries. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. BladeLogic and the BladeLogic logo are the exclusive properties of BladeLogic, Inc. The BladeLogic trademark is registered with the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, and may be registered or pending registration in other countries. All other BladeLogic trademarks, service marks, and logos may be registered or pending registration in the U.S. or in other countries. All other trademarks or registered trademarks are the property of their respective owners. AIX and IBM, are trademarks or registered trademarks of International Business Machines Corporation in the United States, other countries, or both. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. Linux is the registered trademark of Linus Torvalds. Oracle and Java are registered trademarks of Oracle and/or its affiliates. Other names may be trademarks of their respective owners. UNIX is the registered trademark of The Open Group in the US and other countries. The information included in this documentation is the proprietary and confidential information of BMC Software, Inc., its affiliates, or licensors. Your use of this information is subject to the terms and conditions of the applicable End User License agreement for the product and to the proprietary and restricted rights notices included in the product documentation.

Restricted rights legend
U.S. Government Restricted Rights to Computer Software. UNPUBLISHED -- RIGHTS RESERVED UNDER THE COPYRIGHT LAWS OF THE UNITED STATES. Use, duplication, or disclosure of any data and computer software by the U.S. Government is subject to restrictions, as applicable, set forth in FAR Section 52.227-14, DFARS 252.227-7013, DFARS 252.227-7014, DFARS 252.227-7015, and DFARS 252.227-7025, as amended from time to time. Contractor/Manufacturer is BMC SOFTWARE INC, 2101 CITYWEST BLVD, HOUSTON TX 77042-2827, USA. Any contract notices should be sent to this address.

Customer support
You can obtain technical support by using the BMC Software Customer Support website or by contacting Customer Support by telephone or e-mail. To expedite your inquiry, see “Before contacting BMC.”

Support website
You can obtain technical support from BMC 24 hours a day, 7 days a week at http://www.bmc.com/support. From this website, you can
■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

read overviews about support services and programs that BMC offers find the most current information about BMC products search a database for issues similar to yours and possible solutions order or download product documentation download products and maintenance report an issue or ask a question subscribe to receive proactive e-mail alerts when new product notices are released find worldwide BMC support center locations and contact information, including e-mail addresses, fax numbers, and telephone numbers

Support by telephone or e-mail
In the United States and Canada, if you need technical support and do not have access to the web, call 800 537 1813 or send an e-mail message to customer_support@bmc.com. (In the subject line, enter SupID:<yourSupportContractID>, such as SupID:12345). Outside the United States and Canada, contact your local support center for assistance.

Before contacting BMC
Have the following information available so that Customer Support can begin working on your issue immediately:

product information — — — product name product version (release number) license number and password (trial or permanent)

operating system and environment information — — — — — machine type operating system type, version, and service pack or other maintenance level such as PUT or PTF system hardware configuration serial numbers related software (database, application, and communication) including type, version, and service pack or maintenance level

■ ■ ■

sequence of events leading to the issue commands and options that you used messages received (and the time and date that you received them) — — — product error messages messages from the operating system, such as file system full messages from related software

3

License key and password information
If you have questions about your license key or password, use one of the following methods to get assistance:
■ ■

Send an e-mail message to customer_support@bmc.com. Use the Customer Support website at http://www.bmc.com/support.

4

BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide

Contents
Chapter 1 Introduction 11 11 11 12 12 13 13 14 15 15 16 17 18 19 19 21 29 30 30 31 32 33 33 34 34 39 39 41 41 42 42 42 43 Intended Audience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Documentation Conventions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network Shell Documentation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation

System architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Client tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Middle tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Server tier . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Default permissions and security configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Perl support. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tools for managing BMC BladeLogic data . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Troubleshooting tools . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Generating data for support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment . . . . . . Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server

Understanding the application server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application server processes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Work item threads and the job execution thread . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Job distribution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Pooled database connections . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authentication framework. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . The Application Server Launcher . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Changing the configuration of an application server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting Application Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Starting all Application Servers on the host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Restarting Application Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Restarting all Application Servers on the host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stopping Application Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stopping all Application Servers on the host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Contents

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Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to configure Application Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Starting the Application Server Administration console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 The set Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 The show Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48 The help Command . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Specifying multiple values for a parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Changing the default separator for multiple values. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Deleting a configuration setting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Managing Application Server behavior with the Application Server Administration console . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Configuring the Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52 Changing the heap size for BMC BladeLogic components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 71 Enabling/disabling SOCKS proxy rule evaluation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Configuring the file server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74 Configuring a mail server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 Configuring Perl. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Configuring an SNMP server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Configuring a database server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 78 Configuring the process spawner . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 79 Configuring expiration time for credentials of NSH Script Jobs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Processing across mount points . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 82 Restricting the size of configuration and extended objects . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Configuring user interface settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 84 Setting SRP login requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 88 Configuring the PXE Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 89 Configuring the Licensing Module . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 Enabling asynchronous execution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 92 Enabling web services . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 Configuring multiple Application Servers on the same host. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 93 About Application Server deployments and profiles. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 94 Creating additional Application Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 97 Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 100 Listing conflicting attributes. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 105 Getting information about Application Servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 The Application Server Launchers node . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Reporting Application Server information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Managing multiple Application Servers on the same host . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Starting a specific Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Stopping a specific Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 Redeploying a stopped Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 110 Terminating a specific Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Restarting a specific Application Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 Removing an Application Server. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 112 Adding unmanaged deployments. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Editing the list of roles with Application Server Launcher access . . . . . . . . . . . . 113 Resetting database passwords for the Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 114

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BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide

Chapter 4

Administering security

115 117 117 118 119 120 121 122 122 123 123 123 124 124 126 128 128 129 130 130 130 131 132 133 133 134 135 137 140 142 150 153 158 158 159 159 160 160 161 163 163 163 166 166 167 169 170 171 171
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Fundamentals of BMC BladeLogic security. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Session layer security . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Impersonation and privilege mapping . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authorization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SRP. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RSA SecurID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PKI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Active Directory/Kerberos . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Domain Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Authentication profiles . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Single sign-on session credentials . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Keytab files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . RBAC role selection. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Environment variables . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Security for different communication legs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BMC BladeLogic Console to Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . BLCLI to Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network Shell to Network Shell Proxy Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Reports client to reports server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application Server to agent or repeater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network Shell to agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Repeater to agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing single sign-on . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Authentication Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Application Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting override locations for client SSO files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up certificate verification using OCSP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing LDAP authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Overview of LDAP configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . High availability configurations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Certificate trust store. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Distinguished names. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring LDAP authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing RSA SecurID authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring RSA Authentication Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring SecurID authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing PKI authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring PKI authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Implementing Domain Authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Sample domain structure . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Contents

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Securing communication with CA certificates . . . . . . 217 Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the repeater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 177 Overview of AD/Kerberos configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 210 Implementing security – Network Shell to agent . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 251 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 212 Implementing Security – Repeater to agent . . . 218 Provisioning agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate. . . . . 262 8 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 219 Configuring agents to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates 221 Discontinuing use of client-side certificates. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 180 Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 178 Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain . . . . . . 241 Options for exports file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 246 Users and users. . . . . . . . . . 247 Configuring the users or users. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 184 Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 228 Generating a user information file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 230 Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 233 Introduction to the configuration files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 206 TLS with client-side certs – Discontinuing use of client-side certificates . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Implementing Active Directory/Kerberos authentication. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 233 Configuration file functions . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Using certificates to secure communication between clients and Application Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 No authentication – Using a default installation. . . . . . 244 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .local files . . servers. . . . . . . . . 228 Typical scenarios . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 236 How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Restricting commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Communication protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 235 Subnet designations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 211 TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client . . . . . . . . . . . . 237 Exports file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Using the blcred utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 249 Options for users and users. . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Options . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Configuring the secure file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 202 TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 223 Generating a self-signed certificate for an Application Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .local files . . . . . . .local files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 261 Securecert file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . and the secure file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Options for secure file . . 252 Secure file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 258 Examples . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 253 Clients. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 240 Configuring the exports file . . . . . . . . . . . . 194 Implementing security – Application Server to agents or repeaters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Key terms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Collecting log data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 320 Enable SSL on Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Application Server logging . . . . . . 321 Contents 9 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 306 Installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater . . About logging configuration for BMC BladeLogic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Configuring the securecert file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning up historical data. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the Application Server cache cleanup . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the cleanup . . . Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters Overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the clean-up utility . . . . . . Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 309 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .txt file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the database cleanup . Marking data for deletion. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the repeater server cleanup . . . . . . . . Executing the database clean-up utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning the Application Server cache . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 318 Securing communication between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers (optional). . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Agent logging. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 Set up the Advanced File Server for secure communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 319 Generate the SSL certificate . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning up target servers (Agents) . . 304 What is the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater? . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning up repeater servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 263 264 264 264 267 271 271 271 271 272 287 288 288 289 292 293 293 294 295 296 297 297 298 299 299 300 300 303 Cleaning up the BMC BladeLogic database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Installing using the installation program. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the file server cleanup . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PXE Server logging . . . . . . . . Additional log files of interest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the target server (Agent) cleanup. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Before you begin . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 307 Performing an unattended (silent) installation . . . . BMC BladeLogic log file reference . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Cleaning up the file server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling the retention policy utility to mark data for deletion . . . . 312 Configuring Advanced Repeater servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . About the Log4crc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 312 Configuring Advanced File Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 305 Best practice information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 316 Changing the administrator user and password for Advanced Repeater Servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 326 Starting and stopping the Advanced Repeater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 327 Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 329 Levels of integration. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Disabling SSL communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 323 Troubleshooting advanced file servers and advanced repeaters . . . . . . . . . 336 Security Glossary Index 339 345 10 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 329 The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 334 Setting up the connection to BMC Atrium Orchestrator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 335 Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 325 Location of configuration files . . . . . . 324 Configuring bandwidth throttling between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 Assigning job approval permissions . . . . . . . .Configure the Advanced Repeater server for secure communication . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 333 Configuring job approval for job types. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 322 Configure the Advanced File Server to use secure communication. . . . . . . . . 330 Requirements for integration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 324 Location of log files . . . . . . . . . 332 Enabling BMC Remedy ITSM integration for job approval .

Clients are machines running the BMC BladeLogic Console or Network Shell. If a connection is established. Clients establish contact with servers by means of the RSCD agents installed on server machines. Chapter 1 Introduction 11 . Intended Audience This document is intended for system administrators who manage data centers and networks of remote servers. In the BMC BladeLogic context.Chapter 1 1 Introduction The BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide describes all of the configuration and administration tasks you can perform to ensure the smooth functioning of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation (referred to in this guide as “BMC BladeLogic”). and how to define user permissions using the BMC BladeLogic configuration files. a server is a machine where an RSCD agent is installed. how to implement security restrictions. the configuration you define for both the client and the server determines how the client and server communicate with each other. This document describes how to set up and maintain an Application Server. The configuration of the RSCD agent on those servers determines whether the client can establish a connection with the server and what permissions the client will have. Terminology Throughout this document you will see discussions related to client and server machines.

12 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The following is an example of system text: ERROR: You must be "root" for pkgadd to execute properly. This document always calls the machine being contacted a server. users. as well as the exports. bold text highlights actions that you should take. enter man <command>. serif fonts depict text that a user might enter at the command line or text that a system generates in response to user input. this guide uses UNIX-style path separators (forward slashes) except in situations where a Windows-style path separators (backslashes) are specifically required. In addition. Monospace fonts also depict file system paths. a machine may be a BMC BladeLogic server. Bold fonts identify Network Shell commands and utilities. “From the File menu. Documentation Conventions In this document. users.Documentation Conventions In some contexts.local. This can happen because you can install client applications on the same hosts where you have installed an RSCD agent. and in other contexts the same machine can be a client. a procedural step might read. select Add. For example. To display a man page while using Network Shell. such as man nsh. Despite that possibility for confusion. the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Network Shell Command Reference provides a full description of all Network Shell commands and utilities.” When describing paths. monospace. Network Shell Documentation BMC BladeLogic provides descriptions of all Network Shell commands and utilities as man pages available on both Windows and UNIX-style systems. Within a procedure. this document always uses the term client to refer to a machine where someone is using the BMC BladeLogic Console or Network Shell to contact another machine. and secure configuration files.

System architecture A BMC BladeLogic system has a three-tier architecture that consists of client. as well as a discussion of other topics that apply to the BMC BladeLogic system as a whole.Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 2 This chapter provides an overview the system architecture for BMC BladeLogic Server Automation (BMC BladeLogic). and middle tiers. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 13 . server. The following graphic illustrates the relationship between the major components of the three-tiered BMC BladeLogic system.

14 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . a command line interface (BLCLI) that provides API-level access to the functionality available through the console. It also includes a web interface to the BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation server. and Network Shell for ad hoc administration of one or more servers.Client tier BMC BladeLogic Console BLCLI reports client (web browser) Network Shell Client Tier PXE / TFTP Server Application Server(s) reports server Network Shell Proxy Server (optional) BMC BladeLogic core database Middle Tier reporting data warehouse Agent File Server Server Tier Remote Server Remote Server Agent Server Agent Server Agent Server Agent Server Agent Server Client tier The BMC BladeLogic client tier includes the BMC BladeLogic console.

allowing administrators to adjust its performance to accommodate added users and increased database activity. Not only does the Application Server manage communication between consoles and remote servers. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 15 . Linux® (Red Hat and SUSE). The Application Server communicates with RSCD agents and initiates all communication to perform ad hoc and scheduled tasks. Server tier The BMC BladeLogic server tier consists of RSCD agents on remote servers. BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics uses the Application Server to authenticate users. The Application Server is completely scalable. Middle tier The primary component of the middle tier is the Application Server. which controls how the BMC BladeLogic console communicates with remote servers. and it reads data from the core BMC BladeLogic database as well as a reporting data warehouse. HP-UX. All BMC BladeLogic client-tier applications let you manage Solaris®. The Application Server provides servers being provisioned with the instructions necessary to provision the machine. Network Shell can optionally incorporate a middle tier component—an Application Server that is configured to run a Network Shell Proxy Server. the Network Shell Proxy Server authenticates Network Shell client users and ensures traffic is encrypted between clients and managed servers. Network Shell is a network scripting language that enables cross-platform access through a command line interface. with the principal components being the PXE Server and the Application Server. RSCD agents never initiate communication with an Application Server or any other BMC BladeLogic component. the middle tier includes an Apache Tomcat server.Middle tier The BMC BladeLogic console is a graphical user interface that gives system administrators a host of sophisticated tools for managing and automating data center procedures. If necessary. The reporting data warehouse is populated using information from the core BMC BladeLogic database. It also lets system administrators provision operating systems onto servers. AIX®. it also controls interaction with the database and file servers. Operating as an intermediary between Network Shell clients and the managed servers those clients target. The PXE Server delivers instructions to servers being provisioned so they can download a bootstrap program. a BMC BladeLogic system can incorporate multiple Application Servers that cooperate by balancing job processing workloads. and Microsoft Windows 2000/2003/2008 servers. The middle tier also includes several components used for provisioning servers. If a site is running BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics.

The definition of a system object includes a set of authorizations specifying roles who can access the object and the actions those roles can perform. the successor to Secure Socket Layer (SSL). All clients and servers are set to communicate using protocol 5. If your installation requires additional refinement. A role is a set of authorizations and other information that reflects the capabilities of an organizational entity. A system object is an object you can interact with in the BMC BladeLogic Console. For more information on managing access at the console level. ■ 16 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .Default permissions and security configuration Default permissions and security configuration In BMC BladeLogic. the following permissions and security configurations are set by default for each RSCD agent: ■ All clients are granted read/write access to all servers. he or she is granted the authorizations defined for that role. For many BMC BladeLogic installations. you do not have to modify the agent configuration files. The system’s default configuration provides sufficient functionality and appropriate user permissions. BMC BladeLogic also lets you control access to servers at the agent level. With protocol 5. such as QA engineers or web administrators. you can control user access through a combination of role-based and system object-based authorizations. TLS automatically negotiates the strongest form of encryption that clients and servers can support. When a user is assigned to a role. When you install BMC BladeLogic on clients and servers. Configuration files on the RSCD agent let you define who can access servers and how users communicate with those servers. access control can be managed at multiple levels. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. you should understand the default configuration of BMC BladeLogic. a BMC BladeLogic protocol for secure communication based on Transport Layer Security (TLS).

” Incoming users can be granted the permissions of a specified user. For more information on securing communication between all components of a BMC BladeLogic system.” By default when you add users to the BMC BladeLogic system. users can be granted permissions through a process called Windows user mapping. “Administering security. If a user does not have an equivalent local identity on the server. the agent maps the user to an identity using the following steps: ■ First the agent determines whether the user has an equivalent identity on the server machine. “Setting up configuration files. see Chapter 5. when a user attempts to connect to an agent. However. Other forms of authentication are possible. they are set up for SRP authentication when using BMC BladeLogic clients to communicate with Application Servers. you can use Perl scripts to perform functions on remote hosts (such as open. and members of the Administrator group in Windows are not automatically mapped to Administrator. ■ For a complete discussion of how users are granted permissions on servers. read. This process allows a role to be mapped to a local or domain user who has permissions for a Windows server. the script programming language. the connecting user is granted the permissions of that equivalent user. but they require additional configuration. For either of these approaches. users are mapped to user “Anonymous. The BMC BladeLogic Perl module integrates with libnc. — In all other situations. Because of this integration. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. For more information on Windows user mapping. the core library for BMC BladeLogic. the agent maps the incoming user to a default user with downgraded permissions. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 17 . If so. which functions like a network-enabled version of libc. but that requires modification of the configuration files. root users on UNIX are not automatically mapped to root.” On Windows. users are mapped to user “nobody.Perl support ■ Users are granted permissions on managed servers through two different processes: — For Windows servers. users can be granted permissions through a process of user impersonation (for all UNIX servers) or user privilege mapping (for Windows). and write files) as long as those hosts are running RSCD agents. On UNIX.” Perl support BMC BladeLogic provides built-in support for Perl. see Chapter 4.

“Managing BMC BladeLogic data. You can use this utility to delete old temporary files in the Application Server cache (directory). see Chapter 6. These tools include: ■ A database clean-up utility (cleanupDatabase) to minimize the amount of space taken up by unused data in the BMC BladeLogic database. Tools for managing BMC BladeLogic data BMC BladeLogic provides a suite of tools for managing data in the BMC BladeLogic system and controlling its growth where necessary. audit results. You can use this utility to delete old files that accumulate on target servers (agents) from Deploy Jobs. You can delete these files by using the repeater server clean-up utility. The BMC BladeLogic file server clean-up utility. If you are using Perl in conjunction with the BMC BladeLogic Console.Tools for managing BMC BladeLogic data When you install Network Shell on a platform that can support a BMC BladeLogic Application Server. A target server clean-up utility.” 18 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . as described in “Configuring Perl” on page 77. the Perl module is automatically installed. you must configure the Application Server so it knows the location of Perl. ■ ■ ■ ■ For more information on these tools. objects marked for deletion with the retention policy utility. This utility deletes from the database objects users have deleted in the BMC BladeLogic Console. Data from Deploy Jobs can also accumulate in the staging directory on repeater servers. See the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide for a list of the platforms for which BMC BladeLogic provides Perl support. An Application Server cache clean-up utility. These tools let you delete unused data or data no longer needed for BMC BladeLogic operations. snapshot results and compliance results. You can use this utility to delete unused files from the file server. and historical data such as old audit trail entries. A repeater server clean-up utility.

Read authorization. ■ ■ ■ Generating data for support The Generate Support Data tool generates data about the Application Servers and other components in the BMC BladeLogic environment and packages that data into a zip file. use Shift + Click or Ctrl + Click. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 19 . select the Application Servers from which you want to collect data. Click Select All or click the data types you want. Application Server Diagnostics — Runs predefined tests that evaluate the status of the BMC BladeLogic environment while it is running and identifies problems. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. 2 In the Generate Support Data dialog. DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED job property . your role must be granted the BL_Administration. NOTE To use the Support Data Generation tool. Database Diagnostics — Run predefined tests from the command line that evaluate the status of the BMC BladeLogic database and identifies potential issues.provides additional diagnostic information to the job log. 3 Select the data you want to include in the zip file. select Configuration => Generate Support Data. Accept the default selection (the Application Server to which you are connected) or click the Browse button (three dots) and select one or more Application Servers from the Select Application Servers dialog.Troubleshooting tools Troubleshooting tools BMC BladeLogic provides several tools that you can use to collect data for diagnosing issues and working with Customer Support: ■ Generate Support Data — Generates data about Application Servers and other components of the BMC BladeLogic environment and packages that data into a zip file. This data can be useful for diagnostic purposes when you contact Customer Support.) To select multiple Application Servers. (The Select Application Servers dialog lists only Application Servers configured to use the same database and file server and that are currently accessible.

If an Agent resides on the Application Server. Security files included are: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ System Properties table Agent log Secure Exports Users User. Click Agent Security Files and use the Browse button (three dots) to select a server. Click Agent Log and use the Browse button (three dots) to select a server.Generating data for support This selection: Includes: Application Server log The currently active Application Server log.) The file’s name is StatusReport. Console log The current console log. The log from one or more Agents. You can also include console logs that have been rolled over. 20 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . suppose you set the size to 20 MB for the appserver.txt. or a Smart Group of servers. For example.txt. if any. the Secure file is included.log file. At a minimum.log. A “rolled-over” log file is one that is generated after a preset size has been reached for the currently active log file. group of servers. Agent Security Files The current security files from one or more Agents. Click Deploy Job Logs and use the Browse button (three dots) to select one or more jobs. a new log file is automatically created (appserver. or a Smart Group of servers. All transaction logs for target servers that failed to execute the specified Deploy Job run. group of servers.local home Application Server Security Files Deploy Job Target Logs (Failed Targets Only) Security files from the Application Server.1). You can also include Application Server logs that have been rolled over. You can also include Agent logs that have been rolled over. The file’s name is System Properties. (This information is the same as that generated by the Export Detail Report operation in the Infrastructure Management window. When the log file reaches that size. A file containing all status information for the Application Server. A file containing the current contents of the SYSTEM_PROPERTY table in the database to which the Application Server is connected. Application Server Deployment files Application Server status The entire deployment directory for the specified Application Servers. all security files are included.

compare the data to expected behavior. For example. NOTE To use the Support Data Generation tool. and analyze it to determine test success or failure. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 21 . For each Application Server you selected.txt. If you selected multiple Application Servers. These predefined tests collect data on the status of the BMC BladeLogic environment while it is running.zip as the file name. Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment Application Server Diagnostics The Application Server Diagnostics tool provides tests that can be helpful for monitoring the status of your BMC BladeLogic environment and for working with Customer Support to identify and resolve issues.zip. 7 Click Save. 6 In the Object Name field. The zip files created would have the names: data_10_08configserver1. type a name for the zip file.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment This selection: PXE Server Files Includes: Information about the PXE server and the services it runs. The file’s name is NetworkInformationReport.Read authorization. the zip file for each has a name based on the file name you specified plus the Application Server name. your role must be granted the BL_Administration. 5 Specify a path to the location where you want to store the zip file. suppose you selected configserver1 and appserver1 and specified data_10_08. Network Information 4 Click Generate Data. BMC BladeLogic generates the data and creates a zip file. (This information is the same as that reported in the Infrastructure Management window.) A file of information about network configuration and status for each Application Server.zip and data_10_08-appserver1.

keystore files are properly synchronized between the various deployments (each deployment has its own keystore file). 2 In the Application Server Diagnostics view.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. using a job created for test purposes. You can select one or more tests from the list. using a job created for test purposes. Accept the default selection (the Application Server to which you are connected) or click Browse and select one or more Application Servers. Tests the job execution framework. Test AppServer Test BlExec Job Diagnostic Test Description Tests the Application Server’s configuration connectivity with other Application Servers. ■ 22 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . they do not need to be running on the same host. The Select Application Servers dialog lists Application Servers configured to use the same database and file server. select Configuration => Application Server Diagnostics View. Selecting a test group lists those tests in the Application Server Diagnostics area. (Use Shift + click or Ctrl + click to select multiple tests. however. Tests the Application Server’s connectivity with the database and executes test queries. including parallel execution. Tests the Application Server’s connectivity with the File Server. Checks whether the bladelogic.Tests are grouped by the type of evaluation they do. selecting the Configuration test group runs both the AppServer Test and the Service Deployment Test. both of which test the Application Server configuration. Tests the Application Server’s deployment to determine if the Application Server has been properly configured Database Diagnostic Test Environment KeyStore Test File Manager Diagnostic Test Pseudo Job Diagnostic Test Service Deployment Diagnostic Test Accept the tests listed in the Application Server Diagnostics area or refine the list in one of the following ways: ■ Select one or more tests from the Application Server Diagnostics area. For example. 3 The Application Server Diagnostics area lists the tests to be run. Tests the job framework.) Select a group of tests from the Diagnostic Group drop-down menu. select the Application Servers from which you want to collect data.

which are listed in the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide. click Close. Consult with your DBA to see whether these recommendations can be applied. Select a test and click the View Results icon to show detailed test results. For the diagId argument used by some of the parameters. Lists only the ID. open a shell (in Linux) or a command prompt (in Microsoft Windows). 5 In the Application Server Diagnostics area. select the Application Server for which you want to display test results. NOTE The warning messages displayed for any of the DB diagnostics are in most cases an indication that the system needs to be tuned with the recommended values suggested for optimum performance of the product. Lists all diagnostics with full details (for example.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment 4 Click Run All Tests to run all tests listed in the Application Server Diagnostics area. the parameters and their children).exe or dbdiagnostic.NSH/bin folder.. Table 1 Parameter help list listFull Parameters for the DBdiagnostic command (part 1 of 2) Description Displays the help for the command. Database Diagnostics The Database Diagnostics tool provides tests that can be helpful for monitoring the status of the database and for working with Customer Support to identify and resolve issues. and description for all diagnostics. or Failure Advice tab. name. the Status column shows an icon that indicates the success or failure of each test. execute either dbdiagnostic.sh with any of the parameters shown in Table 1. run dbdiagnostics list to determine the ID for each specific diagnostic test. To run the Database Diagnostics tool 1 On the BMC BladeLogic Application Server. 7 When you are finished viewing test results. 6 On the Diagnostic Results dialog.. These predefined tests collect data on the configuration of the BMC BladeLogic database and provide feedback. Then click the Test Output. Or click Run Selected Tests to run only the tests you selected in that area. 2 From the . Log. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 23 .

getDiagParams diagId=diagId Displays the parameters for a diagnostic. To run a diagnostic test. delAllRes runDiag Deletes all results for all diagnostics. Note that these IDs are not fixed and can be different in different environments.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment Table 1 Parameter getDiag Parameters for the DBdiagnostic command (part 2 of 2) Description diagId=diagId Displays information for a specific diagnostic. Table 2 on page 25 shows example IDs for each of the diagnostic tests available with the dbdiagnostics tool. getResLastExec diagId=diagId Displays the results for the last execution for a specific diagnostic. diagId=<diagId> optName1=val1 optName2=val2 Runs a specific diagnostic using optional parameters. The remaining tests apply to Oracle databases only. the status of the run. You can find the list of parameters for a diagnostic by running the diagnostic with the getDiagParams parameter followed by the diagId. first obtain the list of IDs by running dbdiagnostics list and then use the ID of the particular diagnostic that you want to run as input to the utility. NOTE The Top_N_tables_chk and JRE_Row_Count_Chk diagnostic tests apply to both Oracle and SQL Server databases. getResAfterDate diagId=diagId afterDate=MM-dd-yy[yy] (you can enter a two or four digit year) Displays all of the results for diagnostics recorded on or after the specified date starting at 00:00:00 AM. and the parameters used for that run. 24 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . such as statistics on the last execution of the diagnostic. IDs for the diagnostics Each diagnostic test has an associated ID. delRes diagId=diagId Delete the results for a specific diagnostic.

Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 25 . which displays the results of the last execution for this diagnostic (shown in Figure 2). 1000005 JRE_ROW_COUNT_CHK Checks the job_run table and returns the record with the largest number of events. dbdiagnostics runDiag diagId=1000000 Figure 1 output from the command You can then view the results of the diagnostic by running the command with the getResLastExec parameter. 1000001 ORACLE CHECK NUMBER PROCESSES ALLOWED Checks the number of Oracle processes and provides advice. For a description of how to use this diagnostic to verify that Schema statistics are current. while Figure 1 shows the output returned from the command. see the “Before you install” chapter of the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide Example syntax and output The following example shows the command format you would use to run the ORACLE CHECK BLOCK SIZE diagnostic. and recommends remediation if the statistics are not current. 1000004 TOP_N_TABLES_CHK Checks the data volumes/sizes of the top N tables. 1000006 DBMS_STATS_CHK Checks to see if the Schema statistics are current (based on a user-supplied expiration). 1000003 ORACLE OPTIMIZER SETTINGS CHK Checks the Oracle optimizer settings.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment Table 2 ID 1000000 Diagnostic names and description Diagnostic name and description ORACLE CHECK BLOCK SIZE Checks the Oracle block size and provides advice.

4 Click OK. 2 Do one of the following: — Right-click the job and select Set Property.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment dbdiagnostics getResLastExec diagId=1000000 Figure 2 Sample output for ORACLE CHECK BLOCK SIZE diagnostic diagId=1000000 execDiagId=2000002 execStartTime=2010-03-22 12:47:02. which is large enough. The Set Job Properties window is displayed. NOTE Be sure to set the DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED property back to FALSE when not diagnosing an issue. 3 Set the property value to TRUE. messageTime=2010-03-22 12:47:03. select DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED from the Extended properties list. 26 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . To set the DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED job property 1 In the Jobs folder. as running the job in debug mode does have a negative impact on performance. Select DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED from the Name drop-down list. The additional level of logging provides you or BMC Software Customer Support representatives with more detailed information when diagnosing issues with job execution. select a job. you can use the DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED job property to provide additional diagnostic information to the job log. — In the Properties tab.0 Running a job in debug mode If you are experiencing issues with job execution. The default value for the DEBUG_MODE_ENABLED property is FALSE.0 messageLevel=INFO message=ORACLE CHECK BLOCK SIZE: Block size on the Database is 8192.

0. and select Show Log. Warnings. the Application Server log file is located in: UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. 2 Select a run of a job. Click Close to close the dialog. 3 To filter messages so the job log only shows servers with specific job results.Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment To view the job log 1 Open the Jobs folder.00\NSH\br/appserver.log If you are running a multiple Application Server environment. The Log Item Details dialog opens. double-click on a message. 4 To display messages in a dialog that allows you to scroll through messages one by one. You can also review the log file on the Application Server for the additional diagnostic information. right-click the job or Execution Task and select Show Results to display its job runs.00/NSH/br/appserver. right-click. Click the Up arrow or the Down arrow to scroll through messages one by one. see “Considerations for troubleshooting jobs in a MAS environment” on page 57. A window displays log messages generated by the job. Success. 5 Click Close to close the log messages window.log Windows installationDirectory\BladeLogic\8. By default. Chapter 2 Overview of BMC BladeLogic Server Automation 27 . navigate to a job or Execution Task.0. or All. use the Run Details drop-down to select Errors.

Monitoring and diagnosing issues in the BMC BladeLogic environment 28 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

NOTE The Application Server and the RCP client (BMC BladeLogic console) must be located on the same Local Area Network (LAN). Use the following tools to make configuration changes: ■ To make changes to basic configuration settings at a later time. you can run the Application Server Configuration wizard. See “Configuring multiple Application Servers on the same host” on page 93. see “Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings” on page 39. you use the PostInstall Configuration wizard to perform the initial configuration of the Application Server. you can start the Application Server and then fine-tune it as needed. file. ■ Multiple Application Servers on the Same Host This configuration lets you add multiple Application Servers to the host and configure them to perform one or more functions. For information. the Application Server can be adjusted to scale a system and to fine tune its performance. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 29 . Remote users can use the console through either RDP or Citrix from a remote machine to the machine where the console resides. Controlling communication between clients and servers as well as access to database. There are two general configurations for Application Servers in the BMC BladeLogic environment: ■ Single (Default) Application Server on the Host This configuration is the most common one and can be performed as a last step in the installation of an Application Server. See “Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server” on page 34.Chapter 3 3 Configuring the Application Server The core of the three-tier architecture in BMC BladeLogic is the Application Server. During installation. With this basic configuration. and mail servers.

If you prefer. ■ Understanding the application server Application server processes The BMC BladeLogic Application Server is designed to process connections from many clients simultaneously. For information. and you can also use it to set other more complex configuration options. When the request is complete. which is a command line utility that allows you to set all parameters used by the Application Server. See “Configuring the process spawner” on page 79 for more on configuration.) Typically. BMC BladeLogic calls these worker threads. So is the number of open client connections. see “Managing multiple Application Servers on the same host” on page 109.Understanding the application server ■ BMC BladeLogic provides a utility called the Application Server Administration console. 30 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . the Application Server picks a worker thread from the pool to execute that task. (The number of worker threads in the pool is configurable. which launches new processes external to the Application Server process. the Application Server can handle many more client connections than it has worker threads. The other process is a process spawner. To manage multiple Application Servers on the host or change their configurations. See “Scaling the Application Server” on page 52 for more on configuration. Process spawning is primarily used for Network Shell Script Jobs and some types of extended objects. For information. The Application Server Administration console lets you set the same parameters as those available in the Post-Install Configuration wizard. you can configure the Application Server so the process spawner does not run as an external process. One process runs the core functionality of the Application Server. the worker thread is returned to the pool. When a client requests any type of activity. use the Infrastructure Management window. Rather than dedicating a thread to each client connection. Using this approach. see “Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to configure Application Servers” on page 44. the BMC BladeLogic Application Server runs as two distinct processes. Spawning processes externally to the Application Server can be beneficial for memory management. the Application Server maintains a pool of threads that can be used for processing client activity.

and so forth. (For a description of how multiple Application Servers can process jobs cooperatively. With this system. However. the job execution thread loads the job and allocates work item threads. Deploy Jobs can optionally utilize a special pool of lightweight work item threads used only for processing Deploy Job phases that access target servers.Work item threads and the job execution thread Work item threads and the job execution thread A single Application Server processes BMC BladeLogic jobs using one job execution thread and a configurable number of work item threads. when a work item thread becomes available. For most job types. the Application Server assigns equal preference to all pending jobs. The job execution thread constantly watches for scheduled jobs. In addition. a sufficient number of work item threads may not be available for simultaneously processing all jobs.) The number of work item threads needed for any job varies by job type. The next work item thread goes to the third job in the queue. all jobs can begin processing as soon as a work item thread becomes available. until a work item thread has been assigned to all jobs in the queue.) When a job comes due. the job execution thread continues to watch for other scheduled jobs. see “Job distribution” on page 32. starting with the first job in the queue. When allocating work item threads. When the next work item thread becomes available. jobs with fewer job parts may complete sooner than jobs with many job parts. For more information on specifying the number of available work item threads. In this case. but there are exceptions to this rule. Then the cycle of allocating work item threads begins again. which perform all work required for that job. After initiating a job in this way. When an Application Server is running multiple jobs. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 31 . one work item thread is required to execute each part of the job. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. see “Scaling the Application Server” on page 52. (Note that a job set to run immediately is considered a scheduled job. it is assigned to the second job in the queue. For a description of how jobs are divided into job parts. the number of job parts equals the number of target servers. it is assigned to the first job in the queue of pending jobs. All jobs require one work item thread for pre-execution and another for post-execution.

by default) in the Application Server’s profile. When multiple Application Servers are configured to execute jobs. However.) For example. Generally. Application Servers are configured to cooperate when executing jobs. see “Setting up job distribution between multiple Application Servers” on page 55.Job distribution Job distribution If you have multiple Application Servers installed and they all access the same database. NOTE You cannot enable or disable work item sharing at the job type level. scheduled jobs are delegated to the first Application Server that requests a job. By default. local work item threads on an Application Server will process all work items for a job before those work items can be distributed to other Application Servers. Application Servers make an effort to distribute work items to each other to increase the number of concurrently executing work items and shorten overall execution time. (That maximum number can be configured. provided that the Application Server making the request is not already executing the maximum number of jobs that it can run simultaneously. If this attribute is set to False. Although work for an individual job can be spread among multiple Application Servers. Typically. For more information on configuring cooperation between Application Servers. work items are not shared to or from that Application Server. During job execution. or all Application Servers should have the attribute set to False. if all local work item threads are already processing work items. only one Application Server manages each individual job. Using additional Application Servers increases the job execution capacity of the system and in most cases speeds overall job processing. if a BMC BladeLogic installation consists of two Application Servers that are both configured to run the same maximum number of jobs. all Application Servers should have this attribute set to True. those Application Servers can cooperate by distributing jobs to balance their processing workloads. each Application Server will be given the same number of jobs to run (assuming there are an even number of jobs to execute). Best Practice: Do not mix-and-match the value of the MultiAppServerEnabled attribute between Application Servers. the Application Server will distribute work items to other Application Servers that have idle work item threads. This work item sharing capability is controlled by the MultiAppServerEnabled attribute (which is set to true. 32 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . the number of work items processed during a job run directly corresponds to the number of target servers for the job.

see “Setting the number of database connections” on page 64. The client application can then initiate a session by presenting the session credential to an Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 33 . Authentication framework A BMC BladeLogic Application Server employs a unified framework for processing all user authentication requests. If the number of database connections reaches the high boundary. Based on the authentication protocol. When a worker thread or a work item thread needs a database connection. ■ ■ The Authentication Service and the Application Service are always located on the same host. When the database activity is complete. the Authentication Service issues a session credential to the client application. Network Shell Proxy Service—An entity that encapsulates the functionality of a Network Shell Proxy Server. ensuring that the number of connections stays within high and low boundaries. For more information.Pooled database connections Pooled database connections The BMC BladeLogic Application Server maintains two different pools of database connections—one is used for processing jobs running the BMC BladeLogic Console and the other is used for processing all other activity. A thread watches the pool of database connections. the thread attempts to trim the number of database connections back to the low boundary. it acquires one from the appropriate pool of database connections. Application Service—An entity that encapsulates the functionality of a BMC BladeLogic Application Server. such as client connections. When users on a BMC BladeLogic client application (except BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation) want to authenticate. the Authentication Service uses the appropriate mechanism to authenticate that user. the database connection is returned to its pool. If authentication succeeds. or it can be set up on a stand-alone machine even though it is still associated with an Application Server. You can configure the high and low boundaries to accommodate user needs. the client contacts the Authentication Service using any supported authentication protocol. That framework is based on three services: ■ Authentication Service—An entity dedicated to authenticating users by means of all supported authentication protocols. A Network Shell Proxy Service can be located on the same host.

Starting. and restarting the Application Server on the host also starts. see Chapter 4. The BMC BladeLogic environment supports one Application Server Launcher per host. including a description of how BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation authenticates users. stopping. Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server The BMC BladeLogic Post-Install Configuration wizard consolidates the minimum configuration steps that must be performed to set up an Application Server. stop.” The Application Server Launcher An Application Server Launcher is a mechanism for configuring and controlling multiple Application Servers on the same host. The Post-Install Configuration wizard presents those essential tasks in a graphical user interface and provides explanatory information for each step in the process. Available for both Windows and UNIX-style installations. only a few must be set to make a BMC BladeLogic system functional. It is so called because it launches (starts) and controls these additional Application Servers. The Application Server Launcher lets you configure and manage (start. terminate. the configuration wizard allows you to set the following configuration options: ■ Database connection parameters—The BMC BladeLogic Console works in conjunction with an Oracle or SQL Server database server in its middle tier. See “Configuring multiple Application Servers on the same host” on page 93. restart. Use the configuration wizard to configure your database connection. and restarts the Application Server Launcher.The Application Server Launcher For more information on authentication and other security features. “Administering security. stops. The Application Server Launcher must be running on the host in order for you to perform these operations. Although the BMC BladeLogic Application Server Administration console provides commandline mechanisms for configuring all possible Application Server options. 34 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Installing the Application Server on a host also installs the Application Server Launcher. remove and redeploy) each additional Application Server on the host.

If you are running the Post-Install Configuration wizard on UNIX. select Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Utilities => Application Server Configuration Wizard.Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server ■ File server—The BMC BladeLogic Console uses a file server to store large snapshots of files. Click Cancel to close the wizard. Windows installables. The installation program gives you the option of launching the wizard at the end of the installation procedure. and other types of information that is not easily stored in a database. The BLAdmin user has Read access for all system objects within the BMC BladeLogic Console. Use the configuration wizard to provide SRP passwords for the RBACAdmin and BLAdmin users. enter the following: ■ ■ Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 35 . From the Windows Start menu. BLPackages. and the SNMP destination to which all SNMP traps are sent. The RBACAdmin user has full permission to manage roles and users in the RBAC Manager workspace in the BMC BladeLogic Console. Notification servers—The BMC BladeLogic Console optionally generates email and SNMP traps that send notifications when a job completes. the address from which the notification emails originate. do one of the following: ■ Perform an installation that includes installation of the Application Server. Use the configuration wizard to identify the file server and a directory within the file server. ■ ■ NOTE Be aware of the following: ■ If your database is not set up or you do not currently have the information needed to establish a connection to that database. Network Shell scripts. Obtain the necessary connection information and run the PostInstall Configuration wizard again to complete your system configuration. you cannot configure the Application Server. Use the configuration wizard to identify an SMTP server. where you can assign permissions for all users. ■ 1 To start the Post-Install Configuration wizard. Start the wizard manually by running one of the following commands in the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. Super-user passwords—The BMC BladeLogic Console provides several predefined users. the OS-specific x11 libraries must be installed. — On a Windows system.

. the wizard will display configuration settings that have already been entered for the Application Server and allow you to change those settings. By default the database name is bladelogic. provide the following database configuration information (and do not select the Advanced option): Database Server—Server running the database.exe — On a UNIX-style system. By default a BMC BladeLogic installation uses the following database ports: Database Type Oracle SQL Server Port Number 1521 1433 Database Name—SQL Server database name.) User ID—User name that the database needs to authenticate your connection.. If you are using a custom connection string. provide the following database configuration information: 36 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .) SID—System ID of the Oracle database. (This option is only available for Oracle databases. 3 Choose a Database Type—either Oracle or SQL Server. or. Password—Password assigned to the user ID. 4 If you are not using a custom connection string./br/blappconf NOTE If you invoke the wizard without passing the -install flag.Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server \bin\ blappconf. The configuration wizard opens. Database Port—Port the database listens on. The Database page displays. 2 Read the introductory page and click Next. (This option is only available for SQL Server databases. enter the following: .

Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server User ID—User name that the database needs to authenticate your connection. NOTE Do not limit access to the file server by pushing agent ACLs to the agent on the file server. Password—Password assigned to the user ID. File Server Storage Location—Directory on the file server where data is stored. 5 Click Next.local file on the file server: Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 37 . 72 GB of available.user=userName ■ where appServer is a comma-separated list of Application Server names or IP addresses and userName is the name to which all users are mapped. A file server should meet the following requirements: ■ An RSCD agent must be installed and licensed. Advanced—Select this option to indicate that you are providing a custom connection string. the file server is created on the same machine as the Application Server. disk space. Without this mapping a user may not be able to access a file that another user has stored on the file server. ■ A file server must have. By default. non-redundant. as a minimum. The File Server page displays. 6 Provide the following file server configuration information: File Server Name—Name of the server where data is stored. All users need to be mapped to the same user on the file server. ■ The internal System:System role/user must be mapped to the user name defined on the file server. One way to accomplish the necessary mapping is to create an entry like the following in the exports file on the file server: appServer rw. To accomplish the mapping. A user name must be defined on the file server. By default. and all users must be mapped to that user. Connection String—Type the custom connection string in the field below the Advanced checkbox. the directory of the file server is appserverInstallDirectory/storage. create an entry like the following in the users. BMC BladeLogic recommends that the file server have 200 GB or more of available RAID 5 disk space.

BMC BladeLogic jobs can generate email upon their completion. 9 If you are using SNMP trap notifications. where you can assign permissions for all BMC BladeLogic users. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. provide information identifying the SNMP server by entering the following under SNMP Options: SNMP Server—Name or IP address of the host to which SNMP traps should be sent. By default the port is set to the standard SNMP port of 162. 7 Click Next. For more information on the RBACAdmin and BLAdmin users.) Email From—Email address from which BMC BladeLogic-generated email is sent. the process will attempt to create it. (SMTP stands for simple mail transfer protocol. The User Passwords page displays. typically bladmin or administrator. If the required directory structure does not already exist on the file server. SNMP Port—The port on the SNMP server that listens for SNMP traps. 12 Click Finish. 10 Click Next.user=userName where userName is the name to which all users are mapped. The Notification Servers page displays. Passwords are used to authenticate the RBACAdmin and BLAdmin users via the SRP authentication protocol. You will not be able to enter a password if a password has already been set. The RBACAdmin user has full permission to manage roles and users in the RBAC Manager workspace in the BMC BladeLogic Console.Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server System:System rw. The BLAdmin user has Read access for all system objects within BMC BladeLogic. 11 Under both RBACAdmin User and BLAdmin User. 38 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 8 Provide information identifying an email server by entering the following under SMTP Options: SMTP Server—Name or IP address of the host managing email. enter a password and then retype the password to confirm your entry.

Database connection File server Notification servers Most configuration settings or to set additional configuration parameters on an Application Server The Application Server Administration console (blasadmin).Changing the configuration of an application server NOTE BMC BladeLogic recommends that you synchronize the clock on the Application Server and all client machines. Which tool you use depends on the settings you want to change. Attributes (configuration settings) specified The Infrastructure Management window.. This wizard presents the same information as the Post-Installation Configuration wizard. except that it is in a tabbed format and shows current settings in the text boxes. you can use the Application Server Configuration wizard (blappconf). The Application Server Configuration wizard. see “Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings” on page 39. See in an Application Server’s profile (when there “Viewing and editing an Application Server’s are multiple Application Servers on the same profile” on page 100. if an Application Server is in Boston. where the time is 7:04.. To change. For example. Initial (post-installation) configuration settings for the Application Server: ■ ■ ■ You can use. You can also use the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to change these settings. See “Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to configure Application Servers” on page 44.. host) Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings To change configuration settings on an Application Server. Clocks should be synchronized to the minute. Changing the configuration of an application server There are three tools you can use to change an Application Server’s configuration.. For information. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 39 . the clock on client machines in San Francisco should be set to 4:04.

enter the following: \bin\blappconf -s applicationServerName Where applicationServerName is the name of the Application Server you want to change. — From the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. enter the following: .Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings You can change the following settings: ■ Database connection parameters File server name and storage location Notification servers — SMTP server and email address from which notification emails originate and SNMP server and port to which SNMP traps are sent ■ ■ NOTE After super-user passwords are set in the Post-Installation Configuration wizard. enter the following: \bin\blappconf — On a UNIX-style system. select Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Utilities => Application Server Configuration Wizard. you cannot use the Application Server Configuration wizard to change them. You must use the RBAC Administration tool./br/blappconf. use one of the following methods: — From the Windows Start menu. from the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. For example: blappconf -s JobServer1 40 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 1 Start the Application Server Configuration wizard: ■ To change the configuration of the default Application Server.exe ■ To change the configuration of a specific Application Server when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host.

To start all Application Servers on the host. To have changes affect future Application Servers. Make changes you want. ■ Starting all Application Servers on the host This operation starts all Application Servers on the host. Starting Application Servers There are two methods for starting Application Servers. Right-click BladeLogic Application Server and select Start from the pop-up menu. use the Infrastructure Management window. and double-click Services. from the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. See “Starting a specific Application Server” on page 109. whether a single (default) Application Server or multiple Application Servers. To start a specific Application Server (when additional Application Servers are configured on the host).Starting Application Servers NOTE If you specify blappconf -s. whether a single (default) Application Server or multiple Application Servers. from the Start menu. select Settings => Control Panel. 3 Click OK. Application Servers created on the host in the future will not have the changes. 4 Restart the Application Server. Double-click Administrative Tools.d/blappserv start ■ Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 41 . changes affect the specified deployment. enter the following: /etc/init. The method you use depends on the Application Servers you want to start: ■ To start all Application Servers on the host. On a UNIX-style system. If you specify blappconf with no -s option. do one of the following: ■ On Windows. use this command to configure the template deployment: blappconf -s _template 2 The Application Server Configuration wizard appears. see “Starting all Application Servers on the host”. changes affect only the default deployment.

whether a single (default) Application Server or multiple Application Servers. ■ 42 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . whether a single (default) Application Server or multiple Application Servers. and double-click Services. see “Stopping all Application Servers on the host” on page 43. use the Infrastructure Management window. ■ Restarting all Application Servers on the host This operation restarts all Application Servers on the host. The method you use depends on the Application Servers you want to stop: ■ To stop all Application Servers on the host. To stop a specific Application Server (when additional Application Servers are configured on the host). from the Start menu. To restart a specific Application Server (when additional Application Servers are configured on the host). Double-click Administrative Tools. On a UNIX-style system.d/blappserv restart ■ Stopping Application Servers There are two methods for stopping Application Servers.Restarting Application Servers Restarting Application Servers There are two methods for restarting Application Servers. see “Restarting all Application Servers on the host”. To use this stop method. The method you use depends on the Application Servers you want to restart: ■ To restart all Application Servers on the host. use the Infrastructure Management window. the default Application Server must already be started. whether a single (default) Application Server or multiple Application Servers. the default Application Server must already be started. select Settings= > Control Panel. Do one of the following: ■ On Windows. See “Stopping a specific Application Server” on page 109. enter the following: /etc/init. Right-click BladeLogic Application Server and select Restart from the pop-up menu. To use this restart operation. See “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111.

You can use these commands to shut down. The BLCLI provides commands that allow you to shut down Application Servers more gracefully (see “Shutting down Application Servers gracefully”). These commands are available in the AppServerShutdown name space of the BLCLI. enter Control-C. To stop all Application Servers on the host. resume. select Settings => Control Panel. or shut down an Application Server When you pause an Application Server. do one of the following: ■ From the Windows command line window where the Application Server is running. What happens when you pause. Double-click Administrative Tools. Right-click BladeLogic Application Server and select Stop from the pop-up menu. even though they may be currently processing jobs. and double-click Services. the following occurs: ■ The job execution thread on the Application Server no longer processes newly scheduled jobs. From the Windows Start menu. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 43 . You can also use related commands to pause an Application Server while it processes all active jobs or resume service after you have paused the Application Server. See the BLCLI Help for specific information on AppServerShutdown. pause. NOTE You can also use the Infrastructure Management window to gracefully shut down a specific Application Server (when multiple Application Servers are configured on the host). See “Stopping a specific Application Server” on page 109.Stopping all Application Servers on the host Stopping all Application Servers on the host Performing this procedure immediately stops all Application Servers on the host. enter the following: /etc/init. or resume a specific Application Server or all Application Servers on the host. On a UNIX-style system.d/blappserv stop ■ ■ Shutting down Application Servers gracefully The BLCLI provides commands that allow you to shut down an Application Server after all jobs running on it have completed or after a specified period of time has elapsed.

the Application Server’s job framework is paused. Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to configure Application Servers The BMC BladeLogic Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) is a command line utility that lets you set parameters needed for an Application Server. The Application Server is temporarily set so it can no longer request work item threads from other Application Servers. database. When all jobs and work items have completed or a specified period of time has elapsed. file. 44 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . and SNMP servers. This section provides procedures to control all aspects of the Application Server’s behavior. mail. These parameters define the location and behavior of the application.Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to configure Application Servers ■ The Application Server is temporarily set so other Application Servers cannot distribute jobs to it. If any of those work items take a long time to finish. the Authentication Service. When you instruct a paused Application Server to resume work. ■ ■ NOTE When you pause an Application Server. and other components of an Application Server. you essentially undo the actions listed above. the Application Server continues to give out work item threads to other Application Servers. the shutdown sequence begins. versus the subset you can configure with the Post-Install Configuration Wizard. The job execution thread can again process scheduled jobs and the Application Server can request work item threads from other Application Servers. it continues to process all of its current work items. the Application Server will not appear to be paused until all of those work items are complete. if requested. To expedite the processing of any currently active jobs. When you use AppServerShutdown commands to shut down an Application Server. The blasadmin utility lets you configure all parameters. as described above.

How you enter the command depends whether you want to configure the default Application Server or one of multiple Application Servers on the host. enter the following: \bin\blasadmin. enter the commands. 4 Restart the Application Server to have your configuration settings take effect. do one of the following: — From the Start menu.exe Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 45 . select Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Utilities => Application Server Administration. For information. How you start this utility determines the Application Server configuration affected by the commands. See “Starting the Application Server Administration console”. — From the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. 2 At the prompt. you can change the location of a file server (on the default Application Server) by entering the following command blasadmin set fileserver location /tmp/Storage. see: ■ ■ ■ The set Command The show Command The help Command 3 Exit the blasadmin utility. Starting the Application Server Administration console To start the Application Server Administration console. TIP If you want to enter just one or two commands.Starting the Application Server Administration console To configure Application Servers with the Application Server Administration Console (blasadmin): 1 Start the Application Server Administration Console. For example. run the blasadmin command. you can both run the blasadmin utility and pass it a command at the same time. do one of the following: ■ On Windows. Starting blasadmin to Configure the Default Application Server To start the Application Server Administration console when there is a single Application Server on the host.

Starting the Application Server Administration console

Both options run the same command.

On a UNIX-style system, from the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed, enter the following:
./br/blasadmin

This command starts the blasadmin utility and you can use blasadmin set and show commands.

NOTE
All commands you enter during the session affect only the default Application Server. Application Servers created on the host in the future do not have the changes. To have changes affect future Application Servers, use this command to start blasadmin and configure the _template deployment: blasadmin -s _template For information on the default and _template deployments, see “Editing the list of roles with Application Server Launcher access” on page 113

Starting blasadmin when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host
If there are multiple Application Servers on the same host, you need to specify whether you want to use blasadmin to configure one specific Application Server or all Application Servers on the host. Do one of the following:

To start blasadmin and configure one specific Application Server, use:
blasadmin -s appServerName

Where: -s appServerName is the Application Server’s name. For example:
blasadmin -s OtherJobServer

This command starts the blasadmin utility and you can enter blasadmin commands. All commands you enter during the session (until you enter exit at the blasadmin prompt) affect only the Application Server you specified.

To start blasadmin and configure all Application Servers on the host, use:
blasadmin -a

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The set Command

This command starts the blasadmin utility and you can enter set and show commands. All commands you enter during the session affect: — All additional Application Servers configured on the same host — The _template deployment — The default Application Server For information on deployments, see “Editing the list of roles with Application Server Launcher access” on page 113.

The set Command
The set command sets the parameter to the specified value in the configuration. The setting takes effect when you restart the Application Server.The format for the set command is:
set component parameter value

Where:
■ ■ ■

component is the Application Server functionality you can configure parameter is an option that controls the Application Server behavior value is the value for the parameter

For example:
blasadmin> set fileserver name redhat1

This example sets the file server’s name to redhat1.

NOTE
When configuring settings on the Application Server, you must restart the Application Server for a setting to take effect.

TIP
When there is no ambiguity about the command you are typing, you can enter a shortened version of a command. For example, you can type set f n instead of typing set fileserver name.

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The show Command

The show Command
The show command shows components, parameters, and current settings for an Application Server. The format is: show [component] [component parameter] [all]
To Show Descriptions of all parameters for all components At the bladmin> prompt, enter show descriptions For example:
bladmin> show descriptions [AccountConfig] AccountLockoutDuration - How long (in minutes) to keep the account locked AccountLockoutThreshold - How many failed logins before the account is locked MaxPasswordAge - How many days before a password needs to be changed MinPasswordLength - Minimum length of password required [AgentConfig] EnableAgentRpc - Enable or disable agent RPC communication [true, false] SecureFilePath - Path to the rsc “‘secure’ file. [AppServer] AppServerName - name of application server AppSvcPort - listening port for Application service . . .

All components and parameters, plus settings for parameters that have them

show all For example:
bladmin> show all [AccountConfig] AccountLockoutDuration:0 AccountockoutThreshold:0 MaxPasswordAge:0 MinPasswordLength:0 [AgentConfig] EnableAgentRpc:false SecureFilePath: . . .

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The show Command

To Show

At the bladmin> prompt, enter

A component’s parameters show component (with descriptions) For example:
bladmin> show fileserver available options: [all|location|name] all - display all configuration parameters for this option location - the NSH style </c/temp> location name - the name of the fileserver

A component’s parameters show component all and settings For example:
bladmin> show snmpconfig all [SnmpConfig] SnmpPort:162 SnmpServer:

The current setting for a single parameter

show component parameter For example:
bladmin> show database MaxGeneralConnections MaxGeneralConnections:100

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The help Command

The help Command
The help command provides help on the set and show commands.
To get help on At the bladmin> prompt, enter

A list of components (with help set | show descriptions) you can specify with the command For example:
bladmin> help set AccountConfig - minimum password length configuration AuthServer - authorization configuration ConfigManagerUI - configuration for UI Database - the database configuration parameters . . .

All of the parameters for a help set | show component component For example:
bladmin> help set Database

A description of a parameter

help set | show component parameter For example:
bladmin> help show pxeserver listen_port the server port the PXE server listens on

Specifying multiple values for a parameter
Some Application Server parameters accept more than one value. To specify multiple values for a parameter, use a comma-separated list. For example:
blAdmin> set ManagementService EmailRecipients adA@ACo.com,adB@ACo.com

Changing the default separator for multiple values
In the blasadmin utility, the comma is the default separator for specifying multiple parameter values. If the values you want to specify include commas, you can change the separator to a different character. To change the default separator, enter the blasadmin command with the -c option.

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BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide

Deleting a configuration setting

blasadmin -c value_separator_character

For example, to change the value separator to a semicolon, you would enter:
blasadmin -c ;

The setting is in effect only for the blasadmin session (until you exit the blasadmin utility).

Deleting a configuration setting
You can delete a parameter value from an Application Server’s configuration. To delete the value, use the blasadmin set command and specify an empty value surrounded by quotation marks (““). For example:
blasadmin -s OtherConfigServer set AuthServer AppServiceURLs ““

This example removes the AppServiceURLs value for Application Server named OtherConfigServer.

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Managing Application Server behavior with the Application Server Administration console

Managing Application Server behavior with the Application Server Administration console
Using the Application Server Administration console, (the blasadmin utility) you can perform a variety of tasks to manage all aspects of Application Server behavior. The following list describes the procedures you can perform to manage the Application Server. Many of these procedure include subordinate procedures.
■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■

Configuring the Application Server Configuring the file server Configuring a mail server Configuring Perl Configuring an SNMP server Configuring a database server Configuring the process spawner Processing across mount points Restricting the size of configuration and extended objects Configuring user interface settings Setting SRP login requirements Configuring the PXE Server Configuring the Licensing Module Enabling asynchronous execution Enabling web services

Configuring the Application Server
The Application Server is the core of the middle tier in a BMC BladeLogic installation. Not only does the Application Server control communication between clients and servers, it also regulates activity between the client and the database, file, and mail servers. The Application Server provides many adjustable parameters that allow you to scale a BMC BladeLogic system to virtually any size.

Scaling the Application Server
The Application Server provides several options that you can adjust to accommodate increased activity. An Application Server should be configured so that even when all of its work item threads are busy, the Application Server still has additional resource capacity.

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Configuring the Application Server

1 Start the Application Server Administration console, as described in “Starting the
Application Server Administration console” on page 45.

2 To specify the maximum number of worker threads, enter the following:
set appserver maxworkerthreads #

where # is the maximum number of threads that can process requests from clients. For example, you might set this to 10, which means that only 10 client connections can be serviced at a time even though many more users might actually be connected to the Application Server. Worker threads should not be confused with work item threads, which process BMC BladeLogic Console jobs (see step 5).

3 To specify the maximum number of client connections that the Application Server
can manage, enter the following:
set appserver MaxClientContexts #

where # is the maximum number of connections to clients.

4 To specify the maximum number of jobs, enter the following:
set appserver MaxJobs #

where # is the maximum number of jobs. By controlling the number of jobs that are processed simultaneously, you can avoid overtaxing Application Server resources.

5 To specify a maximum size for the pool of threads that can be used to process BMC
BladeLogic Console jobs, enter the following:
set appserver MaxWorkItemThreads #

where # is a number of work item threads. All BMC BladeLogic jobs let you specify how many targets to process in parallel. You can set a value from 1 to 10 or allow an unlimited number of targets to be processed in parallel. The MaxWorkItemThreads and MaxLightweightWorkItemThreads (see step 6) also can control how many targets can be processed in parallel. If your system uses one Application Server, the maximum number of targets that can be processed is based on the Application Server’s available work item threads. If your system uses multiple Application Servers, the maximum number of targets that can be processed in parallel is based on the sum of all available work item threads on all Application Servers.

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6 To specify a maximum size for the pool of lightweight work item threads that can be used for Deploy Jobs. the Application Server can use a pool of lightweight work item threads to process phases of a Deploy Job that access target servers. see “Work item threads and the job execution thread” on page 31.Configuring the Application Server When processing Deploy Jobs. For more on the role of work item threads. Using lightweight work item threads helps you run more Deploy Jobs in parallel more efficiently. An Application Server can optionally provide a secondary pool of lightweight work item threads. 54 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . To avoid this kind of inefficiency. lightweight work item threads behave exactly like work item threads. 7 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set appserver MaxLightweightWorkItemThreads # where # is a number of lightweight work item threads. Lightweight work item threads primarily perform tasks on target servers and consequently consume almost no memory on an Application Server. These threads are only used during the Simulate and Commit phases of a Deploy Job. Other than being limited to particular types of tasks. By default this value is set to 0. work item threads often sit idle while target servers process deployment tasks.

enter the following: set appserver ServerMonitorInterval # where # is the frequency with which an Application Server updates its own time stamp (that is. ■ 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. For information on synchronizing bladelogic.keystore file.Configuring the Application Server Setting up job distribution between multiple Application Servers When Application Servers are configured to access the same database. which functions as its heartbeat. System clocks on all Application Servers must be synchronized to within a few seconds of each other. they automatically attempt to cooperate by balancing their job processing workloads. They accomplish this by distributing the processing of entire jobs or work items for large individual jobs to other Application Servers. its heartbeat). it also checks for the heartbeat of any remote Application Servers. if RemoteServerTimeout is set to 5. enter the following: set appserver RemoteServerTimeout # where # is number of seconds between heartbeats before a remote Application Server is considered out of service. For example. they must know which Application Servers are in service. the Application Server is considered out of service. NOTE For Application Servers to cooperate. To accomplish this. When an Application Server updates its heartbeat. Application Servers that are cooperating monitor each other’s heartbeat to determine which Application Servers are in service. each Application Server periodically updates its time stamp.keystore files. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 55 . 2 To specify a time span that indicates a remote Application Server has timed out. the following prerequisites must be met: ■ Each Application Server must be configured to access the same database and have the same bladelogic. and 10 seconds elapse between heartbeats. see “Synchronizing keystore files of multiple Application Servers” on page 58. For Application Servers to cooperate. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 3 To specify an interval between heartbeats for an Application Server.

56 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Once the maximum is exceeded. By default the RegistryPort is set to 9836. Generally. 6 To specify that a socket connection use SSL. 9 Restart the Application Server. 5 To specify a time-out for responses from a remote Application Server. the connection times out. 7 To specify that remote Application Servers contacting the Application Server must authenticate. Once that maximum is exceeded. enter the following: set appserver RegistryPort # where # is a port number. enter the following: set appserver SocketTimeout # where # is the maximum number of seconds to wait for a response from an Application Server after the initial connection has already been established. enter the following: set appserver RequireClientAuthentication true where true instructs the Application Server to require authentication from remote Application Servers. connections encrypted with SSL also require client authentication. the connection times out. enter the following: set appserver UseSSLSockets true where true indicates that connections to this Application Server must be encrypted using SSL. 8 To specify a port used for communication between Application Servers. enter the following: set appserver SocketConnectTimeout # where # is the maximum number of seconds for obtaining an initial socket connection to a remote Application Server.Configuring the Application Server 4 To specify a time-out for connecting to a remote Application Server.

the logging information for the job is actually distributed between the log files on both appserver1 and appserver2.log There are also individual log files for each Application Server deployment. which by default are located in: UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. For example.1\NSH\br/appserver.1/NSH/br/appserver. When Application Servers are configured to access the same database. you may have two physical Application Servers (appserver1 and appserver2).Configuring the Application Server Considerations for troubleshooting jobs in a MAS environment Each Application Server has a log file which contains information about what is being executed on that Application Server. and the Distribution Manager is dynamically allocating resource and running jobs on both Application Servers as needed. which means that the log information is also distributed.log Windows installationDirectory\BladeLogic\8. the Application Server log file is located in: UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8.1/NSH/br/deploymentProfileName.log Windows installationDirectory\BladeLogic\8. with one job server running on each. By default. Therefore you would need to review the log files on both Application Servers. they automatically attempt to cooperate by balancing their job processing workloads. In this example.1\NSH\br/deploymentProfileName.lo g Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 57 .

Synchronizing keystore files of multiple Application Servers Multiple Application Servers on different hosts can be set up to cooperate on processing jobs. and Lowest. if two concurrent jobs are competing for resources. but with a low maximum parallelism level. By default. see BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Note that these priority levels are meaningful only in relation to each other. see “Authorizations for changing job priority” and “Setting job priority” in the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. or a class of jobs. To synchronize keystore files of cooperating Application Servers. the individual work items of the higher priority job are queued to be processed before the work items of the lower priority job. see “Setting up job distribution between multiple Application Servers” on page 55. For example. You can assign one of any of the following priorities: Critical. with a relatively higher priority to ensure they are executed first in case of resource contention. If you have implemented a multiple Application Server environment.Configuring the Application Server Job distribution and job priority in a MAS environment You can use the PRIORITY* property to mark a job. its target vector. and so on). High. all job types have a priority of Normal. Low. consider the case of a job with a priority of Critical. For a list of the permissions and authorizations required to modify Job Priority. all Application Servers must have the same bladelogic. There is no guarantee about the order of completion of each job (which is dependent on various extraneous factors including the actions performed in each job.) For this cooperation to take place. ■ ■ For more information on setting the job priority level. Normal. once the initial work item assignment quota for that Critical priority job is reached. do the following on each cooperating Application Server: 58 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . as it controls the maximum number of simultaneous work items that can be allocated for a given job. Such a job would appear to relinquish resources to a lower priority job with a high parallelism level. The parallelism configuration of a job can significantly impact the appearance of the effectiveness of the job’s priority level. For example. (For information. the responsiveness of the target space.keystore file. note the following considerations regarding job priority: ■ While queuing work items across all jobs. the Distribution Manager queues work items in respect to priority.

At the command prompt. At the command prompt. enter: set appserverlauncher KeyStorePassword password F If the process spawner is in use. including the PXE server. (If keystore passwords match. if it is in use.keystore file. enter: set appserver CertPasswd password C Repeat these steps for each deployment whose keystore file has changed. enter: blasadmin -s deployment_name For example: blasadmin -s default or blasadmin -s _template B At the blasadmin prompt. change the keystore password for the _spawner deployment. At the command prompt. enter: Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 59 .keystore file from the _template directory of the central Application Server to each deployment directory of the cooperating Application Server.keystore 3 Make sure that the passwords match for bladelogic. The file location is: installationDirectory/br/deployments/_template/bladelogic.) To change the password needed for the bladelogic. enter: blasadmin -s _launcher E At the blasadmin prompt. start the Application Server Administration console for the deployment.keystore file you copied into a deployment has a different password from that of the old bladelogic. If the new bladelogic.keystore files of all deployments of the cooperating Application Server.keystore file for all Application Server deployments: A On the cooperating Application Server. change the keystore password for that deployment. D Change the keystore password for the _launcher deployment. 2 Copy the bladelogic. you can skip this step.Configuring the Application Server 1 Stop the cooperating Application Server.

Setting limits for client connections The Application Server lets you specify certain limits for connections to the Application Server. the connection is closed. the connection is considered expired. If cancellation of a job part exceeds this maximum. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. If the client exceeds these maximums. 3 Restart the Application Server. 60 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . This prevents situations where cancellation of a job is not performing as expected and the act of canceling the job can potentially hang the job. the job part is classified as stuck and the job part is aborted. enter: set ProcessSpawner KeyStorePassword password 4 Restart the cooperating Application Servers. When there is no traffic over the connection between a client and the Application Server for this period of time. enter the following: set appserver MaxTimeForCancelToFinish # where # is the maximum amount of time in minutes that should elapse for job cancellation. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. enter the following: set appserver IdleConnectionPruneTime # where # is a value in minutes. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console.Configuring the Application Server blasadmin -s _spawner G At the blasadmin prompt. such as a prune time for idle connections or the maximum amount of time a client can perform read operations from the Application Server. 2 To set a maximum period for job cancellation. Specifying a maximum time for canceling a job part You can specify a maximum period of time that can elapse for a job part to be canceled. 2 To specify an idle prune time. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.

2 To set time-out behavior. enter the following: set appserver SocketTimeout # where # is the maximum number of seconds for client socket reads before the socket times out. This prevents situations where multiple work item threads time out serially on the same unresponsive server. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. all other work item threads acting on the same server are also canceled. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. To ensure that these jobs are automatically restarted when the Application Server restarts. enter the following: set appserver PropagateWorkItemTimeout true|false Setting this value to true means all work item threads acting on the same server are canceled when one work item thread times out. a work item thread is canceled when it exceeds the time period you have defined in the JOB_PART_TIMEOUT property. 3 Restart the Application Server.Configuring the Application Server When a new incoming connection is made. you can use this procedure to override the default behavior so that only one work item thread times out automatically. Setting time-out behavior for work item threads The Application Server lets you specify time-out behavior for work item threads. 4 Restart the Application Server. By default this value is set to 0. If necessary. if you assign job part time-outs. idle connections with non-zero IdleConnectionPruneTime values are checked. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 61 . which means the connection never expired. use this procedure. By default. Setting it to false means only the one work item thread is canceled. a job waiting for the PXE client to boot). Enabling automatic restart of provisioning jobs after Application Server restart A restart of an Application Server cancels provisioning jobs that have been submitted but are waiting idle (for example. 3 To specify a time-out for client socket read operations from the Application Server. and the connections that have expired are pruned. In addition.

however. Setting the outcome of Update Server Properties Jobs when target agents are unresponsive By default. You can. particularly disk space.Configuring the Application Server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Setting the value to false means that the Update Server Properties Job will be reported (in the log and in the display of job results) as having ended in failed status if the agent on the remote target is unreachable or not licensed. 2 Enable automatic restart of provisioning jobs by entering the following: set appserver restartIdleProvisionJobs true 3 Restart the Application Server. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. If you are running a Compliance Job that examines many server objects that fail a compliance condition. you may tax your system resources. A Compliance Job examines a component and compares its parts to conditions defined in compliance rules for a component template. Parts that do not comply are shown in Compliance Job results. set the Update Server Properties Job to end in failed status whenever agents do not respond. an Update Server Properties Job always ends successfully. If results for a Compliance Job exceed the limits you set in this procedure. Setting a maximum number of Compliance Results displayed The Application Server lets you specify the maximum number of compliance results that are displayed for any failed condition in a compliance rule. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 62 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . the job run is marked with a warning and the job log includes a message saying that job results have been truncated. even if the RSCD agents on the remote target servers are unresponsive. as the AGENT_STATUS property for the target servers is updated in any case. 2 Set the outcome of Update Server Properties Jobs by entering the following: set JobFactory UspJobSucceedsWhenAgentDown true|false The default value is true.

No matter how you define this value. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. Setting behavior for past due jobs The Application Server lets you specify a period of time that a newly created job can remain in a queue while the Application Server is down or too busy to process the job. the scheduled occurrence of a one-time-only job does not execute but the scheduled occurrence of a recurring job does execute. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 63 . 3 Restart the Application Server. Setting this value to 0 means that all past due jobs execute when the Application Server starts. Setting a value for this option specifies that: ■ If you restart the Application Server and the specified period has not elapsed. If you restart the Application Server and the specified period has elapsed. enter the following: set appserver ComplianceResultMaxNumberOfAssets # where # is a the maximum number of server objects displayed per failed condition in a compliance rule. 2 To set past due job execution behavior. 3 Restart the Application Server. the scheduled occurrence of a job does not execute. enter the following: set scheduler MaxJobTimeInSchedulerQ # where # is a value in minutes. By default this value is set to 60. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 2 To set a maximum for compliance results displayed. ■ NOTE This procedure only defines behavior for new jobs.Configuring the Application Server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. all existing jobs remain in the job queue for the default amount of time—60 minutes. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. The period of time is measured from the scheduled occurrence of the job to the time the Application Server starts.

Configuring the Application Server Setting the number of database connections Use this procedure to set maximums and minimums for database connections. You can set the maximum and minimum number of database connections that jobs use. 64 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you can help to prevent situations where client connections seem to hang because large jobs are using all available database connections. use either of the following commands: set database MaxGeneralConnections # set database MinGeneralConnections # where # is a number of database connections. such as client connections to the database. 3 To set a maximum and minimum number of non-job-related database connections. NOTE The sum of the maximum numbers you define for MaxJobExecutionConnections and MaxGeneralConnections cannot exceed the connection limit specified by the database server. 2 To set a maximum and minimum number of job-related database connections. 4 Restart the Application Server. non-job-related purposes. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. increasing the value for MaxJobExecutionConnections can sometimes increase the performance of large Audit Jobs. By providing separate settings for job-related and non-job-related activity. You can also set the maximum and minimum number of database connections used for general. use either of the following commands: set database MaxJobExecutionConnections # set database MinJobExecutionConnections # where # is a number of database connections. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. NOTE Because each work item in an Audit Job requires a dedicated database connection.

ProxySvcPort is set to 9842 for the default Application Server. Application Server ports By convention the Application Server listens to the ports listed in the following table: Port Number (By Convention) 9840 Traffic Type AuthSvcPort Description Listening port for the Authentication Service associated with an Application Server. By default the Authentication Service runs and listens on port 9840. It is used in conjunction with the RMI Execution Port 9850+ (which is obtained from the MaxPort/MinPort range when the Application Server starts).Configuring the Application Server Setting communication ports The following sections list the port requirements for both the Application Server and the Application Server Launcher. the Application Server does not run a Network Shell Proxy Service. and is used in conjunction with the JMX Management Port 9838 (by default) to authenticate the client AppSvcPort (port 9841 by default). When you deploy a new Application Server with its type set to NSH_PROXY or ALL. the Application Server does not run an Authentication Service. update the remote heartbeat status. such as to pull Application Server statistics. the Application Server does not run an Application Service. By default the Application Service runs and listens on port 9841. AppSvcPort 9841 Listening port for the Application Service (that is. If this value is set to 0. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 65 . This port is used for BMC BladeLogic Console to Application Server communication. This communication is used for various administration tasks. If this value is blank. coordinate job work item execution. and so on. If this value is set to 0. You can modify this value if necessary. the ProxySvcPort is automatically set to the Base Port plus 42. This port is used in a multiple Application Server configuration for Application Server to Application Server communication. ProxySvcPort 9842 RegistryPort 9836 Listening port for traffic between Application Servers that cooperate by distributing jobs to each other. You must manually define a listening port for the default deployment of an Application Server. Typically. The listening port for a Network Shell Proxy Service. the service that accepts client connections).

enter the following: set appServerComponent listeningport # where appServerComponent is the option category you want to modify. Each managed Application Server uses this port to notify the Application Server Launcher that the Application Server is up and in a ready state. If the HTTP proxy server authenticates users. such as AuthServer. use this port is used for BMC BladeLogic Console /Application Server Launcher communication.Configuring the Application Server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Default communications port used for Application Server communication with the Application Server Launcher. it requires a user name and password. 2 To specify a listening port. 3 Restart the Application Server. and # is the number of the port. Setting up HTTP proxy server support This procedure describes how to set up a user name and password for authentication on an HTTP proxy server. This communication is all local traffic for this port Incoming messages 9701 RMI execution 9702 In a firewall environment. Ports used in a multiple application server deployment by the Application Server Launcher By default. which the Application Server can provide if you perform the following procedure. the following ports are used by the Application Server Launcher for BMC BladeLogic Console to AppServerLauncher communication: Port Number (By default) 9700 Traffic Type JMX Description Default Java Management Extensions (JMX) port used by the BMC BladeLogic Console to communicate with the Application Server Launcher. such as AuthSvcPort. Many organizations provide Internet access through a proxy server. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. listeningport is the type of listening port. 66 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The patch management component of BMC BladeLogic incorporates the ability to download files from the Internet.

enter the following: set appserver HTTPProxyUser userName where userName is the name of a valid user on the proxy server. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. enter the following: set appserver HTTPProxyName serverName where serverName is the name of the HTTP proxy server. 2 To specify an IP address to which the Application Server should listen. enter the following: set appserver HTTPProxyPassword password where password is the password assigned to the proxy user you identified in the previous step. enter the following: set appserver SocketsBindAddress IP_address|all Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 67 . 3 To specify a listening port for the HTTP proxy server. 2 To identify a proxy server. 5 To specify a password. You can also instruct the Application Server to listen for connections on all of its IP addresses. 6 Restart the Application Server. This procedure is primarily useful when an Application Server has more than one network interface and you want the Application Server to listen for connections on only one. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. enter the following: set appserver HTTPProxyPort # where # is the port used to contact the proxy server.Configuring the Application Server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 4 To specify a user name provided to the HTTP proxy server. Binding the Application Server to an IP address Use this procedure to specify an IP address to which an Application Server should listen.

68 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . such as the management object used by JConsole. 3 Restart the Application Server. the Application Server listens on all IP addresses. enter the following: set appserver JMXManagementPort # 4 To specify a port used to access the process spawner’s remote execution objects. the Application Server listens on all of its IP addresses. enter the following: set ProcessSpawner RMIExecutionPort # For more on the process spawner. if you enter all in the command shown above. you must use all in this command to change those instructions so the Application Server listens on all IP addresses. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 3 To specify a port used to access JConsole. You can use this procedure to turn off packet inspection. 5 Restart the Application Server. BMC BladeLogic inspects data packets traveling between Network Shell clients and proxy servers. Configuring ports for remote execution objects Use this procedure to configure ports used to access remote execution objects. enter the following: set appserver RMIExecutionPort # where # is the number of the port. see “Configuring the process spawner” on page 79. the packet is not delivered. If you do not specify an IP address or host name. When this inspection reveals a problem. 2 To specify a port used to access the Application Server’s remote execution objects. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Enabling and disabling Network Shell proxy inspection To ensure data integrity. If you have previously instructed an Application Server to listen for a specific IP address. Similarly.Configuring the Application Server In the command shown above IP_address is the IP address or host name to which the Application Server should listen.

suppose the Application Server version is 7. 2 Enter the following command: set appserver VersionCompatibilityCheck major|minor|micro|build (In the version number 7. you can set up a version compatibility check. build — Sets the check to compare all four parts of the version numbers. the Application Server refuses the connection. By default proxy inspection is turned on.0.0. For example. 7 is the major part.Configuring the Application Server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console.125 and the client version is 7. and so on. 2 Enable or disable packet inspection by entering the following: set appserver EnableProxyInspection true | false where false turns off proxy inspection and true turns it on. This check compares the version numbers of the client and the Application Server.0. 5 is the minor part. This is the default.125.5.) major — Sets the check to compare only the major part of the version numbers. at a level of detail you specify.5.5. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 69 . minor. and micro parts of the version numbers. minor — Sets the check to compare the major and minor parts of the version numbers. If the version numbers are not the same. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. Ensuring version compatibility between Application Server and client To ensure that a connection does not take place when an Application Server and client are at different versions. 3 Restart the Application Server. micro — Sets the check to compare the major.123. If you specify: set appserver VersionCompatibilityCheck micro The check would find that the version numbers are the same and allow the connection.

the Job does not have to write the same file to the database multiple times.Configuring the Application Server If you specify: set appserver VersionCompatibilityCheck build The check would find that the version numbers differ and would refuse the connection. The default value is 5000. Setting a maximum cache size for file system objects The Application Server lets you specify the maximum number of file system objects that are stored in the cache. if you take a snapshot of a directory structure contains multiple instances of the same. 70 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 2 To set a maximum cache size for file system objects. as the file system object is stored in the cache and can be reused. You can use this setting to improve database performance. For example. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 3 Restart the Application Server. 3 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set appserver FileSystemObjectCacheMaxSize # where # is a the maximum number of file system objects that will be stored in the cache. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.

smart groups. and server objects in the Configuration Object Dictionary. select Infrastructure Management. database assets. for example. From the BMC BladeLogic Console 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. These records are used when working with groups. 3 Restart the Application Server. You can then page through these groups to make working with large numbers of objects more manageable. and other BMC BladeLogic components as described in the following sections. You can adjust this display number by selecting Window => Preferences. The default value is 1000. 2 To set a maximum page size. TIP In the BMC BladeLogic Console. custom objects. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 71 . from the Configuration menu. Changing the heap size for the Application Server You can the heap size for the Application Server from the BMC BladeLogic Console or using the blasadmin utility. enter the following: set appserver MaxPageSize # where # is a the maximum number of items retrieved per page. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. You must choose File => Refresh after changing the default to have the change take effect. by default. search groups. Expand BMC and Paging Options to change the default. the Application Server Launcher. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Changing the heap size for BMC BladeLogic components You can change the heap size for the Application Server. folders. 2 Expand the hierarchy of the Application Servers node.Changing the heap size for BMC BladeLogic components Setting the maximum number of items per page The Application Server lets you specify a maximum number of records retrieved from a managed server. large numbers of objects are presented in groups of 50. per page.

■ On Windows platforms.1024 MB Linux . perform the following steps: 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. the recommended Max Heap Size value for each platform is as follows: ■ ■ ■ Windows . 4 In the Edit Application Server Profile dialog. To change the heap size for the Application Server Launcher. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.2048 MB Changing the heap size for the Application Server Launcher You can also change the heap size for the Application Server Launcher. by default. In a multiApplication Server environment. perform the following steps according to your environment.1536 MB Solaris . 2 Enter the following command: set AppServer MaxHeapSize heapSize For example: set AppServer MaxHeapSize 1024M TIP Assuming that the Application Server has the recommended configuration of 4GB or more of physical memory. Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin utility) To change the heap size for the Application Server using the blasadmin utility. The Edit Application Server Profile dialog opens. update the registry key HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\BladeLogic\Operations Manager\Application Server\option1 72 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Application Servers inherit the heap size value from the Application Server Launcher.Changing the heap size for BMC BladeLogic components 3 Right-click the Application Server you want to edit and select Edit. change the values for the MaxHeapSize attribute.

Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 73 . which is located in the .. Changing the value to Xmx1G..io. you modify the blasadmin. where -Xmx512M specifies a max heap size of 512Mb.tmpdir=$BLADELOGIC_HOME/tmp……. you modify the blclient script. you can disable routing rule evaluation.arg=-Xmx1024M. Changing the value to Xmx1G.tmpdir=$BLADELOGIC_HOME/tmp…….cfg file.cfg) file in the br directory. modify the following line in the corresponding script. ■ For UNIX and Linux platforms. you modify the configuration script or file for the component. modify the following line in the blappserv script. where -Xmx512M specifies a max heap size of 512Mb. modify the corresponding configuration (. By default. the configuration files are located in C:\Program Files\BMC Software\Bladelogic\versionNumber\NSH\br.io. the format for setting the max heap size is jvm./usr/nsh/br directory: $JAVA_HOME/bin/java -Xss2m -Xmx512M Djava. Changing the heap size for other BMC BladeLogic components To change the heap size for other BMC BladeLogic components. ■ For Windows platforms. specifies a max heap size of 1GB./usr/nsh/br directory: $JAVA_HOME/bin/java -Xss2m -Xmx512M Djava. To change the heap size for the BMC BladeLogic Console on UNIX or Linux. If your system does not use SOCKS Proxy Servers to route to remote servers. specifies a max heap size of 1GB.Enabling/disabling SOCKS proxy rule evaluation ■ For UNIX and Linux platforms. to change the heap size for the blasadmin utility on Windows. the BMC BladeLogic system evaluates communication requests to remote servers against routing rules to determine if the communication needs to be routed through a SOCKS Proxy Server. which is located in the .. for example. In the configuration file. for example.. For example. Enabling/disabling SOCKS proxy rule evaluation By default.

Configuring the file server To configure a file server you must specify a host and directory where BMC BladeLogic stores content. BMC BladeLogic uses the file server to store the contents of files included in snapshots. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. A file server should meet the following requirements: ■ An RSCD agent should be installed and licensed. NOTE Do not limit access to the file server by pushing agent ACLs to the agent on the file server. BLPackages. The system evaluates communication requests against routing rules. software packages. the system does not evaluate communication requests against routing rules. 2 To enable or disable routing rule evaluation. Network Shell scripts. For information on setting up communications to remote servers through SOCKS Proxy Servers. you must perform this procedure. In addition. routing rule evaluation is turned on. Before you can start BMC BladeLogic for the first time after a fresh installation. false — Turns off routing rule evaluation. and metabase values longer than 255 characters. By default. All users need to be mapped to the same user on the file server.Configuring the file server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. ■ The file server should have substantial disk space (see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide for exact recommendations). 74 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . COM+. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. and other types of information that is not easily stored in the database. the file server stores registry. 3 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set RoutingConfig EvaluateSocksProxyRules true|false Where: true — Turns on routing rule evaluation.

and all BMC BladeLogic users must be mapped to that user. as opposed to a Windows-style path. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. One way to accomplish the necessary mapping is to create an entry like the following in the exports file on the file server: applicationServer rw. Use a Network Shell style path to a directory. 2 Right-click the file server and select choose from the following options: Option Update File Server Status Description Contacts the file server to determine current status Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 75 . such as C:\FileServer. Setting up the file server 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 1 Select Configuration => Infrastructure Management. such as /c/FileServer. Updating a file server You can update the status or change the properties of a file server using the Infrastructure Management window. 3 To specify the location of the file server directory. enter the following: set fileserver location directory where directory is the directory on the file server where data is stored. For more information see “Exports file” on page 240. 2 To specify the name of the file server. user=userName where applicationServer is a comma-separated list of Application Server names or IP addresses and userName is the name to which all users are mapped.Configuring the file server ■ A user name must be defined on the file server. Without this mapping a user may not be able to access a file that another user has stored on the file server. enter the following: set fileserver name hostname where hostname is the name of the server where data is stored. 4 Restart the Application Server.

enter the following: set emailconfig smtpserver hostname where hostname is the name or IP address of the host managing email. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. For more information. enter the following: set emailconfig fromaddress address where address is the address from which mail should be sent. To modify the file server to an advanced file server.) 3 To specify the email address from which system-generated email is sent. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 2 To specify the name or IP address of the SMTP server. select the Enable Advanced File Server option. where you can modify the host name or the file server root directory. you must configure a mail server. 5 Restart the Application Server. 76 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . You do not have to configure a mail server if you are not using the system’s ability to generate email.Configuring a mail server Option Refresh Properties Description Updates the status of the server Launches the properties dialog. (SMTP stands for simple mail transfer protocol. enter the following: show emailconfig techsupport NOTE The techsupport parameter is a read-only parameter. 4 To display the email address for technical support. see “Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers” on page 312 Configuring a mail server BMC BladeLogic jobs can generate email upon their completion. To enable this capability.

Configuring an SNMP server When a BMC BladeLogic job completes. In addition. it too can generate an SNMP trap. To enable SNMP traps. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. enter the following: set snmpconfig snmpserver hostname where hostname is the name or IP address of the host managing SNMP trap notifications. 2 To specify the name or IP address of the SNMP server. you must configure an SNMP server. 3 To specify a listening port for the SNMP server. 4 Restart the Application Server. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. when an Audit Job detects consistent or inconsistent results. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 77 .exe. If you are using Perl.Configuring Perl Configuring Perl The BMC BladeLogic Console and Network Shell both support the Perl scripting language. such as /c/perl/bin/perl. 2 Specify the path and name of the Perl executable by entering the following: set perlconfig location pathToPerl where pathToPerl is a Network Shell-style path. 3 Restart the Application Server. you should configure the Application Server so it knows the location of the Perl executable. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. it can generate an SNMP trap. enter the following: set snmpconfig snmpport # where # is the port used to contact the SNMP server. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.

driver. you can define the class with one of the following strings: ■ oracle. enter the following: set database driverclass class where class is the Java® class used to communicate with the database. as described in this procedure.jdbc. The installation program can configure the Application Server to communicate with this database. However. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console”. By default. Replace DBNAME with the name of the database or replace SID with the Oracle SID.Configuring a database server Configuring a database server BMC BladeLogic works in conjunction with an Oracle® or SQL Server database server.SelectMethod=cursor When using one of the formats shown above. you can manually configure the Application Server to communicate with the database. enter the following: set database connectionstring string where string is a string that specifies the database type. do the following: ■ Replace DBServer with the name or IP address of the server running the database. Depending on the type of database you are using. Replace PORT with the port number the database is listening on. The connection string can use one of the following formats: ■ ■ jdbc:oracle:thin:@DBSERVER:PORT:SID jdbc:sqlserver://DBSERVER:PORT. the server running the database. and SQL Server database name or Oracle SID. 2 To specify a connection string for the database. a BMC BladeLogic installation uses the following database ports: Port Number 1521 1433 ■ ■ Database Type Oracle SQL Server 3 To specify the driver class for the database. the port the database listens on.DatabaseName=DBNAME. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console.OracleDriver 78 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 79 . Configuring the process spawner An Application Server can be configured to spawn processes externally to the Application Server process itself. TIP Because Oracle databases can be highly tuned. an Application Server spawns processes for Network Shell Script Jobs and some types of extended objects.jdbc. Spawning processes externally can be beneficial for memory management. A larger commit size means database processes execute more quickly. a separate dedicated process (the process spawner) is used only for spawning processes. you may want to consult your Oracle DBA to achieve best results when defining a commit size. enter the following two commands: set database userid id set database password ****** where id is the user name that the database needs to authenticate your connection and ****** is the password assigned to that user ID.SQLServerDriver 4 To specify the user ID and password for the database. but at the same time you run the risk of losing more data should a database process fail. which starts a new child process. If you configure an Application Server in this way. Commit size is primarily used when taking snapshots or performing audits in BMC BladeLogic. it contacts the process spawner. 5 To specify a commit size for an Oracle database. When the Application Server needs to spawn a process.Configuring the process spawner ■ com. Primarily. 6 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set database commitsize size where size is the maximum number of rows that can be updated in an Oracle database before you either have to commit your updates or roll them back.microsoft.sqlserver. The Application Server transfers the necessary information to the child process.

See “Configuring an Application Server to use the process spawner”. 80 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 4 Restart the Application Server. The default port is 1067 and is the port recommended by BMC BladeLogic. By default. Enter the following: set ProcessSpawner SpawnExternally true Setting this value to false indicates the process spawner runs within the Application Server process. do the following: 1 Configure the Application Server to use the process spawner. 2 Configure the process spawner itself. NOTE If you set the ProcessSpawner SpawnExternally value to true. see “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 2 Specify that processes be spawned externally from the Application Server process.d/blprocserv start (UNIX) net start “BladeLogic Process Spawner” (Windows) 3 Specify a port for communicating with the process spawner. BMC Software recommends that you run the following command before starting the Application Server service (to avoid ‘connection refused’ failures for any scheduled jobs): ■ ■ run /etc/init.Configuring the process spawner To configure the process spawner. See “Configuring the process spawner” on page 81. Enter the following: set ProcessSpawner RegistryPort # where # is the number of a port. this value is set to false. Configuring an Application Server to use the process spawner 1 Start the Application Server Administration console for the Application Server that you want to execute the NSH jobs. For example: blasadmin -s JobServer1 For more information on methods for starting this console.

Double-click Administrative Tools. blasadmin -s _spawner For more information on methods for starting this console. select Settings > Control Panel. 7 Restart the process spawner. Right-click BMC BladeLogic Process Spawner and select Restart from the pop-up menu. see “Starting the Application Server Administration console”. On a UNIX-style system.d/blprocserv restart ■ Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 81 . 6 Set the Registry Port for the process spawner to match the port specified to the when you configured the Application Server to use the process spawner. Do one of the following: ■ On Windows. Enter the following: set AppServer RegistryPort # where # is the number of a port. and double-click Services. The default port is 1067 and is the port recommended by BMC BladeLogic. enter the following: /etc/init.Configuring the process spawner Configuring the process spawner 5 Start the Application Server Administration console for the process spawner deployment. from the Start menu.

all active client connections are closed. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. NOTE If a job exceeds the timeout value in the NshScriptJobCredentialTimeout setting. audits. you can perform a snapshot or audit of / and processing can traverse other volumes such as /home or /usr that may reside under /. For more on the process spawner. Once the credentials expire. audits. Processing across mount points Use this procedure to configure the Application Server so snapshots. The default setting is 96 hours. 3 Restart the Application Server. an error message is written to the Application Server log and the job log.Configuring expiration time for credentials of jobs Configuring expiration time for credentials of jobs Use this procedure to set a timeout value for the session credentials that are passed to jobs. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 2 To specify how UNIX mount points are processed. and packaging of BLPackages. enter the following: set ProcessSpawner NshScriptJobCredentialTimeout # where # is the number of hours (minimum of 24). For example. enter the following: set mountconfig SnpAudPkgCrossMounts true|false 82 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . By default. 2 To set a timeout value for the job session credentials. Choosing not to cross mount points can substantially increase the speed of snapshots. if you want to cross mount points. and BLPackages in BMC BladeLogic can be processed across UNIX mount points and network mount points for remote file systems shared through NFS. The NshScriptJobCredentialTimeout setting is a global setting that applies to all jobs. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. processing does not cross mount points. see “Configuring the process spawner” on page 81.

Audit. false means that processing does not cross mount points (this is the default value). and BLPackages crosses mount points. Snapshot. true means processing of audits.Restricting the size of configuration and extended objects In the command shown above. and in live browsing. 3 To specify how network mount points are processed. If a job targets a server that returns more records for a configuration object or extended object than the limit set in this procedure. snapshots. Processing large numbers of records for a configuration object or extended object can consume large quantities of memory. Configuration objects and extended objects can be used in component templates. enter the following: set mountconfig SnpAudPkgNetworkMounts true|false In the command shown above. and Compliance Jobs. the job fails on that server with a parsing error. particularly when the Application Server processes multiple configuration objects or extended objects on multiple servers simultaneously. Restricting the size of configuration and extended objects Use this procedure to limit the number of records that a server can provide to an Application Server for a single configuration object or extended object. true means processing of audits. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 83 . the SnpAudPkgCrossMounts option must also be set to true (see step 2). as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. false means that processing does not cross network mount points (this is the default value). 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 4 Restart the Application Server. 2 To limit the number of records that an Application Server can process for a single configuration object or extended object. snapshots. To set SnpAudPkgNetworkMounts to true. Setting this value to 0 means no records are processed. and BLPackages crosses network mount points. Using this procedure can help prevent the Application Server from running out of memory.000. 3 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set AssetThresholds MaxConfigRecords # where # is the maximum number of records to be processed. By default this value is set to 50.

true indicates that no access nodes can be shown in the BMC BladeLogic Console. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. This procedure lets you globally show or hide no access nodes. If you use this procedure to show no access nodes at the Application Server level. users can delete groups and folders even when they contain system objects. The following procedures describe the available options: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Displaying no access nodes in the BMC BladeLogic Console Deleting groups in the BMC BladeLogic Console Creating properties automatically in the BMC BladeLogic Console Limiting the number of results displayed when browsing Controlling the permissions of copied objects Enabling export and import of property dictionaries and classes Setting temporary group location for update Displaying no access nodes in the BMC BladeLogic Console In the BMC BladeLogic Console. users can potentially see system objects even when those users do not have appropriate permissions to interact with those objects. users cannot display no access nodes. If you use this procedure to hide no access nodes. This setting has no effect on smart groups. By default. 84 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . BMC BladeLogic users have the option of hiding or displaying no access nodes. enter the following: set ConfigManagerUI ShowNoAccessNodes true|false In the command shown above. 2 To show or hide no access nodes. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 3 Restart the Application Server. false indicates no access nodes are hidden. which users can always delete. BMC BladeLogic calls these type of objects no access nodes.Configuring user interface settings Configuring user interface settings The Application Server Administration console gives you several options for controlling the behavior of the BMC BladeLogic Console and the BLCLI. Deleting groups in the BMC BladeLogic Console Use this procedure to specify that users of the BMC BladeLogic Console cannot delete groups or folders unless they are empty.

By default. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. BMC BladeLogic can automatically create properties so you can map them to the properties referenced by the imported object. enter the following: set ConfigManagerUI AutoCreate true|false In the command shown above. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 85 . This procedure lets you specify whether properties should be created automatically during the import process. 3 Restart the Application Server. This procedure lets you set an arbitrary limit to the number of results that can be displayed during live browse. true indicates that properties are automatically created. Limiting the number of results displayed when browsing Use this procedure to limit the number of results displayed when a user is browsing in the BMC BladeLogic Console. 2 To specify whether users can delete groups or folders. enter the following: set ConfigManagerUI GroupsMustBeEmpty true|false In the command shown above. true indicates that groups must be empty before they can be deleted. which can slow your system performance. properties are automatically created. false indicates properties are not automatically created. false indicates users can delete groups and folders even when they contain objects. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. Creating properties automatically in the BMC BladeLogic Console When you import objects into the BMC BladeLogic Console and those objects reference properties not defined on the destination system.Configuring user interface settings 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. 2 To turn the automatic creation of properties on or off. Selecting some nodes while browsing can potentially display large numbers of results. 3 Restart the Application Server. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.

1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Controlling the permissions of copied objects Use this procedure to control the permissions that are assigned to objects during copy and paste operations in the BMC BladeLogic Console. The limit set in the console cannot exceed the limit established with this procedure. when users copy and paste an object. Also the user’s role is granted full permission to the object (that is. users can copy and paste an object. enter the following: set AssetThresholds MaxAllowedLiveBrowseResults # where # is the maximum number of results that can be displayed for any node when browsing in the console. 2 To enable copying of objects so that the copied objects are assigned a default set of permissions.Configuring user interface settings In the BMC BladeLogic Console. 3 Restart the Application Server. 86 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . enter the following: set ACLCopy UseDefaultAclOnObjectCopy true In the command shown above. and the newly created object has the permissions that are specified for that type of object in the object permissions template defined for the user’s role. 2 To limit the number of live browse results that can be displayed. Setting this number to 0 indicates no results are displayed. the newly created object is granted a default set of permissions. the newly created object has the same permissions that were defined for the object that was copied. a * authorization). Normally. true means that when you copy and paste an object.000. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. users can set a preference that also establishes a limit for results displayed while browsing. By default this option is set to false. By default this option is set to 50. false means that when you copy and paste an object. the newly created object has the same permissions as those assigned to the object that was copied. 3 Restart the Application Server. After you use blasadmin to perform this procedure. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.

1 Start the Application Server Administration console. this option must be set to true on both the exporting and the importing Application Server. the import and update process creates a temporary group at the root of the relevant workspace and uses that group to store the imported object. By default. the temporary group is /importAndUpdate. 2 To enable or disable the import and export of the Property Dictionary or custom property classes. false indicates import/export is disabled. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. 3 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set ConfigManagerUI PropertySync true|false In the command shown above. This temporary group is deleted at the end of the update operation. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45.Configuring user interface settings Enabling export and import of property dictionaries and classes Use this procedure to enable or disable the export and import of the entire Property Dictionary or specific custom property classes. enter the following: set ConfigManagerUI DefaultImportAndUpdateFolder /path/to/some/folder 3 Restart the Application Server. To enable import/export. By default this option is set to false. Setting temporary group location for update When you run any of the BLCLI importAndUpdate commands in the Template or BlPackage name spaces. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. true indicates that you can export and import the Property Dictionary or custom property classes. This procedure lets you change this group to another name or location. 2 To specify a new location for the temporary group. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 87 .

■ To specify how long a user is locked out when he or she has surpassed the lockout threshold. In RBAC you can specify that passwords never expire no matter what expiration period you specify. Entering a 0 indicates there is no minimum length for passwords. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. enter the following: set accountconfig MinPasswordLength # where # is the minimum length for passwords. ■ ■ 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. enter the following: set accountconfig MaxPasswordAge # where # is a period of time in days. For more information on RBAC see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Entering a 0 indicates passwords do not expire. enter the following: set accountconfig AccountLockoutThreshold # where # is the number of failed logins that trigger a lockout. Entering a 0 indicates that users cannot be locked out because of login failures. ■ To specify how long it takes for a password to expire. you can require users specifying passwords to provide a password of minimum length. there is no minimum length for passwords. enter the following: 88 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you can specify how many failed logins cause a user to be locked out and how long that lockout lasts. Maximum password age—By setting a maximum password age. 2 Do any of the following: ■ To specify a minimum password length. you can require users to change passwords at specified intervals.Setting SRP login requirements Setting SRP login requirements Use this procedure to configure the Application Server so it forces users logging in via SRP to meet any of the following requirements: ■ Minimum password length—By setting a minimum password length. By default. Account lockout—By setting a threshold and duration for account lockouts. ■ To specify how many times a user can fail to log in before being locked out.

Multicast addresses must fall in the range 224. Servers being provisioned download bootstrap programs from a TFTP server. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console and specify the PXE Server deployment (_pxe). Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 89 .255.1. Enter the following: blasadmin -s _pxe 2 Identify the type of Ethernet interface that the PXE server uses to listen by entering the following: set pxeserver interface_to_bind interfaceName where interfaceName is the type of Ethernet interface.255.0.255. Use this procedure to provide various parameters needed to run a PXE Server. a BMC BladeLogic PXE Server listens on the multicast address of 224. you must set up a PXE Server. Configuring the PXE Server When provisioning some types of servers. 5 Identify the IP address of a multicast TFTP server by entering the following: set pxeserver mtftp_address MTFTP_address where MTFTP_address is the multicast address that the TFTP listens on. For example. which provides instructions for downloading the bootstrap program needed to begin the provisioning process. such as eth0 or eth1. Entering a 0 indicates that users can only be unlocked by an administrator using RBAC. 3 Identify the address of the TFTP server by entering the following: set pxeserver default_address TFTP_address where TFTP_address is the IP address of the TFTP server.0. 4 Identify the IP address of the multicast group that the PXE server listens on by entering the following: set pxeserver multicast_address address where address is an IP address.0.0 to 239. By default.2.Configuring the PXE Server set accountconfig AccountLockoutDuration # where # is the number of minutes the user is locked out. you might enter the name of a network interface card.

10 Specify whether the PXE Server can use a broadcast by entering the following: set pxeserver is_use_broadcast # where # can be one of the following: ■ ■ 0—The PXE Server cannot use a broadcast. 7 Identify the port that the TFTP server should use to listen for traffic from PXE clients by entering the following: set pxeserver mtftp_server_port port where port is the multicast port. By default BMC BladeLogic uses port 1759. 9 Specify whether the PXE Server uses a multicast by entering the following: set pxeserver is_use_multicast # where # can be one of the following: ■ ■ 0—The PXE Server cannot use a multicast. 11 Specify the amount of time the boot prompt displays before the boot process begins by entering the following: set pxeserver prompt_timeout # where # is the maximum amount of time the boot prompt can display. If you enter 0. By default BMC BladeLogic uses port 1758. the boot prompt does not display.Configuring the PXE Server 6 Identify the multicast port that PXE clients should use to communicate with the TFTP server by entering the following: set pxeserver mtftp_client_port port where port is the multicast port that servers being provisioned should use to communicate with the TFTP server. 90 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 1—The PXE Server can use a broadcast. 8 Identify the PXE Server’s listening port by entering the following: set pxeserver listen_port port where port is the port on which the PXE Server listens for connections from PXE clients. 1—The PXE Server can use a multicast.

Use the Licensing command to specify the information required to access the services of the Licensing Portal.com/services/LicensingWS set Licensing DeregisterServiceURL https://webapps. enter: show Licensing ServiceUsername Connecting to the Licensing Portal Use the following parameters for the Licensing command to specify the location of the portal and the credentials the Application Server uses to communicate with the Licensing Portal. Task Set the location of Licensing Portal for registering servers Set the location of Licensing Portal for deregistering servers Command set Licensing LicenseServiceURL http://www. Configuring the Licensing Module The Application Server communicates with the BMC Software Licensing Portal to register or deregister managed servers. For example.bmc.com/ BMCBladelogicLicensingWS/services/BMCBladelogic LicenseService Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 91 . to display the user name the Application Server uses to connect to the Licensing Portal. use the show parameter instead of the set parameter. 14 Restart the PXE Server. Enter the following: set pxeserver tftpd_base_dir directory where directory is the base directory on the TFTP server for storing bootstrap programs.bladelogic. TIP To display the value of a parameter you have set previously.Configuring the Licensing Module 12 Identify the base directory on the TFTP server where operating system bootstrap programs are stored. 13 Identify the PXE Server’s domain by entering the following: set pxeserver domain domain_name where domain_name is the name of the PXE Server’s domain.

1 Start the Application Server Administration console. the password is displayed in encrypted form. it is stored in the database in encrypted form. When you use the show Licensing ServicePassword command.Enabling asynchronous execution Task Set the user name and password Command set Licensing ServiceUsername userName set Licensing ServicePassword password Note: While the password is entered in clear text. Notes Enter the fully-qualified name of the host machine. it is stored in the database in encrypted form. 2 To enable or disable asynchronous execution. the password is displayed in encrypted form. Enabling asynchronous execution Asynchronous execution lets Deploy Jobs run without blocking work item threads for extended periods of time. enter the following: 92 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. This allow an Application Server to process a Deploy Job more efficiently and frees up valuable Application Server resources that can be used by other jobs. Task Set the proxy host name Set the proxy port Set the proxy user name and password Command set Licensing ProxyHost hostName set Licensing ProxyPort portNumber set Licensing ProxyUsername userName set Licensing ProxyPassword password While the ProxyPassword is entered in clear text. Connecting to the Licensing Portal using a proxy These optional parameters for the Licensing command specify the system and credentials for the proxy host through which the Application Server communicates with the Licensing Portal. When you use the show Licensing ProxyPassword command. Turning asynchronous execution on or off does not affect the Staging phase of a Deploy Job. Asynchronous execution can occur during the Simulate and Commit phases of a Deploy Job as well as during an undo.

You can configure each additional Application Server so it performs one or more distinct functions. (For information.Enabling web services set appserver EnableAsyncExecution true | false By default this value is set to true. such as a Configuration Server or a Job Server. Enabling web services To enable web services. the performance of one Application Server does not affect the behavior of another. see “Using the Post-Install Configuration wizard to configure the default application server” on page 34. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Web Services Developer Guide. Configuring multiple Application Servers on the same host BMC BladeLogic lets you run multiple Application Servers on a single host. in addition to the Application Server initially installed. 3 Restart the Application Server. enter the following: set AppServer enableWebServices true For information about additional web services settings.) Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 93 . Defining multiple Application Servers also lets you utilize more fixed memory on a host system because the JavaVM heap limit would otherwise restrict a single Application Server to a fixed amount of memory. Using separate Application Servers in this way. follow these steps: 1 If you have not done so already. The easiest way to achieve this result is to run the Post-Install configuration wizard as the last step of the Application Server installation. To configure multiple application servers on the same host. install and configure the Application Server on the host machine. All Application Servers on the same host must use the same database connection.

based on their Application Server Type and other information you specify. you must use options to specify the Application Server you are configuring or to specify configuration of all Application Servers on the host. use the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to further configure Application Servers. The creation process not only creates the additional Application Servers but also gives them an “out-of-the-box” configuration. See “Using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to configure Application Servers” on page 44. 3 Optionally. Application Server deployments A deployment is a directory of services that an Application Server runs. About Application Server deployments and profiles The following sections provide an overview of Application Server deployment and the different types of Application Servers. The table describes each deployment and the effect of configuration changes on it. See “Creating additional Application Servers”.About Application Server deployments and profiles 2 Use the Infrastructure Management window or the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin) to create and configure additional Application Servers on the host. 94 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . NOTE When you start blasadmin.

Changes to this deployment affect all new Application Servers created. Changes you make using the Application Server Configuration Wizard or the blappconf command with no -s option. ■ AppServerName The deployment for each Application Server created on the same host (in addition to the default Application Server). The following configuration changes affect the default deployment: ■ Changes you make using the Application Server Administration console from the BMC BladeLogic menu or using blasadmin without the -a option or -s option. The following configuration changes affect the deployment: ■ Changes you make using blasadmin -s appServerName or blasadmin -a. each Application Server’s profile determines the number and type of services in its deployment. See “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. The start-up process copies the _template deployment to create the default deployment. default The deployment for a single Application Server or the initial Application Server when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. When there are multiple Application Servers configured on the same host. See “Starting blasadmin to Configure the Default Application Server” on page 45. See “Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings” on page 39. This deployment is created when a single or initial Application Server is first started. This deployment contains default (“out-of-the-box”) settings and initial configuration settings made with the Post-Install Configuration wizard. ■ Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 95 . Configuration changes you make using blasadmin -a affect this deployment. This deployment is created during BMC BladeLogic installation.About Application Server deployments and profiles Deployment Name _template Description The “master” from which other Application Server deployments are created. see “Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings” on page 39. Changes you make using blappconf -s appServerName For more information.

Each Application Server has a different profile. Application Server Type CONFIGURATION Functional Description Handles all requests from the BMC BladeLogic Console and the BLCLI. JOB 96 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The following table lists Application Server types and describes each. While a CONFIGURATION server can create jobs and start the execution of jobs. You specify the Application Server types when you create the Application Server. AppSvcPort) is open.About Application Server deployments and profiles Deployment Name _spawner _pxe _launcher Description The deployment for the process spawner. regardless of settings for the connection ports. Executes work items needed to process a job. An Application Server’s profile is essentially a pre-packaged set of configuration options for an Application Server. The deployment for the Application Server Launcher. The attributes needed for each type are predefined in the profile for the type. See “Configuring the process spawner” on page 81. The deployment for the PXE Server. An Application Server profile can include attributes of one or more Application Server types. only a JOB server can run the work items needed to process a job. A JOB server never responds to remote connection requests. Application Server types The Application Server Type defines the work that an Application Server performs and services that it runs. A JOB server responds to local connection requests from the BMC BladeLogic Console or the BLCLI. and attributes. type. See “Configuring the PXE Server” on page 89. Application Server profiles A profile is a definition of an Application Server’s identity: its name. See “The Application Server Launcher” on page 34. provided that one or more of the connection ports (for example. BMC BladeLogic uses the profile to create and update an Application Server’s deployment (the services that the Application Server runs).

JOB. ALL Creating additional Application Servers You can create additional Application Servers from the BMC BladeLogic Console using the Infrastructure Management window or from the command line using the Application Server Administration console (blasadmin). An NSH_PROXY server cannot service requests from the BMC BladeLogic Console or the BLCLI. select Infrastructure Management. Note that you will not preserve the data that was in the previous unmanaged deployment. Choose one of the following options: ■ Click No to return to the new Application Server dialog. Equivalent to (CONFIGURATION. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. ■ 3 In the New Application Server dialog. If there are unmanaged deployments which match this new Application Server request. from the Configuration menu. Click Yes to redeploy the unmanaged deployment with the base port and configuration type you specify. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 97 . Creating additional Application Servers from the BMC BladeLogic Console Use this procedure to create Application Servers in addition to the Application Server installed on a host.Creating additional Application Servers Application Server Type NSH_PROXY Functional Description Manages traffic between Network Shell clients and remote servers. 2 Expand the Application Server Launchers node and right-click the Application Server Launcher that you want to control the new Application Server. NSH_PROXY) An Application Server with its type set to ALL performs the functions of all Application Server types. you are presented with the option of using the unmanaged deployment or creating a new one. Then select New Application Server. entering the following information for the new Application Server.

Do not use the following reserved names: default. you can change the Display Name. (Use Shift + Click to select multiple contiguous types. For information on each type. if the default port numbers have a base of 9800 (9836 for Registry Port. Used internally within the BMC BladeLogic environment. The system creates a profile for the new Application Server. _spawner. 5 A prompt appears. you could specify 9900 as the base port for the new Application Server. _pxe. and so on. The name can be no more than 200 characters in length. _install. _util. the SRP Port to 9929. Do not use the same name as the default Application Server. _launcher. Specify a number that makes the new Application Server’s default ports unique on the host. Application (Required) Specifies the type of Application Server to create: Server Type(s) CONFIGURATION. The Application Server Type determines the attributes included in its Application Server profile. Base Port (Required) The number that BMC BladeLogic uses to automatically generate default port numbers for the new Application Server. and underscores (_). BMC BladeLogic uses the base port with the last two digits of the default port. Follow these guidelines: ■ Specify a name that is unique on the host. see “Application Server types” on page 96. as well as for the Display Name in the interface. asking if you want to edit the new Application Server’s profile. JOB. 4 Click OK. hyphens (-).Creating additional Application Servers Field Application Server Name Description (Required) The name for the new Application Server. _template. For example. _old. The creation process sets the Registry Port to 9936. The number must be between 1000 and 65536. NSH_PROXY. use Ctrl-Click to select individual items). digits. or ALL (a combination of all three types). and so on). However. 9829 for SRP Port. _postmig ■ ■ ■ You cannot change the Application Server Name after configuration. See “Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile” on page 100. The name can include letters. To generate the numbers. Accept the default (All Server Types) or uncheck All Server Types and select one or more types. 98 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

To accept the profile. You can either start the Application Server or deploy it and start it later. (You can always edit the profile later. see “Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile” on page 100. the authentication port would be 9540. The Edit Application Server Profile dialog appears.Creating additional Application Servers ■ To add or change attributes for the server. If the base_port is 9500. This command provides the ability to set up an environment from the command line. the offset for the authentication port is 40 by default. or All (a combination of all three types). You can create deployments while executing from a shell or while reading in a file. Creating additional Application Servers from the command line You can also add a new Application Server deployment using the blasadmin Create command. click Yes. For guidelines for creating the name. To add a new deployment 1 Start blasadmin for the _template deployment by entering the following: blasadmin -s _template 2 Create a new default deployment of a specific type by entering the following: create deployment_name base_port profile_types where deployment_name is the name of the new deployment you are creating. For information. click No.) ■ BMC BladeLogic creates the Application Server. For information on each type. For example. NSH_Proxy. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 99 . base_port is a number that is combined with offset values to determine Authentication and Application Server port numbers. Job. see “Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile” on page 100. see the description of the Application Server Name field in “Creating additional Application Servers from the BMC BladeLogic Console” on page 97. profile_type is a comma separated list of the type of Application Server to create: Configuration.

use the Edit Application Server Profile dialog. 3 Right-click the Application Server you want to edit and select Edit. clear the field. To view an Application Server’s profile or change attribute values. ■ To add an attribute to the Application Server’s profile or to change a default value. To remove an attribute from the profile. The Edit Application Server Profile dialog opens. 2 Expand the hierarchy of the Application Servers node. and attributes (configuration parameters). clear the field and type the value you want. ■ ■ 100 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console.Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile NOTE For instructions on using blasadmin to create a stand-alone NSH Proxy. 3 Start the Application Server on the machine where you are setting up the deployment. NOTE Always use the Edit Application Server Profile dialog to add or change the attributes (configuration parameters) in an Application Server’s profile. select Infrastructure Management. see “Setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server” on page 145. Do not use the blasadmin utility. To change an existing value. type. 4 In the Edit Application Server Profile dialog. from the Configuration menu. add or change values for attributes. See “Starting Application Servers” on page 41. Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile An Application Server profile is a definition of an Application Server’s identity: its name. type a value in the blank field. The fields in this dialog are effectively overrides to default values or to previouslyspecified configuration parameters.

You do not have to specify a name. _install. digits. If you leave this field blank. JOB. rather than the Application Server name. as specified during configuration. _old. The name that appears in all user interfaces. the Display Name is the same as the Application Server name. If you specify a name. See “Application Server types” on page 96. Attribute Application Server Name Display Name Description The name for the Application Server. A ServiceType of Automatic means that the Application Server will be started automatically by the AppServerLauncher. ■ A ServiceType of Manual. For information. specified during configuration. The name can include letters. You cannot edit this attribute. the ServiceType is Automatic. ServiceType Determines if the Application Server should be automatically started by the AppServerLauncher. _spawner. False —The Application Server do not use the default deployment. Server Profile Type(s) The Application Server’s type. follow these guidelines: ■ Specify a name that is unique on the host. The following table describes all attributes that a profile can include. ■ ■ True — The Application Server uses the default deployment.Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile Attributes listed depend on the Server Profile Type (Application Server Type). ■ By default. _util ■ ■ Default Deployment Shows whether the Application Server uses the default deployment. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 101 . or ALL. _launcher. see “Editing the list of roles with Application Server Launcher access” on page 113. The type can be one or more of the following: CONFIGURATION. hyphens (-). which means that the Application Server can only be started using the Infrastructure Dialog. Do not use the following reserved names: default. NSH. You cannot edit this attribute. You cannot edit this attribute. Do not use the same name as the default Application Server. _template. _pxe. and underscores (_).

you can direct these commands to run on a particular Application Server. Note: When you create a job server (Application Server Type JOB). AppSvcPort The listening port for the Application Service (the service that accepts client connections). the Application Server does not run an Authentication Service. When you create a new Application Server. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. specify one or more comma-separated values. this port defaults to 0. By default BLCLI commands run on the Application Server processing the job. that service accepts only connections from the local machine. BMC BladeLogic sets this value to the Base Port plus 41. 102 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .10:9841 Typically. AuthSvcPort The listening port for the Authentication Service (the service that authenticates user identities). it cannot process BLCLI commands used for import/export. you do not need to specify a value for this attribute. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. If you set this value to 0. unless the server is also a configuration server (Application Server Type JOB and CONFIGURATION). BMC BladeLogic sets this value to the Base Port plus 40. it runs a ClientConnectionService. When you create a new Application Server. To include this attribute in the profile. if you want to run Network Shell Script Jobs that include BLCLI commands. If you set this value to 0. For example: service:appsvc.10. unless the server is also a configuration server (Application Server Type JOB and CONFIGURATION). the default is Base Port plus 40. the Application Server does not run an Application Service. Note: When you create a job server (Application Server type JOB). In that case.bladelogic:blsess://10. However. the port is disabled. If that Application Server is a JOB type Application Server. If you set this value to 0. BLCLI commands used for import or export must run on an Application Server with its type set to CONFIGURATION or ALL. However. CLRProxyPort The listening port for Network Shell (NSH) communication. service:appsvc.Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile Attribute AppServiceURLs Description The Application Service URLs distributed in the session credentials issued by the Authentication Service.10.bladelogic:blsess://localhost:9841.

BMC BladeLogic sets this value to the Base Port + 50. BMC BladeLogic sets the log file’s name to the Application Server name plus the . JVMArgs Arguments to pass to Java Virtual Machine for this Application Server. For information on recommended maximum Java heap size for Application Servers. By default. the value for JVMArgs is used instead of MaxHeapSize. When you create a new Application Server. LogfileName The name of the log file for the Application Server. If you edit this attribute. To specify a value. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. it is assumed to be valid and is used when the Application Server is started. When you create a new Application Server. You do not need to specify a value for this attribute. If you specify a value. The maximum dynamic port number. BMC BladeLogic sets this value to the Base Port plus 38. If you do not specify a value. This value is usually adequate. The console log file contains all information logged to the Application Server log. the Application Server does not start. If you edit this attribute. JMXManagementPort The port used to access the BMC BladeLogic JConsole.Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile Attribute ConsoleLogfileName Description The name of the console log file for the Application Server. MaxWorkItemThreads The maximum size of the pool of threads that can be used to process BMC BladeLogic Console jobs. When you create a new Application Server. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. The default is 20. The default is 50. Specify any argument that can be specified to the Java command line If the MaxHeapSize attribute is set and you specify an -Xmx flag for JVMArgs.log extension. for example: 1G or 225M. MaxHeapSize You can specify a value for MaxHeapSize but you are not required to do so. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. specify a name that is unique on the host. see the hardware requirements for the Application Server in the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide. the Application Server uses the heap size set in the Application Server start-up script or service definition. BMC BladeLogic sets the console log file’s name to the Application Server name plus “_console”. use the standard Java notation. MinPort The minimum dynamic port number. specify a name that is unique on the host. plus any information logged to the console. this value is set to Base Port + 99. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. Determines how many targets can be processed in parallel. If the value is not valid. When you create a new Application Server. MaxJobs MaxPort The maximum number of jobs the Application Server can execute simultaneously. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 103 .

If you leave this field blank. You must manually define a listening port for the default deployment of an Application Server. there is no need to change this list.com:9842 ProxySvcPort The listening port for a Network Shell Proxy Service.properties sql/reports-sql. Typically. the list is: sql/sqlmap. the system uses the default URLs. SqlFiles The list of SQL properties files used by the Database Service. SSLPort The listening port for SSL communication.bladelogic:blsess://host2. TempDirectoryName The name of the directory that stores the Application Server’s tmp files. you can override the default list by typing a comma-separated list of properties in the field. Usually.Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile Attribute ProxyServiceURLs Description The Network Shell Proxy Service service URLs. type a comma-separated list in the field. this name is the same as the Application Server Name and its location is: installDirectory/tmp/temporaryDirectoryName When you create a new Application Server.com:9842. ProxySvcPort is set to 9842 for the default Application Server.properties sql/streamable_sqlmap. If this value is blank. If you edit this attribute. the Application Server does not run a Network Shell Proxy Service. 104 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . You can modify this value if necessary. BMC BladeLogic sets this value to the Base Port plus 36. BMC BladeLogic sets the temporaryDirectoryName to the Application Server Name. For example: service:proxysvc. If you leave this field blank.bladelogic. specify a name that is unique on the host.properties sql/blas-sqlmap. When you deploy a new Application Server with its type set to NSH_PROXY or ALL. When you create a new Application Server. service:proxysvc. RegistryPort The listening port for traffic between Application Servers that cooperate by distributing jobs to each other.bladelogic:blsess://host1. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host.bladelogic. However. the ProxySvcPort is automatically set to the Base Port plus 42. BMC BladeLogic sets this value to the Base Port plus 31. When you create a new Application Server. To override the default URLs. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host.properties In most cases. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host.

When an Application Server’s profile has a conflicting attributes. regardless of what that value is. or SqlFiles. 6 Click OK on the warning that configuration changes do not take effect until you restart the Application Server. from the Configuration menu. expand the hierarchy of the Application Servers node. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 105 . see “Listing conflicting attributes” on page 105. each should have a unique profile. click OK. You can also use the List Conflicts operation to identify attributes on an Application Server that conflict with attributes on other Application Servers. Failure to make them unique results in conflicts that can cause a start or restart failure in one or more Application Servers. a conflict occurs because the same port number has been assigned to more than one Application Server. attributes for these Application Servers cannot have the same values. For information on identifying conflicts in Application Servers’ attributes. Rules for defining unique attributes Several rules apply when assigning unique values to attributes: ■ Multiple Application Servers can share any port that is set to 0 if that setting of 0 disables the port.Listing conflicting attributes 5 When you are finished editing the profile. MaxWorkItemThreads. 7 Start or restart the Application Server to have changes take effect. Typically. 2 In the Infrastructure Management window. Multiple Application Servers can have the same value for MaxJobs. select Infrastructure Management. For the most part. ■ ■ Listing conflicting attributes When there are Application Servers on the same host. its Application Server details shows State = CONFLICT. The Application Server Launcher automatically detects attribute conflicts among the Application Servers that it controls. These conflicts prevent an Application Server from starting or restarting if it has conflicts with one or more currently running Application Servers. All other attributes must be unique. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console.

A Warning panel lists the attributes that conflict with those other Application Servers. To display. the panel shows the attribute name and the name of Application Server that has the same attribute value specified. Do the following: A list of Application Servers on the Expand the Application Servers node. For each attribute.. 2 Expand the hierarchy of the Application Servers node.Read authorization. Getting information about Application Servers You can display information about an Application Server and the services that it runs. This information can be useful for diagnostic purposes.. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. select Infrastructure Management. NOTE To display information about the Application Server. from the Configuration menu. your role must be granted the BL_Administration.Getting information about Application Servers 3 Right-click an Application Server and select List Conflicts. The right pane shows: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Software version Number of jobs running Number of work item threads Database connections Host operating system JVM memory usage 106 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The left pane lists each Application Server’s Display Name and Authorization Port. host (using the same database). 4 Click OK. General information about an Application Server Click the Application Server’s name in the left pane.

State — (VALID | CONFLICTS) Whether the Application Server’s profile has conflicts that can keep the Application Server from starting. Status — (Ready | Stopped | Starting) Whether the Application Server is ready to perform tasks.The Application Server Launchers node To display. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ A list of the services that an Application Server provides Status information about an Application Server service Expand the hierarchy of an Application Server. scroll down. or starting up.) Do the following: Click the Application Server’s name in the left pane.) Expand the hierarchy of the Application Server. A menu of actions you can perform Right-click the Application Server. The right pane shows: ■ The Application Server Launcher that controls the Application Server Name — The name for the Application Server. ■ ■ Server Type— Application Server Type. Elapsed Time — The uptime of the Application Server. (For information.. ServiceType — (Manual | Automatic) Whether the Application Server is automatically started by the AppServerLauncher. Status information from the Application Server Launcher. Start Date — The date when the Application Server was started. stopped. Display name— The name that appears in all BMC ■ ■ BladeLogic user interfaces. Click the service name. on the Application Server The Application Server Launchers node The Application Server Launchers node lists a node for each Application Server Launcher that is configured to use the database and is available. In the right pane. (This information is displayed if your role has authorization to access the Application Server Launcher.. see “The Application Server Launcher” on page 34. Needs Restart — (True | False) Whether the Application Server has been reconfigured and needs to be restarted.) Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 107 . specified during configuration. (The number and type of services vary according to the Application Server’s type.

Create new Application Servers. select a file format. However. Through the Application Server Launchers node. enter the information for the report file: A For Object Name. select the type of character encoding that should be used for the exported data. it is only through the Application Server Launcher that you can: ■ ■ ■ Obtain port information for the Application Server Launcher.Reporting Application Server information The Application Server Launcher lists a node for each Application Server it controls. select a directory where the report should be stored. ■ ■ 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. The report includes: ■ General information for each Application Server configured on the host machine (and using the same database) and detailed status information about each Application Server’s services. from the Configuration menu. 2 In the Infrastructure Management window. select a subdirectory by double-clicking its name in the panel. such as UTF8 or Western (windows-1252). 3 On the Export AppServer Details Report dialog. B For Object Type. C For File Encoding. 5 Click Save. select Infrastructure Management. General information for each PXE server connected to the database and detailed status information about each PXE Servers services. from the pull-down menu. Edit the list of roles allowed access to the Application Server Launcher. 108 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . click Export Detail Report . type a file name for the report. Optionally. Reporting Application Server information You can generate a report containing information about all of the Application Servers on the host. Information about the database to which the Application Server is connected. 4 On the dialog. you can get the same information about Application Servers and perform the same operations as with the Application Servers node.

You can perform any of the following management tasks: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Starting a specific Application Server Stopping a specific Application Server Redeploying a stopped Application Server Terminating a specific Application Server Restarting a specific Application Server Removing an Application Server Adding unmanaged deployments Starting a specific Application Server The start operation starts the Application Server and automatically deploys it. from the Configuration menu. 2 Expand the Application Servers node. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 109 . NOTE You cannot use the stop operation on an Application Server to which a BMC BladeLogic Console is connected.Managing multiple Application Servers on the same host Managing multiple Application Servers on the same host When there are multiple Application Servers configured on the same host. You can select options for handling the running jobs. select Infrastructure Management. 3 Right-click the Application Server and select Start. providing a controlled shutdown. you manage the additional Application Servers through the Infrastructure Management window. if it has not been deployed. Stopping a specific Application Server The stop operation ends running jobs and stops the Application Server. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console.

the offset for the authentication port is 40 by default. NSH_PROXY. 4 On the Redeploy Application Server dialog. 3 Right-click the Application Server and select Redeploy. whichever comes first. base_port is a number that is combined with offset values to determine Authentication and Application Server port numbers. Stop when all running jobs finish OR after specified number of minutes. For example. If the base_port is 9500. see “Application Server types” on page 96. 5 Click OK. For information on each type. 110 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . the authentication port would be 9540. 2 Expand the Application Servers node. Application Server Type: select the profile type for this Application Server: ■ CONFIGURATION. Stop when all running jobs finish. 2 Expand the Application Servers node. or ALL (a combination of all three types).Redeploying a stopped Application Server 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. from the Configuration menu. 4 On the Stop Application Server dialog. select Infrastructure Management. select Infrastructure Management. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. select the method for handling any running jobs: ■ ■ ■ Stop immediately without waiting for running jobs to finish. JOB. 3 Right-click the Application Server and select Stop. from the Configuration menu. NOTE This action is only available for stopped Application Servers. Redeploying a stopped Application Server You can select a stopped Application Server and then redeploy it with a different profile type. enter the following ■ Base port: enter a new base port.

1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. select Infrastructure Management.Terminating a specific Application Server ■ Preserve Existing Data: Check this box if you want to preserve deployment data from the existing deployment. NOTE You cannot use the terminate operation on an Application Server to which BMC BladeLogic Console is connected. NOTE You cannot use the restart operation on an Application Server to which BMC BladeLogic Console is connected. In the case where there are options in the customized deployment that do not exist in the new deployment type. when the Application Server is hung. from the Configuration menu. 2 Expand the Application Servers node. 5 Click OK to validate the information you entered and execute the action on the Application Server launcher. 3 Right-click the Application Server and select Terminate. Terminating a specific Application Server The terminate operation terminates the Application Server process immediately. for example. This option automatically migrates any customizations from the existing deployment to the new deployment. those options are ignored. Use this operation to have configuration changes take effect. You cannot enter a new Application Server name. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 111 . Restarting a specific Application Server The Restart operation first stops the Application Server and then starts it again. This selection is useful in cases where Stop does not work.

4 In the Remove Application Server dialog. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. In addition. In effect. Removing an Application Server The remove operation removes an Application Server from the Application Server Launcher so the Application Server does not automatically restart when the Application Server Launcher starts. from the Configuration menu. 112 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 3 Right-click the Application Server and select Remove. Option Preserve deployment Description Removes the Application Server but leaves its deployment directory unchanged. If you create a new Application Server with the same name. select Infrastructure Management. specify options for handling the Application Server’s deployment directory and the database registration. such as when a system has been decommissioned or repurposed.Removing an Application Server 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. and removes references to the Application Server from routing rules. select Infrastructure Management. 2 Expand the Application Servers node. this selection removes the Application Server from the BMC BladeLogic environment. This operation can be useful in situations where an Application Server is “missing” and no longer in use. from the Configuration menu. Removes the Application Server and deletes its deployment directory. 3 Right-click the Application Server and select Restart. the Application Server still appears under the Application Server Launchers node Removes the Application Server. it uses this deployment directory. deletes its database entry. The Application Server is removed from the Application Server Launcher. Removes the Application Server but does not delete the database entry for the Application Server. Delete deployment Preserve server registration Delete server registration 5 Click OK. This selection ensures that the Application Server can still be referenced from routing rules. 2 Expand the Application Servers node.

select one or more roles you want to have access to the Application Server Launcher. Editing the list of roles with Application Server Launcher access At BMC BladeLogic installation time. 1 Right-click an Application Server Launcher node and select Add Unmanaged Deployments. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console. 3 Right-click the Application Server Launcher and select Edit Role List. Then click the left arrow. only the BLAdmins role is granted authorization to access to the Application Server Launcher. Then click the right arrow to move the role to the Selected Roles list. Chapter 3 Configuring the Application Server 113 . Users with this role can use the Edit Application Server Launcher Roles dialog to grant or deny authorization to other roles. select one or more unmanaged deployments you want to add to the Application Server Launcher. but have had their deployments preserved (using the Preserve deployment option). 2 On the Add Unmanaged Deployments dialog. To remove roles from the selected list. The Application Server Launcher added the deployments you selected as managed Server Profiles. 2 Expand the Application Server Launchers node. you can add the deployment back into the system without having to restart the launcher. under Selected Roles. 4 Under Available Roles. from the Configuration menu. select one or more roles.Adding unmanaged deployments Adding unmanaged deployments If you have Application Servers which have been removed from the system. enabling you to manage these deployments as you would any other deployment in the system. 3 Click OK. NOTE The option is displayed only if there are unmanaged deployments for this Application Server Launcher. select Infrastructure Management.

2 Run the application server configuration wizard and set the new password on the Database page of the wizard.Resetting database passwords for the Application Server 5 When you have finished editing the list. See “Using the application server configuration wizard to change configuration settings” on page 39. update bluser set password = ''. commit. Resetting database passwords for the Application Server In the event that the database user password has been changed. click OK. 1 Execute the following command to set the passwords to a blank value.conf_created_on'. 114 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . delete from system_property where name = 'tpasswd. use this procedure to update the password on the Application Server.

the approaches to security vary. The following graphic illustrates the various communication legs possible within a BMC BladeLogic system. depending on which system components are communicating.Chapter 4 4 Administering security This chapter describes the approaches to security that are possible with BMC BladeLogic. including a discussion of some fundamental security concepts (see “Fundamentals of BMC BladeLogic security” on page 117). In BMC BladeLogic. Chapter 4 Administering security 115 .

See “Security for different communication legs” on page 130 for a discussion of the security approaches that are possible with each leg and references to any implementation procedures required. This chapter includes links to specialized terms that are defined in the Chapter 9. “Security Glossary”. 116 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . A discussion of network security requires many technical terms.

depending on the communication leg. he or she must authenticate with the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service (one of the services hosted by a BMC BladeLogic Application Server) prior to establishing a client/server session.Fundamentals of BMC BladeLogic security Fundamentals of BMC BladeLogic security To implement a secure data center automation system. Then the client uses that session credential to establish an application session with middle tier services. allowing client users to re-establish new application sessions without re-authenticating. In this way a user’s context can easily be passed between BMC BladeLogic client applications. see “Single sign-on” on page 121. If the user’s session credential is cached and the credential has not expired. First. For any entity that communicates directly with agents—including Network Shell clients that access agents without going through a Network Shell Proxy Server— authentication relies on the TLS protocol’s support for client authentication via clientside X. For communication between most client tier applications (the BMC BladeLogic Console. when an Application Server establishes an authenticated connection with an agent. client users authenticate with the Authentication Service and acquire a BMC BladeLogic single sign-on (SSO) session credential. the identity to be verified is the server hosting the Application Service.509 certificates. but in some situations the entity is a service. which are the identities and addresses of the Application Services and Network Shell Proxy Services that can be accessed using the session credential. the user can then exit the console and start a BLCLI session without authenticating again. BMC BladeLogic offers the following capabilities: ■ ■ ■ ■ Authentication Session layer security Impersonation and privilege mapping Authorization Authentication Authentication is the process of verifying the identity claimed by a system entity. For example. when a user starts the BMC BladeLogic Console. or BLCLI) and middle tier applications (Application Server or Network Shell Proxy Server). Network Shell. Written into the session credential are service URLs. For more information on single sign-on. a user can launch the BMC BladeLogic Console and authenticate. BMC BladeLogic client applications can cache SSO session credentials obtained from the Authentication Service. BMC BladeLogic uses different approaches for authentication. Chapter 4 Administering security 117 . Often that entity is a user. BMC BladeLogic employs a twostep process. For example. On the other hand.

If the user chooses not to trust the self-signed certificate. this document refers only to TLS. the certificate is added to the client’s list of trusted certificates and a secure session is established for the client. the Authentication Service) to authenticate and obtain an SSO credential. Communication with middle tier When a BMC BladeLogic client establishes a TLS connection with a middle tier entity (that is. For more information. this document refers to that state as Network Shell operating in proxy mode. as well as its SHA1 and SHA256 fingerprints. For the sake of simplicity.) When a client first accesses a middle tier entity (by necessity. the Authentication. The client cannot recognize the certificate as trusted so the client prompts the user to accept or reject the self-signed certificate. The client application displays the certificate’s content. you can provision middle tier entities with certificates issued by a CA. 118 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . which includes the following capabilities: ■ RSA key negotiation 128-bit AES block encryption algorithm CBC (Cipher Block Chaining) block cipher mode SHA1 HMAC construction for integrity protection. BMC BladeLogic system components employ TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_128_CBC_SHA for the TLS cipher suite. At installation. SSL.509 certificates. the client must validate a certificate from that entity. ■ ■ ■ The BMC BladeLogic Application Server and all client applications use FIPS 140-2 certified modules for cryptographic operations on all transported data. In all contexts (excluding BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation). the client is presented with the Application Server’s self-signed X. When Network Shell connects to a Network Shell Proxy Server.509 certificate. (Optionally. the session is terminated. middle tier entities are provisioned with self-signed X. the client establishes a TLS connection with the Application Server hosting the Authentication Service. If the user chooses to trust the self-signed certificate. or Network Shell Proxy Services). ■ Session layer security BMC BladeLogic uses TLS for session layer security across all communications legs. In the course of the TLS handshake. see “Securing communication with CA certificates” on page 224.Session layer security NOTE Be aware of the following documentation conventions: ■ BMC BladeLogic supports both TLS and its predecessor. Application.

By default. see “How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents” on page 237. Application Service. Self-signed server-side certificates are used to secure the exchange of TLS session keys between agents and entities that communicate with agents. Client applications re-write the keystore file when a trusted X.local configuration files can specify the local user context under which the client’s commands should execute. but you can modify that location. If your installation employs multiple Application Servers or stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Servers. In this way BMC BladeLogic takes advantage of the access control mechanisms provided by the remote server’s operating system. The keystore resides in a default location.pem in the directory where the agent is installed. the user is no longer prompted to trust that certificate when establishing future sessions with any of these other related entities.) If entries in the configuration files map the client user to a local user. If this file is not present. repeaters. BMC BladeLogic does not use client-side certificates. or Network Shell client—contacts an RSCD agent on a remote server. This file is known as a keystore. the agent temporarily acquires the privileges that the managed server’s operating system grants to this local user.Impersonation and privilege mapping All client services running on a BMC BladeLogic Application Server (Authentication Service. or Network Shell client establishes a connection with the agent. The certificate is stored in a file called certificate. you must provision agents with the SHA1 fingerprints of trusted clients’ self-signed certificates. settings in the exports. Communication with server tier Self-signed certificates are used to secure communication between entities that communicate directly with agents. Impersonation and privilege mapping Impersonation (on UNIX) and privilege mapping (on Windows) allow a user to assume an effective user identity and a set of user permissions on remote servers. When a client—that is an Application Server. they too share the same certificate. repeater. and users. BMC BladeLogic generates self-signed certificates when an agent is installed on a server. it is read every time an Application Server. Once a client application has added the Authentication Service’s certificate to its list of trusted certificates. the agent creates one. and Network Shell Proxy Service) share the same certificate. or Network Shell clients. as described in “Setting override locations for client SSO files” on page 150. If this file is present. Network Shell Proxy Server. Network Shell Proxy Servers. By default. (For details on this process. Chapter 4 Administering security 119 . you can choose to use self-signed client-side certificates for TLS sessions with RSCD agents. However. These entities could be Application Servers. Network Shell Proxy Server.509 certificate is added to or removed from the trusted certificate store. user. To accomplish this. A client’s list of trusted certificates are stored in a file written in the Privacy Enhanced Mail (PEM) format.

or users. For more on impersonation and privilege mapping. If there is a match. users are mapped to an underprivileged account (nobody on UNIX or Anonymous on Windows). the system attempts to match the user ID of the incoming user to a user ID defined on the managed server where the RSCD agent is installed. but that same junior administrator cannot make any changes on those servers. For example. “Setting up configuration files. the user will take on the privileges and permissions of the user “joe” on the target server. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. if a user authenticates as “joe” and then begins to use Network Shell. If there is no user mapping defined in the exports. 120 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . For more on RBAC and authorization in BMC BladeLogic. a Network Shell user with a junior admin role can be permitted to perform read-only Network Shell commands such as ls. and those ACLs can grant a range of authorizations to users. grep. BMC BladeLogic uses a technique called user privilege mapping. the user is assigned that user’s permissions in the same manner as if there was explicit mapping—that is.) For example. Every system object that you manage with the BMC BladeLogic Console has ACLs defined for it. Or.Authorization If the managed server is a UNIX-style system. joe does not exist on the target server as a user). which allows the agent to temporarily grant the local user’s group privileges to an unprivileged user account called BladeLogicRSCD.local configuration files. the agent fully impersonates a user through a call to the setuid command. You can also define authorizations for Network Shell users if they are configured to communicate through a Network Shell Proxy Server. on UNIX systems the agent fully impersonates the user through setuid. BMC BladeLogic supports authorization via a role-based access control (RBAC) model and a set of very granular access control lists (ACLs). On Windows systems the agent performs user privilege mapping. or ps on certain directories within a group of servers. If the managed server is a Windows machine. the BMC BladeLogic Console can allow users with an expert role to create component templates and other users with a junior admin role to check for compliance with these templates. see Chapter 5. This privilege mapping mechanism allows the agent to acquire the mapped local user’s group privileges without having to access that user’s Windows credentials (user name and password).” Authorization Authorization refers to the process of giving someone access to resources or permissions to perform certain actions. If user equivalency is not possible (that is. (Network Shell users communicating directly with agents do not assume any particular role. user.

the client presents its SSO session credential to the service. The two client command line applications (BLCLI and Network Shell) do not. The reports server uses these credentials to authenticate to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. that credential can be used to establish a new client/server session without requiring the user to re-authenticate. Users can authenticate with blcred and acquire session credential for the command line applications. having acquired a credential. the command line applications require access to a session credential that was acquired previously. The BMC BladeLogic Console has user authentication utilities built into it. SSO session credentials have a finite lifetime and can be cached in the file system of the client host. client users authenticate with a BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service (one of the services hosted by a BMC BladeLogic Application Server) and acquire an SSO session credential. BMC BladeLogic provides a command linebased user authentication utility called blcred. Readers familiar with HTTP cookies may view SSO session credentials as analogous to cookies used to communicate an authenticated identity to a BMC BladeLogic service. Then. To connect to a middle tier server. The session credential cache file can only hold one session credential.Single sign-on Single sign-on BMC BladeLogic employs a two-stage procedure for authenticating client application users to their respective middle-tier servers. A reports user logs in by providing the user credentials required for his or her authentication type. If a client application's credential cache contains an unexpired session credential. First. All BMC BladeLogic client applications except BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation can share the same session credential. which validates the credential and uses it to establish the identity of the client user. BMC BladeLogic Console users can choose whether to cache newly acquired session credentials in a cache file. This constraint will be relaxed in a future release. BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation is a web-based application that uses BMC BladeLogic single sign-on functionality in a different manner than other BMC BladeLogic applications. Single sign-on functionality supports the following authentication mechanisms: SRP LDAP RSA SecurID PKI Active Directory/Kerberos Domain Authentication Chapter 4 Administering security 121 . Once the TLS session is established. the client application establishes a TLS session with a middle tier service—either an Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service.

the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service authenticates client-tier users against a registry of authorized users. To take advantage of automatic failover. the Authentication Service issues the client a session credential. the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service connects to an LDAP server to authenticate the user. After successfully authenticating the SRP user. The Authentication Service authenticates users by contacting the first available LDAP server in the list. users can set up a list of multiple LDAP servers that provide the same directories of user information. that registry is a user table in the central Application Server’s database. If the LDAP server successfully authenticates the user. Information in the user table is derived from the RBAC utility in the BMC BladeLogic Console. 122 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . At that point a BMC BladeLogic client application can use the session credential to establish a secure authenticated session with the Application Service or a Network Shell Proxy Service identified by the service URLs in the session credential. allowing password-based mutual authentication of a client and server. When a BMC BladeLogic client-tier user logs in and provides an LDAP “distinguished name” and password. a protocol for querying and modifying directory entries that are arranged in a hierarchical. Non-disclosing authentication protocols protect against man-in-the-middle attacks. For SRP. At that point a BMC BladeLogic client application can use the session credential to establish an authenticated secure session with the Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service identified by the service URLs in the session credential. tree-like structure.SRP SRP The secure remote password (SRP) protocol is a non-disclosing authentication protocol (also characterized as a zero-knowledge protocol). In BMC BladeLogic. LDAP BMC BladeLogic authentication can be based on Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). This type of protocol allows a client-tier user to prove to an Authentication Service that he or she has knowledge of a password without ever revealing that password to the middle-tier service. the Authentication Service issues the client a session credential. Client-tier users are correlated to identities maintained in directories on external LDAP servers.

When an Active Directory domain user chooses to authenticate using AD/Kerberos. Client-tier users in BMC BladeLogic are correlated to identities maintained within RSA’s Authentication Manager rather than the central Application Server’s RBAC-based database. At that point a BMC BladeLogic client application can use the session credential to establish a secure authenticated session with the Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service identified by the service URLs in the session credential. SecurID users authenticate by providing a user name and a passcode. Active Directory/Kerberos Active Directory/Kerberos (AD/Kerberos) authentication integrates BMC BladeLogic with a key distribution center (KDC) to utilize the Kerberos v5 protocol for authenticating client-tier users. the user must insert a smart card into a card reader and enter a PIN. While logging into a BMC BladeLogic client. After successfully Chapter 4 Administering security 123 .RSA SecurID RSA SecurID BMC BladeLogic authentication can incorporate RSA’s Authentication Manager to utilize its two factor authentication mechanism. which is obtained from an RSA SecurID token. the Authentication Service issues the client a session credential. If the information the user enters is valid and the OCSP Responder verifies the validity of the user’s certificate. Through middleware. If authentication is successful. The passcode consists of a PIN and the current token code. PKI BMC BladeLogic authentication can be based public key infrastructure (PKI) for users who present a type of smart card known as a common access card (CAC). a BMC BladeLogic client can access the appropriate certificate and private key on the smart card to authenticate the user. At that point a BMC BladeLogic client application can use the session credential to establish a secure authenticated session with the Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service identified by the service URLs in the session credential. The current status of a certificate can be verified by contacting an OCSP Responder. the Authentication Service issues the client a session credential. AD/Kerberos authentication correlates client-tier users to identities maintained within an Active Directory domain controller rather than the central Application Server’s RBAC-based database. Kerberos mediates an authentication exchange between the client (the BMC BladeLogic Console or the blcred utility) and the domain controller as well as between the client and the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service.

This information is passed to the Authentication Service. A user logging into the BMC BladeLogic Application Server can authenticate with a different user name than the user name used to log into the Windows system hosting the BMC BladeLogic client application. In Domain Authentication. For example.COM and then log into BMC BladeLogic as Administrator@DOMAIN. Although BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation does not support AD/Kerberos authentication.COM. a user can log into Windows as Sally@DOMAIN. If the domain controller successfully authenticates the user. and password (see Domain Authentication). BMC BladeLogic clients use authentication profiles. domain. A user logging into the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service authenticates with the same user credential he or she acquires when the logging into the Windows domain. BMC BladeLogic clients (the BMC BladeLogic Console or the blcred utility) accept a user’s name. a BMC BladeLogic client application can use that session credential to establish an authenticated secure session with the Application Server or a Network Shell Proxy Service identified by the service URLs in the session credential.Domain Authentication authenticating the domain user. Domain Authentication provides greater flexibility than AD/Kerberos. Authentication profiles To facilitate single sign-on. it can authenticate AD/Kerberos users who provide a user name. which delegates user authentication to the Active Directory domain controller. and password. domain. which are collections of information that a BMC BladeLogic client application needs to log into the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. a Windows user credential. the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service issues the BMC BladeLogic client an SSO session credential. At that point. An authentication profile identifies the following: 124 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Domain Authentication The Domain Authentication solution integrates BMC BladeLogic with Active Directory without requiring users to obtain a Kerberos ticket—that is. The BMC BladeLogic client application can then use the session credential to establish an authenticated secure session with the Application Server or a Network Shell Proxy Service identified by the service URLs in the session credential. AD/Kerberos takes advantage of the Windows single-sign on functionality. the Authentication Service issues the client a session credential.

he or she would need an authentication profile for each mechanism. when logging on. so a user does not have to specify an Application Server or listening port. The BLCLI or Network Shell user can use the BMC BladeLogic Console or the blcred utility to obtain and cache the appropriate SSO session credential. Using authentication profiles When a user launches a BMC BladeLogic client application (except BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation). he or she would need three different authentication profiles. ■ ■ ■ A user can define multiple authentication profiles. For example. Chapter 4 Administering security 125 . and one for Development. PKI. Instead. The client application looks in its cache of session credentials to determine if it holds a current credential that was acquired under the conditions defined by the authentication profile. he or she must specify an authentication profile. the port used to access the Authentication Service. Each reports server always accesses the same Authentication Service. LDAP. users simply specify an authentication type. or Domain Authentication Information specific to individual authentication protocols. and an authentication mechanism. If the client application does not possess an appropriate session credential. Each authentication profile specifies an Application Server hosting an Authentication Service.Authentication profiles ■ Application Server host name Listening port for the Authentication Service hosted by the Application Server Authentication protocol: SRP. the client application establishes a connection to the service listed in the session credential. users do not define authentication profiles. If a cached session credential includes information matching these specifications. such as the distinguished name template for LDAP. In Network Shell or BLCLI. SecurID. establishment of the client/server session is aborted if the session credential cache does not contain a session credential matching the requirements specified in the authentication profile. the BMC BladeLogic Console prompts the user to log into the Authentication Service identified by the specified authentication profile. one for QA. an organization might employ three instances of BMC BladeLogic—one for Operations. AD/Kerberos. If a user wants to connect to all three from the same client application. In another example. each pointing to a different instance of BMC BladeLogic. For BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation. if a user plans to log into the Application Server using various authentication mechanisms.

see “Environment variables” on page 129. it issues a session credential to the client application. BMC BladeLogic clients use session credentials to establish secure sessions with Application Servers and Network Shell Proxy Servers. A session credential contains the following information: ■ BMC BladeLogic user name 126 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Single sign-on session credentials When an Authentication Service authenticates a user. see “Using the blcred utility” on page 226. The blcred utility always caches any session credential it obtains from the Authentication Service.Single sign-on session credentials The BMC BladeLogic Console provides a dialog that allows users to add or delete authentication profiles as well as select an authentication profile for the purpose of logging in. The following table summarizes these options. The XML file resides at a default location. For more information on using blcred. For more information on using environment variables. Within that file each authentication profile must have a unique name. The BMC BladeLogic command line applications provide various options for identifying an authentication profile by name. The blcred utility also can be used to add or delete authentication profiles. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Authentication profiles are stored in a single XML file. but you can modify that location. Mechanisms to Identify Authentication Profile environment variable: BL_AUTH_PROFILE_NAME secure file setting: auth_profile BLCLI command line option: -v authenticationProfileName environment variable: BL_AUTH_PROFILE_NAME Takes precedence over environment variable Application Network Shell (in proxy mode) Precedence Takes precedence over secure file setting BMC BladeLogic Console login dialog For more information on setting up authentication profiles for the BMC BladeLogic Console. as described in “Setting override locations for client SSO files” on page 150. Note that BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation does not require authentication profiles so it is not listed in the table below. The BMC BladeLogic Console lets users choose to cache session credentials.

AD/Kerberos.Single sign-on session credentials ■ Protocol used to authenticate user: SRP. The reports server can potentially hold the user’s session credential even after the user’s connection with the reports server terminates. its host address. SSO session credentials are cached in a file on the client host. ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Session credentials are digitally signed by the issuing Authentication Service. the reports server does not cache the session credential on the client’s system. BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation can automatically renew the user’s session credential without requiring the user to re-authenticate. verifies the digital signature to ensure the credential’s authenticity and integrity. The reports server relays this information to the Authentication Service and obtains a session credential for the user. Each of these URLs specifies the type of service. and its port. Each time a user logs into the reports server from a browser. its host address. and its port. but you can modify that location. the credential cache can hold a maximum of one session credential at any time. SecurID. This allows users to schedule recurring report jobs. Expiration time for session credential Maximum lifetime for session credential Client system’s IP address Authorized roles for user Service URLs of BMC BladeLogic services that the credential can be used to access. or Domain Authentication Service URL. such as Application Services and Network Shell Proxy Services. upon being presented with a session credential. On both Windows and UNIX. BMC BladeLogic relies on system access controls to restrict access to the session credential cache. which identifies the Authentication Service that issued the session credential. This restriction will be relaxed in a future release. The session credential cache file resides at a default location. the user provides data required for authentication. Chapter 4 Administering security 127 . A BMC BladeLogic service. LDAP. File system access controls only allow the user for whom the credential was issued to access the credential cache Unlike other BMC BladeLogic system components. as described in “Setting override locations for client SSO files” on page 150.

see “Generating a user information file” on page 230. a user must be assigned to an RBAC role. When a user is authorized for multiple roles. Procedures for the AD/Kerberos implementation explain the use of a keytab file in that context. the user can interactively select a role while logging into a BMC BladeLogic client application. BMC BladeLogic only supports a keytab file for SRP authentication.dat. For instructions on setting up user_info. which lets you change roles after a Network Shell session is established. Network Shell also provides a command called chrole. If a user is authorized for multiple roles. Application BMC BladeLogic Console BLCLI Mechanisms to Specify a Role Precedence GUI dialog. Note that BMC BladeLogic also employs a keytab file for its AD/Kerberos implementation. Because of their sensitive nature. The SRP keytab file is called user_info. for single sign-on. The following table summarizes the options available to specifying a role. he or she is assigned to that role after logging into an application. BMC BladeLogic command line applications can specify a role using a command line option or an environment variable. Keytab files provide the blcred utility with long-term user credentials that can be used to authenticate a user. RBAC role selection When a session is established. if multiple roles are defined interactive prompts from command line dialog command line option: -r roleName environment variable: BL_RBAC_ROLE Network Shell (in proxy mode) interactive prompts from command line dialog environment variable: BL_RBAC_ROLE Takes precedence over environment variable 128 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . In this release.dat. When using Network Shell or BLCLI. the role may be specified through an environment variable.Keytab files Keytab files If you are using SRP authentication. If a user is authorized for only one role. keytab files are useful when running unattended automation scripts that make use of Network Shell proxy services or make calls to the BLCLI. access to keytab files should be tightly controlled.

Environment variables Environment variables BMC BladeLogic provides environment variables that can be used to pass configuration data to the command line client applications (BLCLI and Network Shell) and the blcred utility. BLCLI and blcred also provide command line options for providing the same data. To set an environment variable. use a procedure like the following: % BL_SSO_CRED_CACHE_FILE=userHomeDirectory\bladelogic_alt\bl_sesscc % export BL_SSO_CRED_CACHE_FILE The following table details the environment variables that can be used with single sign-on functionality. Environment Variable BL_SSO_TRUSTED_CERT_ KEYSTORE_FILE BL_RBAC_ROLE Description Specifies location of file storing trusted certificates Specifies RBAC role For More Information: “Trusted keystore” on page 151 “RBAC role selection” on page 128 BL_SSO_CRED_CACHE_FILE Specifies location of session “Session credential cache file” credential cache file on page 151 BL_AUTH_PROFILES_FILE Provides location of file containing authentication profile definitions Identifies authentication profile to use when authenticating “Authentication profile file” on page 151 “Using authentication profiles” on page 125 BL_AUTH_PROFILE_NAME Chapter 4 Administering security 129 . The command line options take precedence over environment variable settings.

The following sections describe security for the following communication legs in BMC BladeLogic: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ BMC BladeLogic Console to Application Server BLCLI to Application Server Network Shell to Network Shell Proxy Server Reports client to reports server Application Server to agent or repeater Network Shell to agent Repeater to agent BMC BladeLogic Console to Application Server For traffic between the BMC BladeLogic Console and an Application Server. privilege mapping. 130 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . see “Implementing single sign-on” on page 135. Additional configuration is necessary if you want to customize the default behavior or use other authentication protocols. authentication can be configured differently for the various communication legs. SRP is the default user authentication mechanism. BMC BladeLogic relies on TLS to secure communication between client and server and single sign-on credentials to authenticate client users. BLCLI to Application Server For traffic between BLCLI and an Application Server. The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service supports many authentication mechanisms. and authorization—are consistent throughout BMC BladeLogic. Implementation A default BMC BladeLogic installation sets up a single sign-on system using SRP authentication and TLS session layer security. Client users obtain single sign-on credentials by authenticating themselves to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. BMC BladeLogic relies on TLS to secure communication between client and server and single sign-on credentials to authenticate client users. For implementation details.Security for different communication legs Security for different communication legs Although some aspects of security—session layer security.

Additional configuration is necessary if you want to customize the default behavior or use other authentication protocols. The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service supports many user authentication mechanisms. Implementation ■ A default BMC BladeLogic installation sets up a single sign-on system using SRP authentication and TLS session layer security. Network Shell does not have a built-in authentication utility. Network Shell users obtain single sign-on credentials by authenticating themselves to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. implement any authentication mechanism other than SRP. Chapter 4 Administering security 131 . Additional configuration is necessary to set up a Network Shell Proxy Service. ■ Network Shell to Network Shell Proxy Server For traffic between a Network Shell client and a Network Shell Proxy Server. Alternatively. For implementation details. blcred. Network Shell users can use a separate user authentication command line utility. BLCLI users can use a separate user authentication command line utility. see “Using the blcred utility” on page 226. Alternatively. Network Shell can use that credential. Users can acquire and cache a SSO session credential through the BMC BladeLogic Console. see “Implementing single sign-on” on page 135. to authenticate themselves to an Authentication Service and acquire a SSO session credential.Network Shell to Network Shell Proxy Server BLCLI users obtain single sign-on credentials by authenticating themselves to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. The BLCLI does not have a built-in authentication utility. BMC BladeLogic relies on TLS to secure communication between client and server and single sign-on credentials to authenticate client users. For information on using the blcred utility to obtain session credentials. SRP is the default user authentication mechanism. SRP is the default user authentication mechanism. For implementation details. or customize SSO behavior. blcred. to authenticate themselves to an Authentication Service and acquire a SSO session credential. see “Implementing single sign-on” on page 135. Implementation ■ A default BMC BladeLogic installation sets up a single sign-on system using SRP authentication and TLS session layer security. The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service supports many user authentication mechanisms. Users can acquire and cache a SSO session credential through the BMC BladeLogic Console and the BLCLI can use that credential.

Organizations that want Kerberos-based authentication for BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation can use the Domain Authentication protocol. they are granted session credentials. Users authenticate themselves to the reports server over the HTTPS session.Reports client to reports server ■ For information on using the blcred utility to obtain session credentials. To generate a new certificate. Once a user on the reports client is authenticated. The reports server accesses the BMC SARA Authentication Service to authenticate a user and acquire SSO credentials in the name of the authenticated user. By default 132 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . which can authenticate AD/Kerberos users when they provide their user name. but you can replace it with a custom certificate. Authentication For BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation. user authentication functions much like authentication for other BMC BladeLogic applications. For traffic between the reports client and the reports server. Reports client to reports server A BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation client is a web browser that connects to the reports server. you can use a tool such as OpenSSL. see “Using the blcred utility” on page 226. BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation supports all BMC BladeLogic authentication protocols except AD/Kerberos. domain. and password. Implementation A default installation of BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation sets up a BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service called BMC SARA Authentication. the reports server obtains data for reports from the reports data warehouse. After users are authenticated. By default the reports server uses a self-signed certificate. BMC BladeLogic relies on the HTTPS protocol (HTTP over TLS) to secure communication between the browser and reports server. Server-side certificates The TLS communication protocol automatically negotiates an encryption algorithm to secure data. BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation data is packaged using Cognos Reports. Server-side certificates are used during the TLS handshake to establish session keys for encrypting traffic between the web browser and the reports server.

see the BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation User Guide. modify the exports file on each agent or repeater. when an Application Server connects to an agent or repeater. Implementation To implement this approach. agents and repeaters are provisioned with the SHA1 fingerprints of the Application Servers’ self-signed certificates.Application Server to agent or repeater only SRP authentication is enabled on the BMC SARA Authentication Service. Application Server to agent or repeater For traffic between an Application Server and an agent or repeater. For all implementation details. no authentication occurs. If you want to set up self-signed certificates for a Network Shell Proxy Server. For more information. To accomplish this. Additional configuration is necessary if you want to use an Authentication Server that is not located on the same machine as the reports server. Network Shell to agent For traffic between a Network Shell client and an agent. see “Exports file” on page 240. The procedure is identical. BMC BladeLogic relies on TLS to secure communication and the following options for authenticating the Application Server host to the repeater or agent: ■ Self-signed certificates—Enables agents or repeaters to authenticate Application Servers. Implementation For implementation details. see “TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server” on page 202 or “TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIXbased Application Server” on page 206. use these procedures as well. BMC BladeLogic relies on TLS to secure communication and the following options for authenticating the Network Shell client to the agent: Chapter 4 Administering security 133 . ■ No authentication—By default. ■ IP address—Limits incoming traffic for an agent or repeater to IP addresses of specific Application Servers. Implementation A default installation of BMC BladeLogic provides no authentication for this communication leg.

134 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . client-side certs—Enables agents to authenticate repeaters. when a Network Shell client connects to an agent. no authentication occurs other than the authentication provided by the underlying operating system of the host where Network Shell is running when a Network Shell user logs in. Implementation For implementation details. see “Exports file” on page 240. modify the exports file on each agent. this configuration relies on the host operating system of the Network Shell client to authenticate a user. Repeater to agent For traffic between a repeater and an agent. agents are provisioned with SHA1 fingerprints of Network Shell clients’ self-signed certificates. ■ IP address—Limits an agent’s incoming traffic to IP addresses of specific Network Shell clients. (If necessary. ■ No authentication—By default. agents are provisioned with SHA1 fingerprints of repeaters’ selfsigned certificates.Repeater to agent ■ Self-signed. To accomplish this. see “Implementing Security – Repeater to agent” on page 217. Instead. To accomplish this. BMC BladeLogic relies on TLS to secure communication and the following options for authenticating the repeater host to the agent: ■ Self signed. Implementation For implementation details. Implementation A default installation of BMC BladeLogic provides no authentication. client-side certs—Enables agents to authenticate Network Shell clients. For more information. Application Servers can also be specified in the same way.) Implementation To implement this approach. see “TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client” on page 212.

A standard installation of BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation sets up a stand-alone Authentication Server for reports users. A standard installation of the Application Server sets up the Application Service. Chapter 4 Administering security 135 ■ ■ . After a client user authenticates. Network Shell Proxy Service—Used for accessing the functionality of a Network Shell Proxy Server. Application Servers and specific clients can be specified in the same way. All communication with the Authentication Service occurs over TLS. All communication with the Network Shell Proxy Service occurs over TLS. (If necessary. all requests from the BMC BladeLogic Console or the blcred utility. After a client user authenticates. The Authentication Service processes all user authentication requests—that is. see “Exports file” on page 240. no authentication occurs. when a repeater connects to an agent. ■ No authentication—By default. A standard installation of the Application Server includes an Authentication Service. For more information. modify the exports file on each agent. A client application (the BMC BladeLogic Console or the BLCLI) presents the session credential to the Application Service to establish a secure session with one of the targeted services listed within the session credential. Application Service—Used for accessing the functionality of the BMC BladeLogic Application Server.) Implementation To implement this approach. Some configuration is necessary to set up a Network Shell Proxy Service. Implementing single sign-on To implement the BMC BladeLogic single sign-on system. the client application is issued a session credential. the client application is issued a session credential.Implementing single sign-on ■ IP address—Limits an agent’s incoming traffic to IP addresses of specific repeaters. Implementation A default installation of BMC BladeLogic provides no authentication for this communication leg. All communication with the Application Service occurs over TLS. A Network Shell client presents the session credential to the Network Shell Proxy Service to establish a secure session with the Network Shell Proxy Server. you need the following services: ■ Authentication Service—Used for authenticating user identities and issuing session credentials to authenticated users. SRP authentication is supported by default for all BMC BladeLogic applications.

Currently. If necessary. see “Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service” on page 142. Each of the steps in this procedure references a section that describes another procedure. see any of the following: Implementing LDAP authentication Implementing RSA SecurID authentication Implementing PKI authentication Implementing Active Directory/Kerberos authentication Implementing Domain Authentication 136 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 3 If you want to use a Network Shell Proxy Server. 6 If you want the SSO system to support any authentication protocol other than SRP. see “Setting override locations for client SSO files” on page 150. The files used by the SSO system reside at default locations. A default installation of a BMC BladeLogic Application Server sets up an Authentication Service to support single sign-on for BMC BladeLogic client applications. see “Configuring the Application Service” on page 140. 1 If you want to modify the default behavior of an Authentication Service. You can optionally use OCSP verification for Application Servers provisioned with custom certificates.Implementing single sign-on Use the following master procedure to implement the single sign-on system. 5 If you want to set up OCSP verification of certificates. 4 If you want to modify the location of any SSO files used by any BMC BladeLogic client application. you can instruct a client application to use different files. see “Setting up certificate verification using OCSP” on page 153. OCSP verification is only enabled by default for PKI authentication. 2 If you want to modify the default behavior of the Application Service. A default installation of a BMC BladeLogic Application Server sets up an Application Service to support single sign-on. see “Configuring the Authentication Service” on page 137.

enter the following: set AuthServer IsLdapAuthEnabled true|false By default. the session credential lifetime is 600 minutes (10 hours). Additional configuration is necessary to support other authentication protocols. Setting AuthSvcPort to 0 turns off the Authentication Service. There are various options for modifying the standard behavior of an Authentication Service. ■ To enable or disable SecurID authentication. of issued session credentials. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. do any of the following: ■ To enable or disable SRP authentication. Use the following procedure to set any of those options. enter the following: set AuthServer AuthSvcPort # where # is the number of the port.Configuring the Authentication Service Configuring the Authentication Service A default installation of a BMC BladeLogic Application Server sets up an Authentication Service to support single sign-on and SRP authentication. By default. 2 To specify a listening port other than 9840 for the Authentication Service. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console (that is. 4 To specify the types of authentication mechanisms that are enabled. The Authentication Service runs on the same machine as the Application Server. enter the following: set AuthServer IsSecurIdAuthEnabled true|false Chapter 4 Administering security 137 . 3 To specify the duration of session credentials that the Authentication Service issues. the blasadmin utility). in minutes. enter the following: set AuthServer IsSRPAuthEnabled true|false By default this value is set to true. enter the following: set AuthServer SessionCredentialLifetime # where # is the lifetime. ■ To enable or disable LDAP authentication. this value is set to false.

. it cannot process BLCLI commands used for import/export.. enter the following: set AuthServer IsDomainAuthEnabled true|false By default.. if you want to run Network Shell Script Jobs that include BLCLI commands.bladelogic. bladelogic:blsess://host2. this value is set to false. 5 To write non-default destination service URLs into a session credential.bladelogic. By default BLCLI commands run on the Application Server processing the job..serviceURL where serviceURL.service:appsvc..com:9841. ■ To enable or disable AD/Kerberos authentication.Configuring the Authentication Service By default. enter the following: set PkiAuth IsEnabled true|false By default.. BLCLI commands used for import or export must run on an Application Server with its type set to CONFIGURATION or ALL.com:9841 Typically. However. enter the following: set AuthServer AppServiceURLs " " Note the blank space between the quotation marks. ■ To enable or disable Domain Authentication. 138 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . this value is set to false. do any of the following: ■ To override the default Application Service URL. If that Application Server is a JOB type Application Server.. enter the following: set AuthServer AppServiceURLs serviceURL. ■ To enable or disable PKI authentication.bladelogic: blsess://host1. you do not need to change the default Application Server URL. this value is set to false. this value is set to false.serviceURL is a list of alternative Application Service’s service URLs.. enter the following: set AuthServer IsADKAuthEnabled true|false By default. you can direct these commands to run on a particular Application Server. ■ To configure the Authentication Service so it does not write any Application Service service URLs into the session credential it issues. For example: set AuthServer AppServiceURLs service:appsvc.

serviceURL where serviceURL. set AuthServer ProxyServiceURLs service:proxysvc. then any Network Shell commands run by jobs on this Application Server are routed to the Network Shell Proxy Servers identified by ProxyServiceURLs.com:9842 If you are setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. enter the following: set AuthServer ProxyServiceURLs " " Note the blank space between the quotation marks.bladelogic.serviceURL is a list of alternative Network Shell Proxy Service’s service URLs.bladelogic: blsess://host1. enter the following: set AuthServer AppServiceURLs "" Note that there is no blank space between the quotation marks. NOTE If you provide a value for ProxyServiceURLs on an Application Server that is defined as type ALL. see “Setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server” on page 145. For more information on setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. ■ To override the default Network Shell Proxy Service service URL. For example.com:9842.service:proxysvc. ■ To configure the Authentication Service so it reverts to its default behavior of writing the service URL of the local Network Shell Proxy Service into session credentials (assuming the local proxy service is enabled). ■ To configure the Authentication Service so it does not write any Network Shell Proxy Service service URLs into the session credential it issues. Chapter 4 Administering security 139 . enter the following: set AuthServer ProxyServiceURLs serviceURL. bladelogic:blsess://host2. enter the following: set AuthServer ProxyServiceURLs "" Note that there is no blank space between the quotation marks.Configuring the Authentication Service ■ To configure the Authentication Service so it reverts to its default behavior of writing the service URL of the local Application Service into session credentials.bladelogic. you must identify the URL for the stand-alone server’s Network Shell Proxy Service service URL.

a firewall) that requires address translations. Overriding the defaults and specifying empty service URLs results in session credentials with no destination service URLs. enter the following: set AuthServer AuthSvcSocketTimeout # where # is the maximum number of minutes to wait for a response from a worker thread. the Authentication Service will. the connection times out. There are various options for modifying the standard behavior of an Application Service. Use the following procedure to set any of those options. When a session credential has no destination service URL. Configuring the Application Service A default installation of BMC BladeLogic sets up an Application Service to support single sign-on. by default. This is particularly useful when your installation has a network configuration (for example. 140 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . By default. 7 To specify a time-out for responses from Authentication Service worker threads. enter the following: set AuthServer MaxAuthSvcThreads # where # is the maximum number of threads that can process requests from clients. Once the maximum is exceeded.Configuring the Application Service Providing service URLs lets you specify alternative addresses (in the form of service URLs) for an Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service. Typically. 6 To specify the maximum number of worker threads used for authentication. the maximum is 5. By default the Authentication Service creates a session credential that only includes the service URL for the local Application Service. By default the maximum is 1. 8 Restart the Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). If the local Network Shell Proxy Service is enabled. no additional configuration is necessary. include its service URL in the session credential it issues. a client cannot use it to access an Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service.

If the IP addresses do not match. enter the following: set appserver AppSvcPort # where # is the number of the port. 4 To specify whether the service URL of the Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service specified in a client’s service request should be compared to the actual service URL of that service. this option is set to true.Configuring the Application Service 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Chapter 4 Administering security 141 . the client is denied access. and a client can access any one of many Application Servers when establishing a session connection. Setting AppSvcPort to 0 turns off the Application Service. Set this value to false only if you are using a network load balancer for your Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers. ■ false means the receiving service’s URL does not have to match the service URL to which the request is addressed. enter the following: set appserver ValidateClientIpAddress true|false In the command shown above: ■ true means the IP address of the client must match the client’s IP address included in the session credential. 2 To specify a listening port other than 9841 for the Application Service. you are not using a load balancer for the Authentication Service. 3 To specify whether the client’s IP address included in a session credential should be compared to the IP address of the client that is presenting the credential. By default. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. this option is set to true. By default. enter the following: set appserver ValidateRequestURL true|false In the command shown above: ■ true means the service URL of the Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service handling the request must match the service URL to which the request was addressed. ■ false means the IP address of the client does not have to match the client’s IP address included in the session credential.

Using this configuration. It can relieve the overall workload by processing all Network Shell traffic. See “Setting Up a Network Shell Proxy Server” on page 142. you have the following options: ■ Setting up an Application Server that performs many functions including that of Network Shell Proxy Server. When setting up a Network Shell Proxy Server. you may want to reduce overall traffic loads by setting up an Application Server that functions exclusively as a Network Shell Proxy Server. See “Setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server” on page 145. If an Application Server experiences high traffic loads that include Network Shell activity.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service Always set this value to false if you are using a network load balancer for your Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers. and a client can access any one of many Application Servers when establishing a session connection. which means it only manages Network Shell traffic and performs no other Application Server functionality. Setting up an Application Server that functions exclusively as a Network Shell Proxy Server. ■ ■ This section also includes a description of how to set up Network Shell Proxy Services for Application Servers that process jobs (see “Setting up Network Shell Proxy Services for Windows user mapping” on page 149). 142 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . This procedure is only necessary if you want to use Windows user mapping to run jobs that act on Windows target servers. 5 Restart the Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). A stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server cannot access the BMC BladeLogic database. A default installation of a BMC BladeLogic Application Server does not set up a Network Shell Proxy Server. a Network Shell Proxy Server can accommodate all authentication protocols that BMC BladeLogic supports. Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service Use this procedure to set up a Network Shell Proxy Server that manages traffic from Network Shell clients. Setting Up a Network Shell Proxy Server Use this procedure to configure an Application Server so that it either functions as an Application Server that also manages traffic from Network Shell clients or it only manages Network Shell traffic. See “Setting Up a Network Shell Proxy Server” on page 142. Setting up an Application Server that serves as a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server.

By default the Network Shell Proxy Server listens for traffic on port equal to Base Port plus 42. modify the listening port for the Network Shell Proxy Server by entering the following: set appserver ProxySvcPort # where # is the number of the port on the Application Server that listens for Network Shell traffic. If this value is acceptable. 3 If necessary. 5 To adjust the performance of proxy threads processing Network Shell client connections. Each proxy thread can accommodate multiple Network Shell client connections by switching between connections when there is no traffic on a particular connection. see “Configuring multiple Application Servers on the same host” on page 93. the Application Server does not run a Network Shell proxy service. enter the following: set appserver NshProxyMaxThreadIdleTime # where # can be any of the following: Chapter 4 Administering security 143 . To accomplish this. ■ For more information on application server profiles. 2 Start the Application Server Administration console.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service 1 Start the Network Shell Proxy Server using an application server profile with its Type set so it includes one of the following: ■ ALL—The Application Server performs many functions including Network Shell Proxy Server. using an excessive number of threads can potentially degrade the performance of a Network Shell Proxy Server. Increasing the maximum number of proxy threads can improve performance for Network Shell users. If a value is not set for ProxySvcPort. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. However. 4 To specify the maximum number of threads that are available to process Network Shell client connections. you do not have to set a value for ProxySvcPort. NSH_PROXY—The Application Server functions exclusively as a Network Shell Proxy Server. By default this value is set to 5. enter the following: set appserver MaxNshProxyThreads # where # is the maximum number of threads. specify a maximum idle time for thread processing.

By default this value is set to 60 seconds. By default NshProxyMaxThreadIdleTime is set to 500 ms. that a thread should remain idle. the connection is automatically closed. enter the following: set appserver NshProxySocketOperationTimeout # where # is a value in seconds. Each thread is dedicated to a single connection so the thread never switches connections. 144 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . which means the connection is never closed. enter the following: set appserver IdleNshProxyPruneTime # where # is a value in minutes. enter the following: set appserver NshProxySocketConnectTimeout # where # is a value in seconds. 6 To specify the maximum idle time for a connection with a Network Shell client. While the thread is idle it continues to serve the current connection. 8 To specify the timeout settings for NSH proxy socket reads. in milliseconds. This value specifies the number of seconds for NSH proxy socket reads before the socket times out. -1 – Provides the fastest performance for a particular connection. When the specified period expires. By default this value is set to 0. A thread is always available to serve another connection after traffic ends on the current connection. the harder it is for that thread to process more than one connection. This value specifies the number of seconds for obtaining a NSH proxy socket connection to the Application Server. The longer you instruct a thread to be idle. the thread can switch to another connection. 9 Restart the Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). A value greater than zero specifies a period. When there is no traffic over the connection between a Network Shell client and its proxy for this period of time. 7 To specify the timeout settings for obtaining a NSH proxy socket connection to the Application Server.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service 0 – Provides the best thread switching performance. >0 – Provides a compromise between the two settings described above. By default this value is set to 7200 seconds.

and you must perform some configuration on the central Application Server. When installing. 1 Install an Application Server on the machine where you want to create a standalone Network Shell Proxy Server. perform the following steps: A Start blasadmin for the _template deployment by entering the following: blasadmin -s _template Chapter 4 Administering security 145 . To perform this procedure. you can find bladelogic. See “Setting up a Network Shell Client to run in proxy mode” on page 147. A stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server can perform no other Application Server functionality. such as the _template and _launcher directories. Using the copied bladelogic. 11 Assign the NSH_PROXY. It cannot even access the BMC BladeLogic database. NOTE You cannot use Windows user mapping to grant permissions to a user on a managed server when that user is running a Network Shell client to access a managed server through a standalone Network Shell Proxy Server. search for all instances of bladelogic. Do not run the Post-Install Configuration wizard. blasadmin) to create a new deployment of type NSH_PROXY and configure it as a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. You must repeat this step for every Network Shell client that should communicate with the Network Shell Proxy Server. you must create a Network Shell Proxy Server deployment using the blasadmin utility. On the central Application Server.keystore that may exist within installDirectory/br/deployments or any of its subdirectories.keystore. a deployment of an Application Server is configured to function only as a Network Shell Proxy Server. use the Application Server Administration console (that is.Connect authorization to any role that should be used to connect to a Network Shell Proxy Server. In this configuration.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service 10 Set up a client for Network Shell users. Setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server Use this procedure to configure a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. To accomplish this.keystore file. 2 Copy the bladelogic.keystore on the Application Server where you are setting up a Network Shell Proxy Server. replace all occurrences of bladelogic.keystore at installDirectory/br/deployments/_template/bladelogic. On the Network Shell Proxy Server. 3 On the Network Shell Proxy Server. provide the same password for the Application Server’s certificate that you entered when installing the central Application Server.keystore file from the central Application Server.

Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service B Create a new default deployment of a Network Shell Proxy Server by entering the following: create new_proxy base_port NSH_PROXY new_proxy is the name of the new Network Shell Proxy Server you are creating. configure the central Application Server by doing the following: A Select Configuration => Infrastructure Management. base_port is a number that is combined with offset values to determine Authentication and Application Server port numbers. you do not have to set a value for ProxySvcPort. For new deployments of an Application Server. enter the following: 146 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . If this value is acceptable. the offset for the authentication port is 40 by default. the Network Shell Proxy Server listens for traffic on a port equal to Base Port plus 42. If the base_port is 9500. C On the Edit Application Server Profile. modify the listening port for the Network Shell Proxy Server by entering the following: set appserver ProxySvcPort # where # is the number of the port on the Application Server that listens for Network Shell traffic. If a value is not set for ProxySvcPort. See “Starting Application Servers” on page 41. For example. right-click. B Expand Application Servers. E Indicate that the Network Shell Proxy Server should not contact the BMC BladeLogic database by entering the following command: set appserver PwdStore file 4 Start the Application Server on the machine where you are setting up a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. for ProxyServiceURLs. select the central Application Server. and select Edit. the Application Server does not run a Network Shell Proxy Service. 5 Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. the authentication port would be 9540. C Switch to the newly created deployment by entering the following: switch new_proxy D If necessary.

Chapter 4 Administering security 147 .bladelogic:blsess://NSH_proxy_server_host:proxy_svc_port In this entry NSH_proxy_server_host is the host where you have set up the Network Shell Proxy Server and proxy_svc_port is the port number you defined in step D above (under step 3). NOTE To use the blcred utility. Setting up a Network Shell Client to run in proxy mode Use this procedure to configure a Network Shell client so it can run in proxy mode— that is. You must repeat this step for every Network Shell client that communicates with the Network Shell Proxy Server. 8 Assign the NSH_PROXY.Connect authorization to any role that should be used to connect to a Network Shell Proxy Server. For a complete description of blcred. See “Setting up a Network Shell Client to run in proxy mode” on page 147. Additionally. You can use the blcred utility to authenticate a user and acquire a new session credential. 7 Set up a client for Network Shell users. so it can communicate with servers via a Network Shell Proxy Server. Note that the BL_AUTH_PROFILE_NAME environment variable can override the value of this secure file setting. Authentication profiles are defined in the authentication profiles file. this procedure includes steps to ensure that the scripts have access to valid SSO session credentials. where authProfile is the name of the authentication profile that holds a description of the Authentication Service from which the required session credential should be issued and the authentication mechanism that was used to authenticate the user when the session credential was acquired. Primarily this procedure consists of some settings you must add to the secure file for a client installation. you must have the BMC BladeLogic Console installed.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service service:proxysvc. 1 Start Network Shell for a client installation and use the secadmin utility to create an entry in the secure file that specifies the following: ■ auth_profile=authProfile. see the blcred man page. if you plan to run Network Shell and BLCLI scripts unattended on this client machine. 6 Restart the central Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). The value used for authProfile must match the name of an authentication profile included in that file.

do the following: A Provide an authentication profile name that can be used to generate an SSO session credential. see “Secure file” on page 253.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service ■ auth_profiles_file=fileName. enter the following from Network Shell: secadmin -m default -p 5 -auth_profile QAProfile -auth_profiles_file "/c/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br /authenticationProfiles. you can use the BMC BladeLogic Console to generate authentication profiles on this client machine (see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide for details).xml file.xml" -appserver_protocol ssoproxy -T encryption_only -e tls For more information on the secure file. where fileName is the Network Shell-style path to the XML file containing authentication profile definitions.xml: appserver_protocol=ssoproxy:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption= tls To use the secadmin utility to generate the default entry shown above. ■ appserver_protocol=ssoproxy For example.xml. For more information on secadmin. See the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide for information on using the BMC BladeLogic Console to set up authentication profiles. 2 Assign the NSH_PROXY.Connect authorization to any role that should be used to connect to a Network Shell Proxy Server. 3 To run Network Shell and BLCLI scripts unattended from this client machine. or you can copy authenticationProfiles. 148 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . the following is a default entry in the secure file on a client machine running Network Shell: default:protocol=5:auth_profile=QAProfile: auth_profiles_file=/c/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/ version/NSH/br/ authenticationProfiles.xml from a machine where the console is installed and authentication profiles have already been created. You can create an authentication profile using blcred or you can create one beforehand using theBMC BladeLogic Console. such as /c/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/authenticationProfiles. You can provide an authentication profile name using a command line option for blcred or by defining the BL_AUTH_PROFILE_NAME environment variable. see “Using the secadmin utility” on page 258. Note that the BL_AUTH_PROFILES_FILE environment variable can override the value of the auth_profiles_file setting in the secure file. To create the authenticationProfiles.

3 On the Edit Application Server Profile dialog. — Let the blcred utility prompt for a user name. Chapter 4 Administering security 149 . — Provide a BLCLI command line option that specifies the user’s role. password. which stores a user name. your Application Server environment must meet certain criteria. set up a keytab file called user_info. password. Setting up Network Shell Proxy Services for Windows user mapping If you are using automation principals to implement Windows user mapping. — Let the Network Shell client (operating in proxy mode) and the BLCLI prompt the user to make a role selection after establishing an SSO session. and role.dat. — For SRP authentication. or the job may not run at all. provide a value for ProxyServiceURLs.Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service B Provide user information required for the authentication mechanism specified in the authentication profile by doing any of the following: — Enter command line options to blcred that provide a user name. This procedure is only necessary for Application Servers that handle jobs and are defined as type ALL or JOB. Right-click the Application Server you want to modify and select Edit. If Application Servers are not correctly configured. The following procedure configures an Application Server so that Network Shell traffic will be routed through a Network Shell Proxy Service for any Application Server that is processing jobs. and other information required for the authentication mechanism. see “Generating a user information file” on page 230. C If the user is authorized for multiple roles. make a role selection by doing one of the following: — Define the BL_RBAC_ROLE environment variable. This procedure also requires you to modify the secure file on the Application Server. jobs acting on target servers may not use Windows user mapping and instead may operate using user privilege mapping. password. select Configuration => Infrastructure Management. 1 Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. 2 Expand the Application Servers node.dat. and other information required for the authentication mechanism. For information on setting up user_info.

Setting override locations for client SSO files The BMC BladeLogic system of single sign-on stores SSO user information in the following files: Authentication profile file Session credential cache file Trusted keystore Each of these SSO files resides at a default location. 7 Configure the secure file on the Application Server so the appserver_protocol option is set to ssoproxy. provide values for other Application Server attributes. For more information.Setting override locations for client SSO files This value should identify a Network Shell Proxy Service running in the Application Server’s environment. By default. nshProxyServerHost is the fully qualified name of the host where a Network Shell Proxy Server is running. The value you provide should have the format service:proxysvc.bladelogic:blsess://nshProxyServerHost:portNumber In the value shown above. If necessary. see “Viewing and editing an Application Server’s profile” on page 100. you can instruct a client application to use a file in a different location. 6 Restart the Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). For more information. see “Secure file” on page 253. 4 If necessary. ProxySvcPort is set to Base Port plus 42. 5 Click OK. portNumber is the value provided for ProxySvcPort on that Network Shell Proxy Server. The following procedures let you define override locations for SSO files for the different BMC BladeLogic client applications: ■ ■ Setting SSO file locations for BLCLI Setting SSO file locations for Network Shell 150 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

the client establishes a TLS connection with that entity.bladelogic/bl_sesscc where userHomeDirectory is the home directory of the user running the client application C:\Documents and Settings\WindowsUserName\ Application Data\BladeLogic\bl_sesscc Trusted keystore When a BMC BladeLogic client first accesses a middle tier entity (by necessity. which is known as a keystore. BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation does not need an authentication profile to authenticate users. BMC BladeLogic clients use session credentials to establish secure sessions with Application Servers and Network Shell Proxy Servers. When authenticating with the blcred utility. it issues a session credential. resides in a default location.509 certificate. All authentication profiles are stored within a single XML file. the Authentication Service) to authenticate and obtain an SSO credential.xml file from a client machine where the console is installed and authentication profiles have already been created. session credentials are automatically cached. If the user does. By default. Session credential cache file When an Authentication Service authenticates a user. BMC BladeLogic Console users can choose to cache session credentials. you can use the BMC BladeLogic Console to generate authentication profiles in their default location (see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide for details). The user is asked to trust the certificate. A standard BMC BladeLogic installation uses a default location for caching session credentials. or you can copy the authenticationProfiles. as described below. To create the authenticationProfiles. Within that file each authentication profile must have a unique name. the client is presented with the Authentication Server’s self-signed X. as described below: Chapter 4 Administering security 151 .xml. the certificate is added to the client’s list of trusted certificates. In the course of the TLS handshake. Platform Solaris Linux AIX HP-UX Windows Default Location userHomeDirectory/. This list.Setting override locations for client SSO files Authentication profile file Authentication profiles are collections of information that a BMC BladeLogic client application needs to log into the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. that XML file resides at installDirectory/br/authenticationProfiles.xml file.

pem Setting SSO file locations for BLCLI To specify alternative locations for SSO files used by the BLCLI. The following table identifies SSO file locations you can specify and the mechanisms available to provide that information. see the BLCLI Help. The following table identifies SSO file locations you can specify for BLCLI and the mechanisms available to provide that information. HP-UX Windows Default Location userHomeDirectory/. you can define environment variables or make settings in the client’s secure file.509 certificates command line option: -x certificateStore environment variable: BL_SSO_TRUSTED_CERT_KE YSTORE_FILE Takes precedence over environment variable Takes precedence over environment variable SSO File SSO session credentials Precedence Takes precedence over environment variable For more information on using command line options in BLCLI.bladelogic/client_keystore.Setting override locations for client SSO files Platform Solaris Linux AIX. 152 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . A location provided in an environment variable takes precedence over a secure file setting.pkcs12.pkcs12. Setting SSO file locations for Network Shell To specify alternative locations for SSO files used by Network Shell operating in proxy mode. see “Environment variables” on page 129. A location provided in a command line option takes precedence over a location provided with an environment variable. you can either provide command line arguments or define environment variables. Mechanisms to Identify Location command line option: -f credentialCacheFileName environment variable: BL_SSO_CRED_CACHE_FILE Authentication profile definitions command line option: -w authenticationProfilesFile environment variable: BL_AUTH_PROFILES_FILE Keystore for trusted X. For more information on setting environment variables.pem where userHomeDirectory is the home directory of the user running the client application C:\Documents and Settings\WindowsUserName\ Application Data\BladeLogic\client_keystore.

it sends a message over HTTP to an OCSP Responder. You want failover capability that tries a second OCSP Responder in situations when the first OCSP Responder fails. You will need to perform additional configuration for OCSP if any of the following conditions are true: ■ In the smart card certificate. For more information on setting environment variables. When a BMC BladeLogic Authentication Server uses this type of verification. Chapter 4 Administering security 153 ■ ■ . this default approach is sufficient and users do not have to perform any additional configuration for OCSP checking. an Authentication Server uses the information in a certificate to determine which OCSP Responder to access when verifying a certificate.509 certificates. For example. OCSP can determine the revocation status of customer-provisioned certificates for Application Servers (see “Securing communication with CA certificates” on page 224).Setting up certificate verification using OCSP SSO File SSO session credentials Authentication profile definitions Mechanisms to Identify Location environment variable: BL_SSO_CRED_CACHE_FILE environment variable: BL_AUTH_PROFILES_FILE secure file setting: auth_profiles_file Precedence Takes precedence over secure file setting Keystore for trusted X. see “Secure file” on page 253. You want to override the URL for the OCSP responder in the smart card certificate. Typically. there is no URL for the OCSP Responder. it can also be used to further secure communication between components of the BMC BladeLogic system. In response. Setting up certificate verification using OCSP The Online Certificate Status Protocol (OCSP) is an Internet standard used to verify the revocation status of X. For almost all situations. the OCSP Responder sends back a signed message indicating the certificate’s revocation status. Not only is OCSP checking enabled by default for PKI authentication.509 certificates environment variable: BL_SSO_TRUSTED_CERT_KE YSTORE_FILE For more information on defining settings in the secure file. OCSP checking can be used to improve the security of the overall BMC BladeLogic system. see “Environment variables” on page 129. If the certificate includes a valid URL for an OCSP Responder. BMC BladeLogic will contact that URL to verify the certificate.

The Authentication Server can first attempt to contact the OCSP Responder identified within a certificate. Trusting the response from an OCSP responder If you have used the BMC BladeLogic system to designate an OCSP Responder. the Authentication Server can then contact a secondary responder. To enhance the security of communication with an OCSP Responder. Designating another OCSP responder In some circumstances an organization may want to designate an OSCP Responder. in some situations. identified within the BMC BladeLogic system. If that attempt fails. When you use BMC BladeLogic to designate an OCSP Responder. In this situation. In such a situation. see “Enabling or disabling nonce support” on page 154. No additional configuration is needed to validate responses sent by the OCSP Responder. In a typical configuration. When nonce is enabled. The Authentication Server expects that same value will be returned in the response message from the OCSP Responder. the Authentication Server may be contacting a trusted responder specified within the BMC BladeLogic system. either because a certificate does not include a URL for an OSCP Responder or conditions prevent users from contacting that responder. you can set up a failover capability (see “Configuring failover to an OCSP responder” on page 155). However. Enabling or disabling nonce support Use this procedure to enable or disable nonce support when contacting OCSP Responders.Setting up certificate verification using OCSP ■ Your OCSP Responder signs OCSP responses with a private key that is unrelated to the Certificate Authority that issued your smart card certificates. The response BMC BladeLogic receives is signed either by the CA that issued the certificate or a responder designated by the CA. 154 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you may want to enable the OCSP “PKCS” extension. the Authentication Server contacts the OCSP Responder identified within a certificate. an organization can use the BMC BladeLogic system to designate another OCSP Responder (see “Configuring an additional OCSP responder” on page 155). Using nonce helps to thwart replay attacks. the Authentication Server encloses a unique value in an OCSP request message. The response from that trusted responder may be using a certificate that was not issued by the CA that originally signed the certificate being verified. you must create a trust store used specifically for validating communication with the trusted responder. For more information on this capability. you may need to set up a trust store so the OCSP responses can be validated (see “Setting up a trust store for an OCSP trusted responder” on page 156).

start the Application Server Administration console (that is. With failover. If you set responderURL to an empty string (""). 3 Restart the Application Server. 2 To enable failover between OCSP Responders. Configuring failover to an OCSP responder Use this procedure to set up failover capability between OCSP Responders. the blasadmin utility). 1 On the Authentication Server. start the Application Server Administration console (that is. a second OCSP Responder can be contacted in the event that the first fails for any reason. the blasadmin utility). 1 On the Authentication Server. 3 Restart the Application Server. the only URL used to find an OCSP Responder is the URL obtained from the certificate.Setting up certificate verification using OCSP 1 On the Authentication Server. Once you perform this procedure to define an OCSP Responder. 2 Specify the additional responder by entering the following command: set OCSP ResponderUrl responderURL where responderURL is the URL of the additional responder. This procedure enables the Authentication Server to send the OCSP request to the specified URL. the Authentication Server only contacts the responder identified in this procedure unless you have defined a failover capability (see “Configuring failover to an OCSP responder” on page 155). 2 To enable or disable nonce support. enter the following command: set OCSP IsNonceEnabled true|false By default nonce support is disabled. Configuring an additional OCSP responder Use this procedure to define an OCSP Responder other than the responder specified in a certificate. start the Application Server Administration console (that is. the blasadmin utility). By default this value is set to an empty string. enter the following command: Chapter 4 Administering security 155 .

true means the Authentication Server first contacts the additional responder you have defined using the BMC BladeLogic system (see “Configuring an additional OCSP responder” on page 155). enter the following command: set OCSP UseCustomResponder true|false In this command. be sure to restart the Application Server. when the Authentication Server contacts an OCSP Responder. 2 Import the certificates into a trust store file on the Authentication Server. 156 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 1 Obtain certificates for all OCSP trusted responders from a certificate authority. NOTE The Application Server only reads its certificate store when it starts up. 3 To specify which OCSP Responder the Authentication Server should contact first. The trust store must contain a certificate that allows the Authentication Server to trust messages from the OCSP Responder. Setting up a trust store for an OCSP trusted responder Use this procedure to import a certificate and set up a trust store that is used to verify messages from an OCSP trusted responder. you must set up a trust store used exclusively for validating communication with the OCSP trusted responder. Typically. No additional configuration is required.Setting up certificate verification using OCSP set OCSP IsFailoverEnabled true By default this value is set to false and failover is not enabled. Setting this value to false means the Authentication Server first contacts the OCSP Responder defined in the certificate. the response is signed with the private key that was also used to sign the certificate being verified. In this situation. 4 Restart the Application Server. However. To establish secure communication with an OCSP trusted responder. The certificate to be added to the OCSP trust store must be the same certificate that the OCSP Responder inserted into OCSP response messages or the certificate used to issue the certificate that was inserted into OCSP response messages. a trust store may be necessary in some unusual circumstances. in some circumstances an OCSP trusted responder may sign its response with a key derived from some other entity. If you change the certificate trust store.

if you are importing certificates with the Authentication Server’s version of keytool. 4 Make the OCSP trust store available to the Authentication Server by entering the following command: set OCSP TruststorePathname certificateStore where certificateStore is the local path to the OCSP trust store. Currently.jks -storepass ****** -file DODOcspCert. If you attempt to view this password later using the show command. 5 Provide the password needed to decrypt the certificate by entering the following command: set OCSP TruststorePassword ****** When you enter the password. -storepass provides the password for accessing the trust store. it displays in encoded text. which is available on any machine where the Authentication Server is installed. Chapter 4 Administering security 157 . start the Application Server Administration console (that is. OCSP verification is enabled by default for PKI authentication only.cer -alias ocspt where -keystore identifies the trust store you are setting up. 3 On the Authentication Server. One approach is to use Java’s keytool utility. and -alias is the name you are assigning to the certificate you are adding to the trust store. Enabling or disabling OCSP Use this procedure to enable or disable OCSP support.Setting up certificate verification using OCSP There are many methods for importing a certificate. 6 Specify the type of OCSP trust store by entering the following command: set OCSP TruststoreType trustStoreType In this command trustStoreType can be either of the following: ■ jks—Trust store uses the “JKS” format. ■ 7 Restart the Application Server. pkcs12—Trust store uses the PKCS12 format. the blasadmin utility). For example. you might enter a command like the following: installDirectory/jre/bin/keytool -import -keystore PkiOcspTruststore. -file identifies the certificate you are importing. it is displayed in clear text.

2 Provision the Authentication Server with trusted certificates for all LDAP servers. see “Certificate trust store” on page 159. 1 Specify the LDAP servers. 3 Define a distinguished name template. See “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 161 for a step-by-step procedure describing how to set up LDAP authentication. the service uses that information to bind to an external LDAP server—that is. including any servers used for high availability purposes. For more information on high availability. see “High availability configurations” on page 159. For details on how to specify LDAP servers to the Authentication Server. enter the following command: set OCSP IsEnabled true|false By default OCSP is enabled. For more information. see step 2 on page 161 in “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 161. For details on how to configure the Authentication Server to use a trust store for certificates. When a user logs in and provides an LDAP distinguished name and password.Implementing LDAP authentication 1 On the Authentication Server. see step 3 on page 161 in “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 161. Overview of LDAP configuration tasks This section provides an overview of the concepts you should understand and the tasks you must perform to set up LDAP-based authentication. the Authentication Service uses the LDAP Service. 2 To enable or disable OCSP support. To accomplish this. the Authentication Service issues a session credential with the user’s distinguished name. the blasadmin utility). If the bind is successful. start the Application Server Administration console (that is. 158 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 3 Restart the Application Server. Implementing LDAP authentication The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service can authenticate users defined in an LDAP registry. to connect to an LDAP server and authenticate a user.

see “Distinguished names” on page 160 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. When a list of multiple LDAP servers is available. 4 On the BMC BladeLogic client: A Set up a distinguished name template.509 certificates for the Authentication Server’s trust store. For details on how to set up a distinguished name template for the Authentication Server. you may want to provide a list of LDAP servers that it can potentially contact. For more information. if necessary. The Authentication Service sends the user’s credential to the LDAP Server only if it can validate the LDAP server’s certificate. When configuring LDAP. For more information. Certificate trust store The Authentication Service uses TLS to encrypt its connection to the LDAP Server.509 certificates that LDAP servers provide during the TLS handshake. you can use one of the following approaches: ■ Install certificates for all LDAP servers. LDAP connects to the first functional LDAP server in the list. Chapter 4 Administering security 159 . When provisioning X. see step 4 on page 162 in “Configuring LDAP authentication” on page 161. Listing multiple servers helps to ensure high availability and failover capability. you must identify a file that contains trusted X.509 certificates. This file is the trust store. see “Distinguished names” on page 160. see “Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 160. LDAP servers are authenticated via X. You must repeat this procedure each time an LDAP server’s certificate is updated. B Set up an authentication profile for LDAP authentication.High availability configurations For more information. 5 Cross-register LDAP users with the users in the RBAC user database. High availability configurations When the Authentication Service needs to authenticate a user by connecting to an LDAP server. For more information. see “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide.

the user only enters a string such as “qatest3”. all current and future LDAP certificates are automatically trusted. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. DN templates can be defined in two places: the Authentication Service and LDAP authentication profiles (described in the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide). Consequently. the profile template transforms the name to CN=admin. Use RBAC to add users to the BMC BladeLogic database. Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database Users must be registered in both LDAP registries and BMC BladeLogic’s RBAC-based user database. be sure to enter the users full distinguished name in both RBAC and the LDAP registry. DC=com before it is used to contact the LDAP server. CN=Users. o=bladelogic. For example. see the blcred man page. ou=dev. DC=sub1. DC=com. The name the user provides is transformed to a full DN by the use of a distinguished name template. which replaces the {0} substring. For information on adding users to RBAC. which is replaced with the name the user provides when logging in. ou=dev. with a DN template of CN={0}. Cross-registration allows users to be authorized for RBAC roles. the authentication profile DN template might be CN={0}. There it is transformed into CN=admin. A DN template is a static string containing a {0} substring. CN=Users.509 certificates to the Authentication Server’s trust store. To add X. Since all CA-issued certificates are trusted. 160 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . DC=bladelogic. DC=bladelogic. To authenticate a user. If the user enters “admin” as a user name when logging in. users only have to enter the part of a DN that is unique to their accounts. CN=Users. Rather than entering a full DN. o=bladelogic. For example. such as CN=admin. ou=dev. Only users authorized to use BMC BladeLogic should be entered into the BMC BladeLogic database. CN=sub1 before sending it to the Authentication Service. and the Authentication Service DN template might be {0}. For more information. the user’s DN becomes CN=qatest3. The two templates can be used together or by themselves. the Authentication Service requires a full DN and a corresponding password. be sure to also set IsHostValidationEnabled to True. o=bladelogic. If the common names (CN) specified in the issued certificates are set to the directory server’s fully qualified domain names. Distinguished names LDAP users are uniquely identified by distinguished names (DN).Distinguished names ■ Install the certificate of the trusted Certificate Authority that issued certificates to the LDAP servers. however. When cross-registering users. use the blcred utility. DC=sub1.

the blasadmin utility). see “High availability configurations” on page 159. C To check that the certificate’s common name matches the LDAP server’s fully qualified name. including any servers used for high availability configurations.509 certificates. 2 To identify LDAP servers. enter the following: set Ldap LdapServerURLs serverList where serverList is a list of one or more URLs. To provision a trust store.509 certificates. do the following: A To specify URLs of LDAP servers. use the blcred utility. In a high availability configuration. either by adding certificates from individual LDAP servers or by importing a certificate from a PEM file. URLs must point to LDAPv3 servers that support the StartTLS extension. For more information on high availability configurations in LDAP. B To identify the trust store containing trusted certificates. do the following: A Provision a trust store with X. enter the following: set Ldap ConnectionTimeoutMs # where # is the number of milliseconds to wait. enter the following: set Ldap IsHostValidationEnabled true Chapter 4 Administering security 161 . this is the amount of time the service waits for a response from one URL before trying the next URL in the list you provided in step A. enter the following: set Ldap TrustStore certificateStore where certificateStore is the local path to a trust store. B To specify the amount of time to wait for an LDAP server to respond before terminating the connection. Separate URLs with commas or other delimiters (see “Specifying multiple values for a parameter” on page 50). 3 To set up a trust store for X. start the Application Server Administration console (that is.Configuring LDAP authentication Configuring LDAP authentication Use this procedure to configure the Authentication Service so it can perform LDAP authentication. 1 On the Authentication Server.

7 Cross-register LDAP users with the users in the RBAC user database. See “Crossregistering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 166. be sure to restart the Application Server. See “Certificate trust store” on page 159 for more information on using this option. For more information on X. see “Certificate trust store” on page 159. 162 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 8 Set up authentication profiles using LDAP authentication on the BMC BladeLogic client.509 certificates if the LDAP server’s fully qualified domain name (FQDN) is not contained in one of the alternative names or the common name (CN). 5 To enable LDAP authentication. NOTE The Application Server only reads its certificate store when it starts up. See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. enter the following: set AuthServer LdapUserDnTemplate "text {0} text" where text represents any distinguished name objects that should be included in the template.Configuring LDAP authentication Setting this value to true causes the Authentication Server to reject X. If you change the certificate trust store.509 certificates and setting up trust stores. 6 Restart the Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). See “Distinguished names” on page 160 for more information on using a distinguished name template. enter the following: set AuthServer IsLdapAuthEnabled true By default LDAP authentication is not turned on. NOTE The blasadmin utility provides two additional commands for the Ldap component that are not documented here: DefaultUser and DefaultPassword. 4 To define an LDAP distinguished name template. These commands are only used by BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation.

See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide for more information on authentication profiles. If an RSA Authentication Agent is installed. If a user is registered in the RBAC system. Chapter 4 Administering security 163 . the Authentication Service issues a session credential to the user. The following sections describe those requirements. Users might choose to install an RSA Authentication Agent to help troubleshoot SecurID. This file provides the address of the RSA Authentication Manager Server and other parameters needed to contact it. Then generate a configuration file (sdconf.Implementing RSA SecurID authentication Implementing RSA SecurID authentication The BMC BladeLogic Application Server can authenticate users by means of RSA SecurID. 2 Copy the sdconf. which consists of a PIN and the current token code displayed on an RSA SecurID Token. In addition. Configuring SecurID authentication Use this procedure to configure the Authentication Server so it can perform SecurID authentication.rec) for the newly created agent.rec file to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Server. If the information the user enters is valid. BMC BladeLogic’s integration with SecurID requires the presence of a host configuration file called sdconf. Configuring RSA Authentication Manager BMC BladeLogic assumes you have installed RSA Authentication Manager and are familiar with its functionality. Configuring a BMC BladeLogic system to support SecurID authentication requires configuration beyond the default setup. In that situation you do not have to perform the following procedure. 1 Log in to RSA Authentication Manager and define an Authentication Agent Host using the Application Server’s name or IP address. RSA Authentication Agents are used to protect computers and other resources.rec. BMC BladeLogic does not require one to be installed on the Application Server. that user can authenticate by providing his or her user name and passcode. the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service can share that agent’s configuration file. you must configure a client to use an authentication profile set up for SecurID authentication. In some situations the user may be prompted for a new PIN before authentication can occur.

3 Restart the Authentication Server. The default is 600 seconds. you do not have to restart the Authentication Server if you are making changes to SecurID configuration. enter the following: set SecurID AgentHost iPAddress ■ To specify the interval at which SecurID settings are read. the blasadmin utility). When set to false. you must wait the amount of time specified by ReadConfigInterval (described below) until the new configuration values are read.1. enter the following: set SecurID ReadConfigInterval interval where interval is the interval in seconds for reloading the configuration file. 4 Provide the path to the RSA Authentication Manager’s configuration file (sdconf. enter the following: set SecurID StatusFilePath filePath where filePath is a local path to that file. ■ To specify the path to the RSA Authentication Manager’s optional configuration file (sdopts. The default file name is JAStatus. 5 Do any of the following to set additional configuration options for SecurID: ■ To instruct the RSA Authentication Agent which IP address to use if the Authentication Server has multiple IP addresses.rec). 2 To enable SecurID authentication. However. 1 On the Authentication Server. ■ To specify the path to the RSA Authentication Manager’s server status file. start the Application Server Administration console (that is.rec) by entering the following: set SecurID ConfigFilePath filePath where filePath provides a local path to the sdconf. enter the following: set AuthServer IsSecurIDAuthEnabled true By default SecurID authentication is not turned on. a new file is created in BMC BladeLogic’s /br directory. if you change the SecurID configuration. enter the following: 164 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . all SecurID login attempts are rejected. The valid range is 0-86400 (24 hours). If you do not provide a path.Configuring SecurID authentication When you perform this procedure.rec file.

enter the following: set SecurID LogLevel OFF | DEBUG | INFO | WARN | ERROR | FATAL By default this option is set to OFF. enter the following: set SecurID LogToFile true | false If set to true. If you are running other applications that also use RSA authentication. you must ensure that the Application Server can access the node secret file by granting the appropriate operating system-level permissions to the file. ■ To turn on logging. on Windows you must grant permission to SYSTEM. ■ To set the logging level. enter the following: set SecurID LogFilePath filePath where filePathis local path to the log file. On UNIX. If multiple Application Servers are running on the same host. they may need to share the same node secret file that the Application Server is using. ■ To specify the path to the RSA Authentication Manager’s node secret file. you must grant permission to the bladmin user. If you do not define a path. This file is created automatically the first time the Authentication Service successfully connects to the RSA Authentication Manager.Configuring SecurID authentication set SecurID OptionsFilePath filePath> where filePath is a local path to that file. the file is automatically created in BMC BladeLogic’s /br directory. they should all use the same node secret file. Other applications may have similar access requirements. Chapter 4 Administering security 165 . the RSA SecurID module creates log entries in the file specified by the LogFilePath option. When multiple applications share a node secret file. The default file name is securid. enter the following: set SecurID NodeSecretFilePath filePath where filePath is a local path to that file. ■ To specify the path to the SecurID log file. By default this option is set to false. This configuration file is used to configure a manual authentication load balancing policy.

Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database NOTE SecurID configuration settings are stored in installDirectory/br/deployments/ deploymentName/options/securid-options. Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database Users must be registered in both the SecurID user registry and the BMC BladeLogic RBAC-based user database. the Authentication Server can access an OCSP Responder. Refer to RSA’s product documentation for a more complete description of supported settings. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. For information on adding users to RBAC. Through ActiveClient middleware. You can manually edit this file to specify additional debug options. the Authentication Service issues the client a session credential. While logging into a BMC BladeLogic client. BMC BladeLogic documentation assumes you know how to add users to the SecurID user registry. Cross-registration allows users to be authorized for RBAC roles. Only users authorized to use BMC BladeLogic should be entered into the BMC BladeLogic database. the user must insert a smart card into a card reader and enter a PIN. Implementing PKI authentication The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Server can use public key infrastructure (PKI) to authenticate users who present a type of smart card known as a common access card (CAC). Use RBAC to add users to the database. such as RSA_ENABLE_DEBUG=YES. For more information on setting up OCSP.properties. If the information the user enters is valid and the OCSP Responder verifies the validity of the user’s certificate. OCSP verification is enabled for PKI authentication. a BMC BladeLogic client can access the appropriate certificate and private key on the smart card to authenticate the user. See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. 166 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . To verify whether a certificate is currently valid. See “Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 166. 6 Cross-register users in both the SecurID user registry and the RBAC user data base. see “Setting up certificate verification using OCSP” on page 153. 7 Set up authentication profiles using SecurID authentication on the BMC BladeLogic client. By default.

see “Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 166. enter the following: set PkiAuth IsEnabled true By default PKI authentication is not turned on.Configuring PKI authentication BMC BladeLogic does not provide a default set of trusted CA certificates for use with PKI authentication. Configuring PKI authentication Use this procedure to configure the Authentication Server so it can perform PKIbased authentication. enter the following: set PkiAuth useCommonName true By default cross-registration by common name is not turned on. 2 To enable PKI authentication. 1 On the Authentication Server. you cannot also crossregister users by their distinguished name. Chapter 4 Administering security 167 . For more information on registering users. start the Application Server Administration console (that is. users must be cross-registered according their full distinguished name (DN). the blasadmin utility). NOTE In this release. Note that many steps in this procedure reference a sub-section that describes another procedure. See “Setting up a trust store for PKI authentication”. you must obtain certificates yourself from a CA. all PKI-based login attempts are rejected. When set to false. PKI authentication is not supported for Windows 64-bit platforms. You must choose between the common name or the distinguished name approach. 3 To register users by the common name portion of the subject name within a user’s certificate. 4 Set up a trust store for a PKI certificate. If you are implementing PKI. If you choose to cross-register users by their common name.

2 Import the certificate into a trust store file on the Authentication Server. be sure to restart the Application Server. 4 Make the trust store available to the Authentication Server by entering the following command: set PkiAuth TruststorePathname certificateStore 168 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . One approach is to use Java’s keytool utility.cer where -keystore identifies the trust store you are setting up. See “Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 169. 7 Set up authentication profiles using PKI authentication on the BMC BladeLogic client. which is available on any machine where the Authentication Server is installed. See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. -storepass provides the password for accessing the trust store (needed later in step 5). 1 If you haven’t already done so. obtain the certificate for the certificate authority that issued the certificates on the smart card.jks -storepass ****** -file DODJITCCA_19. In most situations. and -file identifies the certificate you are importing.Configuring PKI authentication 5 To configure certificate verification using an OCSP Responder. There are many methods for importing a certificate. NOTE The Application Server only reads its certificate store when it starts up. see “Setting up certificate verification using OCSP” on page 153. you might enter a command like the following: installDirectory/jre/bin/keytool -import -keystore PkiTruststore. For example. 6 Cross-register users in both the user registry maintained for smart card holders and the RBAC user data base. Setting up a trust store for PKI authentication Use this procedure to import a certificate into a trust store and then make that trust store available to the Authentication Server. 3 On the Authentication Server. the blasadmin utility). OCSP verification is enabled for PKI authentication and no additional configuration is necessary. if you are importing a certificate with the Authentication Server’s version of keytool. start the Application Server Administration console (that is. If you change the certificate trust store.

■ 7 Restart the Application Server. users are registered by their full distinguished name. Cross-registration allows users to be authorized for RBAC roles. Use RBAC to add users to the database.Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database where certificateStore is the local path to the trust store. see “Configuring PKI authentication” on page 167. The Application Server Administration console encodes the password that is displayed. Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database Users must be registered in both the registry maintained for smart card holders and the BMC BladeLogic RBAC-based user database. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. 6 Specify the type of trust store by entering the following command: set PkiAuth TruststoreType trustStoreType In this command trustStoreType can be either of the following: ■ jks—Trust store uses the “JKS” format. Only users authorized to use BMC BladeLogic should be entered into the BMC BladeLogic database. Chapter 4 Administering security 169 . For information on adding users to RBAC. By default. For details on this option. 5 Provide the password needed to decrypt the certificate by entering the following command: set PkiAuth TruststorePassword ****** Enter the password using clear text. BMC BladeLogic documentation assumes you know how to add users to the registry of smart card holders. users can be registered by just the common name portion of the subject name within their certificate. pkcs12—Trust store uses the PKCS12 format. Optionally.

domain. In Windows. The Authentication Service uses that information to authenticate the user to the Active Directory KDC. The following sections provide instructions for setting up Domain Authentication at installations where AD/Kerberos authentication is not already being used for BMC BladeLogic. Configuring a BMC BladeLogic system to support Domain Authentication requires configuration beyond the default setup. use your existing Kerberos configuration files and modify as necessary based on the descriptions in this section. For details on this process. After you configure BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication. If you have already set up AD/Kerberos authentication for BMC BladeLogic. a Kerberos realm is an Active Directory domain. See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide for more information on authentication profiles.Implementing Domain Authentication Implementing Domain Authentication The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service can authenticate users via Windows Active Directory user credentials. 170 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . and password. see “Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication” on page 171. you must configure a client to use an authentication profile set up for Domain Authentication. Users provide a user name. which relies on the Active Directory registry to store the names and passwords of registered users within its Kerberos realm.

NOTE When you specify a domain name in any of the following steps. and password. This is an example. you must use UPPER CASE LETTERS. You may want to review the diagram in “Sample domain structure” on page 171 for an overview of the domain names and host names used in the examples in this section.Sample domain structure Sample domain structure The following diagram shows a sample domain structure containing a parent domain and two child sub-domains. Your domain structure may be simpler or more complex. Chapter 4 Administering security 171 . Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure. The following is a master procedure. domain. Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication Use this procedure to configure BMC BladeLogic so users can authenticate to the Authentication Service by providing an AD/Kerberos user name. The sample names shown in this example are used in many procedures that relate to the Domain Authentication and AD/Kerberos solutions.

4 Configure the Authentication Service to support Domain Authentication.REALM where REALM is a Windows domain name.MYCOMPANY. See “Creating the blappserv_krb5.MYCOMPANY. 7 Set up authentication profiles using Domain Authentication on the BMC BladeLogic client. For example: nslookup -type=srv _kerberos.Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication 1 Obtain the host names for Active Directory KDCs.COM nslookup -type=srv _kerberos.conf file.conf file” on page 173.MYCOMPANY. which provides necessary authentication information. also look up the KDC for the parent realm (DEV. Look up the KDCs for each realm against which users authenticate.conf file” on page 174.mycompany. For example: service = 0 100 88 kdc. See “Locating Active Directory KDCs”.dev._tcp.DEV._tcp.DEV. Locating Active Directory KDCs Use this procedure to obtain the host names for Active Directory KDCs._tcp. 2 Create the blappserv_krb5. See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide.MYCOMPANY.COM nslookup -type=srv _kerberos. which defines Active Directory domains and servers.COM and SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY. Later in the configuration process.COM).MYCOMPANY. If multiple realms are used.SUB1.COM The Active Directory KDC’s host name is reported as the value of service (UNIX) or svr hostname (Windows). such as SUB1. From a command line. 3 Create the blappserv_login.COM.conf file. See “Logging on using default users and roles” on page 177.com 172 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . See “Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 176. enter the following: nslookup -type=srv _kerberos.DEV. See “Creating the blappserv_login.sub2.DEV. See “Defining Authentication Service settings for Domain Authentication” on page 175. 6 Add users to built-in roles._tcp. you will need these host names.SUB2. 5 Add user names based on Kerberos naming conventions to the RBAC user database.

as described in “Locating Active Directory KDCs” on page 172. do not use IP addresses.conf file.com = DEV. If multiple KDCs are running.COM . For example: .USERS_DOMAIN = USERS_REALM USERS_REALM is the realm where users are defined.mycompany.dev. Chapter 4 Administering security 173 . use the nslookup command.dev. The Application Server must be able to resolve DNS names of Active Directory servers.dev.com = SUB2. create a separate stanza for each realm. When Domain Authentication users log in and they do not provide a fully qualified user name.MYCOMPANY. If users are defined in multiple realms.MYCOMPANY.conf file. 1 Create a text file and add the following content to it: [libdefaults] ticket_lifetime = 6000 default_realm = USERS_REALM [realms] USERS_REALM = { kdc = USERS_REALM_KDC:88 } [domain_realm] .COM . they are authenticated as members of the default realm.conf. NOTE When identifying servers in the blappserv_krb5. USERS_REALM_KDC is the host name for the KDC servicing that realm.DEV.conf file Use this procedure to create a blappserv_krb5. you must define a default realm.MYCOMPANY.COM To obtain host names for any of the KDCs listed in this file.mycompany. When you create a blappserv_krb5. Creating the blappserv_krb5. In the “domain_realm” section.mycompany.Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication Ignore the numbers before the host name. USERS_DOMAIN provides DNS names. list all of those KDCs.com = SUB1.sub1. A period before a DNS name indicates you are mapping every system with a DNS name ending with that value to a corresponding Kerberos realm.sub2.DEV. This file configures Kerberos so it can communicate with the Active Directory server or servers.

conf file You must create a blappserv_login. the file should be located as follows: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blappserv_krb5. For example. save the file to the InstallDirectory\NSH\br directory with the name blappserv_login.conf Creating the blappserv_login. the file should be located as follows: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blappserv_login.conf ■ On Windows. the file should be located as follows: 174 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .security. 2 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. This files provides necessary Kerberos authentication information.ADKerberosPasswordLogin { com. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. if the Authentication Server is installed in the default location.conf For example. if the Authentication Server is installed in the default location. 1 Create a text file and add the text shown below to this file.service. }. save the file to the InstallDirectory/NSH/br directory with the name blappserv_login.auth.Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication 2 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. save the file to the InstallDirectory\NSH\br directory with the name: blappserv_krb5. save the file to the InstallDirectory/NSH/br directory with the name: blappserv_krb5.Krb5LoginModule required doNotPrompt=false useTicketCache=false debug=false.bladelogic.sun.module.conf.conf ■ On Windows.auth.conf. com.conf file. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. For example. the file should be located as follows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blappserv_krb5.conf For example.

enter the following: . do one of the following: — From the Start menu. from the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. enter the following: \bin\blasadmin./bin/blasadmin ■ On Windows.bat Both options run the same command. — From the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. enter the following: set AuthServer AuthSvcKrb5LoginConfig fileName Chapter 4 Administering security 175 . This file is essential for supporting Kerberos. enter the following: set AuthServer isDomainAuthEnabled true By default this value is set to false. You can skip this step unless you choose to use a different file name.conf file. you must use the Application Server Administration console. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console by doing one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system.Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blappserv_login.conf file. select Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Utilities => Application Server Administration. 2 To allow users to log in using Domain Authentication. 4 To enable the blappserv_login. By default AuthSvcKrb5Config is set to a value of blappserv_krb5.conf file.conf.conf Defining Authentication Service settings for Domain Authentication Use this procedure to define settings for the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service so it can use the Kerberos configurations you set up in previous procedures. To perform this procedure. enter the following: set AuthServer AuthSvcKrb5Config fileName where fileName is the name of the blappserv_krb5. 3 To enable the blappserv_krb5.

see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Each BMC BladeLogic user name must be in the form: USER@DOMAIN where DOMAIN is the domain the user is registered in.MYCOMPANY. The user’s BMC BladeLogic user name must match the user’s fully qualified Active Directory user name. if you are using RBAC or the bladduser utility to add a new BMC BladeLogic user.conf. Cross-registration allows users to be authorized for RBAC roles.DEV. you would fill in the name field with a value such as: mary@SUB1. Only users authorized to use BMC BladeLogic should be entered into the BMC BladeLogic database. BMC BladeLogic documentation assumes you know how to add users to Active Directory. By default AuthSvcKrb5LoginConfig is set to a value of blappserv_login. Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database Users must be registered in both Active Directory and BMC BladeLogic’s RBACbased user database. Use RBAC to add users to the BMC BladeLogic database.MYCOMPANY. 176 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Requirements for User Names When using AD/Kerberos to authenticate end users.COM.Configuring BMC BladeLogic for Domain Authentication where fileName is the name of the blappserv_login.DEV.COM is a different user name than than mary or mary@SUB3.MYCOMPANY. This file is essential for supporting Kerberos.COM rather than filling in the name field with a value such as: mary Note that the user name mary@SUB1.DEV. For information on adding users to RBAC. You can skip this step unless you choose to use a different file name.conf file. you must ensure that domain user names stored in RBAC are fully qualified and that those names match the user names stored in the Active Directory. 5 Restart the Application Server. For example.

and GlobalReportAdmins—has at least one registered domain user assigned to that role. you must use RBAC to add a fully qualified name to the GlobalReportViewers role. no user will be able to access the built-in roles.MYCOMPANY. you must use RBAC to add a fully qualified user name to the GlobalReportAdmins role.COM. you can simply assign a fully qualified domain user name (for example. GlobalReportViewers. If the BMC BladeLogic administrator intends to support AD/Kerberos authentication exclusively and disable SRP user authentication.DEV. you must use RBAC to add a fully qualified user name to the BLAdmins role. In a default installation. which has built-in authorizations to change permissions for all system objects in BMC BladeLogic.Implementing Active Directory/Kerberos authentication BMC BladeLogic provides a BLCLI command. BLAdmins. To allow a user to log into the GlobalReportViewers role. which has read access to all reports at all sites in a BMC BladeLogic installation. Implementing Active Directory/Kerberos authentication The BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service can authenticate users via Windows Active Directory single sign-on credentials or. the administrator should log in as a user authorized for the RBACAdmins role and ensure that each of the four built-in roles—RBACAdmins. a Kerberos user’s ticket granting ticket (TGT). In this example. equivalently. To allow a user to log into the GlobalReportAdmins role. see the BLCLI help.DEV. then.COM) to the RBACAdmins role. For more information on this command. If you are using that default setup. Windows Server 2003/2008 implements a Kerberos Key Chapter 4 Administering security 177 . prior to disabling SRP.MYCOMPANY. The same issue applies to the BLAdmins role. which has built-in authorizations to see data for all BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics sites. the user would also have to be registered in the Active Directory user registry for the domain SUB2. the GlobalReportAdmins role. To allow a user to log into the BLAdmins role. Otherwise. These default users are assigned to the default roles RBACAdmins and BLAdmins. Windows single sign-on is based on the Kerberos authentication protocol. RBACAdmin_ADK@SUB2. when SRP authentication is disabled. that you can use to synchronize group information in Active Directory with role information in RBAC. Logging on using default users and roles The BMC BladeLogic user database comes pre-provisioned with two default SRP users: RBACAdmin and BLAdmin. respectively. RBACRole:syncUsers. the RBACAdmins role has the authorizations necessary to manage users and roles. and the GlobalReportViewers role.

it employs the end user's AD/Kerberos credentials to conduct a Kerberos protocol exchange with the Authentication Service. a Kerberos realm is an Active Directory domain. which the client stores in a local credential cache. When a BMC BladeLogic authentication user interface (either the authentication user interface built into the BMC BladeLogic Console or the blcred utility) selects an AD/Kerberos authentication profile. The following sections describe those configuration tasks. BMC BladeLogic end users can use their AD/Kerberos credentials to authenticate themselves to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. Give this file and the SPN to the administrator of the Application Server hosting the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. the Authentication Service issues the authentication user interface a single sign-on credential. Configuring BMC BladeLogic authentication user interfaces and the Authentication Service to support AD/Kerberos authentication requires additional configuration beyond the default configuration of clients and servers. the login client sends a request to the Active Directory KDC for a Kerberos Ticket Granting Ticket (TGT). In Windows single sign-on. the Kerberos TGT is also referred to as the domain user credential. Overview of AD/Kerberos configuration tasks This section provides a quick overview of the tasks you must perform to set up a BMC BladeLogic environment that supports user authentication via AD/Kerberos user credentials: 1 On the Active Directory KDC: A Create a user account for the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. referred to as the Active Directory KDC. the Active Directory domain controller or Kerberos KDC mediates the authentication of the end user to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. The keying material used to generate and verify the request is derived from the user’s password. When a registered domain user logs into a client platform (Windows or UNIX). B Export the blauthsvc. The request carries encrypted material that allows the KDC to authenticate the request. This Windows Server KDC. After validating the request. the Active Directory KDC responds by sending the client a limited-lifetime (typically 10 hours) user credential. In this exchange. This credential consists of a service ticket to the ticket granting service (the Ticket Granting Ticket) and an associated ticket granting service session key.Overview of AD/Kerberos configuration tasks Distribution Center (KDC) as one of its default domain services. 178 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Upon successful Kerberos authentication of the end user.keytab file. In the context of Active Directory. relies on the Active Directory registry to store the names and passwords of registered users within its Kerberos realm. which BMC BladeLogic clients can use to establish secure sessions with the BMC BladeLogic Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service.

These tasks are described in detail in “Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication” on page 184. G Create an authentication profile using AD/Kerberos authentication.conf file. C Create the blappserv_krb5. C Locate the Active Directory KDC for the client’s realm.properties file.conf file. set up a Network Shell Proxy Server. 3 On the BMC BladeLogic client: A Windows only: Update the Kerberos Registry Settings. B Create the blclient_login.keytab file in the correct directory. B Locate the Active Directory KDC for the service principal’s realm. 2 On the BMC BladeLogic Application Server: A Put the blauthsvc. These tasks are described in detail in “Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication” on page 194.conf file. D Create a blclient_krb5. D Create the blappserv_login. E Update the config. G If you are using Network Shell to communicate directly with agents.COM). F Add users to the BMC BladeLogic RBAC user database. F UNIX only: Obtain a ticket granting ticket (TGT) for the client. Chapter 4 Administering security 179 .Overview of AD/Kerberos configuration tasks These tasks are described in detail in “Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain” on page 180.conf file. E Define Authentication Service settings to support AD/Kerberos. making sure each user name includes the user’s Active Directory domain (user@DOMAIN.

Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain

Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain
This section provides procedures that an administrator of an Active Directory KDC can use to register the Authentication Service associated with a BMC BladeLogic Application Server in an Active Directory domain. Refer to this section only if you want to employ AD/Kerberos user credentials to authenticate BMC BladeLogic end users to the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service. The following is a master procedure. Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure.

NOTE
When you specify a domain name in any of the following steps, you must use UPPER CASE LETTERS. You may want to review the diagram in “Sample domain structure” on page 171 for an overview of the domain names and host names used in the examples in this section.

1 Review the required utilities that must be installed on the Active Directory server.
For more information, see “Requirements for the Active Directory server” on page 180.

2 Create an Active Directory user account for the Authentication Service associated
with an Application Server. For more information, see “Creating a user account in the domain of the Application Server” on page 181.

3 Export the user account and SPN information into a keytab file. After you create
the keytab file, you must give this file and the SPN to the administrator of the Application Server. For more information, see “Exporting the keytab file” on page 181.

Requirements for the Active Directory server
The following utilities must be installed on the Active Directory server:
■ ■

ktpass.exe (BMC BladeLogic recommends using version 5.2.3790.2732) setspn.exe

For Windows 2003, both of these utilities are provided as part of the Support Tools Service Pack 1. For Windows 2008 these utilities are provided as part of the core operating system.

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Creating a user account in the domain of the Application Server
Use this procedure to create a user account for the Authentication Service in the domain (that is, the Kerberos realm) where the BMC BladeLogic Application Server is running.

1 On a Windows 2003 or 2008 Server, from the Start menu, select Programs =>
Administrative Tools => Active Directory Users and Computers. The Active Directory Users and Computers window displays.

2 In the left column, expand the domain name for the BMC BladeLogic Application
Server so that it displays the Users folder.

3 Right click the Users folder and select New => User. The New Object – User wizard
displays.

4 For First name, enter a name, such as blauthsvc. For User logon name, enter the name
again. In this example, you would enter blauthsvc again.

5 Click Next. The second screen of the wizard displays, requesting password
information.

6 For Password, set the password to whatever you want. Be sure to use a password
that conforms to the Active Directory password policy. Then check Password never
expires.

7 Click Next. The final summary page of the wizard displays. 8 Click Finish to dismiss the wizard.

Exporting the keytab file
Use this procedure to export a keytab file from the Active Directory server. You must give the keytab file to the administrator of the BMC BladeLogic Application Server. The Application Server needs a keytab file because it holds keying material used for decrypting and validating the service ticket that the domain controller (that is, the KDC) issues to the client. When requesting a service ticket from the KDC, the client identifies the targeted server (that is, the Application Server) by the SPN. Because Kerberos employs mediated authentication for the mutual authentication of both the client and server, both the client and server must be registered with the KDC. The user is registered under a domain user name. The server is registered under an SPN.

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Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain

The procedure varies depending on what version of Windows and what service pack you are using. If you are using a Windows 2008 without Service Pack 2, you must work around a Microsoft defect by using a different setup. This defect is corrected in Service Pack 2 for Windows 2008, and it does not affect Windows 2003.

Windows 2003 and Windows 2008 with Service Pack 2 1 Use the ktpass command-line utility to export the keytab file using the command
shown below. Run this utility in a directory suitable for writing a file with sensitive data.
ktpass -out blauthsvc.keytab -princ blauthsvc/instance@DOMAIN -mapuser blauthsvc@DOMAIN +rndPass -minPass 33

In this command, instance is the instance of this Application Server (typically a host name) and DOMAIN is the realm where the Application Server is running. (This is the realm/domain that appeared next to the User logon name when you created the blauthsvc user.) For example, if you used the example names shown in “Sample domain structure” on page 171, you would enter:
ktpass -out blauthsvc.keytab -princ blauthsvc/app4@SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM -mapuser blauthsvc@SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM +rndPass -minPass 33

2 Give the following to the administrator of the Application Server:

The newly created blauthsvc.keytab file. The blauthsvc.keytab file contains key material, so transfer it between systems with care. The Authentication Service needs this keytab to allow users to authenticate. The service principal name used in the keytab file. For example:
blauthsvc/app4

The name of the domain (that is, the Kerberos realm) for the Application Server. For example:
SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM

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Windows 2008 without Service Pack 2 1 On the command line, use the setspn utility to create a service principal name for
the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service by entering the following command:
setspn -A blauthsvc/instance blauthsvc

In this command, instance is the instance of this Application Server (typically a host name). For example, you can enter the following command:
setspn -A blauthsvc/app4 blauthsvc

2 Use the ktpass command-line utility to export the keytab file using the command
shown below. Run this utility in a directory suitable for writing a file with sensitive data.
ktpass -out blauthsvc.keytab -princ blauthsvc@DOMAIN -mapuser blauthsvc@DOMAIN +rndPass -minPass 33

For example, if you used the example names shown in “Sample domain structure” on page 171, you would enter:
ktpass -out blauthsvc.keytab -princ blauthsvc@SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM -mapuser blauthsvc@SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM +rndPass -minPass 33

Note that the -princ parameter identifies a user principal (blauthsvc) rather than a service principal name.

3 Give the following to the administrator of the Application Server:

The newly created blauthsvc.keytab file. The blauthsvc.keytab file contains key material, so transfer it between systems with care. The Authentication Service needs this keytab to allow users to authenticate. The user principal name used in the keytab file. For example:
blauthsvc

NOTE
The remainder of this guide assumes you are using a service principal name when setting up AD/Kerberos authentication. When this guide provides examples of a service principal name, it uses blauthsvc/app4. However, if you are using Windows 2008 without Service Pack 2, you must work around the Microsoft defect by using a user principal name instead of a service principal name. In that case, you should use blauthsvc instead of blauthsvc/app4.

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Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication

The name of the domain (that is, the Kerberos realm) for the Application Server. For example:
SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM

Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication
Use this procedure to configure a BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service so BMC BladeLogic users can authenticate using the AD/Kerberos user credentials. The following is a master procedure. Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure.

NOTE
When you specify a domain name in any of the following steps, you must use UPPER CASE LETTERS. You may want to review the diagram in “Sample domain structure” on page 171 for an overview of the domain names and host names used in the examples in this section.

1 If you have not done so already, perform the following prerequisite procedure:
“Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain” on page 180.

2 Review the information that is needed to perform subsequent steps. See “Required
information” on page 185.

3 Copy the keytab file to the Application Server. See “Copying the keytab file” on
page 185.

4 Obtain the host name of an Active Directory KDC for the service principal’s realm.
See “Locating the Active Directory KDC for the service principal’s domain” on page 186.

5 Create the blappserv_krb5.conf file, which provides essential configuration
information. See “Creating the blappserv_krb5.conf file” on page 186.

6 Create the blappserv_login.conf file, which provides the location of the keytab file.
See “Creating the blappserv_login.conf file” on page 188.

7 Configure the Authentication Service to support Kerberos. See “Defining
Authentication Service settings for AD/Kerberos” on page 191.

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8 Add user names based on Kerberos naming conventions to the RBAC user
database. See “Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 192.

9 If you are using Network Shell to communicate directly with agents, set up a
Network Shell Proxy Server to manage that traffic. See “Setting up a Network Shell Proxy Server” on page 193.

10 Add users to built-in roles. See “Logging on using default users and roles” on
page 194.

Required information
Before you start configuring an Authentication Service, you must obtain the following from the administrator of the Active Directory KDC:

The blauthsvc.keytab file. The service principal name used for the keytab file. For example:
blauthsvc/app4

The name of the service principal’s domain (Kerberos realm). For example:
SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM

For information about creating a user account, service principal name, and keytab file on the Active Directory KDC, see “Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain” on page 180.

Copying the keytab file
Use this procedure to copy the blauthsvc.keytab file you obtained from the Active Directory administrator to the correct location on the Application Server hosting the Authentication Service. For the Authentication Service to authenticate users through the AD/Kerberos user credentials, the Authentication Service must be able to accept KDC service tickets. To accept service tickets, the Authentication Service needs the service key in the blauthsvc.keytab file.

1 Locate the blauthsvc.keytab file that was exported from the Active Directory KDC. 2 Do one of the following:

On a UNIX-style system, copy the file to the /NSH/br directory.

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For example, if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location, the file should be located here:
/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blauthsvc.keytab

On Windows, copy the file to the \NSH\br directory. For example, if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location, the file should be located here:
C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blauthsvc.keytab

Locating the Active Directory KDC for the service principal’s domain
Use this procedure to obtain the host name for the Active Directory KDC that is running in the realm where the keytab file for the service principal was created. Later in the configuration process, you will need this host name. From a command line, enter the following:
nslookup -type=srv _kerberos._tcp.SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN

In this command, SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN is the domain of the service principal. For example:
nslookup -type=srv _kerberos._tcp.SUB2.DEV.MYCOMPANY.COM

The Active Directory KDC’s host name is reported as the value of service (UNIX) or svr hostname (Windows). For example:
service = 0 100 88 kdc.sub2.dev.mycompany.com

Ignore the numbers before the host name.

Creating the blappserv_krb5.conf file
Use this procedure to create a blappserv_krb5.conf file. This file provides necessary Kerberos configuration information.

NOTE
When identifying servers in the blappserv_krb5.conf file, do not use IP addresses. The Application Server must be able to resolve DNS names of Active Directory servers.

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mycompany.COM 2 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. A period before a DNS name indicates you are mapping every system with a DNS name ending with that value to a corresponding Kerberos realm.sub2. SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN provides DNS names.dev.mycompany.COM .MYCOMPANY.COM This is the value you got when you ran the nslookup command.COM SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM_KDC is the host name for the Active Directory KDC for the realm where the keytab file was created. as described in “Locating the Active Directory KDC for the service principal’s domain” on page 186. For example: kdc.DEV.com = SUB2.dev.MYCOMPANY.MYCOMPANY.SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN = SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM In this text file: SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM is the realm where the keytab file was created.dev. For example: .DEV.DEV. save the file to the /NSH/br directory with the name: blappserv_krb5.sub1.DEV.com = SUB1.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication 1 Create a text file like the following: [libdefaults] ticket_lifetime = 6000 default_realm = SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM [realms] SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM = { kdc = SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM_KDC:88 } [domain_realm] .MYCOMPANY. In the “domain_realm” section.conf Chapter 4 Administering security 187 .mycompany.COM .MYCOMPANY.com = DEV. For example: SUB2.SUB2.

sun.conf file You must create a blappserv_login.module.keytab file on your system. the file should be located as follows: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blappserv_krb5.security.jgss.conf Creating the blappserv_login. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. assuming BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. The Application Server looks in the blappserv_login. 1 Create a text file and add the following content to it: com.Krb5LoginModule required useKeyTab=true keyTab="keytabFileLocation" storeKey=true principal="blauthsvc/instance@DOMAIN" doNotPrompt=true debug=false. 188 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .conf file. assuming BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication For example.accept { com.auth.sun.keytab" ■ On Windows. }. In this text file. save the file to the \NSH\br directory with the name: blappserv_krb5. keyTab is the location of the blauthsvc. the keyTab line would look like this: keyTab="/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blauthsvc.conf file to find the location of the keytab file. the keyTab line would look like this: keyTab="C:\\Program Files\\BMC Software\\BladeLogic\\version\\NSH\\br\\ blauthsvc.conf For example. the file should be located as follows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blappserv_krb5.conf ■ On Windows.keytab" Be sure to use the double backslash syntax shown above.security. ■ On a UNIX-style system.

You obtained the service principal name from the Active Directory administrator.conf. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location.conf.COM" If you are using Windows 2008 without Service Pack 2. save the file to the \NSH\br directory with the name blappserv_login.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication In the text file. For example: principal="blauthsvc4@SUB2. you should enter a user principal name rather than a service principal name. In other words. For example: principal="blauthsvc/app4@SUB2. save the file to the /NSH/br directory with the name: blappserv_login. See “Using klist to read the keytab file” on page 189.MYCOMPANY.COM" If you do not have the service principal name and the Application Server’s realm. 1 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. followed by the Application Server’s domain. For example. the file should be located as follows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blappserv_login.conf ■ On Windows. 2 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. principal is the service principal name for the Authentication Service. followed by the @ sign. you can use the klist utility to display them. the file should be located as follows: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blappserv_login. enter the following: Chapter 4 Administering security 189 . For example.MYCOMPANY.DEV.DEV. use blauthsvc instead of blauthsvc/app4. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location.conf Using klist to read the keytab file You can use the klist utility to read the keytab file and display the name and realm of the service principal.

■ On Windows. see “Creating the blappserv_krb5.DEV.conf file you set up for the Authentication Server to one of the following locations: ■ Windows: %WINDIR%\krb5.keytab In this command. If you do not have klist installed on a UNIX system. This procedure is not essential.conf All UNIX platforms except Solaris: /etc/krb5. enter the following: "C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\jre\bin\klist" -t -k "C:\\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blauthsvc. 2 Identify the service account name from the keytab file by entering one of the following: ■ Windows: installDirectory\jre\bin\klist -k -t keytabFile UNIX: utilityPath/klist -k -t keytabFile ■ 190 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .COM. but BMC BladeLogic recommends performing this step to confirm that you have successfully set up authentication based on AD/Kerberos.conf file.MYCOMPANY. Verifying a keytab file Use this procedure to verify that the keytab file you have generated can be used to authenticate.keytab" 2 The klist utility displays output similar to the following: Service principal: blauthsvc/app4@SUB2. There are many online sources for Kerberos utilities such as klist. utilityPath provides the path to the klist utility.MYCOMPANY. assuming that BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. you must first obtain it.DEV.COM The service principal name is blauthsvc/app4@SUB2.conf file” on page 186.conf ■ ■ For more information on the blappserv_krb5.ini Solaris: /etc/krb5/krb5. 1 Copy the blappserv_krb5.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication utilityPath/klist -t -k /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blauthsvc.

MYCOMPANY. If the command does not succeed. 3 Using the results of the previous step. Typically. There are many online sources for Kerberos utilities such as klist. keytabFile is set to installDirectory/br. utilityPath provides the path to the klist utility. this command might identify a service principal called blauthsvc/ app4@SUB2. If this command runs successfully.COM. If you do not have kinit installed on a UNIX system. To perform this procedure. 1 Start the Application Server Administration console by doing one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. The variable keytabFile identifies the location of the keytab file and servicePrincipal is the entity identified in the previous step. from the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. you should be able to authenticate with AD/ Kerberos. verify that the default_realm you have set up in blappserv_krb5. If you do not have klist installed on a UNIX system. The variable keytabFile identifies the location of the keytab file you are generating.keytab Running the klist command generates output that identifies the service principal.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication In this command. you must first obtain it.conf is correct. utilityPath provides the path to the kinit utility.DEV. the keytab file for Windows would be C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\blauthsvc. Defining Authentication Service settings for AD/Kerberos Use this procedure to define settings for the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service so it can use the Kerberos configurations you set up in previous procedures. authenticate to Active Directory by entering one of the following: ■ Windows: installDirectory\jre\bin\kinit -k -t keytabFile servicePrincipal UNIX: utilityPath/kinit -k -t keytabFile servicePrincipal ■ In this command. you must use the Application Server Administration console. enter the following: . For example. you must first obtain it./bin/blasadmin Chapter 4 Administering security 191 . For example. if you used the example names shown in “Sample domain structure” on page 171.

You can skip this step unless you choose to use a different file name.conf file. 192 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Cross-registration allows users to be authorized for RBAC roles. enter the following: set AuthServer AuthSvcKrb5Config fileName where fileName is the name of the blappserv_krb5.conf file.conf file. 2 To enable Active Directory/Kerberos authentication. enter the following: \bin\blasadmin.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication ■ On Windows. do one of the following: — From the Start menu. 4 To enable the blappserv_login. 3 To enable the blappserv_krb5. Cross-registering users in the BMC BladeLogic database Users must be registered in both Active Directory and BMC BladeLogic’s RBACbased user database. By default AuthSvcKrb5LoginConfig is set to a value of blappserv_login.exe Both options run the same command. By default AuthSvcKrb5Config is set to a value of blappserv_krb5.conf. select Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Utilities => Application Server Administration. This file is essential for supporting Kerberos.conf file. enter the following: set AuthServer IsADKAuthEnabled true By default Active Directory/Kerberos authentication is not turned on. — From the directory where BMC BladeLogic is installed. 5 Restart the Application Server (see “Restarting a specific Application Server” on page 111). enter the following: set AuthServer AuthSvcKrb5LoginConfig fileName where fileName is the name of the blappserv_login. You can skip this step unless you choose to use a different file name. This file is essential for supporting Kerberos.conf.

For information on adding users to RBAC. you would fill in the name field with a value such as: mary@SUB1. BMC BladeLogic documentation assumes you know how to add users to Active Directory.Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication Only users authorized to use BMC BladeLogic should be entered into the BMC BladeLogic database. BMC BladeLogic provides a BLCLI command. Use RBAC to add users to the BMC BladeLogic database.COM is a different user name than than mary or mary@SUB3. that you can use to synchronize group information in Active Directory with role information in RBAC. if you are using RBAC or the bladduser utility to add a new BMC BladeLogic user. Network Shell user names do not include domain information. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide.COM rather than filling in the name field with a value such as: mary Note that the user name mary@SUB1. Each BMC BladeLogic user name must be in the form: USER@DOMAIN where DOMAIN is the domain the user is registered in.MYCOMPANY.DEV. you must ensure that domain user names stored in RBAC are fully qualified and that those names match the user names stored in the Active Directory. For more information on this command.MYCOMPANY. see the BLCLI help.COM). Requirements for User Names When using AD/Kerberos to authenticate end users.COM.MYCOMPANY. Chapter 4 Administering security 193 .DEV. Network Shell users may not be able to communicate directly with the agent on that server because the agent will expect user names to include domain information (such as mary@SUB1. For example.DEV. The user’s BMC BladeLogic user name must match the user’s fully qualified Active Directory user name. RBACRole:syncUsers.MYCOMPANY.DEV. Setting up a Network Shell Proxy Server If you cross-register users in Active Directory and RBAC and then you run an ACL Push Job on a server.

the administrator should log in as a user authorized for the RBACAdmins role and ensure that each of the four built-in roles—RBACAdmins. In a default installation. These default users are assigned to the default roles RBACAdmins and BLAdmins.MYCOMPANY. no user will be able to access the built-in roles. you must use RBAC to add a fully qualified user name to the BLAdmins role. you must use RBAC to add a fully qualified name to the GlobalReportViewers role. the RBACAdmins role has the authorizations necessary to manage users and roles. you can simply assign a fully qualified domain user name (for example. Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication This section describes how to configure a BMC BladeLogic client (the BMC BladeLogic Console or the blcred utility) to authenticate with a BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service using AD/Kerberos user credentials. respectively.DEV. when SRP authentication is disabled. then. To allow a user to log into the GlobalReportAdmins role.Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication To avoid this problem and maintain communication with agents via Network Shell. RBACAdmin_ADK@SUB2. If the BMC BladeLogic administrator intends to support AD/Kerberos authentication exclusively and disable SRP user authentication. set up a Network Shell Proxy Server. For more information. which has read access to all reports at all sites in a BMC BladeLogic installation. BLAdmins.COM) to the RBACAdmins role. you must use RBAC to add a fully qualified user name to the GlobalReportAdmins role.COM. The same issue applies to the BLAdmins role. In this example. which has built-in authorizations to change permissions for all system objects in BMC BladeLogic.DEV. GlobalReportViewers. the GlobalReportAdmins role. To allow a user to log into the BLAdmins role. To allow a user to log into the GlobalReportViewers role. If you are using that default setup. see “Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service” on page 142. Logging on using default users and roles The BMC BladeLogic user database comes pre-provisioned with two default SRP users: RBACAdmin and BLAdmin. and GlobalReportAdmins—has at least one registered domain user assigned to that role.MYCOMPANY. Otherwise. which has built-in authorizations to see data for all BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics sites. and the GlobalReportViewers role. 194 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . prior to disabling SRP. the user would also have to be registered in the Active Directory user registry for the domain SUB2.

For UNIX environments.conf file.properties file” on page 200. For more information on defining authentication profiles. When a Windows user logs into the Active Directory. Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure. NOTE When you specify a domain name in any of the following steps. See “Locating the Active Directory KDC for the client’s domain” on page 197.Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication In addition to the procedures described here.conf file” on page 196. a user must also define an authentication profile that calls for AD/Kerberos authentication. See “Authentication profiles” on page 124 and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide.conf file. See “Creating the blclient_login.properties file. 8 Set up authentication profiles using AD/Kerberos authentication on the BMC BladeLogic client. which provides essential Kerberos configuration information. See “Creating the blclient_krb5. 3 Create the blclient_login.conf file” on page 198. which provides essential configuration data. 1 If you have not done so already. This step provides information that is needed for subsequent steps in this procedure. update registry settings and perform other configuration tasks. Chapter 4 Administering security 195 . perform the following prerequisite procedures: ■ “Registering an Authentication Service in an Active Directory Domain” on page 180 “Configuring an Authentication Service for AD/Kerberos authentication” on page 184 ■ 2 For Windows clients. skip this step. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. The following is a master procedure. 5 Create a blclient_krb5. See “Obtaining a TGT for a BMC BladeLogic client (UNIX only)” on page 201. 6 Update the BMC BladeLogic config. 7 For UNIX clients. See “Updating the config. the equivalent of a “kinit” is performed automatically. you must use UPPER CASE LETTERS. You may want to review the diagram in “Sample domain structure” on page 171 for an overview of the domain names and host names used in the examples in this section. each user must manually perform a kinit to obtain a ticketgranting ticket (TGT). 4 Locate the Active Directory KDC for the client’s realm. See “Performing Windows-only client configuration tasks” on page 196.

2. Open the Windows Registry Editor. 5. Disable User Account Control (UAC). 196 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Navigate to \HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos\ Parameters. 3. Windows Vista 1. It should be named allowtgtsessionkey and it should have a value of 1. Create a new registry value of type REG_DWORD.Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication Performing Windows-only client configuration tasks Use this procedure to modify registry settings and perform other configuration tasks on Windows client machines.conf file Use this procedure to create the blclient_login. It should be named allowtgtsessionkey and it should have a value of 1. 4. Navigate to \HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos\ Parameters. Do one of the following: Platform Windows 2003 and 2008 Actions 1.conf file. This file provides necessary configuration information. It should be named allowtgtsessionkey and it should have a value of 1. 3. skip this section. Open the Windows Registry Editor. Windows XP 1. If you are configuring a UNIX-style system. 2. Reboot the workstation. This procedure is only necessary in Windows environments. 2. Create a new registry value of type REG_DWORD. Navigate to \HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\Lsa\Kerberos. 3. Open the Windows Registry Editor. 4. Create a new registry value of type REG_DWORD. Creating the blclient_login. Reboot the server.

conf ■ On Windows.MYCOMPANY.security.auth._tcp. For example. save the file to the \NSH\br directory with the name: blclient_login. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location.sun. You will need this host name later in the configuration process. the file should be located as follows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blclient_login.sun. }. 2 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system.CLIENT_DOMAIN where CLIENT_DOMAIN is the domain containing the user’s workstation where the client is running. save the file to the /NSH/br directory with the name: blclient_login.conf._tcp. For example.Krb5LoginModule required doNotPrompt=true Debug=false useTicketCache=true.COM Chapter 4 Administering security 197 .conf Locating the Active Directory KDC for the client’s domain Use this procedure to obtain the host name for the Active Directory KDC that is running in the domain that includes the client machine.Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication 1 Create a text file and add the following content to it: com.module.initiate { com. enter the following: nslookup -type=srv _kerberos. For example: nslookup -type=srv _kerberos.security. the file should be located as follows: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blclient_login.jgss. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location.DEV.SUB1.conf. From a command line.

SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN = SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_REALM .PARENT_DOMAIN = PARENT_REALM In this text file: CLIENT_DOMAIN is the realm containing the user’s workstation.DEV.MYCOMPANY. This file provides necessary Kerberos configuration information.MYCOMPANY. For example: kdc.COM 198 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .dev.mycompany. 1 Create a text file like the following: [libdefaults] ticket_lifetime = 6000 default_realm = CLIENT_DOMAIN [realms] CLIENT_DOMAIN = { kdc = CLIENT_DOMAIN_KDC:88 } SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN = { kdc = SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN_KDC:88 } PARENT_DOMAIN = { kdc = PARENT_DOMAIN_KDC:88 } [domain_realm] .CLIENT_DOMAIN = CLIENT_REALM .Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication The Active Directory KDC’s host name is reported as the value of svr host name (Windows) or service (UNIX).conf file Use this procedure to create the blclient_krb5.com Ignore the numbers before the host name. For example: service = 0 100 88 kdc.SUB1.sub1. For example: SUB1. Creating the blclient_krb5. where the BMC BladeLogic client is running.DEV.COM CLIENT_DOMAIN_KDC is the host name where the Active Directory server is running in your client’s realm.conf file.

DEV.COM . if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location. For example.sub1.MYCOMPANY.COM .MYCOMPANY.mycompany. SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN provides DNS names.com = SUB2. A period before a DNS name indicates you are mapping every system with a DNS name ending with that value to a corresponding Kerberos realm.sub2.dev. In the “domain_realm” section. SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN is the realm where the keytab file was created.MYCOMPANY. For example. if BMC BladeLogic is installed in the default location.conf Chapter 4 Administering security 199 .dev.conf.DEV.MYCOMPANY.com = DEV. For example: . For example: SUB2.dev.DEV.COM 2 Do one of the following: ■ On a UNIX-style system. For example: kdc.SUB2. as described in “Locating the Active Directory KDC for the client’s domain” on page 197. as described in “Locating the Active Directory KDC for the service principal’s domain” on page 186.COM SERVICE_PRINCIPAL_DOMAIN_KDC is the host name where the Active Directory server is running in the realm where the keytab file was created.mycompany. save the file to the \NSH\br directory with the name blclient_krb5.DEV.COM This is the value you obtained when you ran the nslookup command. save the file to the /NSH/br directory with the name: blclient_krb5. the file should be located as follows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ blclient_krb5.mycompany.conf.com = SUB1.Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication This is the value you obtained when you ran the nslookup command.conf ■ On Windows. the file should be located as follows: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/blclient_krb5.MYCOMPANY.

DEV.COM:88 } DEV. up the tree to the root domain and back down to the other child domain. 1 Open the config.properties is placed in the following user-specific location: ■ UNIX-style systems: userHomeDirectory /.COM.SUB1. These additional DOMAINS specify the explicit path you need to traverse from the first child domain.DEV. assume that there is no direct trust between the child domains SUB1.MYCOMPANY.MYCOMPANY.DEV.bladelogic/config.MYCOMPANY. using the examples in “Sample domain structure” on page 171.DEV.MYCOMPANY. a copy of config.properties 200 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .COM:88 } SUB2.COM:88 } Updating the config.DEV. this file is initially stored in the following location: ■ UNIX-style systems: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/config.properties file.COM = { kdc = kdc. By default.properties file Use this procedure to modify the config.COM = { kdc = kdc.COM = { kdc = kdc.MYCOMPANY. For example.properties ■ Windows systems: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\br\ config.properties When a user runs the console for the first time.MYCOMPANY. you must add additional DOMAINS to the [realms] section of the blclient_krb5.MYCOMPANY.conf file.MYCOMPANY. In this case.Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication NOTE If there is no direct trust between the two child domains. the [realms] section would look something like this: [realms] SUB1.DEV.SUB2.properties file on the BMC BladeLogic client.DEV.COM and SUB2.

If an entry does not already exist in the config. Although the life span of a TGT is configurable. use forward slashes as path delimiters (such as.properties file.useSubjectCredsOnly= false Obtaining a TGT for a BMC BladeLogic client (UNIX only) Users of the BMC BladeLogic Console and the blcred utility running on a UNIX-style host must manually run a kinit to obtain a ticket-gathering ticket (TGT). Alternatively. add it at the end of the file.conf In this entry. path is the full path to the blclient_krb5.login. If a user already has a valid TGT. you can use a backslash as a path separator but you must escape it with another backslash (such as.config= Value path/blclient_login. C\:\\Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/ version/NSH/br/blclient_login. 2 Set the following entries to the values shown below.conf).auth. For Windows paths. Note that in either case you must use a backslash to escape the colon and backslash after the drive letter. path is the full path to the blclient_login.conf).Configuring a BMC BladeLogic Client for AD/Kerberos authentication ■ Windows systems: userHomeDirectory\Application Data\BladeLogic\config.conf).conf In this entry. use forward slashes as path delimiters (such as. you can use a backslash as a path separator but you must escape it with another backslash (such as. java. The TGT is the AD/Kerberos user credential that domain users need to authenticate with the BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service.conf file. C\:\\Program Files\\BMC Software\\BladeLogic\\version\\NSH\\br\\ blclient_krb5.conf). Entry java. For Windows paths.auth.krb5. path/blclient_krb5.properties in both locations—its initial location and in your own user-specific location.properties If you are setting up an AD/Kerberos environment that many users are sharing (for example. you should modify config. C\:\\Program Files\\BMC Software\\BladeLogic\\version\\NSH\\br\\ blclient_login. typically a TGT is valid for 10 hours. this procedure is not necessary.security. Note that in either case you must use a backslash to escape the colon and backslash after the drive letter. Alternatively.conf file. Chapter 4 Administering security 201 . a terminal server) and you have already run the BMC BladeLogic Console.security. This procedure must be performed every time a user needs a TGT on a UNIX client.security. C\:\\Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/ version/NSH/br/blclient_krb5.conf= javax.

utilityPath provides the path to the kinit utility. you can replace the existing version of krb5.conf to /etc/krb5. then you must integrate the contents of blclient_krb5. If you do not have kinit installed. skip this procedure. Implementing security – Application Server to agents or repeaters This section provides the following procedures to secure access between the BMC BladeLogic Application Server and RSCD agents or repeaters by employing TLS client authentication: ■ ■ TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server Use this procedure to generate a self-signed.conf.conf by renaming the copy of blclient_krb5. and configure those agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests using client-side certificates. The name you provide is associated with the client’s realm.conf. If your environment includes multiple Application Servers.conf. 2 To obtain a TGT. 1 Copy blclient_krb5. The user name you provide for the kinit command does not have to be fully qualified. If you are using a Windows client. 202 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you must first obtain it.conf. provision all targeted agents or repeaters with an SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate.conf with the contents of krb5. identified when you created the client’s blclient_krb5. you should repeat this procedure for each Application Server. If you already use krb5.conf file. If you are not already using krb5.conf. client-side certificate for a Windows Application Server. There are many online sources for Kerberos utilities such as kinit. run the following command: utilityPath/kinit userName In this command.Implementing security – Application Server to agents or repeaters This procedure is only necessary in UNIX-style environments.

2 Create a directory called C:\WINDIR\rsc\certs\SYSTEM. See “Provisioning agents and repeaters with a SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate” on page 204. The procedure for a Network Shell Proxy Server is identical to the procedure for an Application Server.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server Note that in the context of this section. 1 Log into a Windows Application Server as Administrator. Generally. You can use this procedure to use TLS with client-side certificates to secure communication between a Windows-based Network Shell Proxy Server and agents or repeaters. See “Configuring agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates” on page 206. client-side certificate on the Windows Application Server. The following is a master procedure. In the path shown above.pem. Then add the passphrase for that certificate to the securecert file. If you want to stop using self-signed. 2 Provision all targeted agents or repeaters with an SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate. 3 Using a command line. 1 Create a self-signed. client-side certificates. see “TLS with client-side certs – Discontinuing use of client-side certificates” on page 210. Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure. Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the Application Server Use this procedure to create a file called id. in BMC BladeLogic documentation a “client” refers to a host running the BMC BladeLogic Console or Network Shell. which contains the self-signed certificate for the Application Server and the private key associated with the certificate. 3 Configure all targeted agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests using client-side certificates. WINDIR is typically winnt (on a Windows 2000 server) or windows. a “client” refers to an Application Server that is attempting to establish contact with the server hosting an agent. generate a self-signed Application Server certificate by entering the following: Chapter 4 Administering security 203 . Then add the passphrase used to encrypt the private key to the securecert file on the Application Server. See “Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the Application Server” on page 203.

If necessary. 1 Ensure that the secure file on all managed servers is configured so that tls_mode=encryption_only. If you prematurely set the rscd entry in a secure file so that tls_mode=encrytion_and_auth. you can find securecert in installDirectoryN\version\NSH\conf\securecert. For example. The encoded passphrase will vary.pem file is created in the C:\WINDIR\rsc\certs\SYSTEM directory. An agent or repeater uses this fingerprint to validate the selfsigned certificate received from the Application Server in the course of the TLS handshake.pem file. the agent or repeater will refuse the incoming connection because it will not have the SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed cert. If additional instances of BMC BladeLogic are installed. Provisioning agents and repeaters with a SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate Use this procedure to create. 4 Update the securecert file to include an encoded copy of the passphrase. generate this setting by running the following secadmin command on each agent: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Before you can provision a managed server with the fingerprint of the Application Server’s certificate. you must ensure that the secure file on the agent or repeater is configured correctly. The secure file (located in the C:\WINDIR\rsc directory on a Windows server and in /usr/lib/rsc on a UNIX-style server) must have the rscd entry set to the following when deploying the certificate fingerprint: 204 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . [default] SYSTEM=FCUVOMLNGLVRZNOO For the initial installation of BMC BladeLogic. you are prompted to provide and then confirm a passphrase. the contents of the securecert file are updated to something like the following. This passphrase is used to encrypt the private key in the id. This file contains the SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate. or update.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server bl_gen_ssl -appcert After you enter the command. on each managed server and repeater a file named SYSTEM. The id. the default location for the second instance of BMC BladeLogic would be C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic2\version\NSH. use the command line to enter the following: secadmin -m default -cu SYSTEM -cp passPhrase After issuing this command. To accomplish this. you can find the securecert file in the C:\WINDIR\rsc directory.

on a UNIX machine. To grant this privilege.. the fingerprint file for a Windows Application Server is /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/certs/SYSTEM.. 5 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping.pem file. On a Windows machine. you must have root or Administrator privileges on the server hosting the agent.agentN where agent1. you should provision each Application Server with its own self-signed certificate. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw. the directory containing the id. 4 Push the SHA1 fingerprint to managed servers by entering the following command: putcert SYSTEM id.agentN is a space-delimited list of the host names or IP addresses of the managed servers hosting agents or repeaters. To provision an agent or repeater with the SHA1 fingerprint of an Application Server’s certificate.. Performing this procedure for each of those Application Servers generates multiple fingerprints in the SYSTEM file. cd to C:\WINDIR\rsc\certs\ SYSTEM. Otherwise.pem agent1. such as the IP address or host name of the Application Server. This command creates or updates a fingerprint file on each targeted agent or repeater.user=root To be safe. 3 Using a command line on the Application Server. Chapter 4 Administering security 205 . the fingerprint file for a Window Application Server is C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\RSCD\certs\ SYSTEM.user=Administrator On a UNIX server. so in most situations there is no need to perform this step. In environments where multiple Application Servers communicate with agents. you should replace the host wildcard (“*”) with a more restrictive setting. all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls This is the default setting after a fresh installation of an agent. 2 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent.. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw.

client-side certificates. see “TLS with client-side certs – Discontinuing use of client-side certificates” on page 210. 206 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server Configuring agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates Use this procedure to update the rscd entry in each agent's secure file so it reads as follows: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_and_auth:encryption=tls After agents are provisioned with the SHA1 fingerprint of an Application Server’s self-signed certificate. If you want to stop using self-signed. The procedure for a Network Shell Proxy Server is identical to the procedure for an Application Server. You can use this procedure to use TLS with client-side certificates to secure communication between a UNIX-based Network Shell Proxy Server and agents or repeaters. Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure. provision all targeted agents or repeaters with an SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate. TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server Use this procedure to generate a self-signed. This section is intended for administrators of BMC BladeLogic Application Servers. This setting requires client authentication via clientside certificates. a “client” refers to an Application Server that is attempting to establish contact with the server hosting an agent. The following is a master procedure. To modify the rscd entry in the secure file on each targeted agent. Generally. use Network Shell to enter the following secadmin command: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_and_auth -e tls This procedure is also necessary if you are configuring a repeater to authenticate incoming requests from an Application Server. the secure files on those agents must be updated so tls_mode=encryption_and_auth. client-side certificate for a UNIX-based Application Server. in BMC BladeLogic documentation a “client” refers to a host running the BMC BladeLogic Console or Network Shell. and configure those agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests using client-side certificates. Note that in the context of this section.

bladelogic directory.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server 1 Create a self-signed client-side certificate on the UNIX Application Server. See “Provisioning agents and repeaters with a SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate” on page 208. 4 Update the securecert file (contained in the /usr/lib/rsc directory) to contain an encoded copy of the passphrase.pem.pem file or the .bladelogic directory. The id. Then add the passphrase for that certificate to the securecert file.pem file is generated. use Network Shell to enter the following: secadmin -m default -cu bladmin -cp passPhrase Chapter 4 Administering security 207 . 3 Enter exit to revert back to the root user. See “Configuring agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates” on page 209. See “Creating a selfsigned client-side certificate on the Application Server” on page 207. and then enter the following command: su .pem file. 2 Provision all targeted agents or repeaters with an SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate. In UNIX the Application Server runs as the bladmin user. 1 Log into the UNIX system on the Application Server as root. 2 Enter the following command: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/bin/bl_gen_ssl After entering the command. which contains the self-signed certificate for the Application Server and the private key associated with the certificate. 3 Configure all targeted agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests using client-side certificates. BMC BladeLogic will not load the certificate if group or world permissions are set for the id. Then add the passphrase used to encrypt the private key to the securecert file on the Application Server. you are prompted to provide and then confirm a passphrase. To accomplish this. Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the Application Server Use this procedure to create a file called id. where the id.bladmin This command logs you in as the bladmin user.pem file is created in the bladminUserHome/. This passphrase is used to encrypt the private key in the id.

bladelogic directory by running the following commands: chmod 700 /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/. the contents of the securecert file are updated to something like the following. on each managed server or repeater a file named bladmin.pem file and the .bladelogic chmod 600 /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/.bladelogic/id.pem Provisioning agents and repeaters with a SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate Use this procedure to create. or update. The encoded passphrase will vary. so in most situations there is no need to perform this step. generate this setting by running the following secadmin command on each agent: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Before you can provision a managed server with the fingerprint of the Application Server’s certificate. If you prematurely set the rscd entry in a secure file so that tls_mode=encrytion_and_auth. If necessary. This file contains the SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate. An agent or repeater uses this fingerprint to validate the selfsigned certificate received from the Application Server in the course of the TLS handshake. 2 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent. 1 Ensure that the secure file on all managed servers is configured so that tls_mode=encryption_only. 208 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . the agent or repeater will refuse the incoming connection because it will not have the SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed cert. The secure file (located in the C:\WINDIR\rsc directory on a Windows server and in /usr/lib/rsc on a UNIX-style server) must have the rscd entry set to the following when deploying the certificate fingerprint: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls This is the default setting after a fresh installation of an agent.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server After issuing this command. [default] bladmin=FCUVOMLNGLVRZNOO 5 Ensure that access is restricted to the id. you must ensure that the secure file on the agent or repeater is configured correctly.

. 4 Push the SHA1 fingerprint to managed servers by entering the following command: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/sbin/putcert bladmin id. To grant this privilege.bladelogic. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw. 3 Using a command line on the Application Server. Performing this procedure for each of those Application Servers generates multiple fingerprints in the bladmin file.pem file. the fingerprint file for a Window Application Server is C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\RSCD\certs\ bladmin.user=root To be safe.pem agent1. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw.. cd to /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/ NSH/br/.. Otherwise. on a UNIX machine. the directory containing the id. you should replace the host wildcard (“*”) with a more restrictive setting. such as the IP address or host name of the Application Server. This command creates or updates a fingerprint file on each targeted agent or repeater. the fingerprint file for a Windows Application Server is /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/certs/bladmin.user=Administrator On a UNIX server.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server To provision an agent or repeater with the SHA1 fingerprint of an Application Server’s certificate. you should provision each Application Server with its own self-signed certificate. all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator. 5 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping.agentN where agent1. On a Windows machine. Configuring agents or repeaters to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates Use this procedure to update the rscd entry in each agent's secure file so it reads as follows: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_and_auth:encryption=tls Chapter 4 Administering security 209 . you must have root or Administrator privileges on the server hosting the agent.agentN is a space-separated list of the host names or IP addresses of the managed servers hosting agents or repeaters. In environments where multiple Application Servers communicate with agents..

2 Remove the SHA1 fingerprint of the Application Server’s self-signed certificate from managed servers by entering the following command: nukecert SYSTEM|bladmin agent1. you may want to replace the host wildcard (“*”) with the IP address or host name of the Network Shell client. TLS with client-side certs – Discontinuing use of client-side certificates Use this procedure to stop using client-side certificates that secure access between Application Servers and agents or repeaters. use Network Shell to enter the following secadmin command: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_and_auth -e tls This procedure is also necessary if you are configuring a repeater to authenticate incoming requests from an Application Server...user=Administrator On a UNIX server.. the secure files on those agents must be updated so tls_mode=encryption_and_auth.agentN is a space-delimited list of the names or IP addresses of the servers where you want to stop using the Application Server’s self-signed certificate. This setting requires client authentication via clientside certificates. you must have root or Administrator privileges on any servers hosting agents or repeaters where you want to discontinue use of clientside certificates. To grant this privilege. To modify the rscd entry in the secure file on each targeted agent.agentN where SYSTEM|bladmin is SYSTEM for a Windows Application Server or bladmin for a UNIX Application Server and agent1.TLS with client-side certs – Discontinuing use of client-side certificates After agents are provisioned with the SHA1 fingerprint of an Application Server’s self-signed certificate. 210 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide ..user=root To be safe. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw. To perform this procedure. 1 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent or repeater. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw.

5 Remove certificates from Application Servers by deleting the SYSTEM directory for Windows Application Servers or the . all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator. For more information on using the exports file.bladelogic. see “Exports file” on page 240. the SYSTEM directory can be found at C:\ WINDIR\rsc\certs\SYSTEM. the bladmin directory can be found at /opt/bmc/ BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/.Implementing security – Network Shell to agent 3 Configure the secure file on all agents or repeaters where you want to stop using certificates by using Network Shell to run the following secadmin command: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Running this command generates an rscd entry in the secure file like the following: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls 4 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping. Typically administrators use the exports file to limit Network Shell client access to agents by restricting access to certain client IP addresses.bladelogic directory for UNIX Application Servers. Implementing security – Network Shell to agent This section provides procedures to secure access between Network Shell clients and servers hosting RSCD agents. Chapter 4 Administering security 211 . For Windows Application Servers. For UNIX Application Servers. The following options are available: ■ ■ No authentication – Using a default installation TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client No authentication – Using a default installation A standard installation of BMC BladeLogic requires no user authentication between Network Shell clients and servers hosting agents. Otherwise.

BMC BladeLogic will not load the certificate if group or world permissions are set for the id. which is encrypted using a password supplied when the self-signed certificate is created. 1 Ensure that the secure file is configured correctly on all agents where you want to set up secure access. the client uses the contents of the id. If you want to stop using self-signed. 212 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Then this procedure calculates the SHA1 fingerprint of the client certificate and pushes it to targeted agents using the putcert utility.pem file (certificate and corresponding private key) and the agents uses the SHA1 fingerprint. The SHA1 fingerprint is written into fingerprint files on the agents. During the TLS handshake.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client Use this procedure to generate a self-signed. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. and configure those agents to authenticate incoming requests using client-side certificates. If necessary. NOTE The machine where you are creating a certificate must have the capability to generate random numbers. For more information.bladelogic directory. At this point in the procedure the rscd entry in the secure file should be set to tls_mode=encryption_only. This procedure creates a file on the client called id. That file contains the client’s digital certificate and the corresponding private key. client-side certificates. so in many situations there is no need to perform this step.pem file or the . provision all targeted agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the self-signed certificate. 2 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent. see “Discontinuing use of client-side certificates” on page 216. Later in this procedure you will change the tls_mode setting. On UNIX machines running Network Shell clients. client-side certificate for a Windows Network Shell client. The BMC BladeLogic installation program for the Application Server tests whether a machine has the capability to generate random numbers.pem. generate this setting by running the following secadmin command on each agent: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls This is the default setting after a fresh installation of an agent. where the id. The installation program also allows you to install a daemon or create a random number seed that BMC BladeLogic uses for generating random numbers.pem file is generated.

ensure that access is restricted to the id. 3 Using a command line on the Network Shell client.. you should replace the host wildcard (“*”) with the IP address or host name of the Network Shell client. generate a self-signed certificate by entering the following: bl_gen_ssl 4 Enter a passphrase.pem is stored in /userHomeDirectory /.bladelogic.. agentN is a space-delimited list of the names or IP addresses of the servers to which you want to push the certificate.pem is stored. Then confirm the passphrase by entering it again. The passphrase is used to encrypt the private key in the id.pem file. such as /home/userName.bladelogic chmod 600 /home/userName/. In Windows. In UNIX. To grant this privilege.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client To provision an agent with the SHA1 fingerprint of a client’s certificate. agentN where userName is the name of the user who created the certificate and agent1 . id. 6 For UNIX machines running Network Shell clients. where userHomeDirectory is the user’s home directory..bladelogic directory by running the following commands: chmod 700 /home/userName/. id. you must have root or Administrator privileges on the server hosting the agent.pem is stored in /userProfileDirectory/Application Data /BladeLogic.pem. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw.pem agent1 . BMC BladeLogic generates a self-signed certificate in a file named id.pem 7 Push the SHA1 fingerprint of the self-signed certificate to managed servers by entering the following command: putcert userName id. where userProfileDirectory specifies a path such as /Documents and Settings/userName.user=root To be safe. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw.. 5 Cd to the directory where id.pem file and the .user=Administrator On a UNIX server. Chapter 4 Administering security 213 .bladelogic/id.

C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\RSCD\certs \userName is the fingerprint file. BMC BladeLogic provides a password mechanism. /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/ NSH/certs/userName is the fingerprint file. 8 Modify the rscd entry in the secure file on each targeted agent by entering the following secadmin command: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_and_auth -e tls NOTE Performing this step could have implications for Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers when they communicate with the same targeted agents. which means these agents will require Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers to also use client-side certificates. The procedure is the same as the procedure for Application Servers. Caching private keys A client certificate and its associated private key (that is.pem file is generated. Because each Network Shell session requires knowledge of the private key password. When an id. the private key is encrypted using the password you provide when you run the bl_gen_ssl utility. This step sets tls_mode=encryption_and_auth on the targeted agents. To keep private keys safe.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client This command creates or updates a fingerprint file on each targeted agent. anyone gaining access to the file can assume the identity of the user named in the certificate. For information on setting up client-side certificates on these entities. Network Shell decrypts and caches your private key. For more information. BMC BladeLogic provides a private key cache so users do not have to retype their passwords every time they start a new Network Shell session. see “Caching private keys” on page 214. 214 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . see “TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Windows Application Server” on page 202 or “TLS with client-side certs – Securing a UNIX-based Application Server” on page 206. If the private key in the id. The procedure for activating the private key cache varies for Windows and UNIX-style systems.pem file) constitute a user credential that the holder of the credential can use to assume the identity of the user named within the credential. Once you provide the password. all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator. Otherwise. On a UNIX agent. you should cache your private key for your client-side certificate. On a Windows agent. 10 If you plan to use Network Shell to run non-interactive tools such as the BLCLI.pem file is not password-protected. making it available to any command running under the shell. 9 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping. the contents of the id. When you start Network Shell. You can also use these procedures to set up client-side certificates on Network Shell Proxy Servers. the system prompts you for your private key password.

To avoid this. Activating the private key cache in UNIX 1 On the Network Shell client. create the certificate. enter the following command. and then start Network Shell again. Network Shell prompts you for a password every time you issue a command during that session. 2 Enter the password and click OK. 3 To stop sharing the password. 2 Enter the password. exit Network Shell. right-click the BMC BladeLogic icon in the system tray and select Exit from the pop-up menu. NOTE This command must be run in the foreground because it prompts for a password. bl_ssl_agent --background The system prompts for your private key password. The BMC BladeLogic icon displays in the system tray on the task bar. Activating the private key cache in Windows 1 From a Windows command line. Network Shell only prompts for the password when you start the new session. Chapter 4 Administering security 215 . The system generates a message like the following: set BL_X509_KEY to xy to reuse this private key where xy is the hexadecimal value of the location of the shared memory segment. indicating the private key password is shared.TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client TIP If you are already running Network Shell and you create a certificate. The command will spawn a new process that will remain in the background to cache the password in a shared memory segment. enter the following command: bltray -blkey A dialog prompts for your private key password.

set the BL_X509_KEY environment variable by entering the following command: BL_X509_KEY=xy 4 Export the BL_X509_KEY environment variable by issuing the following command: export BL_X509_KEY The bl_ssl_agent program remains in the background holding the private key password cached in a shared memory segment until you kill it. This shared memory segment is only usable by the person who ran bl_ssl_agent.user=root To be safe. To perform this procedure.. 3 To reuse this shared memory segment with Network Shell..TLS with client-side certs – Securing a Network Shell client After entering your password.user=Administrator On a UNIX server. 1 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent.. 3 Configure the secure file on all agents where you want to stop using certificates by using Network Shell to run the following secadmin command: 216 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you must have root or Administrator privileges on any servers hosting agents where you want to discontinue use of client-side certificates. bl_ssl_agent runs in the background with the password cached in a shared memory segment. 2 Remove the SHA1 fingerprint of a client-side. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw. To grant this privilege. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw. self-signed certificate from managed servers by entering the following command: nukecert userName agent1..agentN where userName is the name of the user who created the certificate and agent1.agentN is a space-delimited list of the names or IP addresses of the servers where you want to stop using certificates. Discontinuing use of client-side certificates Use this procedure to stop using client-side certificates that secure access between Network Shell clients and agents. you may want to replace the host wildcard (“*”) with the IP address or host name of the Network Shell client.

id. In UNIX. This step sets tls_mode=encryption_only on the targeted agents. id. On UNIX repeaters. provision all targeted agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate. 5 Remove certificates from clients by deleting the id. see “Discontinuing use of client-side certificates” on page 222.pem is stored in /userProfileDirectory/Application Data /BladeLogic. users are mapped to root but mapping to other user names is possible. Each of the steps in this procedure references a sub-section that describes another procedure. Otherwise. where userHomeDirectory> is the user’s home directory. you must perform this procedure for every user to whom connecting users are mapped.bladelogic. client-side certificates.pem file. where userProfileDirectory specifies a path such as /Documents and Settings/userName. client-side certificate for a repeater. 4 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping. such as /home/userName.Implementing Security – Repeater to agent secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Running this command generates an rscd entry in the secure file like the following: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls NOTE Performing this step could have implications for Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers when they communicate with the same targeted agents. Typically. If you want to stop using self-signed. The following is a master procedure. all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator.pem is stored in /userHomeDirectory /. In Windows. On Windows. which means these agents will not require Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers to also use client-side certificates. and configure those agents to authenticate incoming requests using clientside certificates. Implementing Security – Repeater to agent Use this procedure to generate a self-signed. you must perform this procedure for the BladeLogicRSCD user. Chapter 4 Administering security 217 .

3 Configure all targeted agents to authenticate incoming requests using client-side certificates. On UNIX repeaters. C. 2 Provision all targeted agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate. Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the repeater Use this procedure to create a self-signed certificate for the repeater and then add the passphrase for that certificate to the securecert file on the repeater. Then. issue the following command for generating a certificate: bl_gen_ssl ■ On Windows. WINDIR is typically winnt (on a Windows 2000 server) or windows. See “Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the repeater” on page 218. Log into the Application Server as Administrator. generate a self-signed certificate by doing one of the following: ■ On UNIX-style systems. where the id.pem file is generated. and then add the passphrase for that certificate to the securecert file. log into the repeater as a user to whom connecting users are mapped (typically root). 4 Using a command line. do the following: A. client-side certificate on the repeater.Creating a self-signed client-side certificate on the repeater 1 Create a self-signed.bladelogic directory. Then confirm the passphrase by entering it again. BMC BladeLogic will not load the certificate if group or world permissions are set for the id. B. See “Configuring agents to authenticate incoming requests with clientside certificates” on page 221. Create a directory called C:\WINDIR\rsc\certs\BladeLogicRSCD. In the path shown above. See “Provisioning agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate” on page 219.pem file or the . Enter the following command for generating a certificate: bl_gen_ssl -repeatcert 5 Enter a passphrase for the private key to the certificate. 218 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

pem is created in /root/. The secadmin utility encrypts the password. such as root or BladeLogicRSCD.Provisioning agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate BMC BladeLogic generates a certificate in a file named id. id. Enter the password in clear text. For example.bladelogic chmod 600 /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/. the contents of the securecert file are updated to include an entry for your current user name.bladelogic. the file is created in userHomeDirectory /.pem.pem file and the . the file is created in WINDIR\rsc\certs\BladeLogicRSCD.bladelogic/id.pem Provisioning agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate Use this procedure to provision managed servers with the SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate. where userHomeDirectory is the user’s home directory. An agent uses this fingerprint to validate the selfsigned certificate received from the repeater in the course of the TLS handshake. if you are logged in as root.bladelogic/id. ensure that access is restricted to the id.bladelogic directory by running the following commands: chmod 700 /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/.pem. Chapter 4 Administering security 219 . After issuing this command. enter the following: secadmin -m default -cu user -cp password where user is BladeLogicRSCD for Windows repeaters and the user who created the certificate (such as root) for UNIX-style repeaters. this command might create an entry like the following. On UNIX. 6 Update the securecert file to contain an encoded copy of the passphrase. where WINDIR is typically windows or winnt. (The encoded passphrase will vary..) [default] BladeLogicRSCD=FCUVOMLNGLVRZNOO 7 For UNIX repeaters. For example. Using Network Shell. On Windows.

where WINDIR is typically windows or winnt.pem is created at /root/. 220 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .user=root To be safe.user=Administrator On a UNIX server.pem. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw. so in most situations there is no need to perform this step. To grant this privilege. if you are logged in as root. you may want to replace the host wildcard (“*”) with the IP address or host name of the Application Server. generate this setting by running the following secadmin command on each agent: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Before you can provision an agent with the fingerprint of the repeater’s certificate. you must ensure the secure file on the agent is configured correctly. you must have root or Administrator privileges on the server hosting the agent. the agent will refuse the incoming connection because it will not have the SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed cert. The secure file (located in the C:\WINDIR\rsc directory on a Windows server and in / usr/lib/rsc on a UNIX-style server) must have the rscd entry set to the following when deploying the certificate fingerprint: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls This is the default setting after a fresh installation of an agent. For example. To provision an agent with the SHA1 fingerprint of an Application Server’s certificate. id. where userHomeDirectory is the user’s home directory.Provisioning agents with an SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate 1 Ensure that the secure file on all managed servers is configured so that tls_mode=encryption_only. id.pem resides in userHomeDirectory/. On Windows. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw.pem is stored.bladelogic. If you prematurely set the rscd entry in an agent's secure file so that tls_mode=encrytion_and_auth.pem resides in WINDIR\rsc\certs\BladeLogicRSCD..bladelogic/id. 2 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent. id. If necessary. On UNIX-style servers. 3 Cd to the directory on the repeater where id.

pem agent1...agentN where. the secure files on those agents must be updated so tls_mode=encryption_and_auth. Configuring agents to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates Use this procedure to update the rscd entry in each agent's secure file so it reads as follows: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_and_auth:encryption=tls After agents are provisioned with the SHA1 fingerprint of an Application Server’s self-signed certificate. all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator. To modify the rscd entry in the secure file on each targeted agent. It places the SHA1 fingerprint of the id. use Network Shell to enter the following secadmin command: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_and_auth -e tls Chapter 4 Administering security 221 . user is either the name of the UNIX user you were logged in as when you created the certificate or BladeLogicRSCD if the repeater is on a Windows platform. When you issue the putcert command. 5 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping. This setting requires client authentication via clientside certificates. use Network Shell to enter the following: putcert user id.agentN is a space-separated list of the host names or IP addresses of the managed servers hosting agents.. BMC BladeLogic places the SHA1 fingerprint of the id.. To accomplish this. The file resides in the /nsh/certs directory on UNIX-style servers and in \rsc\certs on Windows.pem file for root in a file called root. agent1. Otherwise.pem file for BladeLogicRSCD in a file called BladeLogicRSCD.Configuring agents to authenticate incoming requests with client-side certificates 4 Push the SHA1 fingerprint for the repeater’s certificate to managed servers that communicate with the repeater.

2 Remove the SHA1 fingerprint of the repeater’s self-signed certificate from managed servers.. which means these agents will not require Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers to also use client-side certificates. update the exports file by creating the following entry: * rw. To accomplish this. such as the IP address or host name of the Network Shell client. In the command shown above agent1. you must have root or Administrator privileges on any servers hosting agents where you want to discontinue use of client-side certificates. This step sets tls_mode=encryption_only on the targeted agents.. you must remove those user names as well.. To grant this privilege. use Network Shell to enter the following: nukecert user agent1..user=root To be safe. 222 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . To perform this procedure. If other UNIX users have fingerprints on the agent. you should replace the host wildcard (“*”) with a more restrictive setting.agentN is a space-delimited list of the names or IP addresses of the servers where you want to stop using the repeater’s self-signed certificate. 3 Configure the secure file on all agents where you want to stop using certificates by using Network Shell to run the following secadmin command: secadmin -m rscd -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Running this command generates an rscd entry in the secure file like the following: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls NOTE Performing this step could have implications for Application Servers or Network Shell Proxy Servers when they communicate with the same targeted agents.user=Administrator On a UNIX server.Discontinuing use of client-side certificates Discontinuing use of client-side certificates Use this procedure to stop using client-side certificates that secure access between repeaters and agents.agentN where user is BladeLogicRSCD for a Windows repeater and typically root for a UNIX repeater. update the exports file on a Windows server by creating the following entry: * rw. 1 Set up root or Administrator privileges on each managed server hosting an agent.

On Windows. On UNIX-style servers. Using certificates to secure communication between clients and Application Servers Typically BMC BladeLogic uses self-signed certificates to secure communication between clients and Application Servers. 1 From installDirectory/bin. In some situations.pem. you may choose to provision Application Servers with a CA-issued certificate or certificate chain. Otherwise. where userHomeDirectory is the user’s home directory. enter the following command: blmkcert CN=hostname jksFileName password The command shown above has the following parameters: ■ hostname—Typically set to the host name where you are generating the certificate. where WINDIR is typically windows or winnt. if you are logged in as root..pem file resides in userHomeDirectory/. For more information on that procedure. you may need to manually generate a self signed certificate for an Application Server. the id. The certificate will be valid for three years.pem file resides in WINDIR\rsc\certs\BladeLogicRSCD. Generating a self-signed certificate for an Application Server Performing this procedure generates a 2048-bit RSA key and a self-signed certificate for an Application Server. For more information on that procedure. For example. 5 Remove certificates from repeaters by deleting the id.bladelogic. see “Securing communication with CA certificates” on page 224. However.bladelogic/id.Using certificates to secure communication between clients and Application Servers 4 Revert the setting in the exports file on managed servers back to a more restrictive user mapping. the id.pem file storing the certificate. and it will be stored under the “blade” alias. id.pem resides in /root/. see “Generating a selfsigned certificate for an Application Server” on page 223. Chapter 4 Administering security 223 . all users accessing those agents will be mapped to root or Administrator.

This file should be stored in the /deployments directory for the Application Server that is being updated. If you do not want clients to verify a certificate’s revocation status. if you are generating a self-signed certificate on a Windows server called winappserver1. copy the JKS file you generated in step 1 from this Application Server to all cooperating Application Servers.keystore created automatically when you install the Application Server. you should import those certificates into client trust stores. some organizations may choose to use a CA-issued certificate or certificate chain rather than the default selfsigned certificate. Securing communication with CA certificates When you install an Application Server.) If the certificate you are importing includes a URL for an OCSP Responder.keystore" ******** 2 If you are using a multi-Application Server environment. ■ For example. (A keystore contains certificates and a private key. update the password for each cooperating Application Server. 1 Obtain a certificate chain from a certificate authority. For information on this process. the installation procedure provisions the Application Server with a self-signed certificate. A trust store only contains certificates. password—A password used to encrypt the generated keystore file.Securing communication with CA certificates ■ jksFileName—The path to the keystore you are generating. When you perform this procedure. After you provision Application Servers with CA-issued certificates. such as installDirectory/br/deployments/_template. However. the client will attempt to verify the revocation status of the Application Server’s certificate. If a new password is needed. 2 Import the certificate and its corresponding private key into a keystore file on the Application Server. For more information on that procedure. see “Synchronizing keystore files of multiple Application Servers” on page 58. you might enter a command like the following: blmkcert CN=winappserver1 "C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\ NSH\br\deployments\_template\bladelogic. you set up a keystore that takes the place of the bladelogic. see “Importing CA-issued certificates into clients” on page 226. do not provision the Application Server with a certificate that includes an OCSP URL. 224 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

your certificate authority should create a certificates and private keys and output them using the JKS format. If you are importing a certificate with the Authentication Server’s version of keytool. When you use the blasadmin utility to set up keystores for cooperating Application Servers (described in the next step) you must provide this password. If your CA cannot create a JKS file and instead provides you with a PKCS12 file. This file should be stored in the /deployments directory for the Application Server that is being updated. There are various tools for performing this type of conversion. update the password for each cooperating Application Server. 3 If you are using a multi-Application Server environment. you can use Java’s keytool utility. you might enter a command like the following: installDirectory/jre/bin/keytool -importkeystore -srckeystore bladelogic. NOTE No matter what method you use to import the certificate. such as installDirectory/br/deployments/_template. This is the password used to encrypt the keystore. When you enter the command shown above. Chapter 4 Administering security 225 . If a new password is needed. you must convert your certificates and private keys into JKS. which is the password originally used to create the PCKS12 file. For example. copy the JKS file you generated in step 2 from this Application Server to all cooperating Application Servers. the alias you use to identify the certificate must be blade and the format of the keystore must be jks.keystore -srcstoretype pkcs12 -deststoretype jks -srcalias pkcs12Alias -destalias blade In this command bladelogic.keystore is the name of the keystore file you are creating. pkcs12Alias is the alias under which the certificate and private key are stored. For information on this process. bladelogic.Securing communication with CA certificates Ideally. you are prompted for a destination keystore password.p12 -destkeystore bladelogic. The command shown above also prompts you for the source keystore password.p12 is the file being imported. see “Synchronizing keystore files of multiple Application Servers” on page 58. which is available on any machine where the Authentication Server is installed.

This procedure is not essential.PEM. user name. The related certificate should be the issuing certificate for the Application Server’s certificate. and password. To log into a BMC BladeLogic system. This session credential can be stored in a credential cache file. you must install the BMC BladeLogic Console. On UNIX. On Windows. OCSP verification on the client side will only happen if the CA certificate was imported and the Application Server’s certificate contains an OCSP URL. This file could be the Application Server’s certificate file. Once the Authentication Service validates a user. If the Application Server is provisioned with a certificate chain. the certificate that you import into the client’s trust store should be the issuing certificate for the top of the certificate chain. when you establish a connection to the Application Server. To use blcred.PEM. If you do not perform this procedure. or it could be a CA’s certificate that can be used to verify the validity of the Application Server’s certificate. 226 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . This file must use the PEM or DER format.pkcs12. you are prompted to trust the certificate.pkcs12. Use the blcred utility to import the certificate into the client trust store by entering the following command: blcred cert -import certificateFile In this command certificateFile provides the path to the certificate you are adding to the trust store. session credentials. a user must provide an authentication profile. which uses self-signed certificates. and trusted certificates. but performing it configures the client so it communicates more securely with the Application Server. The authentication profile specifies a BMC BladeLogic Authentication Service and the mechanism that should be employed to authenticate the user.bladelogic/ client_keystore. Using the blcred utility The blcred utility manages authentication profiles. This functionality is equivalent to the default approach for BMC BladeLogic. the Authentication Service issues a session credential. you should import a related certificate into the client’s trust store. this command imports the certificate to C:\Documents and Settings\ user\Application Data\BladeLogic\client_keystore. this command imports the certificate to userHomeDirectory/.Using the blcred utility Importing CA-issued certificates into clients If you have provisioned an Application Server to use a certificate or certificate chain obtained from a Certificate Authority (see “Securing communication with CA certificates” on page 224).

— SecurID—user name and passcode (PIN plus token code). import. After a session credential has expired. — AD/Kerberos—The blcred utility retrieves the AD/Kerberos user credential from the host system's AD/Kerberos credential store. — LDAP—distinguished name and password. or Network Shell Proxy Server. it cannot be used to establish a client/server session. ■ ■ Chapter 4 Administering security 227 . Session credentials have a finite lifetime.509 certificates. Review.Using the blcred utility BMC BladeLogic client applications use session credentials to establish secure sessions with a middle tier service—either the Application Service or the Network Shell Proxy Service. add. When operating in a command line environment. Review.509 certificates are used when establishing a TLS connection to an Authentication Service. add. BMC BladeLogic client applications can use a cached session credential when the owner of the credential cache file invokes the client application. ■ ■ Test whether a valid session credential already exists and determine the lifetime remaining for that credential. and delete authentication profiles. X.509 certificates are used when establishing a TLS connection to an LDAP server. You must insert the smart card before you can use blcred to run the acquire command to obtain a session credential. Application Server.COMPANY. However. as described below: — SRP—user name and password. users do not explicitly use the command line interface to provide AD/Kerberos credentials. BMC BladeLogic users can log on and acquire session credentials using the BMC BladeLogic Console or blcred command line utility. On Application Servers. X. — Domain Authentication—User name (in the form user@KRBDOMAIN. an established client/ server session can continue even though the session credential used to establish that session has expired. and delete trusted X.COM) and password. On clients. the blcred utility lets you: ■ Create an authentication profile Acquire a session credential by providing an authentication profile and the appropriate user credentials for each authentication protocol. — PKI—Insert a smart card into a smart card reader and provide the appropriate PIN for that smart card.

it generates a return code of 0. Typical scenarios The following sections describe some typical scenarios for using blcred. refer to the man page for blcred. Interactively obtaining a session credential If you are interactively running Network Shell (in proxy mode) or the BLCLI and you need to obtain a session credential but cannot use the console. which means the MyProfile session credential is valid for at least 500 minutes.Options Options For a complete description of all available command line options. it generates a return code of 0. If this command is successful. enter a command like the following: blcred cred -test -profile MyProfile -time 500 where 500 is a remaining lifetime in minutes. which means a valid session credential does exist for MyProfile. run the following command: blcred cred -acquire 228 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . If this command is successful. To determine whether a credential's remaining lifetime exceeds a specified number of minutes. Testing for valid session credentials If you are using a command line (BLCLI or Network Shell in proxy mode) and you want to determine whether you have a valid session credential. run the following command: blcred cred -test -profile MyProfile where MyProfile is the name of the authentication profile for which a session credential has been issued.

Typical scenarios The blcred utility will prompt for an authentication profile name. (Alternatively. you can direct blcred to retrieve an SRP user name and password from an SRP keytab file. and you are using SRP authentication. you can direct blcred to obtain a session credential. Instead. you need to obtain a session credential non-interactively. it retrieves the user’s Kerberos credential from the host operating system’s AD/Kerberos credential cache. you can specify the profile name as a command line option. Note that UNIX users must first manually run a kinit before attempting to authenticate.dat Obtaining a session credential using SRP authentication profile If you are running Network Shell or the BLCLI in batch mode. but when prompted for an authentication profile name. using a command like the following blcred cred -acquire -profile srpProfile -i /home/user/user_info. you can enter the same command.) When employing AD/Kerberos authentication. as described in “Obtaining a TGT for a BMC BladeLogic client (UNIX only)” on page 201. you can specify the profile name. you must enter a profile name that calls for AD/Kerberos authentication. $ blcred cred -acquire profile name: srpProfile username: BLAdmin password ****** Authentication succeeded: acquired session credential If you are using AD/Kerberos authentication. $ blcred cred -acquire profile name: adkProfile Authentication succeeded: acquired session credential Obtaining a session credential by referencing a keytab file If you are running Network Shell or the BLCLI in batch mode and you need to obtain a session credential non-interactively. user name and password if the named profile specifies SRP authentication. Alternatively. The example below shows an authentication session that prompts the user for credential information. user name and password as command line options. blcred does not prompt the user for a name or password. blcred cred -acquire -profile srpProfile -username BLAdmin -password ****** Chapter 4 Administering security 229 .

0. blcred cred -acquire -profile ldapProfile -username admin -password ****** If you are not using distinguished name templates. you must provide a full distinguished name and a password.bladelogic:blsess://localhost:9842 Generating a user information file Use this procedure to generate a user information file. password.bladelogic:blsess://localhost:9841 service:proxysvc. and you are using LDAP authentication. 1 From installDirectory/bin. Username: Authentication: Issuing Service: Expiration Time: Maximum Lifetime: Client address: Authorized Roles: RBACAdmins RBACAdmin SRP service:authsvc. 2 Name the file user_info.Generating a user information file Obtaining a session credential using an LDAP authentication profile If you are running Network Shell or the BLCLI in batch mode. you only have to provide a partial distinguished name (in this case admin) and an LDAP password. you can display the contents of your current session credential.dat. Displaying the contents of a session credential Using a blcred command like the following. which caches your user ID. If you are using a distinguished name template.bladelogic:blauth://localhost:9840 Fri Aug 17 20:57:29 EDT 2007 Sat Aug 18 06:57:29 EDT 2007 127. do one of the following: ■ On Windows.1 Destination URLs: service:appsvc. you need to obtain a session credential non-interactively. you can direct blcred to obtain a session credential. On UNIX. run the command bl_gen_blcli_user_info.0. 230 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . ■ The utility prompts you to create a file name. run the command bl_gen_blcli_user_info.exe. and role.

the user_info.Generating a user information file 3 When prompted.dat 5 Make sure that only you have permission to access the directory where you have stored the user_info. and role.dat file must be saved in the userHomeDirectory for the LocalSystem account on Windows or the bladmin user on UNIX.dat ■ UNIX: userHomeDirectory/. enter your user name. run the following command as root or a user with root privileges: sudo -u bladmin echo $HOME Chapter 4 Administering security 231 . To determine the userHomeDirectory for LocalSystem. NOTE When running a Network Shell Script Job based on a Network Shell script that contains CLI commands.user/user_info. 4 Move the file created in step 2 to one of the locations shown below: ■ Windows: userHomeDirectory\Application Data\BladeLogic \user\user_info.dat file. run Network Shell on the Application Server and enter the following command: echo $USERPROFILE To determine the userHomeDirectory for bladmin.bladelogic/. password.

Generating a user information file 232 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

The configuration files control how communication occurs between RSCD agents and their clients. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 233 .txt.txt files are also installed for each client installation. the client user can be granted permissions on the server using two approaches: through configuration files on the agent (a process called user privilege mapping) or through Windows user mapping.txt files reside on each server (that is. users. The chapter also provides an overview of logging in BMC BladeLogic. secure. and log4crc. which clients and users have access to RSCD agents. The exports. Introduction to the configuration files BMC BladeLogic provides the following configuration files: exports users users. each machine where an RSCD agent is installed). securecert. and log4crc.Chapter 5 5 Setting up configuration files This chapter describes how to modify BMC BladeLogic configuration files. and discusses how logging is performed. The secure files on both the client and server configure how clients communicate with servers. users. When a client connects to a server. The secure. securecert.local secure securecert log4crc. even if there are multiple client installations on the same machine.local.

even if you are using Windows user mapping. these files define what permissions apply during the connection.0 or later can recognize automation principals. For more information on configuring clients to use a Network Shell Proxy Server. Consequently. the standard approach to granting user permission on managed servers is user privilege mapping. Disabling user privilege mapping BMC BladeLogic provides a mechanism for disabling user privilege mapping on Windows servers. For more information.local configuration files. When a user runs a Network Shell client to connect directly to a server. you can grant permissions to roles that are mapped to local or domain users who are authorized for a Windows server. you must still create entries for the users. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. This approach should always be used in the following situations: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ When a user is accessing any UNIX server. users.Introduction to the configuration files In BMC BladeLogic. see the man page for the chapw command. Using this technique. The alternative approach to user privilege mapping is to implement Windows user mapping. It uses a combination of the exports. or exports files. Any user mapping information in these entries is ignored for roles that employ Windows user mapping through automation principals. 234 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . and users. When a user is running a Network Shell script defined to use the first and second script types and the appserver_protocol setting in the secure file is not set to ssoproxy.local. you should still push agent ACLs to servers when you add or modify user or role information in the BMC BladeLogic Console. When a user is accessing a Windows server and the user’s role is not mapped to a Windows user through an automation principal. When you are using Windows user mapping to grant permissions to roles. see “Setting up a Network Shell Client to run in proxy mode” on page 147. Together. users. The information in these entries defines whether users can access a server. When a user is using a Network Shell client to connect to servers via a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. NOTE Only Windows servers running BMC BladeLogic 8. For information on implementing Windows user mapping.

users and users. ■ secure—Sets communication parameters that define how client and server machines communicate. Although you can edit the secure file by hand.local—Set access permissions for individual users that communicate with a server.local files override any global user permissions defined in the exports file. With the exports file you can also establish global user permissions. Strong security for communication requires X.) A client’s secure file specifies how the client communicates with agents.509 certificates.txt—Controls logging in BMC BladeLogic so that all events are logged using consistent formats. the values specified in the users file are ■ automatically generated to implement decisions made in RBAC. A server’s secure file specifies how an agent communicates with clients. BMC BladeLogic recommends that you always use secadmin. The secure file also determines whether a Network Shell client communicates with servers via a Network Shell Proxy Server.Configuration file functions Configuration file functions The configuration files function as follows: ■ exports—Sets access permissions for client machines that communicate with a server.509 certificates. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 235 . and client installations each have their own secure file. so that a single log file cannot get excessively large. (On Windows. An Application Server’s secure file specifies how the Application Server communicates with agents and how the file server (typically created on the same host as the Application Server) communicates with clients.) You can use the users. a single machine can have multiple client installations. ■ securecert—Stores passphrases used to encrypt the private keys for X. A utility called secadmin allows you to configure the secure file on a particular machine. Storing passphrases lets BMC BladeLogic access private keys without any need for user interaction. Application Servers. Permissions set in either the users and users. Typically. ■ log4crc. (For more information on RBAC. RSCD agents.txt. you can also control the rolling of log files. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. With log4crc.local file to override any permissions defined in the users file.

100.255.000 @192.255.0 might look like the following: @192. For example.0/24 236 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . exports. a subnet designation uses the following format: @<IP address or hostname>/mask The @ symbol indicates that a subnet is being defined.255. provide the number of bits in the mask.Subnet designations The following graphic illustrates how the secure. or a subnet. Subnet designations When designating a host in the configuration files.255.168. you can use a resolvable host name. a subnet with a subnet mask of 255.10.168. and users configuration files work together to control access to a server. A subnet represents a range of IP addresses.0/24 The following are sample subnet mask definitions: 255. an IP address. In the configuration files. After the IP address or host name.

249/29 How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents When a client contacts an RSCD agent. Then. If an entry for that server exists.240 @192.255. If there is an entry and the communication parameters in the secure file on the server match those in the secure file on the client.100.255.” For more information on using on the secure file. BMC BladeLogic uses the following algorithm to determine whether a user has permissions for accessing the agent: 1 Every client installation (on Windows there can be multiple clients) and the RSCD agent each have their own secure file.168.255.168.192 @192.100.255.100.168.255.168. see “Secure file” on page 253.168. a connection is established.100. additional measures may be required before a connection can be successfully established between clients and servers.255. the client reads its secure file to determine whether it includes an entry for a particular server.225/27 255.255.100. access to the agent is denied.248 @192.128 @192.241/28 255. Depending on the type of authentication and encryption specified in the secure file. “Administering security. If there is no entry for that client in the secure file of the server. First.How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents 255. the client uses the information in the entry to establish a connection with the server.129/25 255. For a complete description of how to set up communication security for a BMC BladeLogic system.255.193/26 255. see Chapter 4. the RSCD agent on the server reads its secure file to determine if it has an entry for the incoming client.255.255. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 237 .224 @192.

How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents 2 Assuming the conditions described below are satisfied. If the same users have entries in both users. The agent being contacted must be running on a server that has already been added to the BMC BladeLogic system. Typically.local and users. Network Shell cannot contact an agent directly or communicate through a stand-alone Network Shell Proxy Server. the users. all users are domain users. 238 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you can map users to root on UNIX-style systems or Administrator on Windows. The users. 3 Once a connection is established between the client and server. you can map a user on a client to a user on a server. with the user= field. A Network Shell client must be communicating through a Network Shell Proxy Server.00 or later.local and users configuration files to determine if these files include any map= entries that supersede definitions set in the exports file. incoming users can only be mapped to local users. Any job acting on a target server must be running in an Application Server environment that meets the following criteria: — The Application Server must also be running a Network Shell Proxy Service or the ProxyServiceURLs value in the Application Server profile must point to a valid Network Shell Proxy Server. If any of the following conditions are not satisfied. you can map a user to a domain user.local file is used for granting user permissions on a per-agent basis rather than granting system-wide user privileges. the exports file produces no user mapping. If a role is mapped to a Windows user through an automation principal. Note that on Windows. the incoming role is granted the permissions of a local or domain user on the server and the process if complete. where the user= field can map users connecting from specified machines to a particular user on the server. the algorithm continues to step 3 ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ The agent being contacted must be running on a Windows server. For more on the exports file. On domain controllers.local and users files produce no user mapping. the users file is used to implement the permissions that are defined and granted to users on a system-wide basis through RBAC Management. however. if you are using Windows user mapping. entries in the users. — The secure file on the Application Server must be defined so the appserver_protocol option is set to ssoproxy. the system checks the exports configuration file. To take advantage of Windows user mapping. If a role is mapped to a Windows user through an automation principal. For example. see “Exports file” on page 240. Using the map= field. On Windows domain controllers.local file take precedence.0. 4 The system checks the users. The agent must be running BMC BladeLogic 8.

For example. mapped to nobody unless a corresponding entry for the root= field is found. If there is a match.” On Windows systems. Similarly. users coming in as root are. users are granted the permissions of user “Anonymous. you can use the anon= field to specify how to deal with anonymous users.How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents For more on the users and users. Similarly. user “root” on a UNIX-style client is not allowed to map to its equivalent user “root” on a UNIX-style server. the user is assigned that user’s permissions. access to the agent is denied. on Windows. Also. The anon= field is not supported for Windows. if an entry in the users file says betty map=WindowsUser then any user named betty that tries to make a connection to this machine is mapped to the local user named WindowsUser. if you are not using Windows user mapping. users. or users files. Note that. If there is no user named WindowsUser. on Windows. by default.local files” on page 247. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 239 .local. access is denied. and the user that is being mapped to does not exist. a mapping exists in the exports or users file. by default. 5 If there is no user mapping defined in the exports. be aware that the validusers= option is treated the same as the allowed= option. see “Users and users. then that user is. on Windows. then root equivalence is allowed. including rejecting them with anon=-1. In UNIX-style systems. the system maps the incoming user to a default user. the system attempts to match the user ID of the incoming user to a user ID defined on the server where the RSCD agent is installed. 6 If none of the previous steps succeed. On Windows.” Note that on UNIX. if the role is not mapped to an automation principal. If a root= field is found. any client user found to be a member of the Administrators group cannot be mapped by default to an equivalent user on the server. if an incoming user is not mapped to an automation principal and that user is a member of the Administrators group. users are granted the permissions of user “nobody.local files. mapped to Anonymous unless a corresponding entry for the root= field is found. by default. On UNIX-style systems.

as described in the following table.local files to specify individual users who are granted read/write permission on that server. When an rscd daemon starts on a server. The exports file resides in different locations in Windows and UNIX-style systems. If the exports file does not exist or it does not contain any configuration information. WINDIR can be \windows or \winnt. Access permissions are defined for each individual RSCD agent and must be configured separately on each host where the RSCD agent is running.local files to override those permissions for particular users. the exports file may still include entries that apply to Windows servers. When changes are made to the exports file. Often the exports file is used to set global permission that apply to users on all client machines. use the users or users. AIX. it automatically reads the exports file. you can use the exports file to limit all clients to readonly permission on the server. Existing client connections are not affected by the changes. Linux. Then you can use the users or users. All subsequent client connections have the access permissions defined in the modified version of the exports file. you cannot establish a connection with an agent.) The exports file does not grant permissions on Windows servers to roles that are set up for Windows user mapping. For example. Platform Solaris. the daemon automatically re-reads it. when necessary. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. If you are using Windows user mapping to grant permissions to roles. With the exports file you can set permissions on a per-client basis and. You do not have to restart the agent or otherwise instruct it to read the new exports file. For information on Windows user mapping. Updating the exports file on the host where you are running Network Shell or other BMC BladeLogic applications does not set access permissions for managed servers. Only the user mapping information in the exports file is ignored. HP-UX Windows Location /usr/lib/rsc/exports WINDIR\rsc\exports (For example. 240 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .Exports file Exports file The exports file determines which BMC BladeLogic clients have access to a server.

use the validusers option instead of the allowed= option. Option allowed=username[:username] Description This option can be used to restrict access to specific users who do not have a local account. resolvable host names. with each entry identifying client hosts and the access permissions granted to those hosts. If a single option sets multiple values. To configure the exports file.Configuring the exports file Configuring the exports file The exports file consists of multiple entries. Each option defines a type of access permission that applies to the hosts you have named in that entry.. For a complete list of available options. as in the following: validusers=user1:user2 Lines in the exports file that begin with # are considered to be comments. see “Options for exports file” on page 241.. create entries that correlate the host names of clients with the permissions that should be granted to those clients. This option is similar to the validusers option except that the users named here are not required to have an account on the local system. Subnet designations are used to define a range of addresses (see “Subnet designations” on page 236). The allowed= option is read before the validusers= option. If possible. option1.optionN is a list of comma-separated fields. separate each value with a colon.. Use the following format for each entry: hostNnames option1. Using an asterisk (*) instead of a list of host names defines default options that apply to any host not specifically named in the exports file.. Options for exports file For each of the entries in the exports file. enter options in a comma-separated list. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 241 . When defining multiple options.optionN hostNnames is a list of comma-separated IP addresses. The user names entered here should be the login names of the users on the client machines. you can apply any of the options listed below. or subnet designations.

The value entered can be numeric or a user name. If a request comes from an unknown user. If ro is not set or the host is not listed in the ro= option. If rw is not set or the host is not listed in the rw= option.Options for exports file Option anon=uid Description (UNIX only. All clients have read-only access except those listed in the rw= option. Specifying the nomknod option instructs the RSCD agent to prevent the client from making a mknod(2) call generating an EACCES (Permission denied) error. the client is denied access. a corresponding GID is searched for. clients are allowed to create special files (character special and block special). If you specify the nosuid option. The ro option takes precedence over the rw option if both are defined. the value 65534 is used. The default value for anon= is the UID of the user nobody. Root users (uid 0) are always considered “unknown” by the RSCD agent unless they are included in the root= option. the RSCD agent silently ignores any attempt to enable the setuid or setgid bits when creating a file or changing a file’s permissions. the user is treated as an anonymous user and the effective user ID is uid. If the user nobody does not exist. nomknod nosuid ro rw All clients have read-write access except those listed in the ro= option. the client is denied access. clients are allowed to create files with the setuid or setgid bits enabled and to set setuid and setgid permission via chown(2). The commands= option allows you to limit the commands a client can execute against an agent. root=hostname[:hostname] This option gives root access to root users from specified hosts. If a user name is entered.) By default. 242 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Setting anon=-1 disables anonymous access. rw=hostname[:hostname] Hosts listed in this option are granted read/write permissions. If a UID is entered. (UNIX only. If both the ro= and rw= options are defined. described below. the ro and rw options are ignored. (UNIX only. If the GID is not found. the GID is set to the GID for the user nobody. the ro and rw options are ignored. Hosts not specified have read-only permissions if ro is defined or they are listed in the ro= option. See “Restricting commands” on page 244 for more details on how to use this option. the corresponding UID and GID are determined and set accordingly. The default is for no hosts to be granted root access.) This option specifies how unknown users should be treated. Hosts not specified have read/write permissions if rw is defined or they are listed in the rw= option. The ro option takes precedence over the rw option if both are defined. If both the ro= and rw= options are defined. commands=cmd1[:cmd2] By default. BMC BladeLogic clients are allowed to execute any command against an agent. ro=hostname[:hostname] Hosts listed in this option are granted read-only permissions.) By default.

) If a numeric UID is entered.Options for exports file Option rootdir=dirname Description By default. if a user name is entered. the rscd server sets the “root” directory to dirname by making a call to or emulating chroot(2). The client command rsu allows a client to get alternate remote permissions on the agent. On Windows. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 243 . The comparison is done as a numeric equivalency and as such group names must be known on the local system to determine their corresponding GID. Group information can be provided in the form of group names or numeric GIDs. see “How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents” on page 237. but with the -p option no password is requested. the RSCD agent looks at the effective GID of the calling user (as reported by the calling host) and only allows it access if the GID is in the specified list. On UNIX. Enter user groups in a colon (:) separated list. See “How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents” on page 237 for more details. Note that on Windows domain controllers. the UID and GID for the user are determined and set accordingly. This option forces all incoming client connections to run with the permissions of username. if a user name or user account SID is entered. it is validated against a list of local users on the machine. For Windows systems. you can map a user to a domain user. If the GID is not in the list. By default the client is challenged for the user’s password. When setting rootdir= on Windows systems. If the user name that is entered is not known. If the user name entered is not known. (For more details on user privilege mapping. The user name you enter is validated against the domain users on the domain controller. access is denied. If an account is associated with a UID. This option takes precedence over the root= and anon= options if they exist. the rscd server allows the client to “see” the complete directory tree from / on down. Clients can only see files and directories from dirname on down. access to the machine is denied. If the client tries to use the rsu command with the -p option (that is. Use /etc/groups to define group names. no password challenge) and then tries to switch to a user not in the list. you can use the native file naming convention rather than a Network Shellstyle path. The single entry you provide for username can be a user name or a numeric UID (UNIX only). rsu=user[:user] user=username validgroups=groupname[:groupname] This option allows you to specify user groups that are allowed access. By specifying the rootdir= option. the connection is refused. Numeric GIDs do not have to correspond to a local group name. then its corresponding GID is also set. The rsu= entry defines which users the client is allowed to rsu without challenging them for a password. you can enter Windows user account SIDs rather than user names. default user mapping applies. then the corresponding UID on the server is used even if no known user account is associated with that UID. For each group name and/or GID entered.

For example. The RSCD agent then matches the user name/UID combination to each attempted client connection. To allow remote commands. and by the commands a user can run. kill. Remote commands do not include this safeguard. the connection is refused. The other type of command that a client can run is called a remote command (remote. For each user name and/or UID that is entered. BMC BladeLogic clients can run two types of commands. User names and UIDs must correspond to a locally known user account. and midair. including cd. ls. hostname $ mkdir //athens/tmp/foo //rome/tmp/bar Besides launching external applications. Restricting commands The RSCD agent reads entries in the exports file to determine what access permissions a calling client should have. which each have distributed capabilities. you also inherently authorize the use of all nsh internal commands against the server. Enter users in a colon (:) separated list. and netstat.) For example. The user information you provide for validusers= can be in the form of user names or numeric UIDs. set. In some circumstances you may want to restrict the commands a user can execute. false. you cannot use the commands= option to explicitly restrict their use. from the client’s perspective). A distinction exists between distributed commands and remote commands. true. If the user name and UID of the client connection does not exactly match one of the user name/UID combinations generated by the daemon. and more. You must first define the allowable distributed commands and then define the allowable remote commands. This can be done using the commands= option in the exports or users files. by user name. echo. If no corresponding user account can be found. (The process is conceptually similar to doing an rsh. remote commands include ps. the entry is ignored. To prevent individuals from renaming executables to trick the RSCD agent.Restricting commands Option validusers=username[:username] Description This option allows you to specify users who are allowed access. The order in which commands are entered and the format of the commands= field affect the way permissions are determined. the RSCD agent looks up the corresponding UID and user name to create a user name/UID combination. such as nsh. that is. Access can be limited by host or subnet. Once you use the commands= option to authorize the nsh command to run against a server. each distributed utility contains an encrypted string that is used to hard code the name of the utility into the executable. you must 244 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The first are Network Shell utilities. Given that these commands are internal to nsh. pwd. These commands do not have distributed capabilities and run remotely on the server host. the nsh utility provides access to many internal commands. df.

commands=nsh:mkdir:rmdir allows users to execute Network Shell’s internal commands as well as to create and remove directories. This command does allow the user to do things like: rome $ ls //athens/foo/ If you only want to limit the remote commands that can be executed. you can specify the full pathname of the remote executable. Then you define the remote commands. For example. This prevents users from trying to execute a different executable than the intended one. For example. the last of which should be the nexec command. commands=nexec:df:ps:netstat allows the user to execute all distributed commands but only allows the user to execute three remote commands on this host. you can leave out the list of distributed commands. In other words. In order to ensure that only the desired remote commands are executed. The entry commands=ls:nexec:ps:df allows a user to execute the remote commands ps and df but does not allow a user to cd to the host because cd is not a remote command and the nsh command has not been authorized. The decision to allow or disallow execution of a remote command is based on comparison of the effective (basename) of the command. For example. if you enter commands=nsh:nexec:/bin/ps the following commands work as expected (executing from /bin/ps): rome $ nexec athens ps -ef rome $ cd //rome/etc athens $ ps -ef Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 245 . Once the nexec entry is found. No remote commands such as ps or df are allowed. first you define the distributed commands. all subsequent commands in the list are assumed to be remote commands.Restricting commands also allow the distributed command nexec.

and it also maps their user privileges to root.rootdir=/pubs. on Windows Domain Controllers.allowed=sysadmin1:sysadmin2. map users to Administrator or the administrator account for the domain.user=root 246 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . * rw. A configuration like this is typically necessary if you are deploying BLPackages to Windows machines because you need Administrator privileges to deploy packages. granting them root access from only one host and changing the root directory to /reports: host1. * ro. Because Windows machines have no inherent concept of root. the user name entered is validated against a list of local users on the machine. When using the exports file to set up user privilege mapping on Domain Controllers.host2.Examples Examples The following example allows customers access to software updates from servers. However.host5 ro.rootdir=/reports.user=guest The following example grants read/write access to all users but turns off the setting of setuid/setgid bits and denies unknown users access.root=host1 host4.admin2 rw. a configuration entry something like this example is important if administrators working on Windows clients want to modify the configuration of UNIX servers.nosuid. need to manage remote UNIX servers. who typically work on Windows clients. It grants two users (sysadmin1 and sysadmin2) read/write permission for all servers.user=Administrator NOTE On Windows.host3 rw.anon=-1 The following example maps incoming connections from machines called admin1 and admin2 to the local user called Administrator.rootdir=/reports The following example is a configuration that could be assigned when administrators. This entry would be added to the exports file on every remote server being managed by the two administrators. The root directory for these users is set to /pubs. * rw. The following example allows both read/write and read-only access for selected hosts. This example grants read-only access to all clients and maps all incoming connections so that users have “guest” privileges. admin1. all users are domain users. The asterisk means permissions apply to all clients unless there are other entries that define different permissions for specific hosts.

168.168.10.foo.local file take precedence.) With RBAC you define the characteristics of a role and assign users to that role. The agent on a server enforces user permissions defined in an ACL by mapping incoming users to users defined on the server. but the users. In this scenario. Both the users and users.foo.local file is used for granting permissions on a per-server basis rather than granting system-wide user privileges.local file to override RBAC policy on a particular server. Typically the users.local files The users and user. If the same users have entries in both users. The users file is primarily used to implement user permissions that are defined through RBAC.1/25. Running an ACL Push Job automatically converts your role definitions and role assignments into entries in the users file on that server. you should first define the exception hosts and then define the default value for the remaining subnet.1/24 rw=@192.local files have the same format. Together these entries are called an access control list (ACL). Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 247 . when user betty attempts to connect to a server.com has read/write privileges while everybody else in the subnet (subnet mask 255.com ro @host1.com rw.local files override any permissions defined on a per-client basis in the exports file.local and users. Administrators may want to modify the users.local file is scanned before the users file. In other words.local files are defined on a per-user basis.ro=@192.255.255. @192. (For more on RBAC.foo. You can apply RBAC decisions to a server by running an ACL Push Job in the BMC BladeLogic Console.local files The following example demonstrates subnets.192) has read-only privileges. a user cannot connect to a server unless a matching user name has been defined on a server.com/26 The following is an example where an address range of 192. The permissions in the users and user.foo.10. The permissions granted in the users and user.168.local files grant access permissions to specific users connecting to a server. she must operate with the privileges already assigned to user betty on that server. In the example below the host host1.10.10.1-255 is split up so that the range from 1-127 has read/write privileges while the range 128-255 has readonly privileges.root=host1. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. host1.129/25 Users and users. entries in the users. The agent accomplishes this by doing the following: ■ Incoming users are matched to a user name on the server. If you want to have different access (ro/rw) permissions for various hosts within a subnet.Users and users.168.

If neither of the two previous techniques are possible. as described in the following table. including permissions for commands. no command authorizations for that role are pushed to the agent. no command authorizations for that role are pushed to the agent.) 248 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . For example.local files. those command authorizations are pushed to the agent.local files ■ Incoming users are mapped to a specified user name.local (For example. This means the role is authorized to perform only those commands on the agent. incoming users are automatically mapped to a user with downgraded permissions. If command authorizations are specified on the server in BMC BladeLogic Console and command authorizations are specified for the role. This means the role has full authorization to use any Network Shell and nexec commands on that server.local WINDIR\rsc\users WINDIR\rsc\users. ■ An ACL Push Job generates users file entries that grant a variety of permissions. all users connecting to a UNIX system can be mapped to root. while users connecting to a Windows system can be mapped to Administrator.local files. You do not have to restart the agent or otherwise instruct it to read the new users or users. If no command authorizations are specified on the server in BMC BladeLogic Console but command authorizations are specified for a role. the command authorizations common to both are pushed to the agent. The users and users. ■ ■ ■ When you make changes to the users or users. UNIX users are mapped to user nobody and Windows users are mapped to Anonymous.Users and users. The job uses the following algorithm to create users file entries relating to command authorizations: ■ If no command authorizations are specified on the server in the BMC BladeLogic Console and no command authorizations are specified for a role. This means the role has full authorization to use any Network Shell and nexec commands on that server. Linux. If command authorizations are specified on the server in BMC BladeLogic Console but no command authorizations are specified for a role. This means the role is authorized to perform those commands on the agent. AIX. HP-UX Windows Location /usr/lib/rsc/users /usr/lib/rsc/users. Platform Solaris. the RSCD agent automatically detects your new settings and uses them for all subsequent client connections. WINDIR can be \windows or \winnt.local files reside in different locations in Windows and UNIX-style systems.

local files” on page 251. For example.local files” on page 251. hosts=host1:host2. If an option sets multiple values.local files The users and users. Only the user mapping information in the users and users.local files Both the users and users. Each entry grants permissions to a user. The second field is a commaseparated list of permissions that apply to the user defined in the first field. The second field is a comma-separated list of permissions that apply to the user defined in the first field. If an option sets multiple values. the first field in a users file entry provides only a user name. For example. For a complete list of available permissions. separate each value with a colon. For information on Windows user mapping. the users or users. The name of a Network Shell user should match the name of the user on the client host who is attempting to make a connection to this server.Configuring the users or users. For a complete list of available permissions. For Network Shell users that are not communicating with servers through a Network Shell Proxy Server. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 249 . such as BLAdmins:BLAdmin. separate each value with a colon.local files is ignored for roles that employ Windows user mapping through automation principals. even if you are using Windows user mapping. However. Configuring the users or users. The first field provides a role and a user name.local files do not grant permissions on Windows servers to roles that are set up for Windows user mapping.local files should still include an entry for each role so that role can be granted access to a Windows server. No role is necessary because Network Shell does not recognize roles. hosts=host1:host2. see “Options for users and users. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide.local files are a list of entries. see “Options for users and users. Consequently. you should still push agent ACLs to servers when you add or modify user or role information in the BMC BladeLogic Console. The format of each entry consists of two fields. separated by a colon. All other settings still apply.

DBAdmins is the role and george and betty are users. the Network Shell entries shown above would not be necessary. Lines in the users and user. Using wild cards in the users. BMC BladeLogic places a nouser entry in the users file if that server has a property called PUSH_ACL_NO_USERS_FLAG set to true.local files that begin with # are considered to be comments.map=root rw. In this example.Configuring the users or users. Including this entry instructs a server to allow a connection from a user only when that user has been explicitly defined in the users configuration file. 250 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The entries for DBAdmins:george and DBAdmins:betty would grant george and betty access to this server. When you use an ACL Push Job to push a users file to a server. All users in the role are mapped to root. In these entries george and betty are not paired with any role # DBAdmins ACLs entries for DBAdmins role DBAdmins:george DBAdmins:betty rw. The users file can also include a nouser entry.map=root nouser If george and betty communicate with the server by means of a Network Shell Proxy Server.map=root rw. For example.map=root # NSH-only ACLs entries for Network Shell users george betty rw.local files Below is a sample users file with entries for DBAdmins:george and DBAdmins:betty.local file allows you to use a wild card in place of user names when defining role:user combinations. you could create a users file entry such as: SecOps:* rw. two more entries grant george and betty access to this server using Network Shell. This capability is unique to the users.local file The users.local file. Below these entries.map=root An entry like this grants read/write access to all users who have assumed the role of SecOpcs.

Because these roles cannot be deleted. the entry applies to the user named in the first field regardless of what host that user is connecting from. Thus an entry like the one shown above overrides any more restrictive settings defined for the role using RBAC. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 251 .) This entry tells the RSCD agent that an account with the same user name must exist on this host.local file when users are added to or removed from a group. you can temporarily allow all users in a role to access a server without first running an ACL Push Job to change the users file on that server.Options for users and users. the entries you make in the users. the corresponding entry in the exports file determines what commands the user can run. If you choose to rename the RBACAdmins or BLAdmins roles. Using wild cards for user names in the users. TIP BMC BladeLogic recommends adding an entry for RBACAdmins:RBACAdmin and BLAdmins:BLAdmin to the users.local files provide the following options that you can use to assign access permissions to users: Option Description commands=cmd1[:cmd2 . See “Restricting commands” on page 244 for more details on the use of this field.] This is a list of colon (:) separated commands that the user is allowed to execute on the local host. If no hosts field is provided.local file is a capability that should be used sparingly.. This entry tells the RSCD agent that permissions should only apply if the user named in the first field is connecting from one of the hosts in this list of colon (:) separated host names and/or addresses..local file override entries in the users file. running an ACL Push Job may first require a lengthy change control process.local file for every server.local files Identifying users with a wild card provides some benefits. Entries in the users.. Options for users and users. You do not have to update entries in the users.local files The users and users. By performing a modification like this. exists hosts=hosts1[:host2 .] (Unix only.local file should reflect those naming decisions. they provide a way to access a server in case you accidentally revoke everyone else’s permissions for that server. Using a wild card like this also lets you authorize all members of a role to perform certain types of actions.. In some organizations. If no commands= option is given.

Examples Option map=username Description This entry forces incoming client connections to run with the permissions of username. For Windows systems. Because no hosts field is provided. By default. (Unix only. If the client tries to use the rsu command with the -p option (that is. the RSCD agent allows the client to “see” the complete directory tree from / on down. chroot(2). the first and second entries in the users file grant read/ write access to user1 and user2. The client command rsu allows a client to get alternate remote permissions on the agent. the RSCD agent silently ignores any attempt to enable the setuid or setgid bits when creating a file or changing a file’s permissions. do not associate those users with a role but do 252 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . or emulating. nomknod nosuid nouser ro rootdir=dirname rsu=user1[:user2 . This is a special user name that denies user access to the server unless the user has an entry specifically configured in the users or users. The named user has read/write access. no password challenge) and then tries to switch to a user not in the list. clients are allowed to create files with the setuid or setgid bits enabled and to set setuid and setgid permission via chown(2). the RSCD agent sets the “root” directory to dirname by making a call to. Clients can then see files and directories from dirname on down.) By default..) By default. see “How BMC BladeLogic grants access to RSCD agents” on page 237. For more information. The third and fourth entries. By specifying the rootdir entry. you can enter a Windows user account SID rather than a user name. who are associated with the role of SrAdmin. The rsu= entry defines which users the client is allowed to rsu without challenging them for a password. server access is limited to users specifically included in the users or users. The named user has read-only access.. Specifying the nomknod option instructs the RSCD agent to prevent the client from making an mknod(2) call. clients are allowed to create special files (character special and block special).local files.local files. By default the client is challenged for the respective user’s password but with the -p option no password is requested. Both users are mapped to Administrator on this server. user1 and user2 can access this server from any other server. access is denied. When the nouser name is included in the users or users.] rw validuser Examples In the following example.local file. (Unix only. This entry tells the daemon that the user name/UID/GID combination of the remote (incoming) user must match a user name/UID/GID combination on the local host. which are for user1 and user2. generating an EACCES (Permission denied) error. If you specify the nosuid option.

user2 is granted read-only permission. BMC BladeLogic Application Server.local file grants read/write access to user1 and user2 if they are connecting from either host1 or host2 and they have a local account with the same user name and user ID as they do on the host from which they are connecting. If user2 is not connecting from host1 or host2. The secure file on the server defines parameters that the RSCD agent uses to communicate with BMC BladeLogic applications on clients.rw.map=user3 ro The following example in the users. The last entry forbids access to all users who are not specified in the users file. If user1 is not connecting from host1 or host2.map=Administrator JrAdmin:user3 ro.local files” on page 247).local file grants read/write access to user1 and user2 and forbids access to all other users.Secure file map them to user Administrator.validuser rw. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 253 .local files control user access to servers (see “Exports file” on page 240 and “Users and users. and users.validuser hosts=host1:host2.map=Administrator user1 rw.map=Anonymous nouser The following example in the users. who is associated with the role of JrAdmin and is mapped to Anonymous on this server. SrAdmin:user1 rw. then user1 is only given access to the /data directory and granted the permissions of user3. The secure file for a client application defines parameters that BMC BladeLogic applications use to communicate with the RSCD agent on a server.map=Administrator SrAdmin:user2 rw. users. user1 user2 rw rw nouser Secure file The secure file defines how BMC BladeLogic applications for a client installation and the RSCD agent on a server communicate with each other. These entries are used for granting permissions to Network Shell users. user1 user2 user1 user2 hosts=host1:host2. In this discussion.map=Administrator user2 rw.rootdir=/data.rw. or Network Shell Proxy Server that communicates directly with an RSCD agent or repeater. The exports. a client application can be a Network Shell client. The fifth entry grants read-only access to user3.

and the secure file When a BMC BladeLogic application on a client attempts to connect to an RSCD daemon on a server. If an entry for the target server exists in the secure file. Always use the secadmin utility to modify the secure file. each with their own secure file. Using the secadmin utility ensures that the secure file is formatted correctly. you need only modify the secure file to establish how data is communicated between clients and servers. The port number can be set with an entry in the Internet services databases (for example. client and server processes communicate via TCP/IP port 4750 with the server process listening on all configured NIC (Network Interface Card) addresses. the application first checks the secure file for a client to see how the connection should be established.Clients. see “Using the secadmin utility” on page 258. servers. servers. The following table shows how the location of the secure file on Windows varies between the first instance and all subsequent instances. the application searches for an entry 254 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . On Windows. For simpler security installations. you can have multiple instances of BMC BladeLogic client applications. the application checks the secure file to see if and how the connection should be redirected and whether data should be encoded. Clients. encrypted. the default location for the second instance of BMC BladeLogic would be \windows or \winnt. /etc/services). and the secure file By default. as described in the following table. “Administering security” for a full description of all the procedures needed to implement security in a BMC BladeLogic system. Name and location of secure file for first instance of BMC BladeLogic /usr/lib/rsc/secure Platform Solaris Linux AIX HP-UX Windows Name and location of secure file for additional instances Not applicable WINDIR\rsc\secure installDirectoryN\version\NSH\conf\secure For example. The secure file resides in different locations in Windows and UNIX-style systems. Stronger security requires additional modifications to a system. WINDIR can be For example. See Chapter 4. C:\Program Files\BMC Software\ BladeLogic2\version\NSH. If an entry for the remote host is not found. For more information. or sent as clear text.

) If the secure file does not include an entry for the remote host or a default entry. the agent uses the connection parameters defined in that entry. as described in “Options for secure file” on page 258). TCP is a bi-directional virtual circuit protocol. For a more detailed description of the capabilities of this suite. the daemon listens by default to port 4750 (or as otherwise defined in the Internet services databases). the RSCD daemon again refers to the secure file to determine what data encoding/encryption it should expect from the client host. The RSCD daemon cannot listen to a port on a list of specified NICs. which automatically negotiates the strongest form of encryption that clients and servers can support. BMC BladeLogic clients and RSCD agents use the TLS_RSA_WITH_AES_256_CBC_SHA cipher suite. If no entry for the connecting host is found. Configuring the secure file When configuring the secure file. the software treats it as a special entry used by the RSCD daemon. that connection is used to both send and receive data. protocol 5 uses Transport Layer Security (TLS). you can make three types of entries: ■ ■ default rscd Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 255 . see “Configuring the secure file” on page 255. The RSCD first checks for an entry for the connecting host. (For more on configuring entries in the secure file. It looks for an entry for a host named rscd. it can only listen on one NIC or all NICs. If an entry is not found. When a client establishes a connection. If an rscd entry is found. establishes rules for communication between BMC BladeLogic clients and Application Servers and the RSCD agent. when a client establishes a connection to an RSCD daemon on a server. the attempt to establish a connection is aborted. As such. see “Configuring the secure file” on page 255. Communication protocol Protocol 5. The rscd entry can specify which port and address to listen to for connection requests and it can specify default communication parameters. the daemon uses the default values from the rscd entry.) The RSCD daemon can listen on a specified port on all available NICs or a particular NIC (specified using the host= field.Communication protocol called default to determine how the connection to the remote host should be made. In other words. see “Session layer security” on page 118. If such an entry exists. To determine where to listen for connection requests. the successor to SSL. the RSCD daemon consults the secure file on the server. (For more on configuring the rscd entry. By default. the BMC BladeLogic default communication protocol.

It defines standard connection parameters that are used for an RSCD agent on a server communicating with clients when those clients are not included in the list of host entries on the server’s secure file. or the RSCD agent. 256 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . When you initially install Network Shell. The default entry specifies that the client use protocol 5 and instructs clients and servers to communicate using the TLS protocol for secure communication....Configuring the secure file ■ host Always use the secadmin utility to configure the secure file. Each option in the list defines a parameter for communicating with all servers that do not have a host entry specifically defined for them. the BMC BladeLogic consoles. For a complete list of available options. a default entry is automatically created in the secure file. The default entry also designates the default port as 4750. An rscd entry in the secure file uses the following format: rscd:option1:option2:option3. see “Using the secadmin utility” on page 258. see “Options for secure file” on page 258.. The default entry that is automatically generated in a client’s secure file reads as follows: default:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls rscd entry The secure file allows for another special host name called rscd. where optionN is a list of colon-separated fields. It defines connection parameters for servers that otherwise do not have an entry in the secure file. The secadmin utility encrypts any keys needed for data encryption and guarantees that the secure file is formatted correctly. A default entry in the secure file uses the following format: default:option1:option2:option3. Creating an rscd entry is an easy way to define the same communication parameters for all of the servers in your system that are not otherwise configured in the secure file. Default entry The secure file allows for a special host name called default. Creating a default entry is an easy way to define the same communication parameters for multiple servers without having to configure entries for each of those servers. For more information.

Host entries in the secure file on a client set connection parameters that define how that client communicates with individual servers. hostName can be a resolvable host name. The rscd entry also designates the default port as 4750. Use the following format for each entry: hostName:option1:option2:option3. To configure host entries in the secure file. see “Options for secure file” on page 258.. create entries that define parameters for a connection with a particular host.Configuring the secure file where optionN is a list of colon-separated fields. You must make corresponding entries in the secure file on both the client and server to establish a connection between client and server. optionN is a list of colon-separated fields. or subnet designation. For a complete list of available options. Each option in the list defines a parameter for communicating with all agents that do not have a host entry specifically defined for them. where. an rscd entry is automatically created in the secure file. The rscd entry specifies that the RSCD agent use protocol 5 and instructs clients and servers to communicate using the TLS protocol for secure communication. Subnet designations are used to define a range of addresses (see “Subnet designations” on page 236). NOTE If you change the RSCD agent port number in the secure file. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 257 . For a complete list of available options. you must restart both the Application Server as well as the RSCD agent on the system(s) where you changed the secure file for the change to take effect. The rscd entry that is automatically generated in the secure file on a server reads as follows: rscd:port=4750:protocol=5:tls_mode=encryption_only:encryption=tls Host entries Host entries in the secure file on a server set connection parameters that define how that server communicates with individual clients. When you initially install an RSCD agent on a server. IP address. see “Options for secure file” on page 258. Each option defines a parameter for communicating with the host (or subnet) named in hostName. hostName is the host with which the client or server is communicating..

the secadmin utility lets you modify entries in the securecert file. or delete entries in a secure file. host3. you must use secadmin to modify the secure file on host2. or delete default or rscd entries in the secure file. Options for secure file An entry in the secure file can include the following fields: 258 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . and host4. you would use secadmin to make the following additions to the secure file on host1: secadmin -a host2 -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls secadmin -a host3 -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls secadmin -a host4 -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls Next. and host4 by entering the following command on each of those servers: secadmin -m host1 -p 5 -T encryption_only -e tls If you are using secadmin on a server where Network Shell is not installed. Example If you are using protocol 5 and you want to specify TLS-style encryption between a client called host1 and three servers called host2. you must include the full path to the secadmin utility when running a secadmin command. you can create. see the man page for secadmin. host3. you can find secadmin in the following locations: ■ UNIX: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/secadmin Windows: C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\RSCD\secadmin ■ For a complete description of the secadmin utility.Options for secure file Using the secadmin utility With the secadmin utility. By default. modify. Additionally. modify. You can also create.

The default value. In a LAN environment the overhead required for compressing and uncompressing data is usually greater than the time saved transferring compressed data. For more on Network Shell Proxy Servers. data is not compressed. This is the default value for appserver_protocol. set value to a number between 1 and 9. the host= field determines the address to which the agent should listen for client connections. then it will be the responsibility of the of the remote daemon to forward the data to an RSCD daemon and also return any data it may return. encryption=type host=value keepalive=value Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 259 . If TCP keep-alives are not sent. the host= field can be used to redirect data between hosts. If the remote daemon to which the data is being sent is not another RSCD daemon. This field specifies whether the agent should send TCP keepalive messages to the other side of a connection. Possible values for this field are yes or no. is yes. however. This field determines the type of data encryption that should be used. This field is used differently. If a system has a single NIC card. You can set protocol to the following: ssoproxy Use the single sign-on functionality when communicating with the Network Shell Proxy Server. sessions may hang indefinitely leaving hung processes or threads on the agent. which specifies that BMC BladeLogic should automatically negotiate an encryption method (usually AES). that better compression is more CPU intensive. By default. you do not have to set this field because the agent automatically listens on the default system NIC card (address).Options for secure file Option Description appserver_protocol=protocol This field specifies the authentication protocol used when communicating with a Network Shell Proxy Server. depending on whether a secure file entry defines the special host name rscd: ■ When applied to an rscd entry. Set this field to tls. where a higher number calls for better compression. Be aware. ■ When applied to a non-rscd entry. see “Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service” on page 142. if unset. compression=value This field sets a data compression level. Typically you should use compression when communicating through a thin pipe. If keep-alive messages are sent. the connecting system will notice the death of a connection or a machine crash. If you want to use data compression. The host= field should only be used for systems with multiple NIC cards (real or virtual) so you can select the NIC (address) to which the RSCD agent should listen.

Options for secure file

Option lock=value

Description When set to a non-zero positive value, this field determines the maximum number of times a bad connection is allowed from a source address before the address is locked. A bad connection can happen if encryption is not set up properly or a particular host is not granted access. The address is locked for a period of time as defined by the unlock= field (see below). This field can be used to redirect data to a port other than the default port of 4750. On most UNIX systems, access to port numbers under 1024 requires root permissions. When selecting an alternate port number, make sure it does not conflict with some other existing service. Also, when using this field, make sure that both the client and server machines are configured to use the same port number. This field determines the transport protocol used for communication between BMC BladeLogic applications and the RSCD agent. Protocol 5, the default protocol, uses the TLS protocol (TLS is the successor to SSL) for communication between client and server. This field identifies the authentication profile that should be used to provide session credentials to Network Shell when communicating with a Network Shell Proxy Server. If you need to use multiple Network Shell Proxy Servers, you can set up a different secure file entry for each profile. Using the BL_AUTH_PROFILE_NAME environment variable, you can override the value defined with this field. For more on Network Shell Proxy Servers, see “Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service” on page 142. This field provides the Network Shell-style path to the file containing authentication profile definitions, which are necessary when Network Shell communicates with a Network Shell Proxy Server. Using the BL_AUTH_PROFILES_FILE, you can override the value defined with this option. For more on Network Shell Proxy Server, see “Configuring the Network Shell Proxy Service” on page 142. When first contacting a remote server, the TCP protocol may continue to contact an offline or unavailable server for several minutes before finally giving up and reporting that a server is unavailable. This option lets you set the maximum number of seconds that a client will wait before giving up. The default value is 30 seconds. This timeout mechanism is implemented within the BMC BladeLogic code and does not in any way alter any system wide TCP parameters. If the operating system has an effective TCP timeout less than the value defined here, the OS value will take precedence.

port=value

protocol=value

auth_profile=profile

auth_profiles_file=filename

timeout=secs

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Examples

Option tls_mode=value

Description When using protocol 5, this field specifies one of the following values: encryption_only Use the TLS protocol to autonegotiate an encryption type (that is, a cipher) and then use that cipher to communicate. Client-side authentication or certificates are not required. Use TLS for encryption and clientside authentication. This option requires a certificate. For more on certificates, see “Implementing security – Application Server to agents or repeaters” on page 202.

encryption_and_auth

unlock=value

This field is used in conjunction with the lock= field, which allows you to lock out IP addresses that repeatedly fail to connect to the (RSCD agent) server. These failures are limited to encryption misconfigurations and host authorization errors. With the unlock= field, you can specify how many minutes the IP address should be locked before allowing connection attempts to resume. If value is a negative number, the IP address is locked until the RSCD agent is restarted. The default value for unlock= is 1 minute. This field turns off X11 forwarding. By default this field is set to on and X11 forwarding is enabled for this agent. This field defines an offset from 6000, and together these values specify the port that the agent binds to for X11 forwarding. By default X11 forwarding starts at port 6010 (6000 plus an offset of 10). Any new connections afterwards increments the offset by one (that is, 6011, 6012, and so forth).

x11_fwd=on |off x11_port_offset=value

Examples
The following examples are meant to serve as sample uses of the fields available in a secure file. To generate entries in a secure file like those shown below, use the secadmin utility. Using the secadmin utility ensures that the secure file is formatted correctly. For more information, see “Using the secadmin utility” on page 258. The following example shows a typical default entry for BMC BladeLogic clients.
default:port=4750:protocol=5:encryption=tls

The following example shows a subnet in an entry:
@192.168.12.13/24:protocol=5:encryption=tls

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Securecert file

The following example instructs a Network Shell client to communicate with a Network Shell Proxy Server using an authentication profile called QAProfile. The authentication profile is stored in the default location for the authentication profile file: default:protocol=5:encryption=tls:appserver_protocol=ssoproxy: auth_profile=QAProfile:auth_profiles_file=/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/br/ authenticationProfiles.xml The following example shows how to use a port other than the default port of 4750. If you use host1 as the client host and host2 as the remote host, the following entry should be in the secure file of host1
host2:port=987

while the following entry should be in the secure file of host2:
host1:port=987

The following example shows how to instruct the RSCD agent to listen on a specific address for client connections: rscd:host=192.168.10.20

Securecert file
The securecert file stores passphrases used to encrypt the private keys for X.509 certificates. By storing passphrases in the securecert file, BMC BladeLogic can access those passphrases without any user interaction. Accessing passwords noninteractively is essential for setting up secure, certificate-based communication with an Application Server. It is also necessary when using secure communication to deploy assets via repeaters (that is, with an indirect deployment). When setting up a securecert file for an Application Server, you must provide an entry for the owner of the process that communicates securely with repeaters and servers. The owner of the process is bladmin on UNIX-style systems and SYSTEM on Windows. When setting up a securecert file for a repeater, you must provide an entry for all users that communicate with servers. On UNIX-style systems, you must provide an entry for any users to whom other users are mapped (typically root). On Windows, you must provide an entry for the user named BMC BladeLogicRSCD. For more information on using the securecert file while setting up security for a BMC BladeLogic system, see Chapter 4, “Administering security.”.

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Configuring the securecert file

The securecert file resides in different locations on Windows and UNIX-style systems, as described in the following table. On Windows, you can have multiple instances of BMC BladeLogic client applications, each with their own securecert file. The following table shows how the location of the securecert file on Windows varies between the first instance and all subsequent instances.
Name and location of securecert file for first Name and location of securecert file for instance of BMC BladeLogic additional instances /usr/lib/rsc/securecert Not applicable

Platform Solaris Linux AIX HP-UX Windows

WINDIR\rsc\securecert For example, WINDIR can be \windows or \winnt.

installDirectoryN\version\NSH\conf\ securecert For example, the default location for the second instance of BMC BladeLogic would be C:\Program Files\BMC Software\ BladeLogic2\version\NSH.

Configuring the securecert file
When configuring a securecert file, you can make entries for the Application Server and repeaters. On the Application Server, create an entry like the following for the owner of the process that communicates securely with repeaters and servers:
[Default] processOwner=********

where processOwner is bladmin for UNIX-style systems and SYSTEM for Windows. You must use the secadmin utility to modify a securecert file. (For more on secadmin, see “Using the secadmin utility” on page 258 or the man page for secadmin). To create an entry like the one shown above using the secadmin utility, enter the following command:
secadmin -m default -cu bladmin -cp password

Enter the password in clear text. The secadmin utility encrypts the password. On repeaters, create an entry like the following for the administrative user that communicates with servers:

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BMC BladeLogic log file reference

[Default] adminUser=********

where adminUser is typically root for UNIX-style systems and BladeLogicRSCD for Windows. Using the secadmin utility to create the entry like the one shown above, enter the following command:
secadmin -m default -cu root -cp password

BMC BladeLogic log file reference
About logging configuration for BMC BladeLogic
BMC BladeLogic uses log4j to capture log messages from the console and the BMC BladeLogic Application Server. Log4j is an open source logging framework used to control logging output from Java applications. For more information on log4j, see http://jakarta.apache.org/log4j/docs/. Unless instructed otherwise by BladeLogic Support, the default logging configuration is recommended for normal operation. BladeLogic Support may ask the Application Server Administrator to enable DEBUG logging for a single logger when debugging a particular issue. This change will typically be backed out once the requested DEBUG information has been gathered.

Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files
A standard BMC BladeLogic installation provides default logging behavior that satisfies the needs of many organizations. Defaults vary for Windows and UNIX-style systems. The default behavior for Windows is:

The RSCD agent logs to rscdInstallDirectory\rscd.log as a rollfile at the info1 level. The RSCD agent service logs to rscdInstallDirectory\rscdsvc.log as a rollfile at the info level. BLPackage Deploy Jobs log at the debug level to locations based on the name and location of the jobs.

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Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files

BLPackage Deploy Jobs on the console log to stdout as a stream at the debug level. The priority level can be overridden using Transaction Options when defining the BLPackage Deploy Job. For more information, see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. The Application Server logs to installDirectory\br\appserver.log as a stream at the info level.

The default behavior for UNIX is:

The RSCD agent logs to rscdInstallDirectory/log/rscd.log as a rollfile at the info1 level. BLPackage Deploy Jobs log at the debug level to locations based on the name and location of the jobs. BLPackage Deploy Jobs on the console log to stdout as a stream at the debug level. The priority level can be overridden using Transaction Options when defining the BLPackage Deploy Job. For more information, see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. The Application Server logs to installDirectory/br/appserver.log as a stream at the info level.

Table 1 lists the various log files that are used by BMC BladeLogic which may be of interest to you. Table 1 Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files (part 1 of 3)
Description and default location Application Server appserver.log Application Server log installDirectory/br/appserver.log Infrastructure Management => AppServer Launcher => Edit AppServer LogfileName attribute installDirectory/br/deployments/ deploymentName/log4j.properties AppServerLauncher.log AppServer Launcher log installDirectory/br/ AppServerLauncher.log post_install.log Application Server configuration log installDirectory/br/post_install.log installDirectory/br/deployments/ deploymentName/log4j.properties installDirectory/br/deployments/ _template/log4j.properties Where to configure

Log file name

Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files

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Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files

Table 1

Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files (part 2 of 3)
Description and default location Application Server Console log installDirectory/br/Console.log Where to configure Infrastructure Management => AppServer Launcher => Edit AppServer ConsoleLogfileName attribute installDirectory/deployments/ deploymentName/log4j.properties RSCD Agent (Windows)

Log file name Console.log

rscd.log*

Windows RSCD Agent log rscdInstallDirectory\rscd.log

rscdInstallDirectory\log4crc.txt

keystroke.log*

nexec session log rscdInstallDirectory\keystroke.log*

rscdInstallDirectory\log4crc.txt

rscdsvc.log*

RSCD agent service rscdInstallDirectory\rscdsvc.log

rscdInstallDirectory\log4crc.txt

*.log

Deploy Job log rscdInstallDirectory\Transactions\log\*.log RSCD Agent (UNIX)

rscdInstallDirectory\log4crc.txt

rscd.log*

UNIX RSCD Agent log rscdInstallDirectory/log/rscd.log

rscdInstallDirectory/log4crc.txt

keystroke.log*

nexec session log rscdInstallDirectory/log/keystroke.log*

rscdInstallDirectory/log4crc.txt

*.log

Deploy Job log rscdInstallDirectory/Transaction/log/*.log RCP Client (Windows)

rscdInstallDirectory/log4crc.txt

.log

BMC BladeLogic Console log WindowsHomeDirectory\BladeLogic\ 1_1_2\Workspacen\.metadata\.log

installDirectory\br\rcp.cf

BLWorkbenchPlugin.log BLWorkbenchPlugin log WindowsHomeDirectory\BladeLogic\ 1_1_2\Workspacen\.metadata\.plugins\ com.bladelogic.client.ui\ BLWorkbenchPlugin.log RCP Client (UNIX) .log BMC BladeLogic Console log /root/.bladelogic/1_1_2/Workspacen/ .metadata/.log 266 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide

installDirectory\br\rcp.cf

installDirectory/br/rcp.cf

log installDirectory/br/deployments/ _pxe/log4j.bladelogic/1_1_2/Workspacen/ .log* TFTP Server log installDirectory/br/tftpsvr. By default.cf /.log PXE server pxesrvr.properties installDirectory/br/tftpsvr.properties configuration file. the file is located in installDirectory/br/deployments/deploymentName/log4j.log file. Within the configuration files for each specific deployment.log* tftpsvr.log BLCLI (UNIX) blcli.cf Log file name BLWorkbenchPlugin.bladelogic/blcli.log BLCLI UNIX log /.properties file. also located in the Application Server installation directory for the specific deployment. The following sections provide information on the log4j.cf Application Server logging Logging is controlled at the Application Server instance level.Application Server logging Table 1 Overview of BMC BladeLogic log files (part 3 of 3) Description and default location Where to configure installDirectory/br/rcp.plugins/ com.log BLCLI Windows log C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Application Data\BladeLogic\blcli.log* BLCLI (Windows) blcli. logging is controlled by the log4j.properties By default.bladelogic.client.cf C:\Documents and Settings\Administrator\Application Data\BladeLogic\blcli-log. Application Server logging output is written to the appserver.ui/ BLWorkbenchPlugin.log BLWorkbenchPlugin log /root/.log* PXE Server log installDirectory/br/pxesrvr.bladelogic/blcli-log. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 267 .metadata/. which is located in the Application Server installation directory for that deployment.

R. Table 2 Attribute Log Files Location Modifying basic Application Server logging attributes Description You can set the log file location using the log4j. There are comments within the file describing other options not defined here. This option instructs the log4j system to use the specified path for logging. You can enable logging of performance-related information pertaining to the Application Server. the maximum log file size is 5000KB. Maximum file size Number of roll-over files Performance logging Timing for Deploy Jobs Content Authoring Log configuration Additional debug logging The log4j. locate the Content Authoring related debug logs section in the file and uncomment the lines in that section. specifying the relative or full path of the log file.properties file can also control where the logging information is stored and how the log files are managed. the log4j.MaxBackupIndex option.properties file. When a log file reaches its maximum size. Modifying basic logging attributes Table 2 on page 268 describes some of the basic log attributes that can be controlled by modifying options in the log4j. locate the BlDeploy appserver performance logging section in the file and uncomment the lines in that section. To do so.properties file contains a large list of loggers that can be configured to add useful debug information. the maximum number of roll-over files is 5.appender. You can enable logging of timing information pertaining to the Deploy Jobs.R. You can set the maximum file size for the log file using the log4j.properties In addition to controlling the logging information. This section describes how to manipulate some of the basic properties of the configuration file. When debugging specific issues with the system. To do so. To do so.Application Server logging Modifying logging configuration using log4j. you can modify one or more of the specified loggers in the file to set the log level to DEBUG. These loggers are initially configured with the log level INFO to prevent the log files from containing too much information. 268 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . By default. By default.appender.File option. locate the timing for deploy jobs section in the file and uncomment the lines in that section. You can enable logging of Content Authoring debug information.R. You can set the number of roll-over files using the log4j. This value controls how many backup files will be retained.MaxFileSize option. a backup file will be made and a new log file will be created.appender.

com. 2 Expand the hierarchy of the Application Servers node. Modifying log file names from the BMC BladeLogic Console You can also modify basic logging options for the Application Server from the BMC BladeLogic Console.bladelogic. To enable basic debug logging 1 Open the log4j.logger.com. from the Configuration menu. C Once saved. ■ log4j.logger.DBServiceImpl – This logger controls messages generated by the database service.properties file.app. The Edit Application Server Profile dialog opens. 2 Locate the following line: log4j. the following options in the log4j. the application server will automatically detect the logging level modification after a short period of time and being logging data in debug mode. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 269 .Demux – This logger controls messages generated by the networking layer.bladelogic.rootLogger=DEBUG.rootLogger=INFO. R.properties file for additional information on these logger options.db.demux. For example. select Infrastructure Management. R. There are many logger options that give you the ability to enable debug logging for very specific tasks. 3 Right-click the Application Server you want to edit and select Edit. C 3 Modify the line to read: log4j.properties file control loggers that are useful for debugging: ■ log4j.mfw. See the comment lines in the log4j.Application Server logging NOTE Debugging issues with the Application Server often require assistance by BMC BladeLogic Customer Support. 1 In the BMC BladeLogic Console.

This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. To disable console logging.log extension. 7 Start or restart the Application Server to have changes take effect. If you edit this attribute. 270 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Attribute ConsoleLogfileName Description The name of the console log file for the Application Server. The console. BMC BladeLogic sets the console log file’s name to the Application Server name plus “_console”.log file. Enabling more detailed logging In addition to the appserver. You can set the number of roll-over files for the console log file in the log4j. click OK. specify a name that is unique on the host. For example.properties file accessed from the _template deployment directory (/br/ deployments/_template/log4j. specify a name that is unique on the host. add or change values for the following attributes. 5 When you are finished editing the profile. When you create a new Application Server.log file is useful for debugging when certain output is not captured by the regular log files.log. BMC BladeLogic sets the log file’s name to the Application Server name plus the . LogfileName The name of the log file for the Application Server. information such as the java thread dump and any messages generated by third party code used by the Application Server that logs messages to standard out/err. an Application Server running on Linux or Solaris can be configured to write all the standard output and standard error information into a file called console. The console log file contains all information logged to the Application Server log. The console.properties). As with the Application Server log files. When you create a new Application Server. plus any information logged to the console.log file contains the same information as the appserver.Application Server logging 4 In the Edit Application Server Profile dialog.log file. set the ConsoleLogfileName to be empty. This convention avoids conflicts when there are multiple Application Servers on the same host. If you edit this attribute. Console logging is enabled by default. the console log files are configured to rollover. 6 Click OK on the warning that configuration changes do not take effect until you restart the Application Server. but in addition it also captures any output that does not go through the log4j logging system.

Collecting log data You can use the Support Data Generation tool to capture log data that you can then send to BMC Software Customer Support. Additional log files of interest Additionally. and what sort of layout the contents of each log should use. You access the tool from the BMC BladeLogic Console by selecting Configuration => Generate Support Data. which logs messages from the BMC BladeLogic Console.properties file located in the PXE server deployment (_pxe directory). PXE Server logging The log file for the PXE Server is controlled with the log4j. where each log file is generated. For detailed information. By modifying XML tags in log4crc.org/log4j/docs/. which logs messages from the TFTP server.txt file allows you to control Agent logging in BMC BladeLogic so that all Agent events are logged using consistent formats.txt file is XML-based. The Generate Support Data tool generates data about the Application Servers and other components in the BMC BladeLogic environment and packages that data into a zip file. see http://jakarta.txt. see “About the Log4crc.apache. you can control which log files BMC BladeLogic generates.txt file” on page 272.Agent logging Agent logging The log4crc.log. tftpsvr. ■ For more information on log4j.cf—Configures ui. The log4crc. see “Generating data for support” on page 19.log. how often logs are rotated. how much information is included in each file. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 271 . For specific instructions. This data can be useful for diagnostic purposes when you contact Customer Support. BMC BladeLogic uses the following configuration files (all found in installDirectory/br) to control logging with log4j: ■ ui.cf—Configures tftpsvr.

txt file is used to control Agent logging. logging level.txt file The log4crc. The following table shows how the location of the log4crc. Syntax The syntax of the log4crc. NOTE The log4crc.txt For example.txt file for additional instances Not applicable WINDIR\rsc\log4crc.txt file allows you to control Agent logging in BMC BladeLogic so that all Agent events are logged using consistent formats. you can have multiple instances of BMC BladeLogic client applications. you can control which log files BMC BladeLogic generates.txt file. see “Application Server logging” on page 267. each with their own log4crc.About the Log4crc. The log4crc. Name and location of log4crc.txt For example.txt Platform Solaris Linux AIX HP-UX Windows Name and location of log4crc.txt. The log appender.txt file for first instance of BMC BladeLogic /usr/lib/rsc/log4crc. For Application Server logging. how much information is included in each file.txt file resides in different locations on Windows and UNIX-style systems. the default location for the second instance of BMC BladeLogic would be C:\Program Files\BMC Software\ BladeLogic2\version\NSH. On Windows.properties file. as described in the following table.txt file on Windows varies between the first instance and all subsequent instances. The log4crc. WINDIR can be \windows or \winnt. By modifying XML tags in log4crc. you control logging attributes using the Infrastructure Management window on the BMC BladeLogic Console and in the Application Server profiles of each default and custom profiles.txt file is XML-based. and logging format for Application Server logs are controlled using the log4j. where each log file is generated.txt file About the Log4crc. how often logs are rotated. and what sort of layout the contents of each log should use. For more information. installDirectoryN\version\NSH\conf \log4crc.txt file consists of three tags: <category> <appender> <layout> 272 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

see “Enabling keystroke logging” on page 283. The following table identifies the possible priority levels: Priority fatal error warn info Description Logs only fatal errors. rscdsvc bldeploy bldeployConsole bldeployAppserver The priority= option specifies the amount of information included in a log. This option only applies to Windows installations. The following list shows the <category> tags included by default in the log4crc. Logs only connection information. Logs all errors. Do not modify this <category> tag. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 273 . The following table identifies all possible names: Name rscd keystroke Description Generates a log for the RSCD agent. priority. Do not modify this <category> tag. and appender. By default. A category managed internally by Deploy Job executables.log" debugappender="stderr"/> <category name="bldeploy" priority="debug"/> <category name="bldeployConsole" priority="debug" appender="stdout"/> <categoryname="bldeployAppserver"priority="error"appender="blbasic"/> The name= option identifies the type of log file BMC BladeLogic generates. Generates a log for the RSCD agent server. Do not modify this <category> tag. Agitator managed internally by Deploy Job executables.About the Log4crc.log" debugappender="stderr"/> <!-category name="keystroke" priority="info1" appender="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/keystroke.txt file category The <category> tag identifies the types of logging that BMC BladeLogic generates. which monitors the RSCD agent and restarts the agent if necessary. Generates a keystroke log that records nexec sessions. this is disabled (commented out).txt file in a Windows installation. <category name="root" priority="info"/> <category name="rscd" priority="info1" appender="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/ BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscd. Uncomment it to enable keystroke logging. For more information. Agitator managed internally by Deploy Job executables. Logs all warnings and errors. The <category> tag can include three options: name. Default values vary somewhat for UNIX-style installations. including fatal errors.log"/--> <category name="rscdsvc" priority="info" appender="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/ BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscdsvc.

the current log file is renamed to rscd. Enter the path using a UNIX or Windows format. the file is renamed with a number appended to its name. usually to prevent log files from getting excessively large. This priority is only valid for the RSCD agent log (that is. Do not use a Network Shell-style path. the <category> tag named rscd). as well as all the system calls that an RSCD agent performs to execute user actions. 274 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . rscd.log is renamed to rscd. This priority corresponds to logging level 1 in older releases of BMC BladeLogic. appender The <appender> tag specifies whether logging information is stored as a stream in a file or periodically rolled over into a new file. When the log file is rolled again. This priority corresponds to logging level 2 in older releases of BMC BladeLogic. Logs connection information and user actions.log.log1.log1.About the Log4crc. the <category> tag named rscd). info2 debug Note that keystroke logs (where name is set to keystroke) support only the following options: Priority info info1 info2 Description Logs only the STDIN stream of the command being run by nexec.txt file Priority info1 Description Logs connection information and user actions.log file. and all new information is recorded in rscd. For example. The appender= tag provides a name and path for a log file. Logs the STDIN and STDERR streams of the command being run by nexec.log1 is renamed to rscd. When a log file is rolled. STDERR. and STDOUT streams of the command being run by nexec. All new information is then recorded in the rscd. Logs the STDIN. Logs all messages. The <appender> tag also lets you specify secure agent logging and keystroke logging.log2. rscd. This priority is only valid for the RSCD agent log (that is. You can specify that log files are rolled at specified intervals or when log files reach a particular size.

The following table identifies the possible types: NOTE You can only roll log files when one source of logging data is being used to create a log file.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/> <!-appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/ rscd. If multiple sources are output to the same log.pem"/--> <appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscdsvc.log" type="encrypt" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="rawtime" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. you must configure the UNIX syslog daemon (see “Configuring the UNIX syslog” on page 284).About the Log4crc. Type stream syslog Description Logging information is output in a continuous stream to a file. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 275 .txt file The <appender> tag can include three options: name. <appender name="stdout" type="stream" layout="basic"/> <appender name="stderr" type="stream" layout="basic"/> <appender name="syslog" type="syslog" layout="basic"/> <appender name="/tmp/bllog" type="stream" layout="dated"/> <appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscd. a feature that is disabled by default. only one category can be output to a single log. type.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.txt file. In other words.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. you must set type=stream. If you are using this option for UNIX systems. The type= option specifies what type of log file to generate. NOTE The two commented out entries (where type is set to digisign or encrypt) are used in secure logging.pem"/--> <!-appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/ keystroke.log" type="digisign" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/> The name= option must match the name (including its full path) assigned to an appender option in a <category> tag. Instead. and layout. Logging information is output to the UNIX syslog. see “Using secure agent logging” on page 277 and “Using keystroke log files” on page 281. For information about secure logging. you cannot use type=rollfile to roll log files. The following list shows the <appender> tags that are included by default in the log4crc.

As with rollfile. In addition to these parameters.1 to log.10. The parameters rollsize. log entries and rolled log files are protected using the security mechanisms described in “Using secure agent logging” on page 277. When the file reaches that maximum. Specifies the file containing the agent’s private key. and rollmaxfiles mean the same as they do for rollfile. the information in file log. In this case. If you set type=rollfile. encrypt Used for keystroke log files. encrypt needs the following additional parameters: certfile privatekeyfile Specifies the file containing the agent’s certificate. log files are rolled. log entries and rolled log files are encrypted and protected using the security mechanisms described in “Using keystroke log files” on page 281. The parameters rollsize.txt file Type rollfile Description Logging information is output to a file that is periodically rolled over into another file. logging information is output to a file that is periodically rolled over into another file. In addition. logging information is output to a file that is periodically rolled over into another file. Specifies the file containing the agent’s private key. the next time the log files roll over. In addition. rolltimeinsec and rollmaxfiles mean the same as they do for rollfile. you can store log files named log. For example. rolltimeinsec rollmaxfiles digisign As with rollfile. you can specify how log files are rotated by including one or more of the following options in the <appender> tag: rollsize Specifies a maximum number of characters for the log file. Specifies an interval in seconds for rolling log files. if you set rollmaxfiles=10.About the Log4crc. Specifies the maximum number of files used for logging.10 is lost. digisign needs the following additional parameters: certfile privatekeyfile Specifies the file containing the agent’s certificate. rolltimeinsec. if you have already generated ten log files. In addition to these parameters. 276 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

Except for the time stamp. contact BMC Software support. This layout outputs minimal information in the log file—just the timestamp and the actual message. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 277 . Using secure agent logging Secure agent logging is a rolling log mechanism that protects your RSCD agent log files by: ■ Securing each entry in the current log file with a Message Authentication Code (MAC) and sequence number. Used only when type is set to encrypt. It does not output the category name and log level that the basic and dated layouts do. Protecting rolled log files with digital signatures. Verifying the integrity of log files. A time stamp precedes all log entries. and recording the status of each verification. Users should not modify the syntax of the <layout> tag. You can later check log file integrity by using the bllogman command.txt file The layout= option specifies the type of layout used for logging information. log entries use the same format as the data that is generated for the log message. The following table identifies all possible layouts: Type basic dated Description Log entries use the same format of the data that is generated for the log message.About the Log4crc. rawtime <layout> The <layout> tag defines the format of logging entries. To develop additional logging formats. ■ ■ For additional information about secure agent logging. see: ■ ■ ■ ■ Overview of the security processes Verifying the integrity of log files Enabling secure agent logging Disabling secure agent logging Overview of the security processes Here is an overview of the security processes that take place as an agent writes and rolls a log file.

log1. 278 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .log1.20. the corresponding signature file would be called rscd.About the Log4crc.log. it uses the session key to calculate a MAC and associate this MAC with each log entry.222 23694 99/99 (Administrator): nexec: nexec engrhes40vm10 ifconfig -a 3. The agent verifies the integrity of each log entry in the rolled log file. If the rolled log file passed the MAC test and the sequencing test. ■ Digital signature file. rscd. the status field is set to Inconsistent. Note that this session key will be used only for the writing of this one log file. In this case. MAC Sequence number 3d8591f27a805b0edac5 0000000012 07/28/07 02:45:16. against each entry’s MAC.log1. If the rolled log file failed the MAC test or the sequencing test. As it writes each log entry. The agent creates a corresponding digital signature file for the rolled log file rscd. the order) of each log entry.21.log is rolled to rscd. The agent will use this key to calculate a Message Authentication Code (MAC) for each entry in the log file. When this log file is rolled and it is time to start a new log file. It also associates a sequence number with each entry. the RSCD agent generates a random session key. 2. When it is time for a rollover. the status field is set to Consistent. Before beginning to write its first log file. The following events take place at rollover: ■ MAC verification test and sequencing test. The RSCD agent starts writing its first log file—rscd.269 INFO rscd . If either the MAC test or the sequencing test fails.sig1. the agent raises an event (in EventLog on Windows and syslog on UNIX-style systems) indicating that the file has been tampered with. the agent will generate a new session key. — The signature file has a status field.txt file 1. It also verifies the sequence number (or in other words.log. rscd.10.

Verifying the integrity of log files You can verify the integrity of all agent log files by using the NSH command. engrhes40vm10. which indicates that it has been tampered with.log1 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd.About the Log4crc. The agent also does the MAC verification test and sequencing test on the rolled log file. — The MAC and sequence number fields are stripped as part of the process of signing the rolled log file. One file (rscd. bllogman.log3 () --> Inconsistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd. the signature file will be rolled along with its associated log file. see the bllogman man page. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 279 . with the creation of a new random session key for use in creating MACs for the next version of rscd.log4 () --> Consistent engw2k3agt1% In the above example. as described the procedure below.log3) is reported as Inconsistent. as described in “Verifying the integrity of log files” on page 279. Enabling secure agent logging You can enable secure agent logs as part of your initial installation (see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide) or later on. NOTE If an agent is restarted. the previous log file is automatically rolled and signed at agent startup. 4. For additional information about bllogman.log () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd.log2 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd. — At the next roll.log. Example: engw2k3agt1% bllogman list --verify engrhes40vm10 Logfile(s) for host engrhes40vm10 with status: /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd. there are five log files on the agent machine.txt file You can use the information stored in the status field to verify the integrity of a rolled log file. The cycle begins again.

log2.log. 5 Make the following changes to the log4crc.log. 3 Delete all the agent log files.log2. 2 Stop the RSCD agent.log1.pem file and the signature files.txt configuration file: 280 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . These files have names like rscd. and so on. 3 Stop the RSCD agent.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/--> Uncomment or add the following entry where type is set to digisign: <appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscd. rscd.txt configuration file: In the <appender> section.log appender entry that has type set to rollfile: <!-appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/ rscd. NOTE On UNIX agents. usual rolling logs will be generated. 2 Back up all your existing agent log files (if any). Disabling secure agent logging If you have enabled secure agent logging and you now want to disable it: 1 Back up the certificate.pem"/> 5 Start the RSCD agent. and so on. secure agent logs are only enabled (even if you have followed these steps) if the server on which the agent is running has either a working random number generator or PRNGD installed. rscd. These files have names like rscd. See the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide for more information. 4 Make the following changes to the log4crc. 4 Delete all the agent log files. remove or comment out the rscd.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/ WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. rscd.txt file 1 Back up all your existing agent log files (if any).About the Log4crc.log" type="digisign" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.log1. Otherwise. rscd.

Whenever a remote user uses the NSH command nexec to execute a command on an agent machine. STDOUT.pem"/>--> ■ Start the RSCD agent. Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 281 . Similar to the secure agent logs. or a particular keystroke log file on an agent machine. Using keystroke log files You can configure the BMC BladeLogic RSCD agent to generate keystroke logs that record nexec sessions. each keystroke log file is accompanied by a digital signature file.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated" Comment out or delete the following entry where type is set to digisign: <!--<appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/ rscd.log" type="digisign" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.txt file In the <appender> section.About the Log4crc. you can verify the integrity of all the keystroke logs on an agent machine. the keystroke log captures and stores the command’s STDIN. which lets you verify the integrity of a keystroke log file. and STDERR streams. add or uncomment the rscd. Additionally.log appender entry that has type set to rollfile: appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscd. keystroke logs are encrypted and so are not readable.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. Keystroke logs are similar to the secure agent logs described in “Using secure agent logging” on page 277: keystroke logs are rolled periodically and are digitally signed after they are rolled. By using the NSH command blkeylogman.

log3 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. the agent tests it for consistency using the MACs and the sequence numbers. The active keystroke log file (/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. Copy a (decrypted) keystroke log file from an agent to the client host.log4 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. The blkeylogman utility also lets you: ■ View the decrypted contents of keystroke log files.log2 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. there are ten keystroke log files on the agent machine. One file (keystroke. ■ ■ For more details.log5) is reported as Inconsistent. These two are then stripped off from the file and a digital signature is computed for it. an event is raised (In the Eventlog on Windows and syslog on UNIXstyle systems).log1 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. View a list of various nexec sessions that have been recorded in the keystroke logs.log7 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke.log9 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. If the log file was detected Inconsistent during this process.log5 () --> Inconsistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke.About the Log4crc. MAC Sequence number 967ff34b84f754c0774a 0000000011 Zl8abih3bvmLNHwTnE4iK5UqeYXWMk2ZQ4 2xdR3nNo8lE2/xUoVxPOd8CSlg7hAygMQgO7D6VmbB2QZVAG6ucg== When the active keystroke log file is rolled.log in the above example) is also protected by MAC codes and sequence numbers. 282 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .log10 () --> Consistent engw2k3agt1% In the above example. which indicates that it has been tampered with.txt file Example: engw2k3agt1% blkeylogman list --verify engrhes40vm10 Keystroke Logfile(s) for host engrhes40vm10 with status: \ /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke.log8 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke. see the blkeylogman man page.log6 () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke.log () --> Consistent /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke.

see “Disabling keystroke logging” on page 283. See the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide for more information.pem file. if the server on which the agent is running has either a working random number generator or PRNGD installed.txt configuration file: In the <category> section.txt configuration file: Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 283 .pem"/> 3 Start the RSCD agent. Disabling keystroke logging If you have enabled keystroke logging and you now want to disable it: 1 Back up the certificate. as described in the procedure below. uncomment or add the following entry. Enabling keystroke logging You can enable keystroke logging as part of your initial installation (see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide) or later on. 3 Make the following changes to the log4crc. To disable keystroke logging.log" type="encrypt" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="rawtime" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. 2 Stop the RSCD agent.About the Log4crc. where name is set to keystroke: <categoryname="keystroke"priority="info1"appender="C:/ProgramFiles/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/keystroke. uncomment or add the following entry. 2 Make the following changes to the log4crc.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. NOTE On UNIX agents. where type is set to encrypt: <appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/ keystroke. 1 Stop the RSCD agent.log"/> In the <appender> section.txt file You can enable keystroke logs as part of your initial installation (see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide) or later on. keystroke logging is only enabled (even if you have followed these steps). as described in “Enabling keystroke logging” on page 283.

284 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . a priority level. comment out or delete the following entry.debug /var/log/rscd-syslog BMC BladeLogic uses the local6 facility. where type is set to encrypt: <!--<appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/ keystroke.log"/>--> In the <appender> section. Within /etc/syslog.conf.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate. and a location for the syslog by creating an entry like the following: local6. comment out or delete the following entry.pem"/>--> ■ Start the RSCD agent. configure a facility. Configuring the UNIX syslog If you are logging output to the UNIX syslog.log" type="encrypt" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="rawtime" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.About the Log4crc. you must configure the syslog daemon to accept output from BMC BladeLogic. where name is set to keystroke: <!--<category name="keystroke" priority="info1" appender="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/keystroke.txt file In the <category> section.

default layouts ======================================= --> <layout name="basic" type="basic"/> <layout name="dated" type="dated"/> <layout name="rawtime" type="rawtime"/> </log4c> Chapter 5 Setting up configuration files 285 .0"> <!-.pem"/--> <!-appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/keystroke.log" type="encrypt" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="rawtime" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.txt file for a Windows installation.default appenders ===================================== --> <appender name="stdout" type="stream" layout="basic"/> <appender name="stderr" type="stream" layout="basic"/> <appender name="syslog" type="syslog" layout="basic"/> <appender name="/tmp/bllog" type="stream" layout="dated"/> <appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscd.root category ========================================= --> <category name="root" priority="info"/> <category name="rscd" priority="info1" appender="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/ version/RSCD/rscd.txt file examples The following is an example of a default log4crc. <?xml version="1.About the Log4crc.log" debugappender="stderr"/> <!--categoryname="keystroke"priority="info1"appender="C:/ProgramFiles/BMCSoftware/ BladeLogic/version/RSCD/keystroke.log"/--> <category name="rscdsvc" priority="info" appender="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/ version/RSCD/rscdsvc.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/> <!-.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/> <!-.1.appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscd.pem" privatekeyfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.log" type="digisign" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated" certfile="C:/WINDOWS/rsc/certificate.log" debugappender="stderr"/> <category name="bldeploy" priority="debug"/> <category name="bldeployConsole" priority="debug" appender="stdout"/> <category name="bldeployAppserver" priority="error" appender="blbasic"/> <!-.txt file Default default log4crc.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?> <!DOCTYPE log4c SYSTEM ""> <log4c version="1.pem"/--> <appender name="C:/Program Files/BMC Software/BladeLogic/version/RSCD/rscdsvc.

pem"/--> <appender name="/tmp/rscdsvc.0" encoding="ISO-8859-1"?> <!DOCTYPE log4c SYSTEM ""> <log4c version="1.0"> <!-. <?xml version="1.txt file The following is an example of a default log4crc.log" type="digisign" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated" certfile="/usr/lib/ rsc/certificate.log" debugappender="stderr"/> <!--categoryname="keystroke"priority="info1"appender="/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/ NSH/log/keystroke.appender name="/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/> <!-.pem"/--> <!--appendername="/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/keystroke.log" debugappender="stderr"/> <category name="bldeploy" priority="debug"/> <category name="bldeployConsole" priority="debug" appender="stdout"/> <category name="bldeployAppserver" priority="error" appender="blbasic"/> <!-.1.log"type="encrypt" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="rawtime" certfile="/usr/ lib/rsc/certificate.txt file for a UNIX-style installation.pem" privatekeyfile="/usr/lib/rsc/certificate.log" type="rollfile" rollsize="10000000" rolltimeinsec="2419200" rollmaxfiles="10" layout="dated"/> <!-.log"/--> <category name="rscdsvc" priority="info" appender="/tmp/rscdsvc.pem" privatekeyfile="/usr/lib/rsc/certificate.default layouts ======================================= --> <layout name="basic" type="basic"/> <layout name="dated" type="dated"/> <layout name="rawtime" type="rawtime"/> </log4c> 286 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .About the Log4crc.root category ========================================= --> <category name="root" priority="info"/> <categoryname="rscd"priority="info1"appender="/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/ rscd.default appenders ===================================== --> <appender name="stdout" type="stream" layout="basic"/> <appender name="stderr" type="stream" layout="basic"/> <appender name="syslog" type="syslog" layout="basic"/> <appender name="/tmp/bllog" type="stream" layout="dated"/> <appender name="/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/version/NSH/log/rscd.

and compliance results. This utility lets you delete old temporary files from a specific Application Server. patch analysis. You can manage data in these areas: ■ The BMC BladeLogic Console. see “Cleaning up target servers (Agents)” on page 293. see “Cleaning up the BMC BladeLogic database” on page 288. audit results. the Application Server to which you are connected. Repeater Servers. You can delete these files by using the repeater clean-up utility. The database clean-up utility also deletes old audit trail entries. and auto-remediation. you can use the target server clean-up utility to delete these files. You can reduce the number of temporary files in the Application Server cache (directory) by using the Application Server clean-up utility.Chapter 6 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data BMC BladeLogic provides a suite of tools for managing data in the BMC BladeLogic system and controlling its growth where necessary. Data from Deploy Jobs can also accumulate in the staging directory on repeater servers. snapshot results. the objects are deleted from the database the next time the database clean-up utility is run. The Application Server Cache. or all accessible Application Servers. You can reduce clutter in your workspace from objects created by job runs. Target Servers (Agents). You can delete data that has accumulated on target servers (BMC BladeLogic agents) from Deploy Jobs. For information. see “Cleaning the Application Server cache” on page 293. For information. This utility deletes from the database objects users have deleted in the BMC BladeLogic Console and objects marked for deletion with the retention policy utility. The BMC BladeLogic Database. For information. see “Marking data for deletion” on page 289. These tools let you delete unused data or data no longer needed for BMC BladeLogic operations. see “Cleaning up repeater servers” on page 294. ■ ■ ■ ■ Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 287 . You can reduce the amount of space taken up by unused data in the database by executing the database clean-up utility. This data consists of old files that are no longer accessed. For information. For information. You can mark these objects for deletion.

This data includes: ■ Objects users have already deleted in the BMC BladeLogic Console. Before using the database clean-up utility. TIP BMC Software recommends that you run the clean-up utility once per week. For information on the retention policy utility. the initial result displays until the cleanup completes. To run the database clean-up utility. This utility lets you mark for deletion from the BMC BladeLogic database old job runs and objects automatically generated by operations such as auto-remediation and patch analysis. For more information on the CLI. These objects include old job runs and job and depot objects automatically created during patching and auto-remediation. if you query again. 288 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . see “Executing the database clean-up utility” on page 292. For information. This clean-up utility deletes any data from the database that has been previously marked for deletion. While the database clean-up utility is running. You can delete unused files from the file server. see “Cleaning up the file server” on page 295. To execute the retention policy utility using the CLI or to run the database clean-up utility. Cleaning up the BMC BladeLogic database BMC BladeLogic provides a database clean-up utility (cleanupDatabase) to minimize the amount of space taken up by unused data.Cleaning up the BMC BladeLogic database ■ The BMC BladeLogic File Server. The result drops to 0 when the cleanup completes. you must first start the Network Shell and then start the BMC BladeLogic command line interface (CLI). see “Marking data for deletion” on page 289. you can run the following database query to determine how many depot objects the database clean-up utility will delete: select count (*) from depot_object where is_deleted = ‘1’. ■ About the clean-up utility The database clean-up utility works in conjunction with the retention policy utility. Objects marked as deleted with the retention policy utility. to avoid longrunning clean-up runs. see the BLCLI Help.

By enabling the utility and setting the retention period. 2 Set the retention period for objects you want to mark for deletion. such as audit trail information and job run events. see “Setting the retention period for automatically-generated objects” on page 291. you can use the CLI to run the Delete:cleanupHistoricalData command. For more information on this command see the BLCLI Help. the objects are deleted from the database the next time the database clean-up utility is run.Marking data for deletion If you want to remove historical data. See “Enabling/disabling the retention policy utility” on page 289. These objects include old job runs and job and depot objects automatically created during patching and auto-remediation. See “Executing the retention policy utility” on page 291. ■ For information on setting the retention period for job runs. the objects are deleted from the database the next time the database clean-up utility is run. Enabling/disabling the retention policy utility The following procedure lets you enable or disable the retention policy. Once they are marked for deletion. files associated with the objects are deleted from the File Server the next time the file server clean-up utility is run. the retention policy utility is not enabled to avoid the possibility of deleting data unknowingly. For information on setting the retention period for automatically-generated objects. the objects that are candidates for deletion (because they are older than the specified retention period) are marked for deletion when the retention policy is executed. ■ 3 Execute the retention policy utility. By default. (In addition. Once they are marked for deletion. The following master procedure summarizes the steps for marking job runs for deletion: 1 Enable the retention policy utility. see “Setting the retention period for job runs” on page 290. Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 289 .) Using the retention policy utility in this way lets you manage the amount of physical space the database requires and avoid potential performance issues resulting from your database getting too large. Marking data for deletion BMC BladeLogic includes a retention policy utility that allows you to mark objects for deletion from the BMC BladeLogic database.

In addition. 3 Restart the Application Server to have this change take effect. To set the number of days to retain job runs before marking them for deletion.) Setting the retention period for job runs You can set the number of days to retain job runs before marking them for deletion. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. do any of the following: ■ To set the default retention period for all jobs.Marking data for deletion 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. To set the default retention period for job runs of a specific job. which lets you mark objects for deletion from the BMC BladeLogic database. the SnapshotJob property class). enter the following: set Cleanup EnableRetentionPolicy true|false Where: true — Enables the retention policy utility. For details on setting a property using the Property Dictionary.) false — Disables the retention policy utility. To set the default retention period for all jobs of a specific type. as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. ■ ■ 290 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . For details on setting a property using the Property Dictionary. (See “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. You cannot mark objects for deletion during database cleanup. 2 To enable or disable the retention policy utility. set the RESULTS_RETENTION_TIME property for the specific job property class in the Property Dictionary (for example. (Objects are deleted from the database the next time the database clean-up utility is run. set the RESULTS_RETENTION_TIME property using the Properties tab for a specific job. set the RESULTS_RETENTION_TIME property for the Job property class in the Property Dictionary. For information on setting property values using the Properties tab for a system object (such as a job). files associated with the objects are deleted from the file server the next time the file server clean-up utility is run.

see “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 291 . as described in “Starting the Application Server Administration console” on page 45. a specific job value overrides any value defined for the specific job type or for all job types. 3 Restart the Application Server to have this change take effect. For example. For information. Setting the retention period for automatically-generated objects To set the number of days to retain automatically-generated objects before marking them for deletion. do the following: 1 Start the Application Server Administration console. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic. 2 If you have not cached your session credentials.Marking data for deletion NOTE The most specific retention value will be used when executing a retention policy. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. do the following: 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the retention policy utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete executeRetentionPolicy For more information about this command. 2 Specify the retention period (in days) with the set command: set Cleanup AutoGeneratedRetentionTime #days Where: # days — is the number of days that job and depot objects are retained before being marked for deletion (when you execute the retention policy utility). Executing the retention policy utility To execute the retention policy utility. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help.

2 If you have not cached your session credentials. To execute a database clean-up operation. TIP BMC Software recommends that you run the clean-up utility once per week. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. see “Single sign-on” on page 121. Executing the database clean-up utility Use this procedure to remove superfluous BMC BladeLogic data from Oracle and SQL Server databases. 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the database clean-up utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete cleanupDatabase For more information about this command. storing this information in the credentials cache.Executing the database clean-up utility NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. For information on using the retention policy utility. NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. storing this information in the credentials cache.System_Cleanup authorization. 292 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . your role must be granted the BL_Administration. For information. see “Single sign-on” on page 121. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic. NOTE BMC BladeLogic also provides the performFullCleanupJob CLI command for database cleanup. For information. to avoid longrunning clean-up runs. For information. see “Marking data for deletion” on page 289. you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period.

You can also use the utility to clean up caches of all accessible Application Servers. 2 If you have not cached your session credentials. The utility lets you specify parameters for the cleanup.System_Cleanup authorization. For information. 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the Application Server cache clean-up utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete cleanupAppServerCache <retention time> For more information about this command. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. storing this information in the credentials cache.Cleaning the Application Server cache Cleaning the Application Server cache Each Application Server has a file cache (directory) containing files that it uses for operations it performs. such as Application Server name and the minimum elapsed time before files can be considered for deletion. use the target server clean-up utility To clean up transactions. your role must be granted the BL_Administration. Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 293 . To delete these objects from a target server. For information on configuring this property. objects such as BL packages. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic. you can use the Application Server cache clean-up utility to delete them from the cache. you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period. To execute a clean-up operation. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. These files are temporary and will probably no longer be accessed. transaction information and log files are created on the target servers and in certain cases are not deleted. NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. the target server clean-up utility uses the value of the server’s TRANSACTIONS_DIR property to locate the transactions directory. Cleaning up target servers (Agents) During Deploy Jobs. These files are temporary files no longer needed after the operation. see “Single sign-on” on page 121.

You can use the repeater clean-up utility to delete these files. use the command in a Network Shell Script Job. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. storing this information in the credentials cache. 294 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .System_Cleanup authorization. 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the repeater server clean-up utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete cleanupRepeater For more information about this command. 2 If you have not cached your session credentials. The utility lets you specify parameters for the cleanup. your role must be granted the BL_Administration. Cleaning up repeater servers Old temporary files from Deploy Jobs can accumulate in the staging directory on repeater servers. see “Single sign-on” on page 121. you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period. To execute a clean-up operation. To clean up a set of target servers. See “Scheduling the target server (Agent) cleanup” on page 300.System_Cleanup authorization. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic. your role must be granted the BL_Administration. For information. 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the target server clean-up utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete cleanupAgent For more information about this command.Cleaning up repeater servers To execute a clean-up operation. such as maximum size for the staging directory and the minimum elapsed time before files can be considered for deletion.

storing this information in the credentials cache. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic. Cleaning up the file server When users delete objects from the BMC BladeLogic Console. Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 295 . Neither the file server clean-up utility or database clean-up utility removes these directories. For information. To clean up the file server 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the file server clean-up utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete cleanupFileServer For more information about this command. it creates a subdirectory under the BLPackage directory for every iteration. you must run the Delete updateDeleteDependencies to remove these directories. the system marks for deletion from the file server all files associated with the objects. 2 If you have not cached your session credentials. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic. you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period.Cleaning up the file server 2 If you have not cached your session credentials. Prior to running the Delete cleanupFileServer command. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. You can use the file server clean-up utility to delete these unused files from the file server and from the temporary file storage on the Application Server. NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. Even after the job run history is removed by the retention policy. these directories still exist. Before you begin When a Custom Package Deploy Job runs. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. see “Single sign-on” on page 121.

you can also clean up historical data by using the historical data clean-up utility. Cleaning up historical data As part of its operation. The utility deletes the following objects: ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ Old audit trail entries Audit results Job run events Compliance results Snapshot results Job schedules Using this utility. For information. 296 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period. you can delete all historical data or only one specific type of object. To clean up one specific type of object. storing this information in the credentials cache. However. Enter a user name and password that you use for accessing BMC BladeLogic.Cleaning up historical data NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. enter the command and specify a value for the objectName variable. see the Delete name space of BLCLI Help. the CLI prompts you for a user name and password. for example. For more information about this command. your role must be granted the BL_Administration. the database clean-up utility (cleanupDatabase) cleans up historical data from the database. 1 Start the Network Shell and then issue the CLI command that executes the historical data clean-up utility by entering the following: #nsh Server1% blcli Delete cleanupHistoricalData This command deletes all historical data. see “Single sign-on” on page 121. snapshot results. To execute a clean-up operation. 2 If you have not cached your session credentials.System_Cleanup authorization.

create a Network Shell script to run the retention policy utility.) Database cleanup (See “Scheduling the database cleanup” on page 298.) Target server (agent) cleanup (See “Scheduling the target server (Agent) cleanup” on page 300.) Application Server cache cleanup (See “Scheduling the Application Server cache cleanup” on page 299.) ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ NOTE BMC BladeLogic recommends that you create all Network Shell Script Jobs for cleanup in a single directory. 1 In a text editor. Running a utility as a script job lets you schedule the job so it executes on a regular basis rather than running it interactively. storing this information in the credentials cache. The script should consist of the CLI command that invokes the utility: blcli Delete executeRetentionPolicy Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 297 . For information.) File Server cleanup (See “Scheduling the file server cleanup” on page 299. for example: /Jobs/BMC BladeLogic Administration/Cleanup Scheduling the retention policy utility to mark data for deletion Use this procedure to run the retention policy utility as a Network Shell Script Job. you can cache your authentication information for repeated use over a given time period.Scheduling the cleanup NOTE If you are authenticating with SRP. Scheduling the cleanup The clean-up utilities can be run as Network Shell Script Jobs. see “Single sign-on” on page 121.) Repeater cleanup (See “Scheduling the repeater server cleanup” on page 300. You can set up Network Shell Script Jobs for performing these clean-up tasks: ■ Marking data for deletion (See “Scheduling the retention policy utility to mark data for deletion”.

Scheduling the database cleanup Use this procedure to run the database clean-up utility as a Network Shell Script Job. 298 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . A Assign any name to the script. For information. B When you specify the Script Type. specify the server functioning as the Application Server. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. A Assign any name to the script. specify the server functioning as the Application Server. B Schedule the job to run at a frequency you prefer. add the Network Shell script to the Depot. A For the target server.Scheduling the database cleanup 2 Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. 1 In a text editor. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. TIP BMC Software recommends that you run the clean-up utility once per week. For information. For information. B Schedule the job to run at a frequency you prefer. The script should consist of the CLI command that invokes the utility: blcli Delete cleanupDatabase 2 Using BMC BladeLogic Console. B When you specify the Script Type. 3 Create a Network Shell Script Job based on the script you added to the Depot in the previous step. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. choose the first option. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. A For the target server. choose the first option. create a Network Shell script to run the database clean-up utility. 3 Create a Network Shell Script Job based on the script you added to the Depot in the previous step. For information. to avoid longrunning clean-up runs. add the Network Shell script to the Depot.

add the Network Shell script to the Depot. Scheduling the Application Server cache cleanup Use this procedure to run the Application Server cache clean-up utility as a Network Shell Script Job. add the Network Shell script to the Depot. A Assign any name to the script. B Schedule the job to run at a frequency you prefer. 1 In a text editor. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. For information. B When you specify the Script Type. 3 Create a Network Shell Script Job based on the script you added to the Depot in the previous step. choose the first option. Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 299 . 1 In a text editor. A For the target server. B When you specify the Script Type. A Assign any name to the script.Scheduling the file server cleanup Scheduling the file server cleanup Use this procedure to run the file server clean-up utility as a Network Shell Script Job. create a Network Shell script to run the file server clean-up utility. choose the first option. For information. The script should consist of the CLI command that invokes the utility: blcli Delete cleanupFileServer 2 Using BMC BladeLogic Console. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. specify the server functioning as the Application Server. For information. create a Network Shell script to run the Application Server cache clean-up utility. The script should consist of the CLI command that invokes the utility: blcli Delete cleanupAppServerCache <retention time> 2 Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. See “Cleaning up the file server” on page 295 for notes on pre-requisites for running the utility.

A For the target server. A For the target server. choose the first option. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Scheduling the target server (Agent) cleanup Use this procedure to run the target server clean-up utility as a Network Shell Script Job. add the Network Shell script to the Depot. B When you specify the Script Type. Scheduling the repeater server cleanup Use this procedure to run the repeater server clean-up utility as a Network Shell Script Job. 1 In a text editor. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. For information. For information. The script should consist of the CLI command that invokes the utility: blcli Delete cleanupRepeater 2 Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. create a Network Shell script to run the repeater server clean-up utility. 1 In a text editor. 3 Create a Network Shell Script Job based on the script you added to the Depot in the previous step. B Schedule the job to run at a frequency you prefer. create a Network Shell script to run the target server (agent) cleanup utility. specify the server functioning as the Application Server. A Assign any name to the script. specify the repeater servers you want to clean up. The script should consist of the CLI command that invokes the utility: blcli Delete cleanupAgent 300 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. B Schedule the job to run at a frequency you prefer. For information.Scheduling the repeater server cleanup 3 Create a Network Shell Script Job based on the script you added to the Depot in the previous step.

B When you specify the Script Type. For information. A For the target server.Scheduling the target server (Agent) cleanup 2 Using the BMC BladeLogic Console. 3 Create a Network Shell Script Job based on the script you added to the Depot in the previous step. B Schedule the job to run at a frequency you prefer. For information. choose the first option. specify the target servers (agents) you want to clean up. Chapter 6 Managing BMC BladeLogic data 301 . A Assign any name to the script. add the Network Shell script to the Depot. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide.

Scheduling the target server (Agent) cleanup 302 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .

Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 7 An advanced file server or Advanced Repeater server uses BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater technology with deploy jobs to enable file servers and repeater servers to store and share deploy data more efficiently. Figure 1 shows a sample configuration. Using an Advanced File Server on the existing File Server with one or more Advanced Repeaters uses a more efficient protocol to ensure that only changes to the content are downloaded across the network. Overview Using advanced file servers and Advanced Repeater servers can help you improve the bandwidth utilization between the central file server and the repeaters. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 303 . the Depot objects are sent to the repeater in their entirety whenever they are required for a deployment. With the standard BMC BladeLogic Server Automation file server and repeater. You can also configure bandwidth throttling on links between the Advanced File Server and the Advanced Repeater.

Key terms Figure 1 Sample configuration Key terms The BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater is the combination of Advanced File Server and Advanced Repeater server.an enhanced Java application server running on an existing File Server. Both the Advanced Repeater and Advanced File Server are built on BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Client Automation technology. The three key components are the Content Replicator. the Transmitter (used by the Advanced File Server). The following list defines some of these key terms. It uses the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Client Automation master transmitter component to hold a second copy of the depot content in a compressed. proprietary format that is well suited to providing bandwidth efficient transfer of data. 304 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . ■ Advanced File Server . and the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Client Automation Proxy (used by the Advanced Repeater server).

you can configure an Advanced File Server and one or more Advanced Repeaters. It is also used to pull the content down to the file system on the Advanced Repeater. and is an alternate option when configuring file servers or repeater servers.What is the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater? ■ Advanced Repeater . Using BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater technology enables file servers and repeater servers to store and share deploy data efficiently. See “Best practice information” on page 306. An RSCD agent must be installed on the servers hosting both the Advanced Repeater and Advanced File Server components. which use the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater. Content Replicator . ■ If the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater components have been installed.the Advanced Repeater and Advanced File Server are both installed from the same installation file. Advanced Repeater installer .used to publish the content from the existing file server to the Transmitter on the Advanced File Server. Any targets which are not configured to use a repeater stage the data directly on the target. NOTE For instructions on installing the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater. using the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Client Automation proxy. ■ ■ What is the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater? The BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater provides scalable transport of data over wide-area networks. any targets which have been configured through Routing Rules to use an Advanced Repeater will make use of the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater. Any targets which have been configured to use a standard repeater continue to do so. see “Installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater” on page 307. When a Deploy Job is run and is set for indirect staging. Using the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater technology for deploying data offers several key benefits: ■ Improved performance of staging data for deploy jobs.a Java application that runs instead of the traditional BMC BladeLogic Server Automation repeater and uses the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Client Automation Proxy component to efficiently download data from the Advanced File Server. If you are using deploy jobs in a large-scale environment. consider setting up Advanced File Servers and using Advanced Repeater servers. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 305 . Ability to manage the use of network resources by the Advanced File Server and Advanced Repeater server.

It is possible to run the transmitter with less than optimal disk space. it runs in limited disk space mode. the file server must have a minimum of 72 GB of available. 306 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . BMC BladeLogic recommends that the file server have 200 GB or more of available RAID 5 disk space. An Advanced File Server cannot be disabled if there are existing Advanced Repeater servers. the transmitter stops maintaining storage size ratio. and compressing. non-redundant.Best practice information NOTE Note the following requirements when configuring Advanced File Servers and repeater servers: ■ ■ An Advanced Repeater server cannot be enabled unless an Advanced File Server is enabled. but efficiency degrades. by removing cache files to reduce the amount of storage. and starts maintaining free disk space instead. The Advanced Repeater transmitter component uses the additional space for optimizations that improve the efficiency of data replication. This setting means that about 1GB RAM should be allowed to run the advanced file server. such as diffing. and attempts to maintain at least 10% free disk space. disk space. In addition. CPU utilization The advanced file server does not make intensive usage of the CPU. it maintains three times the size of the data as cache. using SSL also increases the CPU usage by about 40% due to the encryption and decryption of the content. Best practice information Disk space If you are implementing an Advanced File Server. but the CPU usage will spike when new content is published as this needs to be compressed. In limited disk space mode. When the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater has enough disk space. Memory utilization The default Java heap size is configured for a maximum of 512MB in the advanced file server. caching. If the transmitter does not have enough disk space to maintain the optimal storage size ratio.

2 Do one of the following: ■ In Microsoft Windows environments. The download instructions in the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide provide a standard method for downloading the product files from the BMC Software Electronic Product Download (EPD) website.Installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater Installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater You can install the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater using the installation program or by performing an unattended (silent) installation. copy the installation file to a directory on the server you want to configure as an Advanced File Server or Advanced Repeater Server. click Next. In Linux Environments. click OK. upload the installer bin to the file server or repeater server. The installer files applicable to the Advanced Repeater are labeled BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater for hostPlatform on the EPD site. Installing using the installation program To install the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater 1 Download the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater installation file according to the download instructions in provided in the “Before you begin” chapter of the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Installation Guide. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 307 . 6 Accept the license agreement and click Next. 5 On the Welcome screen. Different installers are provided for 32-bit and 64-bit Windows. 4 On the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater Installation screen. ■ 3 Start the BMC BladeLogic installation program for your platform.

308 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . — Proxy Listener Port: Specify the TCP port for the Proxy Service listener. NOTE You must use the RPC port number that was set during installation. 9 Specify the credentials for the Advanced Repeater administrator. The Workspace Directory window opens. and then click Install. or accept the default. The Advanced Repeater Credentials window opens. 11 Review the current settings to confirm that you have specified the correct installation configuration. Click Next. 10 Specify the following: — Transmitter RPC Port: If the server is using remote procedure calls (RPC). as long as the port number is not already in use. or accept the default. Click Next. You can use any port. The default port is 7717. — Transmitter Listener Port: Specify the TCP port for the Transmitter service listener. 12 When the installation completes. or accept the default credentials by selecting Use default tuner credential settings. Specify an integer between 0 and 65535. Specify an integer between 0 and 65535.Installing using the installation program 7 Specify the destination directory. A notification panel window appears if the installation program detects an existing installation. Specify this TCP port if you are installing the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater behind a firewall. Click Next. The default port is 8081. — Click Next. NOTE The default installation folder (AdvancedRepeater) is the same for both Advanced File Server and Advanced Repeater Server. Click Next to upgrade the installation. click Finish. enter the port number used to establish a new connection for each RPC client connecting to the RPC server. The Advanced Repeater Service Port window opens. 8 Specify the workspace directory (where the Advanced Repeater stores its channels).port number to be used by the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater. The default port is 5282.

For example: -A -P -J -J -J -J -J -J featureAdvancedRepeater installLocation=installationDirectory WORKSPACE_DIRECTORY=pathToWorkspace TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_USER_NAME=admin TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_PASSWORD=password TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_PORT_NUMBER=7177 PROXY_PORT_NUMBER=8081 XMITTER_PORT_NUMBER=5282 Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 309 . On Linux. Before you begin Certain Terminal Server configuration options that pertain to temporary folders must be turned off. to enable running the installation wizard through a Terminal Services connection or a remote desktop session. 8./uninstall where version is the version number for BMC BladeLogic Server Automation (for example.1). create an options file and add the options for the installation that you want to run. select Start => All Programs => BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Uninstall Advanced Repeater and follow the prompts on the uninstall wizard. Performing an unattended (silent) installation Install the Advanced Repeater using silent mode You can perform an unattended (silent) installation of the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater. To install the Advanced Repeater in silent mode 1 In a text editor.Performing an unattended (silent) installation To uninstall the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater Do one of the following: ■ On Microsoft Windows. enter the following command and follow the prompts on the uninstall wizard: ■ :/opt/adv/rptr/version/AdvancedRepeater/UninstallAdvancedRepeater # .

You can use any port.0\AdvancedRepeater On UNIX: -P installLocation= opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner On UNIX: -J WORKSPACE_DIRECTORY=/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. on Windows: -P installLocation=C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\8.0/AdvancedR epeater/tuner The user name and password for Advanced Repeater administrator. -J WORKSPACE_DIRECTORY= pathToWorkspace Specifies the workspace directory (where the Advanced Repeater stores its channels). -J XMITTER_PORT_NUMBER= Guidelines ■ Each option must be on a single line. For example. -J TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_USER_ NAME= -J TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_ PASSWORD= -J The TCP port to be used by the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_PORT_ Advanced Repeater. The TCP port for the Transmitter service listener.Performing an unattended (silent) installation Where: Option -P installLocation= installationDirectory Description Sets the installation directory for the product. ■ 310 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .0/AdvancedRepeater -A featureAdvancedRepeater Specifies installation of the Advanced Repeater. The NUMBER= default is 7717. For example. The default is 5282. Specify this TCP port if you are installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater behind a firewall. The default is 8081. -J PROXY_PORT_NUMBER= The TCP port for the Proxy Service listener. Specify an integer between 0 and 65535. Specify an integer between 0 and 65535. Specify an integer between 0 and 65535. Values for options may contain spaces. as long as the port number is not already in use. on Windows: -J WORKSPACE_DIRECTORY=C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\8.

0/silent_install.txt UNIX example sh AdvancedRepeater_8_1_win32. 2 Change directory to the location where the installer resides. 1 In a text editor. create an options file that contains this option: -A featureAdvancedRepeater 2 Change directory to the location where the installer resides. AdvancedRepeaterInstallerName -i silent -DOPTIONS_FILE=silentOptionsFilePath You must use an absolute path to the options file.txt Upgrade the Advanced Repeater using silent mode You can perform an unattended (silent) upgrade of the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater. However. 3 Run the installation program with the -i silent option. AdvancedRepeaterInstallerName -i silent DOPTIONS_FILE=silentOptionsFilePath You must use an absolute path to the options file.0\silent_upgrade.exe -i silent -DOPTIONS_FILE=C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\8. 3 Run the installation program with the -i silent option. you should specify TUNER_ADMINISTRATION_USER_NAME and PASSWORD. Windows: AdvancedRepeater_8_1_win32.0/silent_install.exe -i silent DOPTIONS_FILE=/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8.txt Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 311 . Windows example AdvancedRepeater_8_1_win32.bin -i silent DOPTIONS_FILE=/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8.Performing an unattended (silent) installation ■ All Java properties have default values if not specified in the options file.

See the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide for information on creating automation principals.bin -i silent DOPTIONS_FILE=/opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. Set up credentials If you have not already done so.Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers UNIX: sh AdvancedRepeater_8_1_win32.0/silent_upgrade. An automation principal defines a user credential that can be used for accessing external systems. create an automation principal which contains the user-defined Administrator credential used to configure the Advanced File Server. 312 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .txt Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers To adjust the configuration settings for the an Advanced File Server or Advanced Repeater server. see the following: ■ Configuring Advanced File Servers Configuring Advanced Repeater servers Changing the administrator user and password for Advanced Repeater Servers ■ ■ Before you begin NOTE Configuring an Advanced Repeater server behind a SOCKS proxy server is not supported.

If necessary. 5 On the General tab. while the File Server Root Path points to the directory on the file server where data is stored. 4 Right-click the file server and select Properties to open the Modify File Server dialog. 3 On the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Console. The Advanced File Server Root Directory points to the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater installation directory. which uses the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater. the Transmitter and Performance tabs are not accessible. 2 Install the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater on the file server. 1 Create a file server as described in “Setting up the file server” on page 75. If you do not specify the install directory. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 313 . as described in “Installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater” on page 307. click Enable Advanced File Server. change the Advanced File Server root directory path to point to the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater installation directory. select Configuration => Infrastructure Management. NOTE The Advanced File Server Root Directory path is different than the File Server Root Path.Configuring Advanced File Servers Configuring Advanced File Servers Use this procedure to modify a file server to be used as an Advanced File Server.

If you specified a custom user/password combination during installation or in the post-install procedure. This credential is needed by BMC BladeLogic Server Automation to access and configure the Advanced File Server. ■ 314 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you can use SSL if your environment requires encryption. This default automation principal matches the built-in administrator credential. ■ If you have not changed any credential during the installation or post-installation procedures. select "Default". select the automation principal that was created for that user/password combination. specify the following: Option SSL Settings Description By default the traffic between the advanced file server and advanced repeater is not encrypted. The automation principal is used to access and configure the Advanced File Server. Advanced File Server Administrator Select an Automation Principal from the drop-down list. See “Securing communication between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers (optional)” on page 319. check SSL Enabled. However. If you have configured secure communication for the file server.Configuring Advanced File Servers 6 On the Security tab.

The Advanced File Server Root Directory field on the General tab will be the same as the value specified here. ■ Install Copy A on an existing file server host. you must install two copies of the Advanced Repeater. the transmitter (in the Advanced File Server) is located on the same host as the existing file server. In some cases. Enter the RPC port number that was set during installation. Transmitter Listener Port RPC Port Enter the port on which the Advanced Repeater listens for requests. By default. You can use any port as the listener port. Select the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater installation directory. if there is not sufficient disk space on the file server host. In this case. Install Copy B on a separate transmitter host. In this case.Configuring Advanced File Servers 7 On the Transmitter tab. the value for the Transmitter Root Directory field reflects the installation directory for Copy B. the transmitter is located on the same host as the File Server. ■ In this case. however. The value Advanced File Server Root Directory on the General tab reflects the installation directory for Copy A. The Host field on the General tab will be the same as the Transmitter Host Name field on the Transmitter tab. as long as the port number is not already in use. The RPC port is used to administer the Advanced Repeater components. specify the following: Option Transmitter Host Name Transmitter Root Directory Description By default. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 315 . you may want the transmitter to be on a different host than file server. you only need to install one copy of the Advanced Repeater on the file server host. For example.

316 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Differencing enabled .specifies whether the Advanced File Server should compress the files it sends.specifies the level of compression the transmitter should use for the files it sends.Configuring Advanced File Servers 8 On the Performance tab. the transmitter uses byte-level differencing to send only the changed bytes. Instead of transferring entire files when updating payloads.specify the number of kilobits per second that the Advanced File Server can use as throughput.the compression is fast but the file size isn't reduced as much as on high (however the byte-savings difference is minimal). — high . Maximum throughput . across all parallel connections. Compression level . A bandwidth setting of “0” (zero) sets specifies maximum bandwidth speed (unlimited). 9 On the Network tab.enter the maximum amount of available bandwidth (as a percentage) that the transmitter can use.balances time and size. such as files in the index cache. Set the amount of memory to allocate for differencing. This setting limits the total traffic leaving the transmitter.the file is compressed as much as possible. which allows the transmitter to send faster payload updates and to use less bandwidth. you can specify options that help you control the amount of network resources used during deployment. — medium . To keep the specified amount of disk space free. Specify the following: Option Network connections Network bandwidth Description Enter the number of clients (Advanced Repeaters) allowed to connect to the Advanced File Server at one time. 10 Click OK. specify the following: ■ ■ Percentage of bandwidth . but for large files the process can take a long time and can use many CPU resources. the transmitter automatically deletes optional files. specify the following: Option Disk resources Description Enter the minimum amount of disk space (as a percentage) that the transmitter should keep free. — low .specifies whether the transmitter should use byte-level differencing. Specify the following: ■ ■ File transfer efficiency ■ Compression enabled . If you select the Enable bandwidth management option.

If necessary. NOTE The Advanced Repeater server must be able to access the Advanced File Server directly using the user name defined in the exports file on the file server. 1 Install the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater on the system that you will use as an Advanced Repeater server. see the Exports File section in the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide. 3 Do one of the following: — Right-click Repeater Servers and select New Repeater Server to start the New Repeater Wizard. 4 On the General panel. change the Advanced Repeater root directory path. click Enable Advanced Repeater.Configuring Advanced Repeater servers Configuring Advanced Repeater servers Use this procedure to create or modify a server to be used as an Advanced Repeater server. as described in “Installing the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater” on page 307. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 317 . NOTE You must have first configured an Advanced File Server before you can configure an Advanced Repeater server. For more information. See “Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers” on page 312. 2 On the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Console. select Configuration => Infrastructure Management. — Right-click an existing repeater server select Properties to open the Modify Repeater Server dialog. which uses the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater.

Advanced Repeater Server Administrator Select an Automation Principal from the drop-down list. This default automation principal matches the built-in administrator credential. If you specified a custom user/password combination during installation or in the post-install procedure. ■ If you have not changed any credential during the installation or post-installation procedures. If you have configured secure communication. When the Advanced Repeater starts cache garbage collection. check SSL Enabled. This credential is needed by BMC BladeLogic Server Automation to access and configure the Advanced Repeater. you can use SSL if your environment requires encryption. The cache does not exceed this disk-space limit. specify the following: Option SSL Settings Description By default the traffic between the advanced file server and advanced repeater is not encrypted. the Advanced Repeater starts garbage collection to delete older channel files from the cache. Enter a percentage that represents the lower limit (cache low watermark) for the Advanced Repeater cache size. specify the following: Option Cache maximum size Description Cache management options Enter the total size (in MB) for the Advanced Repeater cache. However. Once the cache reaches the maximum cache size.Configuring Advanced Repeater servers 5 On the Security tab. it takes a snapshot of the cache and then determines the number of files it must delete to reach the low watermark. select the automation principal that was created for that user/password combination. See “Securing communication between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers (optional)” on page 319. BMC Software recommends that you set the cache low watermark to a value between 75 and 80 (indicating that it is 75% to 80% of the maximum cache size). ■ 6 On the Cache and Port panel. Cache low watermark 318 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . The automation principal is used to access and configure the Advanced File Server. select "Default".

— Navigate to the Advanced Repeater Server installation directory. execute the following command: ■ Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 319 . as long as the port number is not already in use. RPC port 7 On the Network panel. — From a command prompt. 8 Click OK.Changing the administrator user and password for Advanced Repeater Servers Option Listener port Description Port management options Enter the port on which the Advanced Repeater listens for requests. This setting applies for each repeater to file server connection. Enter the RPC port number that was set during installation. Specify the following: Option Network connections Network bandwidth Description Enter the number of concurrent connections to the Advanced Repeater. Maximum throughput . If enabled. A bandwidth setting of “0” (zero) sets specifies maximum bandwidth speed (unlimited). you can specify options that help you control the amount of network resources used during deployment. when running the installation program. the default directory is C:\Program Files\BMC Software\Bladelogic\8. The RPC port is used to administer the Advanced Repeater components. you can change it using a Runchannel command.enter the maximum amount of available bandwidth (as a percentage) that the Advanced Repeater can use. If you know the administrator user/password combination. (On Windows.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\).specify the number of kilobits per second that the Advanced Repeater can use as throughput. specify the following: ■ ■ Percentage of bandwidth . You can use any port as the listener port. Changing the administrator user and password for Advanced Repeater Servers You can change the administrator user and password for Advanced Repeater Servers in any of the following ways: ■ In the installation wizard.

exe -admin "newAdminUser.tuner.) — Navigate to the Advanced Repeater Server installation directory. for example) that is able to issue credentials used for PKI authentication.admin" -value "newAdminUser. (Note that the Tuner program can only be run locally.plain:newAdminPwd" Securing communication between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers (optional) Optionally.plain:newAdminPwd" ■ If you do not know the administrator user/password combination (for example.Securing communication between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers (optional) runchannel http://localhost:5282/Marimba/Current/TunerAdministrator -tuner localhost:7717 -username oldAdminUser -password oldAdminPwd set -property "marimba. all communication between the Advanced File Server and Advanced Repeater servers using the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater can be encrypted using SSL. (On Windows.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\). execute the following command: tuner.d/advancedrepeater start 320 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . — From a command prompt. NOTE The following instructions assume you have a valid certificate authority (using OpenSSL. if you are using the built-in default user/password). You can secure the link between the Advanced Repeater server and the transmitter located on the Advanced File Server. you can use the Tuner program to override the current user/password combination. Set up the Advanced File Server for secure communication 1 Start the Advanced Repeater. using one of the following methods: ■ On UNIX and Linux. the default directory is C:\Program Files\BMC Software\Bladelogic\8. All other traffic is all local and does not require encryption. use the following command: /etc/init.

3 In the left pane. The Certificate Manager dialog is displayed. 4 Click Import to display the Import Certificate dialog. 2 Right-click the Certificate Manager option and select Start.Generate the SSL certificate ■ On Windows. TIP When specifying Host name. 6 When prompted for a password or nickname. complete the fields and click Next. Generate the SSL certificate 1 In the Certificate Manager dialog. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 321 . The SSL Certificate Request dialog is displayed. select SSL in the left pane. 7 On the Root Certificates dialog. Do not enter localhost. click Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Advanced Repeater. select Channel => Show internal channels to populate the list. and click Next. 5 Browse to the location of the root certificate and select it. select Root. select the root certificate you just imported and select SSL from the Trust Type group box. TIP If you do not see any channels listed in the Channels list. use the actual name of the Advanced File Server host system. 4 On the Class 3 Digital ID Information panel. The root certificate is now configured on the Advanced File Server. 2 Click Request. from the Start menu. 3 Click Next. 5 Specify a password. leave the entry field blank.

The certificate request is generated.http. 9 Forward the file to your Certificate Authority. Enable SSL on Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters To configure the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater for secure communication.http.secure true where ■ uniqueID is the ID you obtained in step 3. 1 In the Certificate Manager dialog. paste the contents of the signed certificate and click Next. 10 Once you have received the signed certificate. 3 Click View. The Unique ID is displayed on the Certificate Information dialog.certID uniqueID hostname property -setProperty transmitter. click Install. 322 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 4 Using the Unique ID displayed in the certificate. copy the contents of the file. complete the following steps on the Advanced File Server. 12 On the Install SSL Certificate dialog.http. 8 Copy the certificate request and paste it into a text file.http.savepw true hostname property -setProperty transmitter.pw hostname property -setProperty transmitter.Enable SSL on Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 6 Click inside the text box and enter characters until the counter reaches zero. select SSL in the left pane. 2 Select the certificate you just created. 13 Click Done to complete the SSL certificate. enter the following commands to configure the transmitter to use the certificate and only accept https traffic: runchannel transmitterURL runchannel transmitterURL runchannel transmitterURL plain:password runchannel transmitterURL hostname property -setProperty transmitter. 7 Click Copy CSR to paste buffer. 11 On the SSL Certificates dialog.

https://localhost:5282/Marimba/Current/TransmitterAdministrator. The browser should display the status information for the Advanced Repeater. 4 Click Import to display the Import Certificate dialog. For example. For example. by entering the following string in any browser address field: https://transmitterURL/?status transmitterURL is the URL to the Transmitter Administrator of the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater.Configure the Advanced Repeater server for secure communication ■ transmitterURL is the URL to the Transmitter Administrator of the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater installed on the Advanced File Server. 5 Browse to the location of the root certificate and select it. click Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Advanced Repeater. select Root. 2 Right-click the Certificate Manager option and select Start. http://localhost:5282/Marimba/Current/TransmitterAdministrator. 6 Restart the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater on the Advanced File Server. start the Advanced Repeater using one of the following methods: ■ On UNIX and Linux.d/advancedrepeater start ■ On Windows. from the Start menu. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 323 . 1 On the Advanced Repeater server. 3 In the left pane. Configure the Advanced Repeater server for secure communication 1 Copy the root certificate you created to the Advanced Repeater server. The Certificate Manager dialog is displayed. 5 Validate that the communication type is enabled. use the following command: /etc/init.

see BMC Configuration Automation CMS and Tuner Guide. Do not enter a password or a nickname. by entering the following string in any browser address field: 324 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 7 On the Root Certificates dialog. 4 Click OK. 2 Right-click the Advanced File Server and choose Properties.Configure the Advanced File Server to use secure communication 6 Click OK to bypass the Enter Password and Enter Nickname dialogs. 1 Select Configuration => Infrastructure Management. 3 Select Enable SSL. NOTE To disable SSL communication. For more information on using the Certificate Manager. Configure the Advanced File Server to use secure communication You must configure the Advanced File Server to use SSL when communicating with the Advanced Repeater. clear the Enable SSL check box. 3 Validate that the secure communication type has been disabled. select the root certificate you just imported and select SSL from the Trust Type group box.http. Disabling SSL communication 1 Enter the following command to disable secure communication between the Advanced File Server and the Advanced Repeater server: runchannel transmitterURL hostName property –setProperty transmitter.secure false 2 Restart the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Advanced Repeater.

The Network tab on the Advanced File Server or Advanced Repeater server Properties include options for controlling the number of network connections and the amount of network bandwidth. The options are ■ ■ Network connections Network bandwidth (Percentage of bandwidth and Maximum throughput) These options enable you to enter a maximum amount of available bandwidth that the Advanced File Server or repeater can use. Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 325 . where data is being pushed out to a large number of servers. The options are particularly useful in large scale environments. as well as the number of kilobits per second that the Advanced File Server or repeater can use as throughput. Troubleshooting advanced file servers and advanced repeaters The following topics may be useful if you are experiencing issues with advanced file servers and advanced repeaters. For example.Troubleshooting advanced file servers and advanced repeaters http://transmitterURL:portNumber/?status transmitterURL is the URL to the Transmitter Administrator of the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater. ■ Configuring bandwidth throttling between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers Location of log files Location of configuration files Starting and stopping the Advanced Repeater ■ ■ ■ Configuring bandwidth throttling between Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers Both the Advanced File Server and Advanced Repeater server include options that you can use to control the use of network resources during file staging and deployment. The browser displays the status information for the Advanced Repeater. http://localhost:5282/Marimba/Current/TransmitterAdministrator.

marimba/proxyroot/logs/ 326 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .marimba\BCAC\ UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\.Location of log files NOTE The bandwidth setting on an Advanced File Server is different from the bandwidth setting on an Advanced Repeater server. Location of log files Log files specific to the Advanced Repeater are listed in Table 3 on page 325. These options are described in detail in the procedures for Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeater servers and Configuring Advanced Repeater servers.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\.0/AdvancedRepeater/tuner/.marimba/ws3/ Proxy log files access-y<yyyy>-w<w>. across all parallel connections.marimba\proxyroot\lo gs\ UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8.log The proxy access log is located in: Windows C:\Program Files\BMC Software\Bladelogic\8.log Log files for Advanced Repeater Default location Tuner log files The tuner log file is located in: Windows C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\8. while the bandwidth setting in Advanced Repeater server is a per connection setting (for each repeater to file server link). Table 3 Log file history-<n>.0/AdvancedRepeater/tuner/. The bandwidth setting on Advanced File Server limits the total traffic leaving the transmitter.

nodisplay=true 2 Restart the advanced file server.marimba\proxyroot\lo gs\ UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. if you are experiencing problems on Linux or UNIX systems that are not running X-Windows.tuner.txt Configuration file Chapter 7 Configuring Advanced File Servers and Advanced Repeaters 327 .txt file (see Table 4 for location of file): marimba.Location of configuration files Table 3 Log file Log files for Advanced Repeater Default location admin-y<yyyy>-w<w>.0/AdvancedRepeater/tuner/. In general these configuration files should not be modified. Table 4 Configuration files for Advanced Repeater Default location Properties file properties.txt UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. However.txt The main configuration file for the tuner is located in: Windows C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\8.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\lib\tuner\properties.log The proxy admin log is located in: Windows C:\Program Files\BMC Software\Bladelogic\8.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\.marimba/proxyroot/logs/ Location of configuration files Configuration files specific to the Advanced Repeater are listed in Table 4.0/AdvancedRepeater/tuner/lib/tuner/properties.display. perform the following steps: 1 Add the following property to the properties.

0/AdvancedRepeater/tuner/.marimba\BCAC\prefs.txt UNIX /opt/bmc/BladeLogic/8. use the following command: /etc/init. 328 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .Starting and stopping the Advanced Repeater Table 4 Configuration files for Advanced Repeater Default location Preferences file The preferences file is located in: Windows C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\8. click Programs => BMC Software => BladeLogic Server Automation Suite => Advanced Repeater. — From the Services dialog.txt Configuration file prefs.txt Starting and stopping the Advanced Repeater Use the following procedures to start and stop the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater: ■ On UNIX. start or stop the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater Service.0\AdvancedRepeater\tuner\. use one of the following procedures: — From the Start menu.d/advancedrepeater {start|stop} ■ On Windows.marimba/ws3/prefs.

Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 8 You can integrate BMC BladeLogic with your Change Management processes. and describe how to enable that integration within BMC BladeLogic. NOTE BMC BladeLogic supports integration with BMC Remedy ITSM Change Management. and describe the configuration tasks in BMC BladeLogic that are required to communicate with BMC Remedy ITSM. Once configured and enabled. enabling you to track infrastructure change actions. you can track infrastructure changes when a change is initiated by the BMC BladeLogic operator or when a remediation job is required due to the results of audit and compliance jobs. The following topics provide an overview of integrating BMC BladeLogic with the BMC Remedy ITSM change management solution. Levels of integration The following sections provide an overview of the integration points. ■ The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution Requirements for integration ■ Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 329 .

There are several configuration tasks you need to perform to enable the integration of BMC BladeLogic and BMC Remedy ITSM. compliance. see “Requirements for integration” on page 332. such as incident management and change management. The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution automates the integration of BMC BladeLogic monitoring. enrich BMC Remedy ITSM incidents with server configuration information. enabling an automated coordination of configuration management processes with other ITIL® processes.The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution increases the value of BMC BladeLogic by providing an out-of-the-box integration with BMC Remedy ITSM applications. See “Enriching BMC Remedy ITSM incidents with server configuration information” on page 331. The integration of BMC BladeLogic with BMC Remedy ITSM is accomplished through standard application interfaces (APIs). For complete details on installing and configuring BMC Atrium Orchestrator and setting up the BMC Remedy ITSM templates and filters. auditing. and remediation processes with IT management systems such as BMC Remedy ITSM. but also reduces errors commonly associated with the manual coordination of change and configuration management. If you implement the solution. Benefits of the integration Implementing the BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution enables compliance to the change process without requiring IT personnel to manually create change tickets. The solution reduces the risk of unauthorized and unplanned changes through enforced change tracking and automated documentation of all changes. For an overview of these tasks. See “Facilitating BMC BladeLogic operator-initiated change” on page 331. There are also a number of installation and configuration tasks for other BMC Software tasks to enable the solution. See “Ensuring continuous compliance for servers” on page 331. you can ■ ■ ■ facilitate the tracking of infrastructure change actions initiated by a BMC BladeLogic operator. This automation not only saves organizations time. These tasks are described in “Enabling BMC Remedy ITSM integration for job approval” on page 333. contact your BMC Software sales representative. ensure continuous compliance for servers. For more information on the BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution. 330 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . see BMC Continuous Compliance for Server Automation Solution Getting Started Guide.

or if deviations from a master server configuration are detected. After the job has run. The integration reduces the risk of unauthorized and unplanned changes through enforced change tracking. security. These details added to the workinfo note of incident include things such as: ■ ■ ■ ■ audit trails basic server configuration information historical deployments in the past 24 hours links to BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation reports Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 331 .The BMC Continuous Compliance for Servers solution Facilitating BMC BladeLogic operator-initiated change When operations changes are implemented. a change request is automatically created in BMC Remedy ITSM when a BMC BladeLogic operator submits a job that requires BMC Remedy ITSM tracking and approval. The main benefit of this integration is to enforce continuous compliance to the change process without introducing labor intensive activities. The server auditing and server compliance capabilities in BMC BladeLogic involve: ■ detecting discrepancies between specific servers or component configurations against a baseline server or configuration monitoring and detecting compliance violations between specific servers or component configurations against specific rules related to operations. Ensuring continuous compliance for servers This integration involves automatically creating incidents and change requests if noncompliant servers are detected. To automate this change tracking process. the job is scheduled for execution in BMC BladeLogic. operators need to document these changes in BMC Remedy ITSM Change Management. The BMC Remedy ITSM user can launch the job details report from the task to verify the change actions. the BMC Remedy ITSM change task is closed with an associated completion status and any changed configuration items (CIs). Enriching BMC Remedy ITSM incidents with server configuration information This integration involves automating the addition of information from various relevant sources (such as BMC Atrium Configuration Management Database (CMDB) and BMC BladeLogic servers) to the incident ticket when a server-related incident is detected in BMC Remedy ITSM. Once the change is approved in BMC Remedy ITSM. and governance ■ BMC BladeLogic integrates the remediation of discrepancies and compliance violations in BMC BladeLogic to the change management processes facilitated by BMC Remedy ITSM management system.

To complete the integration tasks associated with BMC BladeLogic.Requirements for integration Requirements for integration To integrate BMC BladeLogic with BMC Remedy ITSM. To implement the solution. change tickets. 332 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . you must complete the following configuration tasks in BMC Atrium Orchestrator and BMC Remedy ITSM: ■ Tasks for integration with BMC Remedy IT Service Management — Create the user ID which is used for monitoring the BMC Remedy alerts. ■ Tasks for integration with BMC Atrium Orchestrator — Configure and deploy the required Operations Actions (OA) management modules — Configure BMC Atrium Orchestrator Run Book modules For details on installing and configuring BMC Atrium Orchestrator and setting up the BMC Remedy ITSM templates and filters. see “Enabling BMC Remedy ITSM integration for job approval”. — Review default BMC Remedy templates .The BMC Atrium Orchestrator workflows create incidents. see BMC Continuous Compliance for Server Automation Solution Getting Started Guide. you must have several BMC Software products installed and configured: ■ ■ ■ ■ BMC Atrium Orchestrator BMC Remedy ITSM BMC BladeLogic Server Automation BMC BladeLogic Integration for Atrium The BMC BladeLogic solution integrates the BMC Remedy ITSM and the BMC BladeLogic systems. using BMC Atrium Orchestrator as the enabling technology. and tasks using BMC Remedy ITSM templates.

you can track these infrastructure changes when the change is initiated by the BMC BladeLogic operator. Use this procedure to enable or disable the BMC Remedy ITSM job approval capability at the job type level.Enabling BMC Remedy ITSM integration for job approval Enabling BMC Remedy ITSM integration for job approval If your environment has been configured to integrate BMC BladeLogic with BMC Remedy ITSM Change Management (as described in BMC Continuous Compliance for Server Automation Solution Getting Started Guide). see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. Configuring job approval for job types The Approval Configuration option enables you to configure whether or not jobs of a given type require BMC Remedy ITSM approval. To fully enable the integration. Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 333 . set the Approval Required option for each available job type. By default. To configure job approval for job types 1 From the BMC BladeLogic Console. 3 Click OK. if integration with BMC Remedy ITSM for job approval is desired. the approval for each supported job type is turned off. complete the following configuration tasks in BMC BladeLogic: ■ Configuring job approval for job types Assigning job approval permissions Setting up the connection to BMC Atrium Orchestrator Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection ■ ■ ■ NOTE Two of these tasks—setting up the connection to BMC Atrium Orchestrator and (optionally) enabling HTTPS support—are necessary also for integrating with BMC Atrium Orchestrator for the creation of Workflow Jobs through the BMC BladeLogic Console. For more information about Workflow Jobs. 2 On the Job Approval Required Configuration dialog. select Configuration => Approval Configuration.

3 Click the Systems tab. To assign job approval permissions 1 In the RBAC Manager workspace of the BMC BladeLogic Console. When that user logs on. 5 Click OK to save the updates. Assign the appropriate approval type to each user role. you may create a role for junior operators that has only Manual permission. only the job approval type assigned for the user role is listed when running the job wizard. 4 Add any of the following RBAC controls to enable specific BMC Remedy ITSM job approval permissions ■ ■ ■ ■ Automatic Manual Emergency NoApproval For example. 334 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Assigning job approval permissions Use this procedure to assign permissions to different BMC BladeLogic users for integrating job execution with BMC Remedy ITSM. select Roles. 6 Click OK to exit the Update Permissions panel. ensuring that any jobs they initiate would be reviewed and approved by a BMC Remedy ITSM prior to execution. 2 Right-click a role and select Open.Assigning job approval permissions All job types with Yes specified for the Approval Required option will require the completion of the Approval tab information in the job wizard. the BLAdmins Role has permissions to all approval permissions. NOTE By default.

enter the configuration information required to connect to BMC Atrium Orchestrator. Specify the name of a grid only if this is the first defined CDP connection. 2 On the AO Configuration dialog box. Other types of peers are not supported. The name defined for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator grid. The connection with BMC Atrium Orchestrator is established through the CDP or through a high availability CDP (HACDP).Setting up the connection to BMC Atrium Orchestrator Setting up the connection to BMC Atrium Orchestrator Through the BMC BladeLogic Console.* and the AutomationPrincipal.* authorizations. in seconds. The port number used to connect to the BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP. The amount of time. Before you begin From the BMC BladeLogic Console. Password Time-out Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 335 . For any additional CDP connection (see step 4). NOTE The integration between BMC BladeLogic Server Automation and BMC Atrium Orchestrator supports connections to a single grid only. To configure the connection with BMC Atrium Orchestrator 1 Select Configuration => AO Configuration. click Add. as all defined connections must be on the same grid. User Name The name of the BMC Atrium Orchestrator user used to log on to the CDP. The BMC Atrium Orchestrator password for the specified user. this field is read-only. Parameter Host Port Grid Name Description The IP address or fully-qualified host name of the BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP server. before a BMC BladeLogic job that connects to BMC Atrium Orchestrator times out. ensure that your role is granted the AOConfig. you must add the configuration information required to connect to BMC Atrium Orchestrator. 3 On the Add new AO configuration dialog box. The default is 300 seconds (five minutes). This user must be associated with the ADMIN role in BMC Atrium Orchestrator. and then click OK.

create the keystore file by entering a command such as the following example: keytool -genkey -alias w2k3-sp-vm5 -dname "cn=w2k3-sp-vm5" -keyalg RSA -keystore C:\. In this example. If you define multiple BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP instances. port. ensure that only one of your CDPs is set as the primary instance (using the Primary AO check box). you must enable an HTTPS connection on both products. 4 If you want to add additional CDP connections to BMC Atrium Orchestrator. repeat step 2 and step 3 for every additional CDP instance of the same grid. SSL enabled? Whether the connection to the CDP is SSL enabled and based on an HTTPS connection (as described in “Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection”). ensure that you select the correct CDP.keystore -storepass changeit The value entered for the -dname option must match the host name where the BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP is installed. 336 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . If you want to test whether or not you can connect to the CDP with the host. In a high-availability environment with multiple CDP instances. Multiple CDPs installed on a grid form a High Availability (HACDP) environment and allow communication to continue even when the connection with one CDP fails. user name. and password details that you specified.Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection Parameter Primary AO Description Whether to specify this CDP as the primary instance. the value is w2k3-sp-vm5. 5 Click Close on the AO Configuration dialog box. To enable HTTPS support on BMC Atrium Orchestrator 1 On the system where the BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP is installed. to ensure high availability. grid name. click Check Connection. as defined in BMC Atrium Orchestrator. Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection If you want to secure the communication of data between BMC BladeLogic Server Automation and BMC Atrium Orchestrator.

keystore storepass changeit In the command shown above.xml file. B Uncomment the following block of configuration information and add two attributes. copy the C:\. 2 On the system where the BMC BladeLogic application server is installed. To enable HTTPS support for BMC Atrium Orchestrator on BMC BladeLogic 1 If BMC Atrium Orchestrator is installed on a different machine.keystore file from the BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP system to the system where the BMC BladeLogic application server is installed.1" SSLEnabled="true" maxThreads="150" scheme="https" secure="true" clientAuth="false" sslProtocol="TLS" keystoreFile="C:\.0_13\jre\lib\security\cacerts" /> The keystoreFile attribute points to the location where the keystore file resides and the truststoreFile attribute points to the CA issued certs in the JDK installation location.Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection 2 Enable HTTPS on Tomcat by completing the following steps: A Open the server. <Connector port="8443" protocol="HTTP/1. export the public certificate from the keystore file which was generated for BMC Atrium Orchestrator to a temporary file by entering a command such as the following example: keytool -export -alias w2k3-sp-vm5 -file C:\cert.csr -keystore C:\. note the following: ■ file is the name and location of the certificate file that is going to be created from this command. ■ ■ 3 Add the public certificate from the temporary file to the trusted certificate file by entering a command such as the following example: Chapter 8 Integrating BMC BladeLogic and Change Management 337 . 3 Restart the BMC Atrium Orchestrator CDP. keystore is the keystore file name and location that you created for BMC Atrium Orchestrator. alias is the name used to distinguish certificates.5.keystore" truststoreFile="C:\Program Files\Java\jdk1.

338 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . Change the path if BMC BladeLogic was installed in a different location.csr -keystore "C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\jre\lib\security\cacerts" -keypass changeit where C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version is the default installation path of BMC BladeLogic.Enabling HTTPS support for the BMC Atrium Orchestrator connection keytool -import -alias w2k3-sp-vm5 -file C:\cert. 4 Enter the following command to check whether the certificate was added to the cacerts file: keytool -list -keystore C:\Program Files\BMC Software\BladeLogic\version\NSH\jre\lib\security\cacerts 5 Restart the BMC BladeLogic application server.

asymmetric encryption A method of encryption that uses public and private keys. an authentication service is implemented within the BMC BladeLogic Application Server. A Active Directory Microsoft's directory service. printers. Authentication Service A service implemented within the BMC BladeLogic Application Server that is responsible for authenticating a user and issuing a session credential.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Security Glossary This chapter provides definitions of terms commonly encountered when discussing network security. known to everyone. known only to the recipient of the data. AD/Kerberos authentication The Active Directory/Kerberos (AD/Kerberos) approach to authentication. C certificate authority (CA) Security Glossary 339 . Network Shell. and users. is used to encrypt data. authentication profile A collection of information that a BMC BladeLogic client (BMC BladeLogic Console. such as applications. but for BMC BladeLogic Decision Support for Server Automation. which integrates BMC BladeLogic with a key distribution center (KDC) to utilize the Kerberos v5 protocol for authenticating client-tier users. The public key. files. is used to decrypt the data. and the private key. or the BLCLI) uses to specify the Authentication Service from which a session credential should be obtained and the authentication mechanism that should be USED to acquire that session credential. AES The Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is an encryption algorithm that has become the encryption standard used in most commercial transactions. Typically. which provides a centralized system for automating management of networked entities. the authentication service stands alone.

The CA usually issues new CRLs at frequent intervals. DC=kerbtest. A certificate is digitally signed by a trusted third party who has verified that the key pair actually belongs to the entity. DC=bladelogic.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z The trusted party issuing digital certificates (especially X. a certificate can be issued based on the request. DC=sub1. certificate revocation list (CRL) A signed list containing the serial numbers of the certificates that have been revoked or suspended by the certificate issuer (the certificate authority (CA)) before their expiration date. For example. CAs can also issue certificates to other sub-CAs. If allowed by the certificate policy of the CA. D Data Encryption Standard (DES) A common method of data encryption using a secret key that is shared by the sender and receiver. a distinguished name might be CN=admin. The highest trusted CA in the tree is called a root CA. This leads to a tree-like certification hierarchy. generated by end entities or registration authority (RA) and sent to the certificate authority (CA). Those objects are listed from bottom to top. CN=Users. A distinguished name consists of the name of an entry as well as the names of the objects above that entry in the LDAP directory. A certification request contains at least the public key and some identity information about the entity making the request. distinguished name An PKCS entry that identifies a user for an LDAP server. certificates Digital documents used for secure authentication of communicating parties. DC=com. and the certificate authority (CA) in a public key infrastructure (PKI). certification service provider (CSP) An organization that acts as a trusted third party or a certificate authority (CA) host providing public key infrastructure (PKI) services to other organizations and individuals. DN 340 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . certificate management protocol (CMP) A definition of the online interactions between end entities. A certificate binds identity information about an entity to the entity's public key for a certain validity period. Certificates can be thought of as analogous to passports that guarantee the identity of their bearers. certification request A request for a certificate.509 public-key certificates) to an identified end entity and vouching for the binding between the data items in a certificate. A certificate is signed with the private key of the entity. A certificate authority can be managed by an external certification service provider or the CA can belong to the same organization as the end entities in a public key infrastructure (PKI). registration authority (RA).

for protecting IP traffic at the packet level. which delegates user authentication to the Active Directory domain controller. domain. A user can access network resources by logging into the domain. J JKS Java keystore.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z An LDAP distinguished name. The protocol uses strong cryptography so a client can prove its identity to a server (and vice versa) across an insecure network connection. This information is passed to the Authentication Service. Domain Authentication only requires a user to provide a name. A type of keystore file used for holding certificates. domains are used to manage access to network resources. defined by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF). F failover A mode of operating in which a secondary component takes over the functions of a primary component when the primary component cannot function. Security Glossary 341 . they can encrypt all of their communications to assure privacy and data integrity. domain controller A role assigned to a server in a network of computers running the Windows NT operating system. After a client and server have used Kerberos to prove their identity. Domain Authentication An approach to authentication that is based on AD/Kerberos authentication. In Windows NT. Additional servers can function as backup domain controllers. One server on the network functions as the primary domain controller by managing a master database of users for the domain. The BMC BladeLogic implementation of Kerberos is based on MIT’s Kerberos v5. K keystore A file used to store a list of certificates along with their private keys. Kerberos A cross-platform mechanism for mutual authentication between a client and server or between two servers before a network connection is opened between the two. I Internet Protocol Security (IPSec) A protocol suite. and password when logging in. The IPSec protocols are defined in RFC 2401. IPSec can be used for protecting the data transmitted by any service or application that is based on IP. The primary domain controller periodically sends copies of its database to the backup domain controllers.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z L LDAP Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP). The protocol for querying and modifying directory entries that are arranged in a hierarchical. certificate repositories (directories).500 models. encrypt. R RC4 An encryption algorithm. tree-like structure. Many companies are using LDAP-based solutions as directories and user management systems. This means that each participating entity (person or device) of the public key infrastructure (PKI) has two keys. P PKCS A group of public key cryptography standards devised and published by RSA Security. public key cryptography A method for authenticating a sender or encrypting a message sent over a network. 342 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . N nonce A random number used for cryptographic processes. the encryption and decryption of messages is done with different keys. public key infrastructure (PKI) A collection of mechanisms that together allow network users to exchange data securely over a network. The number is used only once to ensure that any communication used for authentication cannot be reused. and other mechanisms needed to authenticate. proxy mode A method of using Network Shell to connect to a remote server via a Network Shell Proxy Server rather than connecting directly to the remote server. Lightweight Directory Access Protocol (LDAP) A directory access protocol for accessing directories supporting the X. and decrypt communication using public key cryptography. a public key and a private key. which requires a secure exchange of a shared key. Public key infrastructure consists of a certificate authority (CA). PKI See public key infrastructure (PKI). In public key cryptography. BMC BladeLogic provides an approach to user authentication based on PKI.

BMC BladeLogic clients use session credentials to establish secure sessions with BMC BladeLogic Application Servers and Network Shell Proxy Servers. In this way you can define a set of permissions that might be used by an entire class of users. For more information on RBAC. The RBAC Manager workspace in the BMC BladeLogic Console lets you define roles. session key A key used for encrypting and decrypting traffic during a communication session. meaning the same key is used to encrypt and decrypt data. it is used for symmetric encryption of all subsequent communication during a session. such as expert administrators or help desk personnel. RSA SecurID See SecurID. role-based access control (RBAC) A system of granting permissions to perform certain types of actions to a role and then assigning users who need those permissions to the role. After the session key is decrypted. A hash function like SHA1 takes a long string as input and produces a fixed-length string as output. SRP is the default approach to user authentication in BMC BladeLogic. single sign-on Security Glossary 343 .A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z RBAC The BMC BladeLogic system of role-based access control (RBAC). see the BMC BladeLogic Server Automation User Guide. service URL The identity and address of a BMC BladeLogic Application Service or Network Shell Proxy Service that can be accessed using a session credential. asymmetric encryption is used only to encrypt a session key. SecurID RSA’s authentication protocol based on two-factor authentication. including TLS. Session keys are symmetric. SHA1 is used for many security application and protocols. Because symmetric encryption is very fast and asymmetric encryption is very slow. This output is sometimes called a digital fingerprint. S secure remote password (SRP) A protocol for integrating secure password authentication into networked applications. session credential A credential issued to a BMC BladeLogic client application after a successful user login. SHA1 The most commonly used function in the Secure Hash Algorithm (SHA) family of cryptographic hash functions.

X X. authentication. and integrity for stream-like connections. The ITU-T X. As long as the session credential is valid. TLS is typically used to secure HTTP connections.509 certificate revocation list (CRL). trust store A file used to store a list of trusted certificates. T Transport Layer Security (TLS) A protocol providing confidentiality. TLS is the successor to the Secure Socket Layer (SSL) protocol.509 recommendation defines the formats for X. 344 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide .509 A standard for defining digital certificates.509 certificates and the X. the user does not have to authenticate again.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z The capability for users to cache session credentials so they can be used to secure subsequent sessions between client-tier applications and the Application Server or Network Shell Proxy Server.

txt file 274 <category> tag for log4crc.conf file 196 creating user accounts 181 default users and roles 194 defined 339 exporting keytab file 181 implementing 177 locating KDC for client’s domain 197 locating KDC for service principal 186 overview 178 registering Authentication Service 180 requirements for Active Directory server 180 running kinit to get a TGT 201 sample domain structure 171 updating config. 237 provisioning with SHA1 fingerprints 204.properties file for clients 200 updating Kerberos registry settings 196 verifying a keytab file 190 advanced file server configuring 312 Index 345 .local file 247 anonymous user on Windows 17 Application Server information about 106 reporting information about 108 Application Server Administration console 44 binding to an IP address 67 canceling jobs 60 configuring Application Server 52 configuring database server 78 configuring file server 74 configuring mail server 76 configuring Network Shell Proxy Server 68 configuring Perl 77 configuring process spawner 79 configuring remote execution objects 68 configuring SNMP server 77 configuring the PXE Server 89 A access to RSCD agents 233. 208 scheduling cleanup of 300 secure file 253 users file 247 users. 191 console to Application Server 194 copying keytab file to Application Server 185 creating blappserv_krb5. 209 exports file 240 granting access 233. 235 cleanup of 293 configuring to authenticate using client-side certs 206.conf file 198 creating blclient_login.conf file 188 creating blclient_krb5.txt file 277 network throttling options 315 advanced repeater configuring 316 disk space recommendations 306 installing 307 network throttling options 318 overview 305 securing communication 319 using network throttling 324 AES defined 339 agent logs disabling secure logging 280 enabling secure logging 279 security overview 277 verifying integrity of 279 agents and configuration files 233.txt file 273 <layout> tag for log4crc.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z Index Symbols <appender> tag for log4crc. 237 accounts locking out 88 Active Directory defined 339 Active Directory/Kerberos 123 AD/Kerberos setting up Network Shell Proxy Servers 193 user names 192 AD/Kerberos authentication configuring Authentication Service 184.conf file 186 creating blappserv_login. 185.

93 creating client-side certs 203. 207 creating multiple 97 database connections 33. 64 deleting the deployment of 110 deployment directories for 95 deployments 94 discontinuing client-side certs 210 introduced 15 job distribution 32 job execution thread 31 managing 44 maximum client idle time 60 multiple 93. 42. 129. 70 setting connection types 65 setting database connections 64 setting login requirements 88 setting past due job behavior 63 setting retention time for automatically-generated objects 291 setting time-out behavior 61 showing no access nodes 84 specifying update group location 87 starting 45 Application Server cache scheduling cleanup of 299 Application Server Launchers editing access list for 113 Application Servers attributes for 100 attributes of 96 authentication framework 33 canceling jobs 60 changing access to 113 changing configuration of 100 cleanup of caches for 293 communication ports 65 compliance results maximum 62. 125 SecurID 123. 151. 158 managing profiles with blcred 226 PKI 123 profile files 150. 111 terminating process for 111 tier 13 time-out behavior 61 types of 96 undeploying 110 understanding 30 work item threads 31 Application Service 135 configuring 140 architecture of BMC BladeLogic system 13 asymmetric encryption defined 339 asynchronous execution enabling 92 audience intended 11 authentication AD/Kerberos 123 Application Server framework 33 described 117 domain 124 for BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics 132 LDAP 122. 96 past due job behavior 63 pausing 43 profiles 93 profiles for 96. 152 profiles 124.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z controlling user interface settings 84 crossing mount points 82 default permissions 86 deleting group 84 enabling asynchronous execution 92 enabling import/export of property classes 87 enabling import/export of Property Dictionary 87 enabling/disabling the retention policy utility 289 evaluating SOCKS Proxy Server rules 73 job distribution 55 limiting smart live browse results 85 preparing HTTP proxy server support 66 restricting size of configuration objects 83 restricting size of extended objects 83 scaling Application Server 52 setting client idle time 60 setting communication ports 65 setting compliance results maximum 62. 166 single sign-on 121. 135 SRP 122 Authentication Service 135 configuring 137 configuring for AD/Kerberos 184. 191 configuring for Domain Authentication 171 registering in Active Directory domain 180 authorization described 120 automatically-generated objects setting retention time for 291 346 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 208 restarting 111 restricting size of configuration objects 83 restricting size of extended objects 83 scaling 52 securing with certificates 223 securing with client-side certs 202. 70 configuration wizard 34 configuring 29. 163. 128. 109 stopping 42. 206 security for 133 setting up to cooperate 58 shutting down gracefully 43 starting 41. 100 provisioning agents with SHA1 fingerprints 204. 126. 109.

206. 216 for repeaters 218. 216. 202. 209 commands restricting access with exports file 244 communication legs Application Server to agent or repeater 133.conf file creating for consoles 198 blclient_login. contacting 2 browsing limiting number of results 85 C caching user information 230 certificate authority 339 management protocol 340 revocation list 340 certificate trust store for LDAP 159 certificates defined 340 for BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics 132 for secure communication 258 importing to clients 226 managing with blcred 226 setting up 223. 221. 70 config.properties file for clients 200 configuration for Domain Authentication 172. 226 bltray 215 BMC Atrium Orchestrator integration 333 BMC BladeLogic architecture 13. 217.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z B BladeLogic integration configure job approval for job types 333 blappserv_krb5. 271 configuring Application Server 29 default permissions 16 default security configuration 16 introduced 11. 13–19 Perl support 17 security 115. 212 Network Shell to Network Shell Proxy Server 131 repeater to agent 134. 15 configuration files 233. 222 for Application Server 202.conf file 174 creating for Application Server 188 blasadmin utility 44 starting 45 BLCLI security 130 settings for 84 blclient_krb5. 14. 207 for Network Shell client 212. 11–12 overview 13. 219. 222 reports client to reports server 132 security for 130 communication ports setting 65 Compliance Job results setting maximum number displayed 62. 210 BLCLI to Application Server 130 console to Application Server 130.conf file creating for consoles 196 blcred configuring for AD/Kerberos 194 utility 125. 233–264. 174. 219. 218. 175 configuration files exports file 240 Index 347 . 194 illustrated 116 Network Shell to agent 133. 211. 222 used by agents to authenticate 206. 203. 224 verifying with OCSP 153 certification request 340 service provider 340 chrole command 128 cleanup of agents on servers 293 of BMC BladeLogic database 288 of repeater servers 294 of the Application Server cache 293 of the file server 295 scheduling of 297 cleanupDatabase command 292 client connections maximum idle time 60 client tier 13 of BMC BladeLogic 14 clients connections to database 64 secure file 253 use of term 11 client-side certs 119 discontinuing use 210. 173.conf file 173 creating for Application Server 186 blappserv_login. 206. 115–231 security glossary 339 BMC BladeLogic Console and secure file 253 job parts 31 jobs and Application Server 31 security 130 BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics authentication 132 security for 132 server-side certificates 132 BMC Software. 221.

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z log4crc. 235 options for configuring 241 restricting access to commands 244 extended objects restricting size 83 F file servers cleanup of 295 configuring 37. 173.txt 272–285 logging 272. 174. 172. 240–247 configuring 241 examples 246 introduced 233. 74 configuring advanced file servers 312 scheduling cleanup of 299 D Data Encryption Standard defined 340 database cleanup 288. 192 customer support 3 user names 176 domain controller defined 341 E encryption described 118 for secure communication 258 environment variables 129 exports file 240. 176. 175 default users and roles 177 implementing 170 G groups deleting in console 84 H high availability 159 host entries in secure file 257 HTTP proxy server 66 I impersonation 119 described 119 import and update process specifying temporary group location 87 indirect deployments and certificates 262 Infrastructure Management window Application Server information 106 installing the BMC BladeLogic Advanced Repeater 307 integration and configuration checklist 332 Internet Protocol Security defined 341 348 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 64 databases configuring 78 connecting to Application Server 15 connections to 64 default entry in secure file 256 deployments 95 deleting for an Application Server 110 of Application Servers 94 DES defined 340 distinguished names for LDAP 160 documentation conventions 12 for Network Shell 12 Domain Authentication 124 configuring 171. 166. 289 scheduling 298 utility for 292 database configuration for Application Server 36 database connections for Application Server 33.local file 247. 169. 272–285 overview 233. 271 subnet designations 236 users file 247. 247–253 configuration objects restricting size 83 configuration wizard for Application Server 34 connection types for Application Server 65 console settings for 84 conventions used in documentation 12 copying objects default permissions 86 cross-registering users in RBAC database 160. 235 secure file 253. 247–253 users. 233–264. 253–262 securecert file 262 setting up 233.

conf file 198 creating blclient_login. 272–285 <appender> tag 274 <category> tag 273 <layout> tag 277 configuring syslog 284 default values 285 syntax 272 logging configuration file 272 configuring syslog 284 default values 285 login setting requirements 88 K KDC locating for client’s domain 197 locating for service principal’s domain 186 Kerberos defined 341 Kerberos authentication 123.properties file for clients 200 updating Kerberos registry settings 196 verifying a keytab file 190 keystore file for cooperating Application Servers 58 keystroke logs 281 M mail server configuring 76 man pages 12 middle tier communication 118 of BladeLogic 13 of BMC BladeLogic 15 mount points setting up in Application Server 82 N Network Shell and secure file 253 caching private keys 214 discontinuing use of client-side certs 216 Index 349 . 11–12 IP address binding Application Server to 67 IPSec defined 341 disabling 283 enabling 283 keytab files 128 copying to Application Server 185 exporting 181 verifying 190 klist displaying SPN for Application Server 189 J job execution thread for Application Server 31 job parts for BMC BladeLogic Console jobs 31 job runs setting retention time for 290 jobs canceling 60 defining time-outs 60 distributing between Application Servers 32. 55 past due 63 setting maximum for Application Server 52 L LDAP defined 342 user names 160 LDAP authentication 122 certificate trust store 159 configuring 161 distinguished names 160 high availability 159 implementing 158 overview 158 listening ports on Application Server 65 log4crc.conf file 196 creating user accounts 181 default users and roles 194 exporting keytab file 181 implementing 177 locating KDC for client’s domain 197 locating KDC for service principal 186 registering Authentication Service 180 requirements for Active Directory server 180 running kinit to get a TGT 201 sample domain structure 171 updating config. 178 client to Application Server 194 configuring Application Server 185 configuring Authentication Service 184. 191 configuring blcred 194 copying keytab file to Application Server 185 creating blappserv_krb5.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z introduction to BMC BladeLogic administration 11.txt file 272.conf file 188 creating blclient_krb5.conf file 186 creating blappserv_login.

221 security for 134 using advanced repeater servers 305 RESULTS_RETENTION_TIME property 290 retention policy utility P passwords requiring periodic changes 88 setting minimum length 88 setting through configuration wizard 38 past due jobs 63 Perl 17 configuring 77 permissions default 16 for copied objects 86 PKCS# 12 defined 342 PKI 350 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 219. 166.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z documentation 12 man pages 12 managing private keys 214 securing with client-side certs 212 security 131. 13–19 of Application Server 30 of configuration files 233. 149 Network Shell Script Jobs for Application Server cache cleanup 299 for cleanup 297 for database cleanup 298 for file server cleanup 299 for repeater server cleanup 300 for retention policy utility 297 for target server (agent) cleanup 300 network throttling for advanced file servers 315 for advanced repeater 318 overview 324 no access nodes showing in console 84 nobody user on UNIX 17 notifications setting through configuration wizard 38 defined 342 PKI authentication 123 ports Application Server 65 for remote execution objects 68 Post-Install Configuration wizard 34 database configuration 36 file server configuration 37 notification configuration 38 password configuration 38 private keys caching in UNIX 215 caching in Windows 215 managing 214 privilege mapping described 119 process spawner configuring 79 product support 3 profiles 100 property classes enabling import/export 87 Property Dictionary enabling import/export 87 protocol levels defined in secure file 255 for secure communication 258 public key cryptography defined 342 public key infrastructure defined 342 PXE Server configuring 89 O OCSP 153 overview BMC BladeLogic 13. 169. 235 R RBAC 128 cross-registering users 160. 208 securing with client-side certs 218. 192 defined 343 RC4 defined 342 remote execution objects configuring ports 68 repeater servers cleanup of 294 scheduling cleanup of 300 repeaters and certificates 262 configuring advanced repeaters 316 discontinuing use of client-side certs 222 provisioning with SHA1 fingerprints 204. 176. 133 Network Shell Proxy Servers 68 configuring 142 configuring clients for 147 configuring stand-alone 145 setting up for AD/Kerberos 193 user information for scripts 147 Network Shell Proxy Service 135 configuring 142.

135 using blcred 226 self-signed certificates 119 server tier communication 119 of BladeLogic 13 of BMC BladeLogic 15 servers use of term 11 server-side certificates for BMC Service Automation Reporting and Analytics 132 service principal name displaying with klist 189 service URLs 117 session credential cache file 150. 235 options for configuring 258 protocol levels 258 rscd entry 256 setting defaults for clients 256 setting defaults for servers 256 setting parameters for a client 257 setting up for NSH clients 212. 253–262 certificates 258 client and server interaction 254 communication protocols 255 configuring 255 configuring for agents 210. 126 managing with blcred 226 session key defined 343 session layer security described 118 single sign-on 117 AD/Kerberos authentication 123 authentication profiles 124. 125 certificate verification using OCSP 153 client file locations 152 client files 150. 124. 115–231 Application Server to agent or repeater 133. 123. 216 secure remote password defined 343 securecert file 262 configuring 263 SecurID user names 166. 151 described 121 Domain Authentication 124 environment variables 129 implementing 135.local file 247 rscd entry in secure file 256 SecurID authentication 123 configuring 163. 137.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z description of 289 enabling/disabling 289 executing 291 scheduling for execution 297 retention time for automatically-generated objects 291 for job runs 290 roles selecting 128 RSA SecurID 123 RSCD agents and configuration files 233. 122. 202 authentication using client-side certs 117 authorization 120 BLCLI to Application Server 130 console to Application Server 130 default configuration 16 for different communication legs 130 fundamentals 117 glossary 339 impersonation 119 Network Shell to agent 133. 235 secure agent logging 277 disabling 280 enabling 279 secure agent logs security overview 277 secure file 253. 211 Network Shell to Network Shell Proxy Server 131 privilege mapping 119 repeater to agent 134. 169 Index 351 . 151. 166 security administering 115. 217 reports client to reports server 132 session layer 118 single sign-on 121. 168 configuring RSA Authentication Manager 163 implementing 163. 140. 142 importing CA certs to clients 226 keytab files 128 LDAP authentication 122 S scripts user information for 147 secadmin utility 258 introduced 233. 237 secure file 253 users file 247 users. 222 configuring for Network Shell Proxy Servers 147 default entry 256 encryption method 258 examples 261 host entries 257 introduced 233. 152 session credentials 121. 167. 235 exports file 240 granting access 233.

235 options for configuring 251 T target server scheduling cleanup of 300 target servers cleanup of 293 technical support 3 terminology BMC BladeLogic 11 TGT running kinit to get 201 three-tier architecture 13 ticket-gathering ticket running kinit to get 201 time-outs defining for job parts 60 defining for jobs 60 TLS communication protocol 118 middle tier communication 118 server tier communication 119 TLS with client-side certs Application Server to agent or repeater 202.509 certificates 118 U update process 352 BMC BladeLogic Server Automation Administration Guide . 169. 52. 247–253 configuring 249 examples 252 introduced 233. customer 3 syntax for log4crc. 61 Workflow Jobs 333 X X.A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z overrides for client SSO files 150 PKI authentication 123 SecurID authentication 123 selecting roles 128 session credentials 126 SRP authentication 122 smart card authentication 123 SNMP server configuring 77 SOCKS Proxy Servers 73 SPN displaying with klist 189 SRP defined 343 SRP authentication 122 standard terminology 11 subnet designations 236 support. 222 trusted keystore 150.local 250 Windows client configuration for Kerberos 196 Windows user mapping 149 work item threads for Application Server 31. 166. 176. 210 Network Shell to agent 212 repeater to agent 218. 250 examples 252 introduced 233. 247–253 configuring 249.local file 247. 235 options for configuring 251 users. 152 W wild cards using in users. 206.txt file 272 syslog configuring for logging 284 system architecture overview 13 specifying temporary group location 87 user accounts adding default for AD/Kerberos 194 adding default for Domain Authentication 177 creating in Application Server’s domain 181 locking out 88 user information for Network Shell scripts 147 generating 230 user interfaces settings for 84 user privilege mapping 17. 169. 192 requirements for names 160. 221. 119 user_info. 219. 166. 192 users file 247.dat 128 users cross-registering 160. 151. 176.

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