Sie sind auf Seite 1von 533

CCBOOTCAMPs

CCIE Security Technology Lab Workbook


for the CCIE Security Lab Exam version 3.0
For questions about this workbook please visit: www.securityie.com
CCBOOTCAMP
375 N. Stephanie Street
Building 21, Suite 2111
Henderson, NV 89014
1.877.654.2243 Toll Free
www.ccbootcamp.com
Cisco, the Cisco Logo, CCNA, CCNP, CCDP, CCDA, CCIE, Cisco Certified
Network Associate, Cisco Certified Design Professional, Cisco Certified Design
Associate, and Cisco Certified Network Professional, are registered trademarks of
Cisco Systems, Inc. The contents contained wherein, is not associated or endorsed by
Cisco Systems, Inc.
PLEASE READ THIS SUBSCRIPTION LICENSE AGREEMENT CAREFULLY BEFORE USING THIS PRODUCT.
THIS SUBSCRIPTION LICENSE AGREEMENT APPLIES TO CCBOOTCAMPs CCIE Security Technology
Lab Workbook.
BY ORDERING THIS PRODUCT YOU ARE CONSENTING TO BE BOUND BY THIS LICENSING AGREEMENT.
IF YOU DO NOT AGREE TO ALL OF THE TERMS OF THIS LICENSE, THEN DO NOT PURCHASE THIS
PRODUCT.
License Agreement
CCBOOTCAMPs CCIE Security Technology Lab Workbook is copyrighted. In addition, this
product is at all times the property of CCBOOTCAMP, and the customer shall agree to
use this product only for themselves, the licensed user. The license for the specific
customer remains valid from the purchase date until they pass their CCIE Security lab
exam.
CCBOOTCAMPs CCIE Security Technology Lab Workbook materials are licensed by
individual customer. This material cannot be resold, transferred, traded, sold, or
have the price shared in any way. Each specific individual customer must have a
license to use this product. The customer agrees that this product is always the
property of CCBOOTCAMP, and they are just purchasing a license to use it. A Customers
license will be revoked if they violate this licensing agreement in any way.
Copies of this material in any form or fashion are strictly prohibited. If for any
reason a licensed copy of this material is lost or damaged a new copy will be provided
free of charge, except for the cost of printing, shipping and handling.
Individuals or entities that knowingly violate the terms of this licensing agreement
may be subject to punitive damages that CCBOOTCAMP could seek in civil court. Damages
will be limited to a maximum of $500,000.00 per individual and $2,000,000.00 per
entity. In addition, individuals or entities that knowingly violate the terms of this
license agreement may be subject to criminal penalties as are allowed by law.
The venue of any dispute, controversy, litigation or proceeding (formal or informal)
arising out of or pertaining to this licensing agreement or the subject hereof shall
lie exclusively in the County of Clark, State of Nevada. Provided, however, that if
any such dispute, controversy, litigation or proceeding requires or permits
jurisdiction in a federal court or agency of the United States, then venue shall lie
in no federal court or agency other than those located in (or nearest to) the County
of Clark, State of Nevada.
Term and Termination of License Agreement
This License is effective until terminated. Customer may terminate this License at any
time by destroying all copies of written and electronic material of said product.
Customer's rights under this License will terminate immediately without notice from
CCBOOTCAMP, if Customer fails to comply with any provision of this License. Upon
termination, Customer must destroy all copies of material in its possession or
control. The license for the specific user remains valid from the purchase date until
the user passes their lab exam pertaining to the purchased subscription. Once the
customer passes the relevant lab exam the license is terminated and all material
written or electronic in their possession or control must be destroyed or returned to
CCBOOTCAMP.
Warranty
No warranty of any kind is provided with this product. There are no guarantees that
the use of this product will help a customer pass any exams, tests, or certifications,
or enhance their knowledge in any way. The product is provided on an AS IS basis.
In no event will CCBOOTCAMP, its suppliers, or licensed resellers be liable for any
incurred costs, lost revenue, lost profit, lost data, or any other damages regardless
of the theory of liability arising out of use or inability to use this product.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Table of Contents:
Getting Started: ............................................ 7
Loading the Initial Configurations .................... 8
Sections .............................................. 9
Connectivity .......................................... 9
Join the Discussion .................................. 10
Chapter 1 - ASA Technology ................................. 11
Configure Device Management .......................... 26
Configure IP Routing ................................. 28
Configure Address Translation ........................ 29
Configure ACLs ....................................... 31
Configure Object Groups .............................. 32
Configure Sub Interfaces with VLANs .................. 33
Configure Filtering .................................. 34
Configure Modular Policy Framework ................... 35
Configure Application-Aware Inspection ............... 36
Configure Quality of Service ......................... 37
Configure Layer 2 Transparent Firewall ............... 37
Configure Security Contexts .......................... 39
Configure Failover ................................... 41
Configure High Availability Solutions ................ 42
ASA Technology Solutions ................................... 43
Basic Firewall Configuration ......................... 43
Configure Device Management .......................... 49
Configure IP Routing ................................. 53
Configure Address Translation ........................ 58
Configure ACLs ....................................... 63
Configure Object Groups .............................. 66
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Sub Interfaces with VLANs .................. 68
Configure Filtering .................................. 71
Configure Modular Policy Framework ................... 74
Configure Application-Aware Inspection ............... 79
Configure Quality of Service ......................... 85
Configure Layer 2 Transparent Firewall ............... 87
Configure Security Contexts .......................... 93
Configure Failover .................................. 103
Configure High Availability Solutions ............... 107
Chapter 2 - IOS Firewall .................................. 115
Configure CBAC ...................................... 123
Configure Zone-Based Firewall ....................... 126
Configure Auth-Proxy ................................ 129
Configure Access Control ............................ 130
IOS Firewalls Solutions ................................... 131
Configure CBAC ...................................... 131
Configure Zone-Based Firewall ....................... 151
Configure Auth-Proxy ................................ 158
Configure Access Control ............................ 165
Chapter 3 - VPN Technology ................................ 173
Configure IPsec lan to lan (IOS/ASA) ................ 181
DMVPN ............................................... 181
GET VPN ............................................. 182
Easy VPN ............................................ 183
QoS for VPN ......................................... 185
WebVPN(clientless) .................................. 186
High availability ................................... 187
VPN Technologies Solutions ................................ 187
Configure IPsec lan to lan (IOS/ASA) ................ 187
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
DMVPN ............................................... 199
GET VPN ............................................. 214
Easy VPN ............................................ 223
QoS for VPN ......................................... 232
WebVPN(clientless) .................................. 234
High availability ................................... 236
Chapter 4 - Intrusion Prevention Sensor ................... 244
Initialize the Sensor ............................... 251
Configure Sensor Appliance Management ............... 251
Configure SPAN and RSPAN ............................ 255
Configure Promiscuous and Inline Monitoring ......... 256
Configure and Tune Signatures ....................... 257
Configure Custom Signatures ......................... 258
Configure Blocking .................................. 259
Configure TCP Resets ................................ 260
Configure Rate Limiting ............................. 261
Configure Event Actions ............................. 262
Configure Event Monitoring .......................... 263
Configure Advanced Features ......................... 264
Intrusion Prevention Sensor Solutions ..................... 264
Initialize the Sensor ............................... 265
Configure Sensor Appliance Management ............... 272
Configure Security Policy ........................... 277
Configure Virtual Sensors ........................... 279
Configure SPAN and RSPAN ............................ 280
Configure Promiscuous and Inline Monitoring ......... 283
Configure and Tune Signatures ....................... 288
Configure Custom Signatures ......................... 293
Configure Blocking .................................. 301
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure TCP Resets ................................ 306
Configure Rate Limiting ............................. 309
Configure Event Actions ............................. 314
Configure Event Monitoring .......................... 318
Configure Advanced Features ......................... 321
Configure TACACS+ ................................... 334
Configure Secure ACS ................................ 335
Configure LDAP ...................................... 337
Configure Proxy Authentication ...................... 338
Configure 802.1x .................................... 339
Configure Advanced Identity Management .............. 340
Identity Management Solutions ............................. 340
Configure TACACS+ ................................... 340
Configure Secure ACS ................................ 343
Configure LDAP ...................................... 353
Configure Proxy Authentication ...................... 358
Configure 802.1x .................................... 362
Configure Advanced Identity Management .............. 367
Chapter 6 - Control Plane and Management Plane Security ... 374
Implement routing plane security features ........... 382
Configure Control Plane Policing .................... 383
Configure Broadcast Control and Switchport Security . 384
Configure CPU Protection Mechanisms ................. 387
Disable Unnecessary Services ........................ 388
Control Device Access ............................... 389
Configure SNMP, SYSLOG, AAA, NTP .................... 390
Control Plane and Management Plane Security Solutions ..... 390
Implement routing plane security features ........... 391
Configure Control Plane Policing .................... 405
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Broadcast Control and Switchport Security . 413
Configure CPU Protection Mechanisms ................. 421
Disable Unnecessary Services ........................ 423
Control Device Access ............................... 425
Configure SNMP, SYSLOG, AAA, NTP .................... 431
Chapter 7 - Advanced Security ............................. 435
Configure Packet Marking Techniques ................. 444
Implement Security RFCs ............................. 445
Configure Black Hole and Sink Hole Solutions ........ 446
Configure Remote Triggered Black Hole Filtering ..... 447
Configure Traffic Filtering using Access-Lists ...... 448
Configure IOS NAT ................................... 449
Configure TCP Intercept ............................. 450
Configure uRPF ...................................... 451
Configure CAR ....................................... 451
Configure NBAR ...................................... 452
Configure NetFlow ................................... 453
Configure Policing .................................. 454
Capture and Utilize Packet Captures ................. 455
Configure Transit Traffic Control and Congestion
Management .......................................... 456
Advanced Security Solutions ............................... 456
Configure Packet Marking Techniques ................. 456
Implement Security RFCs ............................. 460
Configure Black Hole and Sink Hole Solutions ........ 461
Configure Remote Triggered Black Hole Filtering ..... 464
Configure Traffic Filtering using Access-Lists ...... 468
Configure IOS NAT ................................... 473
Configure TCP Intercept ............................. 475
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure uRPF ...................................... 479
Configure CAR ....................................... 480
Configure NBAR ...................................... 481
Configure NetFlow ................................... 483
Configure Policing .................................. 486
Capture and Utilize Packet Captures ................. 487
Configure Transit Traffic Control and Congestion
Management .......................................... 488
Chapter - 8 Network Attacks ............................... 493
Identify and protect against fragmentation attacks .. 502
Identify and protect against malicious IP option usage
.................................................... 503
Identify and protect against network reconnaissance
attacks ............................................. 504
Identify and protect against IP spoofing attacks .... 505
Identify and protect against MAC spoofing and flooding
attacks ............................................. 505
Identify and protect against DHCP attacks ........... 507
Identify and protect against ARP spoofing attacks ... 508
Identify and protect against VLAN hopping attacks ... 509
Identify and protect against Denial of Service (DoS)
attacks ............................................. 510
Mitigate Man in the Middle attack ................... 511
Identify and protect against port redirection attacks 512
Identify and protect against DNS attacks ............ 513
Identify and protect against Smurf attacks .......... 514
Network Attacks Solutions ................................. 514
Identify and protect against fragmentation attacks .. 514
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against malicious IP option usage
.................................................... 516
Identify and protect against network reconnaissance
attacks ............................................. 516
Identify and protect against IP spoofing attacks .... 518
Identify and protect against MAC spoofing and flooding
attacks ............................................. 519
Identify and protect against DHCP attacks ........... 521
Identify and protect against ARP spoofing attacks ... 522
Identify and protect against VLAN hopping attacks ... 522
Identify and protect against Denial of Service (DoS)
attacks ............................................. 523
Mitigate Man in the Middle attack ................... 525
Identify and protect against port redirection attacks 527
Identify and protect against DNS attacks ............ 529
Identify and protect against Smurf attacks .......... 530


Getting Started:
The FAQ for rack access can be downloaded from
www.CCBootCamp.com/download beneath the security section.
You should download and review this document before rack
access.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Loading the Initial Configurations
Verify that all configurations have been cleared, before
you load initial configurations onto the devices in your
rack. For the ASA, verify that the correct mode,
single/multiple as well as routed/transparent, is in place
before applying the initial configuration. By loading the
startup configurations, you have a starting point only; the
lab requires you to complete these configurations and
verify that all network components are operating. Unless
otherwise specified, use only the existing networks within
your lab. Additional networks, static and default routes,
may not be configured unless specified in a task.
You must load initial configurations onto the devices in
your pod for each section. Occasionally you may be asked
to load initial configurations at a specific time within a
section. All initial configurations are available for
download from www.CCBootCamp.com/download beneath the
security folder. Use the initial configuration files that
match the workbook version you are using. The workbook
version is in the upper right hand corner of most pages in
the workbook. For users of SecureCRT, you may use the File
Transfer | Send Ascii option, and select the local initial
configuration file from the local drive you downloaded it
to, to apply each initial configuration. This can be
easier than a copy and paste. All pre-configurations
should be assumed to be correct and should not be changed
unless explicitly stated in a question. When creating
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
passwords, use cisco unless indicated otherwise in a
specific task.
The default username on the IPS is cisco, with a password
of ccie5796. On the ACS computer, you may add static
routes for connectivity. Do not change the default route on
the ACS.
Sections
1. ASA Firewalls
2. IOS Firewalls
3. VPNs
4. IPS
5. Identity Management
6. Control/Management Plane Security
7. Advanced Security
8. Network Attack Mitigation
Each section is autonomous. At the beginning of each
section there are 2 copies of the lab and physical
topologies. 1 is for you to remove and have as a resource
without needing to go back and forth in your workbook to
review your diagram. The other copy may remain in your
workbook as a permanent resource.
Connectivity
You may access your rack via TELNET, as described in the
FAQ document, or you may open a single RDP session to your
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
racks ACS Server, and SecureCRT from there to open all your
sessions there. Access via RDP is described in the FAQ.

Join the Discussion
Discussions about CCIE Security blueprint 3 technology and
workbook scenarios may be directed to www.SecurityIE.com
website. Membership is free. SecurityIE.com is a valuable
resource for everyone preparing for a CCIE in security.
We are committed to your satisfaction. If you find any
errors in this workbook, or have recommendations on how we
can make our services better in the future, please email
them to kbarker@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright Information
Copyright 2009 Network Learning, Inc. All rights
reserved.
Cisco, Cisco Systems and CCIE are registered trademarks
of Cisco Systems.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 1 ~ ASA Technology
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Basic Firewall Configuration
T a s k 1 . 1
Set the hostname of ASA1 to ASA1
T a s k 1 . 2
Configure interface E0/0; name it inside and use the IP
address 192.168.2.100/16. Use the default security level.
Bring the interface up.
T a s k 1 . 3
Configure interface E0/3; name it outside and use the IP
24.234.0.100/24. Use the default security level. Bring the
interface up.
T a s k 1 . 4
Verify that your interfaces are functional.
T a s k 1 . 5
Set the domain name to ccbootcamp.com
T a s k 1 . 6
Set the clock to the current time.
T a s k 1 . 7
Configure logging so that information level and above
messages are sent to the local buffer. Log messages should
contain a time-stamp.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 8
Configure logging to send messages of information level and
above to syslog on the ACS server. Enable
T a s k 1 . 9
Verify logging is operational both to the buffer and to the
ACS server.
Configure Device Management
T a s k 1 . 1 0
Configure the management0/0 interface with an IP of address
50.50.50.100 255.255.255.0 and name it management. Ensure
that only management traffic will be allowed to this
interface without using an ACL.
T a s k 1 . 1 1
Configure the ASA to use the ASDM image stored on disk0.
Enable the HTTP server and permit *ONLY* the ACS server to
access it.
T a s k 1 . 1 2
Configure SSH and *ONLY* allow R4 to connect via SSH on the
inside interface. Do not use an ACL to accomplish this.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 1 3
Setup a local user called cisco with a password of cisco
and a privilege level of 15. Setup AAA so that SSH will use
local authentication.
T a s k 1 . 1 4
Verify that you can connect to the ASA using ASDM from the
ACS server and with SSH from R4.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure IP Routing
T a s k 1 . 1 5
Setup a default route so that traffic not matching any
other routes will be sent to the next hop of R1.
T a s k 1 . 1 6
Configure EIGRP on the ASA so that it becomes a neighbor
with R4. Ensure that the loopback network of R4 appears in
the ASAs routing table.
T a s k 1 . 1 7
Configure OSPF on the ASA so that it becomes a neighbor
with R1. Verify that the 1.1.1.0/24 network is reachable.
T a s k 1 . 1 8
Configure EIGRP so that the default route is sent into
EIGRP 1. Configure the ASA so that the EIGRP routes are
sent into OSPF area 100 without summarizing them. Verify
that R4 has received the default route and that R1 has
received the EIGRP routes.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Address Translation
T a s k 1 . 1 9
Configure ASA1 to require a NAT rule for traffic passing
through it.
T a s k 1 . 2 0
Configure dynamic address translation so that any outbound
traffic from the 192.168.0.0/16 network translated to the
outside interfaces IP address.
T a s k 1 . 2 1
Configure NAT so that the ACS server is reachable from the
outside as 24.234.0.101. This host is sensitive to DoS
attacks, so set the total number of TCP connections allowed
to no more than 100 and the number of embryonic connections
allowed per host to 20.
T a s k 1 . 2 2
Configure NAT so that hosts on the outside who telnet to
24.234.0.4 on port 2323 are able to reach R4 on port 23.
T a s k 1 . 2 3
Allow SW1 (192.168.2.11) to send traffic to the outside
without changing its IP address.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 2 4
Dynamically translate R4s address to 24.234.0.254 only
when pings are sent from R4 to R1.
T a s k 1 . 2 5
Verify that your PAT configuration is working, and that the
static and policy NATs are in the ASAs translation table.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure ACLs
T a s k 1 . 2 7
On ASA1, create a standard ACL called R1 to permit all
traffic from R1. Do not apply it to any interface.
T a s k 1 . 2 8
On ASA1, setup an ACL called OUTSIDE that will protect your
network from outside attacks. When it is complete, apply it
for traffic incoming to the outside interface. All traffic
should be denied EXCEPT for:
Telnet from any outside host to R4s outside address
on port 2323
RADIUS from R1 to the ACS servers outside IP address
T a s k 1 . 2 9
All traffic from R4 to anywhere should be allowed during
business hours (9am to 5pm) but should be denied at all
other times. Create an ACL called INSIDE that will meet
these criteria and apply it to traffic inbound to the
inside interface. Log all denied traffic.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 3 0
When a traffic flow matches the INSIDE ACL time based
entry, the flow is cached. Configure the ASA so that an
error message is generated when the number of these cached
flows exceeds 2000.
T a s k 1 . 3 1
Verify that the OUTSIDE ACL is applied and working by
telnetting from R1 to 24.234.0.4 on port 2323.
Configure Object Groups
T a s k 1 . 3 2
Create a network object group called MAILERS and add both
R4 and SW1 (192.168.2.11) to it.
T a s k 1 . 3 3
Create a service object group called MAIL_PORTS and add DNS
(TCP) and SMTP to it.
T a s k 1 . 3 4
Add a single line to the INSIDE ACL that will block R4 and
SW1 from sending e-mail or DNS to servers outside the local
network.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Sub Interfaces with VLANs
T a s k 1 . 3 5
Configure E0/1.11 on VLAN 11. Name it DMZ1 and give it an
IP address of 172.16.11.100/24. Set the security level to
50.
T a s k 1 . 3 6
Configure E0/1.22 on VLAN 22. Name it DMZ2 and give it an
IP address of 172.16.22.100/24. Set the security level to
50.
T a s k 1 . 3 7
Bring up interface E0/1.
T a s k 1 . 3 8
Ping to both R2 and R3 to verify connectivity to the DMZ
hosts. Ping from R2 to R3.
T a s k 1 . 3 9
Correct the issue that is stopping pings between the DMZ
routers.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Filtering
T a s k 1 . 4 0
Remove activex objects from http traffic going from any
source to any destination.
T a s k 1 . 4 1
Stop hosts on the 192.168.0.0/16 network from downloading
java applets via http.
T a s k 1 . 4 2
Configure the ASA to use a URL filtering server in the DMZ.
The server will use the IP address of R2 and will be
running WebSense with the default settings.
T a s k 1 . 4 3
Filter URLs using the newly setup websense server. Do this
for all traffic from the 192.168.0.0/16 network. Block
attempts to use a proxy server and remove any cgi-
parameters.
T a s k 1 . 4 4
The ACS server should be exempt from the URL filtering
policy.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Modular Policy Framework
T a s k 1 . 4 5
Ping from R4 to R1. Use logging to determine why the pings
are failing.
T a s k 1 . 4 6
View the default modular policy framework configuration on
the ASA and then correct it to solve the ping issue. Do not
use an ACL to accomplish this. Verify that R4 can ping R1.
T a s k 1 . 4 7
Configure the ASA so that R2 is not allowed multiple telnet
sessions to R3.
T a s k 1 . 4 8
Verify that R2 is limited to 1 telnet connection at a time.
The password is cisco.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Application~Aware Inspection
T a s k 1 . 4 9
Allow R1 to FTP to the ACS servers outside IP address.
Ensure that this traffic conforms to the RFCs for FTP.
Reset the connection if R1 attempts to use the PUT
command.
T a s k 1 . 5 0
Create and test regular expressions that will match the
domains illegal.com and spam.net
T a s k 1 . 5 1
Drop and log outgoing http traffic from the ACS server when
it contains either of the domain names identified by the
regular expressions.
T a s k 1 . 5 2
Verify that both of your layer 3/4 policies are applied to
the correct interfaces and are using the correct layer 7
policies.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Quality of Service
T a s k 1 . 5 3
DMZ2 contains mail servers. The mail servers send an
excessive amount of SMTP traffic causing connectivity and
speed problems for the entire network. Because of this,
police outgoing SMTP bandwidth to no more than 20mbps. If
the SMTP traffic exceeds this rate, drop it.
T a s k 1 . 5 4
Clients on the inside network run streaming audio/video
applications that use RTP on UDP ports 10000-20000. Because
of its time sensitive nature, this traffic should be given
priority over other traffic. The queue size for these
packets should be increased to the maximum size.
Configure Layer 2 Transparent Firewall
T a s k 1 . 5 5
Setup ASA2 as a transparent firewall. Set the hostname to
ASA2. Set the management IP to 24.234.2.200. Enable
buffered logging with time-stamps at level 6.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 5 6
Configure interface e0/2.55 as the inside interface and set
it to VLAN 55.
T a s k 1 . 5 7
Configure interface e0/2.66 as the outside interface and
set it to VLAN 66.
T a s k 1 . 5 8
Add ICMP to the global inspect policy. Ping from R5 to R6
to verify lack of connectivity. Now bring up e0/2 and
repeat the ping test.
T a s k 1 . 5 9
View the log to see what kind of traffic is being denied.
Configure the ASA to allow this traffic and verify that it
is working on the routers.
T a s k 1 . 6 0
A host on the outside is trying to perform a man in the
middle attack by responding to ARP requests for IP
24.234.2.55 with its own MAC address. The real MAC that
should be mapped to 24.234.2.55 is 001b.533b.5555.
Configure the ASA to drop the bad ARP traffic.
T a s k 1 . 6 1
Enable ICMP from the inside networks to anywhere. Verify
that the ASA is blocking the bad ARP responses by pinging
from R5 to 24.234.2.55 and viewing the firewall log.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Security Contexts
T a s k 1 . 6 2
Prepare for multiple context mode. Erase the configurations
on both ASA1 and ASA2. Change ASA2 to routed mode with the
no firewall transparent command. Reload both firewalls.
T a s k 1 . 6 3
Configure ASA1 as a multiple context firewall. Once it
reboots configure the hostname to ASA.
T a s k 1 . 6 4
Setup interfaces for future contexts. Interfaces should use
unique mac addresses. Create interface e0/1.11 and set it
to vlan 11. Create interface e0/1.22 and set it to vlan 22.
Enable interfaces e0/0, e0/1 and e0/2.
T a s k 1 . 6 5
Delete any existing .cfg files. Create the admin context.
Assign it interface e0/2. Set the config to disk0:
T a s k 1 . 6 6
Create context c1. Assign it interfaces e0/0 and e0/1.11.
Save the config to disk0:
T a s k 1 . 6 7
Create context c2. Assign it interfaces e0/0 and e0/1.22.
Save the config to disk0:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 6 8
Switch to the admin context and setup interface e0/2 as
inside with pi 192.168.2.200/24. Allow the ACS server SSH
access to this context. Verify connectivity to the ACS
server.
T a s k 1 . 6 9
Switch to context c1. Configure e0/0 as outside with IP
address 24.234.0.100/24 and e0/1.11 as inside with IP
address 172.16.11.100/24. Add ICMP inspection to the global
policy-map and test connectivity by pinging from R2 to R1.
T a s k 1 . 7 0
Switch to context c2. Configure e0/0 as outside with IP
address 24.234.0.200/24 and e0/1.22 as inside with IP
address 172.16.22.100/24. NAT the inside network to the
outside interface address and require a NAT translation for
traffic passing through the firewall. Verify connectivity
with telnet from R3 to R1.
T a s k 1 . 7 1
Switch back to the system and set the maximum number of
allowed connections for c1 to 200 and the maximum number of
connections for c2 to 100. Set the maximum number of SSH
connections to the admin context to 5.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Failover
T a s k 1 . 7 2
Prepare for active/standby failover with ASA2. Set ASA1 as
the primary failover unit. Set the failover interface to
E0/3 and name it failover. Set the failover IP address to
10.1.1.1/24 and the standby to 10.1.1.11. Bring up the
failover interface and enable failover.
T a s k 1 . 7 3
Prepare ASA2 for failover. Ensure that it is in multiple
mode. Set the failover interface to e0/3 and name it
failover. Set the failover IP address to 10.1.1.1 and the
standby to 10.1.1.11. Bring up the failover interface and
enable failover.
T a s k 1 . 7 4
Configure SW2 so that fa0/17 and fa0/23 are both on VLAN
66. This will be the failover VLAN.
T a s k 1 . 7 5
Verify that unit failover configuration is operational.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure High Availability Solutions
T a s k 1 . 7 6
Configure the firewall pair to use stateful failover.
Verify that state information is replicating to the
secondary unit.
T a s k 1 . 7 7
Configure the firewall to monitor all of the interfaces for
c1 and c2. Configure a standby IP address on each
interface. This IP should be the primary +10. If one of
these interfaces fails, the unit should failover. Set the
interface polltime to 500 milliseconds. Set the unit
polltime to 500 milliseconds.
T a s k 1 . 7 8
In addition to normal state information, replicate http
state information.
T a s k 1 . 7 9
Prepare for load balancing. Disable failover on both ASA1
and ASA2. Configure ASA1 to be the primary for c1 and
secondary for c2. Ensure that both ASAs will always take
over as active for the context they are primary for.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 8 0
Enable failover and verify that active/active is working
properly.
T a s k 1 . 8 1
Final verification involves testing failover. Telnet from
R2 to R1 and enter the password of cisco. Leave the session
up. On SW1, shutdown port fa0/12. Verify that your telnet
session has remained connected. Verify failover.
ASA Technology Solutions
Basic Firewall Configuration
T a s k 1 . 1
Set the hostname of ASA1 to ASA1
The hostname is set with the hostname command. When
entered, the prompt will change to reflect the new
hostname.
ciscoasa(config)# hostname ASA1
ASA1(config)#
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 2
Configure interface E0/0; name it inside and use the IP
address 192.168.2.100/16. Use the default security level.
Bring the interface up.
Set the IP address with the IP address command.
Interfaces are named with the nameif command. Using the
name inside will automatically set the security-level to
100. Physical interfaces need the no shut command issued
for them to come up.
ASA1(config)# interface Ethernet0/0
ASA1(config-if)# nameif inside
INFO: Security level for "inside" set to 100 by default.
ASA1(config-if)# ip address 192.168.2.100 255.255.0.0
ASA1(config-if)# no shut
T a s k 1 . 3
Configure interface E0/3; name it outside and use the IP
24.234.0.100/24. Use the default security level. Bring the
interface up.
Set the IP address with the IP address command.
Interfaces are named with the nameif command. Using the
name outside will automatically set the security-level to
0. Physical interfaces need the no shut command issued
for them to come up.
ASA1(config)# interface Ethernet0/3
ASA1(config-if)# nameif outside
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
INFO: Security level for "outside" set to 0 by default.
ASA1(config-if)# ip address 24.234.0.100 255.255.255.0
ASA1(config-if)# no shut
T a s k 1 . 4
Verify that your interfaces are functional.
Verify that interfaces are up and have the correct IP with
show interface ip brief.
ASA1(config)# show interface ip brief
Interface IP-Address OK? Method Status
Protocol
Ethernet0/0 192.168.2.100 YES manual up
up
Ethernet0/1 unassigned YES unset
administratively down down
Ethernet0/2 unassigned YES unset
administratively down down
Ethernet0/3 24.234.0.100 YES manual up
up
Management0/0 unassigned YES unset
administratively down down
Now verify connectivity to the outside by pinging to R1 and
to the inside by pinging R4.
ASA1(config)# ping 24.234.0.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.0.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/10 ms
ASA1(config)# ping 192.168.2.4
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.4, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/1/1 ms
T a s k 1 . 5
Set the domain name to ccbootcamp.com
The domain name is set with the domain-name command.
ASA1(config)# domain-name ccbootcamp.com
T a s k 1 . 6
Set the clock to the current time.
The date and time are set manually with the clock set
command.
ASA1(config)# clock set 16:24:00 16 february 2009
T a s k 1 . 7
Configure logging so that information level and above
messages are sent to the local buffer. Log messages should
contain a time-stamp.
Buffered logging is configured with the logging buffered
<level> command. The syslog level (0-7) can be used as
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
well. Time-stamping is included with the command logging
timestamp.
ASA1(config)# logging buffered informational
ASA1(config)# logging timestamp
T a s k 1 . 8
Configure logging to send messages of information level and
above to syslog on the ACS server. Enable Logging.
Logging to a syslog server is configured with logging host
<interface> <ip address> where the interface equals the
interface used to reach the host. Logging level is set with
the logging trap <level> command. Logging is enabled with
the logging enable command. Notice that we used the
syslog level (Level 6) instead of informational.
ASA1(config)# logging host inside 192.168.2.101
ASA1(config)# logging trap 6
ASA1(config)# logging enable
T a s k 1 . 9
Verify logging is operational both to the buffer and to the
ACS server.
Verify that buffered logging is working by issuing the
show logging command. You will see the current logging
settings as well as syslog traffic.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# show logging
Syslog logging: enabled
Facility: 20
Timestamp logging: enabled
Standby logging: disabled
Deny Conn when Queue Full: disabled
Console logging: disabled
Monitor logging: disabled
Buffer logging: level informational, 2446 messages logged
Trap logging: level informational, facility 20, 677 messages
logged
Logging to inside 192.168.2.101
History logging: disabled
Device ID: disabled
Mail logging: disabled
ASDM logging: disabled
16 2009 16:00:04: %ASA-6-302015: Built outbound UDP connection
18 for inside:192.168.2.101/514 (192.168.2.101/514) to NP
Identity Ifc:192.168.2.100/514 (192.168.2.100/514)
Logging to the syslog server on the ACS can be verified by
connecting to the ACS and launching the available syslog
program. (Kiwi shown) The program will receive log entries
similar to those shown here:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Device Management
T a s k 1 . 1 0
Configure the management0/0 interface with an IP of address
50.50.50.100 255.255.255.0 and name it management. Ensure
that only management traffic will be allowed to this
interface without using an ACL.
The management interface is configured like any other. To
allow only management traffic to *ANY* interface; use the
management-only command in interface configuration mode.
The management interface can be used as a regular interface
simply by using the no version of this command.
ASA1(config)# interface management0/0
ASA1(config-if)# nameif management
ASA1(config-if)# ip address 50.50.50.100 255.255.255.0
ASA1(config-if)# management-only
ASA1(config-if)# no shut
T a s k 1 . 1 1
Configure the ASA to use the ASDM image stored on disk0.
Enable the HTTP server and permit *ONLY* the ACS server to
access it.
The ASDM image is set with asdm image <location> command.
The http server is enabled with http server enable. These
commands are necessary for ASDM to function. To allow a
specific IP or network access to the http server use the
command http <ip address and mask> <interface> where ip
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
address is the IP and subnet mask of the allowed host and
interface is the interface by which the allowed host can be
reached.
ASA1(config)# asdm image disk0:/asdm-61551.bin
ASA1(config)# http server enable
ASA1(config)# http 192.168.2.101 255.255.255.255 inside
T a s k 1 . 1 2
Configure SSH and *ONLY* allow R4 to connect via SSH on the
inside interface. Do not use an ACL to accomplish this.
Before enabling SSH you need to generate keys. This is done
with crypto key generate rsa modulus <modulus size>.
Allowing specific hosts or networks to connect via SSH
works much the same as with HTTP in task 2. Use the command
ssh <ip address and mask> <interface>.
ASA1(config)# crypto key generate rsa modulus 1024
ASA1(config)# ssh 192.168.2.4 255.255.255.255 inside
T a s k 1 . 1 3
Setup a local user called cisco with a password of cisco
and a privilege level of 15. Setup AAA so that SSH will use
local authentication.
A user is configured with username <name> password
<password> privilege <priv level>. To setup SSH to use
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
local authentication the command is AAA authentication ssh
console LOCAL.
ASA1(config)# username cisco password cisco privilege 15
ASA1(config)# aaa authentication ssh console LOCAL
T a s k 1 . 1 4
Verify that you can connect to the ASA using ASDM from the
ACS server and with SSH from R4.
First verify that you can connect using ASDM. Get on the
ACS server, open internet explorer and go to
https.//I9?.I88.?.I00. You should get to a page that looks
like the example below. Click on run ASDM applet. Finally,
select yes on all security prompts and if prompted for a
username and password use cisco/cisco.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
To verify that you can SSH to the ASA from R4, connect to
R4 and use ssh l cisco 192.168.2.100 which will connect
using the username cisco. When prompted for the password
use cisco.
R4#ssh -l cisco 192.168.2.100
Password: cisco
Type help or '?' for a list of available commands.
ASA1>
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure IP Routing
T a s k 1 . 1 5
Setup a default route so that traffic not matching any
other routes will be sent to the next hop of R1.
Static routes are done with the route command. The order
of the command is route->interface the traffic will be
routed to->ip and subnet of the traffic to be routed->next
hop address. For default routes you can use the shorthand
of 0 0 for the IP and subnet.
ASA1(config)# route outside 0 0 24.234.0.1
T a s k 1 . 1 6
Configure EIGRP on the ASA so that it becomes a neighbor
with R4. Ensure that the loopback network of R4 appears in
the ASAs routing table.
EIGRP is configured much the same as on a router. Use the
router <routing protocol> <instance number> command. Once
in router configuration mode, the networks who will be
participating in the routing protocol are added with the
network command. Notice that we use a regular subnet mask
to identify the network instead of the wildcard mask that
would be used on a router.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# router eigrp 1
ASA1(config-router)# network 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0
Verify that the ASA has become a neighbor with R4 by using
the show eigrp neighbors command.
ASA1(config)# show eigrp neighbors
EIGRP-IPv4 neighbors for process 1
H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT
RTO Q Seq
(sec) (ms)
Cnt Num
0 192.168.2.4 Et0/0 11 00:27:09 1
4500 0 5
Verify that R4s loopback network is in the routing table
with the command show route. It is the 4.4.4.4/32 network
and the D indicates the route came from EIGRP.
ASA1(config)# show route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile,
B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E -
EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia -
IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 24.234.0.1 to network 0.0.0.0
D 4.4.4.4 255.255.255.255 [90/131072] via 192.168.2.4,
0:25:38, inside
C 24.234.0.0 255.255.255.0 is directly connected, outside
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
S* 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 [1/0] via 24.234.0.1, outside
C 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 is directly connected, inside
T a s k 1 . 1 7
Configure OSPF on the ASA so that it becomes a neighbor
with R1. Verify that the 1.1.1.0/24 network is reachable.
Configuring OSPF is very similar to setting up the EIGRP
network except that we must be sure to add the 24.234.0.0
network to the proper area.
ASA1(config)# router ospf 1
ASA1(config-router)# network 24.234.0.0 255.255.255.0 area 100
We can verify the neighbor relationship with R1 by using
the command show ospf neighbor.
ASA1(config)# show ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address
Interface
1.1.1.1 1 FULL/BDR 0:00:32 24.234.0.1
outside
A show route will show that the 1.1.1.0/24 network is
reachable via R1.
ASA1(config)# show route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile,
B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E -
EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia -
IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 24.234.0.1 to network 0.0.0.0
O 1.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 [110/11] via 24.234.0.1, 0:03:06,
outside
D 4.4.4.4 255.255.255.255 [90/131072] via 192.168.2.4,
2:13:55, inside
C 24.234.0.0 255.255.255.0 is directly connected, outside
S* 0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 [1/0] via 24.234.0.1, outside
C 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 is directly connected, inside
And a ping to 1.1.1.1 will verify that it is reachable.
ASA1(config)# ping 1.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 1.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/1/1 ms
T a s k 1 . 1 8
Configure EIGRP so that the default route is sent into
EIGRP 1. Configure the ASA so that the EIGRP routes are
sent into OSPF area 100 without summarizing them. Verify
that R4 has received the default route and that R1 has
received the EIGRP routes.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configuring EIGRP to propagate the default route is done
with route redistribution. First we will redistribute the
default route into EIGRP 1.
ASA1(config)# router eigrp 1
ASA1(config-router)# redistribute static
Then we redistribute EIGRP into OSPF. Note that we use the
subnets keyword so that the networks are not summarized.
ASA1(config)# router ospf 1
ASA1(config-router)# redistribute eigrp 1 subnets
Verify that R4 has received the default route by doing a
show ip route. It shows up as an EIGRP external route.
R4#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is 192.168.2.100 to network 0.0.0.0
4.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 4.4.4.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
D*EX 0.0.0.0/0 [170/30720] via 192.168.2.100, 00:12:04,
FastEthernet0/0
C 192.168.0.0/16 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Verify that R1 has received the EIGRP routes with show ip
route. They show up as OSPF external type 2 routes. Notice
that it receives 4.4.4.0/24 because of the subnets
keyword.
R1#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
1.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 1.1.1.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
4.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E2 4.4.4.0 [110/20] via 24.234.0.100, 00:06:47,
FastEthernet0/1
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 24.234.0.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/1
O E2 192.168.0.0/16 [110/20] via 24.234.0.100, 00:14:51,
FastEthernet0/1
Configure Address Translation
T a s k 1 . 1 9
Configure ASA1 to require a NAT rule for traffic passing
through it.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
To make ASA1 require a NAT rule use the global command
nat-control.
ASA1(config)# nat-control
T a s k 1 . 2 0
Configure dynamic address translation so that any outbound
traffic from the 192.168.0.0/16 network translated to the
outside interfaces IP address.
To translate from an entire network to a single IP you must
use PAT. First define the inside network to be translated.
Note the NAT ID of 1 after the (inside) keyword.
ASA1(config)# nat (inside) 1 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0
Then, using the global command and the same NAT ID used
to configure the translation. We use the interface
keyword but you could also type the IP address or a range
of IPs.
ASA1(config)# global (outside) 1 interface
INFO: outside interface address added to PAT pool
T a s k 1 . 2 1
Configure NAT so that the ACS server is reachable from the
outside as 24.234.0.101. This host is sensitive to DoS
attacks, so set the total number of TCP connections allowed
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
to no more than 100 and the number of embryonic connections
allowed per host to 20.
Use the static command to allow the ACS server to be
reached from the outside. We use the TCP keyword to set
TCP specific parameters and 100 for the total TCP
connections allowed. The second number is the total number
of embryonic TCP connections allow per host to the ACS
server.
ASA1(config)# static (inside,outside) 24.234.0.101 192.168.2.101
tcp 100 20
T a s k 1 . 2 2
Configure NAT so that hosts on the outside who telnet to
24.234.0.4 on port 2323 are able to reach R4 on port 23.
This type of NAT is known as port-redirection or port-
forwarding. The static command follows the same basic
format but we use TCP before the IP is entered and the
TCP ports after the IP addresses.
ASA1(config)# static (inside,outside) tcp 24.234.0.4 2323
192.168.2.4 23
T a s k 1 . 2 3
Allow SW1 (192.168.2.11) to send traffic to the outside
without changing its IP address.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Nat-control requires a translation, but we can get around
this requirement by using identity NAT, also known as NAT
0. Notice that the NAT ID is set to 0.
ASA1(config)# nat (inside) 0 192.168.2.11 255.255.255.255
nat 0 192.168.2.11 will be identity translated for outbound
T a s k 1 . 2 4
Dynamically translate R4s address to 24.234.0.254 only
when pings are sent from R4 to R1.
A NAT translation based on requests from specific hosts is
known as policy NAT. An ACL is used to identify the
specific traffic. That ACL is then tied to a NAT ID. Notice
that we use a different NAT ID than that used for our PAT.
ASA1(config)# access-list POLICY_NAT extended permit icmp host
192.168.2.4 host 24.234.0.1
ASA1(config)# nat (inside) 2 access-list POLICY_NAT
ASA1(config)# global (outside) 2 24.234.0.254
INFO: Global 24.234.0.254 will be Port Address Translated
T a s k 1 . 2 5
Verify that your PAT configuration is working, and that the
static and policy NATs are in the ASAs translation table.
First, verify the PAT configuration is working by
telnetting from R4 to R1.
R4#telnet 24.234.0.1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Trying 24.234.0.1 ... Open
R1#
To see the translation table on the ASA use the show xlate
detail command. We can see TCP PAT from R4s address on
the inside to the ASAs outside IP. The flags show as ri
which indicates a port map and a dynamic translation. We
can also see the static translation for the ACS server
which has the s or static flag and the policy NAT which
has the sr flags.
ASA1(config)# show xlate detail
3 in use, 3 most used
Flags: D - DNS, d - dump, I - identity, i - dynamic, n - no
random,
r - portmap, s - static
TCP PAT from inside:192.168.2.4/23 to outside:24.234.0.4/2323
flags sr
NAT from inside:192.168.2.101 to outside:24.234.0.101 flags s
TCP PAT from inside:192.168.2.4/17116 to
outside:24.234.0.100/17803 flags ri
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure ACLs
T a s k 1 . 2 7
On ASA1, create a standard ACL called R1 to permit all
traffic from R1. Do not apply it to any interface.
A standard ACL is very basic, it permits or denies based
only on the source IP address.
ASA1(config)# access-list R1 standard permit host 24.234.0.1
T a s k 1 . 2 8
On ASA1, setup an ACL called OUTSIDE that will protect your
network from outside attacks. When it is complete, apply it
for traffic incoming to the outside interface. All traffic
should be denied EXCEPT for:
Telnet from any outside host to R4s outside address
on port 2323
RADIUS from R1 to the ACS servers outside IP address
This second ACL gives us a good mix of TCP, UDP and a
routing protocol. Regardless of which protocol were
working with, the order is the same. Permit/Deny->protocol-
>From this address/port->To this address/port. Remember
that there is an implicit deny at the end of the ACL, so if
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
a packet doesnt match any of the permit lines it will be
dropped.
ASA1(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit tcp any host
24.234.0.4 eq 2323
ASA1(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit udp host
24.234.0.1 host 24.234.0.101 eq radius
ACLs are applied with the access-group command for
traffic that is entering or leaving an interface. In this
case it is entering the interface so we use the in keyword.
ASA1(config)# access-group OUTSIDE in interface outside
T a s k 1 . 2 9
All traffic from R4 to anywhere should be allowed during
business hours (9am to 5pm) but should be denied at all
other times. Create an ACL called INSIDE that will meet
these criteria and apply it to traffic inbound to the
inside interface. Log all denied traffic.
This is an example of a time based ACL. To accomplish the
task we first have to create a time range using the time-
range command. Time-range is based on a 24 hour clock.
ASA1(config)# time-range R4_BLOCK
ASA1(config-time-range)# periodic daily 00:00 to 08:59
ASA1(config-time-range)# periodic daily 17:01 to 23:59
Next, we have to apply the time range to an ACL deny entry.
Remember that we also have to permit all other traffic at
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
all times so that it wont be dropped by the implicit deny
at the end of the ACL. Note the log keyword in the deny
statement. This will generate log entries when this line is
matched.
ASA1# access-list INSIDE extended deny ip host 192.168.2.4 any
log time-range R4_BLOCK
ASA1# access-list INSIDE extended permit ip any any
Now we need to apply this ACL to the inside interface.
ASA1(config)# access-group INSIDE in interface inside
T a s k 1 . 3 0
When a traffic flow matches the INSIDE ACL time based
entry, the flow is cached. Configure the ASA so that an
error message is generated when the number of these cached
flows exceeds 2000.
To set a maximum number of cached flows use the deny-flow-
max command. This is useful in detecting a DoS attack.
ASA1(config)# access-list deny-flow-max 2000
T a s k 1 . 3 1
Verify that the OUTSIDE ACL is applied and working by
telnetting from R1 to 24.234.0.4 on port 2323.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
On R1, use telnet to 24.234.0.4 2323 to verify that the ACL
is allowing the traffic and that the port map is working.
R1#telnet 24.234.0.4 2323
Trying 24.234.0.4, 2323 ... Open
R4#
Now, on the ASA, further verify that the ACL allowed the
traffic with show access-list OUTSIDE. Notice that the
hit count is 1 for the line which permits the telnet
traffic.
ASA1(config)# show access-list OUTSIDE
access-list OUTSIDE; 2 elements
access-list OUTSIDE line 1 extended permit tcp any host
24.234.0.4 eq 2323 (hitcnt=1) 0x84f0d3e2
access-list OUTSIDE line 2 extended permit udp host 24.234.0.1
host 24.234.0.101 eq radius (hitcnt=0) 0x24db0f17
Configure Object Groups
T a s k 1 . 3 2
Create a network object group called MAILERS and add both
R4 and SW1 (192.168.2.11) to it.
Create the group with the object-group command and the
network keyword. Then add the object to the group with the
network-object command. We added individual hosts with the
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
host keyword, but you can also add networks with an IP
address and subnet mask.
ASA1(config)# object-group network MAILERS
ASA1(config-network)# network-object host 192.168.2.4
ASA1(config-network)# network-object host 192.168.2.11
T a s k 1 . 3 3
Create a service object group called MAIL_PORTS and add DNS
(TCP) and SMTP to it.
A service group is also created with the object-group
command, using the service keyword.
ASA1(config)# object-group service MAIL_PORTS
ASA1(config-service)# service-object tcp eq domain
ASA1(config-service)# service-object tcp eq smtp
T a s k 1 . 3 4
Add a single line to the INSIDE ACL that will block R4 and
SW1 from sending e-mail or DNS to servers outside the local
network.
Now were going to use our object groups to save several
lines in an ACL. Remember that there is a permit ip any any
near the end of the ACL so we have to insert the deny
statement before it. Note that instead of deny <protocol>
we have denied the object group.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# access-list INSIDE line 1 deny object-group
MAIL_PORTS object-group MAILERS any
With this line in place, issue the show access-list
INSIDE command to see how many lines we saved by using the
object groups.
ASA1(config)# show access-list INSIDE
access-list INSIDE; 8 elements
access-list INSIDE line 1 extended deny object-group MAIL_PORTS
object-group MAILERS any 0x3eef95c1
access-list INSIDE line 1 extended deny tcp host 192.168.2.4
any eq domain (hitcnt=0) 0x8b85ea80
access-list INSIDE line 1 extended deny tcp host 192.168.2.1
any eq domain (hitcnt=0) 0x60d1a14a
access-list INSIDE line 1 extended deny tcp host 192.168.2.4
any eq smtp (hitcnt=0) 0x4e7ad89b
access-list INSIDE line 1 extended deny tcp host 192.168.2.1
any eq smtp (hitcnt=0) 0x441049a2
access-list INSIDE line 2 extended deny ip host 192.168.2.4 any
log informational interval 300 time-range R4_BLOCK (hitcnt=0)
(inactive) 0x7b2cc583
access-list INSIDE line 3 extended permit ip any any (hitcnt=0)
0x2a29f5f2
Configure Sub Interfaces with VLANs
T a s k 1 . 3 5
Configure E0/1.11 on VLAN 11. Name it DMZ1 and give it an
IP address of 172.16.11.100/24. Set the security level to
50.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
6 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Sub-interfaces are configured like regular interfaces with
the addition of .x where x is the number of the sub-
interface. Add the sub-interface to a vlan with the vlan
command. When sub-interfaces with VLANS are configured on
an interface, the physical interface acts as a DOT1Q trunk.
ASA1(config)# interface Ethernet0/1.11
ASA1(config-subif)# vlan 11
ASA1(config-subif)# nameif DMZ1
ASA1(config-subif)# security-level 50
ASA1(config-subif)# ip address 172.16.11.100 255.255.255.0
T a s k 1 . 3 6
Configure E0/1.22 on VLAN 22. Name it DMZ2 and give it an
IP address of 172.16.22.100/24. Set the security level to
50.
This sub-interface is configured just like the one above.
ASA1(config)# interface Ethernet0/1.22
ASA1(config-subif)# vlan 22
ASA1(config-subif)# nameif DMZ2
ASA1(config-subif)# security-level 50
ASA1(config-subif)# ip address 172.16.22.100 255.255.255.0
T a s k 1 . 3 7
Bring up interface E0/1.
The sub-interfaces will not come up unless the physical
interface is brought up.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# int e0/1
ASA1(config-if)# no shut
T a s k 1 . 3 8
Ping to both R2 and R3 to verify connectivity to the DMZ
hosts. Ping from R2 to R3.
The pings to the DMZ routers from the firewall should be
successful.
ASA1(config)# ping 172.16.11.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.11.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/1/1 ms
ASA1(config)# ping 172.16.22.3
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.22.3, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/10 ms
But the pings from R2 to R3 should fail.
R2#ping 172.16.22.3
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.22.3, timeout is 2
seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 3 9
Correct the issue that is stopping pings between the DMZ
routers.
The pings are being dropped at the firewall even though the
security levels of the DMZ interfaces are both 50. This is
the default behavior of an ASA. For the traffic to be
allowed, you must use the same-security-traffic command.
We permit inter-interface because the traffic is going
from one interface to another. In this case the sub-
interfaces act as different interfaces even though they are
entering and exiting the same physical interface.
ASA1(config)# same-security-traffic permit inter-interface
Now try the ping from R2 to R3 again.
R2#ping 172.16.22.3
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.22.3, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
Configure Filtering
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 4 0
Remove activex objects from http traffic going from any
source to any destination.
This is done with the filter activex command. You can
enter a port number or range to filter traffic on, but we
used http instead of 80. Notice the 0 0 0 0, each zero is
shorthand for 0.0.0.0. This means match all or from any to
any.
ASA1(config)# filter activex http 0 0 0 0
T a s k 1 . 4 1
Stop hosts on the 192.168.0.0/16 network from downloading
java applets via http.
Java is filtered using the same format as activex. In this
example we entered 80 instead of http. We also entered a
source for the traffic, the 192.168.0.0/16 network. The
destination is still any, shortened to 0 0. Its important
to note that this command blocks the java from returning to
the ASA through the outbound connection. It still allows
the HTTP traffic, but with the source for the java applet
commented out.
ASA1(config)# filter java 80 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 0 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 4 2
Configure the ASA to use a URL filtering server in the DMZ.
The server will use the IP address of R2 and will be
running Websense with the default settings.
A URL filtering server is configured with the command url-
server. Notice the interface the server is reached through
in parenthesis, the vendor used and the IP of the server.
ASA1(config)# url-server (DMZ1) vendor websense host 172.16.11.2
T a s k 1 . 4 3
Filter URLs using the newly setup websense server. Do this
for all traffic from the 192.168.0.0/16 network. Block
attempts to use a proxy server and remove any cgi-
parameters.
With the URL filtering server configured, you must choose
which outgoing traffic will be checked against the servers
policy. This is done with the filter url command. The
IPs are entered in a from->to format and we again use the
0 0 shorthand to filter from our network to any
destination. The proxy-block option is used to block
attempts to use an http proxy server. The cgi-truncate
option removes CGI script parameters from the URL.
ASA1(config)# filter url http 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 0 0 proxy-
block cgi-truncate
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 4 4
The ACS server should be exempt from the URL filtering
policy.
Exceptions to the filtering policy can be added using the
filter url except command. These can be specific hosts or
entire networks, determined by the subnet mask. We use a 32
bit mask to identify only the ACS server host address.
ASA1(config)# filter url except 192.168.2.101 255.255.255.255 0
0
Configure Modular Policy Framework
T a s k 1 . 4 5
Ping from R4 to R1. Use logging to determine why the pings
are failing.
Pings from R4 to R1 are failing even though they are coming
from the inside (trusted) network to the outside.
R4#ping 24.234.0.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.0.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Using logging shows that NAT is translating R4s address
properly and that a flow is being created for the ICMP
connection. The returning pings are being blocked by the
outside ACL.
ASA1(config)# show logging | inc 24.234.0.1
Feb 23 2009 13:53:05: %ASA-6-302020: Built outbound ICMP
connection for faddr 24.234.0.1/0 gaddr 24.234.0.254/56751 laddr
192.168.2.4/3
Feb 23 2009 13:53:05: %ASA-4-106023: Deny icmp src
outside:24.234.0.1 dst inside:24.234.0.254 (type 0, code 0) by
access-group "OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 23 2009 13:53:07: %ASA-4-106023: Deny icmp src
outside:24.234.0.1 dst inside:24.234.0.254 (type 0, code 0) by
access-group "OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 23 2009 13:53:09: %ASA-4-106023: Deny icmp src
outside:24.234.0.1 dst inside:24.234.0.254 (type 0, code 0) by
access-group "OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 23 2009 13:53:11: %ASA-4-106023: Deny icmp src
outside:24.234.0.1 dst inside:24.234.0.254 (type 0, code 0) by
access-group "OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 23 2009 13:53:13: %ASA-4-106023: Deny icmp src
outside:24.234.0.1 dst inside:24.234.0.254 (type 0, code 0) by
access-group "OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 23 2009 13:53:15: %ASA-6-302021: Teardown ICMP connection
for faddr 24.234.0.1/0 gaddr 24.234.0.254/56751 laddr
192.168.2.4/3
T a s k 1 . 4 6
View the default modular policy framework configuration on
the ASA and then correct it to solve the ping issue. Do not
use an ACL to accomplish this. Verify that R4 can ping R1.
View the default MPF configuration with the show service-
policy command. Notice that ICMP is not included in the
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
inspection_default class-map. This explains why outgoing
ICMP is allowed but the return traffic is dropped.
ASA1(config)# show service-policy
Global policy:
Service-policy: global_policy
Class-map: inspection_default
Inspect: dns migrated_dns_map_1, packet 0, drop 0, reset-
drop 0
Inspect: ftp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: h323 h225 _default_h323_map, packet 0, drop 0,
reset-drop 0
Inspect: h323 ras _default_h323_map, packet 0, drop 0,
reset-drop 0
Inspect: netbios, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: rsh, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: rtsp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: skinny , packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: esmtp _default_esmtp_map, packet 0, drop 0,
reset-drop 0
Inspect: sqlnet, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: sunrpc, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: tftp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: sip , packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: xdmcp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
This can be corrected by editing the global_policy policy-
map and adding inspect ICMP to the inspection_default
class.
ASA1(config)# policy-map global_policy
ASA1(config-pmap)# class inspection_default
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# inspect icmp
Verify by once again pinging from R4 to R1, the pings are
now successful.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4#ping 24.234.0.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.0.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
You can also look at the show service-policy command
again to see that the ICMP packet counter has increased.
ASA1(config-pmap)# show service-policy
Global policy:
Service-policy: global_policy
Class-map: inspection_default
Inspect: icmp, packet 10, drop 0, reset-drop 0
T a s k 1 . 4 7
Configure the ASA so that R2 is not allowed multiple telnet
sessions to R3.
Modular policy framework is used in situations where ACLs
do not provide enough control. In this case we must first
define the traffic we want to act on with an ACL.
ASA1(config)# access-list R2_TELNET permit tcp host 172.16.11.2
host 172.16.22.3 eq telnet
Then we have to create a class map which creates a class
of traffic that matches our ACL.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# class-map R2_TELNET
ASA1(config-cmap)# match access-list R2_TELNET
A policy map is created to apply an action to traffic
matching our class. In this case the action is to set the
maximum number of connections allowed per client to 1.
ASA1(config-cmap)# policy-map R2_TELNET
ASA1(config-pmap)# class R2_TELNET
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# set connection per-client-max 1
Finally we apply this policy to an interface (or globally)
with a service-policy.
ASA1(config)# service-policy R2_TELNET interface DMZ1
T a s k 1 . 4 8
Verify that R2 is limited to 1 telnet connection at a time.
The password is cisco.
First, telnet from R2 to R3
R2#telnet 172.16.22.3
Trying 172.16.22.3 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
R3>
Then drop back to R2 leaving the session open with
shift_ctrl_66,x. Issue the show sessions command to
verify your telnet connection is still open.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
7 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2#show sessions
Conn Host Address Byte Idle Conn
Name
* 1 172.16.22.3 172.16.22.3 0 0
172.16.22.3
Now attempt to open another telnet connection to R3. The
connection will fail.
R2#telnet 172.16.22.3
Trying 172.16.22.3 ...
% Connection timed out; remote host not responding
Further verify by viewing the ASA log. Notice that the per
client max has been exceeded.
ASA1(config)# show logging | inc 172.16.11.2
Feb 23 2009 15:04:58: %ASA-3-201013: Per-client connection limit
exceeded 1/1 for input packet from 172.16.11.2/38100 to
172.16.22.3/23 on interface DMZ1
Configure Application~Aware Inspection
T a s k 1 . 4 9
Allow R1 to FTP to the ACS servers outside IP address.
Ensure that this traffic conforms to the RFCs for FTP.
Reset the connection if R1 attempts to use the PUT
command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
First we must allow the FTP traffic, and this is done by
adding a line to the OUTSIDE ACL.
ASA1(config)# access-list OUTSIDE extended permit tcp host
24.234.0.1 host 24.234.0.101 eq ftp
Now we have to setup our application level inspection. This
is an added set of steps to the regular MPF configuration.
We will identify the specific type of layer 7 traffic we
want; in this case the ftp put command. To do this we use
class-map type inspect ftp.
ASA1(config)# class-map type inspect ftp match-all ACS_FTP
ASA1(config-cmap)# match request-command put
Now we are going to apply actions to the identified layer 7
traffic with a policy-map type inspect ftp. The action we
apply is reset.
ASA1(config)# policy-map type inspect ftp ACS_FTP
ASA1(config-pmap)# class ACS_FTP
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# reset
Policy map type inspects cannot be directly applied to an
interface. They must be nested within a normal layer 3/4
policy map. So we will proceed with our normal MPF
procedure. Identifying the layer 3/4 traffic to be acted on
with an ACL that will be used in a class map, in this case
R1s connection to the ACS outside address via FTP.
ASA1(config)# access-list R1_ACS extended permit tcp host
24.234.0.1 host 24.234.0.101 eq ftp
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# class-map R1_ACS
ASA1(config-cmap)# match access-list R1_ACS
Now we will apply actions to the identified traffic using a
layer 3/4 policy map. Notice that we inspect ftp with the
strict option which ensures that the FTP traffic conforms
to the FTP RFCs. Also note the ACS_FTP at the end. This is
our layer 7 policy map. This means that FTP will be
inspected and passed as normal, UNLESS the put command is
used, in which case the connection will be reset.
ASA1(config)# policy-map R1_ACS
ASA1(config-pmap)# class R1_ACS
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# inspect ftp strict ACS_FTP
Finally, we have to apply the policy map to an interface.
This is done with the service-policy command.
ASA1(config)# service-policy R1_ACS interface outside
T a s k 1 . 5 0
Create and test regular expressions that will match the
domains illegal.com and spam.net
Create the regular expressions with the regex command.
ASA1(config)# regex illegal "illegal\.com"
ASA1(config)# regex spam "spam\.net"
Test them with the test command. Notice that even though
there is a www. before the phrase it still matches.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# test regex www.illegal.com "illegal\.com"
INFO: Regular expression match succeeded.
ASA1(config)# test regex www.spam.net "spam\.net"
INFO: Regular expression match succeeded.
T a s k 1 . 5 1
Drop and log outgoing http traffic from the ACS server when
it contains either of the domain names identified by the
regular expressions.
First we must create a class type regex that will identify
the phrases. Note the match-any option meaning either of
the phrases (not both) can be matched.
ASA1(config)# class-map type regex match-any BAD_DOMAINS
ASA1(config-cmap)# match regex illegal
ASA1(config-cmap)# match regex spam
Next we will create a class-map type inspect that will
identify the specific layer 7 attributes we want to
identify, in this case the domains we want to drop. Notice
that we are matching a request url that matches one of our
BAD_DOMAINS regular expressions.
ASA1(config)# class-map type inspect http ACS_URL
ASA1(config-cmap)# match request uri regex class BAD_DOMAINS
We have now identified the specific layer 7 traffic and
must apply actions to it with a policy-map type inspect.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Note that we apply multiple actions, dropping the
connection and logging the dropped connection.
ASA1(config-cmap)# policy-map type inspect http ACS_URL
ASA1(config-pmap)# class ACS_URL
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# drop-connection log
Now we need to create an ACL that will identify the layer
3/4 traffic. Traffic from the ACS to any host using http.
ASA1(config)# access-list ACS_HTTP permit tcp host 192.168.2.101
any eq http
Well use this ACL in a layer 3/4 class-map to identify the
traffic.
ASA1(config)# class-map ACS_HTTP
ASA1(config-cmap)# match access-list ACS_HTTP
Now well apply actions to the traffic identified by the
layer 3/4 class-map with a policy-map. Note the inspect
http ACS_URL which nests our layer 7 policy within the
layer 3/4 policy-map.
ASA1(config)# policy-map ACS_HTTP
ASA1(config-pmap)# class ACS_HTTP
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# inspect http ACS_URL
Finally, apply the policy so that it will affect outgoing
traffic from the ACS server. This is done with service-
policy on the inside interface.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# service-policy ACS_HTTP interface inside
T a s k 1 . 5 2
Verify that both of your layer 3/4 policies are applied to
the correct interfaces and are using the correct layer 7
policies.
Because the configuration is lengthy, its always a good
idea to double check your policies. First verify the layer
3/4 policies are applied correctly with show service-
policy (global policy output removed). Note that on the
inside interface, the ACS_HTTP policy is applied and that
it is inspecting http with the ACS_URL layer 7 policy map.
Also note that the R1_ACS policy is applied to the outside
interface and is inspecting ftp strict using the ACS_FTP
layer 7 policy map.
ASA1# show service-policy
Interface inside:
Service-policy: ACS_HTTP
Class-map: ACS_HTTP
Inspect: http ACS_URL, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Interface outside:
Service-policy: R1_ACS
Class-map: R1_ACS
Inspect: ftp strict ACS_FTP, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop
0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Quality of Service
T a s k 1 . 5 3
DMZ2 contains mail servers. The mail servers send an
excessive amount of SMTP traffic causing connectivity and
speed problems for the entire network. Because of this,
police outgoing SMTP bandwidth to no more than 20mbps. If
the SMTP traffic exceeds this rate, drop it.
This is done with MPF, and as such we need a class map to
identify the SMTP traffic. Instead of matching an ACL as in
previous examples, were going to match a TCP port.
ASA1(config)# class-map SMTP_LIMIT
ASA1(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq smtp
Now that weve identified our traffic, we will apply
actions to it with a policy map. We will be using the QoS
action police. With this command were policing the
output rate to 20,000,000 bits per second which is 20MB.
Notice that if the traffic rate conforms (up to 20MB) it
will be transmitted but if it exceeds (over 20MB) it will
be dropped.
ASA1(config)# policy-map SMTP_LIMIT
ASA1(config-pmap)# class SMTP_LIMIT
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# police output 20000000 conform-action
transmit exceed-action drop
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
We now need to apply the policy to an interface, in this
case DMZ2 since that is where the SMTP traffic originates
from.
ASA1(config)# service-policy SMTP_LIMIT interface DMZ2
T a s k 1 . 5 4
Clients on the inside network run streaming audio/video
applications that use RTP on UDP ports 10000-20000. Because
of its time sensitive nature, this traffic should be given
priority over other traffic. The queue size for these
packets should be increased to the maximum size.
This QoS feature is known as priority queuing. To configure
it, first setup the priority queue on an interface, in this
case inside. Per the task, we increase the default queue
size from 1024 to 2048.
ASA1(config)# priority-queue inside
ASA1(config-priority-queue)# queue-limit 2048
Next we need to identify the traffic that will be
prioritized. Were going to create a class-map that matches
RTP starting on UDP port 10000 with a range of 10000,
meaning ports 10000-20000.
ASA1(config)# class-map RTP_INSIDE
ASA1(config-cmap)# match rtp 10000 10000
Now we need to apply an action to the identified traffic
with a policy-map. We already have a policy map in place
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
for the inside interface, so we simply add our class to it
with the class command. Then set the action to
priority. The policy map is already applied to the inside
interface so no further configuration is needed.
ASA1(config)# policy-map ACS_HTTP
ASA1(config-pmap)# class RTP_INSIDE
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# priority
Configure Layer 2 Transparent Firewall
T a s k 1 . 5 5
Setup ASA2 as a transparent firewall. Set the hostname to
ASA2. Set the management IP to 24.234.2.200. Enable
buffered logging with time-stamps at level 6.
Before any configuration, use the command firewall
transparent to set the ASA to transparent mode.
ciscoasa(config)# firewall transparent
You should already be familiar with the hostname command
from the previous ASA configuration. The management IP of a
transparent firewall is setup from global configuration
mode with the ip address command.
ciscoasa(config)# hostname ASA2
ASA2(config)# ip address 24.234.2.200 255.255.255.0
Logging configuration is identical to a standard ASA.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA2(config)# logging buffered 6
ASA2(config)# logging timestamp
ASA2(config)# logging enable
T a s k 1 . 5 6
Configure interface e0/2.55 as the inside interface and set
it to VLAN 55.
Sub-interfaces are configured like a standard ASA, except
that they do not need an IP address since they are not
working at layer 3.
ASA2(config)# int e0/2.55
ASA2(config-subif)# vlan 55
ASA2(config-subif)# nameif inside
INFO: Security level for "inside" set to 100 by default.
T a s k 1 . 5 7
Configure interface e0/2.66 as the outside interface and
set it to VLAN 66.
e0/2.66 is setup similar to e0/2.55
ASA2(config)# int e0/2.66
ASA2(config-subif)# vlan 66
ASA2(config-subif)# nameif outside
INFO: Security level for "outside" set to 0 by default.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
8 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 5 8
Add ICMP to the global inspect policy. Ping from R5 to R6
to verify lack of connectivity. Now bring up e0/2 and
repeat the ping test.
You should be familiar with adding icmp inspection to the
global_policy from the previous ASA configuration.
ASA2(config)# policy-map global_policy
ASA2(config-pmap)# class inspection_default
ASA2(config-pmap-c)# inspect icmp
Ping from R5 to R6. This ping is expected to fail since
the routers are on separate VLANs and there is nothing to
bridge the L2 traffic from one vlan to another.
R5#ping 24.234.2.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.2.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
Bring up physical interface e0/2 and repeat the ping.
Notice that the ping is now successful because the firewall
is bridging the traffic at L2.
ASA2(config)# interface e0/2
ASA2(config-if)# no shut
R5#ping 24.234.2.6
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.2.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
T a s k 1 . 5 9
View the log to see what kind of traffic is being denied.
Configure the ASA to allow this traffic and verify that it
is working on the routers.
View the log with show logging. Notice that the traffic
denied is IP protocol 88 with a destination address of
224.0.0.10. This is EIGRP traffic.
ASA2(config)# show logging
Feb 25 2009 15:27:03: %ASA-3-106010: Deny inbound protocol 88
src outside:24.234.2.6 dst inside:224.0.0.10
Feb 25 2009 15:27:04: %ASA-3-106010: Deny inbound protocol 88
src inside:24.234.2.5 dst outside:224.0.0.10
Feb 25 2009 15:27:08: %ASA-3-106010: Deny inbound protocol 88
src outside:24.234.2.6 dst inside:224.0.0.10
Feb 25 2009 15:27:08: %ASA-3-106010: Deny inbound protocol 88
src inside:24.234.2.5 dst outside:224.0.0.10
To permit this traffic we must create and apply ACLs in
both directions. First for the traffic from the inside-
>out.
ASA2(config)# access-list INSIDE permit eigrp host 24.234.2.5
host 224.0.0.10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA2(config)# access-group INSIDE in interface inside
And then for the traffic from the outside->in
ASA2(config)# access-list OUTSIDE permit eigrp host 24.234.2.6
host 224.0.0.10
ASA2(config)# access-group OUTSIDE in interface outside
Youll notice that neighbor adjacencies are formed on the
routers but they are going up and down. Viewing the ASA log
again points to the reason why. The 224.0.0.10 traffic is
allowed, but now the EIGRP traffic between the routers
themselves is being denied.
ASA2(config)# show logging
cess-group "INSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 25 2009 15:39:44: %ASA-4-106023: Deny protocol 88 src
outside:24.234.2.6 dst inside:24.234.2.5 by access-group
"OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 25 2009 15:39:44: %ASA-4-106023: Deny protocol 88 src
inside:24.234.2.5 dst outside:24.234.2.6 by access-group
"INSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
Feb 25 2009 15:39:49: %ASA-4-106023: Deny protocol 88 src
outside:24.234.2.6 dst inside:24.234.2.5 by access-group
"OUTSIDE" [0x0, 0x0]
To correct this we must add lines to both of our ACLs to
permit the router to router EIGRP traffic.
ASA2(config)# access-list OUTSIDE permit eigrp host 24.234.2.6
host 24.234.2.5
ASA2(config)# access-list INSIDE permit eigrp host 24.234.2.5
host 24.234.2.6
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The EIGRP neighbor adjacencies are now up and stable. You
can view them on the routers.
R5#sho ip eigrp neighbors
IP-EIGRP neighbors for process 1
H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT
RTO Q Seq
(sec) (ms)
Cnt Num
0 24.234.2.6 Fa0/1 13 00:01:24 4
200 0 12
T a s k 1 . 6 0
A host on the outside is trying to perform a man in the
middle attack by responding to ARP requests for IP
24.234.2.55 with its own MAC address. The real MAC that
should be mapped to 24.234.2.55 is 001b.533b.5555.
Configure the ASA to drop the bad ARP traffic.
We can defend against man in the middle attacks with ARP
inspection. We are going to statically map IP 24.234.2.55
to MAC 001b.533b.5555 and the inside interface with the
arp command. After mapping with ARP, we need to apply the
ARP inspection on the outside interface with the arp-
inspection command.
ASA2(config)# arp inside 24.234.2.55 001b.533b.5555
ASA2(config)# arp-inspection outside enable
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 6 1
Enable ICMP from the inside networks to anywhere. Verify
that the ASA is blocking the bad ARP responses by pinging
from R5 to 24.234.2.55 and viewing the firewall log.
First, we have to allow ICMP from our inside networks to
anywhere. This is done by adding an entry to the INSIDE
ACL.
ASA2(config)# access-list INSIDE extended permit icmp any any
Then, try to ping from R5 to 24.234.2.55. The host on the
outside that is MAC spoofing will try to respond to the ARP
requests, but the ASA will block them since they have the
wrong MAC address and are coming from the wrong interface.
View the log, the entry is very clear as to why the traffic
is being blocked.
ASA2(config)# show logging
Feb 25 2009 16:23:01: %ASA-3-322002: ARP inspection check failed
for arp response received from host 001b.533b.e951 on interface
outside. This host is advertising MAC Address 001b.533b.e951 for
IP Address 24.234.2.55, which is statically bound to MAC Address
001b.533b.5555
Configure Security Contexts
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 6 2
Prepare for multiple context mode. Erase the configurations
on both ASA1 and ASA2. Change ASA2 to routed mode with the
no firewall transparent command. Reload both firewalls.
This is done with the write erase command. Reload the
firewall with the reload command.
ASA1# write erase
Erase configuration in flash memory? [confirm]
[OK]
ASA1# reload
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
On ASA 2, be sure to change back to routed mode with no
firewall transparent.
ASA2(config)# no firewall transparent
T a s k 1 . 6 3
Configure ASA1 as a multiple context firewall. Once it
reboots configure the hostname to ASA.
The firewall mode is changed from single context to
multiple context with the mode command. After the reboot
youll be in the system execution space. Youll notice that
many of the standard ASA commands are no longer available.
This is because the system execution space is primarily
used for configuring resources that will be used by the
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
contexts. The actual firewall configuration that we are use
to will be done later within the contexts themselves.
ciscoasa(config)# mode multiple
WARNING: This command will change the behavior of the device
WARNING: This command will initiate a Reboot
Proceed with change mode? [confirm]
Convert the system configuration? [confirm]
Security context mode: multiple
After the reboot well name the firewall ASA.
ciscoasa(config)# hostname ASA
ASA(config)#
T a s k 1 . 6 4
Setup interfaces for future contexts. Interfaces should use
unique mac addresses. Create interface e0/1.11 and set it
to vlan 11. Create interface e0/1.22 and set it to vlan 22.
Enable interfaces e0/0, e0/1 and e0/2.
Unique mac addresses can be configured with the mac-
address auto command.
ASA(config)# mac-address auto
Weve created sub-interfaces on previous configurations and
the commands are the same.
ASA(config)# int e0/1.11
ASA(config-subif)# vlan 11
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA(config-subif)# int e0/1.22
ASA(config-subif)# vlan 22
Interfaces are enabled with the no shut command
ASA(config)# int e0/0
ASA(config-if)# no shut
ASA(config-if)# int e0/1
ASA(config-if)# no shut
ASA(config-if)# int e0/2
ASA(config-if)# no shut
T a s k 1 . 6 5
Delete any existing .cfg files. Create the admin context.
Assign it interface e0/2. Set the config to disk0:
Before creating contexts its a good idea to remove any
existing configuration files that might be on your ASA.
This is done with the delete command.
ASA1# delete *.cfg
Delete filename [*.cfg]?
Delete disk0:/old_running.cfg? [confirm]
Delete disk0:/c1.cfg? [confirm]
Delete disk0:/c2.cfg? [confirm]
Delete disk0:/admin.cfg? [confirm]
The admin context is used for firewall and context
management, sending system related logs, etc To create it,
use the admin-context command. Like other contexts, you
can configure it with the context command.
ASA1(config)# admin-context admin
ASA1(config)# context admin
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Interfaces are added to a context with the allocate-
interface command.
ASA(config-ctx)# allocate-interface e0/2
The configuration file for the context is set with the
config-url command. If the file doesnt already exist, it
will be created. Note the .cfg which indicates a
configuration file.
ASA(config-ctx)# config-url disk0:admin.cfg
INFO: Converting disk0:admin.cfg to disk0:/admin.cfg
WARNING: Could not fetch the URL disk0:/admin.cfg
INFO: Creating context with default config
INFO: Admin context will take some time to come up .... please
wait.
T a s k 1 . 6 6
Create context c1. Assign it interfaces e0/0 and e0/1.11.
Save the config to disk0:
The configuration of context c1 is very similar to the
admin context. We will create the context, allocate
interfaces to it and set a configuration file location.
ASA(config)# context c1
Creating context 'c1'... Done. (2)
ASA(config-ctx)# allocate-interface e0/0
ASA(config-ctx)# allocate-interface e0/1.11
ASA(config-ctx)# config-url disk0:c1.cfg
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
INFO: Converting disk0:c1.cfg to disk0:/c1.cfg
WARNING: Could not fetch the URL disk0:/c1.cfg
INFO: Creating context with default config
T a s k 1 . 6 7
Create context c2. Assign it interfaces e0/0 and e0/1.22.
Save the config to disk0:
Context c2 is setup very similar to context c1. Notice that
contexts c1 and c2 are sharing interface e0/0. This is
acceptable because the ASA will assign packets to the
appropriate context based on a variety of criteria such as
source and destination IP, VLAN, etc.
ASA(config)# context c2
Creating context 'c2'... Done. (3)
ASA(config-ctx)# allocate-interface e0/0
ASA(config-ctx)# allocate-interface e0/1.22
ASA(config-ctx)# config-url disk0:c2.cfg
INFO: Converting disk0:c2.cfg to disk0:/c2.cfg
WARNING: Could not fetch the URL disk0:/c2.cfg
INFO: Creating context with default config
T a s k 1 . 6 8
Switch to the admin context and setup interface e0/2 as
inside with ip 192.168.2.200/24. Allow the ACS server SSH
access to this context. Verify connectivity to the ACS
server.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
9 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
You can move to context configuration mode with the
changeto context command. In this case well change to
the context admin and enter the listed configuration.
Inside the context, configuration is treated just as if you
were on a physical firewall.
ASA(config)# changeto context admin
ASA/admin(config)# int e0/2
ASA/admin(config-if)# nameif inside
INFO: Security level for "inside" set to 100 by default.
ASA/admin(config-if)# ip address 192.168.2.200 255.255.255.0
SSH access is granted with the ssh command. Notice that we
generated a crypto key and configured the ACS server with a
32 bit mask using the inside option.
ASA1/admin(config)# crypto key generate rsa modulus 1024
ASA/admin(config)# ssh 192.168.2.101 255.255.255.255 inside
We can verify connectivity to the ACS server with a ping.
ASA/admin(config)# ping 192.168.2.101
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.101, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/1/1 ms
T a s k 1 . 6 9
Switch to context c1. Configure e0/0 as outside with IP
address 24.234.0.100/24 and e0/1.11 as inside with IP
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
address 172.16.11.100/24. Add ICMP inspection to the global
policy-map and test connectivity by pinging from R2 to R1.
Switch to context c1 with the changeto command and enter
the required interface configurations.
ASA/admin(config)# changeto context c1
ASA/c1(config)# int e0/0
ASA/c1(config-if)# nameif outside
INFO: Security level for "outside" set to 0 by default.
ASA/c1(config-if)# ip address 24.234.0.100 255.255.255.0
ASA/c1(config-if)# int e0/1.11
ASA/c1(config-if)# nameif inside
INFO: Security level for "inside" set to 100 by default.
ASA/c1(config-if)# ip address 172.16.11.100 255.255.255.0
You should already be familiar with adding ICMP inspect to
the global policy-map.
ASA/c1(config)# policy-map global_policy
ASA/c1(config-pmap)# class inspection_default
ASA/c1(config-pmap-c)# inspect icmp
The final step is to test your configuration by pinging
from R2 to R1. This lets you know that your first context
is operational.
R2#ping 24.234.0.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.0.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 7 0
Switch to context c2. Configure e0/0 as outside with IP
address 24.234.0.200/24 and e0/1.22 as inside with IP
address 172.16.22.100/24. NAT the inside network to the
outside interface address and require a NAT translation for
traffic passing through the firewall. Verify connectivity
with telnet from R3 to R1.
The first part of this contexts configuration is very
similar to c1. We change to the context and setup the
interfaces.
ASA/c1(config)# changeto context c2
ASA/c2(config)# int e0/0
ASA/c2(config-if)# nameif outside
INFO: Security level for "outside" set to 0 by default..
ASA/c2(config-if)# ip address 24.234.0.200 255.255.255.0
ASA/c2(config-if)# int e0/1.22
ASA/c2(config-if)# nameif inside
INFO: Security level for "inside" set to 100 by default
ASA/c2(config-if)# ip address 172.16.22.100 255.255.255.0
Now we have to configure PAT, with nat for the inside
network and global for the outside interface. Dont forget
nat-control to require a translation.
ASA/c2(config)# nat (inside) 1 172.16.22.0 255.255.255.0
ASA/c2(config)# global (outside) 1 interface
INFO: outside interface address added to PAT pool
ASA/c2(config)# nat-control
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Our connectivity test is done with telnet instead of ping.
The telnet is successful although we cant log in. We now
have two virtual firewalls with different policies running
on a single physical ASA.
R3#telnet 24.234.0.1
Trying 24.234.0.1 ... Open
R1#
T a s k 1 . 7 1
Switch back to the system and set the maximum number of
allowed connections for c1 to 200 and the maximum number of
connections for c2 to 100. Set the maximum number of SSH
connections to the admin context to 5.
Change to the system with the changeto system command.
Limits to individual contexts are set by defining a class
with the class command. This should not be confused with
a class-map. The limits are set with the limit-resource
command. Each class can have multiple limit-resource
entries although weve only used one per context in our
example. Once the class is created, configure each context
to join the proper class with the member command.
ASA(config)# class c1
ASA(config-class)# limit-resource conns 200
ASA(config-class)# context c1
ASA(config-ctx)# member c1
ASA(config)# class c2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA(config-class)# limit-resource conns 100
ASA(config-class)# context c2
ASA(config-ctx)# member c2
ASA(config)# class admin
ASA(config-class)# limit-resource ssh 5
ASA(config-class)# context admin
ASA(config-ctx)# member admin
Configure Failover
T a s k 1 . 7 2
Prepare for active/standby failover with ASA2. Set ASA1 as
the primary failover unit. Set the failover interface to
E0/3 and name it failover. Set the failover IP address to
10.1.1.1/24 and the standby to 10.1.1.11. Bring up the
failover interface and enable failover.
Failover configuration is done from the system, not the
contexts. From the system, use the failover lan unit
command to set the firewall to either primary or secondary.
Name and set the interface to be used with failover lan
interface command. Finally, set the IP with the failover
interface ip command. Notice the standby IP is set here as
well.
ASA(config)# failover lan unit primary
ASA(config-if)# failover lan interface failover e0/3
INFO: Non-failover interface config is cleared on Ethernet0/3
and its sub-interfaces
ASA(config)# failover interface ip failover 10.1.1.1
255.255.255.0 standby 10.1.1.11
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Bring up the interface with no shut and enable failover
with failover.
ASA(config)# int e0/3
ASA(config-if)# no shut
ASA(config)# failover
T a s k 1 . 7 3
Prepare ASA2 for failover. Ensure that it is in multiple
mode. Set the failover interface to e0/3 and name it
failover. Set the failover IP address to 10.1.1.1 and the
standby to 10.1.1.11. Bring up the failover interface and
enable failover.
For failover to function, both firewalls must be in the
same mode. Change ASA2 to multiple mode with the mode
multiple command. This will require a reboot.
ciscoasa(config)# mode multiple
WARNING: This command will change the behavior of the device
WARNING: This command will initiate a Reboot
Proceed with change mode? [confirm]
Convert the system configuration? [confirm]
Failover configuration for the secondary unit is almost
identical to the primary. First set the unit as secondary.
Then configure and name interface e0/3 with failover LAN
interface. Set failover interface IP with the same IP and
standby address as ASA1. Issue a no shut command on the
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
failover interface and then enable failover with the
failover command.
ciscoasa(config)# failover lan unit secondary
ciscoasa(config)# failover lan interface failover e0/3
INFO: Non-failover interface config is cleared on Ethernet0/3
and its sub-interfaces
ciscoasa(config)# failover interface ip failover 10.1.1.1
255.255.255.0 standby 10.1.1.11
ciscoasa(config)# int e0/3
ciscoasa(config-if)# no shut
ciscoasa(config)# failover
T a s k 1 . 7 4
Configure SW2 so that fa0/17 and fa0/23 are both on VLAN
66. This will be the failover VLAN.
These are simple switchport configuration commands. The
failover VLAN should be isolated from any other network
traffic. Once this configuration is complete, your failover
replication should complete shortly.
SW2(config)#int fa0/17
SW2(config-if)#sw mode access
SW2(config-if)#sw access vlan 66
SW2(config-if)#int fa0/23
SW2(config-if)#sw mode access
SW2(config-if)# sw access vlan 66
T a s k 1 . 7 5
Verify that unit failover configuration is operational.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Failover can be verified with the show failover command.
This is the output for ASA1. Notice that this host is
listed as Primary Active and the other host as Secondary
Standby Ready. Also notice that stateful failover is not
enabled. Well address this in the next section.
ASA# show failover
Failover On
Failover unit Primary
Failover LAN Interface: failover Ethernet0/3 (up)
Unit Poll frequency 1 seconds, holdtime 15 seconds
Interface Poll frequency 5 seconds, holdtime 25 seconds
Interface Policy 1
Monitored Interfaces 3 of 250 maximum
Version: Ours 8.0(4), Mate 8.0(4)
Last Failover at: 14:11:11 UTC Feb 26 2009
This host: Primary - Active
Active time: 1521 (sec)
slot 0: ASA5510 hw/sw rev (2.0/8.0(4)) status
(Up Sys)
admin Interface inside (192.168.2.200): Link
Down (Waiting)
c1 Interface outside (24.234.0.100): Normal
(Waiting)
c1 Interface inside (172.16.11.100): Normal
(Not-Monitored)
c2 Interface outside (24.234.0.200): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface inside (172.16.22.100): Normal
(Not-Monitored)
slot 1: empty
Other host: Secondary - Standby Ready
Active time: 0 (sec)
slot 0: ASA5510 hw/sw rev (2.0/8.0(4)) status
(Up Sys)
admin Interface inside (0.0.0.0): Link Down
(Waiting)
c1 Interface outside (0.0.0.0): Normal
(Waiting)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
c1 Interface inside (0.0.0.0): Normal (Not-
Monitored)
c2 Interface outside (0.0.0.0): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface inside (0.0.0.0): Normal (Not-
Monitored)
slot 1: empty
Stateful Failover Logical Update Statistics
Link : Unconfigured.
Configure High Availability Solutions
T a s k 1 . 7 6
Configure the firewall pair to use stateful failover.
Verify that state information is replicating to the
secondary unit.
Stateful failover allows for all state information to be
transmitted to the standby unit. This is configured with
the failover link command on the primary unit.
ASA(config)# failover link failover e0/3
Verify this is working with show failover. Youll see the
additional state information at the bottom of the output.
ASA(config)# show failover
Stateful Failover Logical Update Statistics
Link : failover Ethernet0/3 (up)
Stateful Obj xmit xerr rcv rerr
General 51 0 46 0
sys cmd 46 0 46 0
up time 0 0 0 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
RPC services 0 0 0 0
TCP conn 0 0 0 0
UDP conn 0 0 0 0
ARP tbl 5 0 0 0
Xlate_Timeout 0 0 0 0
SIP Session 0 0 0 0
Logical Update Queue Information
Cur Max Total
Recv Q: 0 1 46
Xmit Q: 0 1 51
T a s k 1 . 7 7
Configure the firewall to monitor all of the interfaces for
c1 and c2. Configure a standby IP address on each
interface. This IP should be the primary +10. If one of
these interfaces fails, the unit should failover. Set the
interface polltime to 500 milliseconds. Set the unit
polltime to 500 milliseconds.
Interface monitoring is setup in the individual security
contexts. So youll need to change to each context and set
monitoring with the monitor-interface <interface>
command. To setup the standby IP re-enter the interface IP
address with the standby option.
ASA(config)# changeto context c1
ASA/c1(config)# monitor-interface inside
ASA/c1(config)# monitor-interface outside
ASA/c1(config)# int e0/0
ASA/c1(config-if)# ip address 24.234.0.100 255.255.255.0 standby
24.234.0.110
ASA/c1(config-if)# int e0/1.11
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 0 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA/c1(config-if)# ip address 172.16.11.100 255.255.255.0
standby 172.16.11.110
ASA/c1(config)# changeto context c2
ASA/c2(config)# monitor-interface inside
ASA/c2(config)# monitor-interface outside
ASA/c2(config-if)# ip address 24.234.0.200 255.255.255.0 standby
24.234.0.210
ASA/c2(config-if)# int e0/1.22
ASA/c2(config-if)# ip address 172.16.22.100 255.255.255.0
standby 172.16.22.110
To set the interface polltime, change back to the system
and use the command failover polltime interface. Unit
polltime is set with failover polltime unit.
ASA/c2(config)# changeto system
ASA(config)# failover polltime interface msec 500
INFO: Failover interface holdtime is set to 5 seconds
ASA(config)# failover polltime unit msec 500
INFO: Failover unit holdtime is set to 2 seconds
T a s k 1 . 7 8
In addition to normal state information, replicate http
state information.
HTTP state information is not normally included since these
connections are short lived and commonly retried. To enable
http replication, use the failover replication http
command.
ASA(config)# failover replication http
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 1 . 7 9
Prepare for load balancing. Disable failover on both ASA1
and ASA2. Configure ASA1 to be the primary for c1 and
secondary for c2. Ensure that both ASAs will always take
over as active for the context they are primary for.
Disable failover with the no failover command. This only
has to be done on ASA1.
ASA(config)# no failover
To setupload balancing you must configure failover groups
and then join contexts to those groups. To configure the
failover groups, use the command failover group. Notice
that for failover group 1 we set this firewall as the
primary. We also setup both groups to preempt, which means
the ASA will take over the active state for its group when
it comes up.
ASA(config)# failover group 1
ASA(config-fover-group)# primary
ASA(config-fover-group)# preempt
ASA(config)# failover group 2
ASA(config-fover-group)# secondary
ASA(config-fover-group)# preempt
With the failover groups created, we have to join the
contexts to their respective groups. This is done with the
join failover-group command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA(config)# context c1
ASA(config-ctx)# join-failover-group 1
ASA(config-ctx)# context c2
ASA(config-ctx)# join-failover-group 2
T a s k 1 . 8 0
Enable failover and verify that active/active is working
properly.
Enable failover with the failover command on ASA1.
ASA(config)# failover
Verify the configuration with show failover. Youll
notice that this firewall is active for group 1 and standby
for group 2. Just below that youll see the interface IP
addresses for c1 but not for c2. This is because the other
firewall is currently handling the traffic for c2.
ASA(config)# show failover
Failover On
Failover unit Primary
Failover LAN Interface: failover Ethernet0/3 (up)
Unit Poll frequency 500 milliseconds, holdtime 2 seconds
Interface Poll frequency 500 milliseconds, holdtime 5 seconds
Interface Policy 1
Monitored Interfaces 5 of 250 maximum
failover replication http
Version: Ours 8.0(4), Mate 8.0(4)
Group 1 last failover at: 15:57:37 UTC Feb 26 2009
Group 2 last failover at: 15:57:36 UTC Feb 26 2009
This host: Primary
Group 1 State: Active
Active time: 1118 (sec)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Group 2 State: Standby Ready
Active time: 97 (sec)
slot 0: ASA5510 hw/sw rev (2.0/8.0(4)) status
(Up Sys)
admin Interface inside (192.168.2.200): Link
Down (Waiting)
c1 Interface outside (24.234.0.100): Normal
(Waiting)
c1 Interface inside (172.16.11.100): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface outside (24.234.0.210): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface inside (172.16.22.110): Normal
(Waiting)
slot 1: empty
Other host: Secondary
Group 1 State: Standby Ready
Active time: 107 (sec)
Group 2 State: Active
Active time: 1036 (sec)
slot 0: ASA5510 hw/sw rev (2.0/8.0(4)) status
(Up Sys)
admin Interface inside (0.0.0.0): Link Down
(Waiting)
c1 Interface outside (24.234.0.110): Normal
(Waiting)
c1 Interface inside (172.16.11.110): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface outside (24.234.0.200): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface inside (172.16.22.100): Normal
(Waiting)
slot 1: empty
Stateful Failover Logical Update Statistics
Link : failover Ethernet0/3 (up)
Stateful Obj xmit xerr rcv rerr
General 419 0 407 0
sys cmd 410 0 407 0
up time 0 0 0 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
RPC services 0 0 0 0
TCP conn 0 0 0 0
UDP conn 0 0 0 0
ARP tbl 9 0 0 0
Xlate_Timeout 0 0 0 0
SIP Session 0 0 0 0
Logical Update Queue Information
Cur Max Total
Recv Q: 0 1 408
Xmit Q: 0 1 420
T a s k 1 . 8 1
Final verification involves testing failover. Telnet from
R2 to R1 and enter the password of cisco. Leave the
session up. On SW1, shutdown port fa0/12. Verify that your
telnet session has remained connected. Verify failover.
For this final test, telnet from R2 to R1 using the
password cisco.
R2#telnet 24.234.0.1
Trying 24.234.0.1 ... Open
R1#
Now, shutdown port fa0/12 on sw1. This connects to the e0/0
interface of ASA1 and will cause an interface failure.
Verify that your telnet session is still connected by
hitting enter a few times.
R1#
R1#
R1#
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Finally, do a show failover on ASA2 to make sure it is
active for both failover groups.
ASA(config)# show failover
Failover On
Failover unit Secondary
Failover LAN Interface: failover Ethernet0/3 (up)
Unit Poll frequency 500 milliseconds, holdtime 2 seconds
Interface Poll frequency 500 milliseconds, holdtime 5 seconds
Interface Policy 1
Monitored Interfaces 5 of 250 maximum
failover replication http
Version: Ours 8.0(4), Mate 8.0(4)
Group 1 last failover at: 16:06:03 UTC Feb 26 2009
Group 2 last failover at: 15:57:34 UTC Feb 26 2009
This host: Secondary
Group 1 State: Active
Active time: 444 (sec)
Group 2 State: Active
Active time: 1789 (sec)
slot 0: ASA5510 hw/sw rev (2.0/8.0(4)) status
(Up Sys)
admin Interface inside (192.168.2.200): Link
Down (Waiting)
c1 Interface outside (24.234.0.100): Normal
(Waiting)
c1 Interface inside (172.16.11.100): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface outside (24.234.0.200): Normal
(Waiting)
c2 Interface inside (172.16.22.100): Normal
(Waiting)
slot 1: empty
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 2 ~ IoS Firewall
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ACS
.101
R5
IOS Firewall Technology Diagram
VLAN 12
24.234.12.0 /24
Frame Relay
24.234.245.0 /24
VLAN 192
192.168.0.0 /16
VLAN 36
24.234.36.0 /24
VLAN 6
24.234.6.0 /24
VLAN 5
24.234.5.0 /24
VLAN 4
24.234.4.0 /24
R2
VLAN 23
24.234.23.0 /24
R1
R3
R4
R5
R6
F0/0
F0/0
F0/1
F0/1
S0/0/0
S0/0/0
F0/0
F0/1
S0/0/0
F0/1
F0/0
F0/0
F0/0
EIGRP 1
RIP v2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 1 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure CBAC
T a s k 2 . 1
Configure R3 so that interface F0/0 is trusted and
interface F0/1 is untrusted. Allow TCP, UDP, and ICMP
returning traffic. Allow telnet sessions from
FastEthernet0/0 of R6. R3 and R6 should continue to
exchange routing information.
T a s k 2 . 2
Configure R3 to log all dropped packets to the local buffer
and to the syslog server at 192.168.2.101.
T a s k 2 . 3
Configure R3 to log the total number of bytes transmitted
over TCP sessions.
T a s k 2 . 4
Configure R3 so that it will start dropping incomplete TCP
sessions after the number of existing half-open sessions
rises above 600. It should stop dropping incomplete TCP
sessions when the number of existing half-open sessions
falls below 300. Set it to start dropping incomplete TCP
sessions when the number of existing half-open sessions
rises above 400 within a minute. It should stop dropping
incomplete TCP sessions when the number of existing half-
open sessions falls below 200 incomplete within a minute.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 5
Configure R3 to drop TCP sessions if they are not
established within 20 seconds. After completion, TCP
sessions should only be managed for 4 seconds.
T a s k 2 . 6
Configure R3 to drop TCP sessions after 30 minutes of
inactivity and UDP sessions after 15 seconds of inactivity.
Drop DNS name lookup sessions after 4 seconds.
T a s k 2 . 7
Configure R3 to only allow 25 half-open TCP connections to
the same host. If this is exceeded, delete all existing
half-open sessions for the host and block all new
connection requests to the host for 10 minutes.
T a s k 2 . 8
Configure R3 to only allow java responses from webserver
24.234.36.6.
T a s k 2 . 9
Configure R3 to inspect all TCP, UDP and ICMP traffic
originating from the router.
T a s k 2 . 1 0
Improve the performance of CBAC on R3 by increasing the
inspect hash table size to 2048.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 1 1
Configure R3 to inspect fragmented packets, with a maximum
of 30 unassembled packets.
T a s k 2 . 1 2
Configure R3 to inspect http traffic on port 8000 in
addition to the default port. Also inspect port 2121 for
ftp traffic if it is destined for 24.234.6.6.
T a s k 2 . 1 3
Configure FastEthernet0/1 on R3 to re-assemble fragments
for inspection. The maximum number of IP data grams to be
reassembled is 50, and should be completed within 10
seconds.
T a s k 2 . 1 4
Configure R3 so that IM applications running over http are
dropped.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Zone~Based Firewall
T a s k 2 . 1 5
Setup the following security zones on R2: (1) PRIVATE (2)
PUBLIC.
T a s k 2 . 1 6
Setup a zone pair to allow traffic from the PRIVATE zone to
the PUBLIC zone.
T a s k 2 . 1 7
Configure a class-map that should identify all TCP and UDP
traffic.
T a s k 2 . 1 8
Configure a policy-map to inspect the class map created
above.
T a s k 2 . 1 9
Apply the policy-map to the zone pair for private to
public.
T a s k 2 . 2 0
Assign interface FastEthernet0/0 and FastEthernet0/1 to the
PRIVATE zone and interface Serial0/0/0 to the PUBLIC zone.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 2 1
Configure R2 the inspect parameters listed below. This
parameter map should be applied to the existing class for
TCP and UDP traffic.
Alerting should be on
Auditing should be on
DNS timeout should be set to 4 seconds
Drop existing half-open sessions when the number rises
above 1000. Stop dropping existing half-open sessions
when the number falls below 800. Drop existing half-
open sessions when the number rises above 700 within a
minute, and stop dropping existing half-open sessions
when the number falls below 500 within a minute.
Allow a maximum of 3000 sessions
Each host can have a maximum of 25 existing half-open
sessions. When this is exceeded, all existing half-
open sessions should be deleted and blocked for 10
minutes.
Manage TCP sessions for only 5 seconds after they have
finished.
Delete TCP sessions after 30 minutes of inactivity.
Delete TCP sessions if not fully established within 20
seconds.
Delete UDP sessions after 20 seconds of inactivity.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 2 2
Rate limit ICMP traffic from the PRIVATE zone to the PUBLIC
zone to 8000 bps with a burst of 2000 bytes.
T a s k 2 . 2 3
Drop all P2P (KaZaA, Morpheus, Grokster) traffic and AOL
and Yahoo IM traffic from the PRIVATE zone to the PUBLIC
zone.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 2 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated

Configure Auth~Proxy
T a s k 2 . 2 4
Configure R1 to authenticate the ACS Server via HTTP before
allowing the ACS Server to browse to R2. Use a local user
with username authproxyuser and password cisco to do
this.
T a s k 2 . 2 5
Configure R1 with a login banner for Authentication Proxy
that states Unauthorized access is prohibited.
T a s k 2 . 2 6
Configure R1 so that user authentication entries are
removed after 30 minutes of inactivity. Configure R1 so
that the absolute time is 30 minutes. The maximum number
of retries should be set to 5.
T a s k 2 . 2 7
Configure R1 so that it only requires authentication if the
ACS Server is attempting to HTTP to R2s loopback 0 address
(2.2.2.2).
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated

Configure Access Control
(Reload startup config for R2 and R3)
T a s k 2 . 2 8
Configure R2 to deny any IP connectivity from behind
FastEthernet0/0 to the rest of the network. In order for
anyone behind FastEthernet0/0 to have IP connectivity to
the rest of the network, they must authenticate to R2 with
the username locknkey and password cisco. Idle time
should be 2 minutes minimum. Ensure that EIGRP is not
interrupted.
T a s k 2 . 2 9
Modify the configuration of R2 to enable per-host access
only.
T a s k 2 . 3 0
Configure R3 so that all TCP, UDP, and ICMP traffic
initiated from behind FastEthernet0/0 is automatically
allowed to return. Permit FastEthernet0/0 on R6 to initiate
telnet sessions to the 24.234.0.0 network. Ensure that
routing information is not interrupted. Log any denied
packets to the local buffer. Do not use CBAC to accomplish
this.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 3 1
Configure R2 s0/0/0 so that ICMP from R5 s0/0/0 is denied
access to the rest of the network from 2am to 4am. Also,
deny all non-initial fragments inbound on FastEthernet0/0.
All other traffic should be allowed at all times.
IoS Firewalls Solutions
Configure CBAC
T a s k 2 . 1
Configure R3 so that interface F0/0 is trusted and
interface F0/1 is untrusted. Allow TCP, UDP, and ICMP
returning traffic. Allow telnet sessions from
FastEthernet0/0 of R6. R3 and R6 should continue to
exchange routing information.
This is done with CBAC. An ACL is used to block most
incoming traffic on the untrusted interface. The ip
inspect command allows for specific traffic to be
statefully inspected and return traffic allowed through the
ACL.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The inspect rule can be configured either inbound on
FastEthernet0/0 or outbound on FastEthernet0/1. Enabling it
outbound on FastEthernet0/1 allows for multiple trusted
interfaces.
R3#configure terminal
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC tcp
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC udp
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC icmp
R3(config)#ip access-list extended CBAC_ACL
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host 24.234.36.6 any eq 23
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp host 24.234.36.6 host 224.0.0.9
eq 520
R3(config)#interface FastEthernet0/1
R3(config-if)#ip inspect CBAC out
R3(config-if)#ip access-group CBAC_ACL in
You can verify the configuration with show ip inspect
all.
R3#sh ip inspect all
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [400:500]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [400:500]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 50. Block-time 0
minute.
tcp synwait-time is 30 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 5 sec
tcp idle-time is 3600 sec -- udp idle-time is 30 sec
dns-timeout is 5 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 3600
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 30
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Interface Configuration
Interface FastEthernet0/1
Inbound inspection rule is not set
Outgoing inspection rule is CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 3600
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 30
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
Inbound access list is CBAC_ACL
Outgoing access list is not set
You can further verify with ICMP. R1 can ping R6, but pings
initiated from R6 fail.
R1#ping 24.234.36.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.36.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/1/4 ms
R6#ping 24.234.12.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.12.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
R3 shows the established icmp session from R1 to R6.
R3#show ip inspect sessions detail
Established Sessions
Session 46A16EA4 (24.234.12.1:8)=>(24.234.36.6:0) icmp SIS_OPEN
Created 00:00:08, Last heard 00:00:08
ECHO request
Bytes sent (initiator:responder) [360:360]
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
In SID 24.234.36.6[0:0]=>24.234.12.1[0:0] on ACL CBAC_ACL (5
matches)
In SID 0.0.0.0[0:0]=>24.234.12.1[3:3] on ACL CBAC_ACL
In SID 0.0.0.0[0:0]=>24.234.12.1[11:11] on ACL CBAC_ACL
R3 continues to learn the 24.234.6.0 network (VLAN 6) via
RIP.
R3#sh ip route 24.234.6.0
Routing entry for 24.234.6.0/24
Known via "rip", distance 120, metric 1
Redistributing via eigrp 1, rip
Advertised by eigrp 1 metric 1000 1 255 1 1500
Last update from 24.234.36.6 on FastEthernet0/1, 00:00:04 ago
Routing Descriptor Blocks:
* 24.234.36.6, from 24.234.36.6, 00:00:04 ago, via
FastEthernet0/1
Route metric is 1, traffic share count is 1
T a s k 2 . 2
Configure R3 to log all dropped packets to the local buffer
and to the syslog server at 192.168.2.101.
This is done with the logging command. The buffered
keyword sends logs to the local buffer and the host
keyword followed by an IP sends logs to an external host,
in this case the ACS server.
R3(config)#logging buffered
R3(config)#logging host 192.168.2.101
R3(config)#ip access-list extended CBAC_ACL
R3(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
To verify, open the kiwi syslog server on the ACS. Ping
from R6 to R2. The ping will fail.
R6#ping 24.234.23.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.23.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
R3s local buffer shows the denied packet.
R3#sh logging
Syslog logging: enabled (11 messages dropped, 1 messages rate-
limited,
0 flushes, 0 overruns, xml disabled, filtering
disabled)
Console logging: level debugging, 59 messages logged, xml
disabled,
filtering disabled
Monitor logging: level debugging, 0 messages logged, xml
disabled,
filtering disabled
Buffer logging: level debugging, 3 messages logged, xml
disabled,
filtering disabled
Logging Exception size (4096 bytes)
Count and timestamp logging messages: disabled
No active filter modules.
Trap logging: level informational, 55 message lines logged
Logging to 192.168.2.101 (udp port 514, audit disabled,
link up), 3 message lines logged, xml disabled,
filtering disabled
Log Buffer (4096 bytes):
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
*Mar 11 16:27:10.447: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console
by console
*Mar 11 16:27:13.039: %SYS-6-LOGGINGHOST_STARTSTOP: Logging to
host 192.168.2.101 started - CLI initiated
*Mar 11 16:28:07.927: %SEC-6-IPACCESSLOGDP: list CBAC_ACL denied
icmp 24.234.36.6 -> 24.234.23.2 (8/0), 1 packet
The Kiwi Syslog server shows the denied packet.
T a s k 2 . 3
Configure R3 to log the total number of bytes transmitted
over TCP sessions.
The audit trail feature tracks all network transactions,
recording information such as source/destination host
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
addresses, ports used, and the total number of transmitted
bytes with time stamps. By default, audit-trail is off.
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC tcp audit-trail on
Verify by launching a telnet session from R2 to R6, then
exit.
R2#telnet 24.234.36.6
Trying 24.234.36.6 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
R6#exit
[Connection to 24.234.36.6 closed by foreign host]
R2#
R3 shows the audit trail starting and stopping for the telnet
session from R2 to R6.
R3#sh logging
Syslog logging: enabled (11 messages dropped, 1 messages rate-
limited,
0 flushes, 0 overruns, xml disabled, filtering
disabled)
Console logging: level debugging, 63 messages logged, xml
disabled,
filtering disabled
Monitor logging: level debugging, 0 messages logged, xml
disabled,
filtering disabled
Buffer logging: level debugging, 7 messages logged, xml
disabled,
filtering disabled
Logging Exception size (4096 bytes)
Count and timestamp logging messages: disabled
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
No active filter modules.
Trap logging: level informational, 59 message lines logged
Logging to 192.168.2.101 (udp port 514, audit disabled,
link up), 7 message lines logged, xml disabled,
filtering disabled
Log Buffer (4096 bytes):
*Mar 11 16:33:39.123: %SEC-6-IPACCESSLOGDP: list CBAC_ACL denied
icmp 24.234.36.6 -> 24.234.23.2 (8/0), 19 packets
*Mar 11 16:39:17.643: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console
by console
*Mar 11 16:39:56.139: %FW-6-SESS_AUDIT_TRAIL_START: Start tcp
session: initiator (24.234.23.2:16071) -- responder
(24.234.36.6:23)
*Mar 11 16:40:04.499: %FW-6-SESS_AUDIT_TRAIL: Stop tcp session:
initiator (24.234.23.2:16071) sent 43 bytes -- responder
(24.234.36.6:23) sent 86 bytes
The Kiwi Syslog server also shows the audit trail starting
and stopping for the telnet session from R2 to R6.
T a s k 2 . 4
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 3 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure R3 so that it will start dropping incomplete TCP
sessions after the number of existing half-open sessions
rises above 600. It should stop dropping incomplete TCP
sessions when the number of existing half-open sessions
falls below 300. Set it to start dropping incomplete TCP
sessions when the number of existing half-open sessions
rises above 400 within a minute. It should stop dropping
incomplete TCP sessions when the number of existing half-
open sessions falls below 200 incomplete within a minute.
This is done with the ip inspect max-incomplete and ip
inspect one-minute commands. Aggressive behavior (dropping
sessions) begins when the number of existing half-open
sessions rises above the high threshold value, and ends
when the number of existing half-open sessions falls below
the low threshold value.
R3(config)#ip inspect max-incomplete high 600
R3(config)#ip inspect max-incomplete low 300
R3(config)#ip inspect one-minute high 400
R3(config)#ip inspect one-minute low 200
The max-incomplete and one-minute thresholds have been
changed.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 50. Block-time 0
minute.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
tcp synwait-time is 30 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 5 sec
tcp idle-time is 3600 sec -- udp idle-time is 30 sec
dns-timeout is 5 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 3600
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 30
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
T a s k 2 . 5
Configure R3 to drop TCP sessions if they are not
established within 20 seconds. After completion, TCP
sessions should only be managed for 4 seconds.
By default, CBAC waits 30 seconds for TCP sessions to
establish and will manage TCP sessions for 5 seconds after
they are completed. This behavior can be changed with the
IP inspect using the TCP synwait-time and finwait-time
keywords.
R3(config)#ip inspect tcp synwait-time 20
R3(config)#ip inspect tcp finwait-time 4
The TCP snywait-time and finwait-time timers have been
changed.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 50. Block-time 0
minute.
tcp synwait-time is 20 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 4 sec
tcp idle-time is 3600 sec -- udp idle-time is 30 sec
dns-timeout is 5 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 3600
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 30
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 6
Configure R3 to drop TCP sessions after 30 minutes of
inactivity and UDP sessions after 15 seconds of inactivity.
Drop DNS name lookup sessions after 4 seconds.
The TCP and UDP idle timers are measured in seconds. The
default idle time for TCP is 3600 seconds (1 hour) and for
UDP, 30 seconds. The DNS timer is measured in seconds and
the default DNS name lookup timeout is 5 seconds. These can
all be changed using IP inspect with the idle-time and
dns-timeout keywords.
R3(config)#ip inspect tcp idle-time 1800
R3(config)#ip inspect udp idle-time 15
R3(config)#ip inspect dns-timeout 4
Verify with the show ip inspect config command.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 50. Block-time 0
minute.
tcp synwait-time is 20 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 4 sec
tcp idle-time is 1800 sec -- udp idle-time is 15 sec
dns-timeout is 4 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 1800
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 15
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 7
Configure R3 to only allow 25 half-open TCP connections to
the same host. If this is exceeded, delete all existing
half-open sessions for the host and block all new
connection requests to the host for 10 minutes.
This is done with ip inspect using the max-incomplete host
keywords. The default behavior is to allow for 50 tcp
sessions per host. The default block-time is 0 which
deletes the oldest existing half-open session for the host
for every new connection request. When setting a block-time
greater than 0, the router will delete all existing half-
open sessions for the host and then block all new
connection requests. The router will continue to block all
new connection requests to the host until the block-time
expires.
R3(config)#ip inspect tcp max-incomplete host 25 block-time 10
Verify with the show ip inspect config command.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 25. Block-time 10
minutes.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
tcp synwait-time is 20 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 4 sec
tcp idle-time is 1800 sec -- udp idle-time is 15 sec
dns-timeout is 4 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 1800
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 15
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
T a s k 2 . 8
Configure R3 to only allow java responses from webserver
24.234.36.6.
This is accomplished by using IP inspect for http with the
java-list keyword. Java blocking only works with numbered
standard access lists.
R3(config)#access-list 1 permit host 24.234.36.6
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC http java-list 1
Verify with the show ip inspect config command.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 25. Block-time 10
minutes.
tcp synwait-time is 20 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 4 sec
tcp idle-time is 1800 sec -- udp idle-time is 15 sec
dns-timeout is 4 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 1800
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 15
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
http java-list 1 alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 1800
T a s k 2 . 9
Configure R3 to inspect all TCP, UDP and ICMP traffic
originating from the router.
To enable Inspection of Router-Generated Traffic, use IP
inspect with the router-traffic keyword.
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC tcp router-traffic
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC udp router-traffic
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC icmp router-traffic
Verify with the show ip inspect config command.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 25. Block-time 10
minutes.
tcp synwait-time is 20 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 4 sec
tcp idle-time is 1800 sec -- udp idle-time is 15 sec
dns-timeout is 4 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 1800
inspection of router local traffic is enabled
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 15
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
inspection of router local traffic is enabled
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
inspection of router local traffic is enabled
http java-list 1 alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 1800
Telnet from R3 to R6 provides a router generated TCP
session.
R3#telnet 24.234.36.6
Trying 24.234.36.6 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
*Mar 11 17:20:13.083: %FW-6-SESS_AUDIT_TRAIL_START: Start tcp
session: initiator (24.234.36.3:21825) -- responder
(24.234.36.6:23)
R6#
T a s k 2 . 1 0
Improve the performance of CBAC on R3 by increasing the
inspect hash table size to 2048.
This is done with the ip inspect hashtable-size command.
Increasing the size of the hash table allows the number of
sessions per hash bucket to be reduced which can improve
the throughput performance of CBAC.
R3(config)#ip inspect hashtable-size 2048
CBAC: Changing Hashlen from 1024 to 2048
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 1 1
Configure R3 to inspect fragmented packets, with a maximum
of 30 unassembled packets.
This is done with IP inspect and the fragment maximum
command.
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC fragment maximum 30
Verify with the show ip inspect config command.
R3#show ip inspect config
Session audit trail is disabled
Session alert is enabled
one-minute (sampling period) thresholds are [200:400]
connections
max-incomplete sessions thresholds are [300:600]
max-incomplete tcp connections per host is 25. Block-time 10
minutes.
tcp synwait-time is 20 sec -- tcp finwait-time is 4 sec
tcp idle-time is 1800 sec -- udp idle-time is 15 sec
dns-timeout is 4 sec
Inspection Rule Configuration
Inspection name CBAC
tcp alert is on audit-trail is on timeout 1800
inspection of router local traffic is enabled
udp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 15
inspection of router local traffic is enabled
icmp alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 10
inspection of router local traffic is enabled
http java-list 1 alert is on audit-trail is off timeout 1800
fragment Maximum 30 In Use 0 alert is on audit-trail is off
timeout 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 4 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 1 2
Configure R3 to inspect http traffic on port 8000 in
addition to the default port. Also inspect port 2121 for
ftp traffic if it is destined for 24.234.6.6.
This is accomplished by using PAM (Port to Application
Mapping) via the ip port-map command. PAM allows you to
customize TCP or UDP port numbers for network services or
applications.
R3(config)#ip port-map http port tcp 8000
R3#show ip port-map http
Default mapping: http tcp port 80
system defined
Default mapping: http tcp port 8000
user defined
R3(config)#access-list 21 permit 24.234.6.6
R3(config)#ip port-map ftp port 2121 list 21
R3#show ip port-map ftp
Default mapping: ftp tcp port 21
system defined
Host specific: ftp tcp port 2121
in list 21 user defined
T a s k 2 . 1 3
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure FastEthernet0/1 on R3 to re-assemble fragments
for inspection. The maximum number of IP data grams to be
reassembled is 50, and should be completed within 10
seconds.
Well be using virtual fragmentation reassembly (VFR) to
allow the firewall to assemble fragments before inspection.
This is done with the ip virtual-reassembly command. It
is configured per-interface.
R3(config)#int f0/1
R3(config-if)#ip virtual-reassembly max-fragments 50 timeout 10
T a s k 2 . 1 4
Configure R3 so that IM applications running over http are
dropped.
The application firewall allows the router to perform
limited deep packet inspection of instant messenger
traffic. In this case were using it to detect and block IM
over http.
R3(config)#appfw policy-name IM
R3(cfg-appfw-policy)#application http
R3(cfg-appfw-policy-http)#port-misuse im action reset
R3(config)#ip inspect name CBAC appfw IM
Verify with the show appfw configuration command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3#show appfw configuration
Application Firewall Rule configuration
Application Policy name IM
Application http
port-misuse im action reset
Configure Zone~Based Firewall
T a s k 2 . 1 5
Setup the following security zones on R2: (1) PRIVATE (2)
PUBLIC.
The first step in a zone based firewall is configuring the
zones. A security zone is a logical group of interface(s)
to which a policy can be applied.
R2(config)#zone security PRIVATE
R2(config-sec-zone)#description Inside Networks
R2(config-sec-zone)#exit
R2(config)#zone security PUBLIC
R2(config-sec-zone)#description Outside networks
R2(config-sec-zone)#exit
T a s k 2 . 1 6
Setup a zone pair to allow traffic from the PRIVATE zone to
the PUBLIC zone.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
A zone-pair allows you to specify a one way firewall policy
between two security zones. It is configured with the zone-
pair security command. The direction of the traffic is
specified by specifying a source and destination zone.
R2(config)#zone-pair security OUTBOUND source PRIVATE
destination PUBLIC
R2(config-sec-zone-pair)#description Traffic from PRIVATE zone
to PUBLIC zone
T a s k 2 . 1 7
Configure a class-map that should identify all TCP and UDP
traffic.
Layer 3 and 4 class maps identify traffic at a high level.
In this case were matching all traffic with the match
protocol command within the class-map.
R2(config)#class-map type inspect match-any TCP_UDP_ICMAP
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol tcp
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol udp
T a s k 2 . 1 8
Configure a policy-map to inspect the class map created
above.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Layer 3/4 policy maps allow you to define high-level
actions such as inspect, drop, pass, and URL filter. In
this case were using inspect.
R2(config)#policy-map type inspect INSPECT_PMAP
R2(config-pmap)#class type inspect TCP_UDP_ICMAP
R2(config-pmap-c)#inspect
T a s k 2 . 1 9
Apply the policy-map to the zone pair for private to
public.
To attach a firewall policy map to a zone-pair well use
the service-policy type inspect command.
R2(config)#zone-pair security OUTBOUND source PRIVATE
destination PUBLIC
R2(config-sec-zone-pair)#service-policy type inspect
INSPECT_PMAP
Verify with the show zone-pair security command.
R2#show zone-pair security
Zone-pair name OUTBOUND
Description: Traffic from PRIVATE zone to PUBLIC zone
Source-Zone PRIVATE Destination-Zone PUBLIC
service-policy INSPECT_PMAP
T a s k 2 . 2 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Assign interface FastEthernet0/0 and FastEthernet0/1 to the
PRIVATE zone and interface Serial0/0/0 to the PUBLIC zone.
Traffic between members of the same zone is unrestricted.
Traffic between members of different zones will only be
allowed if a zone-pair and policy exists. Add an interface
to a zone with the zone-member security command.
R2(config)#interface FastEthernet 0/0
R2(config-if)#zone-member security PRIVATE
R2(config-if)#interface FastEthernet 0/1
R2(config-if)#zone-member security PRIVATE
R2(config-if)#interface Serial0/0/0
R2(config-if)#zone-member security PUBLIC
Verify with the show zone security command.
R2#show zone security
zone self
Description: System defined zone
zone PRIVATE
Description: Inside Networks
Member Interfaces:
FastEthernet0/0
FastEthernet0/1
zone PUBLIC
Description: Outside Networks
Member Interfaces:
Serial0/0/0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 2 1
Configure R2 the inspect parameters listed below. This
parameter map should be applied to the existing class for
TCP and UDP traffic.
Alerting should be on
Auditing should be on
DNS timeout should be set to 4 seconds
Drop existing half-open sessions when the number rises
above 1000. Stop dropping existing half-open sessions
when the number falls below 800. Drop existing half-
open sessions when the number rises above 700 within a
minute, and stop dropping existing half-open sessions
when the number falls below 500 within a minute.
Allow a maximum of 3000 sessions
Each host can have a maximum of 25 existing half-open
sessions. When this is exceeded, all existing half-
open sessions should be deleted and blocked for 10
minutes.
Manage TCP sessions for only 5 seconds after they have
finished.
Delete TCP sessions after 30 minutes of inactivity.
Delete TCP sessions if not fully established within 20
seconds.
Delete UDP sessions after 20 seconds of inactivity.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
A parameter map allows you to specify parameters and apply
them within a policy-map. First well create the parameter
map.
R2(config)#parameter-map type inspect INSPECT_PARAMETER_MAP
R2(config-profile)#alert on
R2(config-profile)#audit-trail on
R2(config-profile)#dns-timeout 4
R2(config-profile)#max-incomplete high 1000
R2(config-profile)#max-incomplete low 800
R2(config-profile)#one-minute high 700
R2(config-profile)#one-minute low 500
R2(config-profile)#sessions maximum 3000
R2(config-profile)#tcp max-incomplete host 25 block-time 10
R2(config-profile)#tcp finwait-time 5
R2(config-profile)#tcp idle-time 1800
R2(config-profile)#tcp synwait-time 20
R2(config-profile)#udp idle-time 20
Then apply it under our existing policy map. Notice that
the parameter map is added within the inspect command.
Although we only have one, different parameter maps can be
applied to different classes of traffic.
R2(config)#policy-map type inspect INSPECT_PMAP
R2(config-pmap)#class type inspect TCP_UDP_ICMAP
R2(config-pmap-c)#inspect INSPECT_PARAMETER_MAP
Verify with show parameter-map.
R2#show parameter-map type inspect
parameter-map type inspect INSPECT_PARAMETER_MAP
audit-trail on
alert on
max-incomplete low 800
max-incomplete high 1000
one-minute low 500
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
one-minute high 700
udp idle-time 20
icmp idle-time 10
dns-timeout 4
tcp idle-time 1800
tcp finwait-time 5
tcp synwait-time 20
tcp max-incomplete host 25 block-time 10
sessions maximum 3000
T a s k 2 . 2 2
Rate limit ICMP traffic from the PRIVATE zone to the PUBLIC
zone to 8000 bps with a burst of 2000 bytes.
Rate limiting is done within a policy map with the police
command. First identify the protocol ICMP with a class-map.
R2(config)#class-map type inspect ICMP
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol icmp
Then apply actions to it within our existing policy-map.
R2(config)#policy-map type inspect INSPECT_PMAP
R2(config-pmap)#class ICMP
R2(config-pmap-c)#inspect
R2(config-pmap-c)#police rate 8000 burst 2000
T a s k 2 . 2 3
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Drop all P2P (KaZaA, Morpheus, Grokster) traffic and AOL
and Yahoo IM traffic from the PRIVATE zone to the PUBLIC
zone.
This is done with a layer 7 or application class-map. The
match criteria within such a class-map are specific to the
particular application. In this case well be matching any
of the listed P2P protocols.
R2(config)#class-map type inspect match-any P2P
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol fasttrack
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol aol
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol ymsgr
We can then apply the drop action to this class of traffic
in our policy map.
R2(config)#policy-map type inspect INSPECT_PMAP
R2(config-pmap)#class type inspect P2P
R2(config-pmap-c)#drop
Configure Auth~Proxy
T a s k 2 . 2 4
Configure R1 to authenticate the ACS Server via HTTP before
allowing the ACS Server to browse to R2. Use a local user
with username authproxyuser and password cisco to do
this.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 5 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Auth-proxy intercepts requests on a particular interface
and requires authentication before allowing the connection.
The authentication can either be local or remote via
TACACS+ or RADIUS. In this example it will be local
authentication.
R1#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
R1(config)#username authproxyuser password cisco
R1(config)#
R1(config)#aaa new-model
R1(config)#aaa authentication login default local
R1(config)#aaa authorization auth-proxy default local
R1(config)#ip auth-proxy name AUTHP http
R1(config)#
R1(config)#
R1(config)#interface FastEthernet0/0
R1(config-if)#ip auth-proxy AUTHP
R1(config-if)#exit
R1(config)#
R1(config)#ip http server
R1(config)#ip http authentication aaa
Enable the http server on R2 before testing.
R2(config)#ip http server
And verify by attempting to connect via http from the ACS
to R2. The connection must first be authenticated.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The show ip auth-proxy cache command will list the
authenticated client.
R1#show ip auth-proxy cache
Authentication Proxy Cache
Client Name authproxyuser, Client IP 192.168.2.101, Port 4775,
timeout 60, Time Remaining 60, state ESTAB
T a s k 2 . 2 5
Configure R1 with a login banner for Authentication Proxy
that states Unauthorized access is prohibited.
As we saw in the previous section there is no banner on the
authentication screen by default. It can be added with the
ip auth-proxy auth-proxy-banner command.
R1(config)# ip auth-proxy auth-proxy-banner http ^Unauthorized
access is prohibited^
Clear the authentication proxy cache on R1, and re-
authenticate. The login banner is now displayed.
R1#clear ip auth-proxy cache *
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 2 6
Configure R1 so that user authentication entries are
removed after 30 minutes of inactivity. Configure R1 so
that the absolute time is 30 minutes. The maximum number
of retries should be set to 5.
Auth-proxy has several timers, thresholds and variables
that can be modified.
R1(config)#ip auth-proxy inactivity-timer 30
R1(config)#ip auth-proxy absolute-timer 10
R1(config)#ip auth-proxy max-login-attempts 5
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 2 7
Configure R1 so that it only requires authentication if the
ACS Server is attempting to HTTP to R2s loopback 0 address
(2.2.2.2).
This is done with the list option at the end of the ip
auth-proxy command. It allows for control over what
traffic will be authenticated.
R1(config)#access-list 101 permit tcp host 192.168.2.101 host
2.2.2.2 eq 80
R1(config)#ip auth-proxy name AUTHP http list 101
To verify, clear the authentication proxy cache on R1, and
browse to 24.234.12.2 from the ACS Server. No
authentication is required. From the ACS Server, browse to
R2s loopback 0 address 2.2.2.2, and authentication is
required.
R1#clear ip auth-proxy cache *
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Access Control
(Reload startup config for R2 and R3)
T a s k 2 . 2 8
Configure R2 to deny any IP connectivity from behind
FastEthernet0/0 to the rest of the network. In order for
anyone behind FastEthernet0/0 to have IP connectivity to
the rest of the network, they must authenticate to R2 with
the username locknkey and password cisco. Idle time
should be 2 minutes minimum. Ensure that EIGRP is not
interrupted.
This is done with a lock-and-key. Lock-and-key allows a
user to gain temporary access through a dynamic access list
after they have authenticated via telnet to the router.
R2(config)#username locknkey password cisco
R2(config)#ip access-list extended INBOUND
R2(config-ext-nacl)# permit tcp any host 24.234.12.2 eq telnet
R2(config-ext-nacl)# permit eigrp host 24.234.12.1 host
224.0.0.10
R2(config-ext-nacl)# permit eigrp host 24.234.12.1 host
24.234.12.2
R2(config-ext-nacl)#dynamic ACCESS timeout 120 permit ip any any
R2(config-ext-nacl)#interface FastEthernet0/0
R2(config-if)# ip access-group INBOUND in
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config-if)#line vty 0 4
R2(config-line)# login local
R2(config-line)# autocommand access-enable timeout 2
Verify by attempting to ping from R1 to R5, it will fail.
R1#ping 24.234.245.5
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.245.5, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
In order for R1 to connect to R5, R1 must authenticate to
R2 via telnet.
R1#telnet 24.234.12.2
Trying 24.234.12.2 ... Open
User Access Verification
Username: locknkey
Password:
[Connection to 24.234.12.2 closed by foreign host]
R1#ping 24.234.245.5
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.245.5, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/58/60 ms
Once authenticated, you can view the dynamic ACL entry on
R2.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2#show ip access-lists
Extended IP access list INBOUND
10 permit tcp any host 24.234.12.2 eq telnet (81 matches)
20 permit eigrp host 24.234.12.1 host 224.0.0.10 (138
matches)
30 permit eigrp host 24.234.12.1 host 24.234.12.1
40 Dynamic ACCESS permit ip any any
permit ip any any (5 matches) (time left 110)
Notice, that the dynamic ACL is permit ip any any. This
requirement changes in the next step.
T a s k 2 . 2 9
Modify the configuration of R2 to enable per-host access
only.
The host keyword must be used within the access-enable
command in order to enable per-host access.
R2(config)#line vty 0 4
R2(config-line)#autocommand access-enable host timeout 2
R1 cannot ping R5, so R1 will need to authenticate to R2,
before being allowed.
R1#ping 24.234.5.5
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.5.5, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
R1#
R1#telnet 24.234.12.2
Trying 24.234.12.2 ... Open
User Access Verification
Username: locknkey
Password:
[Connection to 24.234.12.2 closed by foreign host]
R1#ping 24.234.5.5
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.5.5, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/57/60 ms
R1#
The dynamic access-list now permits the specific host
instead of any.
R2#sh ip access-lists
Extended IP access list INBOUND
10 permit tcp any host 24.234.12.2 eq telnet (159 matches)
20 permit eigrp host 24.234.12.1 host 224.0.0.10 (1020
matches)
30 permit eigrp host 24.234.12.1 host 24.234.12.1
40 Dynamic ACCESS permit ip any any
permit ip host 24.234.12.1 any (5 matches) (time left
104)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 6 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 2 . 3 0
Configure R3 so that all TCP, UDP, and ICMP traffic
initiated from behind FastEthernet0/0 is automatically
allowed to return. Permit FastEthernet0/0 on R6 to initiate
telnet sessions to the 24.234.0.0 network. Ensure that
routing information is not interrupted. Log any denied
packets to the local buffer. Do not use CBAC to
accomplish this.
Since we cant use CBAC, this will be done with reflexive
ACLs. Reflexive ACLs allow return traffic for certain
protocols, in this case TCP, UDP, and ICMP. On the outbound
ACL use the reflect keyword. On the inbound or blocking ACL
use the evaluate command to allow the return traffic.
R3(config)#logging buffered
R3(config)#ip access-list extended OUTBOUND
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any reflect REF
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp any any reflect REF
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any reflect REF
R3(config-ext-nacl)#ip access-list extended INBOUND
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit udp host 24.234.36.6 host 224.0.0.9
eq 520
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host 24.234.36.6 24.234.0.0
0.0.255.255 eq 23
R3(config-ext-nacl)#evaluate REF
R3(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any log
R3(config-ext-nacl)#interface FastEthernet0/1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(config-if)# ip access-group INBOUND in
R3(config-if)# ip access-group OUTBOUND out
Test by pinging from R2 to R6.
R2#ping 24.234.36.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.36.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
Now do a show ip access-list. Notice that there is a
reflexive ACL entry for the traffic.
R3#show ip access-list
Extended IP access list INBOUND
10 permit udp host 24.234.36.6 host 224.0.0.9 eq rip (12
matches)
20 permit tcp host 24.234.36.6 24.234.0.0 0.0.255.255 eq
telnet
30 evaluate REF
40 deny ip any any log
Extended IP access list OUTBOUND
10 permit tcp any any reflect REF
20 permit udp any any reflect REF
30 permit icmp any any reflect REF (10 matches)
Reflexive IP access list REF
permit icmp host 24.234.36.6 host 24.234.23.2 (20 matches)
(time left 282)
T a s k 2 . 3 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure R2 s0/0/0 so that ICMP from R5 s0/0/0 is denied
access to the rest of the network from 2am to 4am. Also,
deny all non-initial fragments inbound on FastEthernet0/0.
All other traffic should be allowed at all times.
This is accomplished with a time based ACL. First well
configure a time range identifying the time we want to work
with. Then well create an ACL entry using the time range
to deny ICMP traffic.
The fragments keyword is used to block non-initial
fragments. Notice that the deny statement is before any
other entry in the ACL. Only if there are no non-initial
fragments should other entries be checked.
R2(config)#time-range R5
R2(config-time-range)# periodic daily 02:00 to 04:00
R2(config-time-range)#ip access-list extended TIME
R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any fragments
R2(config-ext-nacl)#deny icmp host 24.234.245.5 any time-range
R5
R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any
R2(config-ext-nacl)#interface s0/0/0
R2(config-if)# ip access-group TIME in
Set the clock on R2 to an acceptable time that will allow
R5 to ping R2s loopback address.
R2#clock set 01:00:00 22 jan 2009
R2#
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
*Jan 22 01:00:00.000: %SYS-6-CLOCKUPDATE: System clock has been
updated from 23:04:48 UTC Wed Mar 11 2009 to 01:00:00 UTC Thu
Jan 22 2009, configured from console by console.
R5#ping 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2.2.2.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/57/60 ms
Set the clock on R2 to a time between 2am and 4am. Try the
ping again. It will fail.
R2#clock set 03:00:00 22 jan 2009
Jan 22 03:00:00.000: %SYS-6-CLOCKUPDATE: System clock has been
updated from 01:01:06 UTC Thu Jan 22 2009 to 03:00:00 UTC Thu
Jan 22 2009, configured from console by console.
R5#ping 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2.2.2.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 3 ~ VPN Technology
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 7 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure IPsec lan to lan (IOS/ASA)
T a s k 3 . 1
Configure R1 as a CA and NTP server with authentication.
Setup ASA1 and R5 as NTP and CA clients.
T a s k 3 . 2
Add the following route to the ACS server:
route add 100.0.0.0 mask 255.0.0.0 192.168.2.100.
T a s k 3 . 3
Configure the following IPsec parameters between ASA1 and
R5.
IKE 1 RSA, DH2, AES, SHA
IKE 2 AES, SHA
Protected traffic, all IP between hosts 1.1.1.1 and
22.22.22.2
tunnel endpoints asa 100.60.10.100 and R5 5.5.5.5
DMVPN
Erase and Reload initial configurations on ASA1 and R5.
Verify the ACS PC has a route to 100.0.0.0 via firewall
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 3 . 4
Create a DMVPN using the following:
R2 hub
R3/R4 Spokes
GRE network 10.0.0.y/24
New loop 234 of 10.yy.0.y/24
Overlay of eigrp 1 for the 10 networks.
source from loop 0 on each router
IKE 1: dh2, psk cisco, 3des, sha
IKE 2: 3des, sha
T a s k 3 . 5
Permit the IPsec related traffic through the ASA.

GET VPN
T a s k 3 . 6
Setup GET VPN with the following:
R6 key server
R3/R4 members
IKE 1 3des, dh2, lifetime 400, psk cisco
IKE 2 3des, sha
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
interesting traffic ICMP between 3.3.3.3 and 4.4.4.4
bidirectional

Easy VPN
T a s k 3 . 7
Configure EasyVPN with the following:
ASA easy vpn server on inside
R2 and ACS PC easy vpn clients
IKE 1 sha, dh2, aes, psk
IKE 2 aes, sha, pfs 2
split tunnel- traffic for the 100.70.10.0/24 net
clilent mode
pool 100.60.10.201-210
username vpn_user
group vpn_group
password cisco (for both)
R2 loop 0 is inside interface
allow password storage on clients
user virtual template
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 3 . 8
Allow clients to locally save password.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
QoS for VPN
T a s k 3 . 9
Configure the ASA to prioritize EasyVPN IPsec traffic.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
WebVPN(clientless)
T a s k 3 . 1 0
Configure clientless WebVPN on the inside of ASA1 using the
following:
Connection named SSL_VPN
URL: https://192.168.2.100/ssl
local authentication user ssl_user password cisco
group policy = SSL_VPN
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
High availability
T a s k 3 . 1 1
Configure high availability using the following:
R2 loop 0, peers with R3 and R4 HSRP address
IKE 1 PSK cisco, dh 2, 3des, sha
IKE 2 3des sha
Interesting traffic: IP between New loopback 222 of
10.yy.yy.2/24 and R5 loop 0
Do not add 10.yy.yy.0/24 to any routing protocols on
R2.
VPN Technologies Solutions
Configure IPsec lan to lan (IOS/ASA)
T a s k 3 . 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure R1 as a CA and NTP server with authentication.
Setup ASA1 and R5 as NTP and CA clients:
NTP is necessary so that all times on certificates match
what time the router thinks it is. If they dont a valid
cert may be seen as expired or future.
The NTP source is setup as L0 so that it will be reachable
regardless of interface status. NTP master 1 configures the
router as an NTP server, stratum 1. Stratum is the distance
from the reference clock. Stratum 1 is most
trusted/accurate as it is assumed to be directly connected
to a reference clock. We set up key 1 as cisco.
R1(config)#ntp source Loopback0
R1(config)#ntp master 1
R1(config)#ntp authentication-key 1 md5 cisco
R1(config)#clock timezone PST -8
R1(config)#clock summer-time PDT recurring
Apr 14 17:31:44.327: %SYS-6-CLOCKUPDATE: System clock has been
updated from 17:31:44 UTC Tue Apr 14 2009 to 09:31:44 PST Tue
Apr 14 2009, configured from console by console.
Apr 14 17:31:44.811: %SYS-6-CLOCKUPDATE: System clock has been
updated from 09:31:44 PST Tue Apr 14 2009 to 10:31:44 PDT Tue
Apr 14 2009, configured from console by console.
To configure a router as a CA server youll need a few
things. First, set up the HTTP server. This is used by the
clients to enroll. Youll need a domain name and a hostname
which will be included in the cert. Optionally you can
generate keys which allows you to control the label name.
They will be automatically generated if you dont.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 8 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R1(config)#ip http server
R1(config)#ip domain-name cisco.com
R1(config)#crypto key generate rsa general-keys label R1-
General-Keys modulus 1024 exportable
The name for the keys will be: R1-General-Keys
% The key modulus size is 1024 bits
% Generating 1024 bit RSA keys, keys will be exportable...[OK]
R1(config)#
Apr 14 17:31:53.115: %SSH-5-ENABLED: SSH 1.99 has been enabled
Now well configure the server itself. Weve included some
options such as cert lifetimes and the cdp URL for
certificate revocation. The most important one is grant
auto. This means certs do not need to be approved via the
CLI, they will be granted automatically when the client
makes an enrollment request. Remember to issue the no shut
command on the server
R1(config)#crypto pki server R1-CA_Server
R1(cs-server)#database url nvram:
R1(cs-server)#database level minimum
R1(cs-server)#issuer-name CN=R1-CA_Server.cisco.com L=NV C=US
R1(cs-server)#lifetime ca-certificate 365
R1(cs-server)#lifetime certificate 200
R1(cs-server)#lifetime crl 24
R1(cs-server)#cdp-url http://1.1.1.1/R1-CA_Servercdp.R1-
CA_Server.crl
R1(cs-server)#grant auto
R1(cs-server)#
Apr 14 17:33:05.183: %PKI-6-CS_GRANT_AUTO: All enrollment
requests will be automatically granted.
R1(cs-server)#no shut
%Some server settings cannot be changed after CA certificate
generation.
% Please enter a passphrase to protect the private key
% or type Return to exit
Password:cisco123
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Re-enter password:cisco123
% Generating 1024 bit RSA keys, keys will be non-
exportable...[OK]
% Exporting Certificate Server signing certificate and keys...
% Certificate Server enabled.
R1(cs-server)#
Apr 14 17:33:30.451: %PKI-6-CS_ENABLED: Certificate server now
enabled.
R1(cs-server)#
With the CA server enabled, well move on to client
configuration. On the ASA well set the same timezone as
the server, enter the same key, set it up as trusted and
authenticate the server with the key.
ASA-1(config)# domain-name cisco
ASA-1(config)# clock timezone PST -8
ASA-1(config)# clock summer-time PDT recurring
ASA-1(config)# ntp authentication-key 1 md5 cisco
ASA-1(config)# ntp trusted-key 1
ASA-1(config)# ntp authenticate
ASA-1(config)# ntp server 1.1.1.1 key 1
Well generate RSA keys before setting up the trustpoint.
The retry commands are optional, what is important is the
enrollment URL. Note that the port is 80.
ASA-1(config)# crypto key generate rsa general-keys modulus
1024
WARNING: You have a RSA keypair already defined named <Default-
RSA-Key>.
Do you really want to replace them? [yes/no]: yes
Keypair generation process begin. Please wait...
ASA-1(config)# crypto ca trustpoint R1-CA
ASA-1(config-ca-trustpoint)# enrollment retry count 5
ASA-1(config-ca-trustpoint)# enrollment retry period 3
ASA-1(config-ca-trustpoint)# enrollment url http://1.1.1.1:80
ASA-1(config-ca-trustpoint)# revocation-check none
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA-1(config-ca-trustpoint)# exit
ASA-1(config)# ping 1.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 1.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
30/32/40 ms
After verifying connectivity to the CA server, well first
authenticate and then enroll to it. Authentication must
occur before enrollment is allowed. You will receive a
message stating that the certificate has been granted.
ASA-1(config)# crypto ca authenticate R1-CA
INFO: Certificate has the following attributes:
Fingerprint: 5fe94f9c 3ce30ecc 01972a46 9b34833a
Do you accept this certificate? [yes/no]: yes
Trustpoint CA certificate accepted.
ASA-1(config)# cryp ca enroll R1-CA
%
% Start certificate enrollment ..
% Create a challenge password. You will need to verbally provide
this
password to the CA Administrator in order to revoke your
certificate.
For security reasons your password will not be saved in the
configuration.
Please make a note of it.
Password: cisco123
Re-enter password: cisco123
% The fully-qualified domain name in the certificate will be:
ASA-1.cisco
% Include the device serial number in the subject name?
[yes/no]: no
Request certificate from CA? [yes/no]: yes
% Certificate request sent to Certificate Authority
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA-1(config)# The certificate has been granted by CA!
Configuration for routers is almost identical to the ASA.
Set the timezone, configure NTP with authentication, set a
domain name, generate keys and configure the trustpoint.
The CA must be authenticated before enrollment.
R5(config)#clock timezone PST -8
R5(config)#clock summer-time PDT recurring
R5(config)#
Apr 14 18:40:06.592: %SYS-6-CLOCKUPDATE: System clock has been
updated from 18:40:06 UTC Tue Apr 14 2009 to 10:40:06 PST Tue
Apr 14 2009, configured from console by console.
R5(config)#
Apr 14 18:40:07.740: %SYS-6-CLOCKUPDATE: System clock has been
updated from 10:40:07 PST Tue Apr 14 2009 to 11:40:07 PDT Tue
Apr 14 2009, configured from console by console.
R5(config)#ntp authentication-key 1 md5 cisco
R5(config)#ntp trusted-key 1
R5(config)#ntp authenticate
R5(config)#ntp server 1.1.1.1 key 1
R5(config)#ip domain-name cisco.com
R5(config)#crypto key generate rsa general-keys modulus 1024
exportable
The name for the keys will be: R5.cisco.com
% The key modulus size is 1024 bits
% Generating 1024 bit RSA keys, keys will be exportable...[OK]
R5(config)#
*Apr 14 17:52:04.235: %SSH-5-ENABLED: SSH 1.99 has been enabled
R5(config)#crypto ca trustpoint R1-CA
R5(ca-trustpoint)# enrollment retry count 5
R5(ca-trustpoint)# enrollment retry period 3
R5(ca-trustpoint)# enrollment url http://1.1.1.1:80
R5(ca-trustpoint)# revocation-check none
R5(ca-trustpoint)#exit
R5(config)#
R5(config)#!
R5(config)#crypto pki authenticate R1-CA
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Certificate has the following attributes:
Fingerprint MD5: 5FE94F9C 3CE30ECC 01972A46 9B34833A
Fingerprint SHA1: A6BD7EA9 73833535 8DD8E12E C6BDC548
BEF74795
% Do you accept this certificate? [yes/no]: yes
Trustpoint CA certificate accepted.
R5(config)#cryp pki enroll R1-CA
%
% Start certificate enrollment ..
% Create a challenge password. You will need to verbally provide
this
password to the CA Administrator in order to revoke your
certificate.
For security reasons your password will not be saved in the
configuration.
Please make a note of it.
Password:
Re-enter password:
% The subject name in the certificate will include: R5.cisco.com
% Include the router serial number in the subject name?
[yes/no]: no
% Include an IP address in the subject name? [no]: yes
Enter Interface name or IP Address[]: loop 0
Request certificate from CA? [yes/no]: yes
% Certificate request sent to Certificate Authority
% The 'show crypto ca certificate R1-CA verbose' commandwill
show the fingerprint.
R5(config)#
Apr 14 17:49:37.897: CRYPTO_PKI: Certificate Request
Fingerprint MD5: 68D31458 C10A3DC7 B5113FBD 38132DF8
Apr 14 17:49:37.897: CRYPTO_PKI: Certificate Request
Fingerprint SHA1: EF0CFEDB 71907504 A49B193C 7D700BDC 346789D9
R5(config)#
R5(config)#
R5(config)#
Apr 14 17:49:42.697: %PKI-6-CERTRET: Certificate received from
Certificate Authority
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 3 . 2
Add the following route to the ACS server:
route add 100.0.0.0 mask 255.0.0.0 192.168.2.100
This is simple windows routing. Traffic for 100.x.x.x
should be sent to the next hop of 192.168.2.100.
T a s k 3 . 3
Configure the following IPSec parameters between ASA1 and
R5.
IKE 1 RSA, DH2, AES, SHA
IKE 2 AES, SHA
traffic, all IP between hosts 1.1.1.1 and 22.22.22.2
tunnel endpoints asa 100.60.10.100 and R5 5.5.5.5
On the ASA you must enable isakmp per interface, so well
enable it on the outside. An ACL must be set up to identify
interesting traffic, in this case any ip from 22.22.22.2 to
1.1.1.1.
A tunnel group is set up to enter various attributes of the
tunnel. The group name must be the ip address of the peer,
in this case 5.5.5.5. The tunnel is configured as ipsec lan
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
to lan. The trustpoint, isakmp policy to use and
authentication method (rsa-sig AKA pki) is also set here.
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp enable outside
ASA-1(config)# access-list outside_1_cryptomap line 1 extended
permit ip host 22.22.22.2 host 1.1.1.1
ASA-1(config)# clear xlate
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group 5.5.5.5 type ipsec-l2l
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group 5.5.5.5 ipsec-attributes
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# isakmp keepalive threshold 10 retry
2
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# trust-point R1-CA
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# crypto isakmp policy 10 authen rsa-
sig
The isakmp policy is set per the instructions. AES, SHA, DH
group 2.
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 encrypt aes
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 hash sha
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 group 2
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 lifetime 86400
The transform set is configured per the instructions. ESP
using AES and SHA.
ASA-1(config)# crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-AES-128-SHA esp-
aes esp-sha-hmac
Now well set up our crypto map to tie everything together.
We set the trustpoint to be used, reference our previously
created ACL for interesting traffic, set the peer, the
transform set, the tunnel group to use and the very
important peer-id-validate cert command. Finally, the
crypto map is applied to the outside interface.
ASA-1(config)# crypto map outside_map 1 set trustpoint R1-CA
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA-1(config)# crypto map outside_map 1 match address
outside_1_cryptomap
ASA-1(config)# crypto map outside_map 1 set peer 5.5.5.5
ASA-1(config)# crypto map outside_map 1 set transform-set ESP-
AES-128-SHA
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group 5.5.5.5 ipsec-attributes
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# peer-id-validate cert
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# exit
ASA-1(config)# crypto map outside_map interface outside
Router configuration is similar but a little bit more
simple than the ASA. First well create an ACL to identify
interesting traffic. It will be a mirrot image of the ASAs
ACL.
R5(config)# access-list 100 permit ip 1.1.1.1 0.0.0.0 22.22.22.2
0.0.0.0
Then isakmp policy is set. This must match what the ASA is
using, so rsa-sig authentication (the default), AES
encryption, SHA for hashing and DH group 2.
R5(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R5(config-isakmp)# authentication rsa-sig
R5(config-isakmp)# encr aes 128
R5(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R5(config-isakmp)# group 2
R5(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R5(config-isakmp)# exit
The transform set must also match what is being used on the
ASA. ESP with AES and SHA.
R5(config)# crypto ipsec transform-set MYSET esp-sha-hmac esp-
aes 128
R5(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
A crypto map is used to tie the configuration together.
Recall that the tunnel endpoint on R5 must be 5.5.5.5 or
l0. This must be done even though the crypto map is applied
to an actual interface. The local-address loop 0 command
accomplishes this. The transform set, peer and crypto ACL
are all set and the crypto map applied to the fa0/0.70
interface.
R5(config)# crypto map MYMAP local-address loop 0
R5(config)# crypto map MYMAP 1 ipsec-isakmp
% NOTE: This new crypto map will remain disabled until a peer
and a valid access list have been configured.
R5(config-crypto-map)# set transform-set MYSET
R5(config-crypto-map)# set peer 100.60.10.100
R5(config-crypto-map)# match address 100
R5(config-crypto-map)# exit
R5(config)#interface FastEthernet0/0.70
R5(config-subif)# crypto map MYMAP
R5(config-subif)# exit
Verify by generating interesting traffic, in this case a
ping between 1.1.1.1 and 22.22.22.2. The ping is
successful. Sho crypto ipsec sa shows that the 4 packets
were encrypted and decrypted on both the router and the
ASA.
Apr 14 18:27:31.483: %CRYPTO-6-ISAKMP_ON_OFF: ISAKMP is ON
Verify with a ping from R1 loopback 0 to 22.22.22.2:
R1#ping 22.22.22.2 source loop 0
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 22.22.22.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 1.1.1.1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
.!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
32/32/36 ms
R5#show crypto map
Crypto Map: "MYMAP" idb: Loopback0 local address: 5.5.5.5
Crypto Map "MYMAP" 1 ipsec-isakmp
Peer = 100.60.10.100
Extended IP access list 100
access-list 100 permit ip host 1.1.1.1 host
22.22.22.2
Current peer: 100.60.10.100
Security association lifetime: 4608000 kilobytes/3600
seconds
PFS (Y/N): N
Transform sets={
MYSET,
}
Interfaces using crypto map MYMAP:
FastEthernet0/0.70
R5# show crypto ipsec sa
interface: FastEthernet0/0.70
Crypto map tag: MYMAP, local addr 5.5.5.5
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(1.1.1.1/255.255.255.255/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(22.22.22.2/255.255.255.255/0/0)
current_peer 100.60.10.100 port 500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 4, #pkts encrypt: 4, #pkts digest: 4
#pkts decaps: 4, #pkts decrypt: 4, #pkts verify: 4
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 1, #recv errors 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
1 9 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA-1(config)# show crypto ipsec sa
interface: outside
Crypto map tag: outside_map, seq num: 1, local addr:
100.60.10.100
access-list outside_1_cryptomap permit ip host 22.22.22.2
host 1.1.1.1
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(22.22.22.2/255.255.255.255/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(1.1.1.1/255.255.255.255/0/0)
current_peer: 5.5.5.5
#pkts encaps: 4, #pkts encrypt: 4, #pkts digest: 4
#pkts decaps: 4, #pkts decrypt: 4, #pkts verify: 4
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 4, #pkts comp failed: 0, #pkts
decomp failed: 0
#pre-frag successes: 0, #pre-frag failures: 0, #fragments
created: 0
#PMTUs sent: 0, #PMTUs rcvd: 0, #decapsulated frgs needing
reassembly: 0
DMVPN
Erase and Reload initial configs on ASA1 and R5.
Verify the ACS pc has a route to 100.0.0.0 via firewall.
T a s k 3 . 4
Create a DMVPN using the following:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2 hub
R3/R4 Spokes
GRE network 10.0.0.y/24
New loop 234 of 10.yy.0.y/24
Overlay of eigrp 1 for the 10 networks.
source from loop 0 on each router
IKE 1: dh2, psk cisco, 3des, sha
IKE 2: 3des, sha
Hub configuration:
First well create the loopback interface. Its important to
note that this address isnt routeable on the existing
nextwork.
R2(config)#int loop 234
*Apr 14 20:09:36.807: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Loopback234, changed state to up
R2(config-if)#ip add 10.22.0.2 255.255.255.0
Now well need to set up isakmp according to the
instructions. 3des encryption, sha for hashing, DH group 2
and authentication using a pre-shared key. Note that the
peer address from the pre-shared is the wildcard of
0.0.0.0. This means the key isnt tied to a specific peer
which is important since multiple peers will be using it.
R2(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R2(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R2(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R2(config-isakmp)# group 2
R2(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R2(config-isakmp)# exit
R2(config)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
The transform set is configured using the instructions. ESP
with 3des and sha. Transport mode is set here, if it wasnt
the default of tunnel would be used. This saves us an
additional 20 bytes since the existing IP header is used.
R2(config)# crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-sha-hmac
esp-3des
R2(cfg-crypto-trans)# mode transport
R2(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
Finally, DMVPN doesnt use a crypto map. The ipsec
configuration is tied to the tunnel with an ipsec profile,
so well create that. It is very simple, set the transform
set to be used.
R2(config)#crypto ipsec profile DMVPN_PROFILE
R2(ipsec-profile)# set transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA
R2(ipsec-profile)# exit
Most of the DMVPN configuration occurs on the tunnel
interface itself. Here we set the bandwidth and delay of
the interface, important since EIGRP uses these for metrics
and because the bandwidth by default is very low while the
delay is very high. We also need to set the MTU to a
reasonable level to take into account the additional packet
size caused by ipsec and GRE. Otherwise the packet can be
too large and cause fragmentation. 1400 is a good
conservative mtu. The ip tcp adjust-mss command modifies
the TCP maximum segement size in packets sent during TCP
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
establishment. It is set to 1360 so that end hosts will
only send 1360 bytes via TCP which will keep total packet
size no greater than our MTU of 1400 bytes. This is again
done to combat fragmentation.
R2(config)#interface Tunnel0
R2(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.2 255.255.255.0
R2(config-if)# bandwidth 1000
R2(config-if)# delay 1000
R2(config-if)# ip mtu 1400
R2(config-if)# ip tcp adjust-mss 1360
Next well set up the ip nhrp command which allows the hub
to use the next hop routing protocol to properly map ip
addresses. The important command here is map mulicast
dynamic, which will allow EIGRP to function properly.
R2(config-if)# ip nhrp holdtime 360
R2(config-if)# ip nhrp network-id 100000
R2(config-if)# ip nhrp authentication cisco
R2(config-if)# ip nhrp map multicast dynamic
It is critical to turn off EIGRP split horizon since routing
updates will be leaving via the same interface they were
received on. Also, next-hop-self must be turned off or *ALL*
EIGRP routed traffic between the spokes will traverse the hub.
This defeats the purpose of DMVPN.
R2(config-if)# no ip split-horizon eigrp 1
R2(config-if)# no ip next-hop-self eigrp 1
The tunnel source is set to our new loopback 0 interface,
the mode is set to GRE multipoint, a tunnel key is set and
the ipsec profile is tied to the interface with the tunnel
protection command. Finally the interface is brought up
with no shut command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config-if)# tunnel source Loop 0
R2(config-if)# tunnel mode gre multipoint
R2(config-if)# tunnel key 100000
R2(config-if)# tunnel protection ipsec profile DMVPN_PROFILE
R2(config-if)# no shutdown
R2(config-if)# exit
EIGRP is configured. Well be advertising all of our
10.x.x.x networks. This will include both the tunnel
interface and the loopback interface.
R2(config)#router eigrp 1
R2(config-router)# no auto-summary
R2(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
R2(config-router)# exit
R3 Spoke configuration:
To start, the configuration is almost identical to the hub.
The loopback interface is setup, then isakmp, the transform
set and the ipsec profile.
R3(config)#int loop 234
R3(config-if)#ip address 10.33.0.3 255.255.255.0
R3(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R3(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R3(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R3(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R3(config-isakmp)# group 2
R3(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R3(config-isakmp)# exit
R3(config)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
R3(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-sha-hmac
esp-3des
R3(cfg-crypto-trans)# mode transport
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
R3(config)#crypto ipsec profile DMVPN_PROFILE
R3(ipsec-profile)# set transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA
R3(ipsec-profile)# exit
The tunnel interface configuration starts the same as the
hub. An IP followed by the commands neccessary to combat
fragmentation.
R3(config)#interface Tunnel0
R3(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.3 255.255.255.0
R3(config-if)# bandwidth 1000
R3(config-if)# delay 1000
R3(config-if)# ip mtu 1400
R3(config-if)# ip tcp adjust-mss 1360
There are a few differences in the ip nhrp configuration.
First we need to set a next hop server so that we can
register our tunnel to interface ip mappings and get the
mappings for other spokes we will communicate with. This is
done with the ip nhrp nhs command. Note that it is mapped
to the hubs tunnel address. Since this is the case, we
need to know what routable IP we can send these packets to.
This is done with ip nhrp map. We map the NHS address to
the hubs actual interface IP. We then map multicast to
this same IP so that EIGRP will function via the tunnel
interfaces.
R3(config-if)# ip nhrp holdtime 360
R3(config-if)# ip nhrp network-id 100000
R3(config-if)# ip nhrp authentication cisco
R3(config-if)# ip nhrp nhs 10.0.0.2
R3(config-if)# ip nhrp map 10.0.0.2 100.60.10.22
R3(config-if)# ip nhrp map multicast 100.60.10.22
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The rest of the tunnel configuration is the same as the
hub. A tunnel source, the GRE mode, a tunnel key and the
ipsec profile which will be used to encrypt traffic.
Remember to no shut the interface.
R3(config-if)# tunnel source Loop 0
R3(config-if)# tunnel mode gre multipoint
R3(config-if)# tunnel key 100000
R3(config-if)# tunnel protection ipsec profile DMVPN_PROFILE
R3(config-if)# no shutdown
R3(config-if)# exit
EIGRP is set up the same as the hub. It encompasses the entire
10.x.x.x network.
R3(config)#router eigrp 1
R3(config-router)# no auto-summary
R3(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
R3(config-router)# exit
R4 spoke configuration:
Aside from the ip addresses the other spoke is setup
identical to the first spoke. Cut n paste is the preferred
method for additional spokes since it will save a lot of
time.
R4(config)#int loop 234
R4(config-if)#ip address 10.44.0.4 255.255.255.0
R4(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R4(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R4(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R4(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R4(config-isakmp)# group 2
R4(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R4(config-isakmp)# exit
R4(config)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-sha-hmac
esp-3des
R4(cfg-crypto-trans)# mode transport
R4(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
R4(config)#crypto ipsec profile DMVPN_PROFILE
R4(ipsec-profile)# set transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA
R4(ipsec-profile)# exit
R4(config)#interface Tunnel0
R4(config-if)# ip address 10.0.0.4 255.255.255.0
R4(config-if)# bandwidth 1000
R4(config-if)# delay 1000
R4(config-if)# ip mtu 1400
R4(config-if)# ip tcp adjust-mss 1360
R4(config-if)# ip nhrp holdtime 360
R4(config-if)# ip nhrp network-id 100000
R4(config-if)# ip nhrp authentication cisco
R4(config-if)# ip nhrp nhs 10.0.0.2
R4(config-if)# ip nhrp map multicast 100.60.10.22
R4(config-if)# ip nhrp map 10.0.0.2 100.60.10.22
R4(config-if)# tunnel source Loop 0
R4(config-if)# tunnel key 100000
R4(config-if)# tunnel mode gre multipoint
R4(config-if)# tunnel protection ipsec profile DMVPN_PROFILE
R4(config-if)# no shutdown
R4(config-if)# exit
R4(config)#router eigrp 1
R4(config-router)# no auto-summary
R4(config-router)# network 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255
R4(config-router)# exit
At this point there is still a problem. The ipsec traffic
is not being allowed to pass the ASA.
ASA-1(config)# logging enable
ASA-1(config)# logging buffered 5
ASA-1(config)# show log
Syslog logging: enabled
Facility: 20
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Timestamp logging: disabled
Standby logging: disabled
Debug-trace logging: disabled
Console logging: disabled
Monitor logging: disabled
Buffer logging: level notifications, 3 messages logged
Trap logging: disabled
History logging: disabled
Device ID: disabled
Mail logging: disabled
ASDM logging: disabled
%ASA-5-111008: User 'enable_15' executed the 'logging buffered
5' command.
%ASA-2-106006: Deny inbound UDP from 4.4.4.4/500 to
100.60.10.22/500 on interface outside
%ASA-2-106006: Deny inbound UDP from 3.3.3.3/500 to
100.60.10.22/500 on interface outside
T a s k 3 . 5
Permit the IPSec related traffic through the ASA using an
ACL. Were allowing ISAKMP and NAT-T as a general rule.
ASA-1(config)# access-list outside_access_in line 1 extended
permit udp host 3.3.3.3 host 100.60.10.22 eq 500
ASA-1(config)# access-list outside_access_in line 1 extended
permit udp host 3.3.3.3 host 100.60.10.22 eq 4500
ASA-1(config)# access-list outside_access_in line 1 extended
permit udp host 4.4.4.4 host 100.60.10.22 eq 500
ASA-1(config)# access-list outside_access_in line 1 extended
permit udp host 4.4.4.4 host 100.60.10.22 eq 4500
ASA-1(config)# clear xlate
ASA-1(config)# access-group outside_access_in in interface
outside
With the traffic allowed your EIGRP neighbor relationships
should form and NHRP should be functional.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2#show ip nhrp
10.0.0.3/32 via 10.0.0.3, Tunnel0 created 00:00:32, expire
00:05:28
Type: dynamic, Flags: unique registered used
NBMA address: 3.3.3.3
10.0.0.4/32 via 10.0.0.4, Tunnel0 created 00:00:37, expire
00:05:22
Type: dynamic, Flags: unique registered used
NBMA address: 4.4.4.4
R2#show ip eigrp neighbors
IP-EIGRP neighbors for process 1
H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT
RTO Q Seq
(sec) (ms)
Cnt Num
1 10.0.0.3 Tu0 10 00:00:41 6
200 0 3
0 10.0.0.4 Tu0 10 00:00:46 4
200 0 3
R3#show crypto ipsec sa
interface: Tunnel0
Crypto map tag: Tunnel0-head-0, local addr 3.3.3.3
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/47/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(100.60.10.22/255.255.255.255/47/0)
current_peer 100.60.10.22 port 4500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 97, #pkts encrypt: 97, #pkts digest: 97
#pkts decaps: 96, #pkts decrypt: 96, #pkts verify: 96
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 72, #recv errors 0
A sho ip route verifies that the next hop for the 10.x.x.x
networks is via tunnel 0.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 0 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
1.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O 1.1.1.0 [110/66] via 100.70.10.5, 00:30:59,
FastEthernet0/0.70
2.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O 2.2.2.0 [110/12] via 100.60.10.100, 00:36:01,
FastEthernet0/0.60
100.0.0.0/8 is variably subnetted, 9 subnets, 2 masks
O 100.110.10.0/24 [110/75] via 100.70.10.5, 00:30:59,
FastEthernet0/0.70
C 100.70.10.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0.70
O 100.66.10.0/24 [110/67] via 100.70.10.5, 00:30:59,
FastEthernet0/0.70
O 100.90.10.0/24 [110/66] via 100.70.10.5, 00:31:00,
FastEthernet0/0.70
C 100.60.10.0/24 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0.60
O 100.55.10.0/24 [110/2] via 100.70.10.5, 00:35:52,
FastEthernet0/0.70
O 100.15.10.1/32 [110/65] via 100.70.10.5, 00:31:00,
FastEthernet0/0.70
O 100.15.10.5/32 [110/1] via 100.70.10.5, 00:31:20,
FastEthernet0/0.70
O 100.11.10.0/24 [110/66] via 100.70.10.5, 00:31:00,
FastEthernet0/0.70
3.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 3.3.3.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
4.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O 4.4.4.0 [110/2] via 100.70.10.4, 00:35:52,
FastEthernet0/0.70
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
[110/2] via 100.60.10.4, 00:36:12,
FastEthernet0/0.60
5.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O 5.5.5.0 [110/2] via 100.70.10.5, 00:35:52,
FastEthernet0/0.70
6.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O 6.6.6.0 [110/67] via 100.70.10.5, 00:31:00,
FastEthernet0/0.70
22.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O 22.22.22.0 [110/12] via 100.60.10.100, 00:36:03,
FastEthernet0/0.60
10.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 4 subnets
C 10.0.0.0 is directly connected, Tunnel0
D 10.22.0.0 [90/2944000] via 10.0.0.2, 00:04:38, Tunnel0
D 10.44.0.0 [90/3200000] via 10.0.0.4, 00:02:34, Tunnel0
C 10.33.0.0 is directly connected, Loopback234
O 192.168.2.0/24 [110/11] via 100.60.10.100, 00:19:26,
FastEthernet0/0.60
A ping and sho crypto ipsec sa verifies the traffic.
R3#ping 10.44.0.4 repeat 10
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 10, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 10.44.0.4, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (10/10), round-trip min/avg/max =
4/14/24 ms
R3#show crypto ipsec sa
interface: Tunnel0
Crypto map tag: Tunnel0-head-0, local addr 3.3.3.3
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/47/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(100.60.10.22/255.255.255.255/47/0)
current_peer 100.60.10.22 port 4500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 123, #pkts encrypt: 123, #pkts digest: 123
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
#pkts decaps: 122, #pkts decrypt: 122, #pkts verify: 122
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 72, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 3.3.3.3, remote crypto endpt.:
100.60.10.22
path mtu 1514, ip mtu 1514, ip mtu idb Loopback0
current outbound spi: 0xC400E3DA(3288392666)
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x988C61D7(2559336919)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Transport UDP-Encaps, }
conn id: 2003, flow_id: NETGX:3, crypto map: Tunnel0-
head-0
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec):
(4390499/3146)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
inbound ah sas:
inbound pcp sas:
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0xC400E3DA(3288392666)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Transport UDP-Encaps, }
conn id: 2004, flow_id: NETGX:4, crypto map: Tunnel0-
head-0
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec):
(4390499/3144)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
outbound ah sas:
outbound pcp sas:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/47/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(4.4.4.4/255.255.255.255/47/0)
current_peer 4.4.4.4 port 500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 2, #pkts encrypt: 2, #pkts digest: 2
#pkts decaps: 2, #pkts decrypt: 2, #pkts verify: 2
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 3.3.3.3, remote crypto endpt.: 4.4.4.4
path mtu 1514, ip mtu 1514, ip mtu idb Loopback0
current outbound spi: 0xFB5404C8(4216587464)
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x1BCE6890(466512016)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Transport, }
conn id: 2005, flow_id: NETGX:5, crypto map: Tunnel0-
head-0
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec):
(4525120/3583)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
spi: 0xE945AB59(3913657177)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Transport, }
conn id: 2007, flow_id: NETGX:7, crypto map: Tunnel0-
head-0
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec):
(4453101/3581)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
inbound ah sas:
inbound pcp sas:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x99FE240B(2583569419)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Transport, }
conn id: 2006, flow_id: NETGX:6, crypto map: Tunnel0-
head-0
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec):
(4525120/3581)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
spi: 0xFB5404C8(4216587464)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Transport, }
conn id: 2008, flow_id: NETGX:8, crypto map: Tunnel0-
head-0
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (k/sec):
(4453101/3580)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
outbound ah sas:
outbound pcp sas:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
GET VPN
T a s k 3 . 6
Setup GET VPN with the following:
R6 key server
R3/R4 members
IKE 1 3des, dh2, lifetime 400, psk cisco
IKE 2 3des, sha
interesting traffic icmp between 3.3.3.3 and 4.4.4.4
bidirectional
Key server configuration:
Get VPN uses ipsec to encrypt traffic, so this part of the
configuration will look no different than standard site to
site VPN. Note the wildcard pre-shared key.
R6(config)#no ip domain lookup
R6(config)#ip domain name cisco.com
R6(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R6(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R6(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R6(config-isakmp)# group 2
R6(config-isakmp)# lifetime 400
R6(config-isakmp)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
R6(config)# transform-set gdoi-trans-group1 esp-3des esp-sha-
hmac
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Well be using an ipsec profile, so that is configured
here. Were really just setting the transform set to be
used similar to DMVPN. The SA lifetime is optional.
R6(cfg-crypto-trans)# crypto ipsec profile gdoi-profile-group1
R6(ipsec-profile)# set security-association lifetime seconds
1800
R6(ipsec-profile)# set transform-set gdoi-trans-group1
R6(ipsec-profile)#exit
Now well setup the gdoi or group domain of interpretation.
This is the group that this key server will be providing
policy for. The server is set to local, meaning that this
is a key server. With GET, if youre using unicast re-key
instead of multicast you must define an rsa key to be used.
This is done with the rekay authentication command.
R6(config)#crypto gdoi group group1
R6(config-gdoi-group)# identity number 1
R6(config-gdoi-group)# server local
R6(gdoi-local-server)# rekey lifetime seconds 86400
R6(gdoi-local-server)# rekey retransmit 10 number 2
R6(gdoi-local-server)# rekey auhentication mypubkey rsa group1-
export-general
R6(gdoi-local-server)# rekey transport unicast
Policy is set using the sa ipsec <number> command. Here we
define the ACL that will be used to determine interesting
traffic, the ipsec profile that well use and the address
clients will use for the server, in this case 6.6.6.6.
R6(gdoi-local-server)# sa ipsec 1
R6(gdoi-sa-ipsec)# profile gdoi-profile-group1
R6(gdoi-sa-ipsec)# match address ipv4 101
R6(gdoi-sa-ipsec)# replay counter window-size 64
R6(gdoi-sa-ipsec)# address ipv4 6.6.6.6
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Finally well create the ACL that will be used to determine
interesting traffic. This step *CAN* be performed after the
ACL is defined in the key server setup, and can be changed
without having to reconfigure the key server.
R6(gdoi-coop-ks-config)#access-list 101 permit icmp host 3.3.3.3
host 4.4.4.4
R6(config)#access-list 101 permit icmp host 4.4.4.4 host 3.3.3.3
Member R3 configuration:
Most of the work in a GET configuration is done on the key
server. On the members you simply configure isakmp. A
transform set and ACL is not needed as it will be pushed
down by the key server.
R3(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R3(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R3(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R3(config-isakmp)# group 2
R3(config-isakmp)# lifetime 3600
R3(config-isakmp)# crypto isakmp key cisco address 6.6.6.6
Now well set up the gdoi. Well use the same group and
identity number used on the key server. Instead of server
local well set server to R6s configured key server
address, 6.6.6.6.
R3(config)#crypto gdoi group group1
R3(config-gdoi-group)# identity number 1
R3(config-gdoi-group)# server address ipv4 6.6.6.6
R3(config-gdoi-group)#exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The configuration is completed by creating a gdoi crypto
map and setting it to use the group we just created, group
1. The crypto map is then applied to an interface just as
it would be in a site to site tunnel. Registration should
happen almost instantly.
R3(config)#crypto map map-group1 10 gdoi
R3(config-crypto-map)# set group group1
R3(config-crypto-map)# interface fa0/0.60
R3(config-subif)# crypto map map-group1
R3(config-subif)# interface fa0/0.70
R3(config-subif)# crypto map map-group1
*Apr 14 21:14:33.191: %GDOI-5-GM_REGS_COMPL: Registration to KS
6.6.6.6 complete for group group1 using address 100.60.10.3
*Apr 14 21:14:33.443: %CRYPTO-5-GM_REGSTER: Start registration
to KS 6.6.6.6 for group group1 using address 100.70.10.3
*Apr 14 21:14:33.571: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console
by console
*Apr 14 21:14:33.839: %GDOI-5-GM_REGS_COMPL: Registration to KS
6.6.6.6 complete for group group1 using address 100.70.10.3
Member R4 configuration:
Configuration is identical to R3. Cut n paste is
recommended.
R4(config)# crypto isakmp policy 1
R4(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R4(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R4(config-isakmp)# group 2
R4(config-isakmp)# lifetime 3600
R4(config-isakmp)# crypto isakmp key cisco address 6.6.6.6
R4(config)# crypto gdoi group group1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4(config-gdoi-group)# identity number 1
R4(config-gdoi-group)# server address ipv4 6.6.6.6
R4(config-gdoi-group)# exit
R4(config)#crypto map map-group1 10 gdoi
R4(config-crypto-map)# set group group1
R4(config-crypto-map)#interface Fa0/0.60
R4(config-subif)# crypto map map-group1
R4(config-subif)# interface Fa0/0.70
R4(config-subif)# crypto map map-group1
*Apr 14 21:21:45.119: %GDOI-5-GM_REGS_COMPL: Registration to KS
6.6.6.6 complete for group group1 using address 100.60.10.4
*Apr 14 21:21:45.415: %CRYPTO-5-GM_REGSTER: Start registration
to KS 6.6.6.6 for group group1 using address 100.70.10.4
*Apr 14 21:21:45.811: %GDOI-5-GM_REGS_COMPL: Registration to KS
6.6.6.6 complete for group group1 using address 100.70.10.4
Test by pinging 4.4.4.4 with a source of loopback 0. The
ping should be successful and a sho ipsec sa verifies the
encryption.
R3#ping 4.4.4.4 source loop 0
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 4.4.4.4, timeout is 2 seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 3.3.3.3
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/3/4 ms
R3#show crypto ipsec sa
interface: FastEthernet0/0.60
Crypto map tag: map-group1, local addr 100.60.10.3
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(4.4.4.4/255.255.255.255/1/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/1/0)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 1 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
current_peer port 848
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 0, #pkts encrypt: 0, #pkts digest: 0
#pkts decaps: 0, #pkts decrypt: 0, #pkts verify: 0
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 100.60.10.3, remote crypto endpt.:
path mtu 1500, ip mtu 1500, ip mtu idb FastEthernet0/0.60
current outbound spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2003, flow_id: NETGX:3, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1733)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
inbound ah sas:
inbound pcp sas:
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2004, flow_id: NETGX:4, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1732)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
outbound ah sas:
outbound pcp sas:
protected vrf: (none)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/1/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(4.4.4.4/255.255.255.255/1/0)
current_peer port 848
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 5, #pkts encrypt: 5, #pkts digest: 5
#pkts decaps: 0, #pkts decrypt: 0, #pkts verify: 0
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 100.60.10.3, remote crypto endpt.:
path mtu 1500, ip mtu 1500, ip mtu idb FastEthernet0/0.60
current outbound spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2001, flow_id: NETGX:1, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1731)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
inbound ah sas:
inbound pcp sas:
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2002, flow_id: NETGX:2, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1723)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
outbound ah sas:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
outbound pcp sas:
interface: FastEthernet0/0.70
Crypto map tag: map-group1, local addr 100.70.10.3
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(4.4.4.4/255.255.255.255/1/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/1/0)
current_peer port 848
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 0, #pkts encrypt: 0, #pkts digest: 0
#pkts decaps: 0, #pkts decrypt: 0, #pkts verify: 0
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 100.70.10.3, remote crypto endpt.:
path mtu 1500, ip mtu 1500, ip mtu idb FastEthernet0/0.70
current outbound spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2007, flow_id: NETGX:7, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1723)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
inbound ah sas:
inbound pcp sas:
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2008, flow_id: NETGX:8, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1721)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
outbound ah sas:
outbound pcp sas:
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/1/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(4.4.4.4/255.255.255.255/1/0)
current_peer port 848
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 0, #pkts encrypt: 0, #pkts digest: 0
#pkts decaps: 5, #pkts decrypt: 5, #pkts verify: 5
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
local crypto endpt.: 100.70.10.3, remote crypto endpt.:
path mtu 1500, ip mtu 1500, ip mtu idb FastEthernet0/0.70
current outbound spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
inbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2005, flow_id: NETGX:5, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1720)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
inbound ah sas:
inbound pcp sas:
outbound esp sas:
spi: 0x52555EAA(1381326506)
transform: esp-3des esp-sha-hmac ,
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
in use settings ={Tunnel, }
conn id: 2006, flow_id: NETGX:6, crypto map: map-group1
sa timing: remaining key lifetime (sec): (1716)
IV size: 8 bytes
replay detection support: Y
Status: ACTIVE
outbound ah sas:
outbound pcp sas:
Easy VPN
T a s k 3 . 7
Configure EasyVPN with the following:
ASA easy vpn server on the inside interface
R2 and ACS PC easy vpn clients
IKE 1 sha, dh2, aes, psk
IKE 2 aes, sha, pfs 2
split tunnel- traffic for the 100.70.10.0/24 net
client mode
pool 100.60.10.201-210
username vpn_user
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
group vpn_group
password cisco (for both)
R2 loop 0 is inside interface
allow password storage on clients
user virtual template
ASA1 EasyVPN Server configuration:
The EasyVPN server configuration can be complex so it helps
to break it down into sections. First well configure IPSec
settings. These will include the ISAKMP policy and
transform set that conforms to the instructions.
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp enable inside
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 encrypt aes
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 hash sha
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 group 2
ASA-1(config)# crypto isakmp policy 10 lifetime 86400
ASA-1(config)# crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-AES-128-SHA esp-
aes esp-sha-hmac
Now well need to set up the EasyVPN attributes that will
be used by the clients. This will include the split tunnel
ACL, the group policy, the username/password and the IP
address pool.
ASA-1(config)# access-list vpn_group_splitTunnelAcl standard
permit 100.70.10.0 255.255.255.0
ASA-1(config)# group-policy vpn_group internal
ASA-1(config)# group-policy vpn_group attributes
ASA-1(config-group-policy)# vpn-tunnel-protocol IPSec
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA-1(config-group-policy)# split-tunnel-policy
tunnelspecified
ASA-1(config-group-policy)# split-tunnel-network-list value
vpn_group_splitTunnelAcl
ASA-1(config)# username vpn_user password cisco privilege 0
ASA-1(config)# username vpn_user attributes
ASA-1(config-username)# vpn-group-policy vpn_group
ASA-1(config-username)# ip local pool MYPOOL 100.60.10.201-
100.60.10.210 mask 255.255.255.0
Now well configure the tunnel group. Notice that the type
is remote-access. It will reference the previously created
group policy and address pool. The IPSec attributes are
then set, including the PSK and the isakmp policy we
already created.
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group vpn_group type remote-access
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group vpn_group general-attributes
ASA-1(config-tunnel-general)# default-group-policy vpn_group
ASA-1(config-tunnel-general)# address-pool MYPOOL
ASA-1(config-tunnel-general)# tunnel-group vpn_group ipsec-
attributes
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# pre-shared-key cisco
ASA-1(config-tunnel-ipsec)# crypto isakmp policy 10 authen pre-
share
A dynamic crypto map is used to set both PFS and the
transform set. This dynamic map is referenced in the crypto
map which is actually applied to the inside interface. The
server configuration is now complete.
ASA-1(config)# crypto dynamic-map MYDYN 65535 set pfs group2
ASA-1(config)# crypto dynamic-map MYDYN 65535 set transform-set
ESP-AES-128-SHA
ASA-1(config)# crypto map inside_map 65535 ipsec-isakmp dynamic
MYDYN
ASA-1(config)# crypto map inside_map interface inside
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2 EasyVPN Client Configuration:
This is known as an EasyVPN Hardware client. The setup is
fairly simple. First well configure the ezvpn client
settings. This includes the group to be used which must
match the group name created on the ASA. The peer (the ASA)
ip address is set as is the username and password to be
used. The username and password must match what was set on
the ASA.
R2(config)#crypto ipsec client ezvpn EZ_CLIENT
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# group vpn_group key 0 cisco
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# peer 192.168.2.100
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# username vpn_user password 0 cisco
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# xauth userid mode local
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# exit
Loopback 0 is configured as the inside of the EasyVPN
tunnel.
R2(config)#interface loop 0
R2(config-if)# crypto ipsec client ezvpn EZ_CLIENT inside
R2(config-if)# exit
Now well need to create our virtual template. This
template will be cloned to create a virtual access
interface (applied to the physical outside interface) when
the actual tunnel is built.
R2(config)#interface Virtual-Template1 type tunnel
R2(config-if)# exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
With the virtual template created, we can go back into our
client configuration and set it to use a virtual-interface.
R2(config)#crypto ipsec client ezvpn EZ_CLIENT
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# virtual-interface 1
R2(config-crypto-ezvpn)# exit
Well now set the outside interface of the EasyVPN client,
the interface that face the EasyVPN server. Well also
bring up the virtual-template interface.
R2(config)#interface FastEthernet0/0.168
R2(config-subif)# crypto ipsec client ezvpn EZ_CLIENT outside
R2(config-subif)# exit
R2(config)#interface Virtual-Template1 type tunnel
R2(config-if)# no shutdown
R2(config-if)# tunnel mode ipsec ipv4
R2(config-if)# exit
R2(config)#end
Now that the configuration is complete, we can authenticate
to the server. This is done with the crypto ipsec client
ezvpn xauth command. Youll br prompted for the username
and password. Once authenticated the connection will come
up. Youll see the client address get assigned and see the
virtual access interface come up.
R2# crypto ipsec client ezvpn xauth
Username: vpn_user
Password: cisco
*Apr 14 21:42:08.063: %CRYPTO-6-EZVPN_CONNECTION_UP: (Client)
User= Group=vpn_group Server_public_addr=192.168.2.100
Assigned_client_addr=100.60.10.201
*Apr 14 21:42:08.067: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access1,
changed state to up
R2#
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
*Apr 14 21:42:08.943: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Loopback10000, changed state to up
*Apr 14 21:42:09.011: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface NVI0, changed state to up
*Apr 14 21:42:09.067: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Virtual-Access1, changed state to up
Once the connection is up you can verify the setting with
sho crypto ipsec client ezvpn. Note that the virtual-access
interface is bound to the real outside interface. This lets
us know the virtual-template is functioning.
The client IP was received and is part of the proper pool
that we set on the server. The split tunnel ACL is also
correct. Only traffic destined for 100.70.10.0/24 will be
encrypted.
R2#show crypto ipsec client ezvpn
Easy VPN Remote Phase: 6
Tunnel name : EZ_CLIENT
Inside interface list: Loopback0
Outside interface: Virtual-Access1 (bound to
FastEthernet0/0.168)
Current State: IPSEC_ACTIVE
Last Event: MTU_CHANGED
Address: 100.60.10.201 (applied on Loopback10000)
Mask: 255.255.255.255
Save Password: Disallowed
Split Tunnel List: 1
Address : 100.70.10.0
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Protocol : 0x0
Source Port: 0
Dest Port : 0
Current EzVPN Peer: 192.168.2.100
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 2 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 3 . 8
Allow clients to locally save password.
To allow this, add the password-storage enable command to
the group policy. With this enabled and the xauth userid
mode local command on the client (which weve already
configured) the password will be stored and the next
connect will occur authomatically. View the output below
for verification.
ASA-1(config)# group-policy vpn_group attributes
ASA-1(config-group-policy)# password-storage enable
R2#clear crypto sa
R2#
*Apr 14 21:46:48.967: %CRYPTO-6-EZVPN_CONNECTION_DOWN: (Client)
User= Group=vpn_group Server_public_addr=192.168.2.100
Assigned_client_addr=100.60.10.201
R2#
*Apr 14 21:46:49.023: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access1,
changed state to down
*Apr 14 21:46:50.023: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Virtual-Access1, changed state to down
R2#
*Apr 14 21:46:51.015: %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Loopback10000,
changed state to administratively down
*Apr 14 21:46:51.299: EZVPN(EZ_CLIENT): Pending XAuth Request,
Please enter the following command:
*Apr 14 21:46:51.299: EZVPN: crypto ipsec client ezvpn xauth
R2#
*Apr 14 21:46:52.015: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Loopback10000, changed state to down
R2#crypto ipsec client ezvpn xauth
Username: vpn_user
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Password: cisco
R2#
*Apr 14 21:47:02.827: %CRYPTO-6-EZVPN_CONNECTION_UP: (Client)
User=vpn_user Group=vpn_group Server_public_addr=192.168.2.100
Assigned_client_addr=100.60.10.201
R2#
*Apr 14 21:47:02.831: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access1,
changed state to up
*Apr 14 21:47:03.831: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Virtual-Access1, changed state to up
R2#
*Apr 14 21:47:04.779: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Loopback10000,
changed state to up
*Apr 14 21:47:05.779: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Loopback10000, changed state to up
R2#show crypto ipsec client ezvpn
Easy VPN Remote Phase: 6
Tunnel name : EZ_CLIENT
Inside interface list: Loopback0
Outside interface: Virtual-Access1 (bound to
FastEthernet0/0.168)
Current State: IPSEC_ACTIVE
Last Event: MTU_CHANGED
Address: 100.60.10.201 (applied on Loopback10000)
Mask: 255.255.255.255
Save Password: Allowed
Split Tunnel List: 1
Address : 100.70.10.0
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Protocol : 0x0
Source Port: 0
Dest Port : 0
Current EzVPN Peer: 192.168.2.100
R2#clear crypto sa
R2#
*Apr 14 21:47:58.927: %CRYPTO-6-EZVPN_CONNECTION_DOWN: (Client)
User=vpn_user Group=vpn_group Server_public_addr=192.168.2.100
Assigned_client_addr=100.60.10.201
R2#
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
*Apr 14 21:47:58.955: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access1,
changed state to down
*Apr 14 21:47:59.955: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Virtual-Access1, changed state to down
R2#
*Apr 14 21:48:00.955: %LINK-5-CHANGED: Interface Loopback10000,
changed state to administratively down
*Apr 14 21:48:01.087: %CRYPTO-6-EZVPN_CONNECTION_UP: (Client)
User=vpn_user Group=vpn_group Server_public_addr=192.168.2.100
Assigned_client_addr=100.60.10.201
R2#
*Apr 14 21:48:01.091: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Virtual-Access1,
changed state to up
*Apr 14 21:48:02.091: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on
Interface Virtual-Access1, changed state to up
R2#
*Apr 14 21:48:03.043: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface Loopback10000,
changed state to up
R2#show crypto ipsec client ezvpn
Easy VPN Remote Phase: 6
Tunnel name : EZ_CLIENT
Inside interface list: Loopback0
Outside interface: Virtual-Access1 (bound to
FastEthernet0/0.168)
Current State: IPSEC_ACTIVE
Last Event: MTU_CHANGED
Address: 100.60.10.201 (applied on Loopback10000)
Mask: 255.255.255.255
Save Password: Allowed
Split Tunnel List: 1
Address : 100.70.10.0
Mask : 255.255.255.0
Protocol : 0x0
Source Port: 0
Dest Port : 0
Current EzVPN Peer: 192.168.2.100
R2#telnet 100.70.10.5 /source-interface Loop 0
Trying 100.70.10.5 ... Open
R5#who
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Line User Host(s) Idle
Location
0 con 0 idle 00:24:34
*514 vty 0 idle 00:00:00
100.60.10.201
Interface User Mode Idle Peer
Address
QoS for VPN
T a s k 3 . 9
Configure the ASA to prioritize EasyVPN IPSec traffic.
The first step is to configure priority queues on both the
inside and outside interfaces. In this case the queue-limit
(size of the queue) and tx-ring-limit (number of packets
allowed in the queue) are set but this is optional.
ASA-1(config)# priority-queue inside
ASA-1(config-priority-queue)# tx-ring-limit 80
ASA-1(config-priority-queue)# queue-limit 2048
ASA-1(config-priority-queue)# priority-queue outside
ASA-1(config-priority-queue)# tx-ring-limit 80
ASA-1(config-priority-queue)# queue-limit 2048
Next well need to identify the traffic to be placed in the
priority queue. This is done with a class-map that matches
our easyvpn tunnel-group. Once identified an action is
applied to the traffic using a policy map. In this case the
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
global policy map is used which will affect the traffic
regardless of what interface it appears on. The action of
course is priority which will place the identified
traffic into the priority queue. This means it will be
transmitted before normal traffic.
ASA-1(config)# class-map Remote_VPN
ASA-1(config-cmap)# match tunnel-group vpn_group
ASA-1(config-cmap)# policy-map global_policy
ASA-1(config-pmap)# class Remote_VPN
ASA-1(config-pmap-c)# priority
Verify with the show service-policy command. Under the
class map Remote_VPN section the aggregate transmit counter
for the priority on the inside interface is incrementing.
This means the EasyVPN traffic is being prioritized.
ASA-1(config)# show service-policy
Global policy:
Service-policy: global_policy
Class-map: inspection_default
Inspect: dns preset_dns_map, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop
0
Inspect: ftp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: h323 h225 _default_h323_map, packet 0, drop 0,
reset-drop 0
Inspect: h323 ras _default_h323_map, packet 0, drop 0,
reset-drop 0
Inspect: netbios, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: rsh, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: rtsp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: skinny , packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: esmtp _default_esmtp_map, packet 0, drop 0,
reset-drop 0
Inspect: sqlnet, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: sunrpc, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: tftp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: sip , packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Inspect: xdmcp, packet 0, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Inspect: icmp, packet 20964, drop 0, reset-drop 0
Class-map: Remote_VPN
Priority:
Interface outside: aggregate drop 0, aggregate transmit
0
Priority:
Interface inside: aggregate drop 0, aggregate transmit
482
Class-map: class-default
Default Queueing
WebVPN(clientless)
T a s k 3 . 1 0
Configure clientless WebVPN on the inside of ASA1 using the
following:
Connection named SSL_VPN
url: https://192.168.2.100/ssl
local authentication user ssl_user password cisco
group policy = SSL_VPN
To enter webvpn configuration mode, use the command
webvpn. Well enable it on the inside interface.
ASA-1(config)# webvpn
ASA-1(config-webvpn)# enable inside
INFO: WebVPN and DTLS are enabled on 'inside'.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well configure the group policy for webvpn. The vpn
tunnel protocol is set to webvpn and since no url list is
needed this is set to none.
ASA-1(config)# group-policy SSL_VPN attributes
ASA-1(config-group-policy)# vpn-tunnel-protocol webvpn
ASA-1(config-group-policy)# webvpn
ASA-1(config-group-webvpn)# url-list none
ASA-1(config-group-webvpn)# configure terminal
Next well configure the user, making sure that both the
group policy is set to our previously created policy.
ASA-1(config-webvpn)# username ssl_vpn password cisco privilege
0
ASA-1(config)# username ssl_vpn attributes
ASA-1(config-username)# vpn-group-policy SSL_VPN
ASA-1(config-username)# group-policy SSL_VPN internal
Finally the tunnel group is set up. Note that like the
EasyVPN configuration the type is set to remote access. The
default group policy is set to our policy which is set to
use webvpn. The specific webvpn attributes such as the
alias and URL are set using the tunnel-group <name> webvpn-
attributes command.
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group SSL_VPN type remote-access
ASA-1(config)# tunnel-group SSL_VPN general-attributes
ASA-1(config-tunnel-general)# default-group-policy SSL_VPN
ASA-1(config-tunnel-general)# tunnel-group SSL_VPN webvpn-
attributes
ASA-1(config-tunnel-webvpn)# group-alias ssl enable
ASA-1(config-tunnel-webvpn)# group-url https://100.60.10.100/ssl
enable
ASA-1(config-tunnel-webvpn)# exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
High availability
T a s k 3 . 1 1
Configure high availability using the following:
R2 loop 0, peers with R3 and R4 HSRP address
IKE 1 PSK cisco, dh 2, 3des, sha
IKE 2 3des sha
Interesting traffic: ip between New loopback 222 of
10.yy.yy.2/24 and R5 loop 0
Do not add 10.yy.yy.0/24 to any routing protocols on
R2.
R2 configuration:
First well create loopback 222.
R2(config)#int loop 222
R2(config-if)# ip address 10.22.22.2 255.255.255.0
Then configure our basic ipsec settings. Most of this
should be very familiar with a few new settings. These
include isakmp and NAT keepalives so that the tunnel
problems can be detect and the tunnel rebuilt when failover
occurs. Also new is the local-address command in the crypto
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
map. This lets the tunnel be built between the HSRP address
and the R2 l0 address even though the crypto map is applied
to a physical interface.
R2(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R2(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R2(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R2(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R2(config-isakmp)# group 2
R2(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R2(config-isakmp)# exit
R2(config)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
R2(config)#crypto isakmp keepalive 10
R2(config)#crypto isakmp nat keepalive 10
R2(config)#crypto isakmp invalid-spi-recovery
R2(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-sha-hmac
esp-3des
R2(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
R2(config-if)#access-list 101 permit ip host 10.22.22.2 host
5.5.5.5
R2(config)#crypto map MYMAP local-address loop 0
R2(config)#crypto map MYMAP 1 ipsec-isakmp
R2(config-crypto-map)# set transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA
R2(config-crypto-map)# set peer 100.60.10.34
R2(config-crypto-map)# match address 101
R2(config-crypto-map)# exit
R2(config)#interface FastEthernet0/0.168
R2(config-subif)# crypto map MYMAP
R2(config-subif)# exit
R3 configuration:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Like the R2 configuration, this is mostly a basic IPSec
tunnel. The differences are isakmp and NAT keepalives, and
the crypto map. Weve already talked about the keepalives.
Notice in the crypto map the reverse-route command is used.
When the IPSec tunnel is built, this will create a static
route to the subnets protected by the tunnel. This route is
then redistributed into OSPF so that R5 knows which router
(R3 or R4) to send the traffic to. This is a key concept
for VPN failover to function properly.
The other piece needed for VPN failover is the HSRP
configuration. Notice that the standby group is given a
name, and the crypto map is then applied to the name with
the redundancy keyword. This means the map is applied to
the standby IP, not the actual physical interface.
R3(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R3(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R3(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R3(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R3(config-isakmp)# group 2
R3(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R3(config-isakmp)# exit
R3(config)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
R3(config)#crypto isakmp keepalive 10
R3(config)#crypto isakmp nat keepalive 10
R3(config)#crypto isakmp invalid-spi-recovery
R3(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-sha-hmac
esp-3des
R3(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 3 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(config)#access-list 101 permit ip host 5.5.5.5 host
10.22.22.2
R3(config)#crypto map MYMAP 1 ipsec-isakmp
R3(config-crypto-map)# set transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA
R3(config-crypto-map)# set peer 100.60.10.22
R3(config-crypto-map)# match address 101
R3(config-crypto-map)# reverse-route
R3(config-crypto-map)# exit
R3(config)#interface FastEthernet0/0.60
R3(config-subif)# standby 1 name HA
R3(config-subif)# crypto map MYMAP redundancy HA
R3(config-subif)# exit
R3(config)#router ospf 1
R3(config-router)#redistribute static subnets
R3(config-router)#end
R3#debug ip routing
IP routing debugging is on
R4 configuration:
R4 configuration is the same as R3.
R4(config)#crypto isakmp policy 1
R4(config-isakmp)# authentication pre-share
R4(config-isakmp)# encr 3des
R4(config-isakmp)# hash sha
R4(config-isakmp)# group 2
R4(config-isakmp)# lifetime 86400
R4(config-isakmp)# exit
R4(config)#crypto isakmp key cisco address 0.0.0.0
R4(config)#crypto isakmp keepalive 10
R4(config)#crypto isakmp nat keepalive 10
R4(config)#crypto isakmp invalid-spi-recovery
R4(config)#access-list 101 permit ip host 5.5.5.5 host
10.22.22.2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA esp-sha-hmac
esp-3des
R4(cfg-crypto-trans)# exit
R4(config)#crypto map MYMAP 1 ipsec-isakmp
R4(config-crypto-map)# set transform-set ESP-3DES-SHA
R4(config-crypto-map)# set peer 100.60.10.22
R4(config-crypto-map)# match address 101
R4(config-crypto-map)# reverse
R4(config-crypto-map)# exit
R4(config)#interface FastEthernet0/0.60
R4(config-subif)# standby 1 name HA
R4(config-subif)# crypto map MYMAP redundancy HA
R4(config-subif)# exit
R4(config)#router ospf 1
R4(config-router)#redistribute static subnets
R4(config-router)#end
R4#debug ip routing
IP routing debugging is on
R4(config)# int fa 0/0.60
R4(config-subif)# ip ospf cost 2
R4(config-subif)# int fa0/0.70
R4(config-subif)# ip ospf cost 2
First test to see if the tunnel is built by pinging from
loopback 222 to 5.5.5.5.
R2#ping 5.5.5.5 source loop 222
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 5.5.5.5, timeout is 2 seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 10.22.22.2
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/3/4
ms
With debug ip routing turned on, youll see the static
route created on R3. This is because R3 is the active HSRP
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
router. Since the route is redistributed into OSPF R5 knows
to send the packets destined for 10.22.22.2 to R3. Although
not shown you can also verify this with a sho ip route on
R5.
R3#
*Apr 14 22:50:54.571: RT: add 10.22.22.2/32 via 100.60.10.22,
static metric [1/0]
*Apr 14 22:50:54.571: RT: NET-RED 10.22.22.2/32
R3#show crypto ipsec sa
interface: FastEthernet0/0.60
Crypto map tag: MYMAP, local addr 100.60.10.34
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(5.5.5.5/255.255.255.255/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(10.22.22.2/255.255.255.255/0/0)
current_peer 100.60.10.22 port 4500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 4, #pkts encrypt: 4, #pkts digest: 4
#pkts decaps: 4, #pkts decrypt: 4, #pkts verify: 4
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
Now test failover by reloading R3.
R3#reload
Proceed with reload? [confirm]
*Apr 14 22:52:26.871: %SYS-5-RELOAD: Reload requested by
console. Reload Reason: Reload Command.
*Apr 14 22:52:26.911: %HSRP-5-STATECHANGE: FastEthernet0/0.60
Grp 1 state Active -> Init
*Apr 14 22:52:26.911: RT: del 10.22.22.2/32 via 100.60.10.22,
static metric [1/0]
*Apr 14 22:52:26.911: RT: delete subnet route to 10.22.22.2/32
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
*Apr 14 22:52:26.911: RT: NET-RED 10.22.22.2/32
*Apr 14 22:52:26.911: RT: delete network route to 10.0.0.0
*Apr 14 22:52:26.911: RT: NET-RED 10.0.0.0/8
System Bootstrap, Version 12.4(13r)T, RELEASE SOFTWARE (fc1)
Technical Support: http://www.cisco.com/techsupport
Copyright (c) 2006 by cisco Systems, Inc.
Initializing memory for ECC
Failover isnt instant, give some time for it to occur and
then repeat the ping from R2 loopback 222 to 5.5.5.5.
R2#ping 5.5.5.5 source loop 222
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 5.5.5.5, timeout is 2 seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 10.22.22.2
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max = 1/3/4
ms
Youll notice that since R4 has now become the active HSRP
router, the static route is created and again redistributed
into OSPF. Youve now verified that VPN redundancy is
functioning properly.
R4#
*Apr 14 23:00:38.563: RT: add 10.22.22.2/32 via 100.60.10.22,
static metric [1/0]
*Apr 14 23:00:38.563: RT: NET-RED 10.22.22.2/32
R4#show crypto ipsec sa
interface: FastEthernet0/0.60
Crypto map tag: MYMAP, local addr 100.60.10.34
protected vrf: (none)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(5.5.5.5/255.255.255.255/0/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(10.22.22.2/255.255.255.255/0/0)
current_peer 100.60.10.22 port 4500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 4, #pkts encrypt: 4, #pkts digest: 4
#pkts decaps: 4, #pkts decrypt: 4, #pkts verify: 4
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 0, #recv errors 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 4 ~ Intrusion Prevention Sensor
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ACS
outside
24.234.0.0/24
DMZ
172.16.0.0/24
E0/0.1 E0/1
.100
.100
R1
R2
R3
ASA1
.2
.1
.101
IPS Lab Topoloy
.100 E0/0.200
IPS
VLAN 200
VLAN 2
inside
192.168.2.0/16
IPS
ACS
.150
.3
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
ACS
outside
24.234.0.0/24
DMZ
172.16.0.0/24
E0/0.1 E0/1
.100
.100
R1
R2
R3
ASA1
.2
.1
.101
IPS Lab Topoloy
.100 E0/0.200
IPS
VLAN 200
VLAN 2
inside
192.168.2.0/16
IPS
ACS
.150
.3
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 4 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Initialize the Sensor
T a s k 4 . 1
Log into the IPS with the username cisco and password
ccie5796
T a s k 4 . 2
Set the hostname to IPS, set the management IP to
192.168.2.150/16 and the default gateway to 192.168.2.100.
Allow network 192.168.0.0/16 to manage the IPS. Save your
configuration and verify that you can connect to the device
via IDM from the ACS server.
T a s k 4 . 3
Set the sensor to use a local NTP server at 192.168.2.3.
Set timezone to pacific (GMT -8)

Configure Sensor Appliance Management
T a s k 4 . 4
Restrict access to ONLY allow the ACS server to the sensor
configuration. (192.168.2.101)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 5
Setup a user called ccbootcamp with a password of
ccbootcamp. This user should be able to tune signatures
but not configure devices settings such as interfaces.
T a s k 4 . 6
Setup another user called monitor with a password of
monitor123. This user should only be able to view events.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Security Policy
T a s k 4 . 7
Make a duplicate of policy sig0 called sig1.
T a s k 4 . 8
Make a duplicate of policy rules0 called rules1.
T a s k 4 . 9
Make a duplicate of anomaly detection policy ad0 called
ad1.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Virtual Sensors
T a s k 4 . 1 0
Create an additional virtual sensor called vs1. Assign it
signature def policy sig1, event action policy rules1
and anomaly detection policy ad1.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure SPAN and RSPAN
T a s k 4 . 1 1
Setup a SPAN session on SW1 so that all traffic from port
fa0/10 is mirrored to port fa0/11.
T a s k 4 . 1 2
Configure an RSPAN session so that traffic from VLAN 3 on
SW1 is mirrored to port fa0/4 on SW3. Use VLAN 99 as the
remote vlan.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Promiscuous and Inline Monitoring
T a s k 4 . 1 3
Remove any existing inline pairs.
T a s k 4 . 1 4
Setup fa1/0 as a promiscuous interface, enable it and
assign it to virtual sensor vs1. This will monitor the
inside network.
T a s k 4 . 1 5
Setup interface g0/0 as an inline VLAN pair using vlans 2
and 200. Assign this new inline pair to sensor vs0. This
will monitor traffic between the outside and dmz. Verify
that the inline pair is working.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure and Tune Signatures
T a s k 4 . 1 6
Policy sig1 should monitor traffic only. Ensure that no
signature within sig1 performs a TCP reset.
T a s k 4 . 1 7
Sort sig0 signatures by name and search for ICMP. Find
the sig named ICMP echo reply. Enable it, then modify it
to only fire when R1 replies to R2s echo request. Verify
that the signature is working.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Custom Signatures
T a s k 4 . 1 8
Internal users have been attacking the ACS server with
pings. Create a custom signature that will alert you when
any host pings the ACS server 50 times or more with packets
larger than 2000k
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 5 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Blocking
T a s k 4 . 1 9
Setup the ASA as a blocking device. For this task, create
a user with a username of blocker and password of
blocker. Use SSH to log into the ASA.
T a s k 4 . 2 0
Create a signature in sig0 that will fire when a user tries
to telnet using a username of baduser (case insensitive).
The IPS should use the ASA to block the host and generate
an alert when this happens.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure TCP Resets
T a s k 4 . 2 1
Enable interface fa1/1. Set this interface up as an
alternate TCP reset interface for fa1/0.
T a s k 4 . 2 2
Configure a signature within sig1 that will send a TCP
reset when a host attempts to telnet to R1 with a username
of baduser.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Rate Limiting
T a s k 4 . 2 3
Setup R2 as a blocking device. Use the username blocker
with a password blocker and a privilege of 15. Use telnet
to log into R2. Use the fa0/0 interface to rate limit
traffic.
T a s k 4 . 2 4
Enable and modify the rule within sig0 called icmp flood
so that it requests a rate limit of 1% of interface
bandwidth and generates an alert. Test the rate limit.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Event Actions
T a s k 4 . 2 5
Configure rules0 to protect against dangerous attacks by
changing any signatures action to deny an attacker inline
if the risk rating is 90-100.
T a s k 4 . 2 6
R2 is a critical server. Configure rules0 so that the risk
rating of an attack against R2 is changed to reflect the
critical nature of the server, ensuring that these attacks
will be blocked.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Event Monitoring
T a s k 4 . 2 7
View events that have occurred on the sensor in the last
hour.
T a s k 4 . 2 8
Sort the view so only events with a threat rating of 90 or
greater are shown. Do not show error events.
T a s k 4 . 2 9
View attack response controller events.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Advanced Features
T a s k 4 . 3 0
Setup ad1 anomaly detection to use the inside network for
the internal zone. For ad0, setup the DMZ network as the
internal zone.
T a s k 4 . 3 1
The ACS servers normal traffic appears to be worm traffic
to the sensor. Exclude the ACS server from anomaly
detection in ad1.
T a s k 4 . 3 2
Youve recently redesigned your DMZ and need to establish
baseline traffic patterns for anomaly detection using ad0.
Set ad0 to learn mode.
Intrusion Prevention Sensor
Solutions
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Initialize the Sensor
T a s k 4 . 1
Log into the IPS with the username cisco and password
ccie5796
An un-configured IPS will have a default administrator
account username and password of cisco which you will have
to change upon initial login. CCBOOTCAMPs IPS has been
preconfigured with a username of cisco and a password of
ccie5796.
IPS login: cisco
Password: ccie5796
Last login: Thu Mar 26 07:28:39 on ttyS0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 2
Set the hostname to IPS, set the management IP to
192.168.2.150/16 and the default gateway to 192.168.2.100.
Allow network 192.168.0.0/16 to manage the IPS. Save your
configuration and verify that you can connect to the device
via IDM from the ACS server.
Basic setup can be accomplished with the setup command.
This runs a step by step prompted guide that helps setup
basic connectivity so that IDM can be used for further
configuration. You will be shown the current configuration
and then will be allowed to modify it. During these steps
you will be able to set the hostname, management IP address
and access-list to allow management. At the end you can
review your configuration. You will then be prompted to
save your configuration.
sensor# setup
--- System Configuration Dialog ---
At any point you may enter a question mark '?' for help.
User ctrl-c to abort configuration dialog at any prompt.
Default settings are in square brackets '[]'.
Current Configuration:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
service host
network-settings
host-ip 192.168.1.2/24,192.168.1.1
host-name sensor
telnet-option disabled
ftp-timeout 300
no login-banner-text
exit
time-zone-settings
offset 0
standard-time-zone-name UTC
exit
summertime-option disabled
ntp-option disabled
exit
service web-server
port 443
exit
service interface
inline-interfaces pair-1
description Created via setup by user cisco
interface1 FastEthernet1/0
interface2 FastEthernet1/1
exit
inline-interfaces pair-2
description Created via setup by user cisco
interface1 FastEthernet1/2
interface2 FastEthernet1/3
exit
exit
service event-action-rules rules0
overrides
override-item-status Enabled
risk-rating-range 90-100
exit
exit
Current time: Thu Mar 26 18:52:03 2009
Setup Configuration last modified: Thu Mar 26 17:42:57 2009
Continue with configuration dialog?[yes]:
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Enter host name[sensor]: IPS
Enter IP interface[192.168.1.2/24,192.168.1.1]:
192.168.2.150/16,192.168.2.100
Enter telnet-server status[disabled]:
Enter web-server port[443]:
Modify current access list?[no]: yes
Current access list entries:
No entries
Permit: 192.168.0.0/16
Modify system clock settings?[no]:
Modify interface/virtual sensor configuration?[no]:
Modify default threat prevention settings?[no]:
The following configuration was entered.
service host
network-settings
host-ip 192.168.2.150/16,192.168.2.100
host-name IPS
telnet-option disabled
access-list 192.168.0.0/16
ftp-timeout 300
no login-banner-text
exit
time-zone-settings
offset 0
standard-time-zone-name UTC
exit
summertime-option disabled
ntp-option disabled
exit
service web-server
port 443
exit
service interface
inline-interfaces pair-1
description Created via setup by user cisco
interface1 FastEthernet1/0
interface2 FastEthernet1/1
exit
inline-interfaces pair-2
description Created via setup by user cisco
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 6 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
interface1 FastEthernet1/2
interface2 FastEthernet1/3
exit
exit
service event-action-rules rules0
overrides
override-item-status Enabled
risk-rating-range 90-100
exit
exit
[0] Go to the command prompt without saving this config.
[1] Return back to the setup without saving this config.
[2] Save this configuration and exit setup.
Enter your selection[2]: 2
Configuration Saved.
*18:52:47 UTC Thu Mar 26 2009
Modify system date and time?[no]:
With basic configuration setup you can now connect to the
sensor using a web browser to launch IDM (IPS Device
Manager), once again using cisco/ccie5796 as your
administrator username and password.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 3
Set the sensor to use a local NTP server at 192.168.2.3.
Set timezone to pacific (GMT -8)
Proper time stamping is the key to a good IPS installation.
Synchronizing to an NTP server isnt required but is highly
recommended so that events can be correlated with other
device logs. This is set under configuration->sensor setup-
>time. Hit apply when done with your changes, the sensor
will require a reboot.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Sensor Appliance Management
T a s k 4 . 4
Restrict access to ONLY allow the ACS server to the sensor
configuration. (192.168.2.101)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This is done under configuration->sensor setup->allowed
hosts. Either edit an existing entry or add a new one. You
should only allow 192.168.2.101 255.255.255.255 meaning
just the ACS server. Hit apply when done.
T a s k 4 . 5
Setup a user called ccbootcamp with a password of
ccbootcamp. This user should be able to tune signatures but
not configure devices settings such as interfaces.
To create a user, go to configuration->sensor setup->users.
Click add to add a user. Our ccbootcamp user needs to be
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
assigned the role of operator, which can tune signatures
but not change physical device settings.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
To test our new user, close IDM and log back in as
ccbootcamp. If you click on the interfaces configuration
you will receive the following pop-up letting you know that
you dont have rights to modify it.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
However, if you click on configure->policies->signature
definitions->sig0 you will be allowed. This lets us know
that our operator role is functioning.
T a s k 4 . 6
Setup another user called monitor with a password of
monitor123. This user should only be able to view events.
Youll need to close IDM and log back in as user cisco,
password ccie5796. This user setup works the same as the
operator role setup, but the account is setup with the
viewer role. This role is even more restricted than the
operator role. A viewer can only view events and monitoring
information. After creation, close IDM and log in as
monitor. You should receive the following message when you
try to configure anything.
If you click on the monitoring button however, you are
allowed.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Security Policy
T a s k 4 . 7
Make a duplicate of policy sig0 called sig1.
The easiest way to create a new policy is to copy an
existing one and modify as necessary. This is done under
configuration->policies->signature definitions. Select
sig0 and click on clone. Name the new policy sig1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 8
Make a duplicate of policy rules0 called rules1.
This process is very similar to signature cloning.
configuration->policies->event action rules.
T a s k 4 . 9
Make a duplicate of anomaly detection policy ad0 called
ad1.
This is very similar to the other two policies.
configuration->policies->anomaly detections.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 7 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Virtual Sensors
T a s k 4 . 1 0
Create an additional virtual sensor called vs1. Assign it
signature def policy sig1, event action policy rules1
and anomaly detection policy ad1.
This is done under configuration->analysis engine->virtual
sensors. Click on add to create the new vs1 virtual sensor.
Name it vs1 and change the policies from sig0 to sig1,
rules0 to rules1, etc. Note that this new virtual sensor
can be assigned to interfaces but we wont do so now.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure SPAN and RSPAN
T a s k 4 . 1 1
Setup a SPAN session on SW1 so that all traffic from port
fa0/10 is mirrored to port fa0/11.
SPAN sessions allow network traffic from an interface or
vlan(s) to be mirrored to a port. This port is usually
connected to a network sniffer or promiscuous IPS. SPAN
sessions are setup with the monitor session command. They
must have a source and destination.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
SW1(config)#monitor session 10 source interface fa0/10
SW1(config)#monitor session 10 destination interface fa0/11
T a s k 4 . 1 2
Configure an RSPAN session so that traffic from VLAN 3 on
SW1 is mirrored to port fa0/4 on SW3. Use VLAN 99 as the
remote vlan.
RSPAN functions similarly to SPAN but allows for data to be
mirrored from a source to a destination VLAN. This VLAN can
then be carried to remote switches so they can use it as a
source for their own span sessions. In this case the
traffic will be used by the IPS for the promiscuous sensor.
First an RSPAN VLAN must be configured on SW1. Then it can
be used as a destination in a monitor session.
SW1(config)#vlan 99
SW1(config-vlan)#remote-span
SW1(config-vlan)#exit
SW1(config)#monitor session 1 source vlan 3
SW1(config)#monitor session 1 destination remote vlan 99
On SW 3, the remote vlan is used as a source and the
destination is set to a physical port. This port is
connected to the IPS.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
SW3(config)#monitor session 1 source remote vlan 99
SW3(config)#monitor session 1 destination interface fa0/4
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Promiscuous and Inline Monitoring
T a s k 4 . 1 3
Remove any existing inline pairs.
Your IPS may come with its interfaces pre-configured as
inline pairs. To free up these interfaces for other use,
you must delete the pairs. This is done under
configuration->interface configuration->inline pairs.
Select the pair you want to delete and click delete.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 1 4
Setup fa1/0 as a promiscuous interface, enable it and
assign it to virtual sensor vs1. This will monitor the
inside network.
Interfaces not setup as inline are promiscuous by default.
Interfaces are enabled under configuration->interface
configuration->interfaces. Select the interface fa1/0 and
click edit. Click on the enabled radio button and click ok
to enable.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now you have to assign the interface to virtual sensor vs1.
This is done under configuration->analysis engine->virtual
sensors. Select vs1 and click on edit. Select fa1/0 and
click the assign button. You will see a yes in the assigned
field. Click on ok.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 1 5
Setup g0/0 as an inline VLAN pair using vlans 2 and 200.
Assign this new inline pair to sensor vs0. This will
monitor traffic between the outside and dmz. Verify that
the inline pair is working.
Inline VLAN pairs force layer 3 traffic to traverse a layer
2 bridge on the IPS. Because the traffic must flow through
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
the IPS at layer 2, it is able to inspect and pass or drop
traffic in real time.
To setup the VLAN pair, go to configuration->interface
configuration->VLAN pairs and click on add. Select g0/0 and
enter a subinterface between 1 and 255, I used 2 since
were dealing with VLAN 2. Set VLAN A to 2 and VLAN B to
200.
Now we have to assign g0/0 (and thus the inline vlan pair)
to virtual sensor vs0. This is done exactly the same as
with our promiscuous interface above. Make sure that the
g0/0 interface is enabled as well.
To verify that the pair is working, simply ping from R2 to
R1. Since R2 is on a different vlan than its default
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
gateway (the ASA) the ping will only succeed if the pair is
bridging between the two.
Configure and Tune Signatures
T a s k 4 . 1 6
Policy sig1 should monitor traffic only. Ensure that no
signature within sig1 performs a TCP reset.
Signatures for internal traffic are often setup to monitor
only to avoid disrupting corporate network traffic. To do
this, go to configuration->policies->signature definitions-
>sig1 and click on select all. All of your active
signatures will now be selected.
Click on actions to modify actions for all selected
signatures. Uncheck Reset TCP Connection and click on ok.
This will remove the action. Click apply when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 8 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 1 7
Sort sig0s signatures by name and search for ICMP. Find
the sig named ICMP echo reply. Enable it, then modify it to
only fire when R1 replies to R2s echo request. Verify that
the signature is working.
You can sort signatures based on a variety of criteria. To
sort by name, go to configuration->policies->signature
definitions->sig0 and click on select by. Choose Sig Name.
You can type a string in the Enter Sig Name field and
then click find. In our case well enter ICMP.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Sig 2000 is the ICMP echo reply signature were looking
for. Click on it to select, and then click on enable.
The signature is now active, but we need to modify it so
that it will only fire on echo replies from R1 to R2. Click
on edit to edit the signature. Well need to scroll down
and set specific ip addr options. Set the source to
24.234.0.1 (R1) and the destination to 172.16.0.2 (R2).
Click ok when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
To verify the sig is working we need to generate echo
replies from R1 to R2, so well ping from R2 to R1 which
will of course generate replies.
R2#ping 24.234.0.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.0.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/4/12 ms
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now on the IPS well go to monitoring->events and click on
view. There is an ICMP Echo Reply event shown, so the
signature has fired.

For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Custom Signatures
T a s k 4 . 1 8
Internal users have been attacking the ACS server with
pings. Create a custom signature that will alert you when
any host pings the ACS server 50 times or more with packets
larger than 2000k
If you cant find a signature to clone and modify, you can
create a custom signature. This is done by going to
configuration->policies->signature definitions->sig1 and
clicking on the custom signature tab. Start the wizard.
Well be using the atomic IP engine since it allows us
greater detection detail.
Call the signature Large Pings to ACS, a descriptive title.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now configure the signature. Well set the protocol to
icmp, the ip payload length to 2000-18024 and the
destination address to 192.168.2.101 (The ACS server)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The signature fidelity and severity can be left at the
defaults. We have now setup our sig to detect large pings,
but not 50 or more. Well need to click on the advanced
button to set this.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Set the event count to 50 and the event count key to
attacker address.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Since attacks of this type could generate a large number of
alerts, well use summarization.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The summary interval will be set to every 60 seconds. This
means the sig will only generate an alert once a minute
regardless of how many batches of 50 large pings come from
a single attacker. Click finish to complete the wizard.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
2 9 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well test our sig by generating large pings from R3 to
the ACS server.
R3#ping 192.168.2.101 size 5000 repeat 1000
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 1000, 5000-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.2.101, timeout is
2 seconds:
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
!!!!!!
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (1000/1000), round-trip min/avg/max
= 1/3/28 ms
When we view events, notice that the sig only generated one
alert even though we pinged the ACS server 1000 times.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Blocking
T a s k 4 . 1 9
Setup the ASA as a blocking device. For this task, create
a user with a username and password of blocker. Use SSH
to log into the ASA.
To add a blocking device, we must first setup a login
profile. Go to configuration->blocking->device login
profile. Click on add and enter our username and password
of blocker.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now we can add our blocking device. This is done under
configuration->blocking->blocking devices. Enter the IP
address of the ASA inside interface, use our newly created
blocker profile and set the device type to pix/asa. Click
on ok and apply when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well need to configure the ASA. This involves creating
the blocker username/password, setting up SSH
authentication and allowing SSH from the IPS.
ASA1# conf t
ASA1(config)# username blocker password blocker privilege 15
ASA1(config)# aaa authentication ssh console LOCAL
ASA1(config)# ssh 192.168.2.150 255.255.255.255 inside
Finally we must obtain the ASAs ssh public host key so it
can be set as a known host. Do this under configuration-
>ssh->known host keys. Click on add. Enter the IP address
of the ASA and click on retrieve host key. When the key has
been added, click ok and apply.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 2 0
Create a signature in sig0 that will fire when a user tries
to telnet using a username of baduser, case insensitive.
The IPS should use the ASA to block the host and generate
an alert when this happens.
This involves creating a custom signature. We are already
familiar with running the wizard. Use the string TCP engine
and create a regex that will match the string baduser
regardless of case. Set the service to port 23, telnet. The
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
event action should be produce alert and request block
host.
With the signature complete, attempt to telnet from R2 to
R1 using the username baduser. The host will be blocked
and further communication of any type will be unsuccessful.
R2#telnet 24.234.0.1
Trying 24.234.0.1 ... Open
User Access Verification
Username: baduser
[Connection to 24.234.0.1 closed by foreign host]
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2#ping 24.234.0.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.0.1, timeout is 2
seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
Now on the IPS, go to monitoring->active host blocks.
Youll see a block for host 172.16.0.2.
Configure TCP Resets
T a s k 4 . 2 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Enable interface fa1/1. Set this interface up as an
alternate TCP reset interface for fa1/0.
An interface in promiscuous mode cannot drop connections
inline by definition. It also cannot send normal network
traffic since it relies on the SPAN port of the switch it
is attached to. It can however, use another interface to
send TCP resets post attack. While this isnt ideal it can
provide SOME response to attacks which is better than
nothing.
We already know how to enable an interface under configure-
>interface configuration->interfaces. After enabling fa1/1,
we need to set it as an alternate tcp reset interface for
fa1/0. Select fa1/0 and click on edit. Check the use
alternate tcp reset interface and choose fa1/1 from the
dropdown menu. Fa1/1 will now be used to send tcp resets
for fa1/0.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 2 2
Configure a signature within sig1 that will send a TCP
reset when a host attempts to telnet to R1 with a username
of baduser.
This signature will be identical to the custom sig we
created for our blocking task, except for the event action.
This will be reset tcp connection instead of block
host.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 0 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
We can test the signature by attempting to telnet from R3
to R1. When prompted try to login with a username of
baduser. The connection will be immediately reset.
R3#telnet 24.234.0.1
Trying 24.234.0.1 ... Open
User Access Verification
Username: baduser
[Connection to 24.234.0.1 closed by foreign host]
Configure Rate Limiting
T a s k 4 . 2 3
Setup R2 as a blocking device. Use the username of
blocker with a password of blocker and a privilege of
15. Use telnet to log into R2. Use the fa0/0 interface to
rate limit traffic.
We already know how to setup a blocking device. The
difference is R2 will only be set to rate limit instead of
block, and the communication method will be telnet instead
of SSH.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well also need to setup what interface will be doing
the blocking. This is done under configuration->blocking-
>router blocking device interfaces. Click on add, select
172.16.0.2 (R2) as the blocking device. Enter fa0/0 as the
blocking interface. The direction should be in.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The username blocker must be configured on R2 as well as
the aaa login configuration.
R2#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
R2(config)#username blocker privilege 15 password blocker
R2(config)#aaa new-model
R2(config)#aaa authentication login default local
R2(config)#aaa authorization exec default local
R2(config)#line vty 0 4
R2(config-line)#login authentication default
T a s k 4 . 2 4
Enable and modify the rule within sig0 called icmp flood so
that it requests a rate limit of 1% of interface bandwidth
and generates an alert. Test the rate limit.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Sort sig0s signatures by name and search for the icmp
flood signature. Select it by clicking on it and then click
enable. Click on actions and add the request rate limit
action. Click on ok.
Click on edit and change the external rate limit percentage
to 1%. Click ok when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now we can test our signature by generating large pings
from R1 to R2.
R1#ping 172.16.0.2 repeat 50 size 10000
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 50, 10000-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.0.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!!.!!
Success rate is 76 percent (38/50), round-trip min/avg/max = 12/13/16 ms
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The rate limit is clearly working, but you can also verify
the limit under monitoring->rate limits. You can also
remove the rate limit by selecting it and clicking delete.
Configure Event Actions
T a s k 4 . 2 5
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure rules0 to protect against dangerous attacks by
changing any signatures action to deny an attacker inline
if the risk rating is 90-100.
This is done with event action overrides. As the name
suggests, if an event has a high enough risk rating, the
override will change the action to the configured action.
This is configured in configuration->policies->event action
rules->rules0->event action overrides tab. Well want to
disable the existing deny packet inline and add a new
override. This override will have an action of deny
attacker inline and a risk rating of 90-100.
T a s k 4 . 2 6
R2 is a critical server. Configure rules0 so that the risk
rating of an attack against R2 is changed to reflect the
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
critical nature of the server, ensuring that these attacks
will be blocked.
Specific hosts or networks can be given a target value
rating which will modify the risk rating of an event. This
is configured in configuration->policies->event action
rules->rules0->target value rating tab. Click on add, enter
the IP for R2 and set the TVR to mission critical. This
will greatly boost the risk rating of attacks against R2.
With our configuration complete, we can test it by doing a
large ping from R1 to R2. In our last section this was
rated limited. Now since the TVR of R2 is boosting the
threat rating, R1 is denied inline instead. (Ping stopped)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R1#ping 172.16.0.2 repeat 1000 size 10000
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 1000, 10000-byte ICMP Echos to 172.16.0.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!......
Success rate is 80 percent (24/30), round-trip min/avg/max = 12/15/16 ms
You can verify the attacker was blocked under monitoring-
>denied attackers.

For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated

Configure Event Monitoring
T a s k 4 . 2 7
View events that have occurred on the sensor in the last
hour.
Monitoring of events on the sensor is found under
monitoring->events. The task asks for the default settings,
viewing events that occurred in the last hour. This is done
by clicking on the view button.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 1 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 2 8
Sort the view so only events with a threat rating of 90 or
greater are shown. Do not show error events.
This is done by changing the min field to 90 under show
alert events. Now only events with a threat rating of 90-
100 will be shown. Well also uncheck the error and fatal
boxes under show error events. If you click on view now you
should not show any events as none meet the criteria for
viewing.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 4 . 2 9
View attack response controller events.
This is done by checking the show attack response
controller events box. If you click on view now you will be
shown the block and/or rate limit requests from our
previous tasks.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated

Configure Advanced Features
T a s k 4 . 3 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Setup ad1 anomaly detection to use the inside network for
the internal zone. For ad0 setup the DMZ network as the
internal zone.
The internal zone represents your internal network in
anomaly detection, in our case the 192.168.0.0/16 network.
This is setup under configuration->anomaly detections->ad1-
>internal zone tab. Well enter the range of addresses
192.168.0.0-192.168.255.255. The configuration for ad0 is
identical except for the DMZ address range.
T a s k 4 . 3 1
The ACS servers normal traffic appears to be worm traffic
to the sensor. Exclude the ACS server from anomaly
detection in ad1.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
If a device is causing AD signatures to fire incorrectly
you can exclude it from anomaly detection under the
configuration->anomaly detections->ad1->operation settings
tab. Make sure that enable ignored IP addresses box is
checked and enter the ACS server IP address under source
addresses.
T a s k 4 . 3 2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Youve recently redesigned your DMZ and need to establish
baseline traffic patterns for anomaly detection using ad0.
Set ad0 to learn mode.
When you want anomaly detection to establish a network
baseline for normal traffic you can put it into learn mode.
This is done under configuration->analysis engine->virtual
sensors. Select vs0 and click on edit. Under the AD
operational mode drop down box select learn.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 5 Identity Management
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 2 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure TACACS+
T a s k 5 . 1
Configure TACACS+ on R6 so that logins will authenticate to
the ACS server by default. Use a key of cisco. The
console should not require authentication.
T a s k 5 . 2
Ensure exec mode is authorized and accounted for using
TACACS+. Also, use accounting for all privilege level 0,1,
and 15 commands.
T a s k 5 . 3
Configure ASA1 to use the ACS as a RADIUS server. Do not
setup any further AAA.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Secure ACS
T a s k 5 . 4
On the ACS server create a new ACS administrator named
admin with a password of cisco. This user should have
unlimited access to ACS.
T a s k 5 . 5
Setup R6 as a client within the ACS server using TACACS+ as
the protocol and cisco as the key.
T a s k 5 . 6
Setup ASA1 as a client using RADIUS as the protocol and
cisco as the key.
T a s k 5 . 7
Create a shell command authorization set to allow any
command and associate this command auth set with a group
named super. Ensure that this group has the privilege
level to use any command.
T a s k 5 . 8
Create a user ID on the ACS named superuser with password
of cisco and add this user to the super group.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 9
Verify that this user can login to R6 via telnet and that
all commands are available. Also verify that accounting is
working for both EXEC mode and privilege level 15 commands.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure LDAP
T a s k 5 . 1 0
Configure the ACS server so that authentication via the
windows database is possible. Do not require dialin
permission for windows users to authenticate.
T a s k 5 . 1 1
Ensure that users not found in the ACS local database will
be authenticated against the windows database and will use
the super group for authorization.
T a s k 5 . 1 2
Verify that windows authentication is functional by logging
in to R6 with a username of enablemode and password
enableme.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Proxy Authentication
T a s k 5 . 1 3
If the ACS server attempts to access R2 via http, R5 should
intercept and authenticate the traffic before allowing it.
Use a local username of authp and a password of cisco
to do this.
T a s k 5 . 1 4
Require authentication via telnet at ASA1 before R6 can
ping SW2. Use RADIUS and a virtual telnet address of
24.234.51.50. Authenticate with the ACS windows username of
enablemode and a password of enableme.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 3 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure 802.lx
T a s k 5 . 1 5
Configure 802.1x on SW2. After successful authentication to
the ACS server using RADIUS, clients should be placed into
VLAN111. If a client doesnt have an 802.1x supplicant they
should be placed in VLAN432. Use F0/20 for this
configuration, leave the port shutdown. Add a user to ACS
named dot1xuser with password cisco.
T a s k 5 . 1 6
Verify that you can authenticate as this user from SW2
using the test aaa command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Advanced Identity Management
T a s k 5 . 1 7
On R2, configure a local user account named ping with
password cisco. Allow this user to perform an extended
ping but do not give access to other privilege level 15
commands.
T a s k 5 . 1 8
Create a user on the ACS server called limited with a
password of cisco that can only authenticate on R6 and
can only use level 1 show commands and exit.
Identity Management Solutions
Configure TACACS+
T a s k 5 . 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure TACACS+ on R6 so that logins will authenticate to
the ACS server by default. Use a key of cisco. The
console should not require authentication.
AAA can be configured locally or by using a remote server.
In this case well be using the ACS server so we need to
configure the router to communicate with it first.
R6(config)#tacacs-server host 192.168.2.101
R6(config)#tacacs-server key cisco
Next, well configure AAA itself to authenticate to the ACS
server by default for logins. This is done with the aaa
commands. First well start a new model, then configure
login authentication setting the default method list to use
tacacs+ as the method.
R6(config)#aaa new-model
R6(config)#aaa authentication login default group tacacs+
Finally, we need to make sure we can always get in via the
console even if the connection to the ACS server is not
working. To do this well create a special method list
called CONSOLE with no authentication method. Well apply
it to the console port.
R6(config)#aaa authentication login CONSOLE none
R6(config)#line con 0
R6(config-line)#login authentication CONSOLE
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Well test by logging out of the console port and then back
in. There will be no prompt for username or password.
R6#exit
R6 con0 is now available
Press RETURN to get started.
R6>
T a s k 5 . 2
Ensure exec mode is authorized and accounted for using
TACACS+. Also, use accounting for all privilege level 0,1,
and 15 commands.
Authorization and Accounting are the other 2 As in AAA.
These are also setup using the aaa command with the
authorization and accounting options.
R6(config)#aaa authorization exec default group tacacs+
R6(config)#aaa accounting exec default start-stop group tacacs+
R6(config)#aaa accounting commands 0 default start-stop group
tacacs+
R6(config)#aaa accounting commands 1 default start-stop group
tacacs+
R6(config)#aaa accounting commands 15 default start-stop group
tacacs+
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 3
Configure ASA1 to use the ACS as a RADIUS server. Do not
setup any further AAA.
Similar to a router, the ASA can either do local or remote
AAA. Were going to set the ASA up to use RADIUS instead of
TACACS+. First well setup a server group called RADIUS
that will use the protocol radius. Then well add a host to
this server group which will use the key cisco.
ASA1(config)# aaa-server RADIUS protocol radius
ASA1(config-aaa-server-group)# aaa-server RADIUS host
192.168.2.101
ASA1(config-aaa-server-host)# key cisco
Configure Secure ACS
T a s k 5 . 4
On the ACS server create a new ACS administrator named
admin with a password of cisco. This user should have
unlimited access to ACS.
There should be at least one admin account on the ACS. It
is setup under administration control. Click on add
administrator. Enter the username and password. Under
Administrator Privileges click on grant all. Click submit
when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 5
Setup R6 as a client within the ACS server using TACACS+ as
the protocol and cisco as the key.
Before a device can authenticate to the ACS server it must
be setup as a client. This is done under network
configuration. Click on add entry under the AAA clients
box. Enter the name, ip address, key, and protocol to be
used by the client. When done click on submit + apply.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 6
Setup ASA1 as a client using RADIUS as the protocol and
cisco as the key.
This is done the same as it was for R6. Instead of
selecting TACACS+ as the protocol select RADIUS. Youll
notice there are several forms of RADIUS you can choose.
The choice is based on the vendor/model of the device, in
our case VPN3000/ASA/PIX 7.x.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 7
Create a shell command authorization set to allow any
command and associate this command auth set with a group
named super. Ensure that this group has the privilege
level to use any command.
Shell command authorization sets are used to grant access
to specific commands. They are setup under shared profile
components. Click on Shell Command Authorization Sets.
Enter a name for the set. Normally you would add commands
here which would give the user access to those commands
when logged on to the device. However we will enter no
commands and check the permit unmatched commands radio
button. This will give us access to all commands when
logged in. Click on submit when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Shell command authorization sets are attached to users or
groups. Well create a group called super under group
setup. Select a group from the drop down box and click on
rename group. Call it super and submit. Then click on
edit settings. Scroll down to the TACACS+ section and put a
check in the Shell (exec) box. Under the Shell Command
Authorization section click the radio button next to assign
a shell authorization set to any device. Select the super
authorization set that we created. Click on submit +
restart.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 4 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 8
Create a user ID on the ACS named superuser with password
of cisco and add this user to the super group.
Users are created under user setup. Enter the name
superuser in the user: field and click on add/edit. Once
in the user setup section you can enter a password and
select the super group under the group to which the user
is assigned. Click on submit when you are done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 9
Verify that this user can login to R6 via telnet and that
all commands are available. Also verify that accounting is
working for both EXEC mode and privilege level 15 commands.
This is done by telneting from the ACS server to R6 and
logging in as superuser. Obviously we cant test ALL the
commands on the router, but we can go into config mode and
bring an interface up/down as a good indicator we have full
access.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
EXEC accounting is verified under reports and activity.
Click on TACACS+ accounting.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Command accounting is seen by clicking on TACACS+
Administration. You can see the commands issued in the
report.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure LDAP
T a s k 5 . 1 0
Configure the ACS server so that authentication via the
windows database is possible. Do not require dialin
permission for windows users to authenticate.
This is done under external user databases. Click on
configure database, windows database. Click the configure
button. Uncheck the verify that grant dialin permission
box. Under the configure domain list select \LOCAL and move
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
it from available domains to domain list. Click submit when
done.
T a s k 5 . 1 1
Ensure that users not found in the ACS local database will
be authenticated against the windows database and will use
the super group for authorization.
The first part of this task is done under external user
databases, unknown user policy. The policy should be set to
check the following external user databases and the Windows
Database should be selected. Click on submit when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Next, youll need to map an ACS group to the windows
database. This is also done under external user databases
by clicking on database group mapping and windows database.
Click on new configuration and then enter \LOCAL in the
domain field. Click submit.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now, click on the newly created \LOCAL domain. Click on the
add mapping button. Click on users and add to selected.
From the CiscoSecure group dropdown, select the Super
group. Click submit.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 1 2
Verify that windows authentication is functional by logging
in to R6 with a username of enablemode and password
enableme.
Telnet from the ACS to R6. After login, your rights will be
the same as they were when you logged in as superuser.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Proxy Authentication
T a s k 5 . 1 3
If the ACS server attempts to access R2 via http, R5 should
intercept and authenticate the traffic before allowing it.
Use a local username of authp and a password of cisco
to do this.
Authentication proxy allows a router to require
authentication before allowing certain traffic. First well
create a local user, then configure AAA.
R5(config)#username authp password cisco
R5(config)#aaa new-model
R5(config)#aaa authentication login authp local
R5(config)#aaa authorization auth-proxy default local
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 5 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now, we can setup an auth proxy rule that will intercept
http. The final step is to apply it to an interface, in
this case fa0/0.51 which faces the ACS server.
R5(config)#ip auth-proxy name AUTHP http
R5(config)#interface fa0/0.51
R5(config-subif)#ip auth-proxy AUTHP
Test by attempting an http connection from the ACS to R2.
Youll be prompted for a username and password. Enter
authp/cisco and the traffic will be allowed.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 5 . 1 4
Require authentication via telnet at ASA1 before R6 can
ping SW2. Use RADIUS and a virtual telnet address of
24.234.51.50. Authenticate with the ACS windows username of
enablemode and a password of enableme.
This is known as cut through proxy on an ASA. Similar to
auth proxy, traffic must be authenticated before it is
allowed. First well configure our virtual telnet address.
ASA1(config)# virtual telnet 24.234.51.50
Then setup our outside access list to permit traffic both
to the virtual telnet address and from SW2 to R6.
ASA1(config)# access-list outside line 1 permit tcp any host
24.234.51.50 eq telnet
ASA1(config)# access-list outside line 2 permit icmp host
24.234.51.15 host 192.168.0.6
Next well create an ACL for traffic requiring
authentication to be matched against.
ASA1(config)# access-list VTELNET extended permit icmp host
24.234.51.15 host 192.168.0.6
ASA1(config)# access-list VTELNET extended permit tcp host
24.234.51.15 host 24.234.51.50 eq telnet
Virtual telnet requires a static translation from the
virtual telnet address to itself.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)# static (inside,outside) 24.234.51.50 24.234.51.50
netmask 255.255.255.255
Finally, well use AAA to authenticate traffic that matches
our VTELNET ACL.
ASA1(config)# aaa authentication match VTELNET outside RADIUS
With the configuration in place, try pinging from SW2 to
R6. It will fail.
SW2#ping 192.168.0.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.0.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
Now well telnet to the virtual telnet address and
authenticate using the windows username and password of
enablemode/enableme. After authentication try the ping
again. It will be successful.
SW2#telnet 24.234.51.50
Trying 24.234.51.50 ... Open
LOGIN Authentication
Username: enablemode
Password:
Authentication Successful
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
[Connection to 24.234.51.50 closed by foreign host]
SW2#ping 192.168.0.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 192.168.0.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/4/9 ms
On the ASA you can verify authentication with show uauth.
ASA1# show uauth
Current Most Seen
Authenticated Users 1 1
Authen In Progress 0 1
user 'enablemode' at 24.234.51.15, authenticated
absolute timeout: 0:05:00
inactivity timeout: 0:00:00
Configure 802.lx
T a s k 5 . 1 5
Configure 802.1x on SW2. After successful authentication to
the ACS server using RADIUS, clients should be placed into
VLAN111. If a client doesnt have an 802.1x supplicant they
should be placed in VLAN432. Use F0/20 for this
configuration, leave the port shutdown. Add a user to ACS
named dot1xuser with password cisco.
802.1x requires configuration on both the switch and ACS
server. First well need to setup the switch to
authenticate to the ACS using RADIUS.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
SW2(config)#radius-server host 192.168.2.101
SW2(config)#radius-server key cisco
Then well configure AAA to use radius for dot1x and
globally enable it on the switch.
SW2(config)#aaa new-model
SW2(config)#aaa authentication dot1x default group radius
SW2(config)#aaa authorization network default group radius
SW2(config)#aaa accounting dot1x default start-stop group radius
SW2(config)#dot1x system-auth-control
Well create the VLANs that will be used by dot1x
SW2(config)#vlan 111,432
SW2(config-vlan)#exit
And configure the port specific dot1x commands. Note the
guest VLAN. This is used by clients that do not have dot1x
supplicant software.
SW2(config)#interface FastEthernet0/20
SW2(config-if)# switchport mode access
SW2(config-if)# shutdown
SW2(config-if)# dot1x pae authenticator
SW2(config-if)# dot1x port-control auto
SW2(config-if)# dot1x guest-vlan 432
Now well move on to the ACS configuration. First well
setup SW2 as an AAA client. Note that were using RADIUS
(IETF). Click on submit + apply when done.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well need to setup RADIUS to allow for per user
attributes. This is done under interface configuration.
Click on RADIUS (IETF) which is what SW2 is going to
authenticate with. Place check marks in the user column for
attributes 64, 65 and 81. Click on submit.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well need to setup our dot1x user. You should already
know how to create a user. Scroll down to the IETF RADIUS
attributes section. Put check marks in attributes 64, 65
and 81. For attribute 64 select VLAN from the dropdown
menu. For attribute 65 select 802. For attribute 81 type in
VLAN0111 which must exactly match the name of the VLAN on
the switch. This will assign the user to VLAN 111 when they
authenticate successfully.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
The final step for the configuration to function properly
is the ability of SW2 to communicate with the ACS server.
RADIUS must be allowed through the firewall.
ASA1(config)# access-list outside line 1 permit udp host
24.234.51.15 host 192.168.2.101
T a s k 5 . 1 6
Verify that you can authenticate as this user from SW2
using the test aaa command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Although there isnt an 802.1x supplicant connected you can
verify that authentication will work using the test aaa
command.
SW2#test aaa group radius dot1xuser cisco legacy
Attempting authentication test to server-group radius using
radius
User was successfully authenticated.
Configure Advanced Identity Management
T a s k 5 . 1 7
On R2, configure a local user account named ping with
password cisco. Allow this user to perform an extended
ping but do not give access to other privilege level 15
commands.
This is done by changing the privilege level of the ping
command. Well do that, and then create a user of the same
privilege level.
R2(config)#privilege exec level 1 ping
R2(config)#username ping privilege 1 password cisco
Then well setup AAA to authenticate and authorize the
user. Well setup the VTY lines 0-4 to use the AAA
configuration.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config)#aaa new-model
R2(config)#aaa authentication login AUTHEN local
R2(config)#aaa authorization exec AUTHOR local
R2(config)#line vty 0 4
R2(config-line)#authorization exec AUTHOR
R2(config-line)# login authentication AUTHEN
Now, we can test by telneting from R5 to R2. Once
authenticated as ping we can issue an extended ping from
user exec mode.
R5#telnet 24.234.25.2
Trying 24.234.25.2 ... Open
User Access Verification
Username: ping
Password:
R2>ping
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 24.234.25.5
Repeat count [5]:
Datagram size [100]: 1000
Timeout in seconds [2]:
Extended commands [n]:
Sweep range of sizes [n]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 1000-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.25.5, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
T a s k 5 . 1 8
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 6 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Create a user on the ACS server called limited with a
password of cisco that can only authenticate on R6 and
can only use level 1 show commands and exit.
This will be accomplished with various per user attributes.
Well create the user which we already know how to do.
Scrolling down, the first thing well set is per user
network access restrictions. Set the table to define
permitted calling/point of access locations. Select R6 from
the AAA clients dropdown. The port and address will both be
*.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Under the advanced TACACS+ settings well set the max
privilege for any AAA client to 1.
Under TACACS+ setting click on Shell (exec) and set the
privilege level to 1.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Click the radio button for per user command authorization.
Set it to deny unmatched commands. Enter show for the
command and permit unmatched arguments. Click on submit.
Well have to edit the user after submitting to add the
exit command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
With both commands entered, well submit the user again and
verify that we can login to R6 but not issue commands other
than privilege level 1 show and exit. All other commands
will give a command authorization failed.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 6 ~ Control Plane and Management Plane
Security
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page int ent ionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 7 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Implement routing plane security features
T a s k 6 . 1
Configure RIP MD5 authentication on the link between R1 and
ASA1.
T a s k 6 . 2
Configure OSPF MD5 authentication on the link between R2
and ASA1.
T a s k 6 . 3
Configure EIGRP MD5 authentication on the link between
ASA1, R3, and R4.
T a s k 6 . 4
Configure BGP peering between R1 and R4. R1 should
advertise the 192.168.0.0 /16 network. R4 should advertise
the 24.234.4.0, 24.234.5.0 and 24.234.6.0 networks.
T a s k 6 . 5
Configure MD5 authentication for the BGP peering between R1
and R4.
T a s k 6 . 6
Configure R1 to deny the route 24.234.5.0 via BGP, but
accept all other BGP routes from R4.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Control Plane Policing
T a s k 6 . 7
Configure R5s Control Plane to drop telnet traffic from R3
FastEthernet0/0, and rate limit all remaining telnet
traffic to 8000bps. Any telnet traffic that exceeds
8000bps should be dropped.
T a s k 6 . 8
Configure R6s Control Plane to rate limit all ICMP traffic
outbound to 8000bps with a burst of 1000 bytes. Traffic
should be dropped when it exceeds.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure CP Protection and Management Protection
T a s k 6 . 9
Configure R1s control plane host sub-interface to drop all
telnet packets destined for any of its interfaces.
T a s k 6 . 1 0
Modify R1s control plane configuration to only drop all
closed ports.
T a s k 6 . 1 1
Configure R2s control plane host sub-interface to limit
the number of SNMP packets in the control-plane IP input
queue to 25.
Configure Broadcast Control and Switchport Security
T a s k 6 . 1 2
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/14 to drop unicast
packets when 75% of the interface bandwidth is reached. SW2
should continue blocking all unicast packets until unicast
traffic falls below 50%.
T a s k 6 . 1 3
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/15 to drop broadcast
packets when the interface reaches 3000bps. The interface
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
should continue blocking all broadcast packets until they
drop below 1000bps. During the broadcast storm, SW2 should
shutdown this interface.
T a s k 6 . 1 4
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/16 to drop multicast
packets when the interface reaches 1000pps. The interface
should continue blocking all multicast packets until
multicast packets drop below 700pps. An SNMP trap should be
sent when a storm is detected.
T a s k 6 . 1 5
Configure SW2 to keep track of the small-frame rate-
arrival. Configure interface FastEthernet0/10 to drop small
frames when it reaches 3000 packets per second.
T a s k 6 . 1 6
Configure SW2 to recovery from a port being disabled due to
small frames. SW2 should re-enable the interface after 45
seconds.
T a s k 6 . 1 7
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/11 to block the
forwarding of unknown unicast and multicast packets.
T a s k 6 . 1 8
Configure SW1 interface FastEthernet0/3 so that a maximum
of 1 mac-address is allowed. If there is a violation the
port should be shutdown.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 6 . 1 9
Configure SW1 interface FastEthernet0/4 so the first mac-
address learned is copied into the running configuration.
T a s k 6 . 2 0
Configure SW1 to check for the correction of a port
security violations every 30 seconds and to re-enable the
port if the violation is corrected.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure CPU Protection Mechanisms
T a s k 6 . 2 1
Configure R3 to delete all packets that contain IP Options.
T a s k 6 . 2 2
Configure R6 for logging. Disable logging to the console
and monitor. Configure R6 to limit log generation and
transmission to 100 messages per second except for log
levels 4 (warnings) through 0 (emergencies).
T a s k 6 . 2 3
Configure R6 to limit log-induced process switching to one
packet per 10 milliseconds.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Disable Unnecessary Services
T a s k 6 . 2 4
Secure R5 by disabling unnecessary global services.
T a s k 6 . 2 5
Secure R5 fa0/0 by disabling unnecessary interface
services.
T a s k 6 . 2 6
Secure R1 by disabling unnecessary services using a single
command.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 8 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Control Device Access
T a s k 6 . 2 7
Configure R3 so that only devices in vlan 5 can telnet to
it.
T a s k 6 . 2 8
Configure R5 so that only devices in vlan 6 can ssh to it.
Authenticate the connection using a local user named
admin with a password cisco.
T a s k 6 . 2 9
Configure R4 so that only the ACS Server can HTTP into it.
T a s k 6 . 3 0
Configure ASA1 so that only SW2 can telnet to it. The
telnet session should disconnect after 2 minutes of
inactivity.
T a s k 6 . 3 1
Configure ASA1 so that only R1 can SSH to it. Authenticate
the connection using a local user named admin with a
password cisco.
T a s k 6 . 3 2
Configure SW1 so that when user admin telnets into the
switch, they will have privilege 15 access.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure SNMP, SYSLOG, AAA, NTP
T a s k 6 . 3 3
Configure SW1 to log to the Syslog Server on the ACS
Server.
T a s k 6 . 3 4
Configure SW1 for snmp with a community string of cisco
for read-only and a community string of ccbootcamp for
read-write. Send config traps to the SNMP Manager at
192.168.2.101 with a string of cisco.
T a s k 6 . 3 5
Set the clock and time zone on R1. Configure R1 as an NTP
master. Configure R4 to get its time from R1 using
authenticated NTP.
Control Plane and Management Plane
Security Solutions
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Implement routing plane security features
T a s k 6 . 1
Configure RIP MD5 authentication on the link between R1 and
ASA1.
If you are sending and receiving RIP Version 2 packets, you
can enable RIP authentication per interface. First a key
chain must be configured, then at least one key within the
chain. On the interface itself you can choose the
authentication mode and what key chain to use.
R1(config)#key chain RIP
R1(config-keychain)#key 1
R1(config-keychain-key)#key-string cisco
R1(config-keychain-key)#interface fastethernet0/1
R1(config-if)#ip rip authentication mode md5
R1(config-if)#ip rip authentication key-chain RIP
R1 has MD5 authentication configured but ASA1 does not.
Clear the IP routing table on R1 and there will be no
routes learned from ASA1 present.
R1#clear ip route *
R1#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
1.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 1.1.1.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 24.234.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/1
C 192.168.0.0/16 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
Now well configure RIP authentication on the ASA. The
configuration is different, not requiring key chains.
However the mode and key must match what R1 is using.
ASA1(config)# interface ethernet0/1
ASA1(config-if)# rip authentication mode md5
ASA1(config-if)# rip authentication key cisco key_id 1
R1 will now learn routes from ASA1.
R1#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
1.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 1.1.1.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
2.0.0.0/32 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 2.2.2.2 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:16,
FastEthernet0/1
3.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 3.3.3.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:16,
FastEthernet0/1
4.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 4.4.4.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:16,
FastEthernet0/1
5.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 5.5.5.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:17,
FastEthernet0/1
6.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
R 6.6.6.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:17,
FastEthernet0/1
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 6 subnets
R 24.234.34.0 [120/1] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:19,
FastEthernet0/1
R 24.234.2.0 [120/1] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:19,
FastEthernet0/1
R 24.234.6.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:19,
FastEthernet0/1
R 24.234.4.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:19,
FastEthernet0/1
R 24.234.5.0 [120/2] via 24.234.10.100, 00:00:19,
FastEthernet0/1
C 24.234.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/1
C 192.168.0.0/16 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
T a s k 6 . 2
Configure OSPF MD5 authentication on the link between R2
and ASA1.
The OSPF authentication mode can be set in the router
configuration or per interface as were doing in this case.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R2(config-if)#ip ospf authentication message-digest
R2(config-if)#ip ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco
Since ASA1 does not have OSPF authentication configured, R2
will not show it as a neighbor or learn OSPF routes from
it.
R2#show ip ospf neighbor
R2#
R2#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
2.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 2.2.2.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 24.234.2.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
Now well configure OSPF authentication on the ASA. The
commands are the same as on the router.
ASA1(config)# interface ethernet0/2
ASA1(config-if)# ospf authentication message-digest
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config-if)# ospf message-digest-key 1 md5 cisco
ASA1 and R2 now have an OSPF adjacency and routes are being
exchanged.
ASA1# show ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address
Interface
2.2.2.2 1 FULL/BDR 0:00:35 24.234.2.2
dmz
ASA1#
R2#show ip ospf neighbor
Neighbor ID Pri State Dead Time Address
Interface
24.234.34.100 1 FULL/DR 00:00:37 24.234.2.100
FastEthernet0/0
R2#
R2#sh ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
1.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E2 1.1.1.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:05,
FastEthernet0/0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
2.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 2.2.2.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
3.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E2 3.3.3.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:05,
FastEthernet0/0
4.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E2 4.4.4.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:05,
FastEthernet0/0
5.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E2 5.5.5.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:06,
FastEthernet0/0
6.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
O E2 6.6.6.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:06,
FastEthernet0/0
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 6 subnets
O E2 24.234.34.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:07,
FastEthernet0/0
C 24.234.2.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
O E2 24.234.6.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:07,
FastEthernet0/0
O E2 24.234.4.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:07,
FastEthernet0/0
O E2 24.234.5.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:07,
FastEthernet0/0
O E2 24.234.10.0 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:07,
FastEthernet0/0
O E2 192.168.0.0/16 [110/20] via 24.234.2.100, 00:00:07,
FastEthernet0/0
T a s k 6 . 3
Configure EIGRP MD5 authentication on the link between
ASA1, R3, and R4.
As with RIP, well use key chains for EIGRP authentication.
The authentication mode and key chain to be used are set
per interface.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(config)#key chain EIGRP
R3(config-keychain)#key 1
R3(config-keychain-key)#key-string cisco
R3(config-keychain-key)#interface fastethernet0/0
R3(config-if)#ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
R3(config-if)#ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP
At this point R3 will no longer learn routes from ASA1 and
R4.
R3#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
3.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 3.3.3.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 24.234.34.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
Now well configure authentication on R4 using the same key
and mode.
R4(config)#key chain EIGRP
R4(config-keychain)#key 1
R4(config-keychain-key)#key-string cisco
R4(config-keychain-key)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#ip authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4(config-if)#ip authentication key-chain eigrp 1 EIGRP
R3 and R4 now have an EIGRP adjacency, but neither R3 nor
R4 have an EIGRP adjacency with ASA1.
R3#show ip eigrp 1 neighbors
IP-EIGRP neighbors for process 1
H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT
RTO Q Seq
(sec) (ms)
Cnt Num
0 24.234.34.4 Fa0/0 13 00:02:32 4
200 0 42
R4#show ip eigrp 1 neighbors
IP-EIGRP neighbors for process 1
H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT
RTO Q Seq
(sec) (ms)
Cnt Num
0 24.234.34.3 Fa0/0 14 00:03:08 2
200 0 23
2 24.234.4.10 Fa0/1 14 00:59:08 1
200 0 53
Well now configure authentication on ASA1. As with RIP,
key chains arent used but mode and key must match.
ASA1(config)# interface ethernet0/0
ASA1(config-if)# authentication mode eigrp 1 md5
ASA1(config-if)# authentication key eigrp 1 cisco key-id 1
ASA1 now has adjacencies with R3 and R4 and is learning
routes via EIGRP.
ASA1# show eigrp neighbors
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
3 9 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
EIGRP-IPv4 neighbors for process 1
H Address Interface Hold Uptime SRTT
RTO Q Seq
(sec) (ms)
Cnt Num
1 24.234.34.3 Et0/0 14 00:00:18 2
200 0 26
0 24.234.34.4 Et0/0 14 00:00:18 6
200 0 45
ASA1# show route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, I - IGRP, R - RIP, M - mobile,
B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2, E -
EGP
i - IS-IS, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 - IS-IS level-2, ia -
IS-IS inter area
* - candidate default, U - per-user static route, o - ODR
P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
R 1.1.1.0 255.255.255.0 [120/1] via 24.234.10.1, 0:00:08,
inside
O 2.2.2.2 255.255.255.255 [110/11] via 24.234.2.2, 0:11:44,
dmz
D 3.3.3.0 255.255.255.0 [90/131072] via 24.234.34.3, 0:01:16,
outside
D 4.4.4.0 255.255.255.0 [90/131072] via 24.234.34.4, 0:01:16,
outside
D 5.5.5.0 255.255.255.0 [90/156928] via 24.234.34.4, 0:01:16,
outside
D 6.6.6.0 255.255.255.0 [90/156928] via 24.234.34.4, 0:01:16,
outside
C 24.234.34.0 255.255.255.0 is directly connected, outside
C 24.234.2.0 255.255.255.0 is directly connected, dmz
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
D 24.234.6.0 255.255.255.0 [90/28928] via 24.234.34.4,
0:01:16, outside
D 24.234.4.0 255.255.255.0 [90/28672] via 24.234.34.4,
0:01:16, outside
D 24.234.5.0 255.255.255.0 [90/28928] via 24.234.34.4,
0:01:16, outside
C 24.234.10.0 255.255.255.0 is directly connected, inside
R 192.168.0.0 255.255.0.0 [120/1] via 24.234.10.1, 0:00:08,
inside
T a s k 6 . 4
Configure BGP peering between R1 and R4. R1 should
advertise the 192.168.0.0 /16 network. R4 should advertise
the 24.234.4.0, 24.234.5.0 and 24.234.6.0 networks.
Before any BGP peering can occur, the ASA must be
configured to allow the BGP (TCP 179) traffic from R4 to
R1. This is done with an ACL, allowing the traffic in both
directions.
ASA1(config)# access-list OUTSIDE permit tcp host 24.234.34.4
host 24.234.10.1 eq 179
ASA1(config)# access-list OUTSIDE permit tcp host 24.234.34.4 eq
179 host 24.234.10.1
ASA1(config)# access-group OUTSIDE in interface outside
Now we can configure BGP on both routers.
R1(config)#router bgp 1
R1(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.34.4 remote-as 4
R1(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.34.4 ebgp-multihop 2
R1(config-router)#network 192.168.0.0 mask 255.255.0.0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4(config)#router bgp 4
R4(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.10.1 remote-as 1
R4(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.10.1 ebgp-multihop 2
R4(config-router)#network 24.234.4.0 mask 255.255.255.0
R4(config-router)#network 24.234.5.0 mask 255.255.255.0
R4(config-router)#network 24.234.6.0 mask 255.255.255.0
Verify that peering has occurred.
R1#show ip bgp summary
BGP router identifier 1.1.1.1, local AS number 1
BGP table version is 7, main routing table version 7
4 network entries using 480 bytes of memory
4 path entries using 208 bytes of memory
4/3 BGP path/bestpath attribute entries using 496 bytes of
memory
1 BGP AS-PATH entries using 24 bytes of memory
0 BGP route-map cache entries using 0 bytes of memory
0 BGP filter-list cache entries using 0 bytes of memory
Bitfield cache entries: current 1 (at peak 1) using 32 bytes of
memory
BGP using 1240 total bytes of memory
BGP activity 10/6 prefixes, 11/7 paths, scan interval 60 secs
Neighbor V AS MsgRcvd MsgSent TblVer InQ OutQ
Up/Down State/PfxRcd
24.234.34.4 4 4 21 18 7 0 0
00:03:35 3
R1#show ip bgp
BGP table version is 7, local router ID is 1.1.1.1
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, >
best, i - internal,
r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight
Path
*> 24.234.4.0/24 24.234.34.4 0 0 4 i
*> 24.234.5.0/24 24.234.34.4 28416 0 4 i
*> 24.234.6.0/24 24.234.34.4 28416 0 4 i
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
*> 192.168.0.0/16 0.0.0.0 0 32768 i
T a s k 6 . 5
Configure MD5 authentication for the BGP peering between R1
and R4.
This is setup with the neighbor command within router bgp
configuration.
R1#conf t
R1(config)#router bgp 1
R1(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.34.4 password cisco
R4#conf t
R4(config)#router bgp 4
R4(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.10.1 password cisco
Once configured, you will start seeing these messages on
both routers.
*Mar 12 18:34:32.451: %TCP-6-BADAUTH: No MD5 digest from
24.234.34.4(55006) to 24.234.10.1(179)
With the default settings in place, an ASA will break MD5
authentication between BGP peers. This is for two reasons:
First, the ASA clears Option 19 from the TCP header.
Second, it randomizes the TCP sequence number before
sending the packet. The original sequence number is used in
the MD5 hash so hash values wont match at the destination.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
First the ASA must be configured to allow for option 19
using a TCP map. The map is applied within the
global_policy policy map.
ASA1(config)# tcp-map OPTION19
ASA1(config-tcp-map)# tcp-options range 19 19 allow
ASA1(config)# class-map BGP_CMAP
ASA1(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq 179
ASA1(config)# policy-map global_policy
ASA1(config-pmap)# class BGP_CMAP
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# set connection advanced-options OPTION19
Once the option 19 is allowed, the error message received
on R1 and R4 is now an Invalid MD5 digest, instead of a no
MD5 digest.
*Mar 12 18:42:04.503: %TCP-6-BADAUTH: Invalid MD5 digest from
24.234.34.4(14857) to 24.234.10.1(179)
This is solved by disabling TCP sequence number
randomization for BGP packets.
ASA1(config)# policy-map global_policy
ASA1(config-pmap)# class BGP_CMAP
ASA1(config-pmap-c)# set connection random-sequence-number
disable
After the random-sequence-number is disabled, the errors
will cease and the peers will establish.
R1#
*Apr 14 21:55:41.503: %BGP-5-ADJCHANGE: neighbor 24.234.34.4 Up
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 6 . 6
Configure R1 to deny the route 24.234.5.0 via BGP, but
accept all other BGP routes from R4.
This is done with a distribute list. The distribute list
references an ACL and is set with the neighbor command.
R1(config)#access-list 1 deny 24.234.5.0 0.0.0.255
R1(config)#access-list 1 permit any
R1(config)#router bgp 1
R1(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.34.4 distribute-list 1 in
Well clear bgp and then verify the 24.234.5.0 route is
gone.
R1#clear ip bgp *
R1#
*Mar 12 18:53:46.175: %BGP-5-ADJCHANGE: neighbor 24.234.34.4
Down User reset
R1#
*Mar 12 18:53:48.687: %BGP-5-ADJCHANGE: neighbor 24.234.34.4 Up
R1#show ip bgp
BGP table version is 4, local router ID is 1.1.1.1
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, >
best, i - internal,
r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight
Path
*> 24.234.4.0/24 24.234.34.4 0 0 4 i
*> 24.234.6.0/24 24.234.34.4 28416 0 4 i
*> 192.168.0.0/16 0.0.0.0 0 32768 i
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Control Plane Policing
T a s k 6 . 7
Configure R5s Control Plane to drop telnet traffic from R3
FastEthernet0/0, and rate limit all remaining telnet
traffic to 8000bps. Any telnet traffic that exceeds
8000bps should be dropped.
Control plane policing allows for MQC to be applied to the
control plane. The configuration is the same as a standard
MQC. Identify traffic with a class map, act on the
identified traffic with a policy map and apply the policy
to the control plane with service-policy.
In this case well need two different class maps, one to
identify telnet from R3 and one to identify all other
telnet. The traffic from R3 gets an action of drop and all
other telnet is policed to 8000bps.
R5(config)#ip access-list extended TELNET_DROP
R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp host 24.234.34.3 any eq telnet
R5(config)#ip access-list extended TELNET_RATE
R5(config-ext-nacl)#deny tcp host 24.234.34.3 any eq telnet
R5(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any eq telnet
R5(config-ext-nacl)#class-map TELNET_DROP_CMAP
R5(config-cmap)#match access-group name TELNET_DROP
R5(config-cmap)#class-map TELNET_RATE_CMAP
R5(config-cmap)#match access-group name TELNET_RATE
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R5(config-cmap)#policy-map TELNET_PMAP
R5(config-pmap)#class TELNET_DROP_CMAP
R5(config-pmap-c)#drop
R5(config-pmap)#class TELNET_RATE_CMAP
R5(config-pmap-c)#police rate 8000 bps
R5(config-pmap-c-police)#conform-action transmit
R5(config-pmap-c-police)#exceed-action drop
R5(config-pmap-c-police)#exit
R5(config-pmap-c)#exit
R5(config-pmap)#exit
R5(config)#control-plane
R5(config-cp)#service-policy input TELNET_PMAP
Well verify with a telnet from R4 to R5, this is allowed.
R4#telnet 24.234.5.5
Trying 24.234.5.5 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
Now well try a telnet from R3, the traffic is dropped.
R3#telnet 24.234.5.5
Trying 24.234.5.5 ...
% Connection timed out; remote host not responding
Show policy-map control-plane shows us that packets
matched the configured classes and were acted upon.
R5#show policy-map control-plane
Control Plane
Service-policy input: TELNET_PMAP
Class-map: TELNET_DROP_CMAP (match-all)
4 packets, 240 bytes
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name TELNET_DROP
drop
Class-map: TELNET_RATE_CMAP (match-all)
22 packets, 1329 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name TELNET_RATE
police:
rate 8000 bps, burst 1500 bytes
conformed 22 packets, 1329 bytes; actions:
transmit
exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
drop
conformed 0 bps, exceed 0 bps
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
52 packets, 4140 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
T a s k 6 . 8
Configure R6s Control Plane to rate limit all ICMP traffic
outbound to 8000bps with a burst of 1000 bytes. Traffic
should be dropped when it exceeds.
Like the previous example, this is done with MQC applied to
the control plane. However the service policy is in the
outbound direction.
R6(config)#ip access-list extended ICMP
R6(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any
R6(config-ext-nacl)#class-map ICMP_CMAP
R6(config-cmap)#match access-group name ICMP
R6(config-cmap)#policy-map ICMP_PMAP
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R6(config-pmap)# class ICMP_CMAP
R6(config-pmap-c)#police rate 8000 bps burst 1000 bytes
R6(config-pmap-c-police)#conform-action transmit
R6(config-pmap-c-police)#exceed-action drop
R6(config-pmap-c-police)#exit
R6(config-pmap-c)#exit
R6(config-pmap)#exit
R6(config)#control-plane
R6(config-cp)#service-policy output ICMP_PMAP
Well test by sending 100 icmp packets.
R6#ping 24.234.34.3 repeat 100
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 100, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.34.3, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!
!!!!!!
!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!!!!!!!!.!
Success rate is 89 percent (89/100), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
Note that some packets were dropped. A look at the policy-
map shows that 11 packets were in violation of the policy
and were dropped.
R6#sho policy-map control-plane
Control Plane
Service-policy output: ICMP_PMAP
Class-map: ICMP_CMAP (match-all)
100 packets, 11400 bytes
5 minute offered rate 2000 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name ICMP
police:
rate 8000 bps, burst 1000 bytes
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 0 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
conformed 89 packets, 10146 bytes; actions:
transmit
exceeded 11 packets, 1254 bytes; actions:
drop
conformed 1000 bps, exceed 0 bps
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
30 packets, 2253 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any Configure CP Protection and Management
Protection
T a s k 6 . 9
Configure R1s control plane host sub-interface to drop all
telnet packets destined for any of its interfaces.
Control plane protection allows for finer granularity in
filtering control plane traffic. Well use a port-filter
class map to identify all telnet traffic, and then drop it
in a policy map which is applied to control-plane host.
R1(config)#class-map type port-filter match-any PORT_CMAP
R1(config-cmap)#match port tcp 23
R1(config-cmap)#exit
R1(config)#policy-map type port-filter PORT_PMAP
R1(config-pmap)#class PORT_CMAP
R1(config-pmap-c)#drop
R1(config-pmap-c)#exit
R1(config-pmap)#exit
R1(config)#control-plane host
R1(config-cp-host)#service-policy type port-filter input
PORT_PMAP
R1(config-cp-host)#
*Mar 12 22:14:05.354: %CP-5-FEATURE: TCP/UDP Portfilter feature
enabled on Control plane host path
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
We can test by telneting from SW2 to R1. The traffic is
dropped.
SW2#telnet 192.168.0.1
Trying 192.168.0.1 ...
% Connection timed out; remote host not responding
Showing the policy-map verifies that the packets were
dropped.
R1#show policy-map type port-filter control-plane host
Control Plane Host
Service-policy port-filter input: PORT_PMAP
Class-map: PORT_CMAP (match-any)
4 packets, 240 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: port tcp 23
4 packets, 240 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
drop
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
6 packets, 1554 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
T a s k 6 . 1 0
Modify R1s control plane configuration to only drop all
closed ports.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Closed ports are ports that the router is not actively
listening on. To drop this traffic well remove the telnet
match in our class map and add closed-ports.
R1(config)#class-map type port-filter match-any PORT_CMAP
R1(config-cmap)#no match port tcp 23
R1(config-cmap)#match closed-ports
Verify what ports are open with show control-plane host
open-ports.
R1#show control-plane host open-ports
Active internet connections (servers and established)
Prot Local Address Foreign Address
Service State
tcp *:23 *:0
Telnet LISTEN
tcp *:80 *:0
HTTP CORE LISTEN
udp *:67 *:0 DHCPD
Receive LISTEN
udp *:68 *:0 BootP
client LISTEN
Notice, that RIP (UDP 520) is not listed, but the router is
running RIP. Since this port is not listed, RIP will be
blocked. Verify that R1 is no longer learning routes from
ASA1.
R1#clear ip route *
R1#show ip route
Codes: C - connected, S - static, R - RIP, M - mobile, B - BGP
D - EIGRP, EX - EIGRP external, O - OSPF, IA - OSPF inter
area
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
N1 - OSPF NSSA external type 1, N2 - OSPF NSSA external
type 2
E1 - OSPF external type 1, E2 - OSPF external type 2
i - IS-IS, su - IS-IS summary, L1 - IS-IS level-1, L2 -
IS-IS level-2
ia - IS-IS inter area, * - candidate default, U - per-
user static route
o - ODR, P - periodic downloaded static route
Gateway of last resort is not set
1.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 1.1.1.0 is directly connected, Loopback0
24.0.0.0/24 is subnetted, 1 subnets
C 24.234.10.0 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/1
C 192.168.0.0/16 is directly connected, FastEthernet0/0
T a s k 6 . 1 1
Configure R2s control plane host sub-interface to limit
the number of SNMP packets in the control-plane IP input
queue to 25.
This is done with a queue-threshold class-map and policy-
map. These are special map types used by control plane
protection to limit the number of packets allowed for
specified protocols. This can be useful in defeating DoS
attacks launched against your router.
R2(config)#class-map type queue-threshold match-any QUEUE_CMAP
R2(config-cmap)#match protocol snmp
R2(config-cmap)#exit
R2(config)#policy-map type queue-threshold QUEUE_PMAP
R2(config-pmap)#class QUEUE_CMAP
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config-pmap-c)#queue-limit 25
R2(config-pmap-c)#exit
R2(config-pmap)#exit
R2(config)#control-plane host
R2(config-cp-host)#service-policy type queue-threshold input
QUEUE_PMAP
R2(config-cp-host)#
*Mar 12 22:18:40.562: %CP-5-FEATURE: Protocol Queue Thresholding
feature enabled on Control plane host path
Verify the configuration with a show policy-map.
R2#show policy-map type queue-threshold control-plane host
queue-limit 25
queue-count 0 packets allowed/dropped 0/0
Control Plane Host
Service-policy queue-threshold input: QUEUE_PMAP
Class-map: QUEUE_CMAP (match-any)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: protocol snmp
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
Configure Broadcast Control and Switchport Security
T a s k 6 . 1 2
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/14 to drop unicast
packets when 75% of the interface bandwidth is reached. SW2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
should continue blocking all unicast packets until unicast
traffic falls below 50%.
This is accomplished with storm-control. Storm control is
configured per interface and sets a rising and falling
threshold in percentage of interface bandwidth. The port
will block traffic when the rising threshold is reached and
resume normal operation when the traffic rate drops below
the falling threshold.
SW2(config)#interface fastethernet0/14
SW2(config-if)#storm-control unicast level 75 50
Verify with show storm-control unicast.
SW2#show storm-control unicast
Interface Filter State Upper Lower Current
--------- ------------- ----------- ----------- ----------
Fa0/14 Link Down 75.00% 50.00% 0.00%
T a s k 6 . 1 3
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/15 to drop broadcast
packets when the interface reaches 3000bps. The interface
should continue blocking all broadcast packets until they
drop below 1000bps. During the broadcast storm, SW2 should
shutdown this interface.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This is also done with storm control using the broadcast
option instead of unicast. The shutdown action will
error-disable the interface during a storm.
SW2(config)#interface fastethernet0/15
SW2(config-if)#storm-control broadcast level bps 3000 1000
SW2(config-if)#storm-control action shutdown
Verify with show storm-control.
SW2#show storm-control broadcast
Interface Filter State Upper Lower Current
--------- ------------- ----------- ----------- ----------
Fa0/15 Link Down 3k bps 1k bps 0 bps
T a s k 6 . 1 4
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/16 to drop multicast
packets when the interface reaches 1000pps. The interface
should continue blocking all multicast packets until
multicast packets drop below 700pps. An SNMP trap should be
sent when a storm is detected.
This is done with the multicast option. Notice were
using pps instead of bps. Well also use the action
trap option to send an SNMP trap when the storm is
detected.
SW2(config)#interface FastEthernet0/16
SW2(config-if)#storm-control multicast level pps 1000 700
SW2(config-if)#storm-control action trap
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Once again, well verify with show storm-control.
SW2#show storm-control multicast
Interface Filter State Upper Lower Current
--------- ------------- ----------- ----------- ----------
Fa0/16 Link Down 1k pps 700 pps 0 pps
T a s k 6 . 1 5
Configure SW2 to keep track of the small-frame rate-
arrival. Configure interface FastEthernet0/10 to drop small
frames when it reaches 3000 packets per second.
Incoming VLAN-tagged packets smaller than 67 bytes are
considered small frames. They are forwarded by the switch
but they do not cause the switch storm-control counters to
increment.
You globally enable the small-frame arrival feature on the
switch and then configure the small-frame threshold for
packets on each interface. Packets smaller than the minimum
size and arriving at a specified rate (the threshold) are
dropped since the port is error disabled.
SW2# errdisable detect cause small-frame
SW2(config)#interface fastethernet0/10
SW2(config-if)#small-frame violation-rate 3000
T a s k 6 . 1 6
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure SW2 to recovery from a port being disabled due to
small frames. SW2 should re-enable the interface after 45
seconds.
This is done with errdisable recovery for the cause
small-frame. The interval is set to 45.
SW2(config)#errdisable recovery cause small-frame
SW2(config)#errdisable recovery interval 45
T a s k 6 . 1 7
Configure SW2 interface FastEthernet0/11 to block the
forwarding of unknown unicast and multicast packets.
Default switch behavior is to flood packets with unknown
destination MAC addresses out of all ports. You can change
this behavior per interface with the switchport block
command.
SW2(config)#interface fastethernet0/11
SW2(config-if)#switchport block unicast
SW2(config-if)#switchport block multicast
T a s k 6 . 1 8
Configure SW1 interface FastEthernet0/3 so that a maximum
of 1 mac-address is allowed. If there is a violation the
port should be shutdown.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This is done with port-security. First port-security is
enabled, then a maximum number of allowed mac addresses and
a violation is configured.
SW1(config)#interface fastethernet0/3
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security maximum 1
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security violation shutdown
T a s k 6 . 1 9
Configure SW1 interface FastEthernet0/4 so the first mac-
address learned is copied into the running configuration.
This is done using the sticky option within port
security. The sticky option should be configured before
turning on port-security so the address can be properly
learned.
SW1(config)#interface fastethernet0/4
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security mac-address sticky
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security
T a s k 6 . 2 0
Configure SW1 to check for the correction of a port
security violations every 30 seconds and to re-enable the
port if the violation is corrected.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 1 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This is done with errdisable recovery using the cause
psecure-violation. The recovery interval can also be set.
SW1(config)#errdisable recovery cause psecure-violation
SW1(config)#errdisable recovery interval 30
To verify we will change the mac-address on R4 F0/0 to
0004.0004.0004. The switchport it is connected to will shut
down due to the violation.
R4(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#mac-address 0004.0004.0004
SW1#
09:35:36: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface
FastEthernet0/4, changed state to down
SW1#
09:35:38: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface
FastEthernet0/4, changed state to up
09:35:39: %PM-4-ERR_DISABLE: psecure-violation error detected on
Fa0/4, putting Fa0/4 in err-disable state
SW1#
09:35:39: %PORT_SECURITY-2-PSECURE_VIOLATION: Security violation
occurred, caused by MAC address 0004.0004.0004 on port
FastEthernet0/4.
SW1#
09:35:40: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface
FastEthernet0/4, changed state to down
09:35:41: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/4, changed
state to down
This can be further verified with the show port-security
command for the interface.
SW1#show port-security interface fastethernet0/4
Port Security : Enabled
Port Status : Secure-shutdown
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Violation Mode : Shutdown
Aging Time : 0 mins
Aging Type : Absolute
SecureStatic Address Aging : Disabled
Maximum MAC Addresses : 1
Total MAC Addresses : 1
Configured MAC Addresses : 0
Sticky MAC Addresses : 1
Last Source Address:Vlan : 0004.0004.0004:34
Security Violation Count : 1
Now, we will remove the mac-address from R4 F0/0. The port
will automatically recover.
R4(config-if)#no mac-address 0004.0004.0004
SW1#
09:37:34: %PM-4-ERR_RECOVER: Attempting to recover from psecure-
violation err-disable state on Fa0/4
SW1#
09:37:37: %LINK-3-UPDOWN: Interface FastEthernet0/4, changed
state to up
09:37:39: %LINEPROTO-5-UPDOWN: Line protocol on Interface
FastEthernet0/4, changed state to up
Verify that the violation has been resolved.
SW1#show port-security interface fastethernet0/4
Port Security : Enabled
Port Status : Secure-up
Violation Mode : Shutdown
Aging Time : 0 mins
Aging Type : Absolute
SecureStatic Address Aging : Disabled
Maximum MAC Addresses : 1
Total MAC Addresses : 1
Configured MAC Addresses : 0
Sticky MAC Addresses : 1
Last Source Address:Vlan : 0017.5926.03b0:34
Security Violation Count : 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure CPU Protection Mechanisms
T a s k 6 . 2 1
Configure R3 to delete all packets that contain IP Options.
IP Options can be globally removed with the ip options
drop command.
R3(config)#ip options drop
% Warning: RSVP and other protocols that use IP Options packets
may not function as expected.
T a s k 6 . 2 2
Configure R6 for logging. Disable logging to the console
and monitor. Configure R6 to limit log generation and
transmission to 100 messages per second except for log
levels 4 (warnings) through 0 (emergencies).
Logging can be CPU intensive. Specific methods of logging
can be turned off with the no version of the logging
command. To limit the number of messages logged use
logging rate-limit.
R6(config)#logging on
R6(config)#no logging console
R6(config)#no logging monitor
R6(config)#logging rate-limit 100 except 4
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Verify the logging configuration with show logging.
R6#show logging
Syslog logging: enabled (11 messages dropped, 1 messages rate-
limited,
0 flushes, 0 overruns, xml disabled, filtering
disabled)
Console logging: disabled
Monitor logging: disabled
Buffer logging: disabled, xml disabled,
filtering disabled
Logging Exception size (4096 bytes)
Count and timestamp logging messages: disabled
No active filter modules.
Trap logging: level informational, 41 message lines logged
T a s k 6 . 2 3
Configure R6 to limit log-induced process switching to one
packet per 10 milliseconds.
Although we rate limited the number of log entries, each
packet that matches a logging enabled ACE within an ACL is
processed in the switch. This is CPU intensive. This can be
solved using ip access-list logging interval. The
interval is set in milliseconds.
R6(config)#ip access-list logging interval 10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Disable Unnecessary Services
T a s k 6 . 2 4
Secure R5 by disabling unnecessary global services.
These common global services should be disabled on a
router, if not used. Some are off by default.
R5(config)#no service finger
R5(config)#no service pad
R5(config)#no service udp-small-servers
R5(config)#no service tcp-small-servers
R5(config)#no cdp run
R5(config)#no ip bootp server
R5(config)#no ip http server
R5(config)#no ip finger
R5(config)#no ip source-route
R5(config)#no ip gratuitous-arps
R5(config)#no ip identd
T a s k 6 . 2 5
Secure R5 fa0/0 by disabling unnecessary interface
services.
These common interface services should be disabled on a
router, if not used.
R5(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R5(config-if)#no ip redirects
R5(config-if)#no ip proxy-arp
R5(config-if)#no ip unreachables
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R5(config-if)#no ip directed-broadcast
R5(config-if)#no ip mask-reply
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 6 . 2 6
Secure R1 by disabling unnecessary services using a single
command.
This is done with the auto secure management command.
AutoSecure disables common IP services that can be
exploited by network attacks. Well use the no-interact
option to avoid prompting. (Output cut)
R1#auto secure management no-interact
--- AutoSecure Configuration ---
*** AutoSecure configuration enhances the security of
the router, but it will not make it absolutely resistant
to all security attacks ***
AutoSecure will modify the configuration of your device.
All configuration changes will be shown. For a detailed
explanation of how the configuration changes enhance security
and any possible side effects, please refer to Cisco.com for
Autosecure documentation.
Securing Management plane services...
Control Device Access
T a s k 6 . 2 7
Configure R3 so that only devices in vlan 5 can telnet to
it.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This is done with a standard ACL. The ACL is applied to the
VTY lines with the access-class command.
R3(config)#access-list 1 permit 24.234.5.0 0.0.0.255
R3(config)#line vty 0 4
R3(config-line)#transport input telnet
R3(config-line)#access-class 1 in
Test telneting from R5 which is in the allowed VLAN. The
connection is allowed.
R5#telnet 24.234.34.3
Trying 24.234.34.3 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
Now telnet from R6 which is not in the allowed VLAN. The
connection is refused.
R6#telnet 24.234.34.3
Trying 24.234.34.3 ...
% Connection refused by remote host
T a s k 6 . 2 8
Configure R5 so that only devices in vlan 6 can ssh to it.
Authenticate the connection using a local user named
admin with a password cisco.
To enable SSH the router must first have a domain name and
generated crypto keys. Then well create a local user.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Finally, SSH can be limited just like telnet: with an ACL.
Login is set to local.
R5(config)#ip domain-name ccbootcamp.com
R5(config)#crypto key generate rsa
The name for the keys will be: R5.ccbootcamp.com
Choose the size of the key modulus in the range of 360 to 2048
for your
General Purpose Keys. Choosing a key modulus greater than 512
may take
a few minutes.
How many bits in the modulus [512]: 1024
% Generating 1024 bit RSA keys, keys will be non-
exportable...[OK]
R5(config)#
*Mar 13 21:06:57.746: %SSH-5-ENABLED: SSH 1.99 has been enabled
R5(config)#username admin password cisco
R5(config)#access-list 2 permit 24.234.6.0 0.0.0.255
R5(config)#line vty 0 4
R5(config-line)#transport input ssh
R5(config-line)#access-class 2 in
R5(config-line)#login local
Verify by connecting via ssh from R6 with a username of
admin. The connection is allowed.
R6#telnet 24.234.34.3
Trying 24.234.34.3 ...
% Connection refused by remote host
R6#ssh -l admin -c 3des 24.234.5.5
Password:
R5>exit
[Connection to 24.234.5.5 closed by foreign host]
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 6 . 2 9
Configure R4 so that only the ACS Server can HTTP into it.
By default, routers have the http server service enabled.
Well need to create an access-list that only allows host
192.168.2.101. Apply it to the http server with ip http
access-class.
R4(config)#access-list 1 permit host 192.168.2.101
R4(config)#ip http server
R4(config)#ip http access-class 1
T a s k 6 . 3 0
Configure ASA1 so that only SW2 can telnet to it. The
telnet session should disconnect after 2 minutes of
inactivity.
By default, there are no devices allowed to telnet to the
ASA. The telnet command is used to identify networks and/or
hosts that are allowed to telnet, and from which interface.
The default telnet password for the ASA is cisco.
ASA1(config)# telnet 192.168.0.10 255.255.255.255 inside
ASA1(config)# telnet timeout 2
Verify by telneting from SW2, the connection will be
allowed.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 2 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
SW2#telnet 24.234.10.100
Trying 24.234.10.100 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
Type help or '?' for a list of available commands.
ASA1>
Now telnet from R1, the connection is not allowed.
R1#telnet 24.234.10.100
Trying 24.234.10.100 ...
% Connection timed out; remote host not responding
T a s k 6 . 3 1
Configure ASA1 so that only R1 can SSH to it. Authenticate
the connection using a local user named admin with a
password cisco.
By default, no devices allowed to ssh to the ASA. The ssh
command is used to identify networks and/or hosts that are
allowed to ssh, and from which interface. Like a router, in
order for the ASA to be an ssh server crypto keys have to
be generated. AAA is used to setup authentication for SSH.
ASA1(config)# domain-name ccbootcamp.com
ASA1(config)# crypto key generate rsa modulus 1024
WARNING: You have a RSA keypair already defined named <Default-
RSA-Key>.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Do you really want to replace them? [yes/no]: yes
Keypair generation process begin. Please wait...
ASA1(config)# username admin password cisco
ASA1(config)# ssh 24.234.10.1 255.255.255.255 inside
ASA1(config)# aaa authentication ssh console LOCAL
Test by connecting from R1 via SSH with a username of
admin. The connection will be allowed.
R1#ssh -l admin -c 3des 24.234.10.100
Password:
Type help or '?' for a list of available commands.
ASA1>
T a s k 6 . 3 2
Configure SW1 so that when user admin telnets into the
switch, they will have privilege 15 access.
This is done by setting the privilege level of the user.
SW1(config)#username admin privilege 15 password cisco
SW1(config)#line vty 0 4
SW1(config-line)# login local
Test by telneting from R5 to SW1. When you log in as
admin youll be able to show your privilege level.
R5#telnet 24.234.5.10
Trying 24.234.5.10 ... Open
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
User Access Verification
Username: admin
Password:
SW1#
SW1#show privilege
Current privilege level is 15
Configure SNMP, SYSLOG, AAA, NTP
T a s k 6 . 3 3
Configure SW1 to log to the Syslog Server on the ACS
Server.
Since SW1 is on the outside of the ASA, a translation and
access-list entry must be made for the syslog traffic.
ASA1(config)#static (inside,outside) 192.168.2.101 192.168.2.101
ASA1(config)#access-list OUTSIDE permit udp host 24.234.4.10
host 192.168.2.101 eq 514
And then syslog can be configured with the logging host
command.
SW1(config)#logging host 192.168.2.101
T a s k 6 . 3 4
Configure SW1 for snmp with a community string of cisco
for read-only and a community string of ccbootcamp for
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
read-write. Send config traps to the SNMP Manager at
192.168.2.101 with a string of cisco.
This is done with the snmp-server commands. Community
strings are setup with the community option, traps are
setup with the enable traps option and the trap receiver
setup with the host option.
SW1(config)#snmp-server community cisco ro
SW1(config)#snmp-server community ccbootcamp rw
SW1(config)#snmp-server enable traps config
SW1(config)#snmp-server host 192.168.2.101 traps cisco config
We can verify that traps are being sent by turning on SMNP
debugging and then entering configure commands.
SW1#debug snmp packets
SNMP packet debugging is on
SW1#conf t
Enter configuration commands, one per line. End with CNTL/Z.
SW1(config)#exit
SW1#
*Mar 1 00:19:06.974: SNMP: Queuing packet to 192.168.2.101
*Mar 1 00:19:06.974: SNMP: V1 Trap, ent ciscoConfigManMIB.2,
addr 24.234.4.10, gentrap 6, spectrap 1
ccmHistoryEventEntry.3.10 = 1
ccmHistoryEventEntry.4.10 = 2
ccmHistoryEventEntry.5.10 = 3
*Mar 1 00:19:07.225: SNMP: Packet sent via UDP to 192.168.2.101
SW1#
*Mar 1 00:19:08.106: %SYS-5-CONFIG_I: Configured from console
by console
T a s k 6 . 3 5
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Set the clock and time zone on R1. Configure R1 as an NTP
master. Configure R4 to get its time from R1 using
authenticated NTP.
Since R4 resides on the outside of the ASA, a translation
and access-list entry is needed to allow ntp traffic.
ASA1(config)# static (inside,outside) 24.234.10.1 24.234.10.1
netmask 255.255.255.255
ASA1(config)# access-list OUTSIDE permit udp host 24.234.34.4
host 24.234.10.1 eq 123
R1s clock is set with the clock set command. NTP is
configured with the ntp command.
R1#clock set 9:00:00 22 JAN 2009
R1#conf t
R1(config)#clock timezone PST -8
R1(config)#ntp master 8
R1(config)#ntp authentication-key 1 md5 cisco
R1(config)#ntp authenticate
R1(config)#ntp trusted-key 1
NTP is setup on R4 as well. The difference in the
configurations is that R4 is not set as a master; instead
it uses the ntp server command to get its time.
R4(config)#clock timezone PST -8
R4(config)#ntp authentication-key 1 md5 cisco
R4(config)#ntp authenticate
R4(config)#ntp trusted-key 1
R4(config)#ntp server 24.234.10.1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Verify with show ntp status. Notice that the reference is
R1s IP address.
R4#show ntp status
Clock is synchronized, stratum 9, reference is 24.234.10.1
nominal freq is 250.0000 Hz, actual freq is 250.0000 Hz,
precision is 2**18
reference time is CD2326ED.1E74C01D (09:10:05.118 PST Thu Jan 22
2009)
clock offset is 412.0026 msec, root delay is 1.92 msec
root dispersion is 615.78 msec, peer dispersion is 203.75 msec
Show ntp associations gives more detail about the NTP
server, R1.
R4#show ntp associations detail
24.234.10.1 configured, our_master, sane, valid, stratum 8
ref ID 127.127.7.1, time CD232728.5B248A87 (09:11:04.356 PST Thu
Jan 22 2009)
our mode client, peer mode server, our poll intvl 64, peer poll
intvl 64
root delay 0.00 msec, root disp 0.03, reach 377, sync dist
103.592
delay 1.89 msec, offset 414.3799 msec, dispersion 102.62
precision 2**24, version 3
org time CD23272D.884979E0 (09:11:09.532 PST Thu Jan 22 2009)
rcv time CD23272D.1E72CDAC (09:11:09.118 PST Thu Jan 22 2009)
xmt time CD23272D.1DF4FA20 (09:11:09.117 PST Thu Jan 22 2009)
filtdelay = 1.89 1.92 1.86 1.83 1.83 1.86
1.85 1.85
filtoffset = 414.38 412.00 409.67 0.46 0.42 0.40
0.36 0.33
filterror = 0.02 0.99 1.97 2.94 2.96 2.98
2.99 3.01
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter 7 ~ Advanced Security
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 3 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Fa0/1 Fa0/1 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R1
Fa0/2 Fa0/2 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R2
Fa0/3 Fa0/3 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R3
Fa0/4 Fa0/4 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1 R4
Fa0/5 Fa0/5 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R5
Fa0/6 Fa0/6 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
R6
Fa0/9 Fa0/9 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB1
Fa0/10 Fa0/10 SW1 SW2
Fa0/0 Fa0/1
BB2
Fa0/12 Fa0/12 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/14 Fa0/14 SW1 SW2
Gi0/0: sense Gi0/1: c&c
IDS
Fa0/17 Fa0/17 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
Fa0/18 Fa0/18 SW1 SW2
E0/0 E0/2
Fa0/23 Fa0/23 SW1 SW2
E0/1 E0/3
ASA01
ASA01
ASA02
ASA02
IDS
Sensor Int. Connected to:
G0/0 SW1 Fa0/14
Fa1/0 SW3 Fa0/4
Fa1/1 SW3 Fa0/3
Fa1/2 SW3 Fa0/2
Fa1/3 SW3 Fa0/1
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
SW1 SW2
SW3 SW4
Fas0/20 Fas0/20
Fas0/19 Fas0/19
2811
R7
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/17
SW4
Fas0/17
2811
R8
Fas0/0 Fas0/1
SW3
Fas0/18
SW4
Fas0/18
ACS PC SW1 Fa0/24
192.168.2.101
XP Test PC SW2 Fa0/16
192.168.2.102
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Packet Marking Technigues
T a s k 7 . 1
Configure R3 to modify the DSCP value of telnet traffic
from VLAN 35 to a value of af43. The traffic should be
modified before transmitting out interfaces FastEthernet0/0
and Serial0/0/0.
T a s k 7 . 2
Configure R4 to modify the IP Precedence field for packets
arriving from VLAN 46 to an IP Precedence of immediate (2).
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Implement Security RFCs
T a s k 7 . 3
Configure R4 to deny RFC1918, RFC2827/3704, and RFC3330
addresses on its FastEthernet0/0 interface.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Black Hole and Sink Hole Solutions
T a s k 7 . 4
Configure R3 so that traffic sourced from VLAN 35 and
destined to R2s Loopback0 will take 24.234.234.2 as the
next hop instead of SW1 (24.234.3.10).
T a s k 7 . 5
Configure R1 FastEthernet0/0 to send IP traffic destined
for R6s L0 to interface null0.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Remote Triggered Black Hole Filtering
T a s k 7 . 6
R2, R3, and R4 are configured in BGP AS 234. R2 is peering
with R3 and R4, and is acting as a Route-Reflector Server.
R2 is configured with Loopback 22 (22.22.22.2), and R2 is
redistributing its connected networks into BGP.
R5 and R6 have static route for 22.22.22.0/24 to R3 and R4
respectively.
Configure Remote Triggered Black Hole (RTBH) filtering so
that Routers R3 and R4 black hole any packets destined for
the 22.22.22.0 network.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Traffic Filtering using Access~Lists
T a s k 7 . 7
Configure R3 to deny inbound telnet and ICMP ECHOs on
FastEthernet0/1 from VLAN 35.
T a s k 7 . 8
Configure R4 to deny all inbound packets with the IP option
of timestap on interface FastEthernet0/0.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 4 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure IOS NAT
T a s k 7 . 9
Configure NAT on R4 so that any 24.234.0.0/16 address will
use an external pool as the source IP Address when
connecting to any R6 network. The external NAT pool will
be 46.46.46.100 46.46.46.200.
T a s k 7 . 1 0
Configure R4 so that incoming connections from R6 to
46.46.46.2 will be translated to the destination address of
loopback0 on R2.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure TCP Intercept
T a s k 7 . 1 1
Configure R1 to protect the ACS Server (192.168.2.101) from
SYN-flooding attacks. Use TCP Intercept.
T a s k 7 . 1 2
Configure R1 to wait 20 seconds for TCP sessions to
establish. If TCP connections are not established within
20 seconds, then R1 should send a reset.
T a s k 7 . 1 3
Configure R1 to drop TCP connections 3 seconds after
receiving a reset or FIN-Exchange.
T a s k 7 . 1 4
Configure R1 to manage TCP connections for up to one hour
with no activity.
T a s k 7 . 1 5
Configure R1 to start dropping incomplete TCP connections
when the number exceeds 1000. Stop aggressive behavior when
incomplete TCP connections drop below 700. Configure R1 to
start aggressive behavior when the number of incomplete TCP
connections reaches 400 within a minute. Stop aggressive
behavior when the number of incomplete TCP connections
reaches 200 within a minute.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 7 . 1 6
Configure R1 so that when connections are dropped they are
chosen randomly instead of oldest first.
Configure uRPF
T a s k 7 . 1 7
Configure R3 interface FastEthernet0/1 to ensure that
packets are reachable via the interface they come in on.
Any denied packets should be logged.
T a s k 7 . 1 8
Configure uRPF on ASA1 for all traffic.
Configure CAR
T a s k 7 . 1 9
Configure R2 FastEthernet0/0 so that the inbound traffic is
limited to the following:
HTTP traffic is limited to 1Mbps with a normal burst
of 16KB and an excess burst of 24KB.
ICMP traffic is limited to 200Kbps with a normal burst
of 8KB and an excess of 16KB.
All remaining traffic is limited to 4Mbps with a
normal burst of 16KB and an excess of 16KB.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure NBAR
T a s k 7 . 2 0
Configure R4 to discover application protocols on interface
F0/0.
T a s k 7 . 2 1
Configure R3 FastEthernet0/1 to drop KaZaA, Morpheus, and
Grokster P2P traffic coming from R6.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure NetFlow
T a s k 7 . 2 2
Configure R1 to capture traffic being received by interface
fastethernet0/1.
T a s k 7 . 2 3
Configure R1 to export this data to the ACS Server over UDP
port 514.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Policing
T a s k 7 . 2 4
Configure R4 to police SMTP traffic to 400000Kbps with a
burst of 8k bytes and an excess burst of 16k bytes inbound
on interface FastEthernet0/0. SMTP traffic that conforms
is transmitted, and SMTP traffic that does not conform is
dropped.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Capture and Utilize Packet Captures
T a s k 7 . 2 5
On ASA1 capture ICMP traffic from R1 to R2. The buffer
should start overwriting the beginning when full.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure Transit Traffic Control and Congestion
Management
T a s k 7 . 2 6
Configure R2 to guarantee 33% of the bandwidth for voice
traffic with the dscp value of ef. Next, police ICMP
traffic to 8000 bps with a burst of 1000 bytes and an
excess burst of 1000 bytes. All other traffic uses the
queuing method of fair-queue.
Advanced Security Solutions
Configure Packet Marking Technigues
T a s k 7 . 1
Configure R3 to modify the DSCP value of telnet traffic
from VLAN 35 to a value of af43. The traffic should be
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
modified before transmitting out interfaces FastEthernet0/0
and Serial0/0/0.
This is done with MQC. (Modular Quality of Service Command
Line Interface) An access-list with permit statements
identifies the traffic that we want subjected to the
marking. This ACL is referenced in a class map, an action
(set dscp) is applied in a policy map and finally the
policy applied to an interface with service-policy.
R3(config)#ip access-list extended VLAN35
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp 35.35.35.0 0.0.0.255 any eq
telnet
R3(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R3(config)#class-map match-any VLAN35_CMAP
R3(config-cmap)#match access-group name VLAN35
R3(config-cmap)#exit
R3(config)#policy-map VLAN35_PMAP
R3(config-pmap)#class VLAN35_CMAP
R3(config-pmap-c)#set dscp af43
R3(config-pmap-c)#exit
R3(config-pmap)#exit
R3(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
R3(config-if)#service-policy input VLAN35_PMAP
Show policy-map will allow us to verify. Currently, the
policy-map has not marked any telnet traffic.
R3#show policy-map interface fastethernet0/1
FastEthernet0/1
Service-policy input: VLAN35_PMAP
Class-map: VLAN35_CMAP (match-any)
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Match: access-group name VLAN35
0 packets, 0 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
QoS Set
dscp af43
Packets marked 0
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
23 packets, 1690 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
Now well telnet from R5 to R2.
R5#telnet 24.234.234.2
Trying 24.234.234.2 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password: cisco
R2#exit
[Connection to 24.234.234.2 closed by foreign host]
Issue the show policy-map command again. Notice that
packets have now been marked.
R3#show policy-map interface fastethernet0/1
FastEthernet0/1
Service-policy input: VLAN35_PMAP
Class-map: VLAN35_CMAP (match-any)
23 packets, 1389 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name VLAN35
23 packets, 1389 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
QoS Set
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 5 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
dscp af43
Packets marked 23
Class-map: class-default (match-any)
44 packets, 3210 bytes
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: any
T a s k 7 . 2
Configure R4 to modify the IP Precedence field for packets
arriving from VLAN 46 to an IP Precedence of immediate (2).
This time well be using a route map to provide the marking
of packets. Once again an ACL with a permit statement is
used to identify the traffic. This ACL is referenced in the
route-map. The set command within the route map is used
to set the IP precedence.
R4(config)#ip access-list extended VLAN46
R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 46.46.46.0 0.0.0.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R4(config)#route-map VLAN46_RMAP
R4(config-route-map)#match ip address VLAN46
R4(config-route-map)#set ip precedence immediate
R4(config-route-map)#exit
R4(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#ip policy route-map VLAN46_RMAP
Verify with show route-map. No packets have matched.
R4#show route-map VLAN46_RMAP
route-map VLAN46_RMAP, permit, sequence 10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Match clauses:
ip address (access-lists): VLAN46
Set clauses:
ip precedence immediate
Policy routing matches: 0 packets, 0 byte
Now generate traffic that will match the ACL.
R6#ping 24.234.234.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.234.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/58/60 ms
Issue the show route-map command again and youll see
packets have matched.
R4#show route-map
route-map VLAN46_RMAP, permit, sequence 10
Match clauses:
ip address (access-lists): VLAN46
Set clauses:
ip precedence immediate
Policy routing matches: 5 packets, 570 bytes
Implement Security RFCs
T a s k 7 . 3
Configure R4 to deny RFC1918, RFC2827/3704, and RFC3330
addresses on its FastEthernet0/0 interface.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
All of these RFCs refer to address space allocated for
private, internal, or special use. They should never be
seen incoming from a public network (The Internet) so we
will block them with an ACL.
R4(config)#ip access-list extended RFCs
R4(config-ext-nacl)#remark RFC 1918
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 172.16.0.0 0.15.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 192.168.0.0 0.0.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#remark RFC2827/RFC3704
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 24.234.0.0 0.0.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#remark RFC 3330
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip host 0.0.0.0 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 127.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 169.254.0.0 0.0.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip 224.0.0.0 15.255.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#ip access-group RFCs in
Configure Black Hole and Sink Hole Solutions
T a s k 7 . 4
Configure R3 so that traffic sourced from VLAN 35 and
destined to R2s Loopback0 will take 24.234.234.2 as the
next hop instead of SW1 (24.234.3.10).
Sinkhole routing involves diverting specific traffic so
that it can be segregated, analyzed, etc In order to set a
different next hop than what is present in the routing
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
table, a route map will be used. Traffic that matches a
particular access-list will have a new next-hop set.
Currently, R3 shows the next hop of 2.2.2.2 to be SW1, and
a traceroute from R5 to 2.2.2.2 verifies this.
R3#show ip route 2.2.2.2
Routing entry for 2.0.0.0/8
Known via "eigrp 1", distance 90, metric 156416, type internal
Redistributing via eigrp 1
Last update from 24.234.3.10 on FastEthernet0/0, 00:13:09 ago
Routing Descriptor Blocks:
* 24.234.3.10, from 24.234.3.10, 00:13:09 ago, via
FastEthernet0/0
Route metric is 156416, traffic share count is 1
Total delay is 5110 microseconds, minimum bandwidth is
100000 Kbit
Reliability 255/255, minimum MTU 1500 bytes
Loading 1/255, Hops 2
R5#traceroute 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 2.2.2.2
1 35.35.35.3 0 msec 0 msec 4 msec
2 24.234.3.10 0 msec 0 msec 4 msec
3 24.234.2.2 0 msec * 0 msec
Now well configure and apply our route map.
R3(config)#ip access-list extended R2_L0
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any host 2.2.2.2
R3(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R3(config)#route-map R2_L0_RMAP
R3(config-route-map)#match ip address R2_Lo0
R3(config-route-map)#set ip next-hop 24.234.234.2
R3(config-route-map)#exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
R3(config-if)#ip policy route-map R2_L0_RMAP
We can verify it is working by running the traceroute
again. This time it goes to 24.234.234.2.
R5#traceroute 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 2.2.2.2
1 35.35.35.3 0 msec 4 msec 0 msec
2 24.234.234.2 12 msec * 12 msec
T a s k 7 . 5
Configure R1 FastEthernet0/0 to send IP traffic destined
for R6s L0 to interface null0.
This is known as black hole routing. A route map is used to
set the next-hop of matched traffic to null0 which drops
the packets.
Currently, SW2 can ping R6s L0 (6.6.6.6).
SW2#ping 6.6.6.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 6.6.6.6, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
58/58/59 ms
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now well configure our route-map.
R1(config)#ip access-list extended R6_L0
R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any host 6.6.6.6
R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R1(config)#route-map R6_L0_RMAP
R1(config-route-map)#match ip address R6_L0
R1(config-route-map)#set interface null 0
R1(config-route-map)#exit
R1(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R1(config-if)#ip policy route-map R6_L0_RMAP
Now well ping again to verify the black hole routing is
working properly.
SW2#ping 6.6.6.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 6.6.6.6, timeout is 2 seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
The pings are being dropped. A show route-map verifies
that 5 packets were matched.
R1#show route-map R6_L0_RMAP
route-map R6_L0_RMAP, permit, sequence 10
Match clauses:
ip address (access-lists): R6_L0
Set clauses:
interface Null0
Policy routing matches: 5 packets, 570 bytes
Configure Remote Triggered Black Hole Filtering
T a s k 7 . 6
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2, R3, and R4 are configured in BGP AS 234. R2 is peering
with R3 and R4, and is acting as a Route-Reflector Server.
R2 is configured with Loopback 22 (22.22.22.2), and R2 is
redistributing its connected networks into BGP.
R5 and R6 have static route for 22.22.22.0/24 to R3 and R4
respectively.
Configure Remote Triggered Black Hole (RTBH) filtering so
that Routers R3 and R4 black hole any packets destined for
the 22.22.22.0 network.
RTBH provides the capability to drop packets at the edge of
your network by changing the configuration of a single
router.
R3 and R4 are learning about the R2 connected networks via
BGP.
R3#show ip bgp
BGP table version is 19, local router ID is 3.3.3.3
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, >
best, i - internal,
r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight
Path
*>i2.2.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
*>i22.22.22.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
r>i24.234.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
r>i24.234.234.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4#show ip bgp
BGP table version is 19, local router ID is 4.4.4.4
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, >
best, i - internal,
r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight
Path
*>i2.2.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
*>i22.22.22.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
r>i24.234.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
r>i24.234.234.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
R5 and R6 have connectivity to the 22.22.22.0 network.
R5#ping 22.22.22.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 22.22.22.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
28/30/32 ms
R6#ping 22.22.22.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 22.22.22.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/58/60 ms
First, the BGP routers must have a black hole to route
the bad traffic to. Well configure an address that will be
statically routed to null0.
R2#conf t
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R2(config)#ip route 192.0.5.1 255.255.255.255 null0
R2(config)#end
R3#conf t
R3(config)#ip route 192.0.5.1 255.255.255.255 null0
R3(config)#end
R4#conf t
R4(config)#ip route 192.0.5.1 255.255.255.255 null0
R4(config)#end
Now well configure the BGP Trigger Router (R2) so that
traffic destined for the 22.22.22.0 network will be routed
to our black hole address of 192.0.5.1.
R2(config)#access-list 1 permit 22.22.22.0 0.0.0.255
R2(config)#route-map RTBH permit 10
R2(config-route-map)#match address 1
R2(config-route-map)#set ip next-hop 192.0.5.1
R2(config-route-map)#set local-preference 200
R2(config-route-map)#route-map RTBH permit 20
R2(config-route-map)#router bgp 234
R2(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.234.3 route-map RTBH out
R2(config-router)#neighbor 24.234.234.4 route-map RTBH out
After issuing a clear ip bgp *, we see that R3 and R4 have
updated their BGP table to reflect the next hop for
22.22.22.0 as 192.0.5.1.
R3#clear ip bgp *
R3#show ip bgp
BGP table version is 20, local router ID is 3.3.3.3
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, >
best, i - internal,
r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight
Path
*>i2.2.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
*>i22.22.22.0/24 192.0.5.1 0 200 0 ?
r>i24.234.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
r>i24.234.234.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
R4#show ip bgp
BGP table version is 20, local router ID is 4.4.4.4
Status codes: s suppressed, d damped, h history, * valid, >
best, i - internal,
r RIB-failure, S Stale
Origin codes: i - IGP, e - EGP, ? - incomplete
Network Next Hop Metric LocPrf Weight
Path
*>i2.2.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
*>i22.22.22.0/24 192.0.5.1 0 200 0 ?
r>i24.234.2.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
r>i24.234.234.0/24 24.234.234.2 0 100 0 ?
R5 and R6 can no longer ping 22.22.22.2.
R5#ping 22.22.22.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 22.22.22.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
R6#ping 22.22.22.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 22.22.22.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
Configure Traffic Filtering using Access~Lists
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 6 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 7 . 7
Configure R3 to deny inbound telnet and ICMP ECHOs on
FastEthernet0/1 from VLAN 35.
Access-lists provide traffic filtering capabilities to
allow or deny traffic from entering or exiting a network.
In this case the ACL is fairly simple.
R3(config)#ip access-list extended VLAN35
R3(config-ext-nacl)#deny tcp 35.35.35.0 0.0.0.255 any eq telnet
R3(config-ext-nacl)#deny icmp 35.35.35.0 0.0.0.255 any echo
R3(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any
R3(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R3(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
R3(config-if)#ip access-group VLAN35 in
Verify by attempting a telnet from R5 to 24.234.234.2
R5#telnet 24.234.234.2
Trying 24.234.234.2 ...
% Destination unreachable; gateway or host down
When sourcing the telnet address from loopback 0, the
telnet is allowed.
R5#telnet 24.234.234.2 /source-interface lo0
Trying 24.234.234.2 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
R2#exit
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
[Connection to 24.234.234.2 closed by foreign host]
A ping from R5 fails due to the access-list.
R5#ping 24.234.234.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.234.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
U.U.U
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
But a ping from R5s loopback0 is successful.
R5#ping 24.234.234.2 source lo0
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 24.234.234.2, timeout is 2
seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 5.5.5.5
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
28/29/32 ms
T a s k 7 . 8
Configure R4 to deny all inbound packets with the IP option
of timestap on interface FastEthernet0/0.
ACLs can filter IP Options. In this example, we are denying
packets that have the IP Option timestamp specified.
Currently, R6 can traceroute to 2.2.2.2 with the IP Option
timestamp.
R6#traceroute
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 2.2.2.2
Source address:
Numeric display [n]:
Timeout in seconds [3]:
Probe count [3]:
Minimum Time to Live [1]:
Maximum Time to Live [30]:
Port Number [33434]:
Loose, Strict, Record, Timestamp, Verbose[none]: t
Number of timestamps [ 9 ]:
Loose, Strict, Record, Timestamp, Verbose[TV]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 2.2.2.2
1 46.46.46.4 4 msec
Received packet has options
Total option bytes= 40, padded length=40
Timestamp: Type 0. Overflows: 0 length 40, ptr 9
Time=*16:01:07.611 UTC (836FF01B)
>>Current pointer<<
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Now we will configure an access-list to deny ip packets
with the timestamp IP Option using the option keyword.
R4(config)#ip access-list extended IPOPTIONS
R4(config-ext-nacl)#deny ip any any option timestamp
R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R4(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#ip access-group IPOPTIONS in
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now, the traceroute from R6 to 2.2.2.2 with the timestamp
IP Option is denied.
R6#traceroute
Protocol [ip]:
Target IP address: 2.2.2.2
Source address:
Numeric display [n]:
Timeout in seconds [3]:
Probe count [3]:
Minimum Time to Live [1]:
Maximum Time to Live [30]:
Port Number [33434]:
Loose, Strict, Record, Timestamp, Verbose[none]: t
Number of timestamps [ 9 ]:
Loose, Strict, Record, Timestamp, Verbose[TV]:
Type escape sequence to abort.
Tracing the route to 2.2.2.2
1 46.46.46.4 !A
Received packet has options
Total option bytes= 40, padded length=40
Timestamp: Type 0. Overflows: 0 length 40, ptr 9
Time=*15:58:55.915 UTC (836DEDAB)
>>Current pointer<<
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
* !A
Received packet has options
Total option bytes= 40, padded length=40
Timestamp: Type 0. Overflows: 0 length 40, ptr 9
Time=*15:58:58.915 UTC (836DF963)
>>Current pointer<<
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Time= 00:00:00.000 UTC (00000000)
Issuing show ip access-lists verifies the traceroute
packets were dropped.
R4#show ip access-lists
Extended IP access list IPOPTIONS
10 deny ip any any option timestamp (3 matches)
20 permit ip any any (27 matches)
Configure IOS NAT
T a s k 7 . 9
Configure NAT on R4 so that any 24.234.0.0/16 address will
use an external pool as the source IP Address when
connecting to any R6 network. The external NAT pool will
be 46.46.46.100 46.46.46.200.
First we will create a nat pool. Then create an ACL to
identify traffic to be translated. Well setup the
translation to use the ACL and pool with the ip nat
inside command. Finally interface s0/0/0 is setup as
inside and fa0/0 setup as outside.
R4(config)#ip nat pool NAT-POOL 46.46.46.100 46.46.46.200
prefix-length 24
R4(config)#ip access-list extended NET
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip 24.234.0.0 0.0.255.255 any
R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R4(config)#ip nat inside source list NET pool NAT-POOL
R4(config)#interface serial0/0/0
R4(config-if)#ip nat inside
R4(config-if)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#ip nat outside
Verify by generating traffic that will be translated. A
ping from R2 to R6 accomplishes this.
R2#ping 46.46.46.6
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 46.46.46.6, timeout is 2
seconds:
.!!!!
Success rate is 80 percent (4/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/58/60 ms
Now do a show ip nat translations on R4 to see the NAT.
R4#show ip nat translations
Pro Inside global Inside local Outside local
Outside global
icmp 46.46.46.100:0 24.234.234.2:0 46.46.46.6:0
46.46.46.6:0
--- 46.46.46.100 24.234.234.2 --- ---
T a s k 7 . 1 0
Configure R4 so that incoming connections from R6 to
46.46.46.2 will be translated to the destination address of
loopback0 on R2.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
In this example, we are hiding the 2.2.2.2 address behind
the public address of 46.46.46.2. When R6 telnets to
46.46.46.2, the packets are sent to 2.2.2.2.
R4(config)#ip nat inside source static 2.2.2.2 46.46.46.2
To verify, telnet from R6 to 46.46.46.2. Once logged in
youll be connected to R2.
R6#telnet 46.46.46.2
Trying 46.46.46.2 ... Open
User Access Verification
Password:
R2#
Issue show ip nat translation on R4 to see the NAT.
R4#show ip nat translations
Pro Inside global Inside local Outside local
Outside global
tcp 46.46.46.2:23 2.2.2.2:23 46.46.46.6:11223
46.46.46.6:11223
--- 46.46.46.2 2.2.2.2 --- ---
--- 46.46.46.100 24.234.234.2 --- ---
--- 46.46.46.101 24.234.234.3 --- ---
Configure TCP Intercept
T a s k 7 . 1 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Configure R1 to protect the ACS Server (192.168.2.101) from
SYN-flooding attacks. Use TCP Intercept.
An access-list is used to provide granularity for the
traffic that should be intercepted, in this case from any
device to the ACS server. Then TCP intercept is configured
with ip tcp intercept.
R1(config)#ip access-list extended TCP_INTERCEPT
R1(config-ext-nacl)#permit ip any host 192.168.2.101
R1(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept list TCP_INTERCEPT
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
T a s k 7 . 1 2
Configure R1 to wait 20 seconds for TCP sessions to
establish. If TCP connections are not established within
20 seconds, then R1 should send a reset.
TCP Intercept can be configured in one of two modes:
Intercept or Watch. In watch mode the router will monitor
connections and terminate them only if they are not
established within a specified period.
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept mode watch
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept watch-timeout 20
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
T a s k 7 . 1 3
Configure R1 to drop TCP connections 3 seconds after
receiving a reset or FIN-Exchange.
By default, TCP Intercept waits 5 seconds from receipt of a
reset or FIN-exchange before it ceases to manage the
connection. Well be changing this to 3 seconds.
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept finrst-timeout 3
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
T a s k 7 . 1 4
Configure R1 to manage TCP connections for up to one hour
with no activity.
By default, TCP Intercept still manages a connection for 24
hours after no activity. Well be dropping this time down
to one hour. The time is in seconds.
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept connection-timeout 3600
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 7 . 1 5
Configure R1 to start dropping incomplete TCP connections
when the number exceeds 1000. Stop aggressive behavior when
incomplete TCP connections drop below 700. Configure R1 to
start aggressive behavior when the number of incomplete TCP
connections reaches 400 within a minute. Stop aggressive
behavior when the number of incomplete TCP connections
reaches 200 within a minute.
TCP Intercept starts aggressive behavior when the high
value is exceeded and stops it when the number falls below
the low value.
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept max-incomplete high 1000
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept max-incomplete low 700
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept one-minute high 400
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept one-minute low 200
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 7 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 7 . 1 6
Configure R1 so that when connections are dropped they are
chosen randomly instead of oldest first.
TCP Intercept can drop partial connections one of two ways:
Oldest or Random. The default is to drop the oldest, well
be changing that.
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept drop-mode random
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
Configure uRPF
T a s k 7 . 1 7
Configure R3 interface FastEthernet0/1 to ensure that
packets are reachable via the interface they come in on.
Any denied packets should be logged.
Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding (uRPF) mitigates source IP
Address spoofing. It is applied per interface. Logging can
be added by specifying an access-list at the end of the
command. The log or log-input statement must be added
at the end of the ACL.
R3(config)#access-list 1 deny any log
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
R3(config-if)#ip verify unicast source reachable-via rx 1
T a s k 7 . 1 8
Configure uRPF on ASA1 for all traffic.
Just like an IOS Router, Unicast Reverse Path Forwarding is
configured on a per interface basis.
ASA1(config)# ip verify reverse-path interface inside
ASA1(config)# ip verify reverse-path interface outside
Configure CAR
T a s k 7 . 1 9
Configure R2 FastEthernet0/0 so that the inbound traffic is
limited to the following:
HTTP traffic is limited to 1Mbps with a normal burst
of 16KB and an excess burst of 24KB.
ICMP traffic is limited to 200Kbps with a normal burst
of 8KB and an excess of 16KB.
All remaining traffic is limited to 4Mbps with a
normal burst of 16KB and an excess of 16KB.
This is configured with the rate-limit command in interface
configuration mode. An ACL is used to identify the traffic
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
to be rate limited. The rate is measured in bits per
second. The normal and maximum burst are measured in bytes
per second.
R2(config)#access-list 101 permit tcp any any eq www
R2(config)#access-list 102 permit icmp any any
R2(config)#access-list 103 permit ip any any
R2(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
R2(config-if)#rate-limit input access-group 101 1000000 16000
24000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop
R2(config-if)#rate-limit input access-group 102 200000 8000
16000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop
R2(config-if)#rate-limit input access-group 103 4000000 16000
16000 conform-action transmit exceed-action drop
Configure NBAR
T a s k 7 . 2 0
Configure R4 to discover application protocols on interface
F0/0.
This is done using NBAR with the protocol-discovery
keyword.
R4(config)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#ip nbar protocol-discovery
With this configuration in place, generate some traffic
through the router.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R6#ping 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2.2.2.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/57/60 ms
Now issue the show ip nbar protocol-discovery protocol
icmp command. You can see various information including
the number and size of packets discovered by NBAR.
R4#show ip nbar protocol-discovery protocol icmp
FastEthernet0/0
Input Output
----- ------
Protocol Packet Count Packet
Count
Byte Count Byte Count
5min Bit Rate (bps) 5min Bit
Rate (bps)
5min Max Bit Rate (bps) 5min Max
Bit Rate (bps)
------------------------ ------------------------ -----------
-------------
icmp 5 5
570 570
0 0
0 0
unknown 0 0
0 0
0 0
0 0
Total 47 26
3678 2124
0 0
0 0
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
T a s k 7 . 2 1
Configure R3 FastEthernet0/1 to drop KaZaA, Morpheus, and
Grokster P2P traffic coming from R6.
After NBAR identifies traffic, MQC can be used to take
actions on it such as dropping or policing. The class map
identifies the traffic. The policy map sets the action. The
policy map is applied to an interface with the service-
policy command.
R3(config)#class-map match-any P2P_CMAP
R3(config-cmap)#match protocol fasttrack
R3(config-cmap)#policy-map P2P_PMAP
R3(config-pmap)#class P2P_CMAP
R3(config-pmap-c)#drop
R3(config-pmap-c)#interface fastethernet0/1
R3(config-if)#service-policy input P2P_PMAP
Configure NetFlow
T a s k 7 . 2 2
Configure R1 to capture traffic being received by interface
fastethernet0/1.
NetFlow can be configured on an interface with the ip
flow command in one of two ways: ingress or egress.
Ingress captures traffic being received by the interface.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Egress captures the traffic being transmitted by the
interface. Were using ingress.
R1(config)#interface fastethernet0/1
R1(config-if)#ip flow ingress
Verify that netflow is working by generating traffic.
ASA1# ping 1.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 1.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/10 ms
Now view netflow information with show ip cache flow.
R1#show ip cache flow
IP packet size distribution (14 total packets):
1-32 64 96 128 160 192 224 256 288 320 352 384
416 448 480
.000 .642 .000 .357 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000
.000 .000 .000
512 544 576 1024 1536 2048 2560 3072 3584 4096 4608
.000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000 .000
IP Flow Switching Cache, 278544 bytes
2 active, 4094 inactive, 2 added
40 ager polls, 0 flow alloc failures
Active flows timeout in 30 minutes
Inactive flows timeout in 15 seconds
IP Sub Flow Cache, 25800 bytes
0 active, 1024 inactive, 0 added, 0 added to flow
0 alloc failures, 0 force free
1 chunk, 1 chunk added
last clearing of statistics never
Protocol Total Flows Packets Bytes Packets
Active(Sec) Idle(Sec)
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
-------- Flows /Sec /Flow /Pkt /Sec
/Flow /Flow
SrcIf SrcIPaddress DstIf DstIPaddress Pr
SrcP DstP Pkts
Fa0/1 24.234.10.100 Local 1.1.1.1 01
0000 0800 5
Fa0/1 24.234.10.100 Null 224.0.0.10 58
0000 0000 9
T a s k 7 . 2 3
Configure R1 to export this data to the ACS Server over UDP
port 514.
NetFlow data can be exported to an external device using
the ip flow-export command. When specifying the IP
Address of the device, you must also specify the port to be
used.
In this example, we specified the Kiwi Syslog Server on the
ACS, and set the port to UDP 514, which is the port for
syslog. Since the Kiwi Syslog Server listens on that port,
you will see the NetFlow information sent to the Kiwi
Syslog Server.
R1(config)#ip flow-export destination 192.168.2.101 514 udp
Verify that traffic is being exported by generating
traffic.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1# ping 1.1.1.1
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 1.1.1.1, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/1/1 ms
And then viewing what traffic has been exported with show ip
flow export.
R1#show ip flow export
Flow export v1 is enabled for main cache
Export source and destination details :
VRF ID : Default
Destination(1) 192.168.2.101 (514)
Version 1 flow records
1 flows exported in 1 udp datagrams
0 flows failed due to lack of export packet
0 export packets were sent up to process level
0 export packets were dropped due to no fib
0 export packets were dropped due to adjacency issues
0 export packets were dropped due to fragmentation failures
0 export packets were dropped due to encapsulation fixup
failures
Configure Policing
T a s k 7 . 2 4
Configure R4 to police SMTP traffic to 400000 Kbps with a
burst of 8k bytes and an excess burst of 16k bytes inbound
on interface FastEthernet0/0. SMTP traffic that conforms
is transmitted, and SMTP traffic that does not conform is
dropped.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
An access-list is used to classify the traffic, and MQC is
used to police the traffic.
R4(config)#ip access-list extended SMTP
R4(config-ext-nacl)#permit tcp any any eq smtp
R4(config-ext-nacl)#exit
R4(config)#class-map match-any SMTP_CMAP
R4(config-cmap)#match access-group name SMTP
R4(config-cmap)#policy-map SMTP_PMAP
R4(config-pmap)#class SMTP_CMAP
R4(config-pmap-c)#police 400000 8000 16000
R4(config-pmap-c-police)#conform-action transmit
R4(config-pmap-c-police)#exceed-action drop
R4(config-pmap-c-police)#interface fastethernet0/0
R4(config-if)#service-policy input SMTP_PMAP
Capture and Utilize Packet Captures
T a s k 7 . 2 5
On ASA1 capture ICMP traffic from R1 to R2. The buffer
should start overwriting the beginning when full.
In order to capture and see packets on the ASA, the first
step is to configure an access-list for the specific
traffic that you would like to capture. Once the access-
list has been configured, the capture command is used to
enable the capture. The circular-buffer option allows the
buffer to be overwritten.
ASA1(config)#access-list R1_R2 permit icmp host 24.234.10.1 host
2.2.2.2
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA1(config)#capture ICMP access-list R1_R2 circular-buffer
interface inside
R1#ping 2.2.2.2
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 2.2.2.2, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
The show capture commands are used for viewing of the
captured packets.
ASA1# show capture ICMP
5 packets captured
1: 02:01:57.919752 24.234.10.1 > 2.2.2.2: icmp: echo request
2: 02:01:57.921735 24.234.10.1 > 2.2.2.2: icmp: echo request
3: 02:01:57.923322 24.234.10.1 > 2.2.2.2: icmp: echo request
4: 02:01:57.924924 24.234.10.1 > 2.2.2.2: icmp: echo request
5: 02:01:57.926526 24.234.10.1 > 2.2.2.2: icmp: echo request
5 packets shown
Configure Transit Traffic Control and Congestion
Management
T a s k 7 . 2 6
Configure R2 to guarantee 33% of the bandwidth for voice
traffic with the dscp value of ef. Next, police ICMP
traffic to 8000 bps with a burst of 1000 bytes and an
excess burst of 1000 bytes. All other traffic uses the
queuing method of fair-queue.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 8 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This will be accomplished with MQC. First, the ICMP traffic
will be identified with an ACL.
R2(config)#ip access-list extended ICMP
R2(config-ext-nacl)#permit icmp any any
The voice traffic will be identified with the match command
within a class map and the ICMP traffic by matching our ACL
within another class map.
R2(config)#class-map match-all VOICE
R2(config-cmap)# match ip dscp ef
R2(config-cmap)#exit
R2(config)#
R2(config)#class-map match-any ICMP_CMAP
R2(config-cmap)#match access-group name ICMP
R2(config-cmap)#exit
Then a policy map is created. Within the policy map the
voice class is given priority with the priority percent
command.
R2(config)#policy-map WAN_PMAP
R2(config-pmap)#class VOICE
R2(config-pmap-c)#priority percent 33
R2(config-pmap-c)#exit
Then the ICMP traffic is policed with the police command.
R2(config-pmap-c)#class ICMP_CMAP
R2(config-pmap-c)#police 8000 1000 1000
R2(config-pmap-c-police)#conform-action transmit
R2(config-pmap-c-police)#exceed-action drop
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
All other traffic is fair-queued with the fair-queue
command.
R2(config-pmap)#class class-default
R2(config-pmap-c)#fair-queue
Finally, the policy map is applied to an interface with a
service-policy.
R2(config-pmap-c)#interface serial0/0/0
R2(config-if)#service-policy output WAN_PMAP
Well verify with a normal ping which will conform to the
policy.
R1#ping 4.4.4.4
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 4.4.4.4, timeout is 2 seconds:
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
56/58/60 ms
A show policy-map verifies ICMP packets were subjected to
the policing and in this case were transmitted. (Output cut
for clarity)
R2#show policy-map interface serial 0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Service-policy output: WAN_PMAP
Class-map: ICMP_CMAP (match-any)
5 packets, 520 bytes
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
5 minute offered rate 0 bps, drop rate 0 bps
Match: access-group name ICMP
5 packets, 520 bytes
5 minute rate 0 bps
Queueing
Output Queue: Conversation 265
Bandwidth 100 (kbps)Max Threshold 64 (packets)
(pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
(depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
police:
cir 8000 bps, bc 1000 bytes, be 1000 bytes
conformed 5 packets, 520 bytes; actions:
transmit
exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
drop
conformed 0 bps, exceed 0 bps, violate 0 bps
A large ping request will be denied due to the policy.
R1#ping 4.4.4.4 size 2000
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 2000-byte ICMP Echos to 4.4.4.4, timeout is 2
seconds:
.....
Success rate is 0 percent (0/5)
Doing another show policy-map verifies that there were
packets in violation of the policy.
R2#show policy-map interface serial 0/0/0
Serial0/0/0
Service-policy output: WAN_PMAP
Class-map: ICMP_CMAP (match-any)
15 packets, 10660 bytes
5 minute offered rate 1000 bps, drop rate 1000 bps
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Match: access-group name ICMP
15 packets, 10660 bytes
5 minute rate 1000 bps
Queueing
Output Queue: Conversation 265
Bandwidth 100 (kbps)Max Threshold 64 (packets)
(pkts matched/bytes matched) 0/0
(depth/total drops/no-buffer drops) 0/0/0
police:
cir 8000 bps, bc 1000 bytes, be 1000 bytes
conformed 10 packets, 3140 bytes; actions:
transmit
exceeded 0 packets, 0 bytes; actions:
transmit
violated 5 packets, 7520 bytes; actions:
drop
conformed 0 bps, exceed 0 bps, violate 1000 bps
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Chapter ~ 8 Network Attacks
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
outside
24.234.1.0/24
DMZ
172.16.0.0/24
E0/0.3 E0/1
.100
.100
R1
R2
R3
ASA1
.2
.1
.101
Network Attacks Lab Topoloy
.100 E0/0.2
inside
192.168.2.0/16
ACS
.3
R4 .4
R5
.5
.1
S0/0/0
Fa0/0
Fa0/0
Fa0/0
Fa0/0
S0/0/0
EIGRP 1
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
4 9 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
This page intentionally blank
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated

Identify and protect against fragmentation attacks
T a s k 8 . 1
A network beyond R5 is launching fragmentation based
attacks against the network. Drop non-initial fragments
incoming on R1 but allow all other traffic to pass.
T a s k 8 . 2
Hosts behind R4 are particularly vulnerable to
fragmentation attacks. Drop all fragments incoming to R4.
Do not use an access list to accomplish this.
T a s k 8 . 3
Some fragments must be allowed from the internal network to
the outside, but to cut down on fragmentation attacks,
configure the ASA to only allow a maximum of 12 fragments
per IP packet.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against malicious IP option
usage
T a s k 8 . 4
A network beyond R5 is launching an IP option based attack.
Configure R1 to drop all IP option traffic.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against network reconnaissance
attacks
T a s k 8 . 5
You believe an attacker from the outside is trying to gain
information about your network by scanning internal hosts.
Configure the ASA to detect this behavior and shun the
attacker for half an hour if detected.
T a s k 8 . 6
You think the attacker may have been scanning because you
are allowing too much information to the outside. ICMP and
telnet should only be allowed incoming from R1 and FTP
should only be allowed from anywhere to R2. Review the ASA
configuration and correct the access allowed.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against IP spoofing attacks
T a s k 8 . 7
R1 is connected to the internet via R5. Configure R1 to
drop incoming packets sourced with the RFC 1918 addresses
on the internet facing interface.
T a s k 8 . 8
You believe that a user inside your network is launching
attacks against internet hosts using spoofed source IPs.
Configure the ASA so that it will verify incoming packets
originated from the internal networks.
Identify and protect against MAC spoofing and
flooding attacks
T a s k 8 . 9
You suspect that a user on port fa0/10 of SW1 is spoofing
mac addresses. Configure SW1 to learn the hosts real mac
address, enter it in the running config and disable the
port if additional mac addresses are seen.
T a s k 8 . 1 0
There is a hub attached to port fa0/11 of SW1. The number
of devices on the hub varies from 5 to 10 depending on who
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
is in the office that day. One of the users is attempting
to flood the CAM table of the switch. Configure SW1 so that
the necessary number of devices will be allowed but the
port will be shutdown if CAM table flooding occurs.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against DHCP attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 1
The ACS server is setup as a DHCP server for VLAN 1.
Configure SW1 so that ONLY the ACS server port can respond
to DCHP requests on VLAN 1. Any other port that attempts to
respond should be shutdown.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against ARP spoofing attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 2
Configure SW1 so that ARP spoofing is not possible on VLAN
1.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 0 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against VLAN hopping attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 3
Port fa0/19 on SW1 is designated for use as a trunk link.
Its current configuration is vulnerable to VLAN hopping.
Configure port fa0/19 so this is not possible.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against Denial of Service
(DoS) attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 4
A specially crafted internet worm has infected your
network. Multiple hosts from the inside are leaving half
open connections to the FTP server on R2. Configure the ASA
to limit the number of half open connections to 1000. Do
this without using a NAT statement or ACL.
T a s k 8 . 1 5
Hosts on the internal network are infected with a worm.
They are attempting to syn flood R5 on random TCP ports.
Configure R1 so that when the number of half open
connections exceeds 1000 it will start dropping the oldest
partial connection. When the number of connections drops
below 500 normal behavior should resume.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Mitigate Man in the Middle attack
T a s k 8 . 1 6
Although there are already configurations in place to
defeat man in the middle attacks, SMTP between the loopback
addresses of R3 and R4 is critical to the company. Ensure
that this traffic cannot be viewed or tampered with in
transit, even if an attacker has physical access to the
switch between the devices.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against port redirection
attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 7
R2 has been compromised from the outside and is taking part
in a port redirection attack against internal hosts. Review
the ASA configuration and determine why the port
redirection is possible. Correct the configuration so that
port redirection is not allowed.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against DNS attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 8
R2 is an older DNS server that uses a weak randomization
algorithm for DNS transaction ID. Configure the ASA to
inspect DNS and better randomize the transaction ID for DNS
coming from the outside to R2.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against Smurf attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 9
You suspect R1 might be configured to allow your network to
be used as an intermediary in a smurf attack. Review the
configuration and correct it.
Network Attacks Solutions
Identify and protect against fragmentation attacks
T a s k 8 . 1
A network beyond R5 is launching fragmentation based
attacks against the network. Drop non-initial fragments
incoming on R1 but allow all other traffic to pass.
Non-initial fragments can be matched and permitted or
denied in an ACL with the fragments keyword. Remember
that your ACL needs a permit statement to allow non-
fragmented traffic to be permitted.
R1(config)#access-list 101 deny ip any any fragments
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R1(config)#access-list 101 permit ip any any
R1(config-if)#ip access-group 101 in
T a s k 8 . 2
Hosts behind R4 are particularly vulnerable to
fragmentation attacks. Drop all fragments incoming to R4.
Do not use an access list to accomplish this.
Virtual reassembly is normally used with IOS firewall
features to set limits on reassembling packets for
inspection. However you can also block all fragments using
ip virtual reassembly with the drop-fragments keyword.
R4(config)#int fa0/0
R4(config-if)#ip virtual-reassembly drop-fragments
T a s k 8 . 3
Some fragments must be allowed from the internal network to
the outside, but to cut down on fragmentation attacks,
configure the ASA to only allow a maximum of 12 fragments
per IP packet.
The ASA can set limits on the number of fragments allowed
per whole IP packet. It is 24 by default but you can set it
lower or higher with the fragment chain command. Setting
this to 1 means fragmentation will not be allowed. You can
also set this per interface as we will do in this task.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA(config)# fragment chain 12 inside
Identify and protect against malicious IP option
usage
T a s k 8 . 4
A network beyond R5 is launching an IP option based attack.
Configure R1 to drop all IP option traffic.
IP Options can be dropped at a router with the ip options
drop command. You will receive a warning about protocols
that use IP options not working as expected.
R1(config)#ip options drop
% Warning: RSVP and other protocols that use IP Options packets
may not function as expected.
Identify and protect against network reconnaissance
attacks
T a s k 8 . 5
You believe an attacker from the outside is trying to gain
information about your network by scanning internal hosts.
Configure the ASA to detect this behavior and shun the
attacker for half an hour if detected.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Scanning threats can be detected and/or blocked with the
threat-detection command. Use the shun option with a
duration to block for a specified amount of time in
seconds.
ASA(config)# threat-detection scanning-threat shun duration 1800
T a s k 8 . 6
You think the attacker may have been scanning because you
are allowing too much information to the outside. ICMP and
telnet should only be allowed incoming from R1 and FTP
should only be allowed from anywhere to R2. Review the ASA
configuration and correct the access allowed.
Network attacks often occur because administrators dont
use the principal of least access. Only the least amount of
access needed for a network to function should be allowed.
Anything else leaves the door open for attacks. In this
case we know what access is needed. Now we will look at the
current configuration to see what is allowed.
ASA# sho run access-list
access-list outside extended permit icmp any any
access-list outside extended permit tcp any any eq telnet
access-list outside extended permit tcp any any eq ftp
This allows our network to function, but it is too
permissive. We need to first remove these ACL entries.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA(config)# no access-list outside extended permit icmp any any
ASA(config)# no access-list outside extended permit tcp any any
eq telnet
ASA(config)# no access-list outside extended permit tcp any any
eq ftp
And then add only the access needed. Since we removed the
entire ACL we need to re-apply the new one to the outside
interface.
ASA(config)# access-list outside extended permit icmp host
24.234.1.1 any
ASA(config)# access-list outside extended permit tcp host
24.234.1.1 any eq telnet
ASA(config)# access-list outside extended permit tcp any host
172.16.0.2 eq ftp
ASA(config)# access-group outside in interface outside
Identify and protect against IP spoofing attacks
T a s k 8 . 7
R1 is connected to the internet via R5. Configure R1 to
drop incoming packets sourced with the RFC 1918 addresses
on the internet facing interface.
RFC 1918 addresses are set aside for private network use.
They should never come in from the internet and can be
blocked with an ACL. We already have an ACL present on the
internet facing interface (s0/0/0) so we first need to
remove our permit IP any any statement so the deny
statements will function. After the RFC 1918 addresses are
denied the permit statement can be re-applied.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 1 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R1(config)#no access-list 101 permit ip any any
R1(config)#access-list 101 deny ip 192.168.0.0 0.0.255.255 any
R1(config)#access-list 101 deny ip 172.16.0.0 0.15.255.255 any
R1(config)#access-list 101 deny ip 10.0.0.0 0.255.255.255 any
R1(config)#access-list 101 permit ip any any
T a s k 8 . 8
You believe that a user inside your network is launching
attacks against internet hosts using spoofed source IPs.
Configure the ASA so that it will verify incoming packets
originated from the internal networks.
This is done with the ip verify reverse-path command. The
ASA will check that the source address of a packet is
reachable via the interface this command is configured for.
If it is not, that packet will be dropped.
ASA(config)# ip verify reverse-path interface inside
Identify and protect against MAC spoofing and
flooding attacks
T a s k 8 . 9
You suspect that a user on port fa0/10 of SW1 is spoofing
mac addresses. Configure SW1 to learn the hosts real mac
address, enter it in the running config and disable the
port if additional mac addresses are seen.
This is done with the switchport port-security command.
By default the max number of mac addresses allowed per port
is 1. The default is to disable the port. The sticky
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
option enters the learned mac address into the running
config of the switch.
SW1(config)#interface fa0/10
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security mac-address sticky
T a s k 8 . 1 0
There is a hub attached to port fa0/11 of SW1. The number
of devices on the hub varies from 5 to 10 depending on who
is in the office that day. One of the users is attempting
to flood the CAM table of the switch. Configure SW1 so that
the necessary number of devices will be allowed but the
port will be shutdown if CAM table flooding occurs.
In this case multiple mac addresses are allowable since
there is a hub attached to the port. However we should
never see more than 10 mac addresses on the port. Well
need to use port-security again, but set the maximum
allowable mac addresses to 10.
SW1(config)#interface fa0/11
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security
SW1(config-if)#switchport port-security maximum 10
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 1
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against DHCP attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 1
The ACS server is setup as a DHCP server for VLAN 1.
Configure SW1 so that ONLY the ACS server port can respond
to DCHP requests on VLAN 1. Any other port that attempts to
respond should be shutdown.
This is done with DHCP snooping. It allows you to set a
port as trusted. Only trusted ports will be able to respond
to DHCP requests. First DHCP snooping must be enabled
globally, then for specific VLANs, and finally a port is
set as trusted.
SW1(config)#ip dhcp snooping
SW1(config)#ip dhcp snooping vlan 1
SW1(config)#int fa0/24
SW1(config-if)#ip dhcp snooping trust
You can verify your DHCP snooping configuration with show
ip dhcp snooping.
SW1#sho ip dhcp snooping
Switch DHCP snooping is enabled
DHCP snooping is configured on following VLANs:
1
DHCP snooping is operational on following VLANs:
1
DHCP snooping is configured on the following L3 Interfaces:
Insertion of option 82 is enabled
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 2
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
circuit-id format: vlan-mod-port
remote-id format: MAC
Option 82 on untrusted port is not allowed
Verification of hwaddr field is enabled
Verification of giaddr field is enabled
DHCP snooping trust/rate is configured on the following
Interfaces:
Interface Trusted Rate limit (pps)
------------------------ ------- ----------------
FastEthernet0/24 yes unlimited
Identify and protect against ARP spoofing attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 2
Configure SW1 so that ARP spoofing is not possible on VLAN
1.
One of the benefits of DHCP snooping is that it creates a
mac to IP binding database. Dynamic ARP inspection (DAI)
can then be used to verify a valid mac to ip binding before
allowing the ARP packet.
SW1(config)#ip arp inspection vlan 1
Identify and protect against VLAN hopping attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 3
Port fa0/19 on SW1 is designated for use as a trunk link.
Its current configuration is vulnerable to VLAN hopping.
Configure port fa0/19 so this is not possible.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 3
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
By default switchports are set to negotiate their mode to
either access or trunk links depending on the neighbor.
Its possible to connect a rouge switch or a PC emulating
trunking. Also, fa0/19 is using the default native VLAN of
1 which is used as a data VLAN in our lab. This allows for
possible double tagging to VLAN hop. To eliminate the
possibility of VLAN hopping, force fa0/19 to always be a
trunk link and set the native VLAN to one unused by regular
traffic.
SW1(config)#interface fa0/19
SW1(config-if)#switchport trunk encapsulation dot1q
SW1(config-if)#switchport mode trunk
SW1(config-if)#switchport trunk native vlan 10
Identify and protect against Denial of Service
(DoS) attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 4
A specially crafted internet worm has infected your
network. Multiple hosts from the inside are leaving half
open connections to the FTP server on R2. Configure the ASA
to limit the number of half open connections to 1000. Do
this without using a NAT statement or ACL.
Although the ASA can limit half open connections using a
NAT statement sometimes you are not using NAT to go from
one internal network to another. In this case it can be
done from within a policy map.
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 4
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
ASA(config)# class-map FTP
ASA(config-cmap)# match port tcp eq ftp
ASA(config-cmap)# policy-map FTP
ASA(config-pmap)# class FTP
ASA(config-pmap-c)# inspect ftp
ASA(config-pmap-c)# set connection embryonic-conn-max 1000
ASA(config-pmap-c)# service-policy FTP interface inside
T a s k 8 . 1 5
Hosts on the internal network are infected with a worm.
They are attempting to syn flood R5 on random TCP ports.
Configure R1 so that when the number of half open
connections exceeds 1000 it will start dropping the oldest
partial connection. When the number of connections drops
below 500 normal behavior should resume.
This is done with TCP intercept. The max-incomplete high is
the number of half open connections that must be exceeded
to trigger aggressive mode. The max-incomplete low is the
number that half open connections must fall below for
normal behavior to resume.
R1(config)#access-list 105 permit tcp any host 24.234.0.5
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept list 105
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept max-incomplete high 1000
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 5
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R1(config)#ip tcp intercept max-incomplete low 500
command accepted, interfaces with mls configured might cause
inconsistent behavior
Mitigate Man in the Middle attack
T a s k 8 . 1 6
Although there are already configurations in place to
defeat man in the middle attacks, SMTP between the loopback
addresses of R3 and R4 is critical to the company. Ensure
that this traffic cannot be viewed or tampered with in
transit, even if an attacker has physical access to the
switch between the devices.
Weve already configured DHCP snooping, dynamic arp
inspection and port-security on our network. However an
attacker with physical access to the switch (such as IT
staff) could still perform a MITM attack or simply
duplicate and view the traffic with a SPAN port.
To defeat this you can treat your internal network as
untrusted and encrypt the specific traffic you need to
protect. First well configure R3. (ICMP included for
testing)
R3(config)#crypto isakmp policy 10
R3(config-isakmp)#encryption aes
R3(config-isakmp)#hash sha
R3(config-isakmp)#authentication pre-share
R3(config-isakmp)#exit
R3(config)#crypto isakmp key 0 cisco address 192.168.2.4
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 6
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
R3(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set R4_SMTP esp-aes esp-sha-
hmac
R3(cfg-crypto-trans)#exit
R3(config)#access-list 101 permit tcp host 3.3.3.3 host 4.4.4.4
eq smtp
R3(config)#access-list 101 permit icmp host 3.3.3.3 host 4.4.4.4
R3(config)#crypto map R4_SMTP 10 ipsec-isakmp
% NOTE: This new crypto map will remain disabled until a peer
and a valid access list have been configured.
R3(config-crypto-map)#set peer 192.168.2.4
R3(config-crypto-map)#match address 101
R3(config-crypto-map)#set transform-set R4_SMTP
R3(config-crypto-map)#exit
R3(config)#int fa0/0
R3(config-if)#crypto map R4_SMTP
Then R4
R4(config)#crypto isakmp policy 10
R4(config-isakmp)#encryption aes
R4(config-isakmp)#hash sha
R4(config-isakmp)#authentication pre-share
R4(config-isakmp)#exit
R4(config)#crypto isakmp key 0 cisco address 192.168.2.3
R4(config)#crypto ipsec transform-set R3_SMTP esp-aes esp-sha-
hmac
R4(cfg-crypto-trans)#exit
R4(config)#access-list 101 permit tcp host 4.4.4.4 host 3.3.3.3
eq smtp
R4(config)#access-list 101 permit icmp host 4.4.4.4 host 3.3.3.3
R4(config)#crypto map R3_SMTP 10 ipsec-isakmp
% NOTE: This new crypto map will remain disabled until a peer
and a valid access list have been configured.
R4(config-crypto-map)#set peer 192.168.2.3
R4(config-crypto-map)#match address 101
R4(config-crypto-map)#set transform-set R3_SMTP
R4(config-crypto-map)#exit
R4(config)#int fa0/0
R4(config-if)#crypto map R3_SMTP
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 7
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Now verify the tunnel works, in this case with a ping. The
ping should be successful and the ipsec sa should show
packets encrypted and decrypted.
R4#ping 3.3.3.3 source loopback 0
Type escape sequence to abort.
Sending 5, 100-byte ICMP Echos to 3.3.3.3, timeout is 2 seconds:
Packet sent with a source address of 4.4.4.4
!!!!!
Success rate is 100 percent (5/5), round-trip min/avg/max =
1/2/4 ms
R4#sho crypto ipsec sa
interface: FastEthernet0/0
Crypto map tag: R3_SMTP, local addr 192.168.2.4
protected vrf: (none)
local ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(4.4.4.4/255.255.255.255/1/0)
remote ident (addr/mask/prot/port):
(3.3.3.3/255.255.255.255/1/0)
current_peer 192.168.2.3 port 500
PERMIT, flags={origin_is_acl,}
#pkts encaps: 10, #pkts encrypt: 10, #pkts digest: 10
#pkts decaps: 10, #pkts decrypt: 10, #pkts verify: 10
#pkts compressed: 0, #pkts decompressed: 0
#pkts not compressed: 0, #pkts compr. failed: 0
#pkts not decompressed: 0, #pkts decompress failed: 0
#send errors 15, #recv errors 0
Identify and protect against port redirection
attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 7
R2 has been compromised from the outside and is taking part
in a port redirection attack against internal hosts. Review
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 8
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
the ASA configuration and determine why the port
redirection is possible. Correct the configuration so that
port redirection is not allowed.
Port redirection exploits trust relationships. An outside
host may not have access directly to an internal host, but
does have access to a DMZ host. If the DMZ host has access
to the inside and is exploited, the attacker uses it as a
jump off point to attack the inside.
This is often only possible because the DMZ host has more
access to the inside network than it needs. This violates
the concept of least access. First well review the DMZ ACL
to see what might be wrong.
ASA# sho run access-list dmz
access-list dmz extended permit icmp any any
access-list dmz extended permit tcp any any eq telnet
access-list dmz extended permit tcp any any eq www
access-list dmz extended permit tcp any any eq ftp
The access list allows DMZ hosts fairly broad access to the
inside network. Since the task made no mention of specific
access needed to the inside by DMZ hosts, it is best to
apply the principal of least access and completely remove
the ACL. This will mean the interface security level will
take over and the DMZ will not be able to initiate any
traffic to the inside.
ASA(config)# clear configure access-list dmz
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 2 9
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against DNS attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 8
R2 is an older DNS server that uses a weak randomization
algorithm for DNS transaction ID. Configure the ASA to
inspect DNS and better randomize the transaction ID for DNS
coming from the outside to R2.
This will involve the id-randomization parameter within a
DNS policy map type inspect. The policy map type inspect is
then nested within a L3/4 policy map which is applied to
the outside interface.
ASA(config)# policy-map type inspect dns R2_DNS
ASA(config-pmap)# parameters
ASA(config-pmap-p)# id-randomization
ASA(config-pmap-p)# exit
ASA(config-pmap)# exit
ASA(config)# access-list R2_DNS permit tcp any host 172.16.0.2
eq 53
ASA(config)# access-list R2_DNS permit udp any host 172.16.0.2
eq 53
ASA(config)# class-map R2_DNS
ASA(config-cmap)# match access-list R2_DNS
ASA(config-cmap)# exit
ASA(config)# policy-map R2_DNS_L4
ASA(config-pmap)# class R2_DNS
ASA(config-pmap-c)# inspect dns R2_DNS
ASA(config-pmap-c)# exit
ASA(config-pmap)# exit
ASA(config)# service-policy R2_DNS_L4 interface outside
For questions: www.securityie.com
s.f.wb.09.04.sm.r08.09.07.doc
5 3 0
www.ccbootcamp.com Toll Free 877.654.2243 sales@ccbootcamp.com
Copyright 2009, Network Learning, Incorporated
Identify and protect against Smurf attacks
T a s k 8 . 1 9
You suspect R1 might be configured to allow your network to
be used as an intermediary in a smurf attack. Review the
configuration and correct it.
Smurf attacks rely on directed broadcasts, so that is the
configuration well be looking for.
R1#sho run int fa0/0
Building configuration...
Current configuration : 118 bytes
!
interface FastEthernet0/0
ip address 24.234.1.1 255.255.255.0
ip directed-broadcast
duplex auto
speed auto
end
IP directed-broadcast is off by default but can be
enabled for specific purposes. Since we are concerned with
possible smurf attacks well disable it.
R1(config)#int fa0/0
R1(config-if)#no ip directed-broadcast