Sie sind auf Seite 1von 153

International Student Guide Postgraduate 2012

Global Education + Global Networks = Global Opportunities

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Contents

INTRODUCTION 4 6 8 Why students select UNSW Sydney Where will I study?

COURSEWORK PROGRAMS 14 Coursework programs summary table 24 Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences 34 Australian School of Business 46 Faculty of Built Environment 52 COFA 59 Faculty of Engineering 76 Faculty of Law 82 Faculty of Medicine 90 Faculty of Science

RESEARCH PROGRAMS 102 Research at UNSW 104 Research programs summary table 112 Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences 114 Australian School of Business 116 Faculty of Built Environment 118 COFA 120 Faculty of Engineering 122 Faculty of Law 124 Faculty of Medicine 130 Faculty of Science

GENERAL INFORMATION 134 English language requirements 135 UNSW Institute of Languages 136 What do I need to know? 138 Daily life 139 Student organisations and sport and recreation 140 A place to live 142 Representative offices 144 Applying to study at UNSW 146 Scholarships 147 Application forms 151 Where can I find information? 151 Useful websites

10 Studying at UNSW 12 Tuition fees and other study costs

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Why students select UNSW


The University of New South Wales (UNSW), Australias first international university, provides a dynamic learning environment across nine faculties. UNSW is highly recognised internationally and is ranked as the 46th university in the world and 35th in the world for employer satisfaction of graduates.

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) is a major force in Australian tertiary education and occupies a premier position in the Asia-Pacific region as a dynamic source of innovative teaching and research. Established in 1949, UNSW works closely with industry, business and public research bodies nationally and internationally to ensure programs are relevant to todays fast-paced and ever-changing world. Teaching and research are core activities of UNSW and, should you decide to study for your degree with us, you will be joining a university which is: committed to providing excellent service and facilities for international students ranked 46th in the world in the 2010 QS World University Rankings recognised as the top university in Australia for teaching and learning in the latest Australian Federal Governments Learning and Teaching Performance Fund ranked Australias 4th most research-intensive university in the Australian Research Councils 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia Report a member of the prestigious Group of Eight (Go8), leading teaching and research universities in Australia a member of Universitas 21, a consortium of the worlds leading research universities from Asia, Europe and North America and consistently ranked in the top 50 universities in the world a major recipient of competitive research grants from industry and government bodies such as the Australian Research Council ranked in the top band of Australian universities by the Australian Governments Committee for Quality Assurance in Higher Education continually striving to cultivate global alliances to enhance the quality of the educational experience for students and staff proud to contribute to Australia and the Asia-Pacific region through research and scholarship has achieved 5 star ratings in 8 key performance indicators in the 2011 Australian Good Universities Guide determined to strengthen its position as a leading international university with world-renowned academics and world-class facilities. Our international students come from over 120 countries and we welcome their contribution to academic and social life at UNSW. Come and join the vibrant intellectual research and cultural hub of UNSW.

UNSW prepares graduates for global career opportunities and challenges

The Universitys founding motto of Scientia Manu et Mente (Knowledge by Hand and Mind) is at the core of todays dynamic and contemporary institution. UNSWs drive for innovation and excellence remains the cornerstone of its world-class ranking and reputation. UNSW aims to attract the best students and provide national and international opportunities for graduates as global citizens of high standard. In todays professional environment, all graduates benefit from a global outlook. A degree from UNSW is recognised worldwide and, through one of Australias largest international exchange programs, we offer opportunities for study in the Asia-Pacific region, North America, Latin America, South Africa and Europe. Many UNSW graduates have become leaders in government, business, research and industry and our graduates enjoy the highest median starting salaries in Australia*.
*UNSW Australian Graduate Survey 2010

Students who select UNSW are seeking: top starting salaries fast-track career advancement a passport to the best jobs in Australia and internationally an international study environment connections to a vast and influential global alumni network a blend of applied and theoretical teaching to study in some of the top-ranked faculties in Australia an education alongside other highly-motivated students lectures taught by some of the leading academics in their field in Australia and also internationally an enriching student and cultural experience.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Alumni

UNSW graduates are an integral and vital part of our community and the UNSW Alumni Relations Office offers a range of services and opportunities for you to remain connected with the University. There are over 220,000 alumni living in more than 130 countries around the world providing an outstanding global network. Many UNSW alumni work throughout the world in prominent positions including in the professions of commerce, government, and academic life. Prominent alumni include CEO of Suntech Power Dr Shi Zhengrong, award-winning animator Phillip To, High Court Judge His Honour Justice Barnabas Fung, founder of Red Med Inc Dr Peter Farrell AM and co-founder of the Octopus Group Elaine Teh. As an alumnus of UNSW we trust that your relationship with the University continues in a variety of ways, enhancing your personal and professional network, and keeping you informed of developments at the University. In Australia, alumni enjoy special lectures on campus as well as reunions, social and professional events. There are networks in China, Hong Kong, Malaysia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam, the United Kingdom, the United States and Indonesia offering alumni the opportunity to meet other alumni wherever you may be. UNSW alumni also have access to online communities through UNSWorld Online, Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter and our own Alumni Community which caters more specifically to the global alumni network. The UNSWorld Online community website provides access to an online directory, job board, discussion groups and profile pages. Staying connected with UNSW is also a great way to ensure you receive the alumni magazine, UNSWorld, which is published twice a year and is available as an e-magazine. All alumni are also eligible to receive a lifelong alumni email address and activate a zmail account upon graduation. This is a great way to receive updates, invitations and publications wherever you may be. For more information on alumni activities and services visit: www.alumni.unsw.edu.au

Facts and Figures


Faculties Arts and Social Sciences Australian School of Business Built Environment COFA Engineering Law Medicine Science UNSW@ADFA Faculty Profiles Schools Research Centres Principal Teaching Hospitals Institutes Study Programs Student Enrolments (2010) International Students (2010) Staff (2010 Full-Time Equivalent) Total Degrees Awarded (1949 - 2008) Alumni International Students at UNSW North Asia South-East Asia Americas Europe Africa Sub-Continent/Middle East Pacific Other

66 90 4 11 740 52,582 14,607 5,107 232,021 >220,000 14,607 7,056 3,081 658 691 94 1,180 78 1,769

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Sydney
Sydney, Australias largest and most dynamic city, is a vibrant and ever-changing urban centre. Ranked as one of the worlds most liveable cities according to The Economists Global Liveability Report 2010, Sydney is exciting and cosmopolitan with a lifestyle that has a flavour like no other city in the world.
Located on the south-east coast of Australia, Sydney is the gateway to Australia and home to over four million people. Sydney is also one of the worlds most multicultural cities, where you can experience the food, entertainment and customs of the worlds many cultures. It is the principal port of call for international airlines operating in Australia and offers more entertainment, shopping and sightseeing than any other Australian city. Frequent major cultural and sporting events, thousands of eateries and restaurants from many different cultures, excellent shopping options, an exciting and diverse nightlife, and weekly markets of all sorts make living in Sydney a truly varied experience.

Friendly People

Australians are typically friendly and easy to get along with. They come from culturally diverse backgrounds that range from Anglo-Saxon and European cultures to Asian, South American, African and Middle Eastern cultures. Partly because of this diverse cultural background, Australians are very accepting of the cultures of others. Indeed, Australians celebrate their differences and enjoy learning about the culture, religions and customs of visitors and their fellow Australians. Currently over 50 per cent of Sydney residents were either born outside Australia or have at least one parent born overseas.

A Mild Climate

There are four seasons in Sydney. Summer is from December to February, Autumn from March to May, Winter from June to August, and Spring from September to November. January and February are the hottest months in Sydney. There is no wet season and rainfall in Sydney is usually spread evenly through the year. Sydneys winters are mild. Sydneys warm and sunny climate lends itself to a healthy outdoor lifestyle. The city is surrounded by pristine sandy beaches, national parks and mountain ranges so you can enjoy swimming, hiking and camping.

6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au www.international.unsw.edu.au

www.international.unsw.edu.au www.international.unsw.edu.au

7 7

Where will I study?


UNSW Kensington campus
< Bronte Beach < To Bondi Beach Coogee Beach Maroubra Beach

Randwick Village

Royal Randwick Racecourse

A To the
o th <T eC ity

irport >

UNSW Campuses
Kensington campus: www.unsw.edu.au Paddington campus: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au Canberra campus: www.unsw.adfa.edu.au

UNSW has two campuses in Sydney and also a campus in the capital of Australia, Canberra.
Northern Territory Queensland Western Australia South Australia New South Wales

Sydney Kensington campus Paddington campus


Victoria

Canberra Canberra campus

Tasmania

Campus Tour: To take a virtual tour of UNSW campuses visit http://studentlife.unsw.edu.au/

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Bri dg

Prime Ministers residence

rbo

ur

Bradleys Head
Fort Denison

Ha

Sydney

BALMAIN

DARLIN

G ST

THE ROCKS
rb Darling Ha our

Sydney Opera House


Circular Quay Royal Botanic Gardens

Mrs Macquaries Chair DARLING POINT


Rushcutters Bay

PORT JACKSON

GEORGE ST

BRIDGE ST

CBD

Sydney Town Hall

CHINATOWN
IS RR HA
PIT

WILLIA

M ST

Railway Square

Taylor Square

St Vincents Hospital

Royal Sydney Golf Course

TS

PADDINGTON
OX FO RD

Central Station
ST

CU

ELIZABE TH ST

RPA Hospital

CLEVEL

AND ST

Sydney Football Stadium E QUE


CROWN ST

MO OR EP ARK RD

N ST

RL

NEWTOWN
N G

Sydney Cricket Ground


DOWLI NG ST

BONDI
BONDI JUNCTION
Bondi Beach Ben Buckler

WIL

SON

ST

ST

Fox Studios Centennial Park

RAG

T AN S

KI

BIRREL

L ST

SOUTH

U BO

RK

ST

Moore Park

DARLE

Y RD

BO

BOT ANY

HILD

RD

LL

RD

AVE

UR

RD

AN

BE

EU

KE

ST

CA

ST ON

Sydney Park
MP

Randwick Racecourse
RD

RD

UN

CLOVEL LY RD

HSC

OR

Australian Golf Course

RANDWICK

ALISO

N RD

ARDEN

SW

ST

AL IS

>B

on

di

a Be

ch

m 15

inu

tes
Tamarama Beach Bronte Beach

MACPH

ERSO

N ST

ROT

KENSINGTON

Clovelly Beach Gordons Bay Coogee Beach

IO

HW Y

GARDE

NERS

RD

Ai
International Terminal Domestic Terminal

rt rpo

AVOC

>U

W NS

CE

A ST

-1

IN

nu mi

tes

PW Hospital

COOG

EE BA Y RD

KINGSFORD

COOGEE

OL DS OU T
BLAIR ST

Queen Victoria Building


EB GL E PT RD

NE WS

OUTH

HEAD RD

EW

IS

HH
ST

EA

GE

Sydney Aquarium

Double Bay

D
ON BR TE RD

RD

ANZ

AC

Rose Bay

BRID

TT WA S LE T

ST

AY ILW RA

OCE AN S T

CBD

> UN SW 20 m

KIN GS T
CA NA LR D

inute s

D NR

PR

Place of interest Open Space Railway with station Underground railway Major road Minor road
Maroubra Beach

BUNNER ONDG RD

ANZAC

Kingsford-Smith Airport

N Eastlakes TWO RT Golf Course H

PARADE

MAROUBRA

MARO

UBRA

1KM

E AV

RD

Kensington campus

The main campus is located at Kensington, an inner south-eastern suburb of Sydney. It is conveniently linked to all the major city transport hubs. It is 15 minutes by bus from Sydneys main train station, Central Railway Station, in the city and only 15 minutes from Sydney International Airport. It is also easily accessible from the nearby seaside suburbs of Bondi, Bronte, Clovelly, Coogee and Maroubra. The UNSW Kensington campus could be mistaken for a small city. Aside from providing excellent and modern teaching and research facilities, UNSW offers a myriad of opportunities for recreation and social life. Modern buildings, attractive grounds, extensive sporting and recreational facilities complement the Universitys essential quality - our reputation for teaching, research and scholarship. On the main campus in Kensington there are seven Faculties of study: Arts and Social Sciences, Australian School of Business, Built Environment, Engineering, Law, Medicine, and Science.

Paddington campus

COFA is located at Paddington, only minutes from the UNSW main campus. COFA is in close proximity to the citys art galleries and the emerging IT and design hubs of Sydney in Surry Hills and East Sydney. COFA is one of the largest art, design and media schools in Australia, with a reputation to match. COFA provides first-class student and staff amenities, in particular a specialist library, four computing laboratories, the COFASpace Gallery, and the Kudos Gallery which is managed by the COFA Students Association. The COFA campus will be redeveloped over the next two years. At the end of the project, COFA will be home to a world-class art and design gallery, new technologically advanced computer laboratories, extensive fine art and design studio spaces, new cafs and landscaped communal grounds.

Canberra campus

The UNSW Canberra campus, known as UNSW@ADFA, is located at the Australian Defence Force Academy in Canberra, Australias capital city. Undergraduate education for future leaders of the Australian Defence Force is provided on this campus. UNSW@ADFA also offers opportunities to international students for postgraduate study and research. The campus has the best student-to-teacher ratio among Australian universities and the best academic staff in their respective fields. It is located a few kilometres from Canberras city centre and includes a large and comprehensive library, media resources service, and the latest technology and computing facilities.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Studying at UNSW
UNSW students are encouraged to excel. Teaching staff require from their students strong commitment, enthusiastic participation and dedicated study throughout the academic year. Put simply, the aim is to train the best and most well equipped graduates who will be keenly sought after by employers around the world.
Teaching Methods Semester 2 entry

Teaching methods at university may be different from those commonly used at secondary school. At university rote learning or memorising information is generally considered less important. Students must understand and apply concepts and theories, and be able to critically examine arguments. In Australia, students are expected to participate in class discussion, and to ask questions if they do not understand. It is not considered bad manners for students to express views different from those of their teachers. Many lecturers and tutors deliberately provoke discussion and argument to shed more light on a subject. A variety of teaching methods are employed across and within the Faculties. Individual Faculty websites provide more detail on what can be expected when studying at UNSW. A course outline is provided to all students at the beginning of each course. This indicates how the course is to be structured, what the work requirements will be and how the course will be assessed. Tutors, lecturers and Faculty-based academic advisers are willing to discuss, either in class or individually, any problems students may have in understanding lectures and discussions, writing essays and preparing for exams.

Many programs can be started in Semester 2. Because of timetable and prerequisite restrictions it may mean the initial order of courses is different than if commencing in Semester 1 and it may not be possible to complete in minimum time. In some cases, for example, a student commencing a Science degree in Semester 2 may be required to complete Summer Semester studies in first or second year in order to finish within the minimum time. Applicants granted advanced standing or credit transfer may be able to commence their studies in Semester 2 even for programs which do not usually offer Semester 2 entry. If you have any questions about Semester 2 entry please contact the relevant Faculty for further details.

Facilities

Over the last five years, the physical environment of UNSW has undergone significant redevelopment. The campus is continually being upgraded to ensure that the teaching and learning environment is one of the best in Australia. Each Faculty has the responsibility to provide appropriate facilities required for each program and course. Typical facilities common to all Faculties include lecture theatres, tutorial spaces and computer laboratories. Specialist facilities such as design studios, video production equipment, computer design equipment and studios are provided for design programs offered by the Faculty of Built Environment and the College of Fine Arts. Engineering and Science programs have appropriate laboratory space and equipment. The Faculty of Law has working Legal and Law Centres and the University has a specialist Law Library. As specific facilities are too many and varied to list in full in this publication please check the relevant Faculty website for a detailed description of the facilities and services provided. www.facilities.unsw.edu.au

Assessment

Assessment methods vary from program to program and course to course. End-of-year and mid-year examinations are still important in many courses. A students progress may be assessed throughout the year by set written work, essays, participation in class discussions, practical work, presentations and short tests (continuous assessment). In some courses students may be able to choose the means by which their work will be assessed and the relative importance of essays and exams in determining their final marks. Continued progression will depend on results achieved and is considered at the end of each semester by Faculty authorities.

Full-time study

The Library

If you are studying on a student visa it is a requirement that you progress your studies satisfactorily at normal rate (full-time) to ensure completion within the specified duration of your student visa. UNSW defines normal full-time enrolment as 18 to 24 units of credit (UOC) per semester. You are encouraged to enrol in 24 UOC per semester to ensure standard progression and completion of your program within the duration as stated in your Confirmation of Enrolment (CoE). If your study load is less than a 24 UOC full-time load you may risk not completing your program within the expected duration as specified on your CoE. In this situation, you may need to catch up by either studying courses during a non-compulsory study period, or by undertaking additional subjects in compulsory study periods (that is, enrolling in more than 24 UOC) to compensate.

The UNSW Library is one of Australias leading university libraries. The Librarys collection is available in three locations: Main Library and Freehills Law Library, Kensington campus, and the COFA (College of Fine Arts) Library, Paddington. The collection contains approximately 2.7 million items and subscribes to over 42,000 e-journal titles and 100,000 e-book titles. Students at both undergraduate and postgraduate levels benefit from flexible access to a range of resources and tailored services, including customised consultations. The Library provides a modern and vibrant study environment including technology-enabled group study rooms and media booths, dedicated postgraduate spaces, and informal reading and lounge areas. Support services are provided for users with disabilities. www.library.unsw.edu.au

10

www.international.unsw.edu.au

The Learning Centre

The Learning Centre provides a wide range of academic support services to UNSW students. Assistance includes: academic skills workshops, academic English workshops, individual consultations, online study guides, and discipline-based learning and language programs. All programs are free of charge and individual consultations are completely confidential. www.lc.unsw.edu.au

Global Education Opportunities

UNSW has an exciting range of Global Education programs for students to participate in one of 40 countries across Asia, North America, Europe and South America. Participation in these programs enables you to enhance your career opportunities both in Australia and around the world. Student Exchange Program UNSW international postgraduate students are actively encouraged to spend one semester studying overseas at a partner university. Choose from over 200 partner institutions in more than 32 countries and receive credit for your studies. We also warmly welcome students from our partner institutions. Postgraduate students may participate in a student exchange program if their degree is three semesters or more in duration. www.international.unsw.edu.au/outbound-exchanges/your-options/ student-exchange Other Global Education Opportunities In addition to formal Student Exchange programs there are also a range of other international education opportunities that you can choose from. If you want to experience a different culture, gain credit for your overseas study, make international connections and build important global networks consider some of these opportunities. Experiences range from: Practicum exchange: Ideal for short-term research internships at one of our partner institutions for honours or postgraduate students. http://www.international.unsw.edu.au/outbound-exchanges/your-options/ research-exchanges/ International internships: Gain work experience either locally or overseas in an international company in your field of study. www.international.unsw.edu.au/outbound-exchanges/your-options/ international-internships International volunteering: Volunteering abroad is the perfect way to immerse yourself in new cultures, meet new people and to make a difference. Prospective employers value the skills you acquire, as you demonstrate that you have interests, aptitudes and personal skills beyond your studies. www.international.unsw.edu.au/outbound-exchanges/your-options/ international-volunteering International short courses: Take advantage of the short courses offered at our partner universities during your summer or winter break. www.international.unsw.edu.au/outbound-exchanges/your-options/ international-short-courses

UNSW Careers and Employment

If you decide to study at UNSW, the Careers and Employment Office provides a range of services to assist you to develop career management skills and gain employment. All services are provided free of charge and include: Careers Online job vacancy website (part time, casual, vacation and graduate) Careers Development Workshops daily workshops on job search, career planning, resume and cover letter writing, and interview skills Career Advice Appointments career consultant available to provide assistance with career management issues and job applications Career Expos, Employer Information Sessions and Guest Workshops - network with representatives from various organisations and learn more about current opportunities International Employment program links UNSW graduates with international employers. Specific services for international students include: UNSW Professional Development Program employment skills training and the opportunity to do an internship at the University Workshops on preparing for the Australian workplace, how to find part-time and casual work and networking. www.careers.unsw.edu.au

Counselling and Psychological Services

Counselling and Psychological Services (CAPS) at UNSW provides free and confidential psychologically focused strategies to UNSW students. UNSW counsellors are registered psychologists, with many years of experience, who understand the needs of students enrolled in higher education. The service assists international students to adapt more easily to cultural and educational differences, to strive to achieve their personal best whilst at UNSW and to enhance general confidence in life and career experiences. CAPS also provides services that enhance the well-being of students and treatment for mental health and psychological issues. www.counselling.unsw.edu.au

www.international.unsw.edu.au

11

Tuition fees and other study costs

Tuition fees

Tuition fees for international students at UNSW are set at course (subject) level rather than at program level as is the case at most other Australian universities. The fees for courses reflect the relative cost of providing each type of course. As an example, Engineering and Science courses are more costly to provide than a course offered by the Faculty of Law. This means that your tuition fees will reflect your choice of courses. The Calculation of Tuition Fees table on page 13 provides details on the tuition fees for postgraduate programs available to international students, with the estimated annual fee for 2012 based on program-prescribed fulltime study loads. The tuition fees payable for each year of a study program are calculated on the basis of that years current fee as listed in the Calculation of Tuition Fees tables below. For students entering Semester 2 (July), the fees for your first semester will be calculated on the basis of the per UOC fee applicable at the time of your entry. In Semester 1 of the following year your fees will then be calculated on the tuition fees for the new academic year. Summer Semester tuition will be charged at the tuition rate of the year in which the census date falls for the enrolled course. For example, for 2012/2013 Summer Semester enrolment, any course that has a census date in December (or earlier) will be charged at the 2012 tuition rate; courses with a census date in January or later will be charged at the 2013 tuition rates. If you have an offer to study at UNSW and defer the start date into the new academic year, the tuition fees will be calculated based on the rates for the year you commence your studies. Each coursework degree program has a regulated structure, which outlines all courses to be taken in order to complete the degree. Based on that structure you can calculate your expected tuition fees until graduation. The program structure and regulations can be found in this guide or the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au
Note: If you are required to complete a course again, you must also pay the tuition fee for the course again.

Refund of fees and overpayments

All fees paid, less a A$500 administration charge, will be refunded upon request to students withdrawing before enrolment. The University may decide to waive the A$500 charge in cases where the applicant has not been granted a visa or is unable to attend because of illness. OSHC will be refunded if the money has not yet been sent by the University to its recommended provider. If the money has been sent to the recommended provider, the student will need to apply for the OSHC refund from the recommended provider directly. All fees paid will be refunded upon written request less a A$1,000 administrative charge to students who withdraw after enrolment but before the census date. This may change subject to Government legislation. In cases where a student withdraws after census date no refund of fees will be made for that semester. Any fees paid in advance for following semesters would be refunded in full. The University does not recommend fees overpayment. Overpayments made when accepting an offer or when paying tuition fees will only be returned in the case of a student withdrawing from his or her studies - less any administrative charges which may apply. For students continuing their studies any overpaid monies will be held (without interest payment) by the University for payment towards their next semester fees. Refunds will only be made in Australian dollars. A full version of the UNSW fees policy can be found at: https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/fees/FeePolicyInternational.html

Financial aid programs

UNSW is authorised to assist approved citizens of the United States (US) and Canada in extending their national student loans programs to cover tuition fees and other related expenses for UNSW programs. If you are a US or Canadian citizen and are eligible for such support please contact the UNSW International Financial Aid Office for assistance and advice on how to apply and process loan applications. The UNSW Financial Aid Office may also be able to assist UNSW students with applications for education-related private loans. For full information regarding UNSW financial aid programs, visit the UNSW International website: www.international.unsw.edu.au/courses-applying/financial or email: financialaid@unsw.edu.au
Note: US students studying Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma programs will not be eligible to apply for Title IV Stafford Loans.

When to pay your fees

If you receive an offer letter from the University the letter will contain instructions on how to accept the offer. Just after enrolling you will pay your tuition fees for your first semester less the tuition fees deposit. Payment is usually due one week after the start of semester. The fees for each subsequent semester will be due after you have confirmed enrolment at the beginning of that semester.

12

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Calculation of tuition fees

The fees listed in the tables below are tuition fees only in Australian dollars. In some programs additional costs will be incurred such as for chemistry kits, laboratory notes or field trips. Fees listed do not include living costs please refer to the Student Life and Daily Life sections for estimates of what these costs will be. Fees are charged on a semester basis at the time of enrolment and are payable by the University due date - usually the end of the first week of semester. The UNSW Confirmation of Enrolment and fee statement is available only via myUNSW access: https://my.unsw.edu.au Tuition fees for coursework programs The estimated annual fees listed in the table below only reflect the fees for a student undertaking a program-prescribed full-time study load in 2011. A standard full-time year of study at UNSW is 48 units of credit (UOC) or 24 UOC per academic semester. A program-prescribed full-time study load is the maximum UOC to be undertaken in a year or semester, which allows completion of the program in minimum time. It is usually 48 UOC per year for coursework Masters, 36 or 48 UOC per year for Graduate Diplomas, and 18 or 24 UOC per semester for Graduate Certificates. For most postgraduate coursework degrees the total UOC requirement will be fulfilled by completing courses from the Faculty offering the degree. However, in some cases it may be possible to enrol in a course from

another Faculty. In this case the fees listed could vary. They will be higher if courses with higher fees are chosen. Graduate Diplomas by Research are a combination of coursework and research, and fees can vary according to the number of UOC of research involved in the program. The following table contains the tuition fees that have been set for students commencing studies in 2011. Actual fees for 2012 will be released in 2011 and will be available at: https://my.unsw.edu.au/student/fees/TuitionFees.html Tuition fees for research programs A standard full-time year of study for research programs at UNSW is 48 units of credit (UOC) or 24 UOC in each academic semester. In some research programs, there may be a combination of coursework and research in a semester or year. Concurrent courses relevant to the research program are covered by the research tuition paid. Graduate Diplomas by Research are not classified as research degrees. They are equivalent to an undergraduate honours year and are assessed on the value of the individual courses undertaken. Tuition fees for research programs are listed below and the fees listed for 2012 are indicative only. Tuition fees are charged per UOC according to the subject classification (course identifier). Tuition fees are charged on a semester basis irrespective of when studies are commenced.

Tuition Fees for Postgraduate Coursework Programs


Faculty Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Australian School of Business Faculty of Built Environment Band 1: All coursework programs except the Master of Architecture (8143) Band 2: Master of Architecture (8143) COFA Faculty of Engineering Faculty of Law Band 1: All coursework programs except Juris Doctor (9150) Band 2: Juris Doctor (9150) Faculty of Medicine Health Management programs (8901, 8902, 5509, 7360), Public Health programs (9045, 9046, 9047, 5507, 7368), International Public Health programs (9043, 9044, 9048, 5567, 7367), Drug Development programs (9060, 5504, 7370, 5511) Band 2: Forensic Mental Health programs (9012, 5512, 7312) Faculty of Science Band 1: All coursework programs except Aviation programs (8738, 5678, 7448) Band 2: Aviation programs (8738, 5678, 7448) UNSW@ADFA 2011 (A$/UOC) $470 $675 $530 $570 $485 $645 $570 $635 $630 $695 $615 $565 $510 2012 (A$/UOC) $500 $715 $565 $605 $500 $685 $650 $680 $670 $740 $655 $600 $560
Indicative fee for 2012

Tuition Fees for Postgraduate Research Programs


Faculty Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Australian School of Business Faculty of Built Environment COFA Faculty of Engineering Faculty of Law Faculty of Medicine Band 1: Master by Research and PhDs in Public Health Band 2: All other disciplines in Medicine Faculty of Science UNSW@ADFA 2011 (A$/UOC) $460 $455 $510 $485 $635 $500 $490 $685 $615 $490
Indicative fee for 2012

2012 (A$/UOC) $490 $500 $550 $500 $675 $570 $520 $725 $655 $520

www.international.unsw.edu.au

13

Coursework programs summary table


Application deadlines are 31 October for Semester 1 (March) and 30 April for Semester 2 (July), subject to available places. Not all courses are available in every academic semester. Students who find this of particular concern should consult the Program Coordinator or School contact person prior to accepting an offer of a place. The entry requirements provided in the coursework program summary table below are a guide only and may be higher than those indicated. In all cases admission will be determined upon the receipt of an application. Cut-off scores may be increased should demand exceed the availability of places in a program. The University reserves the right to vary entry requirements to those published without further notice. Details of equivalent scores required for other accepted English language proficiency qualifications can be found on page 134 in the English Language Requirements section. Please note that regardless of UNSWs English language requirements, international applicants should be aware that they must still satisfy the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship English language requirements for visa applications. # The estimated annual tuition fees are calculated based on a program-prescribed full-time study load in 2011. To calculate the estimated tuition fee for a whole program which may spread over more than one academic year, please refer to the Calculation of Tuition Fees section on page 13. US students studying distance learning programs and courses, Graduate Certificates and Graduate Diplomas are not eligible for Title IV Stafford Loans.

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #

Semester Start

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences


Master Programs Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics (8225) 25 A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant area, such as linguistics, English or a foreign language. Applicants with a degree in another discipline will be considered on an individual basis. Preference will be given to applicants with relevant work experience. A recognised Bachelor degree and significant work and/or volunteer experience in an area appropriate to the program. A recognised Bachelor degree in the social sciences, humanities or law, with a credit average or above. Relevant work experience may be taken into account in cases where academic qualifications do not meet these requirements. Admission is limited to non-Chinese citizens or permanent residents of Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR and Taiwan. Refer to program description for more details. 1 year 48 UOC $22,560 S1 and S2

Master of Arts in Development Studies (8225) Master of Arts in International Relations (8225)

25

1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

26

$22,560

S1 and S2

Master of Arts in International Relations and Public Policy (8225) Master of Arts in Interpreting and Translation Studies (8225) Master of Arts (Extension) in Interpreting and Translation Studies (8229) Master of Arts in Advanced ChineseEnglish Translation and Interpreting (8225) Master of Arts in TESOL (8225)

26

2 years 78 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1 year 48 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

26

$22,560

S1 and S2

27

A recognised Bachelors degree or equivalent with a credit average and advanced bilingual proficiency at native or near-native level.

1.5 years 72 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

27

1 year 48 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

28

A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant area, normally with a specialisation in linguistics, English or a foreign language. Preference will be given to applicants with relevant work experience. A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant area and any requirements specific to the individual Master program chosen. A recognised Bachelor degree and relevant experience in education or training. A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with appropriate studies in the chosen relevant teaching specialisation(s). An overall IELTS score of 7.5, with a minimum score of 8.0 in speaking and listening and a minimum of 7.0 in reading and writing, or the equivalent.

1 year 48 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

Master of Arts and Master of Social Sciences (Combined) (8224) Master of Education (8910) Master of Educational Leadership (8960) Master of Teaching (Secondary) (8926)

28

2 years 96 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 1.5 years 96 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

29 30 30

$22,560 $22,560 $22,560

S1 and S2 S1 and S2 S1 only

Master of Journalism and Communication (8222)

31

A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average or above. Significant work experience may be taken into account where academic qualifications do not meet these requirements. A one page curriculum vitae must also be submitted. A recognised Bachelor degree and significant work experience in a related area. Applicants who believe they may not have the necessary work experience should contact the Program Coordinator. Applicants must submit a one to two page curriculum vitae summarising work experience and a one to two page statement that outlines reasons and interests in undertaking the program.

1 year 48 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all subtests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$22,560

S1 and S2

Master of Policy Studies (8248)

32

1 year 48 UOC

$22,560

S1 and S2

14

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$22,560 $22,560

Semester Start

Master of Public Relations and Advertising (8291) Master of Social Development (8939)

32 33

A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent qualification. A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline with a credit average or above. Applicants must have at least one year of relevant work or voluntary experience. A curriculum vitae and a two page letter providing reasons for applying must be submitted. A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with appropriate studies in the chosen relevant teaching specialisation(s).

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all subtests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

S1 and S2 S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) (5926) 31 An overall IELTS score of 7.5, with a minimum score of 8.0 in speaking and listening and a minimum of 7.0 in reading and writing, or the equivalent. 1 year 72 UOC $33,840 S1 only

Australian School of Business


Building Business Capabilities Programs Master of Commerce (8404) Master of Commerce (Extension) (8417) Master of Technology and Innovation Management (8007) Building Leadership Programs Master of Business and Technology (8616) 39 A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) plus a minimum of four years relevant professional experience, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a strong academic performance and a minimum of two years relevant professional or managerial work experience. A minimum overall GMAT score of 550 with minimum scores of verbal 25, quantative 35 and AWA 4.0 must be achieved. For additional entry requirements required refer to page 44. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a substantial component of mathematics, statistics, econometrics or actuarial studies, with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business. 3 to 6 years part time via distance learning 72 UOC 16 months full time $48,600 for full program S1 and S2 35 35 39 A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in science, engineering or technology with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1.5 years 72 UOC 2 years 96 UOC 1 year 48 UOC $32,400 $32,400 $32,400 S1 and S2 S1 and S2 S1 and S2

Master of Business Administration (AGSM MBA) (8350)

44

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$64,800 for full program

Session 1 (January)

Achieving Professional Accreditation Programs Master of Actuarial Studies (8411) Master of Actuarial Studies (Extension) (8416) Master of Professional Accounting (8409) Master of Professional Accounting (Extension) (8415) Master of Accounting and Business Information Technology (8425) Master of Economics (8412) 40 40 1.5 years 72 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 2 years 96 UOC 1.5 years 72 UOC 2 years 96 UOC $32,400 $32,400 S1 and S2 S1 and S2

40 40

$32,400 $32,400

S1 and S2 S1 and S2

Developing Business and Professional Excellence Programs 39 A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in accounting or information systems/information technology with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in economics with a credit average in the economics major and a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in finance with a credit average in the finance major and a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in finance or accounting with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business.
A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in information systems, information technology, computer science or engineering with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business plus a minimum of two years full-time relevant professional experience after completion of the relevant degree. For additional entry requirements for applicants with extensive professional experience refer to page 42.

1 year 48 UOC

$32,400

S1 and S2

41

1 year 48 UOC

$32,400

S1 only

Master of Finance (8406)

41

Master of Financial Analysis (8413)

42

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

1 year 48 UOC

$32,400

S1 and S2

1 year 48 UOC

$32,400

S1 and S2

Master of Information Systems (8407)

42

1 year 48 UOC

$32,400

S1 and S2

Master of Marketing (8414)

43

A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in commerce or business with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business plus a major in marketing and one year relevant work experience. For additional entry requirements for applicants with extensive professional experience refer to page 43.

1 year 48 UOC

$32,400

S1 and S2

www.international.unsw.edu.au

15

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year 48 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$32,400

Semester Start

Master of Risk Management (8418)

43

A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business, or a recognised Bachelor degree and extensive professional experience. For entry requirements for the program specialisations offered refer to page 43. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in law or commerce (including one course in taxation) with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Similar to those for entry into the program from which the course has been taken. It is important to note that certain courses demand prior knowledge and are, therefore, subject to prerequisites.

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

S1 and S2

Taxation Programs Master of Taxation (9250) 45 1 year 48 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent $32,400 S1 and S2

Master of Taxation Studies (9257) Single Course Study (Non-Award) (6066)

45

2 years 96 UOC 6 months by distance learning only

$32,400

S1 and S2

45

S1 and S2

Faculty of Built Environment Master Programs Master of Architecture (8143) 47 A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in architecture with a credit average or above and evidence of six months work experience. A portfolio must be submitted. Refer to page 47 for details. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree with a credit average in an appropriate discipline. Where an applicants qualifications are not considered adequate, admission may be permitted into the Graduate Diploma, with the possibility of upgrading to the Master program, subject to satisfactory performance. A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average or above in a relevant field such as building, construction management, construction economics, civil engineering, mining engineering, architecture, quantity surveying, property development or real estate. Professional experience in the construction industry of at least 12 months at a management level is essential. Students who have completed the requirements of the Master of Construction Project Management with a credit average (but have not formally graduated) may apply to upgrade to the Master of Construction Project Management in Professional Practice program. A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average or above. Where qualifications are not considered adequate, admission may be permitted to the Graduate Diploma, with the possibility of upgrading to the Master program, subject to satisfactory performance. A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average or above. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree with a credit average or above in a relevant discipline such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, urban studies, real estate economics or property development. A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average or above in a relevant discipline. Professional experience will also be considered. A recognised Bachelor degree. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 2 years 96 UOC $27,360 S1 and S2

Master of the Built Environment in Sustainable Development (8132)

47

1.5 years 72 UOC

$25,440

S1 and S2

Master of Construction Project Management (8123)

48

1 year 48 UOC

$25,440

S1 and S2

Master of Construction Project Management in Professional Practice (8124)

48

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

1.5 years 72 UOC

$25,440

S1 and S2

Master of Planning (8147)

49

1.5 years 72 UOC

$25,440

S1 and S2

Master of Property and Development (8127) Master of Urban Development and Design (8131)

49 51

1.5 years 72 UOC 1 calendar year including a summer semester 72 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

$25,440

S1 and S2

$38,160 plus S1 and S2 approximately $5,000 for field trip

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma in the Built Environment in Sustainable Development (5132) Graduate Diploma in Planning (5147) COFA Master Programs Master of Art (9307) 53 A recognised Bachelor degree or completion of the Graduate Diploma in Art (5307). An overall IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent, subject to approval of the UNSW English language proficiency waiver. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1.5 years 72 UOC $23,280 S1 and S2 48 $25,440 S1 and S2

49

1 year 48 UOC

$25,440

S1 and S2

Master of Art Administration (9302)

54

A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. Students who have a degree in areas other than the visual arts may be considered for admission, but must undertake introductory courses in art history and theory as part of their program.

1.5 years 72 UOC

$23,280

S1 and S2

16

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year 48 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$23,280

Semester Start

Master of Art and Design Education (9303)

55

A recognised Bachelor degree in visual arts teaching, design teaching, or art/design teaching with a credit average.

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. An overall IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent, subject to approval of the UNSW English language proficiency waiver. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. An overall IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent, subject to approval of the UNSW English language proficiency waiver. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. An overall IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent, subject to approval of the UNSW English language proficiency waiver. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

S1 and S2

Master of Design (9304)

56

A recognised Bachelor degree in design or related discipline. Applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission and must submit a portfolio. A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline with a credit average; and a portfolio showcasing the applicants skills in the media arts, particularly in the chosen specialisation of 3D CGI or video production. See page 57 for more details. A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average, or completion of the Graduate Diploma in CrossDisciplinary Art and Design (5309).

1.5 years 72 UOC

$23,280

S1 and S2

Master of Digital Media (9308)

57

1.5 years 72 UOC

$23,280

S2 only

Master of CrossDisciplinary Art and Design (9309)

58

1.5 years by distance learning 72 UOC

$23,280

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma in Art (5307) 54 A recognised Bachelor degree or completion of the Graduate Certificate in Art (7307). 1 year 48 UOC $23,280 S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Art Administration (5302)

55

A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. Students who have a degree in areas other than the visual arts may be considered for admission but must undertake introductory courses in art history and theory as part of their program. A recognised Bachelor degree in design or related area. Applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission and must submit a portfolio. A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline with a credit average; and a portfolio showcasing the applicants skills in the media arts, particularly in the chosen specialisation of 3D CGI or video production. A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average, or completion of the Graduate Certificate in CrossDisciplinary Art and Design (7309).

1 year 48 UOC

$23,280

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Design (5724)

57

1 year 48 UOC

$23,280

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Digital Media (5308)

58

1 year 48 UOC

$23,280

S2 only

Graduate Diploma in Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design (5309)

58

1 year by distance learning 48 UOC

$23,280

S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate Programs Graduate Certificate in Art (7307) 54 A recognised Bachelor degree. In exceptional cases, applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission. These applicants must submit a portfolio of their artwork and curriculum vitae, and undertake an interview. An overall IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent, subject to approval of the UNSW English language proficiency waiver. 6 months 24 UOC $11,640 S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate in Art Administration (7302)

55

A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. Students who have a degree in areas other than the visual arts may be considered for admission but must undertake an introductory course in art history and theory as part of their program. A recognised Bachelor degree in visual arts teaching, or design teaching, or art/design teaching with a credit average. A recognised Bachelor degree in design or related discipline. Applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission and must submit a portfolio. A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline with a credit average, and a portfolio showcasing the applicants skills in the media arts, particularly in the chosen specialisation of 3D CGI or video production. A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. In exceptional cases, applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission.

Graduate Certificate in Art and Design Education (7304) Graduate Certificate in Design (7303)

56

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

6 months 24 UOC

$11,640

S1 and S2

6 months 24 UOC 6 months 24 UOC

$11,640

S1 and S2

57

Graduate Certificate in Digital Media (7308)

58

An overall IELTS score of 6.0, with a minimum score of 5.5 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent, subject to approval of the UNSW English language proficiency waiver. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$11,640

S1 and S2

6 months 24 UOC

$11,640

S2 only

Graduate Certificate in Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design (7309)

58

6 months by distance learning 24 UOC

$11,640

S1 and S2

www.international.unsw.edu.au

17

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #

Semester Start

Faculty of Engineering Master Programs Master of Engineering Science (8538) 60 A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in an appropriate area of engineering with Honours 2/2 or equivalent or an average grade of 65% over the final two years. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in an appropriate area of engineering with Honours 1 or equivalent or an average grade of 75% over the final two years. A recognised four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree in electrical engineering or telecommunications, with a minimum overall average of 65% or equivalent. 1.5 years 72 UOC $30,960 S1 and S2

Master of Engineering Science (Extension) (8539) Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering Master of Engineering in Telecommuncations (8621) Master of Biomedical Engineering (8660) Master of Science in Food Science and Technology (8033)

60

2 years 96 UOC

$30,960

S1 and S2

71

2 years 96 UOC

$30,960

S1 and S2

72

A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering, science or medicine, with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree, Honours degree or equivalent (for example, three-year degree plus sufficient relevant industry experience) involving some basic studies in chemistry, microbiology and biochemistry. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree, Honours 1 1/2 degree or equivalent involving some basic studies in chemistry, microbiology and biochemistry with a minimum average of 75% over the final two years. A recognised four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering, science or a discipline that includes mathematics up to at least year two level, with an average grade of 65% over the final two years; a recognised three-year Bachelor degree in computer science or engineering, with an average grade of 65% over the final two years; or completion of the Graduate Diploma in Information Technology. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science with Honours 2/2 or equivalent or an average grade of 65% in performance over the final two years. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree or equivalent, involving some basic studies in chemistry, microbiology and biochemistry. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science or a discipline that included mathematics up to at least year two level, with a high credit average over the final two years; or completion of the Graduate Certificate in Computing. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science or a minimum of five years work experience in an appropriate area of engineering or science. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a science program. Subject to the approval by the Head of School, those with less formal tertiary qualifications but with relevant work experience may be admitted.

72

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

1.5 years 72 UOC 1.5 years 72 UOC

$30,960

S1 and S2

$30,960

S1 and S2

Master of Science (Extension) in Food Science and Technology (8034) Master of Mining Engineering (8058) Master of Information Technology (8543)

73

2 years 96 UOC

$30,960

S1 and S2

74

1 year 48 UOC 2 years 96 UOC

$30,960

S1 and S2

75

$30,960

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma of Engineering Science (5338) Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Engineering (5445) Graduate Diploma in Food Technology (5020) Graduate Diploma in Mine Ventilation (5045) Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering (5040) Graduate Diploma of Information Technology (5543) 60 1.5 years 60 UOC $30,960 S1 and S2

72

1 year 36 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1.5 years 60 UOC 1 year 36 UOC 1 year 36 UOC 1.5 years 72 UOC

$23,220

S1 and S2

73

$30,960

S1 and S2

74 74 75

$23,220 $23,220 $30,960

S1 and S2 S1 and S2 S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate Programs Graduate Certificate of Engineering Science (7338) Graduate Certificate in Computing (7543) 60 1 year 48 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 6 months 24 UOC $30,960 S1 and S2

75

$15,480

S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate in Food Technology (7310)

74

1 year 48 UOC

$30,960

S1 and S2

Faculty of Law Master Programs Master of Laws (9200) MBA/Master of Laws (9230) 77 78 A recognised Bachelor degree in law or equivalent qualification with a credit (65%) average. A recognised Bachelor degree in law or equivalent qualification with a credit (65%) average and a minimum of two years post degree work experience in a managerial/ professional role. Candidates are required to pass the GMAT test with a minimum score of 580. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1 year 48 UOC 2 years 144 UOC $27,360 $92,160 for full program S1 and S2 S1 and S2

18

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$27,360 $27,360

Semester Start

Master of Business Law (9231) Master of Criminal Justice and Criminology (9285) Master of Dispute Resolution (9235)

78 80

A recognised Bachelor degree in any non-law discipline with a credit (65%) average. A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline with a credit (65%) average. A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline with a credit (65%) average. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social science or humanities with a credit (65%) average. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline with a credit (65% ) average. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate at least eight years experience in the area of expertise. Candidates must also submit a study plan and curriculum vitae. See page 80 for more details. A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent qualification in any discipline other than law, or a recognised non-Australian law degree. A recognised Bachelor degree in a non-law discipline. A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline.

S1 and S2 S1 and S2

78

$27,360

S1 and S2

Master of Human Rights Law and Policy (9211) Master of International Law and International Relations (9240) Master of Legal Studies (9220)

79 79

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

$27,360 $26,160

S1 and S2 S1 and S2

80

$27,360

S1 only

Juris Doctor (9150)

80

3 years 144 UOC

$30,480

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma in Business Law (5231) Graduate Diploma in Criminal Justice and Criminology (5285) Graduate Diploma in Dispute Resolution (5235) Graduate Diploma in Applied Intellectual Property (5265) Graduate Diploma in Human Rights Law and Policy (5211) Graduate Diploma in International Law and International Relations (5760) Faculty of Medicine Master Programs Master of Medical Science in Drug Development (9060) 83 A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Relevant degrees include those in basic science or in the health professions. 3 years part time by distance learning 72 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 6 months 24 UOC 1 year full time or 2 years part-time by distance learning 48 UOC 1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning 48 UOC 1.5 years 72 UOC A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least two years work experience in a health-related field. 1.5 years 72 UOC 1.5 years 72 UOC $15,120 S1 only 78 80 1 year 36 UOC 1 year 36 UOC 1 year 36 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1 year 36 UOC $20,520 $20,520 S1 and S2 S1 and S2

78 A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social science or humanities. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social science or humanities.

$20,520

S1 and S2

79

$20,520

S1 only

79

1 year 36 UOC

$20,520

S1 and S2

79

1 year 36 UOC

$19,320

S1 and S2

Master of Health Management (8901) Master of Health Management (Extension) (8902) Master of International Public Health (9048)

84

An appropriate recognised Bachelor degree and a minimum of two years postgraduate work experience, preferably in a health-related field. Completion of the Master of Health Management (8901) or equivalent with a minimum credit average and submission of an acceptable research proposal. A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least one year of work experience in a health-related field.

$30,240

S1 and S2

84

$15,120

S1 and S2

85

$30,240

S1 and S2

Master of Public Health (9045)

86

A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least two years of work experience in a health-related field.

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$30,240

S1 and S2

Master of Public Health/ Health Management (9047) Master of International Public Health/Health Management (9044) Master of International Public Health/Public Health (9043)

87

$15,120

S1 and S2

88

$30,240

S1 and S2

88

$30,240

S1 and S2

www.international.unsw.edu.au

19

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year 48 UOC 2 years part-time by distance learning 48 UOC 2 years part time by distance learning 48 UOC 2 years part time by distance learning 48 UOC 1 year 36 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$33,360 $15,120

Semester Start

Master of Forensic Mental Health (9012) Master of Reproductive Medicine (9065)

88 89

A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. A recognised Bachelor degree.

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

S1 and S2 S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma in Drug Development (5504) 83 A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Relevant degrees include those in basic science or in the health professions. $15,120 S1 only

Graduate Diploma in Pharmaceutical Medicine (5511)

83

Entry is restricted to qualified medical practitioners having degrees requisite for registration as a medical practitioner in Australia and other jurisdictions considered of comparable standard by the Faculty of Medicine Higher Degree Committee. An appropriate recognised Bachelor degree, and two years postgraduate work experience preferably in a health-related field. A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least one year of work experience in a health-related field. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$15,120

S1 only

Graduate Diploma in Health Management (5509) Graduate Diploma in International Public Health (5567)

84

$22,680

S1 and S2

85

1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning 36 UOC 1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning 36 UOC 1 year 36 UOC 2 years part time by distance learning 36 UOC 1 year part time by distance learning 24 UOC 6 months 24 UOC 6 months full time or 1 year part time by distance learning 24 UOC 6 months full time or 1 year part time by distance learning 24 UOC 6 months full time or 1 year part time by distance learning 24 UOC 1 year part time by distance learning 24 UOC

$22,680

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Public Health (5507)

87

A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline, and at least two years of work experience in a health-related field.

$22,680

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Forensic Mental Health (5512) Graduate Diploma in Reproductive Medicine (5508)

89

A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline.

$25,020

S1 and S2

89

A recognised Bachelor degree.

$15,120

S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate Programs Graduate Certificate in Drug Development (7370) 83 A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Relevant degrees include those in basic science or in the health professions. $15,120 S1 only

Graduate Certificate in Health Management (7360) Graduate Certificate in International Public Health (7367)

85

An appropriate recognised Bachelor degree, and two years postgraduate work experience preferably in a health-related field. A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least one year of work experience in a health-related field. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$15,120

S1 and S2

86

$15,120

S1 and S2 (S1 only for full time study)

Graduate Certificate in Public Health (7368)

87

A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline and at least two years of work experience in a health-related field.

$15,120

S1 and S2 (S1 only for full time study)

Graduate Certificate in Forensic Mental Health (7312)

89

A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline.

$16,680

S1 and S2 (S1 only for full time study)

Graduate Certificate in Reproductive Medicine (7379)

89

A recognised Bachelor degree.

$15,120

S1 and S2

Faculty of Science Master Programs Master of Science and Technology in Aviation (8738) 91 A recognised Bachelor degree with relevant industry experience. An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score of 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1 year by distance education 48 UOC $27,120 S1 and S2

20

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year (48 UOC) 1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$29,520

Semester Start

Master of Conservation Biology (8745) Master of Science and Technology in Spatial Information (8714) Master of Science and Technology in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management (8708)

92

A recognised appropriate four-year Bachelor degree of a level acceptable to the Faculty Coursework Committee. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree of appropriate standing. A recognised four-year Bachelor of Science degree with a major in chemistry; or a three-year Bachelor of Science degree with at least one year of relevant experience in a laboratory environment; or a threeyear Bachelor of Science degree and completion of the Graduate Diploma in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management with at least a credit (65%) average and no failures. A recognised three or four-year Bachelor degree in applied mathematics, pure mathematics or statistics. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses is also required. A recognised three or four-year mathematics or statistics program within a science and/or mathematics Bachelor degree; or a degree in a related discipline. A sufficient mathematical/ statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses is also required. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in statistics or a four-year Honours degree in a related discipline (commonly mathematics). A sufficient mathematical/ statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses is also required. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in statistics or a four-year Honours degree in a related discipline with a significant quantitative component (such as science, engineering, finance, economics, actuarial science, psychology, epidemiology or bioinformatics). A sufficient mathematical/ statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses is also required. A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science.

S1 and S2

93

$29,520

S1 and S2

94

$29,520

S1 and S2

Master of Science and Technology in Mathematics (8718)

94

1 year 48 UOC

$29,520

S1 and S2

Master of Financial Mathematics (8161)

95

1.5 year 72 UOC

$29,520

S1 only

Master of Statistics (8750)

95

1.5 year 72 UOC

$29,520

S1 and S2

Master of Biostatistics (8751)

95

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

1.5 year 72 UOC

$29,520

S1 only

Master of Science and Technology in Engineering Materials (8715) Master of Optometry (8760) Master of Community Eye Health (8761) Master of Psychology (Clinical) (8256)

96

1 year 48 UOC

$29,520

S1 and S2

96 97 98

A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in optometry. A recognised Bachelor degree and at least three years work experience relevant to community eye health. An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Honours Class 1 in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychological Accreditation Council or equivalent. See page 98 for more details. An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Honours Class 1 or a good Class 2 in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council or equivalent. See page 99 for more details.

1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 2 years 96 UOC

$29,520 $29,520 $29,520

S1 and S2 November S1 only

Master of Psychology (Forensic) (8257) Master of Psychology (Organisational) (8258) Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Clinical) (1404) Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Forensic) (1405) Combined PhD/ Master of Psychology (Organisational) (1406) Master of Environmental Management (8619)

99 99 98

2 years 96 UOC 2 years 96 UOC 4 years 192 UOC 4 years 192 UOC 4 years 192 UOC 1.5 years 72 UOC

$29,520 $29,520 $29,520

S1 only S1 only S1 only

99

99

An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Upper First Class Honours or equivalent in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council or equivalent. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component. See pages 98 and 99 for more details.

$29,520

S1 only

$29,520

S1 only

100

A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline. Relevant experience will also be considered for admission. For details of other selection criteria refer to page 100. A recognised university graduate diploma with relevant industry experience.

$29,520

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma Programs Graduate Diploma in Aviation Management (5678) Graduate Diploma in Spatial Information (5693) 91 An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. 1 year by distance education 36 UOC 1 year 36 UOC $20,340 S1 and S2

93

A recognised three-year Bachelor degree or qualification deemed appropriate by the Faculty Coursework Committee.

$22,140

S1 and S2

www.international.unsw.edu.au

21

Program Title (Code)

Page

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Minimum English Language Requirements (IELTS)

Program Duration/ Total Units of Credit (UOC)


1 year 36 UOC

Estimated Annual Tuition Fee for 2011 ($A) #


$22,140

Semester Start

Graduate Diploma in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management (5648) Graduate Diploma in Mathematics and Statistics (5659)

94

A recognised Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry, or equivalent qualification to the satisfaction of the School. A recognised Bachelor degree in statistics or econometrics, or commerce with major in business statistics. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses is also required. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in optometry. Entry into this program is based on work experience only. Applicants must have at least three years work experience relevant to community eye health. A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline of study.

S1 and S2

96

1 year 48 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

$29,520

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Optometry (5665) Graduate Diploma in Community Eye Health (5666) Graduate Diploma in Environmental Management (5499) Graduate Diploma in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics by Research (5345) Graduate Diploma in Microbiology and Immunology by Research (5355)

97 97

1 year 36 UOC 6 months 36 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

$22,140 $22,140

S1 and S2 November

101

$29,520

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma by Research Programs


91 A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Students with Honours degrees or higher and who have undertaken a significant research project would normally be directed to a Master of Science by Research program. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant area, as determined by the Program Coordinator. Students with Honours degrees or higher and who have undertaken a significant research project would normally be directed to a Master of Science by Research program. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline, as determined by the Head of School. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in optometry. 1 year 48 UOC $29,520 S1 and S2

92

1 year 48 UOC

$29,520

S1 and S2

Graduate Diploma in Biological Science by Research (5350) Graduate Diploma in Optometry by Research (5523) Graduate Diploma in Physics by Research (5533) Graduate Diploma in Physics Research Techniques by Research (5663) Graduate Certificate in Aviation Management (7448) Graduate Certificate in Spatial Information (7714) Graduate Certificate in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management (7428) Graduate Certificate in Mathematics and Statistics (7659)

92

97

An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent.

1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC 1 year 48 UOC

$29,520

S1 and S2

$29,520

S1 and S2

98

A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline. A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline which includes some physics courses.

$29,520

S1 and S2

98

$29,520

S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate Programs


91 A minimum of four years of relevant industry experience, or two years of advanced training (for example, holder of an ATPL) and two years of relevant industry experience. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree or qualifications deemed appropriate by the Faculty Coursework Committee. A recognised Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry, or equivalent qualification to the satisfaction of the School. Students without a sufficient background in chemistry will be required to study 12 additional units of credit (total of 36 UOC). A recognised Bachelor degree in statistics or econometrics, or commerce with major in business statistics. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses is also required. A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in optometry. A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline. In special circumstances students who do not have such qualifications may be considered for admission. 6 months by distance education 24 UOC 6 months 24 UOC 6 months 24 UOC An overall IELTS score of 6.5, with a minimum score 6.0 in all sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing, or the equivalent. $13,560 S1 and S2

93

$14,760

S1 and S2

94

$14,760

S1 and S2

96

6 months 24 UOC

$14,760

S1 and S2

Graduate Certificate in Optometry (7435) Graduate Certificate in Environmental Management (7339) UNSW@ADFA

97 101

6 months 24 UOC 6 months 24 UOC

$14,760 $14,760

S1 and S2 S1 and S2

UNSW@ADFA offers a range of postgraduate coursework programs by distance learning. For more information visit www.unsw.adfa.edu.au

22

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Postgraduate Coursework Study Areas


A 35, 40 Accounting 39 Accounting and Business Information Technology 40 Actuarial Studies 32 Advertising 47 Architecture 53-54 Art 54-55 Art Administration 55-56 Art and Design Education 91 Aviation Management B 36 Banking 91 Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics 92 Biological Science 61, 72 Biomedical Engineering 95 Biostatistics 44 Business Administration 38, 78 Business Law 39 Business and Technology 37 Business Strategy C 56 Ceramics 57 3D CGI Modelling 62 Civil Engineering 94 Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management 62 Chemical Process Engineering 31 Communications 97 Community Eye Health 65, 75 Computing 92 Conservation Biology 48-49 Construction Project Management 80 Criminal Justice and Criminology 58 Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design D 56-57 Design 57 Design Management 25 Development Studies 57-58 Digital Media 53 Drawing 78 Dispute Resolution 83 Drug Development E 41 Economics 29-31 Education 30 Educational Leadership 71 Electrical Engineering 62-63 Energy Systems 60-72 Engineering 63 Environmental Engineering 100-101 Environmental Management O 96-97 37 Optometry Organisation and Management Studies M 65-66 38, 43 96 94-96 66 92 66-67 74 Manufacturing Engineering and Management Marketing Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Mechanical Engineering Microbiology and Immunology Microelectronics and Microsystems Mining Engineering W 70-71 Water Resources Engineering 71 Water, Wastewater and Waste Engineering L 77 80 25 Law Legal Studies Linguistics T 45 Taxation 30 Teaching (Secondary) 39 Technology and Innovation Management 70-72 Telecommunications Engineering 28 TESOL 57 Textiles Design 54 Time-Based Art 26-27 Translation Studies U 51 Urban Development and Design V 57 Video J 56 31 80 Jewellery Design Journalism Juris Doctor I 39, 42-43 65, 75 79 37 79 85-86, 88 26, 79 26-27 Information Systems Information Technology Intellectual Property International Business International Law International Public Health International Relations Interpreting Studies S 53 Sculpture, Performance and Installation 69 Signal Processing 33 Social Development 28 Social Sciences 57 Sound 93 Spatial Information 95-96 Statistics 47-48 Sustainable Development 36 Strategic Value Management 69 Structural Engineering 69 Systems and Control Engineering H 84-85, 87-88 79 37 Health Management Human Rights Law and Policy Human Resource Management G 64 64-65 56 Geoinformation Technology Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Technology Graphics/Media F 36-37, 41-42 95 63-64 72-74 88-89 57 Finance Financial Mathematics Food Process Engineering Food Science and Technology Forensic Mental Health Furniture and Lighting Design P 53 Painting 67 Petroleum Engineering 83 Pharmaceutical Medicine 53 Photomedia 68 Photovoltaics and Solar Energy 98 Physics 49 Planning 26, 32 Policy Studies 53 Printmaking 48, 68 Project Management 49-51 Property and Development 98-99 Psychology 86-88 Public Health 26 Public Policy 32 Public Relations R 89 Reproductive Medicine 43-44 Risk Management

www.international.unsw.edu.au

23

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences


The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences offers professionally relevant, socially engaged and intellectually stimulating postgraduate programs. The Faculty is one of the largest of its kind in Australia, with 6,000 students from over 80 countries taught by academic staff who are leaders in the research and teaching of the humanities and social sciences.
Arts and Social Sciences at UNSW is a vibrant community of students and scholars, buzzing with creative ideas and activity. As a member of our community you will discover new ways of thinking about the world while continuing your skills and knowledge development to meet the challenges of a rapidly changing global work environment. Coursework programs are oriented towards professional development, with an emphasis on the expansion of specific skills as well as allowing the exploration of specific areas of interest in greater depth. The need for continued study and skills development is widely recognised among employers, industry and in educational circles and these programs are designed to meet the needs of those developing an existing career or beginning a new one. Those interested in research have the option to pursue PhD and Master by research programs in a diverse range of disciplines and cross-disciplinary areas within our schools and research centres. The Facultys programs are highly regarded in Australia and internationally: Ranked 33rd globally in the 2010 QS World University Rankings Top ranking for Humanities, Arts and Education in the most recent Australian Federal Teaching and Learning Performance Fund

Schools

School of Education School of English, Media and Performing Arts School of History and Philosophy School of Languages and Linguistics School of Social Sciences and International Studies

Student Facilities

Student facilities specific to the Faculty include computer laboratories located in all Faculty buildings, conference interpreting labs, a music recording studio, video editing suites, sound laboratories, a cinema, recording studio for video and film productions, multimedia laboratories and new language laboratories. The Faculty has performance spaces which include purpose-built dance and music studios, fully operational public theatre and student performance spaces.

Contact Details

Tel: +61 2 9385 8511 Email: studyarts@unsw.edu.au Website: www.arts.unsw.edu.au

24

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Arts
Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics Program Code: LINGBS8225 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Debra Aarons School of Languages and Linguistics Email: d.aarons@unsw.edu.au The Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics is a vocationally relevant program designed to meet the needs of recent graduates or professionals who work in a language-related area. The program provides language teachers, language administrators, materials developers, curriculum designers and other language professionals the opportunity to refresh and upgrade their knowledge and develop analytical skills. Students learn about applications of linguistic theory to other areas, such as cognitive science, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics and the social and institutional contexts of language learning and use. In addition to the standard Applied Linguistics program, students have the option of specialising in Japanese or Korean. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant area such as linguistics, English or a foreign language. Applicants with a degree in another discipline will be considered on an individual basis. Preference will be given to applicants with relevant work experience. Program Structure The program consists of eight courses (one core course and seven electives) totalling 48 units of credit (UOC). Core Course (6 UOC) Introduction to Linguistic Analysis Electives (42 UOC) Select 7 courses from the following: Special Project in Applied Linguistics Second Language Acquisition Language Teaching Methodology Testing and Evaluation Curriculum Design The Grammar of English Cross-Cultural Pragmatics Teaching Spoken English Special Project in TESOL
Note: Not all courses listed are offered each year.

UOC Aspects of the Japanese Language Advanced Writing in Japanese Japanese Teaching Practicum Insights into the Korean Language Korean Teaching Practicum Career Opportunities Graduates will have the knowledge and skills to build a language-related career. Professionals already in the education sector interested in undertaking professional development, may work in a specialist area. Master of Arts in Development Studies Program Code: COMDBS8225 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Associate Professor Michael Johnson School of Social Sciences and International Studies Email: ssis@unsw.edu.au This program applies a social science and humanities perspective to questions of social, economic and political development. Students acquire a solid knowledge of the nature of poverty, inequality and other development challenges in the developing world and the theories, policies and practices used to address them. Core courses may be combined with specialist electives covering the areas of Development Management; Asia-Pacific Regional Studies; Political Economy and the Environment; Humanities, Human Rights and Politics. Students are prepared for professional career opportunities that require analytical skills and a practical appreciation of the processes of development, development policy and implementation. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree and significant work and/or volunteer experience in an area appropriate to the program. Program Structure The program consists of the following eight courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) four core courses and four electives. Students can enrol in a relevant course from other UNSW postgraduate programs if approved by the Program Coordinator.
Note: Not all courses listed are offered each year.

Policy and Advocacy Issues and Policy in Social Development Politics of International Aid Special Program NGOs and Development Elective Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Development Management Environmental Impact Assessment International Human Resource Management Management and Policy in Organisations Policy and Advocacy Ethics in Organisations Community Development Program Design and Evaluation Program Management Working with Aboriginal People Political Economy and the Environment Taxation and Investment Regulation in China Society, Environmental Policy and Sustainability Environmental Management Aspects of International Governance International Trade Law: Environment and Development Ethical Issues in Business and Professions Global Politics: The Globalisation of World Politics International Organisations and Global Politics The International Political Economy Theories of the Global Free Markets and their Critics Middle East and Global Politics Humanities, Human Rights and Politics International Human Rights International Social Justice Law of Armed Conflict The Politics of International Law International Peace and Security Visual and Museum Cultures Politics of International Aid Refugees and Forced Migration Social Development Internship

6 6 6 6 6

6 6 6 6 6

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6

UOC 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

An Introduction to Language Learning and Teaching 6

Core Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Internship Program The International Political Economy Special Program in Development Studies Policy Analysis Information and Research for Policy International Development Policy

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 Asia Pacific Regional Studies Taxation and Investment Regulation in China Chinese Management Case Studies China and Asia-Pacific Security Career Opportunities Graduates have secured positions in development policy and program analysis in the public, private or not-for-profit sectors.

Specialisation in Japanese or Korean The Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics with a specialisation in Japanese or Korean requires completion of five LING courses plus three Japanese or three Korean courses from the list below. A special project course may be used for either specialisation with permission from the Program Coordinator.

Developing Countries and the International System 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

25

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Master of Arts in International Relations Program Code: POLSBS8225 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Penny Griffin School of Social Sciences and International Studies Email: penny.griffin@unsw.edu.au The program provides an advanced understanding of contemporary international politics. Theoretically, the program explores different perspectives, explains various influences on the behaviour of states and other actors and analyses issues such as the global economy and environment, international law and diplomacy, international and regional institutions and the conduct of war and peace. Practically, the program explores current issues of international concern such as global environmental problems, human rights, and global poverty. A number of electives examine international relations broadly, while others concentrate on specific issues, regions or countries. The program is broadly applicable to students from a range of educational backgrounds and professional interests. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in the social sciences, humanities or law, with a credit average or above. Relevant work experience may be taken into account in cases where academic qualifications do not meet these requirements. Program Structure The program has eight courses or 48 units of credit (UOC), consisting of four core courses and four electives. Each course involves participation in a twohour lecture/seminar and completion of the required assessment tasks. Core Courses (24 UOC) International Organisations and Global Politics The International Political Economy The Politics of International Law Elective Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Internship Program Australia in the World Law War and Justice Thesis* China and Asia-Pacific Security Theories of the Global Free Market and their Critics Middle East and Global Politics International Peace and Security Terrorism and Political Violence Developing Countries and the International System Policy and Advocacy Politics of International Aid International Development Policy Health, Development and Rights 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC

Career Opportunities Graduates can be found in a range of challenging and high-profile roles including: Public sector: AusAid, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Immigration and Citizenship Affairs in Australia, Ministry of External Affairs (Mexico), Ministry of Foreign Affairs (Norway), Ministry of Defence (Singapore). Private sector: media organisations, industry and financial services, non-government organisations in countries such as Australia, Indonesia, Malaysia, Thailand and Tonga. The program is also a gateway for higher research in international relations. Master of Arts in International Relations and Public Policy Program Code: 8221 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years Staff Contact: Professor Marc Williams School of Social Sciences and International Studies Email: marc.williams@unsw.edu.au This program offers students with the opportunity to study a combination of two separate programs, the UNSW Master of Arts in International Relations and the Peking University Master of Public Policy (MPP). The combined program will substantially extend and deepen a students existing skills, knowledge and understanding of global politics and public policy. The strengths of both programs are combined to foster critical enquiry and advanced skills in analytical thinking and research. Entry Requirements Admission into the MPP program is limited to nonChinese citizens or permanent residents of Hong Kong SAR, Macau SAR and Taiwan. Students can be considered for admission to the combined program at time of original application to one university, but must lodge a separate application for the second university to ensure that all legal/ legislative requirements are met. Students must meet the admission requirements for both programs at the time of original application to one university. Program Structure Students need to complete 48 units of credit (UOC) in the UNSW Master of Arts in International Relations (see course listing on first column of this page) and 30 UOC plus a thesis in the PKU Master of Public Policy. For the full course listing please visit the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate/programs/2011/8221.html Career Opportunities Graduates can be found in a range of challenging and high-profile roles including: Public sector: government departments in Australia and overseas such as AusAid, Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Ministry of Defence, Ministry of Immigration and Citizenship Affairs, Ministry of External Affairs, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Defence. Private sector: media organisations, industry and financial services, non-government organisations.

Master of Arts in Interpreting and Translation Studies Program Code: MODLSBS8225 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Mira Kim School of Languages and Linguistics Email: mira.kim@unsw.edu.au Interpreting and translation are professional skills that only the most proficient bilinguals can be trained to perform. The work of interpreters and translators is captivating, challenging and varied, and makes a critical contribution to communication in government and non-government organisations, business, international relations and human services. The UNSW interpreting and translation programs offer innovative teaching methods that link practice with theory. Students have the opportunity to gain professional experience by undertaking translation and interpreting assignments for a range of organisations. Students learn in new, purpose-built language laboratories equipped with electronic conference interpreting equipment which provide reallife conference simulation opportunities. Teaching staff are practitioners accredited by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI), experienced conference interpreters and internationally acclaimed translators of scholarly and literary works. Courses are offered in English and the following languages: Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Spanish. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average and advanced bilingual proficiency at native or near-native level. Applicants whose first language is not English must meet minimum English language proficiency requirements specified by UNSW* however English language proficiency at or above IELTS 7 (TOEFL 600 or CTOEFL 250) is advisable. Applicants who are native speakers of English or have completed all their primary and high school education within Australian schools may not be required to provide an English exam result but they may be required to demonstrate satisfactory performance in an aptitude test for LOTE administered by the program.
*For more details please see www.unsw.edu.au/futureStudents/ postgradCourse/sad/fspgengreqpol.html

Global Politics: The Globalisation of World Politics

Program Structure Students are required to complete eight courses (48 units of credit), including five core courses plus three elective courses. Core Courses (30 UOC) Foundations and Principles Interpreting and Translation 1 Interpreting and Translation 2 Professional Practice Preparation for Accreditation UOC 6 6 6 6 6

* This 15,000 word thesis course is normally only available to students who have achieved a distinction grade (75%) in three courses and have demonstrated research capacity. It may only be undertaken with permission from the Program Coordinator. Note: Not all courses listed are offered each year.

26

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Elective Courses (18 UOC) Select 3 courses from the following: Interpreting and Translation Techniques 1 Interpreting and Translation Techniques 2 Research Project Bilingual Enhancement

UOC 6 6 6 6

Any hybrid or postgraduate courses offered by the School of Languages and Linguistics (including LING, CHIN and other courses) Students not intending to apply for NAATI accreditation will have different course requirements. For details, visit the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/2011/ MODLBS8225.html Professional Recognition This program has been approved by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) at professional translator level. NAATI is the national standards and accreditation body for translators and interpreters in Australia. It is the only agency that issues accreditations for practitioners who wish to work in this profession in Australia. Note: Students must fulfil certain criteria before applying for NAATI accreditation. Contact the School of Languages and Linguistics for more information: languages@unsw.edu.au. Career Opportunities This program prepares students for professional careers as translators and interpreters in key languages required by the international and domestic markets. Graduates will be equipped with the professional interpreting and translation skills necessary for employment in government and private sectors required in conference, legal, community and diplomatic settings. Master of Arts (Extension) in Interpreting and Translation Program Code: CHINAS8229, FRENBS8229, GERSCS8229, INDODS8229, JAPNES8229, KOREFS8229, RUSSGS8229, SPANHS8229 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years Staff Contact: Dr Mira Kim School of Languages and Linguistics Email: mira.kim@unsw.edu.au The Master of Arts (Extension) in Interpreting and Translation Studies prepares students for professional activities as highly qualified translators and interpreters. Students develop the skills necessary to meet the challenges of the growing domestic and international interpreting and translation markets. The three semesters of the program allow for further development of interpreting skills. Students undertake 150 hours of practicum to engage in real-world translation and interpreting. Courses in interpreting and translation are offered in English, with streams in the following languages: Chinese (Mandarin), French, German, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Russian and Spanish.

Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average and advanced bilingual proficiency at native or near-native level. Applicants whose first language is not English must meet minimum English language proficiency requirements specified by UNSW* however English language proficiency at or above IELTS 7 (TOEFL 600 or CTOEFL 250) is advisable. Applicants who are native speakers of English or have completed all their primary and high school education within Australian schools may be required to provide an English exam result but they may be required to demonstrate satisfactory performance in an aptitude test for LOTE administered by the program.
*For more details please see www.unsw.edu.au/futureStudents/ postgradCourse/sad/fspgengreqpol.html

Master of Arts in Advanced Chinese-English Translation and Interpreting Program Code: CHINES8225 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Mira Kim School of Languages and Linguistics Email: mira.kim@unsw.edu.au This program provides advanced skills in ChineseEnglish translation and interpreting. Students gain an advanced contextual knowledge relevant to a career in the Chinese-English translation industry. Specialist contextual courses include contemporary Chinese business management case studies, commercial and legal language, and Chinese poetry and poetics. The program is designed for those who have professional experience in the interpreting and translation fields or who already hold an interpreting and translation qualification and seek a continuing education opportunity and advanced understanding of the Australian and Chinese interpreting and translation markets. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average and advanced bilingual proficiency at native or near-native level. Applicants whose first language is not English must meet minimum English language proficiency requirements specified by UNSW* however English language proficiency at or above IELTS 7 (TOEFL 600 or CTOEFL 250) is advisable. Applicants who are native speakers of English or have completed all their primary and high school education within Australian schools may be required to provide an English exam result but they may be required to demonstrate satisfactory performance in an aptitude test for LOTE administered by the program.
For more details please see www.unsw.edu.au/futureStudents/ postgradCourse/sad/fspgengreqpol.html

Program Structure Students are required to complete a total of 12 courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC) over the period of at least three semesters, including eight core courses in interpreting and translation theory and practice three contact hours per week per course) and four elective courses in Contextual and Advanced Language, 6 UOC each course. Core Courses (54 UOC) Foundations and Principles Interpreting and Translation Techniques 1 Interpreting and Translation Techniques 2 Interpreting and Translation 1 Interpreting and Translation 2 Conference Interpreting Professional Practice Preparation for Accreditation Elective Courses (18 UOC) For a full list of elective courses for each language stream visit the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/ programs/2011/8229.html Professional Recognition This program has been approved by the National Accreditation Authority for Translators and Interpreters (NAATI) at professional translator and professional interpreter level. NAATI is the national standards and accreditation body for translators and interpreters in Australia. It is the only agency that issues accreditations for practitioners who wish to work in this profession in Australia. Note: Students must fulfil certain criteria before applying for NAATI accreditation. Contact School of Languages and Linguistics for more information: languages@unsw.edu.au. Career Opportunities Graduates will be equipped with the professional interpreting and translation skills necessary for employment in government and private sectors, required in conference, legal, community and diplomatic settings. UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Program Structure Students must complete eight courses, including two core courses. Core Courses (12 UOC) Chinese English Translation Chinese English Interpreting Elective Courses (36 UOC) Chinese Management Cases Chinese for Commercial Use Chinese Poetry and Poetics Major Translation Australian-Chinese Documents Any MODL5xxx courses UOC 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6

Note: Students can enrol in relevant course from other UNSW graduate programs if approved by the Program Coordinator.

Students who wish to complete the Advanced Chinese-English Translation and Interpreting program and the Master of Arts in Interpreting and Translation (NAATI accredited at translator level) should consider the Combined Master of Arts and Master of Social Sciences program listed on page 28. Career Opportunities Graduates can pursue a professional career in Chinese-English Translation and Interpreting and make a critical contribution to communication in government and non-government organisations, business, international relations and human services.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

27

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Master of Arts in TESOL Program Code: LINGCS8225 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Debra Aarons School of Languages and Linguistics Email: d.aarons@unsw.edu.au The program is designed for those seeking a qualification for a career in teaching English to speakers of other languages. An academically, professionally and vocationally relevant degree, the program enables students to refresh and upgrade their knowledge and skills, or develop new specialisations. Students learn about applications of linguistic theory to other areas, such as cognitive science, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics and the social and institutional contexts of language learning and use. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant area, normally with a specialisation in linguistics, English or a foreign language. Preference will be given to applicants with relevant work experience. Program Structure The program consists of the following eight courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC). Core Courses (24 UOC) Language Teaching Methodology Testing and Evaluation Curriculum Design Linguistic Analysis Elective Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Second Language Acquisition Special Project in TESOL Introduction to Language Learning and Teaching Cross-Cultural Pragmatics Teaching Spoken English The Grammar of English Career Opportunities Career options may include curriculum designer, teacher, language tester, education administrator or similar roles. 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC

Master of Arts and Master of Social Sciences (Combined) Program Code: 8224 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years Staff Contact: Faculty Student Centre Email: arts@unsw.edu.au The Master of Arts and Master of Social Sciences (Combined) caters for students who wish to significantly broaden their existing skills and knowledge by providing the opportunity to combine two complementary disciplines over two years of study. Students graduate with two Master degrees under their specialist names, for example: Master of Journalism and Communication plus a Master of Arts in International Relations. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant area and any requirements specific to the individual Master programs listed below. Program Structure The program consists of 96 units of credit offered in the two specified coursework programs. The combined degree can be a combination of any two of the following postgraduate programs offered by the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences with the exception of those listed in the exclusion list. Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics Master of Arts in Advanced Chinese-English Translation Master of Arts in Development Studies Master of Arts in International Relations Master of Arts in Interpreting and Translation Master of Arts in TESOL Master of Education in Applied Linguistics Master of Education Master of Educational Leadership Master of Journalism and Communication. Master of Policy Studies Master of Public Relations and Advertising Exclusions The following combinations are excluded:

Jirapan Kaewwanarat Kinney, Thailand Master of Arts in TESOL Jirapan Kinney knew from an early age that teaching was her calling in life, and decided that the UNSW Master of Arts in TESOL was the first step along that path. I chose teaching English as my profession because I love the language and I love helping others to learn it she said. Jirapan, originally from Thailand, spent several years in North America, before deciding she needed exposure to a different flavour of English - so she packed her bags and moved to Australia. I found that UNSW offered a program which suited my needs and career aspirations perfectly. Jirapan says she has learnt valuable knowledge and skills in the Master of Arts in TESOL program and her studies in second language acquisition, language teaching methodology and curriculum design will serve her very well in her career. She felt that the practicum component of the program gave her an invaluable teaching experience. I also enjoyed learning from my lecturers and my class mates, both in and out of the classroom. Their insights enabled me to see my own experience of learning English in a whole new light. Jirapan is already using her TESOL skills, teaching English, business and tourism at a private vocational college in Lampang, Thailand. In the future she would like to hone her teaching experience by establishing a career overseas and learning several more languages. Jirapan would ultimately like to pursue a higher research degree in education administration and return to her hometown, Lampang, Thailand, to establish her own language institution.

Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics/Master of Arts in TESOL Master of Education in Applied Linguistics/Master of Arts in Applied Linguistics Master of Education/Master of Educational Leadership Master of Social Development/Master of Arts in Development Studies.

28

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Education
Master of Education Program Code: 8910 Commencement: Summer Semester (January), Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Eva Bernat School of Education Email: education@unsw.edu.au The Master of Education programs offer a range of specialist studies for educational professionals, including qualified teachers, trainers in industry and commerce, and adult educators. Students will gain substantial knowledge and a range of skills related to their field of education. Master of Education - This program is designed for educationists who wish to study education at an advanced level to enhance their professional development in school and training sectors. Master of Education in Applied Linguistics - This is a cross-disciplinary program in education and applied linguistics designed to meet the needs of recent graduates or professionals who work in TESOL or a language education related area. Master of Education in Gifted Education - This program is designed for teachers who would like to specialise in the field of gifted education. This rewarding program focuses on contemporary issues involving gifted and talented students as well as the development of curricula and teaching strategies for their learning needs. Master of Education in Special Education - This is a specialist program designed to address the increasing demands for strategies in teaching children with special needs. The program will focus on learner diversity and inclusive learning as well as behaviour management and research methodologies. Note: The Master of Education programs are not accredited pre-service education programs. For those wishing to qualify to teach in NSW schools, please refer to the entries for the Master of Teaching (Secondary) and/or the Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) on pages 30 and 31. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree and relevant experience in education or training. Program Structure Master of Education The program consists of any eight courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) in Education, including courses from the Master of Educational Leadership. Subject to the approval of the Program Coordinator, a student may also select up to two Master level courses from other schools and faculties at UNSW. Elective Courses in Education (48 UOC) Select 8 courses from the following: Experiment and Survey Research Multivariate Research Design High Incidence Disabilities Performance Based Culture Intellectual Disabilities Autism Spectrum Disorders: Educational Practices Curriculum and Assessment Social and Political Contexts of Education 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Community Engagement Project Professional Issues in First Year Qualitative Research Method Philosophical Issues in Education Research in Science Education Human Cognitive Architecture Mental Processes Stress Management Research Individual Differences Motivation in Education Organisational Analysis Organisation Theory in Education Evaluation of Educational Programs Leadership Theory Advanced Methodology and Curriculum Design 1 Advanced Methodology and Curriculum Design 2 Advanced Professional Practice Workplace Leadership Development Project Educational Policy: Theory and Practice Issues in Language Education Culture and Curriculum Human Resource Management in Education Language and Learning Literature Review in Education School-Based Management Specialist Study in Education Teacher Leadership Effective Schools Current Issues in the Education of Intellectually Gifted Children Curricula and Teaching Strategies for Intellectually Gifted Children Social and Emotional Development of Intellectually Gifted Children Research Project Addressing Learner Diversity
Note: Not all courses listed are offered each year.

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Curricula and Teaching Strategies for Intellectually Gifted Children Catering for the Affective Needs of Intellectually Gifted Children

6 6

Social and Emotional Development of Intellectually Gifted Children 6 For a full list of elective courses available please refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/2011/ EDSTNS8910.html Master of Education in Special Education The program consists of eight courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) including four core courses plus an appropriate course in research methodology, a research project and two elective courses chosen from any other Master of Education programs. Core Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Addressing Learner Diversity Behaviour Management of Exceptional Students Teaching Methods for High Incidence Disabilities Professional Practice for Special Education Advanced Professional Practice Intellectual Disabilities through the Life Span 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

For a full list of elective courses available refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/2011/ EDSTNS8910.html

Master of Education in Applied Linguistics The program consists of eight courses, including one core course and three electives from the School of Education, plus four electives from the School of Languages and Linguistics. The core course is Contemporary Issues in Language Education. For a full list of elective courses available please refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/2011/ EDSTNS8910.html Master of Education in Gifted Education The program consists of eight courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) including four core courses plus an appropriate course in research methodology, a research project and two elective courses chosen from any other Master of Education programs. Core Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Current Issues in the Education of Intellectually Gifted Children Introduction to the Identification of Intellectually Gifted Children Developing and Evaluating Programs for Intellectually Gifted Children 6 6 6 UOC

www.international.unsw.edu.au

29

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Master of Educational Leadership Program Code: 8960 Commencement: Summer Semester (January), Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Kerry Barnett School of Education Email: k.barnett@unsw.edu.au or education@unsw.edu.au The Master of Educational Leadership is designed to provide aspiring and current educational leaders with an understanding of recent developments in theory, research, policy and practice in educational leadership. At the completion of the program students will be able to apply principles for action, based on relevant scholarship and research, to their own professional leadership context. The program allows leaders to share international research and their own experiences in order to better understand and develop their leadership roles. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree and relevant experience in education or training. Program Structure Students undertake eight courses (48UOC), including two core courses (12UOC) and six elective courses (36 UOC), with a minimum of four electives to be chosen from educational leadership electives. The remainder of the program is made up with educational leadership electives or education electives, or with permission courses offered by other schools in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences or other faculties. Core Courses (12 UOC) Organisation Theory in Education Leadership Theory, Research and Practice Elective Courses (36 UOC) Select 6 courses from the following: Experiment and Survey Research Multivariate Research Design Developing a Performance-Based Culture Leadership for Gifted Students Curriculum and Assessment Qualitative Research Method Stress Management Research and Practice in the Workplace Organisational Analysis and Diagnosis Evaluation of Educational Programs Workplace Leadership Development Project Educational Policy: Theory and Practice Human Resource Management in Education School-Based Management and Accountability Specialist Study in Education Contemporary Issues in Educational Leadership Effective Schools Research Project 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 UOC

Career Opportunities Graduates are equipped to lead education at all levels in government and independent schools, school systems, universities, TAFE and other educational and training organisations. Master of Teaching (Secondary) Program Code: 8926 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 1.5 years Staff Contact: Dr Kalervo Gulson School of Education Email: k.gulson@unsw.edu.au or education@unsw.edu.au The School of Education offers two intensive preservice secondary teacher education programs for graduate students, the Master of Teaching and the Graduate Diploma in Education. Both pre-service teacher education programs offer innovative teaching methods that link practice with theory and equip students with the understanding and skills needed to become competent education professionals. Students gain advanced skills in effective unit and lesson planning, assessment and reporting design. Emphasis is placed on enhanced communication skills to ensure effective classroom communication, the practice of reflective teaching and the desire to continually improve professional knowledge and practice. The programs also encourage active engagement with members of the teaching profession and the wider community. Teaching practice is undertaken in at least two different secondary schools under the supervision of experienced teachers, and is complemented by an innovative program of community engagement. The Master of Teaching (Secondary) is an accelerated pre-service secondary teacher education program specifically designed to support students in their transition into first year teaching and to nurture future leaders of the profession. The Master program also includes a school-based professional practice component, consisting of extensive self and peer evaluation and critical reflection. Students must be available five days a week during normal school hours during these periods. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with appropriate studies in the chosen relevant teaching specialisation(s). Program Structure During the program students will complete a range of core courses, method courses and 85 days of professional experience, including 50 days of supervised teaching practice in at least two different secondary schools, and two electives drawn from any area in the Master of Education program. Teaching specialisations offered in 2012: Double Method Courses English Modern History Mathematics Science

Single Method Courses Aboriginal Studies Business Studies Dance

Drama (Theatre and Performance Studies) Economics English

English as a Second Language (ESL)* Geography Languages: Chinese, French, German, Indonesian, Japanese, Korean, Spanish Legal Studies Music Modern History Society and Culture

*ESL is a second teaching specialisation only. The prerequisites are two years of languages, or two years of linguistics, or one of each, or the equivalent.

For full list of teaching specialisation requirements refer to the relevant UNSW Online Handbook entry: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/ programs/2011/5926.html Year 1 (72 UOC) Compulsory Courses Semester 1 Learning Perspectives Professional Experience 1 The Professional Teacher: Ethics Policy and Practice Method A1 Method B1 Semester 2 Professional Experience 2 Addressing Learner Diversity Creating Learning Environment Method A2 Method B2 Summer Semester (Year 1 only) Social and Political Contexts of Education Community Engagement Project Year 2 (24 UOC) Professional Issues in First Year Advanced Professional Practice 2 elective courses from the Master of Education program (see page 29) 6 6 UOC 6 6 12 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Professional Recognition The Master of Teaching (Secondary) is recognised as an initial teaching qualification in both government and non-government schools in New South Wales and all other states in Australia. It is also widely accepted as a teaching qualification overseas. Career Opportunities Secondary school teacher or education professional in other areas related to education and training.

For details of Education elective courses refer to the UNSW Online Handbook: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/2011/ EDSTAS8910.html
Note: Not all courses listed are offered each year.

30

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) Program Code: 5926 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Michael Michell School of Education Email: m.michell@unsw.edu.au or education@unsw.edu.au The Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) is an intensive program consisting of the first three semesters of the Master of Teaching (Secondary). The program aims to provide a strong initial year of preparation for teaching in secondary schools. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with appropriate studies in the chosen relevant teaching specialisation(s). Program Structure The Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) is usually completed over three semesters of study. Students complete a range of core courses, method courses and 50 days of teaching practice. Students may apply for internal transfer from the Graduate Diploma to the Master of Teaching or vice versa at any time during their study. For teaching specialisations refer to the Master of Teaching program structure. Professional Recognition The Graduate Diploma in Education (Secondary) is recognised as an initial teaching qualification in both government and non-government schools in New South Wales and all other states in Australia. It is also widely accepted as a teaching qualification overseas. Career Opportunities Secondary school teacher or education professional in other areas related to education and training.

Communications
Master of Journalism and Communication Program Code: 8222 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Kath Albury Journalism and Media Research Centre Email: mjcenquiries@unsw.edu.au The Master of Journalism and Communication is designed for students interested in a career in the print, radio, television and online media and in the media relations and corporate communication sectors. The comparative media focus ensures that the content is suitable for international students. Students will develop a knowledge of the social, economic and political role of Australian and international media industries and explore future directions in media and communication production. Graduates will have production skills in the audio, video, print and online fields and a portfolio of work suitable for presentation to future employers. The program is taught by experienced media practitioners who work in contemporary mainstream media industries. Learning will take place in a variety of environments: lectures, seminars, workshops and online sites. Assessments will build skills in research, critical thinking, essay writing, news and feature writing, audio and audiovisual production, online media production, teamwork, project management and reflective professional practice. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average or above. Significant work experience may be taken into account where academic qualifications do not meet these requirements. A one page curriculum vitae must also be submitted.

Program Structure The program consists of 48 units of credit (UOC) or eight courses, including the four core courses below. Core Courses (24 UOC) Understanding Contemporary Media Broadcast Journalism Online and Mobile Media Writing for Media Elective Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Media and Public Relations Sports, Media and Culture Feature Writing Media Ethics and Law Literary Journalism Media Project* 6 6 6 6 6 12 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC

*Students complete a short research thesis or a media project. Entry to this program is at the discretion of the Program Coordinator.

Career Opportunities Graduates of this program will be prepared for jobs in the print, radio, television and online media industries and in the media relations and corporate communication sectors.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

31

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Master of Public Relations and Advertising Program Code: 8291 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Professor Judy Motion Journalism and Media Research Centre Email: mjcenquiries@unsw.edu.au This program explores the theoretical and practical dimensions of professional public relations and advertising communication, with a focus on creativity, interactivity and engagement. An emphasis on contemporary Australian and international industry practices prepares students for careers in public relations, advertising and corporate communication. In addition to core courses in professional communication practice students have the opportunity to select electives in media design and production, interactive environments and web design and marketing communication. Students will critically examine how their professional skills operate within current economic and social contexts and the dynamics of industry, governments, markets, consumer cultures and society. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent qualification. Program Structure The program consists of 48 units of credit (UOC) or eight courses, including five core courses and three electives. Core Courses (30 UOC) Media and Public Relations Advertising and Creativity Corporate and Interpersonal Communication Public Relations Strategy Advertising Production Elective Courses (18 UOC) Select 3 courses from the following: Non-Profit and Social Marketing Understanding Contemporary Media Writing for Media Broadcast Journalism Online and Mobile Media Feature Writing Communication Project Ethics in Organisations Video Construction Introductory Interactive Multimedia Narrative and Gameplay Writing for Digital Media Events Management and Marketing Career Opportunities Graduates will be equipped with the skills and knowledge for professional work relevant to public relations, advertising, media relations and organisational communication in corporate, political and non-profit organisations. 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Policy Studies
Master of Policy Studies Program Code: 8248 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Mr Chris Walker School of Social Sciences and International Studies Email: c.walker@unsw.edu.au or ssis@unsw.edu.au The Master of Policy Studies applies a social science perspective to questions of policy and management in modern organisations. The program provides a solid grounding in policy analysis and the policy process, before specialising in a range of areas which may include social policy, international development policy or policy management. Students acquire analytical skills and a practical appreciation of the processes of policymaking and implementation. Emphasis is placed on developing the skills and perspective needed for proficient assessment, evaluation and sensitivity to the effectiveness of programs in terms of the impact they have on clients, customers and the public. The program is oriented to the practice of policy, and participants are required to have relevant work experience. This may be in the public sector, unions, business or community organisations. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree and significant work experience in a related area. Applicants who believe they may not have the necessary work experience should contact the Program Coodinator. Applicants must submit a one to two page curriculum vitae summarising work experience and a one to two page statement that outlines reasons and interests in undertaking this program. Program Structure The program consists of the following eight courses or 48 units of credit (UOC), including four core courses. Core Courses (24 UOC) Policy Analysis Information and Research for Policy Policy and Organisations Policy Project Elective Courses (24 UOC) Select 4 courses from the following: Policy Management and Program Evaluation Evaluation of Educational Programs Ethics in Organisations Policy and Advocacy Program Design and Evaluation International Development Policy International Development Policy Issues and Policy in International Social Development Community Development Politics of International Aid International Social Development Project UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

International Relations Policy Issues in Australian Public Policy

UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6

Global Politics: The Globalisation of World Politics International Organisations and Global Politics The International Political Economy Social and Public Policy Tax Policy Social Planning Policy Studies Environmental Policy Planning and Land Policy Society, Environmental Policy and Sustainability Environmental Management
Note: Other electives relevant to a students field of policy interest can be completed from another school or faculty, subject to approval from the School of Social Sciences and International Studies. Not all electives are offered each year.

Career Opportunities Graduates have careers in policy development and management in the public sector, unions, business organisations or community bodies.

Ashley Heath, USA Master of Policy Studies Ashley spent a year travelling and immersing herself in different cultures, before arriving in Sydney and instantly feeling at home. After completing an undergraduate degree in communications and political science. Ashley felt that the UNSW Master of Policy Studies was a natural choice when deciding to further her education. I had heard that UNSW offered excellent programs for international students. UNSW offered a more focused and elaborate program in policy studies. The program seemed very in-depth and I found the elective options to be incredibly interesting. The degree has broadened her mind about policy and the importance of understanding how different cultures and ideas influence policy decisions. Policy is extraordinarily relevant to all people. Policy shapes the way we communicate, behave, and conduct out lives. The Master of Policy Studies program has honed my expertise in public policy and international relations as well as providing technical and theoretical insight.

32

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Coursework programs

Social Development
Master of Social Development Program Code: 8939 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) and Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Staff Contact: Dr Linda Bartolomei School of Social Sciences and International Studies Email: linda.bartolomei@unsw.edu.au The Master of Social Development is a flexible and interactive program which provides specialist studies in international social development, refugee resettlement and social and community development work. Students are equipped with practical professional skills which may be applied to a diverse array of career options in development. The program is taught within a human rights framework, and is based on a philosophy of social justice and a community development approach. Advanced social development theory and practice core courses are offered with elective courses relevant to the program plan chosen. Community Development: Focuses on education and service in community development, including studies in social and community development theory and practice, social policy in development, program management and evaluation. International Social Development: Provides knowledge and skills related to international policy, planning, delivery and the evaluation of programs and projects relevant to international social community development, aid work, advocacy and human rights. Refugees and Forced Migration: Builds knowledge and skills related to international and domestic refugee and development policy and programs relevant to international and local social and community development and advocacy work with refugees and other displaced persons. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline with a credit average or above and at least one year of relevant work or voluntary experience. A curriculum vitae and a two page letter providing reasons for applying must be submitted. Program Structure The program consists of seven core courses and one elective, totalling 48 units of credit (UOC). Community Development Plan SOCWFS8939 7 Core Courses Issues and Policy in Social Development Community Development Rights-Based Project Design and Evaluation Policy Analysis Policy and Advocacy Rights-Based Program and Project Management Working with Aboriginal People UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Elective Course Select 1 course from the following: Health Development and Human Rights Community Education Strategies Refugees and Forced Migration Community Development Project Social Development Internship

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12

Elective Course Select 1 course from the following: Health Development and Human Rights Community Education Strategies

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 12

International Protection Tools for Refugees and IDPs International Advocacy: Linking Development and the United Nations Social Development Internship Program Refugees and Forced Migration Project Professional Practical Research Project

International Protection Tools for Refugees and IDPs Refugee and Forced Migration Project Working with Aboriginal People Professional Practical Research Project International Social Development SOCWES8939 7 Core Courses Issues and Policy in Social Development Community Development Politics of International Aid Rights-Based Project Design and Evaluation Rights-Based Program and Project Management International Advocacy: Linking Development and the United Nations Refugees and Forced Migration or Community Education Strategies Elective Course Select 1 course from the following: Health, Development and Human Rights Community Education Strategies Refugees and Forced Migration Community Development Project International Protection Tools for Refugees and IDPs Refugee and Forced Migration Project Social Development Internship Program International Social Development Project Professional Practical Research Project

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12

Career Opportunities The program is designed to meet the needs of professionals already in the field and those interested in entering the field of social development. These include teachers, social workers, health professionals, economists, engineers, agricultural scientists, journalists, project managers and many others.

Refugees and Forced Migration Plan SOCWGS8939 7 Core Courses Issues and Policy in Social Development Community Development Rights-Based Project Design and Evaluation Politics of International Aid Rights-Based Program and Project Management Refugees and Forced Migration International Protection Tools for Refugees and IDPs or International Advocacy: Linking Development and the United Nations UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6

6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

33

Australian School of Business


Rankings and Accreditation Band 1 in the most recent Australian Department of Education Science and Training Performance Fund Top world performance in the 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia Report Number 1 for Commerce, Management, Tourism and Services Number 2 for Economics 2011 Financial Times UK Global MBA Rankings Number 1 MBA in Australia for 12 consecutive years Number 1 Custom Programs provider of AGSM Executive Programs in the Asia Pacific 35th MBA program in the world 2010 awarded accreditation by EQUIS (European Quality Improvement System) for five years AACSB accreditation for AGSM MBA programs

The Australian School of Business is one of the leading business schools in Australia, and a peer in high standing with the best business schools in the world. Our purpose is to create and disseminate business knowledge for the benefit of individuals, organisations and society. We develop business, research and community leaders with the capability to succeed globally. Our vision is to be recognised as a leading global research-intensive business school renowned for its teaching quality, innovation and stakeholder engagement.

We enjoy the privilege of having the best and brightest students compete for entry into our programs. Our community approach to learning means students are part of an elite group, comprising industry partners, academic staff and students. Many of our alumni occupy senior positions in leading Australian and international business and government organisations. Upon graduation you will join our global network of more than 60,000 alumni, opening doors and offering new opportunities. With new ground-breaking research-driven programs, strong industry-linked curriculum and excellent innovating teaching and learning methodologies, our search for excellence is an ongoing commitment process. The Australian School of Taxation (Atax) joining the Australian School of Business to strengthen the Taxation and Business Law program portfolio, the introduction of the Master of Risk Management, Master of Accounting/Business Information Technology, our globally ranked AGSM MBA and Executive Education programs are examples of our commitment to meet the needs of tomorrows business leaders. Programs offered by the Australian School of Business cater for a diverse range of students; those who wish to build business knowledge or obtain specific professional accreditation or attain an advanced qualification in their chosen field of study. Programs are offered in the areas of: Accounting Actuarial Studies Banking and Finance Economics nformation Systems, Technology and Management I Marketing Organisation and Management Strategy and Entrepreneurship Taxation and Business Law Looking ahead, our priorities for enhancing the student learning experience include increasing experiential learning, international exposure, social responsibility and enhancing flexibility and choice. Professional Recognition Program accreditation is supported by a rigorous quality assurance process. The Australian School of Business is entrusted to prepare postgraduate students for admission to membership of peak professional bodies including CPA Australia, the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia (ICAA), the National Institute of Accountants (NIA), the Institute of Actuaries of Australia, the Institute and Faculty of Actuaries (London), Australian Computer Society, and the Australian Marketing Institute. Knowledge@Australian School of Business www.knowledge.asb.unsw.edu.au Launched in April 2010 in partnership with The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, Knowledge@Australian School of Business is a new online business portal where you are able to access topical articles, videos and podcasts inspired by research from academics at the Australian School of Business and The Wharton School.

Contact Details Tel: +61 2 9385 3507 Email: businessinfo@unsw.edu.au Website: www.asb.unsw.edu.au

34

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Master of Commerce Program Code: 8404 Program Duration: 1.5 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July)

Managing for Value Creation 1

6 UOC

Management International Business, Human Resource Management, Organisation and Management Studies, Business Strategy, Business Law Information Systems Information Systems, Supply Chain and Logistics Marketing Marketing, Tourism Marketing

Master of Commerce (Extension) Program Code: 8417 Program Duration: 2 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Commerce (MCom) has a long and distinguished history of providing high-quality, relevant education to graduates who are looking to build and broaden their business capabilities. The program is designed for business and non-business graduates who wish to broaden or develop their business skills and knowledge, or for early career professionals seeking career advancement or change. The Master of Commerce (Extension) provides students with an opportunity to enrich and extend their business knowledge by adding four more elective courses to the MCom. These additional four courses allow students to further their study by choosing different courses from the various offered in the MCom or to structure the degree to include two specialisations. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Exemptions Applicants with a Bachelor degree in business may be granted transfer credits for the MCom core courses. Program Structure The Master of Commerce consists of 12 courses made up of four core courses plus six specialisation courses plus two MCom elective courses. The Master of Commerce (Extension) consists of 16 courses For a single specialisation, students complete four core courses plus six specialisation courses plus six MCom elective courses. For a double specialisation, students complete four core courses plus six specialisation courses (within first specialisation) plus six specialisation courses (within second specialisation). 4 Core Courses (24 UOC) 24 UOC Non-business graduates* gain a broad understanding of business through the four MCom core courses. These core courses should be studied in the first semester, except for Business Capstone Project or Quantitative Methods for Business, which should be completed in the final semester. Business Communication, Ethics and Practice 6 UOC This course addresses learning and communication skills that impact on academic and professional performance in particular communication, teamwork and conflict resolution skills and the capacity to apply these skills in cross-cultural contexts. Specific attention is paid to ethical frameworks and the opportunity for informed self-reflection in applying ethical perspectives in a business context.

Together with Managing for Value Creation 2, this course exposes students to an integrated perspective of the firm and how it creates and sustains value. The course builds a conceptual and analytical framework to examine the choices managers face at the firm and how these choices are shaped by government, society and competitors. The focus of this course is on value creation from the perspective of the disciplines of Strategy, Economics, Marketing, HRM, Organisational Behaviour, Organisational Analysis and Design. Managing for Value Creation 2 6 UOC Together with Managing Value Creation 1, this course exposes students to an integrated perspective of the firm and how it creates and sustains value. The course builds a conceptual and analytical framework to examine the choices managers face at the firm and how these choices are shaped by conventions, regulations and legal frameworks. The focus of this course is on the management of value creation from a financial perspective drawing on the disciplines of Accounting, Finance, Information Systems and Business Law. Business Capstone Project** 6 UOC Provides a team-based, integrative learning experience allowing students to apply their skills and knowledge, including effective management of the project and the team process, to a real-world business problem that crosses disciplinary boundaries. or Quantitative Methods for Business** 6 UOC This course is designed to teach basic quantitative skills and techniques that have proved useful in making business decisions and interpreting business data. In the context of practical problems of interest to business managers and under each of these themes applying quantitative procedures to solve these problems.
* Applicants with a Bachelor degree in business may be granted transfer credits for the MCom core courses. **Either Business Capstone Project or Quantitative Methods for Business completed at the end of MCom study depending on the specialisation chosen.

Accounting
MCom (Accounting) The Accounting specialisation focuses on the use of financial information by managers, owners, creditors and other stakeholders to achieve business objectives. This specialisation is ideal for students who wish to undertake a flexible accounting program that can be tailored to their individual needs. Students looking to gain professional accreditation should consider the Master of Professional Accounting. This specialisation is not recommended for students who have prior accounting studies. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus Specialisation Core Courses Financial Accounting Management Accounting and Business Analysis Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: International Financial Statement Analysis Auditing and Assurance Services Business Analysis and Valuation Value Creation from the Office of the CFO Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Managing the Accounting and Finance Function E-Business: Strategy and Processes Strategic Management Accounting Corporate Accounting and Regulation Advanced Financial Reporting Managing Agile Organisations Management Accounting Control Systems Accounting for Climate Change Assurance for Climate Change International Corporate Governance: Accounting and Finance Perspectives Information Systems Auditing Information Systems Security Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

Plus 6 Specialisation Courses 2 Specialisation Core Courses 4 Specialisation Elective Courses Specialisation courses enable students to gain specialist skills in a particular area with 16 different specialisations to choose from. Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses 12 UOC The MCom elective courses enable students to take more courses to gain a greater depth of knowledge within their chosen specialisation, or courses from other specialisations within the MCom program, subject to meeting course prerequisites. Specialisations for Master of Commerce and Master of Commerce (Extension) There are 16 specialisations available in the MCom program within five key areas of study: Accounting Accounting, Strategic Value Management Finance Banking, Finance, International Finance, Funds Management, Financial Econometrics 36 UOC

www.international.unsw.edu.au

35

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Strategic Value Management


MCom (Strategic Value Management) The Strategic Value Management specialisation focuses on contemporary developments in management accounting. It focuses on active managerial involvement in the use of resources in organisations with the aim of creating ongoing value for different stakeholders. This specialisation is designed for students seeking to develop strategic financial and resource management skills. Students interested in learning about up-to-date management accounting practices and strategic planning would particularly benefit from this specialisation. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Strategic Management Accounting Management Accounting and Business Analysis Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Value Creation from the Office of the CFO Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Managing the Accounting and Finance Function E-Business: Strategy and Processes Managing Agile Organisations Management Accounting Control Systems Accounting for Climate Change Assurance for Climate Change Global Business Operations and Management Managing Organisation Change Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Capital Budgeting and Financial Decisions Financial Institutions Management And choose 2 courses from the following: Credit Risk and Loan Policy International Banking Management Business Analysis and Valuation 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Financial Markets and Institutions Investments and Portfolio Selection Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Capital Budgeting and Financial Decisions International Corporate Finance And choose 2 courses from the following: Emerging Financial Markets International Banking Management International Insurance Management For students who wish to extend the MCom (International Finance) specialisation, refer to the list of electives available in the UNSW Online Handbook at www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/ current/FINSFS8404.html Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (Financial Econometrics) The Financial Econometrics specialisation provides students with the economic, quantitative and statistical skills to understand, analyse, model and forecast financial data. This specialisation suits finance professionals who are looking to improve their quantitative skills in financial data analysis. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) UOC 6 6 Statistics for Business Investments and Portfolio Selection Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 2 courses from the following: Financial Economics Managerial Economics Financial Econometrics Business Forecasting And choose 2 courses from the following: Capital Budgeting and Financial Decisions Applied Portfolio Management and Modelling Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (Funds Management) The Funds Management specialisation provides a strong applied and theoretical grounding in all aspects of the financial services industry. It provides students with a solid understand of the environment in which investment analysis and portfolio management occur, as well as advanced and applied knowledge in a range of critical aspects of investment analysis. 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 UOC 6 6

For students who wish to extend the MCom (Banking) specialisation, refer to the list of electives available in the UNSW Online Handbook at www.handbook.unsw. edu.au/postgraduate/plans/current/FINSDS8404.html Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (Finance) The Finance specialisation is concerned with the modern fundamentals of corporate financial decision making with special reference to the investment, financing and dividend decision of corporations. This specialisation is designed for students who are interested in gaining a broad understanding of general financial concepts and problem solving techniques in the context of the modern corporate environment. Students with prior finance study should consider the Master of Finance instead. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Financial Markets and Institutions Investments and Portfolio Selection Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Capital Budgeting and Financial Decisions International Corporate Finance Financial Institutions Management Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

Finance
MCom (Banking) The Banking specialisation applies modern theory of finance and financial modeling techniques to financial decision making and risk management of global financial institutions. This specialisation provides skills and knowledge suitable for a wide range of careers in financial institutions and is designed for students who have not completed prior studies in banking or finance. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Financial Markets and Institutions Investments and Portfolio Selection UOC 6 6

For students who wish to extend the MCom (Finance) specialisation, refer to the list of electives available in the UNSW Online Handbook at www.handbook.unsw. edu.au/postgraduate/plans/current/FINSAS8404.html Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (International Finance) The International Finance specialisation deals with the financial management for business corporations with international financial flows. It provides both a theoretical and practical framework through which the key financial decisions of multinational corporations can be analysed. This specialisation is designed for students who are interested in the factors affecting exchange rates, the workings of international financial markets and the issues involved in the global financial management of firms.

Fixed Income Securities and Interest Rate Derivatives 6

36

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

This specialisation is designed to provide the breadth and depth required for successful placement and career advancement in the financial services industry, with a special emphasis on positions in investment analysis in the industry. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Financial Markets and Institutions Investments and Portfolio Selection Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Capital Budgeting and Financial Decisions Applied Portfolio Management and Modelling And choose 2 courses from the following: Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques Advanced Investment and Funds Management Applied Funds Management For students who wish to extend the MCom (Funds Management) specialisation, refer to the list of electives available in the UNSW Online Handbook at www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/ current/FINSES8404.html Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 UOC 6 6

Business Japanese A Business Law in a Global Economy International Business Tax International Marketing in Asia Chinese Business and Management International Entrepreneurship Special Topic in International Business International Employment Relations International Business Negotiation International Human Resource Management For students who wish to extend the MCom (International Business) specialisation, additional electives can be taken from the list above. MCom (Human Resource Management)

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

MCom (Organisation and Management Studies) The Organisation and Management Studies specialisation focuses on the analysis of organisational change. Specifically it looks at the coordination of organisational structure and resources in order to effectively attain organisational goals. This specialisation is designed for students interested in how organisational change can achieve designated organisational goals. There is increasing demand in both the private and public sectors for professional managers and consultants with expertise in organisational design and change implementation. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Business Capstone Project) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Management, Work and Organisation Organisational Behaviour Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Cross-Cultural Management Global Business Operations and Management Negotiation Skills Technology, Management and Innovation Organisational Transformation at the Speed of E Strategic Human Resource Management Towards Corporate Sustainability International Business Negotiation Career Management and Skills Strategic People Management Global Business Strategy Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation Value Creation from the Office of the CFO Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Managing Agile Organisations Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (Business Strategy) The Business Strategy specialisation is designed to provide students with the analytical skills necessary to tackle the complex strategic decisions facing managers in the global business environment. This specialisation provides the big picture skills necessary for anyone who wants to effectively guide the direction of a business unit or corporation. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Managerial Economics Global Business and the Multinational Enterprise UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

The Human Resource Management (HRM) specialisation provides a strong applied and theoretical grounding in all aspects of the management of people. This specialisation is aimed at students interested in acquiring a working knowledge of all key HRM functions and processes. Specialists in HRM are increasingly sought after in private and public sector organisations, both as managers and as management consultants. A good knowledge of HRM issues is also important for those interested in general management. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Business Capstone Project) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Management, Work and Organisation Strategic Human Resource Management Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Cross-Cultural Management Employment Relations The Management of Training Employment and Industrial Law Negotiation Skills Technology, Management and Innovation Organisational Transformation at the Speed of E Career Management and Skills Managing Occupational Health and Safety Remuneration and Performance Management Human Resource Recruitment, Selection and Development International Human Resource Management Strategic People Management Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

Management
MCom (International Business) The International Business specialisation focuses on three key areas of strategic international management: organising and conducting global operations, the competitive international environment, and the role and responsibilities of management in firms facing international competition.This specialisation is aimed at students who wish to acquire the skills to analyse corporate and business-unit strategies and the many dimensions of international business. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Business Capstone Project) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Global Business and the Multinational Enterprise Asia-Pacific Business and Management Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Cross-Cultural Management Global Business Strategy and Management Corporate Strategy in East Asia Global Business Operations and Management Plus MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) Choose 2 courses from the following: Cross-Cultural Management Management Accounting Control Business Chinese A Investments and Portfolio Selection International Corporate Finance 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

37

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Economics of Strategy Organisational Economics Global Business Strategy and Management Global Business Operations and Management UOC 6 6 6 6

Business Law
MCom (Business Law) The Business Law specialisation addresses the legal implications of business strategies across a range of key areas of contemporary commerce, including regulatory compliance, taxation, finance, franchising, trade practices, and intellectual property. This specialisation is aimed at students interested in legal issues relevant to commerce. It enables students to obtain general knowledge in a number of areas or to specialise within a particular area of business law. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including COMM 5004 Business Capstone Project) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Legal Foundations of Business And choose one course from the following: Corporations and Business Associations Law Taxation Law Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Intellectual Property for Business E-Business and the Law Special Topic in Business Law Special Topic in Taxation Competition and Consumer Law Corporations and Business Associations Law (if not already completed) Law of Corporate Governance Taxation Law (if not already completed) Business Law in a Global Economy Technology, Information and the Law Franchising Taxation of Business Entities International Business Taxation Corporate Law, Tax and Strategy Capital Gains Tax Project Report Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 UOC 6

Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Business Capstone Project) Plus 2 Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Customer and Market Analysis Marketing Management Plus 4 Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Marketing Communication and Promotion Applied Marketing Research Distribution, Retail Channels and Logistics New Product and Service Development E-Marketing International Marketing in Asia Services Marketing Contemporary Issues in Marketing Non-Profit and Social Marketing Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (Tourism Marketing) The Tourism Marketing specialisation focuses on the tourism and hospitality industries with specific reference to the planning, promotion and delivery of attractions, events, meetings, transport and lodging. Students have the option to participate in hands-on operational study and industry placements. This specialisation is designed for students with no prior formal knowledge of the sector who wish to acquire the knowledge and skills to work in the rapidly expanding global tourism industry. It prepares students for management roles in destination marketing, conference planning, consulting firms and international hotels. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Business Capstone Project) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Customer and Market Analysis Marketing Management Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Global Perspectives in Tourism Strategic Tourism Marketing Destination Marketing and Management Business, Sporting and other Event Management Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

For students who wish to extend the MCom (Business Strategy) specialisation, refer to the list of electives available in the UNSW Online Handbook at www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/plans/ current/COMMDS8404.html Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC)

Aswin Andrison, Indonesia Master of Commerce (Business Strategy) The Australian School of Business offers high quality postgraduate business degrees and a rich student experience, both of which are highly regarded by todays leading corporations. I chose the Business Strategy specialisation in the Master of Commerce to gain greater strategic business skills and to enter the management consulting industry. Even before I completed my degree, the knowledge, skills and experience that I gained allowed me to stand out from the crowd and practise in the strategy consulting profession earlier than planned. This degree has provided me with the capability to understand the external and internal forces operating in our clients business and has equipped me with the skills to formulate effective strategies in helping our clients to gain an advantageous position in the competitive marketplace and to ensure their sustainable growth. The highlight of my study has been my involvement as President in the Australian School of Business postgraduate student organisation. This role has given me the opportunity to utilise skills and knowledge gained from my studies and has also given me a hands-on experience in managing an organisation from the strategic point of view.

Marketing
MCom (Marketing) The Marketing specialisation is concerned with demand generation and exchange processes in competitive markets, both domestically and internationally. The specialisation takes an intellectually rigorous approach, drawing not only on the general field of marketing but also the related disciplines of economics, finance, psychology, sociology, mathematics and statistics. This specialisation is designed for students interested in a management relevant approach to marketing. The specialisation prepares students for a career in product management, customer services and tourism, new product planning, international marketing and management, logistics and distribution, sales and purchasing, advertising, direct marketing and public relations, marketing research and management consulting.

Information Systems
MCom (Information Systems) The Information Systems specialisation focuses on the effective use of information systems and information technology within organisations. The program concentrates on how information systems are planned, analysed, designed or acquired, operated

38

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

and managed. It is suitable for students with no prior information systems studies, who are interested in information systems and their ability to support organisational objectives. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Business Capstone Project) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Business Information Systems Data Management Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Information Systems Project Management E-Business Applications and Technologies Information Systems Auditing Information Systems Forensics Advanced Data Management Knowledge Management Systems and Technologies Information Systems Management Business Data Communications Infrastructure Information Systems Security Information Systems Development Business Intelligence and Decision Support Special Topic in Information Systems and Management Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) MCom (Supply Chain and Logistics) The Supply Chain and Logistics specialisation provides both theoretical and practical guidance on the management of supply chain and logistics functions in increasingly globalised business organisations. It introduces students to the knowledge and tools required to understand and manage logistic and supply chain processes which involve sourcing, producing, storing and transporting goods within and between organisations. This specialisation ensures students are equipped with skills and knowledge suitable for a wide range of careers in all industries involving logistics and supply chain functions. Examples include mining and energy, transport and logistics, manufacturing and retail industries. It is also designed to prepare students for a career in business process management. Program Structure 4 MCom Core Courses (24 UOC) as required (including Quantitative Methods for Business) Plus Specialisation Core Courses (12 UOC) Supply Chain Planning and Design Logistics Management Plus Specialisation Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Business Process Improvement and Quality Management Statistics for Business Business Forecasting Business Risk Management 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6

E-Business: Strategies and Processes Management Accounting and Business Analysis Information Systems Project Management Business Information Systems Distribution, Retail Channels and Logistics Plus 2 MCom Elective Courses (12 UOC) Master of Technology and Innovation Management Program Code: 8007 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July)

6 6 6 6 6

want to expand their career choices by broadening their business expertise. The unique design of MBT courses enables participants to acquire the intellectual tools to manage both business and technology. Students can customise their individual program to focus on improving business management and/ or technology management competencies and knowledge. A unique combination of courses provides participants with an array of intellectual tools to manage business as well as technology, and where these two aspects of management intersect. The MBT is designed to be undertaken part time in conjunction with full-time employment and can be taken via interactive online classes accessed by students at any time and place. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) plus a minimum of four years relevant professional experience, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC), normally 12 courses of 6 UOC each. Learning can be tailored to individual needs (choose 12 from over 20 courses). The program includes 2 capstone courses and students are required to undertake at least one of 2 capstone courses towards the completion of their program. Students are not permitted to enrol in either or both of the 2 capstone courses until they have successfully completed 8 courses (48 UOC). Master of Accounting and Business Information Technology Program Code: 8425 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Accounting and Business Information Technology (MAccBIT) is a specialist Master program that exposes students to current theory and practical applications of a range of issues. These include enterprise systems, business intelligence, design support, strategic management accounting, e-business, corporate governance, risk management, audit and assurance, information systems, security, and forensic investigation. The program is designed for graduates, early and mid-career professionals with a background in accounting or information systems/ information technology wanting to extend their understanding of methods and tools for leveraging accounting and information systems to enhance business value and competitiveness. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in accounting or information systems/information technology with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Program Structure 8 courses (48 UOC) with a minimum of 3 accounting courses and 3 information systems courses. A further 2 elective courses can be chosen from either accounting and/or information systems. Accounting Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the following: International Financial Statement Analysis Auditing and Assurance Services Business Analysis and Valuation 6 6 6 UOC

The Master of Technology and Innovation Management is offered by the Australian School of Business, the Faculty of Engineering and the Faculty of Science at UNSW. Designed to enhance business and management skills relevant to the demands of modern organisations, the program enables students to complement their technical knowledge by combining management studies with coursework in their field of expertise. The Master of Technology and Innovation Management is designed for early and mid-career science, engineering and technical specialists who want to broaden and develop their skills to include people management and an understanding of business. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in science, engineering or technology with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Program Structure This program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC), normally 8 courses made up of 3 core courses and 5 elective courses. 3 Core Courses (18 UOC) Technology, Management and Innovation Competitive Advantage Through People Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation 5 Elective Courses* (30 UOC) *Of the 5 elective courses, students may take a maximum of 3 courses from any one faculty or School (i.e. the Australian School of Business and the faculties of Engineering and Science). See the UNSW Online Handbook for further information at www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/8007.html Master of Business and Technology Program Code: 8616 Program Duration: 3 to 6 years part time via distance learning Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Study Mode: Distance learning only The Master of Business and Technology (MBT) is an innovative graduate business program aimed at experienced managers and professionals who UOC 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

39

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Value Creation from the Office of the CFO Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Managing the Accounting and Finance Function E-Business: Strategy and Processes Financial Accounting Strategic Management Accounting Corporate Accounting and Regulation Advanced Financial Reporting Managing Agile Organisations Management Accounting Control Systems Accounting for Climate Change and Sustainability Assurance for Climate Change and Sustainability Management Accounting and Business Analysis International Corporate Governance: Accounting and Finance Perspective Information Systems Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the following: Business Systems Project Information Systems Project Management E-Business Applications and Technologies Information Systems Auditing Information Systems Forensics Advanced Data Management Knowledge Management Systems and Technologies Information Systems Management Accounting Information Systems Business Data Communications Infrastructure Information Systems Security Information Systems Development Business Intelligence and Decision Support Data Management Plus

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

The program covers professional actuarial courses and students can choose from a range of elective courses. It is designed for graduates in disciplines with strong mathematical and statistical components such as actuarial studies, economics, engineering, mathematics and science. The Master of Actuarial Studies (Extension) is a lengthened program of the Master of Actuarial Studies, allowing students to include an additional four courses (24 UOC). Subject to academic performance, students from non-actuarial backgrounds may be able to complete the academic requirements to become an associate member of the Institute of Actuaries of Australia. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a substantial component of mathematics, statistics, econometrics or actuarial studies, with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Applicants are expected to have a mathematical background equivalent to a full year of calculus and linear algebra at first-year university undergraduate level at an above credit grade. Applicants without a strong mathematical background may be advised to complete the Institute of Actuaries foundation course and demonstrate adequate mathematical performance on the selfassessed test. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Program Structure The Master of Actuarial Studies program consists of 12 courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC), made up of 4 core courses and 8 elective courses. The Master of Actuarial Studies (Extension) program consists of 16 courses totalling 96 units of credit (UOC) made up of 4 core courses and 12 elective courses. Core Courses (24 UOC) Probability and Statistics for Actuaries Financial Mathematics Finance and Financial Reporting for Actuaries Business Economics Plus 8 Elective Courses (48 UOC) for the Master of Actuarial Studies. Choose 8 courses from the list below. or 12 Elective Courses (72 UOC) for the Master of Actuarial Studies (Extension). Choose 12 courses from the list below. UOC Superannuation and Retirement Benefits Project Report Actuarial Studies Actuarial Theory and Practice A Stochastic Modelling for Actuaries Actuarial Statistics Life Insurance and Superannuation Models Insurance Risk Models Financial Economics for Insurance and Superannuation Actuarial Theory and Practice B Models for Risk Management Risk and Capital Management Asset-Liability Management Risk Management Strategies 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Master of Professional Accounting Program Code: 8409 Program Duration: 1.5 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July)

Master of Professional Accounting (Extension) Program Code: 8415 Program Duration: 2 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Professional Accounting provides an introduction to business with an accounting focus and enables students to obtain recognition by the peak professional accounting bodies in Australia including CPA Australia and the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia (ICAA). It is ideal for those interested in achieving professional accreditation or anyone wanting to build a career in financial management. This program is designed for graduates with no or limited exposure to the study of accounting. Students with extensive accounting experience are advised not to enrol in this program. The Master of Professional Accounting (Extension) provides students with the opportunity to complete a more comprehensive program beyond the core professional knowledge areas required for accreditation with the ICAA and CPA Australia (that is, Master of Professional Accounting). Students study four additional elective courses related to resource management and specialised professional work. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC), normally 13 courses made up of 10 core courses, 2 core half courses and 1 elective course. Core Courses (66 UOC) Auditing and Assurance Services Financial Accounting Strategic Management Accounting Corporate Accounting and Regulation Management Accounting and Business Analysis Business Economics Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis Corporate Finance Legal Foundations for Accountants Accounting Information Systems Corporations and Business Associations Law Taxation Law Plus Elective Course (6 UOC) Choose 1 of the following: Business Analysis and Valuation Advanced Financial Reporting 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 6 3 6 6 6

2 Elective Courses from Accounting and/or Information Systems (12 UOC) Master of Actuarial Studies Program Code: 8411 Program Duration: 1.5 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July)

Master of Actuarial Studies (Extension) Program Code: 8416 Program Duration: 2 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Actuarial Studies allows graduates to obtain and develop the required competencies to enter an actuarial career, and provides quantitative risk management training for entry into the financial service industry.

40

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

For the Master of Professional Accounting (Extension) complete 4 courses from the following (24UOC): UOC International Financial Statement Analysis Business Analysis and Valuation (if not already completed) Value Creation from the Office of the CFO Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Managing the Accounting and Finance Function E-Business: Strategy and Processes Advanced Financial Reporting (if not already completed) Managing Agile Organisations Management Accounting Control Systems Accounting for Climate Change and Sustainability Assurance for Climate Change and Sustainability Business Communication, Ethics and Practice Managerial Economics International Corporate Governance: Accounting and Finance Perspectives Information Systems Security Law for Business International Business Taxation Entrepreneurship and New Venture Management Or other courses as approved by the Program Director. Professional Recognition The Master of Professional Accounting is accredited by CPA Australia and the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia (ICAA). Although the degree is accredited, these organisations assess every applicant against their standing membership requirements. This includes the requirement that each applicant holds an Australian Bachelor degree or equivalent, as determined by the National Office of Overseas Skills Recognition (NOOSR). If requested, these organisations will provide an assessment of an overseas qualification. For further information, contact the professional bodies or obtain information from their websites: www.cpacareers.com.au and www.icaa.org.au Master of Economics Program Code: 8412 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 only (March) The Master of Economics provides advanced training in theoretical and applied aspects of modern economics and econometrics and is designed for graduates with prior economic studies who want to retrain, or upgrade their skills in contemporary economics. Graduates of this program will be prepared for a career as professional economists with advanced technical skills or for further studies in economics or related fields. They will be provided with the knowledge and skills necessary to undertake independent economic analysis and research. Core courses ensure that students develop an in-depth knowledge of contemporary developments in microeconomics, macroeconomics and econometrics. The wide range of elective courses on theoretical and applied topics in economics and econometrics offers the flexibility for students to acquire technical training and knowledge in a number of fields. 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in economics with a credit average in the economics major and a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. The economics major must include a minimum of second-year microeconomics, macroeconomics, econometrics and an additional economics focus, and applicants must have demonstrated competence with mathematical and statistical methods. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC), normally 8 courses made up of 4 core courses and 4 elective courses. Core Courses (24 UOC) Microeconomic Analysis Macroeconomic Analysis Econometric Analysis Mathematical Economics Plus Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Advanced Microeconomic Analysis Advanced Macroeconomic Analysis Advanced Econometric Theory Policy Evaluation Methods Applied Econometrics Strategic Market Behaviour International Trade Economics of Labour Markets Environmental Economics Economics of Health and Medical Care Special Topics in Economics Master of Finance Program Code: 8406 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Finance offers a challenging learning environment which exposes students to the latest thinking in finance, as lecturers are actively involved in innovative finance research. Students complete four core course and four elective courses, with the option to specialise in corporate finance, funds management, international finance or investment banking. The program is designed for graduates who have completed a finance major in their undergraduate degree and who are looking to develop their specialist skills by studying more advanced finance topics. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in finance with a credit average in the finance major and a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Applicants must have demonstrated competence in mathematics and statistical methods. Entry is based on academic achievement only and work experience will not be assessed. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6

Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC), normally 8 courses made up of 4 core courses and 4 elective courses. Core Courses (24 UOC) UOC 6 6 6 Empirical Techniques and Applications in Finance Empirical Studies in Finance Financial Theory and Policy Plus Elective Courses (24 UOC) from any of the streams below Corporate Finance Business Analysis and Valuation International Corporate Finance Alternative Asset Classes Risk and Insurance Real Estate Finance and Investment Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques Services Marketing Structured Finance Law Taxation of Financial Arrangements Research Project Funds Management Business Analysis and Valuation Alternative Asset Classes Financial Institution Management Real Estate Finance and Investment Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques Financial Planning Advice Advanced Investment and Funds Management Applied Funds Management Research Project Services Marketing International Finance Business Analysis and Valuation International Corporate Finance Emerging Financial Markets Alternative Asset Classes Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques International Banking Management International Insurance Management Services Marketing Research Project Investment Banking Business Analysis and Valuation Alternative Asset Classes Financial Institution Management Risk and Insurance Real Estate Finance and Investment Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Financial Risk Management for Financial Institutions 6

Takeovers, Restructuring and Corporate Governance 6

Strategic Management of Credit Risk and Loan Policy 6 Fixed Income Securities and Interest Rate Derivatives 6

Strategic Management of Credit Risk and Loan Policy 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

41

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Fixed Income Securities and Interest Rate Derivatives 6 Takeovers, Restructuring and Corporate Governance 6 Trading in Financial Securities Services Marketing Structured Finance Law Taxation of Financial Arrangements Research Project 6 6 6 6 6

Plus Finance Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the following: Investments and Portfolio Selection Capital Budgeting and Financial Decisions Issues in Corporate Finance International Corporate Finance Applied Portfolio Management and Modelling Emerging Financial Markets Alternative Asset Classes International Corporate Governance: Accounting and Finance Perspectives Financial Institution Management Risk and Insurance Real Estate Finance and Investment Derivatives and Risk Management Techniques Financial Planning Advice Advanced Investment and Funds Management Applied Funds Management International Banking Management International Insurance Management Trading in Financial Securities* 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Students may also take any other course approved by the Master of Finance Program Director. Master of Financial Analysis Program Code: 8413 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Financial Analysis is designed for finance and accounting professionals who want to further develop their knowledge and skills to pursue a career in financial planning. A broad range of courses in accounting and finance are offered. Students have the flexibility to tailor the program and select courses according to their professional requirements and interests. The program develops high-level analytical skills which are critical for career development in investment analysis, funds management and most careers involving business analysis. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in finance or accounting with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC), normally 8 accounting and finance courses. Students must study a minimum of 3 courses in each discipline. Accounting Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses for the following: International Financial Statement Analysis Auditing and Assurance Services Business Analysis and Valuation Value Creation from the Office of the CFO Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Managing the Accounting and Finance Function E-Business: Strategy and Processes Financial Accounting Strategic Management Accounting Corporate Accounting and Regulation Advanced Financial Reporting Managing Agile Organisations Management Accounting Control Systems Accounting for Climate Change and Sustainability Assurance for Climate Change and Sustainability Management Accounting and Business Analysis International Corporate Governance: Accounting and Finance Perspectives 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Category A - Applicants with limited professional experience must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in information systems, information technology, computer science or engineering with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business A minimum of two years full-time relevant professional experience after completion of the relevant degree. Category B - Applicants with extensive professional experience must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) as determined by the Australian School of Business A minimum of five years full-time relevant professional experience after completion of the relevant degree. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC), normally 8 courses made up of 6 core courses and 2 elective courses. Core Courses (36 UOC) Strategic Management of Business Information Systems Management of Business Information Systems Operations Information Technology Quality and Project Management Business Systems Project Managing the Human Side of Technological Innovation UOC 6 6 6 6 6

Strategic Management of Credit Risk and Loan Policy 6 Fixed Income Securities and Interest Rate Derivatives 6 Takeovers, Restructuring and Corporate Governance 6

*Trading in Financial Securities may count as an Accounting or Finance course but not both.

Plus 2 Elective Courses from Accounting and/or Finance (12 UOC) Professional Recognition CPA Australia is willing to grant exemptions for elective segments of the CPA program for prior learning assessed on the basis of courses that meet its requirements of equivalent content and depth. The granting of exemptions is not automatic. Decisions will be made on a case-by-case basis by CPA Australia. Master of Information Systems Program Code: 8407 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Information Systems is designed to provide further education to information systems (IS)/ information technology (IT) professionals, who see themselves advancing into management and leadership roles in the industry. The program provides up-to-date knowledge and skills in the management of business information systems in the context of the fast-changing business environment focusing on aligning IT and business strategy, delivering IT services, project management and quality IS, and human resource and change management involved in IS/IT implementation. Entry Requirements Admission to the Master of Information Systems is based on relevant academic qualifications and professional experience. There are two categories of entry.

Bandar Aboalshamat, Saudi Arabia Master of Information Systems I came from Saudi Arabia as an international student and I chose to study at UNSW due to its reputation as a prestigious Australian university with excellent postgraduate business programs. The Master of Information Systems enabled me to build on my work experience and undergraduate studies to develop an understanding of IS theories and applications in relation to modern businesses. In particular, the course content is industry relevant and can be directly applied in my work as Assistant Project Manager at The Saudi National Bank. I would highly recommend the Master of Information Systems to students wishing to differentiate themselves for future employers.

42

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Plus Choose 1 course from the following: Negotiation Skills Organisational Behaviour Career Management and Skills Business Communications, Ethics and Practice Plus Elective Courses (12 UOC) Choose 2 courses from the following: E-Business Applications and Technologies Information Systems Auditing Information Systems Forensics Advanced Data Management Knowledge Management Systems and Technologies Business Data Communications Infrastructure Information Systems Security Business Intelligence and Decision Support Principles of Marketing Accounting: User Perspective Business Economics Business Law and Technology Fundamentals of People Management Enterprise Risk Management Note: Master of Information Systems students are exempted from normal course prerequisites. Master of Marketing Program Code: 8414 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Marketing is an advanced coursework program designed to enhance the skills and knowledge of marketing professionals looking to move into senior marketing or management roles, or become skilled leaders in a specialist area of marketing. The core courses provide students with an understanding of current marketing thinking and students can choose from a range of elective courses. Entry Requirements Admission to the Master of Marketing is based on relevant academic qualifications and professional experience. There are three categories of entry. Category A - Applicants with limited professional experience must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in commerce or business with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business Significant academic studies in marketing or a closely related discipline A minimum of one year full-time relevant professional experience after completion of the relevant degree Demonstrated competence in business statistics. 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6

Category B - Applicants with extensive professional experience must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in commerce or business, as determined by the Australian School of Business A minimum of three years full-time relevant professional experience after completion of the relevant degree Demonstrated competence in business statistics. Category C - Applicants without a Bachelor degree in business. Special consideration may be given where an applicant has extensive (more than five years) professional marketing and business experience. Applicants must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business Some formal marketing training A minimum of five years professional marketing and business experience Demonstrated competence in business statistics. Please consult the following website for further assessment criteria: www.asb.unsw.edu.au Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC), normally 12 courses made up of 4 core courses and 8 elective half courses. Core Courses (24 UOC) UOC 6 6 6 6 Marketing Management: Contemporary Analytical Perspectives Strategic Skills for Marketers Creativity Innovation and Change in Marketing Marketing Consulting Project Plus Elective Half Courses (24 UOC) Choose 8 courses from the following:* Business-to-Business Marketing Services Marketing Management Customer Relationship Management Marketing Relationships and Networks Marketing Research Global Marketing and Entrepreneurships International Marketing Research Advances in Consumer Analysis Global Marketing Strategy Marketing in Asia Understanding Buyer Behaviour Analytical Methods for Segmentation,Targeting and Consumer Analysis Product and Brand Management Strategic Digital Marketing and Customer Experience Management Integrated Marketing Communications Advertising and Promotion Implementation Advanced Marketing Strategy Advanced Topics in Marketing 1 Advanced Topics in Marketing 2 Advanced Topics in Marketing 3
* Course content and elective course offerings vary from year to year reflecting contemporary and emerging marketing issues of topical concern and specialty areas of visiting professors and academics. **Core courses are offered in intensive mode on weekends from 9:00am to 5:00pm and elective courses (3 UOC) are offered in the evenings from 6:00pm to 9:00pm.

Master of Risk Management Program Code: 8418 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) The Master of Risk Management (MRM) is a new integrated program which provides up-to-date knowledge and skills in the management of a broad spectrum of risks that organisations are confronted with in the context of the fast-changing, increasingly global business environment. The MRM prepares graduates, early and mid-career business and nonbusiness professionals for the emerging role of risk manager in a broad spectrum of organisations. Three specialisations are available Quantitative Risk, Business Operations and Policy and Compliance, reflecting the different skill sets and backgrounds of graduates who wish to follow a career path as a risk professional. Entry Requirements Admission is based on relevant academic qualifications and professional experience. There are two categories of entry. Category A - Applicants with no professional experience must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Category B - Applicants with extensive professional experience must have: A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification), as determined by the Australian School of Business A minimum of three years full-time relevant professional experience after completion of the relevant degree, as determined by the Australian School of Business.

UOC 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3 3

For both categories of entry the required academic requirements are: MRM (Quantitative Risk): a recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) majoring in quantitative finance, actuarial studies, mathematics or statistics MRM (Business Operations): a recognised Bachelor degree in commerce or economics (or equivalent qualification) MRM (Policy and Compliance): a recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) Program Structure The MRM consists of 8 courses (5 core courses plus 3 elective courses from the specialisations). Core Courses (30 UOC) UOC Finance and Financial Reporting for Actuaries Fundamentals of Risk and Risk Management Risk Tools Risk Decisions People, Organisation and Risk 6 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

43

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Plus Elective Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 Electives from one of the specialisations: Quantitative Risk This specialisation is well suited to business graduates and professionals with a strong quantitative finance and actuarial background, who are aspiring to progress their career as a risk manager infield such as health care, life insurance, investments or pensions. UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 Stochastic Modelling Insurance Risk Models Financial Economics for Insurance and Superannuation Superannuation and Retirement Benefits Models for Risk Management Risk and Capital Management

AGSM MBA Program Program Code: 8350 Program Duration: 16 months Commencement: Session 1 (January) The AGSM MBA program is a world-class program ranked number 1 in Australia and 35th in the world (2011 Financial Times UK Global MBA Rankings). The program is designed for talented young managers and business professionals seeking to accelerate a career shift into senior management and leadership roles, and fully realise their leadership potential. The program prepares graduates for leadership roles in business and government. The program incorporates scenario modelling and simulations into traditional classroom teaching, using the case study method and a strong emphasis on teamwork and cohesion to develop management skills, encourage critical thinking and sharpen decision-making abilities. AGSM MBA students are of exceptional calibre, with an average GMAT of 665. Students learn at an internationally recognised institution, in which both students and faculty members have significant industry experience and there is direct access to management insights of many current business leaders. Joining an MBA program is one of the most important decisions you can make, whether it is to further your current career, make a change or develop new abilities. You will meet and work with an exceptionally talented group of individuals from diverse backgrounds, many of whom have worked for global organisations. You will gain knowledge, skills and confidence to achieve your goals and accelerate your career. You will have lifelong learning opportunities and, through the alumni network, be part of an influential global network of business leaders. The relationship of AGSM MBA programs with many of the worlds leading business schools is testimony to its standing in the international community. This is reflected in the depth of its incoming and outgoing exchange programs with leading schools from Asia, Canada, Europe, the UK and the USA. AGSM MBA programs currently has exchange partnerships with 27 elite international business schools. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a strong academic performance and a minimum of two years relevant professional or managerial work experience. Applicants without a Bachelor degree require a minimum of six years relevant professional or managerial work experience. Applicants must also submit supporting documentation including four personal statements (each approximately 250 words in length), examining leadership, experience, community connectivity and problem solving capability. A detailed curriculum vitae demonstrating business management leadership potential is also required, along with two referee reports and proof of identify. Applicants must also provide a minimum overall GMAT score of 550 with minimum scores of verbal 25, quantitative 35 and AWA 4.0.

Program Structure The AGSM MBA program has a two-stage structure the core phase and the elective phase. Stage 1 Core phase consists of 9 core courses (54 UOC) completed over 2 sessions UOC Foundations of Management (3 week intensive) Accounting Data Analysis and Decision Making Economics Finance Marketing Management Operations Management Organisational Behaviour Strategy 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Business Operations This specialisation is well suited to business graduates and professionals who wish to follow a career path as an operation risk manager. Courses focus on the examination of risks that arise from the execution of an organisations day-to-day activities through its people, systems and processes, and the challenges associated with their effective management. UOC International Financial Statement Analysis Auditing and Assurance Services Business Risk Management Managing Intangible Resources Financial Accounting Accounting for Climate Change and Sustainability Policy and Compliance This specialisation is well suited to non-business graduates and professionals who wish to follow a career path as a risk manager in organisations where this role evolved from a function traditionally responsible with the management of safety, health and environmental risks. Human Factors in Transportation Safety Tax Risk Management Contracts Management and Law Environment Management Food Safety and Quality Assurance 6 6 6 6 6 6

Stage 2 Elective phase consists of 7 elective courses (42 UOC) in the following subject disciplines: Accounting Economics Finance General Management Marketing Organisational Behaviour Statistics and Operations Management During the elective phase, students may apply to go on an international exchange program at one of the AGSM MBA programs prestigious partner schools in Europe, North America and Asia. These partner schools represent 27 of the worlds leading business schools including London Business School, Wharton, Stern (NYU) and ESADE. Internships, management projects and individual studies in management may also be undertaken during this phase. Career and Recruitment Services The AGSM Career Services Unit provides students with the opportunity to develop career management skills during the course of the MBA program. The range of career services is specifically designed to provide students with the tools for successful job searching and career advancement as well as the guidance and support needed to map out their longterm career paths. The tailored services provided by the AGSM Career Services Unit include: Career Management Programs - These programs provide students with a range of skills to proactively manage their careers. These are delivered face-toface via classroom/team sessions or online through the AGSM MBA Career Centre. Career Advice/Guidance - Individual counselling sessions are available by appointment with the professional AGSM MBA Careers Services team to obtain more tailored career guidance and support. Recruitment Services - The AGSM Career Services Unit builds and develops strong relationships with companies who can benefit from having an MBA graduate in their organisation. Successfully aligning the skills and experience of MBA students with the needs of business is our key objective. The Career Services Unit continually markets to previous and prospective recruiters and leverages from our strong alumni base. Prestigious clients include companies such as ABN AMRO Bank N.V., A.T. Kearney, Inc., Barclays Bank PLC, BMW (Japan), Boral Limited, Mercer LLC (China), and McKinsey & Company. Professional Recognition The AGSM MBA program is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegial Schools of Business (AACSB).

UOC 6 6 6 6 6

44

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Coursework programs

Taxation
Atax is now part of the Australian School of Taxation and Business Law within the Australian School of Business at UNSW. Atax programs have been designed with a range of delivery modes for international students: Distance study mode Courses may be studied in your own country. This mode of study utilises a combination of Audio Conferences and Regional Classes, Webinars and Blackboard (UNSW web-based site to complement Ataxs teaching resources. Study materials, past examination papers, feedback, discussion forums and online links are available from this site). Face to face weekly mode* Face-to-face classes are held at UNSW CBD Campus. These classes are usually in the evening from 6:00pm to 8:00pm. Class sizes are limited to a maximum of 40 students, so students can be assured of a quality educational experience. Intensive mode* Some Atax courses can also be studied face-to-face via intensive mode. Intensive classes enable students to complete the required face to face classes in four days. These classes are held at UNSW main campus in Kensington, Sydney or at UNSW CBD campus. *A student visa is required for these modes. Master of Taxation Program Code: 9250 Program Duration: 1 year Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Study Mode: Distance learning or on-campus The Master of Taxation provides students with an advanced taxation knowledge base and advanced professional skills in taxation. It is suited to those with a good basic grounding in taxation who seek to develop advanced technical skills in taxation; international tax; tax and financial planning; or revenue administration. The program is appropriate for early and mid-career tax professionals. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) in law or commerce (including one course in taxation) with a credit average overall, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Program Structure The structure for this program is currently under review for Semester 1 2012. The new structure will consist of 8 courses: a series of core courses with the choice of courses from one of four specialisations taxation, international taxation, taxation and financial planning or revenue administration. Professional Recognition Completion of the Master of Taxation provides full members of CPA Australia with the academic component required for specialist status. Study is recognised as contributing to Continuing Professional Development for CPAs and Financial Planners, Continuing Professional Education for Chartered Accountants and Continuing Legal Education for Lawyers.

Master of Taxation Studies Program Code: 9257 Program Duration: 2 years Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Study Mode: Stage 1 Distance learning only, Stage 2 Distance learning or on-campus The Master of Taxation Studies is designed for students who intend to become a taxation specialist but who do not have a background in the Australian legal or taxation system. It is a two stage program, each of which is the equivalent of a year of full time study. The first stage covers core courses in law, taxation and accounting to ensure that students have a good understanding of the Australian legal system as it applies to taxation. The second stage builds on this foundation to develop an advanced knowledge base and to further develop professional skills. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree (or equivalent qualification) with a credit average, as determined by the Australian School of Business. Program Structure The Master of Taxation Studies consists of 16 courses (8 core courses in Stage 1, and 1 core course and 7 elective courses in Stage 2). There are two areas of specialisation available within the Master of Taxation Studies - international taxation, and taxation and financial planning. For more information refer to: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au Core Courses in Stage 1 (48 UOC) Principles of Australian Taxation Law Microeconomics and Australian Taxation System Framework of Commercial Law Accounting 1 Taxation Administrative Law Law of Companies, Trust and Partnerships Taxation of Companies. Trusts and Partner Critical Perspectives and Ethics Core Course in Stage 2 (6 UOC) Taxation Policy Plus Elective Courses in Stage 2 (42 UOC) Choose 7 courses from the list below: Research Methods in Taxation Taxation of Corporations Asia Pacific Tax Regimes Taxation of Trusts Taxation Administration Process Taxation of Corporate Finance International Taxation: Anti-Avoidance Taxation of Superannuation Taxation of Capital Gains Taxation of Industry and Technology Consolidations and Group Structures Principles of Australian International Taxation Taxation of Structured Finance 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6

GST: Design and Structure Principles of GST Law Taxation of Employee Remuneration Taxation and Invest Regulations in China Taxation Strategies in Financial Planning International Taxation: Design and Structure Principles of Revenue Administration Specific Taxation Jurisdictions: Europe Specialist Taxation Jurisdictions: North America Specialist Taxation Jurisdictions: Asia Double Taxation Agreements Taxation Risk Management Self Managed Superannuation Funds Law Comparative Taxation Systems Taxation of Property Transactions Single Course Study (Non-Award) Program Code: 6066 Program Duration: 6 months Commencement: Semester 1 and Semester 2 Study Mode: Distance learning only

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Single Course Study allows you to supplement your existing skills and knowledge in a particular field of study, perhaps related to your work, or it allows you to test the water with tertiary studies, perhaps prior to embarking on a degree program. While Single Course Study does not directly lead to the award of a formal qualification from UNSW, tertiary level credits are accrued and may be recognised towards a tertiary program provided the correct level of assessment has been completed and you meet the entry requirements for that program. Entry Requirements Entry requirements are similar to those for entry into the program from which the course has been taken. It is important to note that certain courses demand prior knowledge and are, therefore, subject to prerequisites. Professional Recognition Study of single courses is recognised as contributing to Continuing Professional Development for Certified Practising Accountants and Financial Planners, Continuing Professional Education for Chartered Accountants and Continuing Legal Education for Lawyers. Students with overseas degree qualifications in Commerce, Business or Accounting who are seeking conversion of international accounting qualifications can study Single Courses to meet the Institute of Chartered Accountants in Australia (ICAA) and CPA Australia requirements, either from overseas or in Australia. Distance mode of study provides the distinct advantage of allowing study of conversion courses from your home country in order to have your overseas accounting qualifications recognised by ICAA and CPA Australia. You have the opportunity, therefore, of completing professionally recognised Australian studies before migrating, greatly enhancing your prospects of finding suitable employment in the shortest possible time after your arrival. You should contact the ICAA and/or CPA Australia for accurate information relating to your personal circumstances before enrolling in taxation courses.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

45

Faculty of Built Environment

The Faculty of Built Environment Building during the City of Lights Festival

UNSW Built Environment is internationally renowned for being one of the largest built environment faculties in Australia, providing a comprehensive range of multidisciplinary degree programs.

UNSW Built Environments unique offering provides students with specialised skills within a coordinated framework, and encourages them to complement their chosen degree with education experience across a broad range of related disciplines. The faculty is a vibrant community of scholars and students who are focused on the design, delivery and management of a sustainable world. Each degree program is globally recognised as a leading qualification that is highly valued by industry. Students are taught by world acclaimed and award winning lecturers who are leading practitioners in their field. They benefit from a unique learning experience where they are encouraged to understand and partake in collaborative work processes involving multidisciplinary problem solving. Studying at UNSW Built Environment enables you to experience the urban culture of Sydney. Studio projects in each program are often formed from major initiatives affecting the future of Sydney Australians largest and most cosmopolitan city. UNSW Built Environment places a high value on international engagement, this is evident by the excellent working and learning relationships we have established with some of the worlds most reputable institutions including the Politecnico de Milano Design School in Milan, Italy and the Tsinghua University in Beijing, China. Students can participate in a UNSW exchange program with one of 250 international partner institutions. All students enjoy 24-hour access to design studios, a digital workshop and materials library as well as dedicated workspaces. You can expect a flexible and supportive learning environment, which will allow you to balance your study, professional and personal life. Discover how UNSW Built Environment can support your career and challenge you to become an accomplished leader at the forefront of your profession.

Note: The Faculty will be reviewing all postgraduate programs in 2011 with a view to simplifying program structures and enhancing academic coherence. This will improve program quality, strengthen academic advisement and enable students to better understand program and course requirements. Prospective students in 2012 will be informed of substantive program changes (if any).

Contact Details

Tel: +61 2 9385 4799 Email: fbe@unsw.edu.au Website: www.fbe.unsw.edu.au

46

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Built Environment Coursework programs

Architecture
Master of Architecture Program Code: 8143 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years The Master of Architecture is an accredited degree for architectural registration. Designed for qualified graduates wishing to enter architecture at a professional level, the program draws its candidates from Sydney, Australia, the Pacific region and all over the world. It allows students increased flexibility and mobility in tertiary education, strengthening pathways to a global, professional career as an architect. The program fosters a broad vision that equips graduates with a considered understanding of the cultural, social, environmental, political, business and development contexts in which architecture is designed, situated and practised in the built environment. The program builds advanced knowledge and techniques in architectural design and develops capabilities to work in professional practice which are complemented by specialised elective course studies. The studio project options offered in the first year provide students with course choices, while in the second year, the graduation year experience provides students with the unique opportunity to engage in a comprehensive research and design experience. Enhancing the students postgraduate educational experience. There are opportunities to choose course studies from other disciplines within the Faculty of Built Environment, summer semester courses and engagement in course projects that connect with local and international communities. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in Architecture with a credit average or above and documented evidence of six months work experience. A portfolio must be submitted and this will be considered in the assessment for admission. The portfolio should be in powerpoint format (do not include CAD drawings, PDF or TIFF files) or alternatively may be submitted as an A4 bound hard copy. Applicants must include sample works from various stages of their first degree, text should accompany all drawings/images to explain the projects. Professional work can be included, but the degree of responsibility of the work must be stated. Program Structure A total of 96 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of core courses (60 UOC) and elective courses (36 UOC). There is a wide range of elective courses offered by the Faculty (additional to the following list of electives) which may be studied. Students should check with the Faculty at time of enrolment. Core Courses (60 UOC) Design Studio 1 Design Studio 2 Construction and Structures Environment Professional Practice Research Studio Architecture in Asia Major Design Studio UOC 6 6 6 6 6 12 6 12

Elective Courses (36 UOC) Choose 6 courses from the following list: Multimedia in Design Presentation Parametric Design using a Building Information Model Experimental Modelling Chinese Gardens 20th-century Architecture: Modernity to Deconstruction Thinking Through Drawings 2 A History of Housing Glass in 20th-century Architecture Architectural Spatialisation Drawing and Design: Ideation Tropical Architecture Presentation Rhetoric Land and Environment Law Urban Design Design and Technology Timber History and Theory of Urban Development and Design Documentation Techniques for Major Buildings Design for Energy Efficiency

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Built Environment (Sustainable Development)


Master of the Built Environment in Sustainable Development Program Code: 8132 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of the Built Environment in Sustainable Development is an advanced interdisciplinary coursework program suitable for graduates from a wide range of backgrounds such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, building, property development, civil engineering, environmental studies and education which provides opportunities for professionals to improve their knowledge and skills in the application of the principles of sustainable development to the planning, design, construction and management of buildings and the urban environment. While approached from an international perspective, the program places special emphasis on the rapidly developing SouthEast Asian region. The program aims to: improve understanding of the issues of sustainability, their interconnectedness and interdependencies at building, neighbourhood, city and regional scales develop skills in energy/environmental modelling, assessment tools, life cycle assessment, sustainable planning and design, and quadruple bottom line develop understanding of human factors and urban planning considerations create specialisation through a graduate project and electives. The program is supported by industry specialists and academics who assist students in developing a broad understanding of key issues as they affect the built environment, as well as in building key sets of skills to serve growing professional needs. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average in an appropriate discipline. Where an applicants qualifications are not considered adequate, admission may be permitted to the Graduate Diploma or Graduate Certificate with the possibility of upgrading to the Master program, subject to satisfactory performance. Program Structure The program comprises four core courses, a research project or a design studio, and a number of electives, which may be selected from various faculties across the University depending on career path intentions and interest, for a total of 72 units of credit (UOC). Students may specialise by completing a research project or a design studio. The design studio pathway gives students from design disciplines the opportunity to apply and develop their knowledge base with a studio class of professional practitioners, including students from the Master of Urban Development and Design. Core Courses (24 UOC) Sustainable Development and the Urban Environment Resources, Materials and Sustainability Energy and the Built Environment Human Factors, Sustainability and Habitability UOC 6 6 6 6

Note: Most courses are offered in only one semester per year. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please check course availability with the Faculty Student Centre prior to enrolment.

Professional Recognition The program is accredited by the New South Wales Architects Registration Board and recognised by the Royal Australian Institute of Architects, which will enable graduates to sit the professional examinations required to become a registered architect following the prescribed period of professional experience. Career Opportunities Graduates gain professional experience in a variety of private, corporate and government practice settings to enable them to meet the requirements for registration as an architect. These practice settings range from large multidisciplinary built environment practices with offices throughout Australia and the Asia Pacific region to medium to small scale architectural practices. Graduates may contribute to practice teams working on large scale civic and institutional buildings, urban and infrastructure projects or multi-density residential projects. These contributions may range from contract documentation to design development to design concept schemes and often include competitions. Complementing their comprehensive postgraduate studies are the specialised architectural interests graduates develop during their studies, their engagement with interdisciplinary and teamwork projects as well as their bilingual capabilities. These attributes prepare graduates for their architectural practice experiences and their future leadership contributions in the profession of architecture.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

47

Faculty of Built Environment Coursework programs

Plus Option 1 Design Studio (48 UOC from the following) Design Studio UOC 12 12 12 36

Note: The following may substitute this class in arrangement with Program Director.

Program Structure The Graduate Diploma comprises the four core courses within the Master of the Built Environment in Sustainable Development and four electives totalling 48 units of credit.

Core Courses (36 UOC) Human Resources Management Principles and Practice of Management Construction Planning and Control Contracts Management and Law Construction Management Applications Project Management Plus Elective Courses (12 UOC) Choose 2 courses from the following list: Computers in Construction Management Project Risk Management Property Investment Asset and Facilities Management Resources, Materials and Sustainability

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6

Urban Design Studio 1 Urban Design Studio 2 Elective Courses Or Option 2 Research (48 UOC) Design Research Methods Graduate Project Elective Courses Elective Courses (2436 UOC) Land and Environment Law Project Management Environmental Impact Assessment Society, Environmental Policy and Sustainability Frameworks for Environmental Management Tools for Environmental Management Transport Applications of GIS Property Development Case Studies in Urban Development and Design Managing Greenhouse Gas Emissions Design for Energy Efficiency

Construction Project Management


Master of Construction Project Management Program Code: 8123 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Construction Project Management is a well-established and highly regarded degree designed for graduates in building, construction management, architecture, engineering and quantity surveying. It is both professionally oriented and firmly grounded in contemporary scholarship. Graduates have a strong capacity to integrate, apply and develop new knowledge in their professional field. The program aims at improving proficiency of practitioners in the construction industry to meet current and future challenges. It allows students to learn general management and project management principles and techniques, as well as the specific application of these principles and techniques to the management of large-scale and complex construction projects. Students develop a knowledge base in managing construction projects and industry best-practice, as well as developing learning and research skills, a capacity to think critically, logically and creatively, to make better decisions and solve problems effectively and ethically. Key features of the program include: strong participation and support from Australias leading construction and project management companies with learning content that is modern and advanced lecturers who include leading researchers and excellent teachers with very diverse backgrounds exclusive learning and graduate attribute workshops to enhance and develop students learning skills opportunities to share diverse cultural and industry experiences in a multicultural environment the use of extensive information technologies and online course websites to enhance learning experience and outcomes Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average or above in a relevant discipline such as building, construction management, construction economics, civil engineering, mining engineering, architecture, quantity surveying, property development or real estate. Professional experience in the construction industry of at least 12 months at a management level is essential. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of six core courses (36 UOC) and two elective courses (12 UOC).

UOC 6 6 6 6 6

UOC 6 18 24 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Economics of Climate Change and Carbon Markets 6

Note: Most courses are offered in only one semester per year. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please check with the Faculty Student Centre prior to enrolment.

Career Opportunities The program is appropriate for people seeking to advance their careers in construction management, project management, design management, contracts management, construction corporate management (including human resource management), value management and international project management. Master of Construction Project Management in Professional Practice Program Code: 8124 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The management of construction projects embraces and comprises all of the modern management methodologies and principles including project management. Students apply them across the different phases of the construction project development life-cycle to achieve successful outcomes in terms of time, cost, quality, safety and sustainability. The program places particular emphasis on the conceptual, design and construction stages. Qualified applicants may pursue a research study as part of this program. Features of the program include: a strong participation and support from Australias leading construction and project management companies with learning content that is modern and advanced lecturers who include leading researches and excellent teachers with very diverse backgrounds Entry Requirements Students who have completed the requirements of the Master of Construction Project Management with a credit average or above (but have not formally graduated) may apply to upgrade to the Master of Construction Project Management in Professional Practice program.

Note: Most courses are offered in only one semester per year. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please check course availability with the Faculty Student Centre prior to enrolment.

Career Opportunities The program is structured around a number of career options. It allows architects, planners, landscape architects and engineers to build a clearer focus on sustainability in their practice. It also allows for career shift options regardless of career background, graduates can specialise in policy/governance, local government, education or development. This is done by choice of electives and graduate project. The Program Director advises students on these selections to enable the desired career pathways. Graduate Diploma in the Built Environment in Sustainable Development Program Code: 5132 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma of the Built Environment in Sustainable Development fully articulates into the Master program which allows flexibility in course selection and progression. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent with a credit average or above in a relevant discipline. Professional experience will also be considered.

48

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Built Environment Coursework programs

Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of the six core courses (36 UOC) and two elective courses (12 UOC) within the Master of Construction Project Management, research methods (6 UOC) and a research project (18 UOC). In exceptional cases, where a student can demonstrate his/her research skills with evidence, the Research Methods course may be exempted and substituted with an elective course. Career Opportunities The program is appropriate for people seeking to advance their careers in construction management, project management, design management, contracts management, construction corporate management (including human resource management), value management and international project management.

Core Courses (42 UOC) Social Planning Planning and Land Policy Land and Environmental Law Spatial Policy Urban Planning and Infrastructure Urban Economics Human Factors, Sustainability and Habitability Plus Planning Project Plus

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Professional Recognition The program is accredited by the Planning Institute of Australia (PIA). Master graduates are eligible, subject to professional experience requirements, for corporate membership of PIA. Career Opportunities Planners are employed in a large variety of positions in many different organisations with some stake in the built environment. The major employment sectors are state and federal government departments (dealing with land use, development, transport, heritage, infrastructure, urban services etc), local councils, consultant planners, property companies, and environmental organisations. Graduate Diploma in Planning Program Code: 5147 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent. Where an applicants qualifications are not considered adequate, admission may be permitted on the basis of professional experience. Program Structure The program consists of seven core courses within the Master of Planning, totalling 42 units of credit, and one elective (6 UOC). Master of Property and Development Program Code: 8127 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Property and Development program combines built environment and commerce perspectives to reflect both European and North American approaches to real estate, together with an Asian focus. It is designed for professionals who manage urban development as well as those who develop and invest in the built environment. The program stresses creativity, problem solving and interdisciplinary approach. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average or above. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of a combination of core and elective courses. In response to the rapid changes in the field of property, the program offers three choices of specialisation: General Master of Property and Development with no specialisation, or Investment and Development, or Asset and Facilities Management.

12

Electives (18 UOC from one of the following fields) The Master of Planning may be undertaken as a general degree, or with a concentration in one field by taking 18 UOC of electives from one of the following fields, together with an approved planning project. Environmental Sustainability Stream Transport, Land Use and Environment Environmental Management Environmental Impact Assessment Frameworks for Environmental Management Tools for Environmental Management Sustainable Development and the Urban Environment Energy and the Built Environment Urban Design Stream Architecture and the City Design Modelling Time Based Urban and Regional Design Urban Design Studio 1 Urban Design Studio 2 History and Theory of Urban Development and Design Case Studies in Urban Development and Design Urban Landscape and Heritage Urban Governance and Management Stream Transport Land Use and Environment Rural Planning Project Management Property Development Case Studies in Urban Development and Design Urban Landscape and Heritage Urban Modelling Stream Design Modelling Time Based Advanced Techniques in BIM Design Collaboration using a Building Information Model Urban Transport Planning Practice GIS for the Built Environment
Note: Most courses are offered in only one semester per year. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please check course availability with the Faculty Student Centre prior to enrolment. This list of electives is not exhaustive other electives are available and may be taken by students.

Planning
Master of Planning Program Code: 8147 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Planning allows professionals with a Bachelor degree to obtain postgraduate planning qualifications. It is also tailored for professionals working in other sectors, especially those whose work may intersect with the planning system, or requires involvement with planning agencies. The content of the Master of Planning is wide ranging, exposing students to different fields of knowledge and paths to understanding as required by a diverse, contemporary urban society. The program offers teaching in core knowledge, training and key skills required by qualified planners. It also provides students with the opportunity to concentrate their studies in one of four specialist fields: environmental sustainability, urban design, urban management and governance, or urban modelling. Features of the program include: study based on the solid reputation of 40 years of planning education at UNSW the planning project provides opportunity to undertake more detailed applied or theoretical research into an area of planning of personal interest by producing a dissertation of publishable quality Graduates have a sound understanding of the principles and practices of planning and an ability to think critically and analytically about the development and preservation of the built environment. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average or above. Where an applicants qualifications are not considered adequate, admission may be permitted to the Graduate Diploma, with the possibility of upgrading to the Master program, subject to satisfactory performance. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of seven core courses (42 UOC), a planning project (12 UOC) and elective courses (18 UOC).

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 12 12 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

49

Faculty of Built Environment Coursework programs

General (No Specialisation) Core Courses (36 UOC) Property Investment Property Development Modern Property Land and Environmental Law Planning and Land Policy Sustainable Development and the Urban Environment Plus Elective Courses (36 UOC) Choose 6 courses from the following list: Brian Marshall, USA Master of Property and Development (MPD) Before attending UNSW, Brian directed a property development and consultancy firm in the USA. After graduation, he worked with Mirvac in Sydney then with VicUrban in Melbourne as the Development Director for Australias largest sustainable masterplanned community (8,000 homes). Brian is currently in California where he owns a firm focused on the redevelopment of distressed properties. I chose the UNSW Built Environment (BE) program to gain exposure to international markets and networks. My studies at BE gave me a more sophisticated and well-rounded approach toward property development. The MPD program was one of only a few in Australia and was highly recommended and not to forget, was located in one of the greatest cities in the world. The BE staff were accessible and wellconnected within the industry. Through them, I was able to work on real-world projects which also exposed me to Australian and international property development professionals and firms. Designing Public Spaces Social Planning Urban and Regional Design Urban Planning and Infrastructure Property Finance Energy and the Built Environment Human Factors, Sustainability and Habitability Case Studies in Urban Development and Design Valuation Urban Economics Project Management 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6

Planning and Land Policy Sustainable Development and the Urban Environment Plus Extended Core Courses (18 UOC) Project Management Property Finance Case Studies in Urban Development and Design Plus Elective Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the following list: Designing Public Spaces Social Planning Urban and Regional Design Urban Planning and Infrastructure Energy and the Built Environment

6 6

UOC 6 6 6

UOC 6 6 6 6 6

Electives can also be studied from a postgraduate program within another faculty at UNSW subject to meeting any pre-requisites for that course and subject to the Program Directors approval. Asset and Facilities Management Major Core Courses (36 UOC) Property Investment Property Development Modern Property Land and Environmental Law Planning and Land Policy Sustainable Development and the Urban Environment UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6

Electives can also be studied from a postgraduate program within another faculty at UNSW subject to meeting any prerequisites for that course and subject to the Program Directors approval. Investment and Development Major Core Courses (36 UOC) Property Investment Property Development Modern Property Land and Environmental Law UOC 6 6 6 6

Plus Extended Core Courses (18 UOC) Asset and Facilities Management Energy and the Built Environment Human Factors, Sustainability and Habitability Plus Elective Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the following list: Design Collaboration using a Building Information Model Designing Public Spaces Social Planning Urban and Regional Design Urban Planning and Infrastructure Property Finance 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 6 6 6

Electives can also be studied from a postgraduate program within another faculty at UNSW subject to meeting any prerequisites for that course and subject to the Program Directors approval.
Note: Most courses are offered in only one semester per year. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please check course availability with the Faculty Student Centre prior to enrolment.

Career Opportunities Students develop a strong background in property development and investment, which will enable them to manage large commercial property portfolios, work in corporate valuation companies, or develop careers in financial institutions (banking and investment).

50

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Built Environment Coursework programs

Graduates can engage with the property profession and industry by participating in a wide range of activities such as property development, property analysis, property finance, property agency, property management and asset and facilities management. Professional Recognition Graduates can become members of the Australian Property Institute and the Royal Institution of Chartered Surveyors subject to the designated practical experience requirements of both institutions.

The Studio sequence is informed by theory courses in the following areas of advanced study: spatial political economy, the history of urban development, case study theory, urban design principles and paradigms, urban and environmental law, planning policies, principles of property development, urban landscape, and urban heritage conservation. In addition, students re-consider and re-present the years work in a curated exhibition and yearbook, launched in association with the annual UNSW Paul Reid Lecture in Urban Design, a major contribution to critical discourse in the field. In exceptional cases students may be admitted on the basis of professional experience. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree with a credit average in a relevant discipline such as architecture, landscape architecture, urban planning, urban studies, real estate economics or property development. In exceptional cases students may be admitted on the basis of professional work experience. Program Structure The program consists of eight core courses (66 UOC) and one elective course (6 UOC) totalling 72 units of credit (UOC). Core Courses (66 UOC) Urban Design Studio 1 Urban Design Studio 2 Urban Design Studio 3 History and Theory of Urban Development and Design Case Studies in Urban Development and Design Planning and Urban Development Urban Landscape and Heritage Communication in Urban Design Plus Elective Course (6 UOC) Choose 1 course from the following list: Architecture and the City Design Modelling Time Based Advanced Techniques using BIM Principles and Practice of Management Property Finance Modern Property 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC 12 12 12 6 6 6 6 6

Urban Development and Design


Master of Urban Development and Design Program Code: 8131 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 calendar year including a summer semester In responding to the unprecedented pace and scale of urban growth in our time, the Master of Urban Development and Design seeks the creative synthesis of three urban research fields: spatial political economy, the manifestation in urban form of global patterns of capital formation, investment and disinvestment urban design principles and paradigms, normative models of good city form grounded in aesthetic, social and environmental concerns urban design as public policy, the intersection of public policy, design principles, the deal-making of the property sector and defence of the public realm. This is a multidisciplinary program that explores the inter-relationship of urban development and design from an international perspective, placing the mega-cities of the Asia-Pacific region in comparative relationship with the cities of Europe, the Americas, the Middle East and Australasia. The one calendar year program involves two academic semesters of study plus a summer semester which includes a compulsory International Urban Design Studio working with universities and/or planning agencies in a major city of the world. Each year students are given a choice of two cities in the past five years, the Program has undertaken urban projects in Buenos Aires, Abu Dhabi, Beijing, Delhi, Tokyo, Budapest, Hangzhou, Istanbul, Nagoya and Madrid. The Urban Design Studio sequence is progressive, moving from urban design principles and paradigms to the testing of these principles in a specific urban setting, usually in Sydney, in Studio 1. Core skills in the making of the urban project are consolidated in Studio 2, which involves a detailed investigation of urban design as public policy grounded in planning policies, political realities, development scenarios, master plan principles, evidence based design and the generation of urban design guidelines. The International Urban Design Studio is the culminating experience of the Program, which involves the deployment of knowledge and skills in an intense twoweek workshop in a totally new city and new culture, combined with critical reflection on this experience, design development and documentation back in Sydney.

Zhizhe Yu, China Master of Urban Development and Design (MUDD) During my university years in Beijing, Chinese cities began to change very dramatically and I felt there was a big and immediate need for urban design. It was exciting to see the fast urbanisation and modernisation of our wonderful city, but also tragic to see the planning mistakes and the loss of its special character. I believed that studying urban design could help me go beyond architecture itself, and look at the bigger picture in the design world. I spent time researching and comparing all the Australian universities, accepting the offer from UNSW Built Environments Master of Urban Design and Development (MUDD) Program, as I felt that it offered the most interesting and thoughtful courses as well as the best teaching resources. The program was challenging yet also extremely rewarding. The highlight for me was the MUDD exhibition night. It was a wonderful feeling to see our hard work beautifully displayed and viewed by so many professionals outside of the faculty and the University. The significance of my urban design studies in the MUDD program have stimulated and contributed my love of cities, and has grounded my understanding of how architecture is made through the process of urban development. Zhizhe now works as the Associate Principal for Kohn Pederson Fox in New York, USA

Sustainable Development and the Urban Environment 6


Note: Most courses are offered in only one semester per year. Some courses may not be offered every year. Please check course availability with the Faculty Student Centre prior to enrolment.

Professional Recognition The program is accredited by the Planning Institute of Australia. Career Opportunities On completing the course most graduates start their careers working for urban and architectural design consultants. Some have their own professional practices in urban design and allied design areas. Others have gone on to careers in academia or to doctoral studies at major international universities.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

51

COFA - Art Design Media


As Australias premier art, design and media educational institution, COFA places strong emphasis on integrating course content with professional practice and industry experience in all degrees. With over 300 full-time international students representing nearly 50 countries, COFA is committed to the development of the individual creative potential of our students whether they are undertaking undergraduate, postgraduate or online courses.
COFA Highlights
COFA provides students with a deep understanding of studio methods and techniques through studio-based practice via small group tuition from recognised artists and designers. With a focus on learning by doing COFA staff lead by example - with many having been awarded national competitive research grants on the basis of their studio activities. COFA is unique in that we are the only art and design college in Australia that teaches a broad range of traditional practical, studio-based courses alongside innovative and cutting-edge courses, including art history and art education, enabling truly multidisciplinary study. COFA has an apartment at the Cit Internationale des Arts in Paris, France, situated on the right bank of the Seine, available for research students; and also a residence in Fowlers Gap, in remote New South Wales, for students to directly experience the Australian outback. COFA is located in the heart of Paddington, Sydney, and is nestled between galleries, design companies and museums. Just a few minutes bus ride from the city and Sydneys Central Station, the campus resides among the spreading trees close to the popular shopping area of Oxford Street. UNSW is the top-ranked research institution in Australia for research studies in Creative Arts and Writing according to the 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia Report, and COFA achieved the best result of any art and design school in Australia with top rankings in Art Theory, Film, Television and Digital Media and Visual Arts.

COFA Schools/Units

COFA consists of four Schools divided into a number of related discipline study areas through which courses and programs of the College are offered: School of Art: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/about-us/why-choose-cofa/school-of-art School of Art History and Art Education: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/about-us/whychoose-cofa/school-of-art-history-and-art-education School of Design Studies: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/about-us/why-choose-cofa/ school-of-design-studies School of Media Arts: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/about-us/why-choose-cofa/schoolof-media-arts COFA Online: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/about-us/why-choose-cofa/cofa-online

COFA Events and Profile

COFA holds regular events showcasing student works, such as the Annual International Exhibition and the COFA Annual Exhibition, which showcases the ingenuity and creativity of our graduating students Our students are exposed to numerous dynamic exhibitions and showings held at COFA galleries: COFASpace, where students can showcase their work and gain gallery experience and KUDOS, established by the COFA Students Association to provide students with an accessible gallery space off campus COFA has a high profile and an outstanding success rate with national awards and scholarships won by students and graduates, including the Archibald Prize, the Fullbright Scholarship for the Visual Arts, the Rotary Ambassadorial Scholarship, the Helen Lempriere Art Travelling Scholarship, the Samstag Award, the Object New Design Award, the Bombay Sapphire National Design Award, the Gordan Andrews Research Scholarship and the Lloyd Rees Memorial Youth Art Award.

Student Support

COFA has a wide range of excellent support facilities available including: the COFA Clement Semmler Library, a highly respected specialist art library with an extensive range of resources computer labs and comprehensive studios in printmaking, photography, filmmaking, sound, jewellery, ceramics and sculpture COFA Student Work: Ivan Vizintin, Posture (detail). the Resource Centre which lends a wide range of equipment to students, from microphones to cameras the Computing Services Unit Support Desk which provides first-level technical support the Digital Print and Copy Unit with skilled staff who can assist in the production of digital prints and document finishing services

Contact Details

Associate Dean, International Dr Vaughan Rees Email: v.rees@unsw.edu.au International Student Advisor, Student Centre Ms Leah Mitchell Email: l.mitchell@unsw.edu.au Tel: +61 2 9385 0614 Website: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au

52

www.international.unsw.edu.au

COFA Coursework programs

Art
Master of Art Program Code: 9307 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Art provides an intensive postgraduate experience in contemporary fine art practice. The program is structured to provide either a foundation or an extension for people who are, or would like to become, practising artists in the visual arts or related fields. It allows for a focused investigation into art practice, which is grounded in critical and investigative thinking and which can also prepare students for further study at research level. The main discipline areas within the Master of Art in which students can major are: Painting; Drawing; Printmaking; Sculpture, Performance and Installation; Photomedia; and Time-Based Art. Interdisciplinary practice is encouraged and excellence promoted. In addition to becoming practising artists, graduates from this degree often gain employment in related areas such as the photographic industry, theatre and television production, prop making, digital and sound technology industry, making of films and documentaries, video and multimedia industries as well as working in galleries or museums. Many also win prizes, gain grants, awards and commissions as well as artist residencies. The Master of Art also prepares students for admission into research programs, although completion of the Master of Art does not guarantee entry into these programs. For more information please see: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/9307.html Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or completion of the Graduate Diploma in Art (5307). Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required. UOC Prescribed Major Core Courses x 3 Studio Major Core Courses x 3 Core Theory x 2 Electives x 4 Total units of credit Total units of credit per semester 18 18 12 24 72 24

Plan Details Drawing A major study plan in Drawing must include the following 3 prescribed major core courses: UOC Drawing 1 Drawing 2 Drawing 3 Plus 3 of the following postgraduate studio major core courses: Advanced Drawing Drawing Painting Life Drawing Painting from Life Anatomy for Artists Composition and Design Colour Digital Imaging and Painting Painting/Drawing Field Studies Special Projects Studio Plus 2 core theory courses, Current Issues in Art and Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education. Plus 4 electives including at least 1 studio course. Painting A major study plan in Painting must include the following 3 prescribed major core courses: UOC Painting 1 Painting 2 Painting 3 Plus 3 of the following postgraduate studio major core courses: Advanced Drawing Drawing Painting Life Drawing Painting from Life Anatomy for Artists Composition and Design Colour Digital Imaging and Painting Painting/Drawing Field Studies Special Projects Studio 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Photomedia A major study plan in Photomedia must include the following 3 prescribed major core courses: UOC Photomedia 1 Photomedia 2 Photomedia 3 Plus 3 of the following postgraduate studio major core courses: Introduction to Analogue Photography Digital Imaging Advanced Analogue Photography Vector Graphics in Visual Arts Writing for Digital Media Introduction to Photographic Studio Lighting Advanced Photographic Studio Lighting Cinematography Workshop 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Plus 2 core theory courses, Current Issues in Art, and Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education. Plus 4 electives including at least 1 studio course. Printmaking A major study plan in Printmaking must include the following 3 prescribed major core courses: UOC Printmaking 1 Printmaking 2 Printmaking 3 Plus 3 of the following postgraduate studio major core courses: Etching Advanced Etching Custom Printing Advanced Custom Printing Artists Books Screen Printing Printmaking Paper Technology Special Projects Studio 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Plus 2 core theory courses, Current Issues in Art, and Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education. Plus 4 electives including at least 1 studio course. Sculpture, Performance and Installation A major study plan in the area of Sculpture, Performance and Installation within the Master of Art program must include the following 3 prescribed major core courses: UOC Sculpture, Performance and Installation 1 Sculpture, Performance and Installation 2 Sculpture, Performance and Installation 3 6 6 6

Plus 2 core theory courses, Current Issues in Art, and Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education. Plus 4 electives including at least 1 studio course.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

53

COFA Coursework programs

Plus 3 of the following postgraduate studio major core courses: Sculpture Advanced Sculpture Installation Electronic Technologies Advanced Electronics Metal Casting Ceramic Shell Casting Sculpture Field Studies Special Projects Studio

Graduate Certificate in Art UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Abi Alice, Australia Master of Fine Arts In a society that often draws boundaries between artists and designers, Abi Alice understands that she is regarded as both. A practising artist for more than a decade, Abi has been a successful and internationally recognised designer since 2005. Alices unexpected move from art into design began in 1995 when, as an undergraduate fine art student at COFA, she took part in a workshop taught by Alberto Alessi. In his workshop, Alessi did not separate the purpose and outcomes of design from that of art. Instead he spoke, Alice recollects, of bringing art and poetry into peoples lives through design. Inspired, Alice ventured to Italy. She showed up at the company headquarters and chanced a meeting, unsure if Alessi was even there. As it happens, he was, and as Alice says, I shared my work with him and he liked it. So began their discussions about the design process, production and consumer culture. It was to become a happy collaboration between an artist-come-newdesigner and a world leader in the area of product design. Her Resonance centrepiece is now produced through the Alessi design factory, but Abi Alice is at heart an artist.
Words - Jo Bosben Portrait photograph - Glen Wilke

Program Code: 7307 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree. In exceptional cases, applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission. These applicants must submit a portfolio of their artwork and curriculum vitae, and undertake an interview. Program Structure Students must complete four courses. These courses must include one prescribed major core course, one studio major core course (from the same disciplinary area as the prescribed core major course), one studio elective and one elective. Completion of the program with a credit average will allow progression to the Graduate Diploma in Art (5307). Refer to the Master of Art (9307) entry for further information.

Plus 2 core theory courses, Current Issues in Art, and Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education. Plus 4 electives including at least 1 studio course. Time-Based Art A major study plan in Time-Based Art within the Master of Art program must include the following 3 prescribed major core courses: UOC Time-Based Art 1 Time-Based Art 2 Time-Based Art 3 Plus 3 of the following postgraduate studio major core courses: Introduction to Game Design Introductory Interactive Multimedia Introductory Animation Advanced Interactive Multimedia Writing for Digital Media Introduction to Sound Advanced Animation and Video Graphics Advanced Sound Video Construction Introduction to Photographic Studio Lighting Advanced Photographic Studio Lighting Cinematography Workshop Video Art Electronic Technologies Advanced Electronics 6 6 6

Art Administration
Master of Art Administration Program Code: 9302 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Art Administration combines wide ranging aspects of the visual arts in relation to exhibition management, marketing and finance as well as curatorial practices, writing and documentation, legal and art historical studies. The degree recognises the significant changes that are taking place in the cultural sphere and prepares students for future employment in areas both inside and outside the traditional gallery/museum context. Practical, analytical and theoretical skills are developed in a program that emphasises vocational training within a wider cultural and critical framework. The program consists of lectures, seminars and hands-on activities, a research paper and an internship of no less than 240 hours. Each course normally requires attendance at a 3-hour lecture (or equivalent) plus related research and assignment work. The research paper draws on the experiences of the internship but is an independent project that involves a time commitment at least equivalent to other core courses. It is intended that students graduating from this program will be equipped with the skills necessary to function in managerial, administrative, curatorial, art writing and other professional capacities within the visual arts industry. For more information please see: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/9302.html

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Graduate Diploma in Art Program Code: 5307 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or completion of the Graduate Certificate in Art (7307). Program Structure Students must complete eight courses which include two prescribed major core courses, one core theory course, two studio major core courses (from the same disciplinary area as the prescribed core major courses), and three electives, one of which shall be a studio based course. Completion of the program with a credit average will allow progression to the Master of Art (9307). Please refer to the Master of Art (9307) entry for further information.

Plus 2 core theory courses, Current Issues in Art, and Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education. Plus 4 electives including at least 1 studio course.

54

www.international.unsw.edu.au

COFA Coursework programs

Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. Students who have a degree in areas other than the visual arts may be considered for admission, but must undertake introductory courses in art history and theory as part of their program. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required. UOC Core Courses x 4 Research Paper Internship Core Options (minimum of 3) Electives (maximum of 3) Total units of credit Total units of credit per semester The Master of Art Administration must include the following 4 core courses, Internship and Research Paper: UOC Management and Organisation: Systems, Service and Survival Writing for Different Cultures and Audiences Cultural Property, Ethics and the Law Organisational Psychology: Managing People in the Workplace Internship* Research Paper* 6 6 6 6 6 6 24 6 6 18 18 72 24

Graduate Diploma in Art Administration Program Code: 5302 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Art Administration is an introduction to the field of study and is available to candidates who wish to gain new directions which are different to the major study of their undergraduate degree. This program can be a prelude to the Master of Art Administration. Students must complete eight courses which include four prescribed core courses and four courses of which at least two courses must be core options, but up to two courses may be open electives. Please refer to the Master of Art Administration (9302) entry for further information. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. Students who have a degree in areas other than the visual arts may be considered for admission but must undertake introductory courses in art history and theory as part of their program. Graduate Certificate in Art Administration Program Code: 7302 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months The Graduate Certificate in Art Administration is an introduction to the field of study and is available to candidates who wish to gain new directions which are different to the major study of their undergraduate degree. Students must complete four courses over one semester of full-time study. These courses must include two prescribed core courses and two core options courses. Please refer to the Master of Art Administration (9302) entry for further information. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. Students who have a degree in areas other than the visual arts may be considered for admission but must undertake an introductory course in art history and theory as part of their program.

Art and Design Education


Master of Art and Design Education Program Code: 9303 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Art and Design Education provides professional development courses in art, design and media education. Students investigate current visual arts, design and new media interests through courses interpreting curriculum changes and innovation, building research practice and leadership in the profession. Faculty staff who teach in this program include art and design educators, who are the architects of syllabus change in high schools in New South Wales, along with practicing artists, educators, designers, and art historians and theorists. Courses emphasise individual contact with Faculty, and the opportunity to discuss the most recent developments in art, design, media and education with senior academics who are widely published, have exhibited internationally and are recognised as eminent leaders within their fields. A wide choice of electives combined with flexible modes of delivery provide opportunities for individuals to tailor a program of study to match their changing preferences, professional interests, and personal needs. Typically classes attract primary, secondary and tertiary educators and others with an interest in visual art and design education in a range of settings. On completion of the program students achieve a recognised postgraduate credential and increased confidence to practically manage and implement changes. For more information please see: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/9303.html Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in visual arts teaching, design teaching, or art/design teaching with a credit average.

* The internship and research paper require written approval from the Program Authority. It is advisable to begin the internship before semester 3. The internship may continue over the mid-year recess.

Plus at least 3 of the following core options. Please note that not all core options are offered each year, but rotation of courses over a cycle of 3 years ensures that most students have access to most of the courses listed below: UOC Exhibition Management and Curatorial Studies Exhibition and Gallery Design Development Education and Public Programs Marketing and Promotion Arts and Cultural Policy The Australian Art Market Conservation and Collections Management History of Exhibition of Australian Art The Development of Art Criticism in Australia Art Galleries and Collections in Australia Visual and Museum Cultures of the Asia-Pacific Region Festivals and Biennales Registration and Handling 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Museum Development: Fundraising and Philanthropy 6 Plus up to 3 courses selected from other COFA postgraduate programs or from postgraduate courses offered by other Faculties of the University. Students who wish to take electives from other Faculties are advised to consult the Program Authority.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

55

COFA Coursework programs

Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required. UOC Core Courses x 4 Core Options x 2 Electives x 2 Total units of credit Total units of credit per semester 24 12 12 48 24

Graduate Certificate in Art and Design Education Program Code: 7304 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in visual arts teaching, design teaching, or art/design teaching with performance at credit average. Program Structure Students must complete four courses which include two prescribed core courses, one core option and one elective. Please refer to the Master of Art and Design Education (9303) entry for further information.

The Master of Design must include the following 8 core courses: UOC Design Seminar 1: Design and the Sustainable Society Design Seminar 2: Perception and Desire Design Seminar 3: The Great Debate Design Communication Design Research Integrated Studio 1 Integrated Studio 2 Integrated Studio Project 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12

The Master of Art and Design Education must include 4 of the following core courses: UOC Practices of Research in Art, Design and Education 6 Issues in Design Education Curriculum in Art, Design and Education Applying the Conceptual Framework in the Art Museum Introduction to Aboriginal Studies Art and Design History in Art Education Contextual Studies in Teaching Art and Design Bodies of Work and the Practice of Art Making 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Design
Master of Design Program Code: 9304 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Design provides candidates with knowledge of contemporary design, an understanding of the relationship design has to a sustainable society; to environmental and contextual issues, and the multidisciplinary nature of integrated design. The program develops a students ability to design contemporary outcomes across a range of disciplines within a collaborative environment. The main discipline areas are: Ceramics, Design Management, Environment/Spatial Design, Furniture and Lighting, Graphics Media, Jewellery, Programmable and Digital Design, and Textiles. The program is aimed at design professionals who wish to extend their knowledge of contemporary design or who wish to revitalise or redirect their design skills into a different area of specialisation. For more information please see: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/9304.html Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in design or related discipline. Applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission and must submit a portfolio. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required. UOC Prescribed Core Courses x 8 Design Electives x 2 Design-related Elective Total units of credit Total units of credit per semester 54 12 6 72 24

Plus 2 design electives from the following 8 strands (electives can be taken from any strand, for example students are not required to take all electives from one strand): Graphics Media The Graphics Media Studio pushes the limits of what graphic design is and does. Students develop graphic communication projects to inform, entertain and engage local and international communities. UOC Introduction to Graphics Media Graphics Media: Contemporary Typography Graphics Media: Outreach Environment/Spatial Design The Environment/Spatial Design Studio explores the uses of space - internal and external, public and private. Students may research and work in a range of spatial design areas, including interior and exterior spatial design display and exhibition design, such as signage, lighting and placement of objects. UOC Introduction to Environment/Spatial Design Environment/Spatial Design: Physical Contexts Environment/Spatial Design: Cultural Contexts Ceramics The Ceramics Studio encourages students to advance their knowledge and practical expertise in ceramic design and the production of ceramic objects. This Studio highlights interdisciplinary and innovative approaches to ceramic practice. UOC Introduction to Contemporary Ceramics: Materials and Meanings Contemporary Ceramics: Surface and Form Contemporary Ceramics: Space and Form Jewellery The Jewellery Studio focuses on the materials, techniques, and processes that inform design and production of jewellery. This Studio supports diverse outcomes including one-off pieces and small-scale production design. UOC Introduction to Jewellery Skills and Contemporary Concepts Jewellery: Contemporary Wearables Jewellery: Contemporary Objects 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Dialogues, Communities and Cultural Development 6

Plus 2 of the following core options (students may apply to substitute up to 2 core options with electives): UOC Theoretical Frameworks in Art, Design and Education 6 Introduction to Art Therapy Research Seminar in Art Education Design Process Workshop 1 Design Management and Practice 1 Education and Public Programs Arts and Cultural Policy Organisational Psychology: Managing People in the Workplace Current Issues in Art Plus 2 of the following suggested electives: UOC Education Studies Art and Design Criticism in Art Education Qualitative Research in Art, Design and Education Research Project in Elective Studies 1 Research Project in Elective Studies 2 Introduction to Frameworks of Research in Art and Design Ed Theory of Knowing in Art, Design and Education Theory Exhibition and Gallery Design Development Marketing and Promotion Conservation and Collections Management The Development of Art Criticism in Australia Visual and Museum Cultures of the Asia-Pacific Region Festivals and Biennales Registration and Handling 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Note: Students may undertake a studio specialisation within the program. Please contact the COFA Student Centre for further details.

56

www.international.unsw.edu.au

COFA Coursework programs

Textiles The Textiles Studio explores new technologies and innovative applications for the use and production of textiles for wearable textiles and interior spaces, in response to current sustainable, cultural and social conditions. UOC Introduction to Contemporary Textiles 1 Textiles: Contemporary Wearables Textiles: Contemporary Interiors Furniture and Lighting The Furniture and Lighting Studio explores new territories in the design and production of furniture and lighting systems in response to social and cultural needs. UOC Introduction to Furniture and Lighting: Design Contemporary Furniture and Lighting: Domestic Landscapes Contemporary Furniture and Lighting: Design Narratives Design Management The Design Management stream focuses on aspects of professional design practice including small business management, design project management and associated legal issues. UOC Design Management: Developing Design Cultures Design Management: Identity and Communication Design Management Project Programmable and Digital Design The Programmable and Digital Design stream supports students to create innovative content for the core courses. UOC Introduction to Programmable Design Programmable Wearable Project Generative Graphics Projects Responsive Object Projects 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Graduate Diploma in Design Program Code: 5724 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in design or related discipline. Applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission and must submit a portfolio. Program Structure Students must complete eight courses. These courses must include six core courses and two design electives from the eight discipline areas offered in the program. Please refer to the Master of Design (9304) entry for further information. Graduate Certificate in Design Program Code: 7303 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in design or related discipline. Applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission and must submit a portfolio. Program Structure Students must complete four courses which include three prescribed core courses, and one design elective core from the eight discipline areas offered in the program. Refer to the Master of Design (9304) entry for further information.

Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline with a credit average; and a portfolio showcasing the applicants skills in the media arts, particularly in the chosen specialisation of 3D CGI or video production. In exceptional cases, applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission. These applicants must submit in addition to a portfolio, a curriculum vitae and may be required to undertake an interview. All students must indicate their choice of specialisation of either 3D CGI or video production at the time of application. Applicants who hold a UNSW Bachelor of Digital Media, or equivalent qualification recognised by COFA, may be offered entry to Semester 1 (March) with a duration of 1 year. All other applicants must commence the program in Semester 2 (July). Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required. UOC Prescribed Core Courses x 5 Art Theory Electives x 3 Studio Electives x 2 Total units of credit Total units of credit per semester 42 18 12 72 24

The Master of Digital Media must include the following 3 core courses: UOC Sound Construction 1 Sound Construction 2 Digital Media Major Project Workshop Plus 2 specialisation courses: Video Specialisation: Video Construction and Production Workshop 6 6 6 6 18

Digital Media
Master of Digital Media Program Code: 9308 Commencement: Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Digital Media is aimed at digital media, design and fine arts graduates who would like to add to their existing skills set. The program provides students with a challenging postgraduate experience in the practice and theory of contemporary media production. All students study audio and specialise in their choice of either 3D CGI or video production. They are provided with intensive studio instruction, preparing them for the production of a major studio project in their third and final stage of the program. Electives in interactive media and digital imaging are amongst a range of practical and theoretical studies that complement the core studio courses of the program. For more information please see: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/9308.html

or 3D CGI Specialisation: 3D Animation 1 and 3D Animation Workshop Plus 2 of the following Studio electives: UOC Introduction to Game Design Introductory Interactive Multimedia Introduction to Analogue Photography Advanced Analogue Photography Vector Graphics in Visual Arts Advanced Interactive Multimedia Narrative and Gameplay Writing for Digital Media* Introduction to Photographic Studio Lighting Advanced Photographic Studio Lighting Cinematography Workshop Video Art 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Plus 1 Design-related elective, which can be selected from all COFA postgraduate courses or from the following: UOC Introduction to 3D Computer Aided Design Design Practice Nexus, Collaboration, Creation Experimental Design Porosity Studio Special Project 6 6 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

57

COFA Coursework programs

3D Character Modelling Texturing and Rigging ** Design, Interactivity and Emerging Media Creative Character Design The Art of Scientific Visualisation
Notes: * Writing for Digital Media is recommended for all students of the Master of Digital Media in stage 1 of the program. ** 3D Character Modelling Texturing and Rigging is recommended for 3D CGI specialisation students.

6 6 6 6

Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design


Master of Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design Program Code: 9309 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years by distance learning The Master of Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design is a fully online postgraduate coursework degree that aims to offer you the opportunity to experience, better understand and work within a range of creative disciplines to enhance and strengthen your own creative processes. The nature of the program is also intended to increase your value as an employee, in a rapidly changing and frequently cross-disciplinary workplace, by responding to a professional field that increasingly requires artists and designers to work collaboratively across a range of disciplines. The program offers a suite of in-depth elective courses in art, design and theory. A structured sequence of core study contextualises these electives by illuminating their theoretical, practical and disciplinary connections. In doing so, the program offers an understanding of cross-disciplinary creative practice, and how this can benefit your own creative and/or professional activity. By tailoring your own learning pathway throughout the program, you will have the opportunity to take part in both individual and collaborative coursework and communication. As part of the core sequence of studies, you will also investigate effective online learning strategies and online information literacy skills maximising your online learning experience to gain the most advantage from the program. The fully online context of the program will also enable you to study with a diverse range of students from different creative backgrounds, professional experiences, locations and cultures around the world. For more information please see: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/ current/9309.html Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average, or completion of the Graduate Diploma in CrossDisciplinary Art and Design (5309). Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required. UOC Sequenced Core Courses x 3 Online Electives x 9 Total units of credit Total units of credit per semester 18 54 72 24

Plus 9 online electives from a wide range of creative courses such as: UOC Graphics and Contemporary Society Curating Art and Exhibitions Textiles: Technology and the Body Fashion: 1980 Now Cross Cultural Sculpture Visual Identity in the Built Environment Print Advertising for a World Market Textiles for Interiors: Senses and Spaces Contemporary Aesthetics in Digital Architecture Creative Thinking Processes Society Through the Lens The Art of Scientific Visualisation Experiencing and Understanding Art Digital Illustration for Concept Art Spatial Design Retail, Exhibition and Hospitality Draw Your World Unravelling Urban Design Creative Character Design Performance Art Making Digital Holograms Managing Creativity Graduate Diploma in Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design Program Code: 5309 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average, or completion of the Graduate Certificate in CrossDisciplinary Art and Design (7309). Program Structure Students must complete eight courses which include two sequenced core courses and six online elective courses. Refer to the Master of Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design (9309) entry for further information. Graduate Certificate in Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design Program Code: 7309 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months by distance learning Design, Interactivity and Emerging Media

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Plus 3 approved Art Theory electives. It is recommended that all Master of Digital Media students enrol in CGI Pre-visualisation and Layout for Media Production in stage 2 of the program instead of their Art Theory elective. This course provide students the opportunity to develop a proposal for their Digital Media Major Project Workshop taken in their third and final semester of the program, and will leave students well placed to complete their project at an advanced level. Graduate Diploma in Digital Media Program Code: 5308 Commencement: Semester 2 (July) only Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline with a credit average; and a portfolio showcasing the applicants skills in the media arts, particularly in the applicants chosen specialisation of 3D CGI or video production. Refer to the Master of Digital Media (9308) entry for more information on entry requirements. Program Structure Students must complete eight courses. These courses must include four prescribed core courses, two approved theory electives and two approved studio electives. Refer to the Master of Digital Media (9308) for more information. Graduate Certificate in Digital Media Program Code: 7308 Commencement: Semester 2 (July) only Program Duration: 6 months Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline with a credit average; and a portfolio showcasing the applicants skills in the media arts, particularly in the applicants chosen specialisation of 3D CGI or video production. Refer to the Master of Digital Media (9308) entry for more information on entry requirements. Program Structure Students must complete four courses over one semester. These courses include two prescribed core courses, one approved theory elective and one approved studio elective. Please refer to the Master of Digital Media (9308) entry for further information.

The Master of Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design program must include the following 3 sequenced core courses: UOC Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design 1 Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design 2 Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design 3 6 6 6

Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with a credit average. In exceptional cases applicants who submit evidence of other academic and professional qualifications may be considered for admission. Program Structure Students must complete four courses. These courses include one core course and three online elective courses. Refer to the Master of Cross-Disciplinary Art and Design (9309) entry for further information.

58

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering
The Faculty of Engineering was the founding faculty of UNSW in 1949 and is the major centre for engineering studies and research in Australia, with the widest choice of engineering disciplines and internationally renowned research programs.
The Faculty is recognised as a top-ranking engineering faculty in Australia, continuously achieving high rankings including 42nd in the world in the QS World University Rankings. These consistent high rankings reflect the excellence of research and teaching and confirm that UNSW is the place to study engineering. The Faculty of Engineering at UNSW is: The largest Engineering faculty in Australia in terms of staff, operating budget, international student numbers, diversity of teaching programs and external grants. Extensively and closely linked with key industrial, commercial and professional organisations. Recognised worldwide for our outstanding theoretical and applied research performance across a broad range of engineering disciplines. Equipped with extensive, well-resourced research laboratories and computing facilities on the main UNSW Kensington campus. Sub-campuses at manly Vale and Randwick house specialised laboratories for water engineering and heavy structures research. A pioneer in engineering education with an emphasis on design and problem solving and a contemporary research-led curriculum, our postgraduate coursework programs offer career development opportunities for professional engineers, while research students have a comprehensive induction program and can access a career development program. Faculty Highlights Recent Faculty highlights include the following: UNSWs Dr Rita Henderson has been recognised as one of the brightest talents in international water research by winning the 2010 International Water Association Young Water Professionals Award. UNSWs Sunswift solar car has lived up to its name, smashing a Guinness World Record to become the worlds fastest solar vehicle. The car, designed and built by UNSW students, smashed the world solar car speed record at the HMAS Albatross navy base airstrip in Nowra, New South Wales on January 7, 2011 travelling at more than 88km/h. The Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research at UNSW Launched in November 2010, the Centre aims to assist in the Australian Federal Governments push to increase Australias capabilities in the space industry. Breakthrough in quantum computer race - A team led by UNSW engineers and physicists have developed one of the key building blocks needed to make a quantum computer using silicon: a single electron reader. Quantum computers promise exponential increases in processing speed over todays computers through their use of the spin, or magnetic orientation, of individual electrons to represent data in their calculations. In order to employ electron spin, the quantum computer needs both a way of changing the spin state (write) and of measuring that change (read) to form a qubit - the equivalent of the bits in a conventional computer. New energy technologies building - Work has begun at UNSW on a landmark new energy research centre, the Tyree Energy Technologies Building (TETB). The A$125m TETB will bring together under one roof the Universitys internationally recognised research and teaching in key energy areas including photovoltaics, carbon capture and storage, oil and gas reserves, nanomaterials, energy policy and market analysis. Nanotechnology powers up - Improved cancer treatments, new solar power and communications technologies, and a next-generation bionic eye are among the projects enabled by equipment in the New South Wales (NSW) Node of the Australian National Fabrication Facility, with the opening of a A$10 million dollar, state-of-the-art nanofabrication facility at UNSW. Schools The Faculty is arranged into 10 schools: Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering School of Chemical Engineering School of Civil and Environmental Engineering School of Computer Science and Engineering School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering School of Mining Engineering School of Petroleum Engineering School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems Contact Details Tel: +61 2 9385 6437 Email: eng.faculty@unsw.edu.au Website: www.eng.unsw.edu.au

www.international.unsw.edu.au

59

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Engineering Science
Master of Engineering Science Program Code: 8538 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years This is a career development and enhancement program for graduate engineers with opportunities for cross training, re-training and an advanced level technical specialisation. The program is offered in 22 specialisations. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in an appropriate area of engineering with Honours 2/2 or equivalent or an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Program Structure The program comprises 12 courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC) in three key areas: Professional Development Courses (4 courses) 24 UOC

Signal Processing Structural Engineering Systems and Control Telecommunications Water Resources Water, Wastewater and Waste Engineering Master of Engineering Science (Extension) Program Code: 8539 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years This program is similar to the Master of Engineering Science, but provides a more advanced level of technical specialisation and a more extensive research training component. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in an appropriate area of engineering with Honours 1 or equivalent or an average grade of 75% over the final two years. Program Structure The Master of Engineering Science (Extension) comprises 16 courses totalling 96 units of credit (UOC) in three key areas: Professional Development Courses (4 courses) Specialisation Electives (810 courses) 24 UOC 48 to 60 UOC 12 to 24 UOC

Graduate Diploma of Engineering Science Program Code: 5338 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Graduate Diploma of Engineering Science is designed for graduate engineers who wish to undertake a re-training program or for those who wish to undertake a shorter program of specialised study. It is also suitable for graduate engineers who do not meet the entry requirements for the Master of Engineering Science. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science with Honours 2/2 or equivalent or an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Program Structure The Graduate Diploma of Engineering Science comprises 10 courses totalling 60 units of credit (UOC) in three key areas: Professional Development Courses (4 courses) Specialisation Electives (35 courses) 24 UOC 18 to 30 UOC 6 to 18 UOC

These courses are designed to develop core knowledge and skills for students with limited background in their chosen specialisation. Specialisation Electives (46 courses) 24 to 36 UOC

Engineering Management Courses (13 courses)

These courses provide technical depth in a particular discipline. Engineering Management Courses (24 courses) 12 to 24 UOC

Includes courses in advanced data and experimental analysis, economic decision-making, project management, process quality management, information technology and resource management, and risk assessment.
Notes: 1. Students who have a four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree in an appropriate discipline with at least a credit average over the final two years may be exempted from all the Professional Development courses. In this instance, the requirement for the award of the Master of Engineering Science is 48 UOC. 2. On approval by the specialisation authority, up to 12 UOC of a project thesis may be undertaken in the Master program. To be eligible students would be expected to achieve a credit average in other completed courses. 3. On approval by the specialisation authority, students may be permitted to substitute up to 12 UOC of specialisation courses not on the approved list of courses. 4. Students may articulate with full credit into the appropriate Master of Engineering Science (Extension) program on completion of the Master of Engineering Science provided they achieve a credit average (65%).

Engineering Management Courses (24 courses)

Notes: 1. Students who have a four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree in an appropriate discipline with at least a credit average over the final two years may be exempted from all the Professional Development courses. In this instance, the requirement for the award of the Master of Engineering Science (Extension) is 72 UOC. 2. Students enrolled in this program must complete project/ thesis work of between 12 and 24 UOC. 3. On approval by the specialisation authority, students may be permitted to substitute up to 12 UOC of specialisation courses not on the approved list of courses.

Notes: 1. Students who have a four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree in an appropriate discipline with at least a credit average over the final two years may be exempted from all Professional Development courses. In this instance the requirement for the award of the Graduate Diploma is 36 UOC. 2. Students may articulate with full credit into the appropriate Master of Engineering Science program on completion of the Graduate Diploma provided they achieve a credit average (65%).

Specialisations Available For program details refer to the relevant page from pages 61-71. Biomedical Engineering Chemical Process Engineering Civil Engineering Energy Systems Engineering and Technical Management Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Geoinformation Technology Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology Information Technology Manufacturing Engineering and Management Mechanical Engineering Microelectronics and Microsystems Petroleum Engineering Photovoltaics and Solar Energy Project Management

Specialisations Available Chemical Process Engineering Civil Engineering Energy Systems Engineering and Technical Management Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Geoinformation Technology Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology Information Technology Manufacturing Engineering and Management Mechanical Engineering Microelectronics and Microsystems Petroleum Engineering Photovoltaics and Solar Energy Project Management Signal Processing Structural Engineering Systems and Control

Specialisations Available Chemical Process Engineering Civil Engineering Energy Systems Engineering and Technical Management Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Geoinformation Technology Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology Information Technology Manufacturing Engineering and Management Mechanical Engineering Microelectronics and Microsystems Petroleum Engineering Photovoltaics and Solar Energy Project Management Signal Processing Structural Engineering Systems and Control Telecommunications Water Resources Water, Wastewater and Waste Engineering. Graduate Certificate of Engineering Science Program Code: 7338 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Certificate of Engineering Science is a program for graduate engineers who wish to undertake a re-training program or who have significant professional experience but limited formal qualifications.

Telecommunications Water Resources Water, Wastewater and Waste Engineering

60

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Program Structure The Graduate Certificate of Engineering Science comprises eight courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) from three essential components: Professional Development Courses (4 courses) Specialisation Electives (35 courses) 24 UOC 18 to 30 UOC 6 to 18 UOC

Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) Students may select courses from any of the Professional Development courses provided by other specialisations in the Master of Engineering Science program. Specialisation Courses (3648 UOC) UOC Courses listed below comprise the Engineering and Technical Management specialisation. They also form the required courses for the Engineering Management component of all programs. Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

MEngSc (Biomedical Engineering) Specialisation Authority: Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Biomedical Engineering introduces engineers from various disciplines to biomedical engineering, the application of engineering techniques and analysis to problem solving in medicine and healthcare delivery. The growing complexity of medical technology has increased the demand for appropriately trained professionals to bridge the gap between clinical medicine and applied medical technology. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students background will be made by the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Medical Imaging Biomedical Systems Analysis Mass Transfer in Medicine Biocompatibility Cellular and Tissue Engineering Regulatory Requirements for Biomedical Technology Clinical Laboratory Science Chemistry and Physics of Synthetic and Biological Polymers Clinical Information Systems Introductory Biomechanics (1) Mechanics of the Human Body Biomechanics of Physical Rehabilitation (2) Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials Biological Signal Analysis Biomedical Instrumentation Biosensors and Transducers Implantable Bionics Dynamics of the Cardiovascular System Modelling Organs, Tissues and Devices Experimental Biomechanics
Notes: (1) For students with no mechanics background. (2) Only offered in Semester 1 of every even year.

Engineering Management Courses (13 courses)

Notes: 1. Students who have a four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree in an appropriate discipline with at least a credit average over the final two years may be exempted from all the professional development courses. In this case the requirement for the award of the Graduate Certificate is 24 UOC. 2. Students may articulate with full credit into the appropriate Graduate Diploma of Engineering Science program on completion of the Graduate Certificate provided they achieve a credit average.

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Specialisations Available Chemical Process Engineering Civil Engineering Energy Systems Engineering and Technical Management Environmental Engineering Food Process Engineering Geoinformation Technology Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology Information Technology Manufacturing Engineering and Management Mechanical Engineering Microelectronics and Microsystems Petroleum Engineering Photovoltaics and Solar Energy Project Management Signal Processing Structural Engineering Systems and Control Telecommunications Water Resources Water, Wastewater and Waste Engineering Specialisations for Master of Engineering Science and Master of Engineering Science (Extension) MEngSc (Engineering and Technical Management) Specialisation Authority: Faculty of Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Engineering and Technical Management provides extended training in key areas of technology management that are of importance for engineers working in a range of organisations and at various levels of responsibility. Courses enable students to target particular career development requirements including advanced data and experimental analysis, economic decision making, project management, process quality management, information technology and resource management, and risk assessment. The courses are suited to graduates in line management roles with operational, engineering, and/or research and development responsibilities.

Engineering Economics and Financial Management 6


Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Project MEngSc (Extension) (Engineering and Technical Management) Specialisation Authority: Faculty of Engineering Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Engineering and Technical Management enables graduates in line management roles with operational, engineering, and/ or research and development responsibilities to target particular career development requirements, including advanced data and experimental analysis, economic decision making, project management, process quality management, information technology and resource management, risk assessment. Program Structure Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses 24 UOC 48 to 60 UOC 6 12 UOC

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

See list for MEngSc (Engineering and Technical Management) Project Courses 12 to 24 UOC This component is made up of a Project Report (12 UOC), or a Project Report (12 UOC) and Project (6 UOC), or a Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required.

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management

www.international.unsw.edu.au

61

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Project

UOC 6 12

Project Courses (012 UOC) Minor Project

On approval by the specialisation authority only. Process Engineering Project

UOC 6 6

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

MEngSc (Chemical Process Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Chemical Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Chemical Process Engineering covers in-depth designing, analysing and monitoring of factors affecting the life cycle of plants, processes and operations. Issues that affect business decisions encountered in the chemical industry are introduced and distinctions are made in order to focus on efficient design and robust, objective analysis. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) Appropriate professional development courses will be tailored to suit students individual needs. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Advanced Reaction Engineering Advanced Particle Systems Engineering Process Control Topics in Polymer Technology Minerals Engineering 1 Environmental Management Topics in Business Management in Chemical Engineering Electrochemical Engineering Process Heat Transfer Process Engineering in the Petroleum Industry Process Engineering: Natural Gas and Light Hydrocarbons to Petrochemicals Process Engineering in the Food Industry Environmental Chemistry in the Process Industries Particle Characterisation in the Process Industries Membrane Technology in the Process Industries Pharmaceutical Processing Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

MEngSc (Extension) (Chemical Process Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Chemical Engineering Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Chemical Process Engineering helps advance careers across a wide range of areas such as the fuel and energy sector, mineral processing, fine chemicals, pharmaceuticals, petrochemicals, consumer products, the food industry and more. It is designed for graduates in Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry, Food Engineering or a related discipline who wish to enhance particular aspects of their technical training or acquire specialised knowledge in specific areas. Program Structure Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Chemical Process Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Chemical Process Engineering) Engineering Management Courses Project Courses See list for MEngSc (Chemical Process Engineering) 24 UOC

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Special Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering Masters Project MEngSc (Extension) (Civil Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96

24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC

UOC

6 12

This component is made up of a Minor Project (6 UOC) and a Process Engineering Project (6 UOC), or a Process Engineering Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Civil Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 72

This specialisation provides advanced study options across the breadth of specialisations in civil engineering as well as courses in transport engineering and construction management. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Civil Engineering) Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Civil Engineering) Engineering Management Courses See list for MEngSc (Civil Engineering) Project Courses 12 to 24 UOC This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC), or a Masters Project (12 UOC) and Special Topics in Civil and Environmental Engineering (6 UOC), or Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Energy Systems) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Energy Systems is concerned with the generation, transmission, distribution and use of electrical energy. Core courses provide a firm grounding in key engineering aspects of electrical energy systems as well as an introduction to the theory and implementation of electricity industry restructuring and methods and technologies to enhance electricity industry sustainability, with a focus on the Australian context. Elective courses and projects provide the opportunity for in-depth study in each of the above areas. 12 to 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 24 UOC

This specialisation provides advanced study options across the breadth of specialisations in Civil Engineering as well as courses in transport engineering and construction management. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Courses may be chosen from any postgraduate specialisation offered from the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering including any of the following. Urban Transport Planning Practice Transport Systems Part 1 Transport Systems Part 2 UOC

Managing Energy Efficiency Life Cycle Engineering

Engineering Decision Structures Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

6 6 6 6 6 6

Traffic Management and Control

Design of Construction Operations

Construction Estimating and Tendering


Note: The availability of courses may vary from semester to semester and courses may be offered in alternate years. Please check the Schools website for current information.

Engineering Economics and Financial Management

62

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC In addition to the courses listed below, students may choose up to 12 UOC of courses from another specialisation list within the Master of Engineering Science. Advanced Power Electronics High Voltage Systems Industrial and Commercial Power Systems Electricity Industry Planning and Economics Electricity Industry Operation and Control*
* Offered in alternate years

Project Courses

12 to 24 UOC

This component is made up of Project Report A (6 UOC) and Project Report B (6 UOC), and/or Project Extension Report (12 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Environmental Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Units of Credit: 72 This specialisation provides advanced study options in environmental engineering including aquatic chemistry, microbiology for engineers, environmental management (materials risk assessment), contaminant transport in the environment, and transformation and fate of contaminants.

MEngSc (Extension) (Environmental Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96 This specialisation provides advanced study options in environmental engineering including aquatic chemistry, microbiology for engineers, environmental management (materials risk assessment), contaminant transport in the environment, and transformation and fate of contaminants. Program Structure Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Environmental Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Environmental Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Environmental Engineering) This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC), or an Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Food Process Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Chemical Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Food Process Engineering provides a comprehensive study of some factors affecting the science, processes, operation technology and engineering of foods, and the life cycle of plants. Issues that affect business decisions encountered in the food industry are introduced and distinctions are made in order to focus on efficient design and robust, objective analysis. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of professional development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined by the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC Students must complete all compulsory courses (*) in the Food Process Engineering specialisation and may select other courses to meet the requirements of the program rules. Advanced Reaction Engineering Advanced Particle Systems Engineering Process Control Topics in Polymer Technology Minerals Engineering 1 Topics in Business Management in Chemical Engineering Fuel and Energy Engineering 2 Electrochemical Engineering Environmental Technologies Process Engineering in the Petroleum Industry Process Engineering: Natural Gas and Light Hydrocarbons to Petrochemicals Process Engineering in the Food Industry Advanced Computer Methods in the Process Industries Environmental Chemistry in the Process Industries Particle Characterisation in the Process Industries Membrane Technology in the Process Industries Pharmaceutical Processing 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

Program Structure
Professional Development Courses (24 UOC)

A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority.
Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC 18 UOC of courses listed below must be completed. Additional specialisation courses are to be chosen from courses offered within the specialisations of Water Resources and Water. Refer to page 71 for details. Environmental Engineering Science 1 Environmental Engineering Science 2 Environmental Management Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Special Topics Masters Project 6 12 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Report A Project Report B MEngSc (Extension) (Energy Systems) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical and Telecommunications Engineering Units of Credit: 96

UOC 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

The specialisation in Energy Systems is concerned with the generation, transmission, distribution and use of electrical energy. Core courses provide a firm grounding in key engineering aspects of electrical energy systems as well as an introduction to the theory and implementation of electricity industry restructuring and methods and technologies to enhance electricity industry sustainability, with a focus on the Australian context. Elective courses and projects provide the opportunity for in-depth study in each of the above areas.
Program Structure Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Energy Systems) See list for MEngSc (Energy Systems) Engineering Management Courses See list for MEngSc (Energy Systems) 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC

UOC

www.international.unsw.edu.au

63

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Unit Operations in Food Processing* Food Microbiology Advanced Food Engineering* Food Preservation: Principles and Applications* Food Science and Technology Laboratory Advanced Food Chemistry
* Compulsory course

6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

MEngSc (Geoinformation Technology) Specialisation Authority: School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems Units of Credit: 72 This specialisation is offered in a range of topics in the area of geoinformation technology, including advanced surveying, geodesy and geopositioning, geographic information systems (GIS), GPS/GNSS technology, image analysis, and remote sensing. Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) UOC

Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Project

UOC 6 12

MEngSc (Extension) (Geoinformation Technology) Specialisation Authority: School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Geoinformation Technology is offered in a range of topics in the area of geoinformation technology, including: advanced surveying, geodesy and geopositioning, geographic information systems (GIS), GPS/GNSS technology, image analysis, and remote sensing. Program Structure Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Geoinformation Technology) See list for MEngSc (Geoinformation Technology) See list for MEngSc (Geoinformation Technology) This component is made up of a Project (12 UOC or 24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology is designed for civil engineers, environmental engineers, and geologists who are pursuing or intend to pursue a professional career in geotechnical engineering, geoenvironmental engineering, or engineering geology. Courses are intended to present the state of practice, with a theoretical and practical balance, integrating soil and rock mechanics with engineering geology. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC)

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

In addition to the 3 courses below, students must choose another course (6 UOC) from the list of specialisation and/or Faculty-based courses upon approval by the specialisation authority, based on individual background, skills and knowledge they need to acquire. Engineering Statistics and Experiment Design Modern Geodesy and Applications Precise GPS Positioning Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Principles of GIS* Advanced GIS Image Analysis in Remote Sensing* Special Topic in Geoinformation Technology and Applications A Special Topic in Geoinformation Technology and Applications B Principles of GPS Positioning GPS Receivers and How They Work Satellite Navigation: Receivers and Systems Fundamentals of Geopositioning* Geopositioning Technologies for Infomobility Applications Modern Geodesy and Applications Principles of Remote Sensing* Microwave Remote Sensing Major Assignment
* Compulsory course

6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Minor Project Research Project MEngSc (Extension) (Food Process Engineering)

UOC 6 12

Specialisation Authority: School of Chemical Engineering Units of Credit: 96

The specialisation in Food Process Engineering provides a comprehensive study of some factors affecting the science, processes, operation technology and engineering of foods, and the life cycle of plants. Issues that affect business decisions encountered in the food industry are introduced and distinctions are made in order to focus on efficient design and robust, objective analysis. Program Structure
Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 0 to 24 UOC

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined by the specialisation authority.
Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Geotechnical Models and Site Investigation Geomechanics Advanced Foundation Engineering Numerical Methods in Geotechnical Engineering Slope Instability and Stabilisation Rock Engineering Pavement Engineering and Analysis Geotechnical Engineering of Dams
Note: The availability of courses may vary from semester to semester and courses may be offered in alternate years. Please check the Schools website for current information.

See list for MEngSc (Food Process Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Food Process Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Food Process Engineering) This component is made up of a Minor Project (6 UOC), and/or a Research Project (12 UOC), or a Research Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required.

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management

64

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Life Cycle Engineering Engineering Decision Structures Ethics and Leadership in Engineering

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Program Structure

Note: Course levels are indicated in brackets.

Security Engineering Workshop Computer Vision UOC Multimedia Systems (2) Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Research Project Research Project MEngSc (Extension) (Information Technology) Specialisation Authority: School of Computer Science and Engineering Units of Credit: 96

6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Professional Development Courses (24 UOC)

Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

The following courses are available to students who are not exempt from some Level 0 courses (introductory courses) and wish to take some of the Faculty-based courses offered or co-offered by the School of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE). Provided that the requirements are met, students can choose any CSE Level 1, 2 or 3 courses (core computing and advanced electives). Prerequisites apply but students can be exempted from some Level 0 courses. Principles of Programming (0) Microprocessors and Interfacing (0) Database Systems (0) Artificial Intelligence (0) Human Computer Interaction (0) Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Object-Oriented Software Development (2) Advanced and Parallel Algorithms (3) Theory of Computation Advanced Topics in Software Verification Experimental Robotics (1) Intelligent Agents (1) Knowledge Representation and Reasoning Advanced Computer Security User Interface Design and Construction Information Retrieval and Web Search In-Formal Methods: The Lost Art Advanced Graphics (2) Design and Analysis of Algorithms (2) Programming Languages and Compilers (2) Software System Development Using the B-Method and B-Toolkit (3) Foundations of Concurrency Algorithmic Verification Concepts of Programming Languages Object Oriented Programming Language Based Software Safety Operating Systems (2) Computer Architecture (2) Digital Circuits and Systems (1) Advanced Operating Systems (3) Distributed Systems (3) Next Generation Database Systems (2) Database System Implementation (2) XML and Databases (2) Data Warehousing and Data Mining (2) Web Data Compression and Search E-Commerce Systems Implementation Infrastructure (1) E-Commerce Systems Engineering (2) E-Enterprise Project (2) Computer Networks and Applications (1) Network Routing and Switching (2) Advanced Computer Networks (2) Capacity Planning of Computer Systems and Network (2) Wireless Mesh and Sensor Networks (2) Mobile Data Networking (2) Computer Graphics (1) Knowledge Based Systems Machine Learning and Data Mining (1) Neural Networks (2) 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

6 6 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) Special Topics

On approval by the specialisation authority only. Masters Project

UOC 6 12

MEngSc (Extension) (Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology is designed for civil engineers, environmental engineers and geologists who are pursuing a professional career in geotechnical engineering, geoenvironmental engineering, or engineering geology. Courses present the state of practice, with a theoretical and practical balance, integrating soil and rock mechanics with engineering geology. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology) Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology) Engineering Management Courses See list for MEngSc (Geotechnical Engineering and Engineering Geology) Project Courses 24 UOC

UOC 6 12

The specialisation in Information Technology is aimed at students with a solid computing background who want to expand their technical skills and be exposed to the practice of project management and quality principles. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Information Technology) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Information Technology) See list for MEngSc (Information Technology) This component is made up of a Research Project (12 UOC), or a Research Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Manufacturing Engineering and Management) Specialisation Authority: School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Manufacturing Engineering and Management covers essential topics, methodologies and manufacturing applications of product and process design, manufacture and delivery process in organisations towards achieving quality, timely delivery, minimum cost and flexible manufacturing by utilising good manufacturing practices. Courses are suited to 24 UOC

24 to 48 UOC

12 to 24 UOC

This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC), or a Masters Project and Special Topics (6 UOC), or an Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Information Technology) Specialisation Authority: School of Computer Science and Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Information Technology is aimed at students with a solid computing background, who want to expand their technical skills and be exposed to the practice of project management and quality principles.

12 to 24 UOC

www.international.unsw.edu.au

65

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

students in line management roles with operational, engineering, and/or research and development responsibilities. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Industrial Management Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing UOC 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Program Structure Professional Development Courses 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Manufacturing Engineering and Management) Specialisation Courses 24 to 48 UOC See list for MEngSc (Manufacturing Engineering and Management) Engineering Management Courses 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Manufacturing Engineering and Management Project Courses 12 to 24 UOC This component is made up of a Masters Project A (12 UOC), a Masters Project B (12 UOC), Manufacturing Engineering and Management (12 UOC), or a Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Mechanical Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Mechanical Engineering covers the design, development, construction, operation and maintenance of machines, tools, plants and factories, including power generation propulsion or manufacture of goods. It thoroughly covers essential topics, methodologies and manufacturing applications. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Computer Aided Design/Computer Aided Manufacturing Strategic Manufacturing Management Operations and Supply Chain Management in Engineering Fundamental and Advanced Vibration Analysis Fundamentals of Noise Mechanics of Fracture and Fatigue Finite Element Applications Computational Fluid Dynamics Solar Thermal Energy Design Refrigeration and Air Conditioning 1 Internal Combustion Engines 1 Machine Condition Monitoring Modelling and Control of Mechatronic Systems Industrial Robotics Artificially Intelligent Systems Robot Design Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6

Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Masters Project A MEngSc (Extension) (Mechanical Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Mechanical Engineering covers the design, development, construction, operation and maintenance of machines, tools, plants and factories, including power generation propulsion or manufacture of goods. It thoroughly covers essential topics, methodologies and manufacturing applications.

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Concurrent Product and Process Design Strategic Manufacturing Management Operations and Supply Chain Management in Engineering Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Life Cycle Engineering Engineering Decision Structures Ethics and Leadership in Engineering

UOC 6 12

Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Program Structure
Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Mechanical Engineering) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Mechanical Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Mechanical Engineering) The project courses component is made up of either a Masters Project A (12 UOC), a Masters Project B (12 UOC), or a Project Extension (24 UOC). Students must have approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option. MEngSc (Microelectronics and Microsystems) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Microelectronics and Microsystems allows students to acquire comprehensive knowledge across a range of technology and design issues in microelectronics and microsystems. Core courses provide a firm foundation in semiconductor device physics and the technology involved in the fabrication of microelectronic circuits. The microelectronic design courses cover the basics of analog and digital integrated circuit design and lead on to more advanced treatment of mixed-signal design issues, commonly encountered in VLSI circuits. The microsystems program will introduce students into the world of MicroElectro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS), sensors and actuators. 24 UOC

Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or

Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

6 6 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) Project

On approval by the specialisation authority only. Masters Project A MEngSc (Extension) (Manufacturing Engineering and Management)

UOC 6

12

Specialisation Authority: School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Manufacturing Engineering and Management covers essential topics, methodologies and manufacturing applications of product and process design, manufacture and delivery process in organisations towards achieving quality, timely delivery, minimum cost and flexible manufacturing by utilising good manufacturing practices. Courses are suited to students in line management roles with operational, engineering, and/or research and development responsibilities.

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

66

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC

Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Microelectronics and Microsystems) Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Microelectronics and Microsystems) Engineering Management Courses See list for MEngSc (Microelectronics and Microsystems) Project Courses 6 6 6 6 6 24 UOC

Reservoir Engineering (1)

Petroleum Production Economics Natural Gas Engineering

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Well Drilling Equipment and Operations (4) Petroleum Production Engineering (3) Drilling Mud Formulation, Selection and Maintenance (4) Reservoir Characterisation (2)

24 to 48 UOC

In addition to the courses listed below, students may choose up to 12 UOC of courses from another specialisation list within the Master of Engineering Science. Mixed Signal Microelectronics Design RFIC Design Microsystems Design and Technology VLSI Technology* Quantum Devices*
*Offered in alternate years.

12 to 24 UOC

Well Completions and Stimulation (4) Drilling Systems and Design Optimisation (4) Well Control and Blowout Prevention Casing Design and Cementing Practical Aspects of Well Planning Formation Evaluation (1)

This component is made up of a Project Report A (6 UOC) and a Project Report B (6 UOC), and/or a Project (12 UOC), or a Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Petroleum Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Petroleum Engineering Units of Credit: 72

12 to 24 UOC

Directional, Horizontal and Multilateral Drilling


(1) Core course for Reservoir Characterisation, Reservoir and Production Engineering, and Drilling and Well Technology. (2) Core course for the Reservoir Characterisation area. (3) Core course for the Reservoir and Production Engineering area. (4) Core course for the Drilling and Well Technology area.

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

The specialisation in Petroleum Engineering is designed for upstream oil and gas personnel who are interested in expanding their knowledge base and improving their technical understanding of petroleum engineering. The specialisation covers three areas, namely reservoir characterisation, reservoir and production engineering, and drilling and well technology. The petroleum industry traditionally relies on on-thejob training programs, supplemented by in-house and external short courses to train and update petroleum engineers and earth scientists. Accordingly, the specialisation is delivered by lecture and distance learning mode. The open learning program is specifically designed for personnel who are currently working in the industry and who are unable to attend classes on campus. Students are provided with specially written resource material/study guides and pre-prepared computerbased software for problem solving and self-study. Contact with the Course Facilitator is via the web using Vista software, which provides an interactive learning environment. Entry Requirements Master program - A recognised Bachelor of Engineering degree plus one year of industry experience. Graduate Diploma - A recognised Bachelor degree plus three years industry experience. Graduate Certificate - Completion of the Australian Higher School Certificate or equivalent plus five years industry experience. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Human Resources Management Contracts Management Management of Risk UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Life Cycle Engineering Engineering Decision Structures Ethics and Leadership in Engineering

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Report A Project Report B Project MEngSc (Extension) (Microelectronics and Microsystems) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 96

Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

6 6 6

UOC 6 6 12

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Project MEngSc (Extension) (Petroleum Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Petroleum Engineering Units of Credit: 96

UOC 6 12

The specialisation in Microelectronics and Microsystems allows students to acquire comprehensive knowledge across a range of technology and design issues in microelectronics and microsystems. Core courses provide a firm foundation in semiconductor device physics and the technology involved in the fabrication of microelectronic circuits. The microelectronic design courses cover the basics of analog and digital integrated circuit design and lead on to more advanced treatment of mixed-signal design issues, commonly encountered in VLSI circuits. The microsystems will introduce students into the world of Micro-ElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS), sensors and actuators.

Environmental Management Petroleum Geophysics (2) Well Pressure Testing (3)

The specialisation in Petroleum Engineering is designed for upstream oil and gas personnel who are interested in expanding their knowledge base and improving their technical understanding of petroleum engineering. The specialisation covers three areas, namely reservoir characterisation, reservoir and production engineering, and drilling and well technology. The petroleum industry traditionally relies on on-thejob training programs, supplemented by in-house and external short courses to train and update petroleum engineers and earth scientists. Accordingly, the specialisation is delivered by lecture and distance learning mode.

Numerical Reservoir Simulation (3)

Field Development Geology for Petroleum Engineers (2)

www.international.unsw.edu.au

67

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

The open learning program is designed for personnel who are currently working in the industry and who are unable to attend classes on campus. Students are provided with specially written resource material/study guides and pre-prepared computer-based software for problem solving and self-study. Contact with the Course Facilitator is via the web using Vista software, which provides an interactive learning environment. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Petroleum Engineering) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Petroleum Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Petroleum Engineering) This component is made up of a Project (12 UOC or 24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Photovoltaics and Solar Energy) Specialisation Authority: School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Photovoltaics and Solar Energy builds on the previous education of engineers from other engineering disciplines who are attracted to the booming solar photovoltaic energy industry. Students undertake courses from the areas of photovoltaic devices, and photovoltaic systems and applications. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) 24 UOC

Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Report Project Report A Project Report B

6 6 6 6

Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Project Planning and Control Human Resources Management Contracts Management Management of Risk Dispute Avoidance Resource Management Marketing in Technology and Engineering Problem Solving and Decision Making Legal Studies and Professional Practice International Project Management Project Management Framework Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management

UOC 12 6 6

MEngSc (Extension) (Photovoltaics and Solar Energy) Specialisation Authority: School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering Units of Credit: 96

The specialisation in Photovoltaics and Solar Energy is designed to build on the previous education of engineers from other engineering disciplines who are attracted to the booming solar photovoltaic energy industry. Students undertake courses from the areas of photovoltaic devices, and photovoltaic systems and applications. Program Structure
Professional Development Courses Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Photovoltaics and Solar Energy) See list for MEngSc (Photovoltaics and Solar Energy) See list for MEngSc (Photovoltaics and Solar Energy) This component is made up of a Project Report (12 UOC), and/or a Project (12 UOC) and/or a Project Report (6 UOC) and/or a Project Report (6 UOC) or a Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Project Management) 6 6 6 6 6 Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Project Management is designed for graduates who intend to pursue a professional career in project management in either public or private sectors, at various levels of responsibility - from strategic management through to detail. The program covers both fundamentals and applications in project management including planning, risk, contracts, people, equipment, materials, legals, finances and economics. This specialisation was developed following extensive consultation with industry. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority.

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority.
Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC In addition to the courses listed below, students may choose up to 12 UOC of courses from another specialisation list within the Master of Engineering Science. Managing Manufacturing Operations Photovoltaics* Solar Cells and Systems* High Efficiency Silicon Solar Cells* Solar Cell Technology and Manufacturing*
* Compulsory courses

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Special Topics Special Topics MEngSc (Extension) (Project Management) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96

UOC 6 6

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

The specialisation in Project Management is designed for graduates who intend to pursue a professional career in project management in either public or private sectors, at various levels of responsibility - from strategic management through to detail. The program covers both fundamentals and applications in project management including planning, risk, contracts, people, equipment, materials, legals, finances and economics. This specialisation was developed following extensive consultation with industry. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Project Management) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Project Management) See list for MEngSc (Project Management) 24 UOC

68

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Project Courses

12 to 24 UOC

This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC), or a Masters Project (12 UOC) and Special Topics (6 UOC), or a Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Signal Processing) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Signal Processing is one of the fundamental disciplines behind electrical engineering and telecommunications, with broad applicability to the development of sensing, enhancement, recognition, compression, communication and reproduction systems. A signal processing specialisation will equip students with portable skills, developing an in-depth understanding of single- and multi-dimensional signals, along with practical algorithms. For a well-rounded education, consider combining this specialisation with a selection of courses from the telecommunications or systems and control disciplines. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC

MEngSc (Extension) (Signal Processing) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Signal Processing is one of the fundamental disciplines behind electrical engineering and telecommunications, with broad applicability to the development of sensing, enhancement, recognition, compression, communication and reproduction systems. A signal processing specialisation will equip students with portable skills, developing an in-depth understanding of single- and multi-dimensional signals, along with practical algorithms. For a well-rounded education, consider combining this specialisation with a selection of courses from the telecommunications or systems and control disciplines. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Signal Processing) Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Signal Processing) Engineering Management Courses See list for MEngSc (Signal Processing) Project Courses 12 to 24 UOC This component is made up of a Project Report A (6 UOC) and a Project Report B (6 UOC), or a Project (12 UOC), or a Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Structural Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Structural Engineering allows students to develop skills in analysis and design of steel and concrete structures with an understanding of modern materials. The program is ideally suited for both practising structural engineers and recent graduates planning a career in structural engineering. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined by the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Structural Stability Prestressed Concrete Design Reinforced Concrete Design Computational Structural Mechanics Steel Structures Advanced Materials Technology
Note: The availability of courses may vary from semester to semester and courses may be offered in alternate years. Please check the Schools website for current information.

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6 Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Special Topics Masters Project MEngSc (Extension) (Structural Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Structural Engineering allows students to develop skills in analysis and design of steel and concrete structures with an understanding of modern materials. The program is ideally suited for both practising structural engineers and recent graduates planning a career in structural engineering. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Structural Engineering) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Structural Engineering) See list for MEngSc (Structural Engineering) This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC) or an Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Systems and Control) UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 72 The specialisation in Systems and Control is built around core courses that provide some theory (Robust and Linear Control Systems plus Analysis and Design of Non-linear Control), some fundamental implementation ideas (Real Time Computing and Control) and a specific application of systems and control (Biomedical Instrumentation and Informatics). With the addition of some Professional Development courses as required, two technical electives or a small project, and two professional engineering management courses, this specialisation provides a solid postgraduate coursework program for professional engineers working in the systems and control area. 24 UOC 6 12 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

UOC

24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC

Students must complete the following 4 courses and may select up to 2 courses from any postgraduate specialisation offered by the School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications. Digital Signal Processing Theory and Applications Digital Image Processing Speech Processing Audio and Electroacoustics Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Report A Project Report B 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design

UOC 6 6 6 6 6

UOC

www.international.unsw.edu.au

69

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) UOC

Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Systems and Control) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Systems and Control) See list for MEngSc (Systems and Control) This component is made up of a Project Report A (6 UOC) and a Project Report B (6 UOC), or a Project (12 UOC or 24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Telecommunications) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 72 The Telecommunications specialisation focuses on recent and advanced aspects of telecommunications, ranging from protocols used in networks such as the internet, the operation and control of such networks, and the design and operation of switches and routers within such networks. Aspects of advanced wireless communications are also covered such as modulation techniques, coding techniques and information theory. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Internet Design and Equipment Architectures* Network Operations and Control* Advanced Wireless Communications* Coding and Information Theory* Microwave Circuits, Theory and Techniques Advanced Networking Quantum Communications
*Compulsory course

Project Courses (012 UOC) 24 UOC On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Report A Project Report B MEngSc (Extension) (Telecommunications) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 96

UOC 6 6

Students must complete the following 4 courses and may select up to 2 courses from any postgraduate specialisation offered by the School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications. Robust and Linear Control Systems Analysis and Design of Non-linear Control Real Time Computing and Control Biomedical Instrumentation and Informatics Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Project Report A Project Report B MEngSc (Extension) (Systems and Control) Specialisation Authority: School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications Units of Credit: 96 The specialisation in Systems and Control is built around core courses that provide some theory (Robust and Linear Control Systems plus Analysis and Design of Non-linear Control), some fundamental implementation ideas (Real Time Computing and Control) and a specific application of systems and control (Biomedical Instrumentation and Informatics). With the addition of some Professional Development courses as required, two technical electives or a small project, and two professional engineering management courses, this specialisation provides a solid postgraduate coursework program for professional engineers working in the systems and control area. 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

The Telecommunications specialisation focuses on recent and advanced aspects of telecommunications, ranging from protocols used in networks such as the internet, the operation and control of such networks, and the design and operation of switches and routers within such networks. Aspects of advanced wireless communications are also covered such as modulation techniques, coding techniques and information theory. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Telecommunications) Specialisation Courses Engineering Management Courses Project Courses 24 to 48 UOC 12 to 24 UOC 12 to 24 UOC See list for MEngSc (Telecommunications) See list for MEngSc (Telecommunications) This component is made up of Project Report A (6 UOC) and Project Report B (6 UOC), or Project (12 UOC or 24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Water Resources) 24 UOC

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 72 The Water Resources specialisation provides advanced study options in water resources including various aspects of surface water hydrology, urban hydrology and stormwater management, catchment and water resources modelling, groundwater investigations and hydrogeology, hydrodynamics of rivers and estuaries, and coastal engineering related to waves, beaches and coastal infrastructure. Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Surface Water Hydrology Urban Hydrology and Storm Water Management Catchments and Water Resources Modelling Channels Rivers and Estuaries Groundwater Hydrology and Resource Analysis Waves Beaches and Coastal Infrastructure
Note: The availability of courses may vary from semester to semester and courses may be offered in alternate years. Please check the Schools website for current information.

UOC

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Economics and Financial Management

70

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Program Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) A selection of Professional Development courses appropriate to the students specialisation will be determined in consultation with the specialisation authority. Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Water and Wastewater Analysis and Quality Requirements Water Treatment Wastewater Treatment Solid Waste Management Hazardous Waste Management Sustainability Assessment
Note: The availability of courses may vary from semester to semester and courses may be offered in alternate years. Please check Schools website for current information.

Engineering Management Courses

See list for MEngSc (Water, Waste Water and Waste Engineering) Project Courses

12 to 24 UOC

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6

This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC), or a Masters Project (12 UOC) plus a Special Topic in Civil and Environmental Engineering (6 UOC), or an Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required.

12 to 24 UOC

Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications


Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering Master of Engineering in Telecommunications Program Code: 8621 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years The School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications offers a two-year Master of Engineering program. Students may choose to study one of the two plans within the program: an Electrical Engineering plan leading to a Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering or a Telecommunications plan leading to a Master of Engineering in Telecommunications. Flexibility and choice are maintained throughout the program as many elective courses are offered. The program serves as an entry point for students to move into the engineering profession. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree in electrical or telecommunications engineering with a minimum overall average of 65% or equivalent. Professional Recognition The two-year Master program has received provisional professional accreditation by Engineers Australia. Specialisation: Electrical Engineering Academic Plan: ELECAS8621

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) On approval by the specialisation authority only. Special Topics Masters Project MEngSc (Extension) (Water Resources) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

UOC 6 12

Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or

The Water Resources specialisation provides advanced study options in water resources including various aspects of surface water hydrology, urban hydrology and stormwater management, catchment and water resources modelling, groundwater investigations and hydrogeology, hydrodynamics of rivers and estuaries, and coastal engineering related to waves, beaches and coastal infrastructure. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Water Resources) Specialisation Courses See list for MEngSc (Water Resources) Engineering Management Courses See list for MEngSc (Water Resources) Project Courses 12 to 24 UOC This component is made up of a Masters Project (12 UOC), or a Masters Project (12 UOC) plus a Special Topic in Civil and Environmental Engineering (6 UOC), or an Extension Project (24 UOC). Approval from the specialisation authority to undertake this option is required. MEngSc (Water, Waste Water and Waste Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 72 This specialisation provides technical professionals the opportunity to learn the core fundamentals of current practice in this field and to engage with existing and future technologies. Effective and sustainable water and wastewater treatment and environmentally responsible waste management are now absolutely crucial for urban populations, given the environmental challenges facing Australia and the rest of the world. 12 to 24 UOC 24 to 48 UOC 24 UOC

Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC)

6 6 6

On approval by the specialisation authority only. Special Topic in Civil and Environmental Engineering Masters Project 6

12

MEngSc (Extension) (Water, Waste Water and Waste Engineering) Specialisation Authority: School of Civil and Environmental Engineering Units of Credit: 96 This specialisation provides technical professionals the opportunity to learn the core fundamentals of current practice in this field and to engage with existing and future technologies. Effective and sustainable water and wastewater treatment and environmentally responsible waste management are now absolutely crucial for urban populations, given the environmental challenges facing Australia and the rest of the world. Program Structure Professional Development Courses See list for MEngSc (Water, Waste Water and Waste Engineering) Specialisation Courses 24 UOC

The specialisation in Electrical Engineering provides students with the opportunity to acquire comprehensive knowledge over a range of technology and design issues in electrical systems. Core courses provide a firm foundation in signal processing, system control, energy systems, microelectronics systems and photonics and other electrical systems. Specialisation Structure UOC

The program consists of 96 units of credit made up of the following courses: 6 Professional Electives 5 Postgraduate Electives in Electrical Engineering 2 Management Courses 1 Electrical Design Proficiency Course 1 Master of Engineering Project 36 30 12 6 12

See list for MEngSc (Water, Waster Water and Waste Engineering)

24 to 48

www.international.unsw.edu.au

71

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Specialisation: Telecommunications Academic Plan: TELEAS8621 The specialisation in Telecommunications focuses on recent and advanced aspects of telecommunications, ranging from protocols used in networks such as the internet, the operation and control of such networks, the design and operation of switches and routers within such networks. Aspects of advanced wireless communications are also covered, such as modulation techniques, coding techniques and information theory. Specialisation Structure UOC

Biomedical Engineering Courses Medical Imaging Biomedical Systems Analysis Mass Transfer in Medicine Biocompatibility Cellular and Tissue Engineering Regulatory Requirements of Biomedical Technology Clinical Laboratory Science Chemistry and Physics of Synthetic and Biological Polymers Clinical Information Systems Introductory Biomechanics (1) Mechanics of the Human Body Biomechanics of Physical Rehabilitation (2) Mechanical Properties of Biomaterials Biological Signal Analysis Biomedical Instrumentation Biosensors and Transducers Implantable Bionics Dynamics of the Cardiovascular System Modelling Organs Tissues and Devices Masters Project Report* Engineering Statistics and Experiment Design Experimental Biomechanics
Notes: (1) For students with no mechanics background. (2) Only offered in Semester 1 of every even year. * This degree is primarily obtained through coursework study but may include a research project conducted in the University, hospital, industry or other approved institution. The program offers scope for original research into the application of engineering principles and technology to medical problems.

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 12 6 6

Food Science and Technology


Master of Science in Food Science and Technology Program Code: 8033 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Science in Food Science and Technology provides a comprehensive study of theoretical aspects of the science, technology and engineering of foods. The program provides an opportunity for graduates to apply their basic skills in areas relevant to those fields of science and technology in which the School of Chemical Engineering has developed special expertise. The program has three specialisations: food science and technology, food science and nutrition, food safety and quality. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree, Honours degree or equivalent (for example, three-year degree plus sufficient relevant industry experience) involving some basic studies in chemistry, microbiology and biochemistry. Program Structure The program requires completion of 72 units of credit (UOC) of courses made up of professional development courses from the chosen specialisation (24 UOC), engineering management courses (12 to 24 UOC) and specialisation courses (minimum 24 UOC). Students who have been awarded a recognised Bachelor degree in food science with a credit average will be exempted from all professional development courses. Specialisation: Food Science and Technology Plan: FOODGS8033 The Food Science and Technology specialisation is designed for graduates in science, applied science, biochemistry, microbiology, biotechnology or related disciplines, who seek specialised knowledge of the science and technology of foods. It provides advanced training in various aspects of food science and technology that can be tailored to the background of students. Specialisation Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) Food Processing Principles* Unit Operations in Food Processing* Product Design and Development*
* Compulsory course

The program consists of 96 units of credit made up of the following courses: 6 Professional Electives 5 Postgraduate Electives in Telecommunications 2 Management Courses 1 Telecommunications Design Proficiency Course 1 Master of Engineering Project 36 30 12 6 12

For further information, visit: www.ee.unsw.edu.au/ master_program/index.html

Biomedical Engineering
Master of Biomedical Engineering Program Code: 8660 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Biomedical Engineering is designed for graduates in engineering, science or medicine. Students are able to select up to 24 units of credit (UOC) in courses providing a background of study in either biological or physical sciences and then complete the program by selecting another 48 UOC from a broad range of postgraduate courses. An optional Research Project (12 UOC) is available to suitable students in their final semester. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering, science or medicine, with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC) of which a minimum of 48 UOC must be from courses offered by the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering. The remaining 24 UOC may be at either postgraduate or undergraduate level and can be selected from other schools of the University if approved by the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering. The selection of any background courses must be made in consultation with the Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering. Candidates are encouraged to present a full program plan to the School prior to the commencement of their first semester. Background Courses Examples of courses available include: Fundamentals of Anatomy Computing for Engineers Fundamentals of Mathematics B Engineering Materials and Chemistry Physiology 1A Physiology 1B Fundamental of Physics 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Engineering Program Code: 5445 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Biomedical Engineering is a specialist postgraduate qualification for candidates with a three-year Bachelor degree or equivalent. The program allows courses taken from a wide selection to be studied at a reduced load of 18 units per semester. Students who perform well in their first semester (credit average or better) may apply for articulation to the Master of Biomedical Engineering taking all their course credits into that program. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 36 units of credit. For details of courses visit the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate/programs/2011/5445.html

UOC

6 6 6 6

Food Preservation: Principles and Applications

Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Instrumental Analysis Process Engineering in Food Industry

UOC

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Special Topics in Food Science and Technology Topics in Food Science and Technology Forensic Food Science Food Microbiology Nutrition

Advanced and Applied Nutrition Advanced Food Microbiology Food Toxicology

Food Science and Technology Laboratory Food Safety and Quality Assurance

72

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Life Cycle Engineering Engineering Decision Structures Ethics and Leadership in Engineering

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6 6 6 6

Quality in Engineering or Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses On approval by the specialisation authority only. Minor Project Research Project Master of Science (Extension) in Food Science and Technology Program Code: 8034 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years This program provides a comprehensive study of theoretical aspects of the science, technology and engineering of foods, with an opportunity to undertake an extensive research project. It is available in the areas of food science and technology, food safety and quality, and food science and nutrition. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree, Honours 1 1/2 degree or equivalent involving some basic studies in chemistry, microbiology and biochemistry with a minimum average of 75% over the final two years.

6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment Quality in Engineering or

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or

Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) Minor Project Research Project Specialisation: Food Safety and Quality Plan: FOODIS8033

6 6 6

UOC 6 12

Quality and Quality Systems Project Management or Project Management Framework Economic Decision Analysis in Engineering or

6 6 6 6

UOC 6 12

On approval by the specialisation authority only.

Engineering Economics and Financial Management Project Courses (012 UOC) Minor Project

On approval by the specialisation authority only. Research Project Specialisation: Food Science and Nutrition Plan: FOODDS8033

UOC 6

12

The Food Science and Nutrition specialisation is designed for graduates in science, food science, nutrition and food technology with principal interests in chemistry, biochemistry, physiology and human nutrition. The program comprises professional development courses and specialisation courses that offer a choice of courses in human nutrition, and food science and technology based on the background of students. Specialisation Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) Nutrition* Advanced and Applied Nutrition* UOC 6 6 6 6 6

The Food Safety and Quality specialisation is designed for graduates in food science, food technology, microbiology, biochemistry, biotechnology or related disciplines, who seek specialised knowledge of safety issues associated with foods. The program provides advanced training in all aspects of food safety and quality as well as fundamental aspects of food science and technology. Specialisation Structure Professional Development Courses (24 UOC) Food Microbiology* Nutrition Food Preservation: Principles and Applications* Food Safety and Quality Assurance Advanced Food Chemistry
* Compulsory course

UOC 6 6 6 6 6

Food Preservation: Principles and Applications* Food Safety and Quality Assurance Advanced Food Chemistry
* Compulsory course

Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Unit Operations in Food Processing* Product Design and Development Special Topics in Food Science and Technology Topics in Food Science and Technology Forensic Food Science Food Diagnostics Advanced and Applied Nutrition Advanced Food Microbiology Food and Nutritional Toxicology Food Science and Technology Laboratory
* Compulsory course

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Program Structure The program requires completion of 96 units of credit (UOC) consisting of professional development courses from the chosen specialisation (24 UOC), engineering management courses (12 to 24 UOC), specialisation courses (minimum 24 UOC) and a research project (minimum 12 UOC). Students who have been awarded a recognised Bachelor degree in food science with a credit average will be exempted from all professional development courses. Graduate Diploma in Food Technology Program Code: 5020 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Graduate Diploma in Food Technology is suitable for practising food technologists and other graduates wishing to pursue a specialised range of courses to enhance their career opportunities in a particular area. It serves as a qualifying course for entry into the Master of Science in Food Science and Technology or Master of Science in Food Science and Technology by Research. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree or equivalent, involving some basic studies in chemistry, microbiology and biochemistry. Program Structure The program requires the completion of 60 units of credit (UOC) consisting of professional development courses from the chosen specialisation (24 UOC), engineering management courses (6 to 18 UOC) and specialisation courses (minimum 18 UOC). Students

Specialisation Courses (2436 UOC) Food Diagnostics Food and Nutritional Toxicology

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Food Sciences and Technology Laboratory Program Design and Evaluation Qualitative Research Methods

Applied Research Methods for Public Health International Health and Development Food and Nutrition Policy Studies

Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Engineering Decision Structures Life Cycle Engineering Ethics and Leadership in Engineering Engineering Statistics and Experimental Design Environmental Management Sustainability Assessment

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Engineering Management Courses (1224 UOC) Managing Energy Efficiency Life Cycle Engineering Engineering Decision Structures Ethics and Leadership in Engineering

Process Improvement and Maintenance Engineering 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

73

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

who have been awarded a recognised Bachelor degree in food science with a credit average will be exempted from all professional development courses. For full details refer to the UNSW Online Handbook www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/ programs/2011/5020.html Graduate Certificate in Food Technology Program Code: 7310 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This program provides the opportunity to obtain a Graduate Certificate qualification after successful completion of postgraduate courses totalling 48 UOC. The Graduate Certificate in Food Technology will suit practising food science/technology graduates or other graduates, wishing to upgrade their knowledge and skills in particular areas of the field (for example, nutrition, food microbiology, food safety, food processing, product development, quality assurance). Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a science based program. Subject to the approval by the Head of School, those with less formal tertiary qualifications but with relevant work experience may be admitted. Program Structure The program requires the completion of 48 units of credit (UOC) consisting of professional development courses from the chosen specialisation (24 UOC), engineering management courses (6 to 12 UOC) and specialisation courses (minimum 12 UOC). Students who have been awarded a Bachelor of Science in Food Science and Technology from UNSW with at least Honours 2/2 (or equivalent) in an appropriate discipline will be exempted from all professional development courses. For full details refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/ programs/2011/7310.html

weeks) to complete assignments and projects. Please note that not all MINE electives are offered each year, it is anticipated that each course will be offered every two years. However this will ultimately depend on demand. Some courses are also offered online (web based). Specialisation: Mine Geomechanics Academic Plan: MINEIS8058 Core Courses (24 UOC) Mining Processes and Systems Hazard Identification Risk and Safety Management in Mining Mining Geomechanics Mine Geology and Geophysics for Mining Operations Elective Courses (36 UOC) Select 4 electives from the following list: Technology Management in Mining Mine Slope Stability Advanced Rock Mechanics Advanced Soil Mechanics and Mine Fill Technology Drilling Blasting and Machine Excavation Specialisation: Mine Management Academic Plan: MINEOS8058 Core Courses (12 UOC) Mining Processes and Systems Hazard Identification Risk and Safety Management in Mining Elective Courses (36 UOC) Select 6 electives from the following list: Technology Management in Mining Management Systems Projects, Processes, Contracts, Contractors Mine Geology and Geophysics for Mining Operations Mining Law Environmental Management for the Mining Industry Advanced Mineral Economics and Project Evaluation Mine Surveying Mineral Processing Mine Design and Feasibility Mine Ventilation Professional Recognition and Career Prospects Mining engineering is an international profession with many of our graduates employed with mining companies operating in South East Asia, Africa, South and North America and Europe. Mining engineering graduates are trained to be versatile, adaptable and responsive to change in a physically and mentally challenging career. 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Graduate Diploma in Mine Ventilation Program Code: 5045 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This program provides professional development in mine ventilation and environment for mining engineers and other mining personnel. The Graduate Diploma is structured so that it can be tailored to the needs of either the metalliferous or coal mining sectors. Accredited programs offered by UNSW for the appointment of Statutory Coal Mine Ventilation Officers in both New South Wales and Queensland can be taken as options in the Graduate Diploma. The course contents have been developed from standard texts, industry guidelines and case studies. These are delivered from both a theoretical and operational perspective with the aim that course contents will be immediately relevant to industry. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Program Structure The program requires the completion of 36 units of credit (UOC) consisting of four core courses (24 UOC) and two elective courses (12 UOC).For full details refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook. unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/2011/5045.html Professional Recognition The program is affiliated with the Australian National Centre for Mine Ventilation, established in 1999 as an initiative of MTEC, the tertiary minerals education arm of the Minerals Council of Australia. Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering Program Code: 5040 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Mining Engineering provides a professional introduction to the mining industry for graduates in Science and Technology or Engineering. It is also qualifying program for entry to the Master of Mining Engineering or Master of Mining Engineering by Research. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Programs Structure The program requires the completion of 36 units of credit (UOC) consisting of two core courses (12 UOC) and four elective courses (24 UOC). For full details refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook. unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/programs/2011/5040.html

UOC

UOC

Mining Engineering
Master of Mining Engineering Program Code: 8058 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Mining Engineering provides advanced study in the areas of geomechanics and mining industry management. The program provides an opportunity for engineering graduates to continue their professional development in specialised areas. It also provides an opportunity for non-mining graduates to broaden their career prospects within the mining industry. There are two academic plans in the mining engineering program: mine geomechanics and mine management. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor of Engineering degree with an average grade of 65% over the final two years. Program Structure Students are required to complete eight courses. Each course is coordinated by specialists in the relevant fields who include staff from the School of Mining Engineering and the mining industry. All courses within the program are offered as a single short course over a period of approximately one week. Students are then provided with an extended period of time (usually six

74

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Coursework programs

Information Technology
Master of Information Technology Program Code: 8543 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years (or 1 year with advanced standing) The Master of Information Technology provides engineering and science students with a broad-based IT education and specialised knowledge in a maximum of two majors, enabling them to work in a range of positions in the IT industry. It is offered by the School of Computing Science and Engineering (CSE). Students with a computing background may seek exemptions from up to eight courses (48 UOC) and complete the program in one year. Students seeking exemptions will be required to undertake additional assessment before credit is granted. See the Advanced Standing section in the Program Structure for possible course exemptions. Students who are not eligible for entry into the Master of Information Technology, or who wish to undertake a shorter postgraduate qualification, may apply for the Graduate Diploma of Information Technology. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering, science or a discipline that includes mathematics up to at least year two level, with an average grade of 65% over the final two years; a recognised three-year Bachelor degree in computer science or engineering, with an average grade of 65% over the final two years; or completion of the Graduate Diploma in Information Technology. Program Structure The program consists of 16 courses totalling 96 units of credit (UOC). These courses are defined by four study levels level 0 has no course prerequisites, level 1 has one prerequisite, level 2 has a chain of two prerequisites and level 3 has a chain of three prerequisites. As many courses within the program have prerequisites, courses may only be studied if the required prerequisites have been met. Students may complete introductory courses (Level 0), core computing courses (Level 1 and 2) and advanced electives (Level 3). Two majors can be studied. For the full list of courses, refer to the following website: www.cse.unsw.edu.au/information/future-students/ postgrad-coursework/programs/mit/mit.html#8543 Level 0, 1, 2, 3 GSOE9820 TOTAL Non-CSE Elective Options 90 UOC (15 courses) 6 UOC (1 course) 96 UOC (16 courses)

Data Structures and Algorithms Microprocessors and Interfacing Database Systems Computer Networks and Applications Artificial Intelligence Engineering Project Management

6 6 6 6 6 6

Internetworking Network Routing and Switching (2) Advanced Computer Networks (2) Systems Capacity Planning (2) Wireless Mesh and Sensor Networks (2) Mobile Data Networking (2) Securing Wireless Networks (2) Security Engineering (2) Graduate Diploma of Information Technology Program Code: 5543 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Students who receive advanced standing may choose to forego those credits in favour of completing additional courses from the course list. Students eligible for advanced standing will be restricted in their choice of electives, available at a ratio of 1:4 for every CSE course completed. Majors Up to two majors can be selected from the following areas with a completion of minimum of three courses required to satisfy the major. Course levels are indicated in brackets. Artificial Intelligence Experimental Robotics (1) Intelligent Agents (1) Knowledge Representation and Reasoning (1) Data Warehousing and Data Mining (2) Machine Learning and Data Mining (2) Neural Networks (2) Computer Vision (1) Bioinformatics Compulsory courses: Bioinformatics Methods and Applications (0) Choose 3 courses from the following: Computational Bioinformatics (2) Introduction to Probability and Stochastic Processes (0) Introduction to Statistics and Statistical Computations* (0) Data Warehousing and Data Mining (2) Machine Learning and Data Mining (2) 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC

The Graduate Diploma of Information Technology provides engineering and science students with a broad-based IT education, and more specialised knowledge in up to two majors, enabling them to work in a range of positions in the IT industry. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science or a discipline that included mathematics up to at least year two level, with a high credit average over the final two years; or completion of the Graduate Certificate in Computing. Program Structure The program consists of 12 courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC). These courses are defined by four study levels level 0 has no course prerequisites, level 1 has one prerequisite, level 2 has a chain of two prerequisites and level 3 has a chain of three prerequisites. Students may cover introductory courses (Level 0), core computing courses (Level 1 and 2) and advanced electives (Level 3). Two majors can be studied. For full details refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/ programs/2011/5543.html Students who are not eligible for entry to the Graduate Diploma of Information Technology, or who wish to take a shorter postgraduate qualification, may apply for the Graduate Certificate in Computing.
Graduate Certificate in Computing Program Code: 7543

* MATH5856 has a corequisite of MATH5846. Seek permission from School of Mathematics if you have sufficient background knowledge and wish to enrol in MATH5856 on its own.

Information Technology

This option is for students who do not want to specify a major. Students may study 3 to 6 courses (18 to 36 UOC) from any IT specialisation. Database Systems Next Generation Database Systems (2) Database Systems Implementation (2) XML and Databases (2) Data Warehousing and Data Mining (2) Web Data Compression and Search (2) Web Applications Engineering (1) e-Commerce Systems Web Applications Engineering (1) Service-Oriented Architectures (2) e-Enterprise Project (2) e-Business: Strategy and Management* (0) e-Business and the Law (0) UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6

Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months

Students may receive 1 elective option for every 4 CSE courses completed, including 1 open elective. Projects Students are also able to substitute 2 or 3 electives with a project of equal value provided they meet the following criteria: completed (or have advanced standing in) 72 UOC obtained agreement from a CSE academic supervisor maintained a Distinction level performance in the program. Advanced Standing UOC Advanced standing may be granted for up to 8 courses from the following list: Foundations of Computer Science Principles of Programming 6 6

The Graduate Certificate in Computing provides engineering and science students with a specialised IT education, which may include study in one of the IT majors within the Master of Information Technology. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science, or a minimum of five years work experience in an appropriate area of engineering or science. Program Structure The program consists of four courses totalling 24 units of credit from any course within the Master of Information Technology which students are qualified to study. For full details refer to the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate/programs/2011/7543.html

* Students must apply 6 weeks before the start of semester by submitting a Master of Business and Technology Cross Program Enrolment form to the School of Computer Science and Engineering Student Office. A curriculum vitae must be attached at the request of the Graduate Programs in Business and Technology Program Office.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

75

Faculty of Law
UNSW Law Building

UNSW Faculty of Law is made up of the Law School and 12 research, education and advocacy centres.

Benefits of studying at UNSW Law School include:


Small Interactive Classes for a Stimulating Learning Environment One of the key strengths of the Law School is our commitment to small group teaching. Large lecture style teaching is never used at the postgraduate level and most classes average between 20 to 35 students. This enables lively class debate and enhances the learning experience. Open and friendly teacher-student interaction is a hallmark of the Law School. Excellent Teaching Staff Many of our academics are internationally known scholars in their field. Courses are taught by faculty members, specialists in practice or distinguished international visiting academics. Law Building UNSW Law School is located in a state-of-the-art building offering excellent facilities and resources for postgraduate study and research. Convenient Format and Location of Classes Postgraduate courses are taught in a variety of formats both during the Universitys formal academic semesters and over teaching breaks. Many are taught for two hours per week over a teaching semester or intensively over four days. Courses are taught in the Law Building at Kensington, the UNSW central business district campus in downtown Sydney or in other city venues. Learn with Top Graduates from around the World Law graduates come from all over the world to undertake postgraduate law studies at UNSW. This diversity generates a stimulating and exciting learning environment, one which encourages freedom of expression and provides the opportunity to learn about other legal systems.

The UNSW Law School is in the very top tier of Australian law schools. The pre-eminence of our teaching, research excellence and the outstanding support we provide students at every level are the characteristics that continue to attract the most talented teachers, researchers and students from Australia and internationally.

Flexible Research-Based Assessment All postgraduate courses have a strong research dimension and course assessment is principally on the basis of research essays. Essay topics are agreed upon in the first few weeks of semester to enable students to concentrate on their research with feedback from the lecturer. Student Facilities and Support Services The Law School has excellent research facilities and is acknowledged as having the leading academic law collection in Australia with online access to major Australian and international legal databases. Computer facilities are available for all students to use in the law library in addition to dedicated postgraduate research labs. English language assistance is available through the Learning Centre (www.lc.unsw.edu.au). The Law School also provides additional classes in Legal English for international students. Professional Recognition Candidates interested in qualifying as a legal practitioner, and who have a Bachelor degree in a non-law discipline, should refer to the three-year full time Juris Doctor, JD (program code 9150). The JD degree satisfies the academic requirements for admission as a legal practitioner, however as the requirements for admission to legal practice are complex, prospective students should refer to the relevant admitting body in the state or country where they intend to practise.

Contact Details

Faculty of Law Student Services Tel: +61 2 9385 2227 Email: law@unsw.edu.au Website: www.law.unsw.edu.au

76

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Law Coursework Programs Coursework programs

Master of Laws Program Code: 9200 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Laws (LLM) offers law graduates an opportunity to study areas of specialty and courses with greater difficulty than are met within a Bachelor of Laws program, some of which require advanced interdisciplinary perspective. Courses offered in the LLM program combine a degree of sophistication or technical difficulty in terms of legal content with a substantial consideration of relevant interdisciplinary aspects of the course matter and a focus on policy. Each course contains a significant research component. It is important to consult the current timetable when choosing courses as not all courses are available every year. Students who complete the LLM with a distinction average, or higher, may apply for entry into the Doctor of Juridical Science (SJD) program. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in law or equivalent qualification with a credit (65%) average. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree. All law courses are 6 UOC unless otherwise stated. Students may elect to complete a major sequence of courses (see Specialist Major Sequences below). Students may apply to the Program Coordinator for permission to take, as appropriate to their overall program: A research thesis of about 12,000 words in place of one semester long course Up to 24 UOC in cross-institutional enrolment from postgraduate law courses offered by another School of Law. Cross-institutional courses are credited at 6 UOC. Specialist Major Sequences Candidates for the LLM may undertake study incorporating a major sequence in one of the following specialist areas: Corporate and Commercial Law Corporate, Commercial and Taxation Law Criminal Justice and Criminology Dispute Resolution Environmental Law Human Rights and Social Justice Innovation Law International Business and Economic Law International Law Media and Technology Law Taxation Law

When selecting courses, students should take the following points into consideration. 1. In order to incorporate a major sequence in the degree, a student must obtain no less than 24 of the 48 UOC required for the award of the degree from the courses allocated to that major sequence. The Corporate, Commercial and Taxation major sequence requires the completion of a minimum of 18 UOC from law courses offered in the Corporate and Commercial Law major sequence and 18 UOC from postgraduate courses in tax offered by the Australian School of Taxation (Atax). The Taxation major sequence requires the completion of a minimum of 24 UOC tax courses offered by Atax and a minimum of 18 UOC law courses offered by the School of Law plus 6 UOC from either the School of Law or Atax. The Environmental Law major sequence requires the completion of 24 UOC in Environmental Law courses including Environmental Law in Australia and International Environmental Law. Not all courses are available every year. Students are advised to consult the timetable on the Faculty website for the availability of particular courses. 2. From time to time the allocation of courses to major sequences may be altered. Please consult the Faculty website for current information: www.law.unsw.edu.au 3. The Program Coordinator may, when considering it appropriate, authorise the inclusion of a special elective within, or the deletion of a special elective from among the courses allocated to a major sequence. 4. The Program Coordinator may, when considering it appropriate, approve as part of an individual students major sequence a course or courses taken by that student on a cross-institutional basis. Please note that a minimum of 18 UOC credited to a specialisation must be completed at UNSW School of Law. 5. Where a special case is made, or where an individual students assessment program for the courses concerned is tailored specifically to issues relevant to a major sequence, the Program Coordinator may approve a course not otherwise allocated to a major sequence as part of that students major sequence. 6. A research thesis course may be counted towards the units of credit required for a major sequence where, in the opinion of the Program Coordinator, the subject matter of the thesis topic concerned is substantially related to the specialist area of the major sequence. 7. When a student completes the LLM incorporating a major sequence as above, the students academic transcript will identify the major sequence and the courses which constitute it and the students testamur will contain the words Master of Laws specialising in... (the major sequence completed) or words to like effect. Where a student qualifies for more than one major sequence, they must choose the specialisation to be noted on the academic transcript and testamur.

Judith Erren, Germany Master of Laws I chose UNSW because of its reputation as one of the best law universities in Australia. I always wanted to do a Master degree in an English speaking country. Meeting such different people with such varied cultural and personal backgrounds during my classes was a highlight and broadened my mind. The classes at UNSW are small so that everyone has the chance to say something if he or she wants to. The teachers cultivate and appreciate discussions in class. After class the lecturers are very helpful and always have an open ear, should you need some assistance or simply would like to discuss a certain topic. UNSW offers a broad variety of postgraduate law classes, many of them held in the evening or in intensive mode, so that working people can take part, too. I think this is why in many of my classes I was able to meet real Australians already practising law. All in all, studying in Australia, at UNSW, was an unforgettable life experience.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

77

Faculty of Law Coursework programs

Master of Business Administration (MBA)/ Master of Laws Program Code: 9230 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years The AGSM Master of Business Administration (MBA)/ Master of Laws is offered jointly by the School of Law and the Australian School of Business. The program provides expertise and knowledge in the areas of law and management and will be particularly relevant to: government lawyers lawyers working in law firms who want to develop their capacity to better manage the way their organisations deliver legal services lawyers working as in-house counsel where contribution to the strategic direction and organisational effectiveness is required lawyers seeking to change careers. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in law or equivalent qualification with a credit (65%) average and a minimum of two years post degree work experience in a managerial/professional role. Candidates are required to pass the GMAT test with a minimum score of 580. For further details, refer to www.business. unsw.edu.au Program Structure A total of 144 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the combined degree, 48 UOC in Law courses and 96 UOC from courses offered in the AGSM MBA program. The AGSM MBA component requires 54 UOC of the required 96 UOC to be completed in core courses as required by the Australian School of Business. Law Courses (48 UOC) Please refer to the Master of Laws entry for course details. AGSM MBA Core Courses (54 UOC) Foundations of Management Economics Accounting Finance Data Analysis and Decision Making Operations Management Marketing Management Organisational Behaviour Strategy Elective Courses (42 UOC) For list of courses, refer to the UNSW Online Handbook: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate/ programs/2011/9230.html Master of Business Law Program Code: 9231 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Business Law (MBL) has been designed for non-lawyers involved in the private, commercial, government or international sectors where business law issues are relevant to their UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

employment such as finance, accounting, compliance, human resources and marketing professionals. It is also a valuable qualification for students seeking careers in those fields where knowledge of legal requirements is an advantage. The MBL provides students with access to a range of business law subjects that allows for a program that can be tailored to the students needs. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a non-law discipline with a credit (65%) average. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required for the award of the degree which includes up to three compulsory courses totalling 18 UOC. Compulsory Course All students (6 UOC) Legal Concepts, Research and Writing for Business Law* UOC 6

Master of Dispute Resolution Program Code: 9235 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Dispute Resolution provides a comprehensive, academically rigorous program for those seeking a specialist postgraduate qualification in dispute resolution theory and practice. Note: The program does not lead to professional qualification for legal practice. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline with a credit average (65%). Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes two compulsory courses totalling 12 UOC. Compulsory Courses (12 UOC) Dispute Resolution Principled Negotiation Elective Courses (36 UOC) Select 6 courses from the following: Advanced Issues in Dispute Resolution Complex Commercial Litigation Criminal Justice: Global Perspectives Foundations of Facilitation International Commercial Arbitration International Commercial Dispute Resolution Juvenile Justice Managing Workplace Conflict and Change Mastering Facilitation Mediation Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes Regulatory Litigation Research Thesis Sentencing: Law Policy and Practice Graduate Diploma in Dispute Resolution Program Code: 5235 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes two compulsory courses totalling 12 UOC Dispute Resolution (6 UOC) and Principled Negotiation (6 UOC). Elective courses totalling 24 UOC may be selected from those listed under the Master of Dispute Resolution entry. UOC 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

* All students are required to complete this subject in their first semester of study.

Compulsory Courses For graduates from disciplines other than law** (12 UOC) Legal Foundations of Business Corporations and Business Associations Law

UOC 6 6

**Students who have previously undertaken legal studies can select elective courses in place of these two courses.

Elective Courses (3042 UOC) The remaining courses may be selected from the elective list on: www.law.unsw.edu.au/mbl Graduate Diploma in Business Law Program Code: 5231 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a non-law discipline. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) is required for the award of the degree which includes up to three compulsory courses. Compulsory Course All students (6 UOC) Legal Concepts, Research and Writing for Business Law* UOC 6

* All students are required to complete this subject in their first semester of study.

Compulsory Courses For graduates from disciplines other than law** (12 UOC) Legal Foundations of Business Corporations and Business Associations Law

UOC 6 6

**Students who have previously undertaken legal studies can select elective courses in place of these two courses.

Elective Courses (1830 UOC) The remaining courses may be selected from the elective list on: www.law.unsw.edu.au/mbl

78

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Law Coursework Programs Coursework programs

Graduate Diploma in Applied Intellectual Property Program Code: 5265 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Applied Intellectual Property is a specialist program designed for professionals who wish to acquire expertise in the practical, commercial application of intellectual property. Note: The program does not lead to professional qualification for legal practice. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes four compulsory courses totalling 24 UOC. Master of Human Rights Law and Policy Program Code: 9211 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This program provides an opportunity for the specialised study of human rights law and policy at the postgraduate level and equips diverse graduates to be able to take up the cause of human rights advocacy from within the broad perspective of law. It is designed for professionals across a wide range of disciplines who are seeking detailed knowledge about human rights law and policy. Note: This program does not lead to a professional qualification for legal practice. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social sciences or humanities with a credit average (65%). Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes at least one compulsory course. Compulsory Course All students (6 UOC) International Human Rights Compulsory Course For graduates from disciplines other than law (6 UOC) Legal Concepts, Research and Writing for Human Rights Elective Courses (3642 UOC) Advanced Issues in International Law UOC 6 UOC 6 UOC 6

International Aspects of Social Justice International Climate Law International Criminal Law International Environmental Law International Law and the Use of Force International Law of Equality and Discrimination International Organisations International Refugee Law International Trade Law: Environment and Development Law of Armed Conflict Law, Culture and the International Law, Rights and Development Managing Workplace Conflict and Change National Protection of Human Rights: Comparative Perspectives Native Title Law, Policy and Practice Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes Principles of International Law Research Thesis Transnational Business and Human Rights Transnational Policing and Human Rights

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Note: The program does not lead to professional qualification for legal practice. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social sciences or humanities with a credit average (65%). Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate at least eight years experience in the area of expertise. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes two core courses totalling 12 UOC. On completion of the compulsory law component, students may choose 18 UOC from Law courses offered and 18 UOC from the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences courses offered. Compulsory Courses (12 UOC) Principles of International Law The Politics of International Law Elective Courses (36 UOC) Law Courses Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Courses UOC 6 6 UOC 18 18

To view courses, refer to www.law.unsw.edu.au/milir Graduate Diploma in International Law and International Relations Program Code: 5760 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social science or humanities. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes two core courses totalling 12 UOC - Principles of International Law (6 UOC) and The Politics of International Law (6 UOC). On completion of the compulsory law component, students may choose 12 UOC from Law courses offered and 12 UOC from Social Sciences and International Studies courses offered. To view courses, please visit: www.law.unsw.edu.au/milir Compulsory Courses All students (24 UOC) Commercial Transactions Involving Intellectual Property Intellectual Property Law and Innovation IP Licensing and Commercialisation IP Strategy and Management Compulsory Course For graduates from disciplines other than law (6 UOC) Legal Concepts, Research and Writing for Applied Intellectual Property Elective Courses (612 UOC) Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property Comparative Patent Law Law and the Culture Industries Research Thesis UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Students may choose to take all of their elective courses from the postgraduate law electives listed above or may choose to take up to two courses (12 UOC) from postgraduate non-law courses offered at UNSW and approved by the Program Director/s or the Program Coordinator. Graduate Diploma in Human Rights Law and Policy Program Code: 5211 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in law, social sciences or humanities. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate extensive experience in the area of expertise. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit are required for the award of the degree which includes at least one compulsory course. Please refer to the Master of Human Rights Law and Policy for details of courses. Master of International Law and International Relations Program Code: 9240 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of International Law and International Relations is a joint program offered by the School of Law and School of Social Sciences and International Studies in the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. This program provides students with an interest in careers in international law and international relations with a strong theoretical and practical understanding of the problems, conduct, overlap and conflicts between international law, politics and the areas of interaction.

Contemporary Issues in International and Domestic Indigenous Law 6 Criminal Justice: Global Perspectives Disability Law and Policy European Human Rights Law and Institutions Human Rights in Asia Human Rights Internship Program Indigenous Peoples in International Law 6 6 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

79

Faculty of Law Coursework programs

Juris Doctor Program Code: 9150 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 3 years The Juris Doctor (JD) program enables graduate students to study law. It is available only to those students who already have a university degree in a discipline other than law (or non-Australian law degrees). It requires full-time attendance for three years, although accelerated progression can reduce the duration of the program to two years. The JD is a degree which leads to admission to legal practice, however as the requirements for admission to legal practice are complex, intending students should refer to the relevant admitting body in the state or country where you intend to practise. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree or equivalent qualification in any discipline other than law, or a recognised non-Australian law degree. Program Structure A total of 144 units of credit (UOC) is required for the award of the degree made up of compulsory courses (92 UOC) and elective courses (52 UOC). Compulsory Courses (92 UOC) Criminal Law 1 Criminal Law 2 Foundations of Law Torts Contracts 1 Contracts 2 Property, Equity and Trusts 1 Property and Equity 2 Public Law Federal Constitutional Law Administrative Law Litigation 1 Litigation 2 Business Associations 1 Law, Lawyers and Society Advanced Legal Research Legal Theory Law and Social Theory Electives (52 UOC) Approximately 25-30 electives are available each semester. Please refer to the online timetable for the complete list of electives which are offered in that particular semester: www.law.unsw.edu.au/current_ students/timetable/index.asp UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Master of Criminal Justice and Criminology Program Code: 9285 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Criminal Justice and Criminology is designed for graduates seeking an interdisciplinary specialised education at an advanced level in criminal justice law, policy, theory and practice. It is jointly offered by the Faculty of Law and the Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences. The program provides graduates with a strong understanding of criminological and legal research, and legal and criminological perspectives on the practices and regulation of criminal justice institutions and processes. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline with a credit (65%) average. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required for the award of the degree which includes up to three compulsory courses. Compulsory Course All students (6 UOC) Explaining Crime Compulsory Courses For graduates from disciplines other than law** (12 UOC) Conceptualising Criminal Laws Legal Concepts, Research and Writing for Criminal Justice and Criminology
**Students who have previously undertaken legal studies can select elective courses in place of these two courses.

Master of Legal Studies Program Code: 9220 Commencement: Semester 1 only (March) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Legal Studies (MLS) is designed for non-lawyers to understand how the legal system works and provide some substantive knowledge of the law in specific areas. The MLS is designed to complement previous study and work experience and build an understanding of the law into the current area of expertise of non-law professionals. The program does not allow for candidates to branch into a new area of knowledge. The Master of Legal Studies is currently under review. Please refer to the Faculty website for updates. Note: This program does not lead to a professional qualification for legal practice. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline with a credit (65%) average. Work experience will be taken into consideration where a candidate can demonstrate at least eight years experience in the area of expertise. Candidates must submit a study plan outlining the non-core courses they wish to study within the MLS program with their application form. Candidates should also submit their curriculum vitae with the application form so that work experience can be taken into consideration for study plan approval. Information provided with the application form will be used by the School of Law for admission purposes only. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required for the award of the degree. The following five core law courses (total of 24 UOC) must be completed before or taken concurrently with non-core courses: Compulsory Courses (24 UOC) Australian Legal System and Process Elements of Contract Introduction to Property Law Introduction to Public Law Research and Writing in a Legal Environment Electives (24 UOC) The remaining courses totalling 24 UOC may be selected from postgraduate courses offered by the Faculty of Law or from accrediting postgraduate courses from other UNSW faculties. UOC 8 4 4 4 4

UOC 6 UOC 6 6

Elective Courses (3042 UOC) The remaining courses may be selected from the elective list on the law website: www.law.unsw.edu.au/mcjc Graduate Diploma in Criminal Justice and Criminology Program Code: 5285 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) are required for the award of the degree which includes up to three compulsory courses. Compulsory Course All students (6 UOC) Explaining Crime Compulsory Courses For graduates from disciplines other than law** (12 UOC) Conceptualising Criminal Laws Legal Concepts, Research and Writing for Criminal Justice and Criminology
**Students who have previously undertaken legal studies can select elective courses in place of these two courses.

UOC 6 UOC 6 6

Elective Courses (1830 UOC) The remaining courses may be selected from the elective list on: www.law.unsw.edu.au/mcjc

80

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Law Coursework Programs Coursework programs

Courses for Master of Laws and Doctor of Juridical Science The following courses are available for credit towards postgraduate law programs. Lawyers who do not have a civil law background are required to enrol in the course, Australian Legal System, in their first semester of enrolment. Allocation of courses to particular specialist major sequences for the LLM can be viewed on the UNSW Online Handbook at www.handbook.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate/programs/2011/9200.html. Please note that not all courses are available in every academic semester and new courses are added. Students should consult the timetable for 2012 which will be available on the Facultys website: www.law.unsw.edu.au UOC Advanced Debt Capital Markets and Securitisation Advanced International Trade Law Advanced Issues in Dispute Resolution Advanced Issues in International Law Advanced Issues in Property Law Advanced Issues in Torts Advanced Topics in Intellectual Property Anti-Money Laundering and Proceeds of Crime: Laws and Counter Measures Asian Competition Law Australian Climate Law Australian Legal System Banking and Finance Law Censorship, Contempt and the Media Chinese Corporate and Securities Law Chinese Legal System Commercial Conflict of Laws Commercial Contracts Commercial Property Transactions Commercial Transactions Involving IP Comparative Anti-Terrorism Law Comparative Patent Law Comparative Trade Mark Law Competition Law Competition Law and Intellectual Property Complex Commercial Litigation Construction of Commercial Agreements 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Disability Law and Policy Dispute Resolution Electronic Commerce Law Environmental Law in Australia Environmental Markets European Human Rights Law and Institutions European Union: Economic and Trade Law European Union: Institutions and Legal Systems Fiduciary Duties and Conflicts of Interest Finance for Lawyers Foundations of Facilitation Fraud, Forgery and Dishonesty Funds Management, Superannuation and Insurance Gender, Race and Justice Global Issues in Competition Law and Policy Globalisation and Commercial Law Globalisation and Intellectual Property Law History and Theory of International Law Human Rights in Asia Human Rights Internship Program Indigenous Peoples in International Law Insurance Law Intellectual Property Law International and Comparative Intellectual Property International Aspects of Social Justice International Business Transactions International Climate Law International Commercial Arbitration International Commercial Dispute Resolution International Criminal Law International Environmental Law International Financial Institutions: Law and Practice International Financial System: Policy and Regulation International Human Rights International Investment Law International Law and the Use of Force International Law of Equality and Discrimination International Organisations International Refugee Law International Trade Law International Trade Law: Environment and Development IP Licensing and Commercialisation IP Strategy and Management Juvenile Justice Knowledge Management in Legal Services Law and the Culture Industries Law and Valuation Law of Armed Conflict Law of the Sea Law, Culture and the International

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Law, Rights and Development Managing Workplace Conflict and Change Mastering Facilitation Media and Communications Industry Regulation Mediation Mining and Resources Law National Protection of Human Rights: Comparative Perspectives Native Title Law, Policy and Practice Natural Resources Law Online Content Regulation Peaceful Settlement of International Disputes Planning Law and Environmental Assessment Principled (Interest Based) Negotiation Principles of International Law Privacy and the Media Regulation, Litigation and Enforcement Renewable Energy Law Research Thesis Restitution and Unjust Enrichment Law Securities and Financial Markets Regulation Sentencing: Law, Policy and Practice Sports Sponsorship and Marketing: Commercial Issues Strata and Community Title Law Transnational Business and Human Rights Transnational Policing and Human Rights Water Rights and Contemporary Policy Workplace Law

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Note: Postgraduate studies in taxation law must be completed in order to qualify for a specialisation in Corporate, Commercial and Taxation Law and also the Taxation specialisation. Please consult the School of Law website regarding selection of these courses.

Contemporary Issues in International and Domestic Indigenous Law 6 Corporate Control Transactions Corporate Governance Corporate Insolvency Crime Prevention Policy Criminal Justice: Global Perspectives Current Issues in Criminal Justice Cybercrime, Security and Digital Law Enforcement Data Surveillance and Information Privacy Law Defamation and the Media Digital Media Regulation 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

81

Faculty of Medicine
UNSW Medicine is one of Australias largest and most prestigious medical faculties. It offers an innovative and unique teaching program, with links to some of Australias leading teaching hospitals, spanning both urban and rural NSW. The University is perfectly and centrally positioned in Sydneys eastern suburbs, in the midst of the impressive Randwick health precinct.
UNSW Medicine has an enviable track record in cutting-edge medical research and provides facilities that are world class. With a multi-million dollar capital works strategic campaign in progress, UNSW Medicine is in one of the most exciting stages of our 49 year history. The recently completed A$127 million Lowy Cancer Research Centre combines adult and childhood cancer research into one purpose-built building housing over 400 researchers. Further planned projects revolve around our key strengths. The Neurosciences Precinct aims to combine some of the real powerhouses of affiliated UNSW research, including the Black Dog Institute, the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre with our leading researchers in dementia, Alzheimers disease and cognitive decline as well as studies of the healthy ageing brain. The Australian Advanced Treatment Centre will take new discoveries made by our researchers and accelerate the process of translation to those involved in its clinical applications. Lastly, the hallmark of UNSW Medicine, the Wallace Wurth building has a planned revitalisation that will include new research and teaching space to be incorporated into the existing structure. These planned large scale projects will be coupled with our existing and leading research groups such as the Centre for Vascular Research and the newly launched Australian Institute of Health Innovation. Schools UNSW Medicine has nine schools: Prince of Wales Clinical School Rural Clinical School School of Medical Sciences School of Psychiatry School of Public Health and Community Medicine School of Womens and Childrens Health South Western Sydney Clinical School St George Clinical School St Vincents Clinical School Affiliated Teaching Hospitals Bankstown Hospital Liverpool Hospital Prince of Wales Hospital St George Hospital St Vincents and Mater Health Sydney Sutherland Hospital War Memorial Hospital Waverley Criminal Record Checks NSW Health has a duty of care to all patients and clients receiving services from NSW Health and determined that criminal record checks will be carried out on all persons, including university staff and students, who require access to facilities operated by NSW Health. Staff within NSW Health will conduct the checks and all information will be confidential. In accepting your offer to study a postgraduate program at UNSW Medicine (in a facility operated by NSW Health), you must provide a criminal record statement from your own country and complete the NSW Health criminal record consent form which will be sent with your offer letter. NSW Health will provide a clearance letter which will cover students for the duration of their program. For further information please consult the appropriate Program Coordinator or the Postgraduate Administrative Officer. Immunisation for Clinical Students All postgraduate students undertaking coursework or research which involves contact with patients or clinical materials (for example blood, human tissue) should be aware of their immunity or lack of immunity to common infectious diseases. Students undertaking work in any facility of UNSW Health will be required to be compliant with the NSW Health policy on Occupational Assessment, Screening and Vaccination against Specified Infectious Diseases. If students require any immunisations, or are uncertain of their immune status, they should visit their local general practitioner or the UNSW Health Service. The UNSW Health Service is located on the ground floor of the east wing of the Quadrangle Building. Matters relating to infectious diseases are constantly under review and the Faculty policy may be amended as the policies of NSW Health or the Medical Board of Australia or other relevant government bodies change. Medical practitioners who knowingly do not take appropriate measures to reduce their risk of transmitting infections may be liable to charges of professional misconduct if they are responsible for transmitting an infection. Students and medical practitioners in this position may be vulnerable to legal action. Contact Details Tel: +61 2 9385 8765 Email: medicine.info@unsw.edu.au Website: www.med.unsw.edu.au

82

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

Drug Development
The UNSW postgraduate programs in drug development aims to enable people working in the field of developing and marketing pharmaceutical substances to obtain literacy in all aspects of drug development ranging from procedures for identifying lead compounds through to the full development, registration, and marketing of the product. Since interchange of ideas is an essential part of any educational activity, programs include interactive assignments with specific tutors, and group discussions where students come together for tutorials, workshops and practice sessions, and generally to exchange knowledge. Staff Contact Jan Cooper, Program Administrator Tel: +61 2 9385 2557 Fax: +61 2 9313 8629 Email: jan.cooper@unsw.edu.au Website: http://drugdev.med.unsw.edu.au Master of Medical Science in Drug Development Program Code: 9060 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 3 years part time by distance learning As the MBA is to the world of commerce, so the Master of Medical Science in Drug Development is to the pharmaceutical industry, namely, a valuable asset in recruitment and promotion within the industry. The program is specially designed to enhance the capabilities of staff whose vocation lies in the clinical, regulatory, scientific, informational, pharmacoeconomic, and managerial areas of the pharmaceutical industry. All of these areas are interrelated. It is not possible to function to maximum potential in any of these areas without adequate knowledge of the others. The Master of Medical Science in Drug Development enables students to achieve in three years a level of competency that would otherwise take decades to achieve, if achieved at all. Courses are tailored specifically to meet the needs of the clinical, regulatory and other scientific staff working within the pharmaceutical manufacturing industry. A highly effective collaboration between academia, industry, the professions, and government has been achieved in developing and teaching course materials. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline including those in basic science or in the health professions. Those who do not have a degree but have relevant experience in the pharmaceutical industry may be admitted to the Graduate Certificate and, upon successful completion of this program, may apply to upgrade to the Graduate Diploma and then, if they wish, to the Master degree. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Core courses and most electives include a two-day interactive session held at the UNSW Kensington campus. In addition to the interactive sessions, some courses will include additional sessions. For example, Module 4 Law, Ethics and the Regulation of Medicines will include a two-day on-site interactive session at the Australian Governments Therapeutic Goods Administration facilities in Canberra.

Year 1 Principles of Drug Action Efficacy and Safety of Medicines Clinical Development of Medicines Law, Ethics and the Regulation of Medicines Year 2 Pharmaceutical Development of New Medicines Post-marketing Development of Medicines R and D in the Pharmaceutical Industry Biostatistics and Trial Design Plus Electives

UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Program Structure There are eight courses with a total of 48 units of credit in this program. Please contact the School for more information. Graduate Certificate in Drug Development Program Code: 7370 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 1 year part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Relevant degrees include those in basic science or in the health professions. Program Structure There are four courses with a total of 24 units of credit (UOC) in this program. Please contact the School for more information. Graduate Diploma in Pharmaceutical Medicine Program Code: 5511 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 2 years part time by distance learning The Graduate Diploma in Pharmaceutical Medicine is designed for physicians working in the medical departments of pharmaceutical companies. Pharmaceutical physicians are responsible for the conduct of clinical trials, registration of new drugs and associated regulatory activities, pharmacoeconomic studies, supply of drug-related information, pharmacovigilance studies (for example monitoring and reporting of adverse drug reactions), and other similar activities. Physicians wishing to advance within the pharmaceutical industry need to develop high levels of skill in the areas mentioned above. It is also important that these skills meet assessable standards and are compatible with international scientific, legal, regulatory, and semantic conventions which is vital for local and international activities and for career development. Entry Requirements Entry to this program is restricted to qualified medical practitioners having degrees requisite for registration as a medical practitioner in Australia or other jurisdictions considered of comparable standard by the Faculty of Medicine Higher Degree Committee. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of seven 6 UOC courses and two 3 UOC courses. Courses are delivered mainly by distance education with one on-campus workshop per course. Each candidate is assigned a mentor from a medical department of a pharmaceutical company. Year 1 Principles of Drug Action Efficacy and Safety of Medicines Clinical Development of Medicines Law, Ethics and the Regulation of Medicines Year 2 Pharmaceutical Development of New Medicines Post-marketing Development of Medicines R and D in the Pharmaceutical Industry Economic Drivers of the Pharmaceutical Industry and Medical Department Management UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

UOC 6

Therapeutics and the Molecular Basis of Disease 1

Therapeutics Basis of Drug Use and Development 1 6 Therapeutics Basis of Drug Use and Development 2 6 Advanced Pharmaceutical Development of Medicines 6 Advanced Pharmacokinetics Advanced Regulatory Affairs Pharmacoeconomics Advanced Clinical Trials Management 6 6 6 6

Therapeutics and the Molecular Basis of Disease 2 6 Business Management Electives Since the multi-disciplinary activities involved in drug development require an understanding of relevant business and management decision making, students may replace up to two electives listed above with business and management courses selected from the UNSW AGSM MBA program. No other electives will be considered. Such electives include: Accounting and Financial Management Corporate Finance Economics in Management Practice Law for Practising Managers Managerial Skills Managing Change Managing People and Organisations Marketing Management Professional Recognition The Drug Development Program is supported strongly in Australia by peak industry organisations and internationally by the Drug Information Association. Graduate Diploma in Drug Development Program Code: 5504 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 2 years part time by distance learning The Graduate Diploma in Drug Development is designed for persons wishing to pursue careers that relate to the development and safe use of medicines. Health care professionals interested in developing new medicines and improving the use of existing medicines will find the program of value. The extensive range of electives enables students to specialise in areas such as the discovery of new medicines, regulatory affairs, clinical trials, market development, medical department administration, and preclinical studies. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Relevant degrees include those in basic science or in the health professions.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

83

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

Professional Recognition The program is compliant with the syllabus required for accreditation as a Pharmaceutical Physician by the International Federation of Associations of Pharmaceutical Physicians.

Elective Courses (12 UOC)* Electives available may be selected from the following list including core courses offered in the Public Health or International Public Health programs or graduate courses offered by other academic units within UNSW or by other universities. Approval of the Program Director is required to undertake an elective offered outside the School. UOC Community Development Advanced Health Economics and Financial Management Academic Practice** Program Design and Evaluation Qualitative Research Methods Prevention and Management of Chronic Disease Applied Research Methods for Public Health Ethics and Law Policy Studies Comparative Health Care Systems Case Studies in Infectious Diseases in the Healthcare Setting Advanced Biostatistics and Statistical Computing Advanced Epidemiology Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drugs International Health Reproductive, Maternal and Childrens Health Environmental Health Principles and Practice of Primary Health Care in the Community HIV/AIDS: Australian and International Responses Inequalities and Health Health Impact Assessment Public Health Perspectives of Indigenous Health Case Studies in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Current Debates in International Health Health, Development and Human Rights Outbreak Investigation Managing Human Resources for Health Public Mental Health in Australia Current Challenges in Infectious Diseases Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Emergencies and Disasters Tropical Disease Control Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases Social and Cultural Aspects of Contagion Communication in Public Health Health Informatics Principles 6 6 n/a 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Health Management
Staff Contacts Joanne Travaglia Director, Health Management Program Tel: +61 2 9385 8339 Fax: +61 2 9385 1526 Email: j.travaglia@unsw.edu.au Program Administrator Tel: +61 2 9385 1699 Fax: +61 2 9385 1526 Email: postgrad-sphcm@unsw.edu.au Website: www.sphcm.med.unsw.edu.au Master of Health Management Program Code: 8901 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year plus an optional summer semester The program is designed to provide students from countries with developing economies and health systems with the knowledge and skills to be competent health service planners, policy makers and managers. It also caters for students from developed health systems who are involved, or choosing a career path, in international health. Students will focus and develop relevant planning and management knowledge from within a development framework as well as consider issues within the Australian health service context. Mode of Delivery This program is delivered as face-to-face weekly classes. Some electives may involve intensive workshops followed by independent study. For students residing outside Australia, the program is also available in part-time mode via distance learning, with approval from the Program Director, but students must attend one-week residential schools held in Sydney before each academic semester, in March and July. Entry Requirements An appropriate recognised Bachelor degree and a minimum of two years postgraduate work experience, preferably in a health-related field. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of 36 UOC of core courses and 12 UOC of electives. The program may include a summer semester if you wish to complete your studies over a 12 month period. Core Courses (36 UOC) The following six courses must be successfully completed. Advanced standing can only be granted by the Program Director on the basis of demonstrated equivalent Master degree level coursework previously undertaken. UOC Foundations in Public Health and Health Care Systems Health Leadership and Workforce Management Healthcare Economics and Financial Management Clinical Governance and Risk Management Strategy, Policy and Change Evidence-informed Decision-making 6 6 6 6 6 6

Articulation The program articulates with the Graduate Diploma in Health Management and the Graduate Certificate in Health Management. Credit for courses completed in the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, and you should contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy. Graduates and currently enrolled Master of Public Health students at the Chinese University of Hong Kong may apply for advanced standing in our graduate programs. Professional Recognition This program is recognised by the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators and the Australasian College of Health Service Management. Master of Health Management (Extension) Program Code: 8902 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months The Master of Health Management (Extension) provides students with the opportunity to study additional courses to build research skills, and complete an 18 units of credit (UOC) major project in health services management. Students should apply to study this program on completion of core courses within the Master of Health Management. Successful completion of the extension program is a requirement for entry into the PhD program. Entry Requirements Completion of the Master of Health Management (8901) or equivalent with a minimum credit average and submission of an acceptable research proposal. Program Structure In addition to the 48 UOC required for the Master of Health Management, students must complete 24 UOC consisting of one 6 UOC course tailored to the students particular research project and a major project (18 UOC). Professional Recognition This program is recognised by the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators and the Australasian College of Health Service Management. Graduate Diploma in Health Management Program Code: 5509 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Program Structure The Graduate Diploma in Health Management is available for students who wish to exit the Master of Health Management after completing the following core courses totalling 36 UOC. UOC Foundation in Public Health and Health Care Systems Strategy, Policy and Change Health Leadership and Workforce Management Clinical Governance and Risk Management Evidence-informed Decision-making 6 6 6 6 6

The Global HIV Epidemic: Social Aspects and Impacts 6

Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Across the Lifespan 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Notes: * Elective courses offered by the School are under progressive review. Please check the School website for updated elective courses: www.sphcm.med.unsw.edu.au **International students from non English-speaking countries are required to take an additional course, Academic Practice, in their first semester. This course is available for all students to assist them to gain maximum benefit from their study. It does not contribute to the UOC requirements of the degree.

Health Care Economics and Financial Management 6

84

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

Entry Requirements An appropriate recognised Bachelor degree, and two years postgraduate work experience preferably in a health-related field. Professional Recognition This program is recognised by the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators and the Australasian College of Health Service Management. Graduate Certificate in Health Management Program Code: 7360 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months The Graduate Certificate in Health Management provides recognition to students who are limited to study for one semester only, and want to focus on health services management. Entry Requirements An appropriate recognised Bachelor degree, and two years postgraduate work experience preferably in a health-related field. Program Structure Students must successfully complete a minimum of four courses or the equivalent to a total of 24 units of credit from courses offered by the School of Public Health and Community Medicine. Recommended electives are listed in the Master of Health Management entry. Selection of courses must be approved by the Program Coordinator. Articulation The Graduate Certificate articulates with the Master of Health Management and Master of Public Health. Credit for courses completed in the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, and you should contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy. Professional Recognition This program is recognised by the Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators and the Australasian College of Health Service Management.

conflict countries, still afflicted by infection and malnutrition; through to middle income countries, experiencing increases in cardiovascular disease, cancer and injuries, in addition to the persistence of a communicable disease and under-nutrition burden; to more developed countries where the major challenges are non-communicable disease, although threats from infectious disease persist such as in Russia and countries of Eastern Europe and Central Asia. The aim of the Master of International Public Health is to combine: a human ecology perspective of health and disease and expertise in relevant investigative methods, with evidence-based, culturally appropriate and costeffective approaches to disease control, health promotion and health services development based on real life public health interventions, and which emphasises development of infrastructure for policy development, monitoring and surveillance, research and evaluation, workforce development, and program delivery that directs and supports public health action to promote, protect and maintain the health of populations. Mode of Delivery This program is delivered as face-to-face weekly classes. Some electives may involve intensive workshops followed by independent study. For students residing outside Australia, the program is also available in part-time mode via distance learning, with approval from the Program Coordinator, but students must attend one-week residential schools held in Sydney before each academic semester, in March and July. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least one year of work experience in a health-related field. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of 18 UOC of core courses and 30 UOC of select electives. Core Courses (18 UOC) Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health International Health Plus International Public Health Electives (18 UOC)* UOC At least 3 courses (18 UOC) from the designated international public health electives must be selected: Academic Practice** Community Development Program Design and Evaluation Policy Studies Comparative Health Care Systems Reproductive, Maternal and Childrens Health Environmental Health HIV/AIDS: Australian and International Responses The Global HIV Epidemic Health, Development and Human Rights Health Leadership and Workforce Management Current Challenges in Infectious Diseases Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Emergencies and Disasters Tropical Disease Control n/a 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 6

Plus Project or other electives (12 UOC) 2 Electives Or Elective plus Project in International Health 6 6 UOC 12

Notes: *Elective courses in the School are under progressive review. Please check the School website for updated elective courses: www.sphcm.med.unsw.edu.au **International students from non English-speaking countries are required to take an additional course, Academic Practice, in their first semester. This course is available for all students to assist them to gain maximum benefit from their study. It does not contribute to the UOC requirements of the degree.

Articulation The program articulates with the Graduate Diploma in International Public Health and the Graduate Certificate in International Public Health. Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma and the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program. For details on the credit transfer policy, contact the School. Career Opportunities The Master of International Public Health (MIPH) is recognised as a sought after qualification in international health. Many graduates of MIPH or similar programs have found employment with international aid organisations. Graduate Diploma in International Public Health Program Code: 5567 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least one year of work experience in a health-related field. Program Structure The Graduate Diploma in International Public Health comprises the following courses: UOC International Health Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 3 International Health-related electives (as for Master of International Public Health) 6 6 6 18

International Public Health


Staff Contacts Professor Richard Taylor Program Director, International Public Health Tel: +61 2 9385 2595 Fax: +61 2 9385 1526 Email: r.taylor@unsw.edu.au Program Administrator Tel: +61 2 9385 1928 Fax: +61 2 9385 1526 Email: postgrad-sphcm@unsw.edu.au Master of International Public Health Program Code: 9048 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning The Master of International Public Health equips students with the knowledge and competencies to contribute to disease control and health promotion across a wide range of populations and countries. These extend from lesser developed and post-

Articulation The Graduate Diploma articulates with the Master of International Public Health. Credit for courses completed in the Graduate Diploma may be transferred to the Master program. Contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

85

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

Graduate Certificate in International Public Health Program Code: 7367 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months full time (Semester 1 commencement only) or 1 year part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a health-related discipline, and at least one year of work experience in a health-related field. Program Structure The Graduate Certificate in International Public Health comprises courses totalling 24 units of credit (UOC) including International Health (6 UOC) and 3 international health-related electives as for Master of International Public Health (18 UOC). Articulation The Graduate Certificate articulates with the Graduate Diploma and Master of International Public Health. Credit for courses completed in the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Graduate Diploma or Master program. Contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy.

Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of 18 UOC of core courses and 30 UOC of select electives. Core Courses (18 UOC) Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health Foundations in Public Health and Health Care Systems Electives (30 UOC)* The following list of electives allows students to focus on areas of interest and professional relevance. Electives may be chosen from core courses offered in the Public Health or International Public Health programs or graduate courses offered by other academic units within the University or by other universities in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer. Approval from the Program Director is required to undertake an elective offered outside the School. UOC Community Development Advanced Health Economics and Financial Management Academic Practice** Program Design and Evaluation Qualitative Research Methods Prevention and Management of Chronic Disease Applied Research Methods for Public Health Ethics and Law Policy Studies Comparative Health Care Systems Case Studies in Infectious Diseases in the Healthcare Setting Advanced Biostatistics and Statistical Computing Advanced Epidemiology Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drugs International Health Reproductive, Maternal and Childrens Health Environmental Health Principles and Practice of Primary Health Care in the Community HIV/AIDS: Australian and International Responses Inequalities and Health Health Impact Assessment Public Health Perspectives of Indigenous Health Case Studies in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Current Debates in International Health Managing Human Resources for Health Health Development and Human Rights Outbreak Investigation Public Mental Health in Australia Current Challenges in Infectious Diseases Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Emergencies and Disasters Tropical Disease Control Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases 6 6 n/a 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 6

Social and Cultural Aspects of Contagion Communication in Public Health Health Informatics Principles

6 6 6

Notes: * Elective courses in the School are under progressive review. Please check the School website for updated elective courses www.sphcm.med.unsw.edu.au **International students from non English-speaking countries are required to take an additional course, Academic Practice, in their first semester. This course is available for all students to assist them to gain maximum benefit from their study. It does not contribute to the UOC requirements of the degree.

Articulation The program articulates with the Graduate Diploma in Public Health and the Graduate Certificate in Public Health. Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma and the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program. Contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy. Career Opportunities The Master of Public Health is widely recognised as essential for a career in population health including health promotion, primary health care, policy formulation, research, and management of health programs. Many of our graduates occupy key positions in health services and universities in the Western Pacific and Asia-Pacific regions. Plans (Areas of Specialisation) The following specialisations (plans) are available in the Master of Public Health. These plans allow students to focus their studies on areas where the School has considerable expertise and may incorporate project work. Students who demonstrate capability through achieving a credit average and propose an appropriate project topic in the area of specialisation may apply to undertake a 6 UOC project. The project may be in the form of a small-scale research study, a case study, a program evaluation or a report on field experience, and will be negotiated in advance with the relevant Plan Convenor. Students must complete 48 UOC. Health Promotion Plan The Master of Public Health in Health Promotion is designed for students who wish to specialise in health promotion. Students must complete: UOC 3 Master of Public Health Core Courses Plus Qualitative Research Methods Plus 3 courses (18 UOC) from the Health Promotion-related electives below: Community Development Program Design and Evaluation Applied Research Methods Policy Studies International Health Health, Development and Human Rights Health Leadership and Workforce Management Social and Cultural Aspects of Contagion Plus Project in a Health Promotion-related topic or Elective 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 18

Public Health
Staff Contacts Associate Professor Glenda Lawrence Program Director, Public Health Tel: +61 2 9385 3197 Fax: +61 2 9385 6185 Email: g.lawrence@unsw.edu.au Program Administrator Tel: +61 2 9385 2507 Fax: +61 2 9385 1526 Email: postgrad-sphcm@unsw.edu.au Master of Public Health Program Code: 9045 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning The Public Health program provides preparation for education, research and service in all aspects of public health. The program includes study in epidemiology, quantitative and qualitative research methods, health services management, health promotion, development and education in health, as well as systematic review of topical public health issues. It is designed to address the continuing health needs of specialists in public health as well as providing a general orientation to public health issues and methods for the health professions. Mode of Delivery This program is delivered as face-to-face weekly classes. Some electives may involve intensive workshops followed by independent study. For students residing outside Australia, the program is also available in part-time mode via distance learning, with approval from the Program Director, but students must attend one-week residential schools held in Sydney before each academic semester, in March and July. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline, and at least two years of work experience in a health-related field.

The Global HIV Epidemic: Social Aspects and Impacts 6

Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Across the Lifespan 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

86

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Control Plan The Master of Public Health in Infectious Diseases Epidemiology and Control provides students with strong training in the principles of communicable diseases epidemiology and modelling. It is aimed at public health trainees who seek a career in communicable disease control in the health sector or in international health, or who wish to progress to postgraduate research in infectious diseases epidemiology. Students must complete: UOC 3 Master of Public Health Core Courses Plus Current Challenges in Infectious Diseases Plus 3 courses (18 UOC) from the Infectious Diseasesrelated electives below: Applied Research Methods Case Studies in Infectious Diseases in the Healthcare Setting Advanced Epidemiology International Health HIV/AIDS: International and Australian Responses The Global HIV Epidemic Outbreak Investigation Communicable Diseases in Humanitarian Emergencies and Disasters Tropical Disease Control Mathematical Modelling of Infectious Diseases Plus Project in an Infectious Diseases-related topic or Elective International Health Plan The Master of Public Health (MPH) in International Health provides students from developing countries with skills and knowledge to address key health issues in their home countries, as well as enabling local students to contribute effectively to international health development. Students must complete: UOC 3 Master of Public Health Core Courses Plus International Health Plus 3 courses (18 UOC) from the International Health-related electives below: Program Design and Evaluation Qualitative Research Methods Applied Research Methods: Public Health Reproductive, Maternal and Child Health HIV/AIDS: Responses The Global HIV Epidemic Health, Development and Rights Social and Cultural Aspects of Contagion Plus Project in an International Health-related topic or Elective 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 18 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 18

Primary Health Care Plan The Master of Public Health in Primary Health Care is designed for students who wish to specialise in primary health care. Students must complete: UOC 3 Master of Public Health Core Courses Plus Principles and Practice of Primary Health Care Plus 3 courses (18 UOC) from the Primary Health-related electives below: Community Development Program Design and Evaluation Prevention and Management of Chronic Diseases Comparative Health Care Systems Tobacco, Alcohol and Illicit Drugs HIV/AIDS: Australian and International Responses The Global HIV Epidemic Inequalities and Health Clinical Governance and Risk Management Plus Project in a Primary Health Care-related topic or Elective
Note: Students enrolled in the Primary Health Care plan will be required to enrol in one or more courses in the Summer semester.

Graduate Certificate in Public Health Program Code: 7368 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months full time (Semester 1 commencement only) or 1 year part time by distance learning The Graduate Certificate in Public Health comprises the following courses totalling 24 UOC including Foundations in Public Health and the Health Care System (6 UOC) and 3 electives as for the Master of Public Health (18 UOC). Articulation The Graduate Certificate articulates with the Graduate Diploma and Master of Public Health. Credit for courses completed in the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Graduate Diploma or Master program. Contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy.

18 6

6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Across the Lifespan 6

Combined Degree Programs


Staff Contacts Associate Professor Glenda Lawrence Program Director, Public Health Tel: +61 2 9385 3197 Fax: +61 2 9385 6185 Email: g.lawrence@unsw.edu.au Program Administrator Tel: +61 2 9385 2507 Fax: +61 2 9385 1526 Email: postgrad-sphcm@unsw.edu.au Master of Public Health/Health Management Program Code: 9047 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Public Health/Health Management enables candidates to specialise in both public health and health management. The combined program will provide graduates with essential knowledge, skills and attributes to carry out senior managerial roles in both population and clinical health services. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline, and at least two years experience in a health-related field. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of 42 UOC of core courses and 30 UOC of electives. Core Courses (42 UOC) Foundations in Public Health and Health Care Systems Strategy, Policy and Change Healthcare Economics and Financial Management Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health Health Leadership and Workforce Management Clinical Governance and Risk Management Academic Practice* UOC Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 n/a

Indigenous Health and Wellbeing Across the Lifespan 6

Graduate Diploma in Public Health Program Code: 5507 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year full time or 2 years part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline, and at least two years of work experience in a health-related field. Program Structure The Graduate Diploma in Public Health comprises the following courses totalling 36 UOC. UOC Foundations in Public Health and the Health Care System Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health 3 Electives (as for the Master of Public Health) 6 6 18

Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 6

Articulation The Graduate Diploma articulates with the Master of Public Health. Credit for courses completed in the Graduate Diploma may be transferred to the Master program, and you should contact the School for details on the credit transfer policy.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

87

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

*International students from non English-speaking countries are required to take the additional course, Academic Practice, in their first semester. This course is available for all students to assist them to gain maximum benefit from their study. This course does not contribute to the UOC requirements of the degree.

Master of International Public Health/ Health Management Program Code: 9044 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of International Public Health (MIPH) is recognised as a sought after qualification in international health. Many graduates of MIPH or similar programs have found employment with international aid organisations. The Master of Health Management (MHM) provides students with the essential knowledge, skills and attributes required for senior managerial roles in health service delivery. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline, and at least two years experience in a health-related field. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of 48 UOC of core courses and 24 UOC of electives. Core Courses (48 UOC) Foundations in Public Health and Health Care Systems Strategy, Policy and Change Healthcare Economics and Financial Management Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health International Health Health Leadership and Workforce Management Clinical Governance and Risk Management Academic Practice* Plus Designated International Public Health electives (as for Master of International Public Health) 18 Plus Project in International Health or Elective 6 6 UOC Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 n/a

Master of Forensic Mental Health Program Code: 9012 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Forensic Mental Health provides comprehensive training in forensic mental health. It covers the theoretical and practical aspects of criminal civil, child and family forensic mental health sub-speciality. It is designed to provide training, skills and expertise required in the forensic mental health workplace both in the private and non-private arena. The program requires attendance at lectures and in some cases field-site visits. The program is designed for mental health professionals including medical practitioners, nurses, psychologists, and social workers. It is also open to members of the legal profession and correctional staff. The Forensic Mental Health Services (criminal aspects) are largely provided for by the New South Wales (NSW) Justice Health and development of new facilities will require additional suitably qualified staff for the foreseeable future. Forensic Psychiatry private practice provides further opportunities for practitioners. Please note that the Master of Forensic Mental Health is not designed to lead to registration as a practising psychologist in NSW. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Students must complete 24 UOC in core courses and 24 UOC of electives offered by the School of Psychiatry. Core Courses (24 UOC) Law and Mental Health Psychiatry and Criminal Law Violence Administration, Institutions and Services Elective Courses (24 UOC) Choose 4 courses from the following: Mental Disorders, Personality Disorders and Crime* 6 Substance Abuse Unusual Behaviours and Special Group 6 Deviant and Criminal Sexual Behaviour Families, Children and Adolescents Civil Law in Relation to Psychiatry Applied Research Methods Epidemiology and Statistics: Public Health Indigenous Health Evidence-Based Decision Making
* Candidates without a clinical background are required to undertake this course in place of one elective.

Electives (30 UOC)** Electives may be chosen from core courses offered in the Health Management, Public Health or International Public Health programs. Students may also enrol in graduate courses offered by other academic units within the University, as well as approved courses offered by other universities. Approval of the Program Director is required to undertake an elective offered outside the School. Students may elect to undertake independent studies across selected areas of concentration, to learn about a particular area or course matter of special interest not offered in the formal program.
** Elective courses in the School are under progressive review. Please check the School website for updated elective courses: www.sphcm.med.unsw.edu.au

Master of International Public Health/Public Health Program Code: 9043 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of International Public Health (MIPH) is recognised as a sought after qualification in international health. Many graduates of MIPH or similar programs have found employment with international aid organisations. The Master of Public Health (MPH) is widely recognised as essential for a career in population health, including health promotion, primary health care, policy formation, research, and management of health programs. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree, preferably in a healthrelated discipline, and at least two years of experience in a health-related field. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) is required, consisting of 24 UOC of core courses and 48 UOC of electives. Core Courses (24 UOC) Foundations in Public Health and Health Care Systems Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health International Health Academic Practice* Plus Designated International Public Health Electives (as for Master of International Public Health) Electives Plus Project in International Health or Elective 6 6 18 24 UOC Health Promotion and Social Perspectives of Health 6 6 6 6 n/a

UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC

*International students from non English-speaking countries are required to take the additional course, Academic Practice, in their first semester. This course is available for all students to assist them to gain maximum benefit from their study. It does not contribute to the UOC requirements of the degree.

Forensic Mental Health


The Forensic Mental Health programs at UNSW have been developed to enhance the knowledge and skills of a broad range of professionals working at the interface of human services and criminal justice systems. While the program content is based in forensic psychiatry, the disciplines of forensic psychology, nursing and law contribute to this exciting new frontier. Our academic contributors are also leading authorities in their clinical fields which allow students to participate in the challenges of the forensic workplace. In addition, the expert knowledge and experience of our academic staff relate to both the Australia-wide and international forensic context. Staff Contact Dr Elizabeth Kaziro Tel: +61 2 8372 3002 Fax: +61 2 9344 4151 Email: elizabeth.kaziro@justicehealth.nsw.gov.au Website: www.forensicmentalhealth.unsw.edu.au

6 6 6 6 6 6 6

*International students from non English-speaking countries are required to take the additional course, Academic Practice, in their first semester. This course is available for all students to assist them to gain maximum benefit from their study. It does not contribute to the UOC requirements of the degree.

Articulation The program articulates with the Graduate Diploma in Forensic Mental Health and the Graduate Certificate in Forensic Mental Health. Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma and the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer.

88

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Coursework programs

Career Opportunities Graduates may work in private practice in forensic mental health. There are also career opportunities with Government stakeholders including Department of Corrective Services, Department of Community Services and Department of Aged Disability and Health Care. Additional employment will also be available in Area Mental Health, Juvenile Justice, Police and Correctional Services. Graduate Diploma in Forensic Mental Health Program Code: 5512 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Students must complete 18 UOC in core courses and 18 UOC of electives offered by the School of Psychiatry. Core Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the following: Law and Mental Health Psychiatry and Criminal Law Violence Administration, Institutions and Services Elective Courses (18 UOC) Choose 3 courses from the electives listed in the Master of Forensic Mental Health entry. Articulation The program articulates with the Master of Forensic Mental Health and the Graduate Certificate in Forensic Mental Health. Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma and the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer. Graduate Certificate in Forensic Mental Health Program Code: 7312 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Program Structure A total of 24 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Students must complete 12 UOC in core courses and 12 UOC of electives offered by the School of Psychiatry. Core Courses (12 UOC) Choose 2 courses from the following: Law and Mental Health Psychiatry and Criminal Law Violence Administration, Institutions and Services 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC UOC

Elective Courses (12 UOC) Choose 2 courses from the electives listed in the Master of Forensic Mental Health entry.

UOC

Laboratory Aspects of ART Menopause Psychosocial Issues in Reproductive Health Ethics and Law in Reproductive Medicine

6 6 6 6

Articulation The program articulates with the Master of Forensic Mental Health and the Graduate Diploma in Forensic Mental Health. Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma and the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer

Note: Students may undertake up to 12 UOC in courses from outside the School, with approval from the Program Coordinator.

Reproductive Medicine
Reproductive medicine sits at the interface between medicine and science. It is a young discipline, being born (literally) with the birth of Louise Brown in 1978. New approaches to the clinical management of infertility offer hope to many needy couples, with great satisfaction for clinicians involved in their care, and continuing rapid scientific advance reflecting into practice. However reproductive medicine is about more than infertility, with considerable strengths in gynaecological disorders including polycystic ovary syndrome, endometriosis and premature ovarian failure that affect millions of women. The field stretches from paediatric and adolescent disorders through menopause and beyond, and links to endocrinology, oncology, urology and surgery amongst other specialities. Staff Contact Ms Michelle White Tel: +61 2 9382 6755 Fax: +61 2 9382 6444 Email: m.white@unsw.edu.au Website: http://swch.med.unsw.edu.au/ Master of Reproductive Medicine Program Code: 9065 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree. Special competency based entry may be granted. Program Structure A total of 48 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Students must complete a 6 UOC core course and 42 UOC of electives from the selection of courses listed over the page. Core Courses (6 UOC) Basic Reproductive Physiology Elective Courses (42 UOC) Choose 7 courses from the following: Epidemiology and Statistics for Public Health Public Health Management and Professional Practice Contraception Clinical Reproductive Endocrinology Clinical Reproductive Medicine 1 Clinical Reproductive Medicine 2 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 UOC

Articulation The program articulates with the Graduate Diploma in Reproductive Medicine (5508) and the Graduate Certificate in Reproductive Medicine (7379). Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma and the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer. Graduate Diploma in Reproductive Medicine Program Code: 5508 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 2 years part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree. Special competency based entry may be granted. Program Structure A total of 36 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Students must complete a 6 UOC core course (Basic Reproductive Physiology), and 30 UOC of electives from the selection of courses listed in the Master of Reproductive Medicine entry. Articulation Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Diploma may be transferred to the Master program, in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer. Graduate Certificate in Reproductive Medicine Program Code: 7379 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year part time by distance learning Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree. Special competency based entry may be granted. Program Structure A total of 24 units of credit (UOC) is required to complete this program. Students must complete a 6 UOC core course (Basic Reproductive Physiology), and 18 UOC of electives from the selection of courses listed in the Master of Reproductive Medicine entry. Articulation Credit for courses completed as part of the Graduate Certificate may be transferred to the Master program, in accordance with the UNSW policy on credit transfer.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

89

Faculty of Science
Science is truly international and the respected science degree you earn at UNSW is a passport to professional work all over the world, independent of local professional accreditations. High-level skills in science, gained through specialised postgraduate training at world-class universities, like UNSW, will open up that world of possibility.
The Faculty of Science is at the forefront of many new developments in science and is renowned for the quality of its research. We attract some of the best Australian and international scientists and have award winning Laureate fellows, Federation fellows, Eureka prize winners and Rhodes scholars amongst our staff. The research culture and expertise in research feeds into our teaching programs. An extensive range of coursework and research programs are offered in both traditional and emerging fields of science. For some programs study is possible by distance learning. The flexibility of many programs enables you to specialise in a chosen discipline to gain particular skills, and to broaden your postgraduate training to optimise opportunities for a satisfying career.

Schools and Departments

The Faculty is arranged into nine schools. School of Aviation: is unique in Australasia, offering academic programs and research services related to the aviation industry. We own 10 aircraft at our Flying Operations Unit which delivers professional flying training and research in aviation safety and management topics. School of Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences: has a national and international reputation for quality education and research. It teaches the mainstream disciplines of biology, geography and geology. Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary studies, notably in marine and environmental sciences, are offered. School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences: offers research and teaching which fall within the disciplines of molecular biology, biochemistry, genetics, microbiology, immunology, bioengineering, bioinformatics and biotechnology. School of Chemistry: is a leading centre for research and teaching in chemistry. It teaches more than 2,000 students in various faculties and research includes surface and materials chemistry, chemical synthesis, analytical chemistry, and medicinal chemistry. School of Materials Science and Engineering: is focused on developing and processing improved metals, ceramics, polymers, and composites. Research interests range from production to the design, development, processing and recycling of materials for aerospace, transportation, electronics, energy conversion and biomedical systems. School of Mathematics and Statistics: is one of Australias largest and most important research centres in mathematics and statistics. Postgraduate programs include coursework degrees and vigorous Master of Science and PhD research degrees. School of Optometry and Vision Science: graduates about 40% of Australias new optometrists for clinical practice and ophthalmic industries. It has active research programs, a public clinic and laboratories which provide test, calibration, research and development services concerning light and colour for a range of industries. School of Physics: is a leader in research programs, the stature of academic staff, the strength and vitality of teaching programs and in community outreach programs. It has research strengths in astrophysics, condensed matter physics, quantum physics, theoretical physics, biophysics and music acoustics. School of Psychology: has an international reputation for its research and teaching programs. It has particular strengths in behavioural neuroscience, cognitive psychology, perception, social psychology, developmental psychology, clinical psychology, neuropsychology, organisational psychology and forensic psychology. In addition, Institute of Environmental Studies, established in 1992 offers comprehensive programs in environmental management studies and research.

Faculty Highlights

The Faculty of Science was one of the founding faculties when the University was officially established in 1949. The Faculty is a powerhouse of research within UNSW. Each year, the Faculty receives a significant level of research funding from the Australian Research Council - more than 40% of the Universitys new Australian Research Council Discovery Project grants and new linkage project grants. In 2010, researchers from the Faculty won 41 grants worth A$12.9 million in UNSW-led Australian Research Council Discovery Grants to commence in 2011, and eight grants worth A$2.4 million in UNSW-lead Australian Research Council Linkage Grants. UNSW was awarded three of the 13 Centres of Excellence issued by the Australian Research Council in 2010: with the Faulty of Science claiming two of the awards, for Climate System Science, and Quantum Computation Communication and Technology. The Facultys publication rate is also rising strongly, from 454 journal publications in 2004 to over 570 in 2008 as weighted by the Australian Department of Education, Science and Training. The Facultys annual research funding income has risen strongly each year, from A$19.6 million in 2004 to A$44.3 million total in 2008. Most (61%) of these funds are earned through competitive grant schemes while a significant proportion is contributed by industry and non-government sectors (23%).* The Faculty strategically invests in future technology for research and training. The School of Aviation took delivery of seven new aeroplanes in 2010. The Faculty has a team of internationally renowned academics, researchers and industry experts including two Eureka winners in 2009 and one winner of 2009 NSW Scientist of the Year in the Environment, Water and Climate Science category. The Faculty is associated with 26 UNSW research centres and eight Cooperative Research Centres. The Faculty is a foundation member of the Sydney Harbour Institute of Marine Science.
*Percentages based on 2008 figures

Contact Details

Tel: +61 2 9385 7788 Email: science@unsw.edu.au Website: www.science.unsw.edu.au

90

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Aviation
Staff Contact: Jamie Lim Tel: +61 2 9385 6767 Fax: +61 2 9385 6637 Email: aviation@unsw.edu.au Website: www.aviation.unsw.edu.au The UNSW School of Aviation is an independent unit of the Faculty of Science, operating in cooperation with the Faculty of Engineering. This cross-faculty collaboration, supported by resources and expertise from the aviation industry, provides the foundations of the School of Aviation. Students undertaking aviation programs at UNSW are exposed to a high degree of interaction between academic staff and industry personnel. Many staff members have international industrial experience and consult widely for the Australian aviation industry. Programs offered by the School are uniquely international in their application, thus demanding a high level of cultural and political awareness. Master of Science and Technology in Aviation Program Code: 8738 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year by distance learning. Part-time mode is also available. The Master of Science and Technology in Aviation is designed with industry input for professionals and managers working in aviation related environments. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree with relevant industry experience. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) including at least 6 AVIA5000 series courses (36 UOC) of which one is a compulsory research project (6 UOC). Compulsory Course (6 UOC) Aviation Research Project Plus Elective Courses (42 UOC) Choose 42 UOC from the following list: Law and Regulation in Aviation Aviation and Security Aviation Safety and Accident Prevention Airline Operational Management Airport Planning Airport Management Air Traffic Management Airline Corporate Management Aviation Human Factors Management of Aviation Technical Operations and Maintenance Aircraft Accident Investigation Techniques Flight Deck Operations for Advanced Transport Aircraft Inflight Services Management Airline Incident Investigation Aviation Ground Safety Investigation Aviation System Safety Safety Risk Management: Human Performance Safety Risk Management: Physical Hazards
Note: Some exclusions may apply

Graduate Diploma in Aviation Management Program Code: 5678 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year by distance learning. Part-time mode is also available. The Graduate Diploma is designed with industry input for professionals and managers working in aviation related environments. Entry Requirements A recognised university graduate diploma with relevant industry experience. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 36 units of credit. A credit average (65%) must be achieved to continue on to the Master of Science and Technology in Aviation. Available courses are listed under the entry for the Master of Science and Technology in Aviation. Graduate Certificate in Aviation Management Program Code: 7448 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months by distance learning. Part-time mode is also available. The Graduate Certificate in Aviation Management is designed for students who have relevant work experience but who do not have tertiary qualifications. It is offered through distance education and designed with industry input for professionals and managers working in aviation related environments. Entry Requirements A minimum of four years of relevant professional experience, or two years of advanced training (for example, holder of an ATPL) and two years of relevant industry experience. Program Structure Courses totalling 24 units of credit must be completed. A credit average (65%) must be achieved to continue onto the Graduate Diploma level. Available courses are listed under the entry for the Master of Science and Technology in Aviation.

Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences


Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Genetics
Staff Contact: Associate Professor Peter White Tel: +61 2 9385 3780 Fax: +61 2 9385 1483 Email: p.white@unsw.edu.au Website: www.babs.unsw.edu.au Biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics are the key foundations of modern biology, biomedicine and biotechnology. UNSW offers a range of basic and advanced programs in these disciplines to prepare students for the science of tomorrow. These programs are ideal for students interested in understanding and appreciating biological processes at the molecular level. The disciplines also represent fundamental components of medical science and play an increasingly important role in many aspects of modern medicine. Study of biotechnology and biomolecular sciences is also available through the Master of Philosophy degree, a 1.5 year program which has coursework and research components. Graduate Diploma in Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics by Research Program Code: 5345 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This Graduate Diploma provides opportunities to combine biochemistry, molecular biology and genetics with other related areas. It provides advanced study for graduates who wish to obtain advanced training in the areas of biochemistry and molecular biology. The program is adapted to suit the needs and objectives of each student. The expectation is that students who achieve a high standard in the program may be admitted to a higher degree research program, provided suitable supervision and facilities are available. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant discipline. Students with Honours degrees or higher and who have undertaken a significant research project would normally be directed to a Master of Science program. Program Structure The program is tailored according to the background and requirements of individual students. In most cases it would include advanced formal undergraduate training, including lectures in general and medical biochemistry, training in the use of modern biochemical techniques, for example high throughput analysis of gene structure and function including analysis of genomic sequence, micro-array analysis of gene function, proteomic analysis of protein function, high throughput mass spectrometry of proteins, gene expression and cloning, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and animal and plant cell culture. Students would also carry out a research project (or projects) in the laboratory of an academic member of staff and write a report on the project. The range of disciplines include molecular biology, marine biochemistry, parasite biochemistry, molecular genetics, molecular cellular biology, biochemistry and cancer biology. Specialised areas of research are determined by the academic staff directing the research portion of the program. Specific details of research areas covered may be found at www.babs.unsw.edu.au

UOC 6

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 3 3 3 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

91

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Microbiology and Immunology


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Peter White Tel: +61 2 9385 3780 Fax: +61 2 9385 1483 Email: p.white@unsw.edu.au Website: www.babs.unsw.edu.au The Faculty provides training in the areas of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics. Specific areas covered include microbial genetics, environmental microbiology, immunology, medical bacteriology and animal virology. Research activities within the School include microbial ecology, molecular genetics, environmental microbiology, marine microbiology, intestinal and gastroduodenal infections and allergic reactions. Employment opportunities include work in many industries, government, education, research, health and environmental areas. Graduate lecture study programs can be designed to suit specific student needs and research projects may be available in the areas described above depending on the availability of supervisory staff, laboratory and financial resources. Graduate Diploma in Microbiology and Immunology by Research Program Code: 5355 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Microbiology and Immunology (by Research) is designed as a one-year program of study and research. It is an advanced training program for graduates who wish to obtain specialist training in a particular area of microbiology or immunology. The program is adapted to suit the needs and objectives of each student. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant area, as determined by the Program Coordinator. Students with Honours degrees or higher and who have undertaken a significant research project would normally be directed to a Master of Science by Research program. Program Structure The program structure (courses totalling 48 units of credit) is decided after discussion with students, taking into account their particular background, interest and career goals. Usually students attend two of the advanced third-year courses in microbial genetics, microbial physiology, environmental microbiology, immunology, medical bacteriology or virology. The rest of the year is spent carrying out a research project supervised by an academic staff member, depending on the availability of supervisory staff, laboratory and financial resources. The diverse research interests can be grouped into the areas of helicobacter pylori and gastroduodenal disease, immunology of allergic responses, environmental microbiology and remediation, microbiology of extremophiles, water-borne viral pathogens, probiotics, molecular microbiology and genomics, bacterial communication systems, marine microbiology and biotechnology.

Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Peter Banks Tel: +61 2 9385 2066 Fax: +61 2 9385 1558 Email: p.banks@unsw.edu.au Website: www.bees.unsw.edu.au The Faculty of Science offers study programs in botany, zoology, marine biology, environmental science, and ecology and evolution. Special expertise includes animal behaviour, ecology and environmental science, evolution and genetics, invertebrate zoology, mammalogy, marine biology, palaeontology, plant physiology and systematics, ecosystem and wetland ecology. Computer facilities are maintained allowing access to the University Wide Area Network, including library databases and the internet; computers have been configured to deliver multimedia applications. Graduates find employment in areas such as the media, agriculture, environment, government, industry, research, education, consulting, fisheries and forestry. Specific roles include research, technical, administration, manufacturing, human resources and commercial functions. Graduate Diploma in Biological Science by Research Program Code: 5350 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The program provides advanced study for graduates who wish to obtain advanced training in the areas of biological science. The program is research oriented and the expectation is that students who achieve an appropriate standard in the program are then admitted to a higher degree research program, provided suitable supervision and facilities are available. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a relevant area as determined by the Head of School. Students with Honours degrees or higher and who have undertaken a significant research project would normally be directed to the Master of Science by Research program. Program Structure The program is designed to meet the needs and objectives of individual students and to build on their competence and experience. It involves 48 units of credit and includes a substantial project that is carried out under the supervision of an academic staff member. Students also receive advanced formal training to provide them with background information relevant to their research project.

Conservation Biology
Staff Contact: Associate Professor Paul Adam Tel: +61 2 9385 1684 Email: p.adam@unsw.edu.au Website: www.bees.unsw.edu.au Master of Conservation Biology Program Code: 8745 Commencement: Semester 1 (January at VUW) or Semester 2 (July at UNSW) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Conservation Biology is a joint program between UNSW and Victoria University (Wellington, New Zealand). Students spend six months at each university. Students must apply both to UNSW and to Victoria University to be admitted into the two halves of the program and allow sufficient time to obtain Australian and New Zealand student visas. Students also need to ensure they obtain student visas as soon as they receive offer letters from the two universities. Enrolment into individual teaching units happens on arrival at each university. Entry Requirements A recognised appropriate four-year Bachelor degree of a level acceptable to the Faculty Coursework Committee. Tuition Fees Tuition fees are paid separately on a semester basis to each institution. Fees for course BIOL424 (a field trip) is paid in addition to Victoria Universitys international fee at the beginning of the New Zealand semester. Please refer to the program website for detailed information about fees for this program. Program Structure The program consists of 48 units of credit (UOC) of which 24 UOC are completed at UNSW and the remaining 24 UOC are completed at Victoria University. At UNSW, students undertake three compulsory courses. These can be taken in any order on campus or by distance learning. Much of the material is available online. UOC World Conservation Biology Australasian Mammals and Conservation Conservation Project
Note: The program structure is currently under review. Please visit www.bees.unsw.edu.au for updates.

6 6 12

Closing Dates for Applications For studies starting in mid-January (VUW): October 15 For studies starting in late July (UNSW): May 30 As closing dates vary, please check the program website for updates.

92

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Geography and Spatial Information


Staff Contact: Dr Shawn Laffan Tel: +61 2 9385 8093 Fax: +61 2 9385 1558 Email: shawn.laffan@unsw.edu.au Website: www.bees.unsw.edu.au Geography at UNSW is focused primarily on the practical issues arising from environmental and urban problems. There is also a focus on crucial issues in areas such as environmental change, disturbance ecology, natural resource management, urban social change and spatial information systems (GIS and remote sensing). Facilities for students include laboratories for soil and water quality analysis, palynological research, and computer laboratories for GIS and remote sensing. Master of Science and Technology in Spatial Information Program Code: 8714 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree of appropriate standing. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) comprising 24 UOC from List 1 and 24 UOC from List 2 (which may include a 12 UOC project). Courses other than those listed below may be taken with the approval of the Program Coordinator. List 1 Courses (24 UOC) Principles of Geographic Information Systems Image Analysis in Remote Sensing Fundamentals of Geopositioning Principles of Remote Sensing Plus List 2 Courses (24 UOC) Project in Geology Image Processing in Geophysics Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Remote Sensing Applications Directed Problems in Remote Sensing Advanced Geographic Information Systems Special Topic in GIS Innovations in Spatial Information 1 Innovations in Spatial Information 2 Project Geophysical Techniques in Groundwater, Engineering and Agriculture Groundwater 3D Geological Computer Models and 3D Spatial Data Analysis Special Topic in GeoIT and Application B GPS Surveying UOC 12 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 3 12 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Microwave Remote Sensing Transport Applications of GIS Applications in Geographical Information Analysis Graduate Diploma in Spatial Information Program Code: 5693 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree or qualification deemed appropriate by the Faculty Coursework Committee.

6 6 6

Graduate Certificate in Spatial Information Program Code: 7714 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree or qualifications deemed appropriate by the Faculty Coursework Committee. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 24 units of credit (UOC) selected from the Master of Science and Technology in Spatial Information courses. 12 UOC must be selected from List 1 and an additional 12 UOC of electives selected from List 1 and/or List 2. Courses other than those listed below may be taken with the approval of the Program Coordinator. Articulation A candidate enrolled in the Graduate Certificate in Spatial Information who has not taken out their award and whose entry to the Graduate Diploma or Master program has been approved, may carry completed units of credit from the Graduate Certificate program into the Graduate Diploma or Master program.

Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 36 units of credit (UOC) selected from the Master of Science and Technology in Spatial Information courses. Courses totalling 12 UOC must be from List 1, with the balance from List 1 and/or List 2. Courses other than those listed may be taken with the approval of the Program Coordinator. List 1 Courses (Minimum 12 UOC) Principles of Geographic Information Systems Image Analysis in Remote Sensing Fundamentals of Geopositioning Principles of Remote Sensing Plus List 2 Courses (24 UOC) Project in Geology Image Processing in Geophysics Hyperspectral Remote Sensing Remote Sensing Applications Directed Problems in Remote Sensing Advanced Geographic Information Systems Special Topic in GIS Innovations in Spatial Information 1 Innovations in Spatial Information 2 Project Geophysical Techniques in Groundwater, Engineering and Agriculture Groundwater 3D Geological Computer Models and 3D Spatial Data Analysis Special Topic in GeoIT and Application B GPS Surveying Microwave Remote Sensing Transport Applications of GIS Applications in Geographical Information Analysis Articulation Candidates enrolled in the Graduate Diploma in Spatial Information who have not taken out their award and whose entry to the Master program has been approved, may carry completed units of credit from the Graduate Diploma into the Master program. UOC 12 6 6 6 6 6 6 3 3 12 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

93

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Chemistry
Staff Contact: School Office Tel: +61 2 9385 4666 Fax: +61 2 9385 6141 Email: chemistry@unsw.edu.au Website: www.chem.unsw.edu.au/postgrad The School of Chemistrys reputation as one of Australias leading research facilities is confirmed by the consistently high level of funding it receives, most notably from the Australian Research Council. Links with institutes and universities in Europe, Asia and the United States also ensure the Schools position at the forefront of international research efforts. Many staff are recognised, nationally and internationally, as leaders in their fields. The School of Chemistry is located in state-of-the-art laboratories, and it has immediate access to world-class facilities in the Universitys Analytical Centre. Master of Science and Technology in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management Program Code: 8708 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This program offers training in advanced chemical analysis techniques and associated management issues. It allows students to select from a series of courses covering all aspects of modern chemical analysis, environmental analysis, and people management. It is particularly suited to new graduates or laboratory chemists and managers who wish to upgrade their qualifications in, and knowledge of, chemical analysis and related topics. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor of Science degree with a major in chemistry; or a three-year Bachelor of Science degree with at least one year of relevant experience in a laboratory environment; or a threeyear Bachelor of Science degree and completion of the Graduate Diploma in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management with at least a credit (65%) average and no failures. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 48 units of credit (UOC) selected from the following courses with at least 6 UOC selected from the following: Analysis Courses (Minimum 6 UOC) Elemental Analysis Chromatography Treatment of Analytical Data Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry Molecular Analysis Analytical Project Environmental Toxicology Plus Management Courses (Minimum 6 UOC) Quality Assurance and Laboratory Practice Technology, Management and Innovation Competitive Advantage Though People Strategic Management of Technology and Innovation UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Graduate Diploma in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management Program Code: 5648 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This program offers training in advanced chemical analysis techniques and associated management issues. It allows students to select from a series of modules covering all aspects of modern chemical analysis, environmental analysis, and people management. It is particularly suited to new graduates or laboratory chemists and managers who wish to upgrade their qualifications in, and knowledge of, chemical analysis and related topics. This is the second stage in a fully articulated program of Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, and Master of Science and Technology in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor of Science degree with a major in chemistry, or equivalent qualification to the satisfaction of the School. Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 36 units of credit (UOC) with at least 6 UOC selected from analysis courses and at least 6 UOC from management courses. Available courses are listed under the Master of Science and Technology in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management program structure. Graduate Certificate in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management Program Code: 7428 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months This program offers training in advanced chemical analysis techniques and associated management issues. It allows students to select courses covering all aspects of modern chemical analysis, environmental analysis, and people management. It is particularly suited to new graduates or laboratory chemists and managers who wish to upgrade their qualifications in, and knowledge of, chemical analysis and related topics. This is the first stage in a fully articulated program of the Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma and Master of Science and Technology in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor of Science with a major in chemistry, or equivalent qualification to the satisfaction of the School. Students without a sufficient background in chemistry will be required to study 12 additional units of credit (total of 36 UOC). Program Structure The program consists of courses totalling 24 units of credit (UOC) with at least 6 UOC selected from analysis courses and at least 6 UOC from management courses. Available courses are listed under the Master of Science and Technology in Chemical Analysis and Laboratory Management program structure.

Mathematics and Statistics


Staff Contact: Dr Donna Mary Salopek Tel: +61 2 9385 7030 Fax: +61 2 9385 7123 Email: pg.MathsStats@unsw.edu.au Website: www.maths.unsw.edu.au The School of Mathematics and Statistics is one of the premier Australian centres of mathematical research. Its continual success in obtaining high levels of Australian Research Council funding as well as other external research funding is a measure of its national research standing. International research collaborations involve institutes and universities in Europe, Asia and North America. The possibility exists for research students to spend part of their program at leading international universities such as the University of California Berkeley in the United States, and the University of Goteborg and University of Tubingen in Europe. The School is organised into three departments: Applied Mathematics Pure Mathematics Statistics. Master of Science and Technology in Mathematics Program Code: 8718 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The program may be taken as a preliminary step towards enrolment in the PhD program in mathematics. It provides advanced training for persons specialising in the teaching of mathematics in tertiary institutions. In addition an appropriate program may provide training for those employed or seeking employment in the area of industrial mathematics. Entry Requirements A recognised three or four-year Bachelor degree in applied mathematics, pure mathematics or statistics. Sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses. Program Structure The program requires a total of 48 units of credit (UOC), consisting of six approved lecture courses, each worth 6 UOC, and a compulsory project (12 UOC). Each candidates proposed program of study requires the approval of the Program Authority. With the approval of the Program Authority, a student may substitute for one or more of the lecture courses a reading course supervised by a member of staff. Again, with this approval, a student may substitute at most three postgraduate courses offered in a relevant discipline outside the School of Mathematics and Statistics. The project consists of either a critical review of the literature in a specific field of mathematics, or a short research project supervised by a staff member. Students are also required to participate in relevant departmental seminars. There are no compulsory courses other than the project and students may choose from a wide variety of courses within the School of Mathematics and Statistics or elsewhere within the University. Available courses are described on the Schools website: www.maths.unsw.edu.au

94

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Master of Financial Mathematics Program Code: 8161 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Financial Mathematics is unique in its in-depth analysis of financial modelling issues. This is achieved through a well-balanced combination of advanced mathematical techniques of stochastic analysis, numerical methods and sophisticated statistical techniques. The program is appropriate for students who wish to develop their knowledge and skills in mathematical, statistical and computational methods applied to modern finance. It also provides students with a route to high-quality careers in the financial industry. Entry Requirements A recognised three or four-year mathematics or statistics program within a science and/or mathematics Bachelor degree; or a degree in a related discipline. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) of courses must be completed including 48 UOC of compulsory courses and 24 UOC of elective courses. Compulsory Courses (48 UOC) Computational Methods for Finance Continuous Time Financial Modelling Stochastic Processes Discrete Time Financial Modelling Introduction to Stochastic Analysis Term Structure Modelling Project (over two consecutive semesters) Plus Elective Courses (24 UOC) Risk and Capital Management Asset-Liability Management Optimisation Applied Regression Analysis Classical Measure, Integration and Probability Time Series Analysis Multivariate Analysis Longitudinal Data Analysis Nonparametric Statistics Categorical Data Analysis Bayesian Inference and Computation
Not all elective courses are offered every year.

Master of Statistics Program Code: 8750 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Statistics covers a wide range of statistical theory and practice and provides advanced training for practising statisticians. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in statistics or a four-year Honours degree in a related discipline (commonly mathematics). Honours graduates in statistics may be exempt from courses totalling a maximum of 30 units of credit. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) of courses must be completed including 24 UOC of compulsory courses and 48 UOC of elective courses. Compulsory Courses (24 UOC) Stochastic Processes Statistical Inference Project (over two consecutive semesters) 6 6 6 6 6 6 12 Plus Elective Courses (48 UOC) Applied Regression Analysis Continuous Time Financial Modelling Classical Measure, Integration and Probability Statistical Methods in Epidemiology Data Mining and its Business Applications Time Series Analysis Multivariate Analysis UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 Sample Survey Design Data Management for Advanced Statistical Analysis Longitudinal Data Analysis Nonparametric Statistics Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials Survival Analysis Statistical Consultancy Categorical Data Analysis Discrete Time Financial Modelling Introduction to Stochastic Analysis Term Structure Modelling UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 12

Master of Biostatistics Program Code: 8751 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Biostatistics represents the development and application of statistical science to research in health-related areas, including medicine, biology, public health and epidemiology. It provides advanced coursework training in bio-statistical theory and methods using an on-campus delivery mode with a significant project component. The program is appropriate for graduates who wish to work as biostatisticians. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in statistics or a four-year Honours degree in a related discipline with a significant quantitative component (such as science, engineering, finance, economics, actuarial science, psychology, epidemiology or bioinformatics). Honours graduates in statistics may be exempt from courses totalling a maximum of 30 units of credit. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses. Program Structure A total of 72 units of credit (UOC) of courses must be completed including 48 UOC of compulsory courses and 24 UOC of elective courses. Compulsory Courses (48 UOC) Applied Regression Analysis Statistical Methods in Epidemiology Longitudinal Data Analysis Statistical Inference Design and Analysis of Clinical Trials Survival Analysis Project (one semester) or Project (over two consecutive semesters) Plus Elective Courses (24 UOC) Bioinformatics Methods and Applications Genomics and Proteomics Design of Experiments Stochastic Processes Data Mining and its Business Applications Time Series Analysis Multivariate Analysis Sample Survey Design Nonparametric Statistics Statistical Consulting Categorical Data Analysis Bayesian Inference and Computation Population Health Epidemiology and Statistics Introduction to Public Health Advanced Biostatistics and Statistical Computing UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 4 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 12 12

UOC

Up to 18 units of credit may be taken in postgraduate courses offered by other UNSW departments or schools, subject to the approval of the Head of School. Note: MATH5816 has the prerequisite MATH5965.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

95

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Health Informatics Principles Evidence-Based Health Systems Decision Support Systems


Notes: Other courses may be taken as electives subject to approval by the Head of School. Not all elective courses are offered every year.

6 6 6

Materials Science and Engineering


Staff Contact: Professor Charles Sorrell Tel: +61 2 9385 4421 Email: c.sorrell@unsw.edu.au Website: www.materials.unsw.edu.au The field of Materials Science and Engineering offers virtually unlimited possibilities for innovative and novel coursework programs, research and development. The School maintains a comprehensive range of modern facilities for the processing, characterisation, and property measurement of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. Master of Science and Technology in Engineering Materials Program Code: 8715 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Master of Science and Technology in Engineering Materials provides a comprehensive study of the full range of materials, including metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. It is designed for graduates wishing to acquire expertise in the design, selection, use and performance of modern materials. The program is designed for several types of students: Graduates with science, engineering, technology, or related backgrounds who seek to broaden their ranges of expertise Graduates with materials science or materials engineering backgrounds who seek to extend specific aspects of their expertise Graduates with materials science or materials engineering backgrounds who seek to update their expertise. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in engineering or science. Program Structure This program comprises a total of 48 units of credit (UOC) with 36 UOC of formal coursework plus 12 UOC of experimental and/or design project work (Materials Project). All formal coursework is taught during work hours, although the project work may be undertaken with considerable flexibility in terms of time and location. Enrolment in formal coursework offered by Schools other than Materials Science and Engineering is permitted, subject to the approval of the Head of School. Compulsory Courses (18 UOC) Professional Communication and Presentation Materials Project Plus Elective Courses (30 UOC) Materials Design Materials Processing Materials Properties and Behaviour Materials Characterisation Advanced Materials Characterisation Materials Applications and Performance Materials Modelling Management UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 12

Optometry and Vision Science


Staff Contact: Dr Sieu Khuu (Optometry Programs) Tel: +61 2 9385 4620 Fax: +61 2 9313 6243 Email: s.khuu@unsw.edu.au Website: www.optom.unsw.edu.au Staff Contact: Dr Catherine Suttle (Community Eye Health Programs) Tel: +61 2 9385 4380 Fax: +61 2 9313 6243 Email: c.suttle@unsw.edu.au Website: www.optom.unsw.edu.au The School of Optometry and Vision Science offers research and coursework programs. Research candidates can enrol in either the Doctor of Philosophy or the Master of Science program. Research in the School of Optometry and Vision Science encompasses a diverse range of topics and disciplines including basic, applied and clinical research in the science of vision. The Schools multidisciplinary approach to research is one of its key strengths. Research students come from a variety of disciplines including optometry, microbiology, education, bioengineering and pharmacology. The School incorporates the Optics and Radiometry Laboratory (ORLAB), which conducts research into eye protection and colour measurement, and has close links with the Cooperative Research Centre for Vision. Master of Optometry Program Code: 8760 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The program provides advanced training in clinical and theoretical aspects of optometry, with opportunities for specialisation in areas such as contact lenses, occupational optometry, and behavioural optometry. Entry Requirements A recognised four-year Bachelor degree in optometry. Program Structure The Master of Optometry consists of a section of elective courses. Each course comprises 3, 6 or 12 units of credit (UOC), which count towards the total of 48 UOC required for this degree. Please note that some courses have prerequisites, corequisites or exclusions. Not all courses are offered every year and those offered will only run if there is sufficient demand. Up to 12 UOC may be taken from a postgraduate program elsewhere in the University, subject to the approval of the Head of School. For information on courses offered contact the School Office at: postgrad@optom.unsw.edu.au Available courses for Graduate Certificate, Graduate Diploma, Graduate Diploma by Research, and Master of Optometry programs are listed as follows: UOC Behavioural Optometry 1 Advanced Contact Lens Studies 1 Research Skills in Optometry Public Health Optometry Pathophysiology of Ocular Disease 1 Pathophysiology of Ocular Disease 2 Visual Neuroscience 6 6 6 6 3 3 6

Graduate Diploma in Mathematics and Statistics Program Code: 5659 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This Graduate Diploma is intended for mathematics or statistics graduates wishing to further develop their knowledge and skills in mathematical and statistical sciences. In particular, it provides an opportunity for advanced training in topics relevant to applied or pure mathematics, medical statistics and financial mathematics. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in statistics or econometrics, or in commerce with major in business statistics. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses. Program Structure The program requires 48 units of credit (UOC), consisting of eight courses from the School of Mathematics and Statistics (excluding MATH5001, MATH5925 and MATH5935). A maximum of two courses may be selected from those offered by other UNSW schools, subject to approval of Heads of relevant schools. Available courses are described on the Schools website: www.maths.unsw.edu.au Graduate Certificate in Mathematics and Statistics Program Code: 7659 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months This Graduate Certificate is intended for mathematics or statistics graduates wishing to further develop their knowledge and skills in mathematical and statistical sciences. In particular, it provides an opportunity for advanced training in topics relevant to applied or pure mathematics, medical statistics and financial mathematics. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in statistics or econometrics, or in commerce with major in business statistics. A sufficient mathematical/statistical background and at least a credit average grade (65%) or equivalent overseas qualifications in relevant third year or higher mathematics/statistics university courses. Program Structure The program requires 24 units of credit (UOC), consisting of four courses from the School of Mathematics and Statistics (excluding MATH5001, MATH5925 and MATH5935). Available courses are described on the Schools website: www.maths.unsw.edu.au

96

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Behavioural Optometry 2 Specialty Contact Lenses Pathophysiology of Ocular Disease 3 Pathophysiology of Ocular Disease 4 Advanced Clinical Optometry Clinical Imaging Research Project Ocular Therapy Graduate Diploma in Optometry Program Code: 5665 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The program provides advanced training in clinical and theoretical aspects of optometry, with opportunities for specialisation in fields such as contact lenses, occupational optometry and behavioural optometry. On successful completion of the Graduate Diploma, students may continue with study at the Master of Optometry level and use all 36 units of credit (UOC) towards this degree.

6 6 3 3 12 6 12 12

Graduate Certificate in Optometry Program Code: 7435 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months The program provides advanced training in clinical and theoretical aspects of optometry, with opportunities for specialisation in fields such as contact lenses, occupational optometry and behavioural optometry. The Graduate Certificate and Graduate Diploma programs in optometry allows postgraduate students to take progressive steps towards a higher degree at a level of their choice and to appeal to practising optometrists with time constraints. On successful completion of the Graduate Certificate, students may continue with study at a higher level (Graduate Diploma in Optometry or Master of Optometry). Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in optometry. Program Structure The Graduate Certificate in Optometry consists of a selection of elective courses listed in the Master of Optometry program structure. Courses comprise 3, 6 or 12 UOC, which count towards the total of 24 UOC required for this degree. Please note that some courses have prerequisites, corequisites or exclusions. Up to 6 UOC may be taken from postgraduate courses elsewhere in the University, subject to the approval of the Head of School. Some or all of the UOC achieved in this program may be counted towards a Graduate Diploma or Master of Optometry. Students may use all 24 UOC in this way if the Graduate Certificate is not awarded or 18 UOC if the degree is awarded. Not all courses are offered every year and those offered will only run if there is sufficient demand. For information on courses offered contact the School Office at: postgrad@optom.unsw.edu.au Master of Community Eye Health

Program Structure The program comprises 48 units of credit (UOC), including six compulsory courses totalling 36 UOC. 12 units of credit are gained by a completion of a research project which may be conducted at ICARE, LVPEI, or UNSW, or at the candidates home location (if appropriate supervision is available at that location). Where appropriate, joint supervision will be arranged between academic staff of LVPEI and UNSW. UOC Introduction to Community Eye Health Community Eye Health Needs Assessment Epidemiology of Blinding Eye Diseases Advocacy and Education in Community Eye Health Eye Health Economics and Sustainability Eye Care Program Management Research Project Graduate Diploma in Community Eye Health Program Code: 5666 Commencement: November Program Duration: 6 months Study Mode: This program is only delivered in India but is open to all eligible students The Graduate Diploma in Community Eye Health offers specialised training in a range of areas related to community eye health, including the following aspects of the field: needs assessment, health economics, epidemiology, advocacy, and the Vision 2020: The Right to Sight global initiative. The program is conducted mainly at the International Centre for Advancement of Rural Eye Care (ICARE), part of the LV Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI), Hyderabad, India. The program aims to produce health professionals who are innovative leaders with an understanding of the principles of community eye health and their applications. Entry Requirements Entry into this program is based on work experience only. Applicants must have at least three years work experience relevant to community eye health. Program Structure The program comprises of six compulsory courses totalling 36 units of credit (UOC). Achievement of an average mark of 65% or above in these courses allows the option of transferring to the Master of Community Eye Health program. The further 12 UOC* required for the Master program is gained by completion of a research project which may be conducted at ICARE, LVPEI, or UNSW, or at the candidates home location (if appropriate supervision is available at that location). Where appropriate, joint supervision will be arranged between academic staff of LVPEI and UNSW.
*See rules on articulation on the following page.

6 6 6 6 6 6 12

Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in optometry. Program Structure The Graduate Diploma in Optometry consists of a selection of elective courses listed in the Master of Optometry program structure. Courses comprise 3, 6 or 12 UOC, which count towards the total of 36 UOC required for this degree. Please note that some courses have prerequisites, corequisites or exclusions. Not all courses are offered every year and those offered will only run if there is sufficient demand. Up to 9 UOC may be taken from postgraduate courses elsewhere in the University, subject to the approval of the Head of School. For information on courses offered contact the School Office at: postgrad@optom.unsw.edu.au Graduate Diploma in Optometry by Research Program Code: 5523 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Optometry (by Research) offers training and experience in scientific research and specialised training in aspects of optometry. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in optometry. Program Structure The program comprises 48 units of credit, 24 of which are gained by completion of a research project and 24 by coursework. Available courses are listed in the Master of Optometry program structure except Research Skills in Optometry and Research Project. The Graduate Diploma is expected to allow entry to a higher research degree program for students without an Honours degree. Candidates anticipating progression to a higher research degree should consult with their supervisor to ensure an appropriate choice of courses for their chosen field of study.

Program Code: 8761 Commencement: November Program Duration: 1 year Study Mode: This program is only delivered in India but is open to all eligible students The Master of Community Eye Health offers specialised training in a range of areas, including the following aspects of the community eye care field: needs assessment, health economics, epidemiology, advocacy, and the Vision 2020: The Right to Sight global initiative. The program is conducted mainly at the International Centre for Advancement of Rural Eye Care (ICARE), part of the LV Prasad Eye Institute (LVPEI) Hyderabad, India. The program aims to produce health professionals who are innovative leaders with an understanding of the principles of community eye health and their applications. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree and at least three years work experience relevant to community eye health.

UOC Introduction to Community Eye Health Community Eye Health Needs Assessment Epidemiology of Blinding Eye Diseases Advocacy and Education in Community Eye Health Eye Health Economics and Sustainability Eye Care Program Management 6 6 6 6 6 6

www.international.unsw.edu.au

97

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

This program will articulate with the Master of Community Eye Health. On completion of the Graduate Diploma in Community Eye Health with a credit average (at least 65%), it is possible to transfer to the Master program. If graduating with both programs, an academic penalty of 6 UOC will apply. The additional 12-6 units of credit required to complete the Master program may be achieved by completion of the 12 UOC research project, in addition to one of the following two courses offered in the Master of Optometry program: Public Health Optometry (by distance learning) or Research Skills in Optometry.

Program Structure The program has coursework and research project requirements similar to Physics Level Four, with substitutions if required to be approved by the Postgraduate Coordinator. Students normally complete courses in quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, electro-magnetism and solid-state physics. Other lecture courses and research projects are offered in general areas of physics including astrophysics, condensed matter physics and theoretical physics. More details may be found at: www.phys.unsw.edu.au Graduate Diploma in Physics Research Techniques by Research Program Code: 5663 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year The Graduate Diploma in Physics Research Techniques is an advanced training program for graduates who wish to update their knowledge of physics and/or satisfy requirements for admission to a research degree in physics. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in a related discipline which includes some physics courses. Program Structure The program requires 48 units of credit (UOC), consisting of courses at Level Three/Four totalling 30 UOC and a research project (18 UOC). The choice of courses is very flexible. Most courses selected should be from the School of Physics but courses from other schools may be included. Students wishing to proceed to a research degree should consult with their potential supervisor on selection of courses.

Master of Psychology (Clinical) Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Clinical) Program Code: 8256 (Master), 1404 (Combined PhD/Master) Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 2 years (Master), 4 years (Combined PhD/Master) Staff Contact: Professor Skye McDonald Tel: +61 2 9385 3029 Fax: +61 2 9385 3641 Email: s.mcdonald@unsw.edu.au The Combined PhD/Master program provides dual graduate training for psychologists who intend to develop skills in research to the level of PhD as well as skills to work as clinicians in hospitals, community health and other settings where they might be engaged in health promotion and the diagnosis, assessment and treatment of people with a range of psychological problems or disabilities. Entry Requirements Master of Psychology (Clinical) An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Honours Class 1 in psychology from a university recognised discipline by the Australian Psychological Accreditation Council or an equivalent qualification as assessed by the Australian Psychological Society. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component. Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Clinical) An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Upper First Class Honours or equivalent in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychological Accreditation Council or an equivalent qualification as assessed by the Australian Psychological Society. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component. Program Structure The program structure for both the Master and Combined PhD/Master degree consists of three compulsory components:

Physics
Staff Contact: Professor Michael Ashley Tel: +61 2 9385 5465 Fax: +61 2 9385 6060 Email: m.ashley@unsw.edu.au Website: www.phys.unsw.edu.au The UNSW School of Physics is one of the leading physics schools in Australia and well recognised internationally. The School has more than 40 staff, including 20 academic and 20 research staff, and more than 50 research students from all over the world who are engaged in a variety of research projects. Many of these projects have strong international collaborations and links. The School receives significant external research funding each year from various Australian and international funding agencies. Postgraduate students have access to firstrate laboratories, equipment and projects, which have been externally judged to be of the highest quality. The School offers two programs. The Graduate Diploma in Physics by Research is similar to the fourth (Honours) year and includes courses and a research project. The Graduate Diploma in Physics Research Techniques by Research is a similar one-year program designed for students who wish to upgrade their knowledge of physics. Both programs allow students to apply for admission into a research degree - Doctor of Philosophy or Master of Science by Research. Graduate Diploma in Physics by Research Program Code: 5533 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year This is an advanced training program for graduates who have not completed an Honours program and who wish to pursue postgraduate study in physics. Students qualified to enrol in the Honours program would be expected to do so rather than to enrol in this Graduate Diploma program. For suitably qualified students, the expectation is that this program would allow entry into a higher degree research program provided that suitable supervision and facilities are available. Entry Requirements A recognised three-year Bachelor degree in a related discipline.

Psychology
The School of Psychology is one of the strongest psychology departments in Australia. The School has excellent research and professional training facilities. It has extensive computing facilities, a psychological test library, a psychology clinic, a careers research and assessment service, a technical workshop and laboratories in all areas of experimental psychology. It has strong links with professional practitioners in the areas of clinical, forensic, neuropsychology and organisational psychology. The School is recognised for its research tradition, and many staff have international reputations in their respective fields. Research programs are often carried out in collaboration with researchers in other countries. The following programs are offered in two forms, either as two-year taught programs leading to a Master of Psychology with a clinical, forensic or organisational specialisation, or as combined PhD/ Master of Psychology programs which incorporate the Masters-level training and qualification with a research PhD in a relevant area of psychology. In the clinical program only, preference is given to students wishing to undertake the combined course. More details about the School and its psychology programs may be found at: www.psy.unsw.edu.au

Coursework courses (weekly lectures and seminars with associated written forms of assessment)

Professional practice (completion of a minimum of 1,000 hours of supervised clinical practice within the School Clinic and in field clinical settings, weekly clinical meetings and skills training workshops) A research thesis (Master program) or PhD thesis (Combined PhD/Master program) Stage 1 Courses (48 UOC) Research and Evaluation Methods Psychological Assessment 1 Child Clinical Psychology Human Neuropsychology Experimental Clinical Psychology 1 Experimental Clinical Psychology 2 Professional and Ethical Practice (Clinical) 1 Professional and Ethical Practice (Clinical) 2 Plus Stage 2 Courses (48 UOC) Psychology of Health and Illness Experimental Clinical Psychology 3 Professional and Ethical Practice (Clinical) 3 Professional and Ethical Practice (Clinical) 4 Research Thesis (Clinical) 1 Research Thesis (Clinical) 2 UOC 6 6 6 6 12 12

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

98

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Professional Recognition The Master of Psychology (Clinical) degree is an APAC accredited program offering the fifth and sixth years of required study leading to full membership of the Australian Psychological Society (the professional body of Australian psychologists) and its specialist college, and registration as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia and practice endorsement as a Clinical Psychologist. The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency requires that graduates in all health disciplines must demonstrate English language skills at IELTS level 7 or equivalent before being considered for professional registration. Test results from relevant examinations will need to be obtained within two years prior to applying for registration. In many cases this will require examination during a course of study. Master of Psychology (Forensic) Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Forensic) Program Code: 8257 (Master), 1405 (Combined PhD/Master) Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 2 years (Master), 4 years (Combined PhD/Master) Staff Contact: Dr Richard Kemp Tel: +61 2 9385 1401 Fax: +61 2 9385 3641 Email: richard.kemp@unsw.edu.au The program provides graduate training for psychologists who intend to pursue employment within a setting associated with the legal system police, courts, prisons, probation and parole, guardianship, child protection, statutory review tribunals (for example, mental health), worker compensation, licensing of special programs and community services, public policy and legislative review. The program aims to produce graduates with expertise in both the criminal and civil domains of forensic psychology. Entry Requirements Master of Psychology (Forensic) An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Honours Class 1 or a good Class 2 in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council or an equivalent overseas qualification as assessed by the Australian Psychological Society. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component. Combined PhD/Master Psychology (Forensic) An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Upper First Class Honours or equivalent in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council or an equivalent overseas qualification as assessed by the Australian Psychological Society. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component. Program Structure The program structure for both the Master and Combined PhD/Master degree consists of three compulsory components: Coursework courses (weekly lectures and seminars with associated written forms of assessment) Professional practice (completion of a minimum of 1,000 hours of supervised practice in forensic settings, weekly forensic psychology meetings, and skills training workshops) A research thesis (Master program) or PhD thesis (Combined PhD/Master program)

Stage 1 Courses (48 UOC) Law for Psychologists 1 Research and Evaluation Methods Psychological Assessment 1 Interventions in Forensic Psychology 1 Interventions in Forensic Psychology 2 Applications of Forensic Psychology Professional and Ethical Practice (Forensic) 1 Professional and Ethical Practice (Forensic) 2 Plus Stage 2 Courses (48 UOC) Law for Psychologists 2 Experimental Psychology and Law Professional and Ethical Practice (Forensic) 3 Professional and Ethical Practice (Forensic) 4 Research Thesis (Forensic) 1 Research Thesis (Forensic) 2

UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6

Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Organisational) An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Upper First Class Honours or equivalent in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council or an equivalent overseas qualification as assessed by the Australian Psychological Society. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component. Program Structure The program structure for both the Master and Combined PhD/Master degree consists of three compulsory components: Coursework courses (weekly lectures and seminars with associated written forms of assessment) Professional practice (completion of a minimum of 1,000 hours of supervised organisational practice in the Schools Careers Research and Assessment Service and in organisational field settings, weekly organisational meetings and career development workshops) A research thesis (Master program) or PhD thesis (Combined PhD/Master program) Stage 1 Courses (48 UOC) Research and Evaluation Methods Psychology of Organisations 1 Psychology of Organisations 2 Learning,Training and Development Career Choice and Development Professional and Ethical Practice (Organisational) 1 Professional and Ethical Practice (Organisational) 2 Assessment in Organisations Stage 2 Courses (48 UOC) Psychological Assessment 2 Advanced Topics in Organisational Psychology Professional and Ethical Practice (Organisational) 3 Professional and Ethical Practice (Organisational) 4 Research Thesis (Organisational) 1 Research Thesis (Organisational) 2 UOC 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 12 12

UOC 6 6 6 6 12 12

Professional Recognition The Master of Psychology (Forensic) degree is an APAC accredited postgraduate program offering the fifth and sixth years of requiring study leading to full membership of the Australian Psychological Society (the professional body of Australian psychologists) and to registration as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia and practice endorsement as a Forensic Psychologist. The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency requires that graduates in all health disciplines must demonstrate English language skills at IELTS level 7 or equivalent before being considered for professional registration. Test results from relevant examinations will need to be obtained within two years prior to applying for registration. In many cases this will require examination during a course of study. Master of Psychology (Organisational) Combined PhD/Master of Psychology (Organisational) Program Code: 8258 (Master), 1406 (Combined PhD/Master) Commencement: Semester 1 (March) only Program Duration: 2 years (Master), 4 years (Combined PhD/Master) Staff Contact: Dr Joanne Earl Tel: +61 2 9385 3017 Fax: +61 2 9385 3641 Email: j.earl@unsw.edu.au The program provides graduate training for psychologists who intend to work with organisations, teams and individual employees to improve their performance and increase effectiveness and productivity in the workplace. Organisational psychologists analyse organisations and their people, and devise strategies to recruit, motivate, develop, change and inspire. Entry Requirements Master of Psychology (Organisational) An accredited four-year Bachelor degree with Honours Class 1 or a good Class 2 in psychology from a university recognised by the Australian Psychology Accreditation Council or an equivalent overseas qualification as assessed by the Australian Psychological Society. The degree must include a research thesis as a major component.

Professional Recognition The Master of Psychology (Organisational) degree is an APAC accredited postgraduate program offering fifth and sixth years of study leading to full membership of the Australian Psychological Society (the professional body of Australian psychologists), to registration as a psychologist with the Psychology Board of Australia and practice endorsement as an Organisational Psychologist. The Australian Health Practitioner Regulation Agency requires that graduates in all health disciplines must demonstrate English language skills at IELTS level 7 or equivalent before being considered for professional registration. Test results from relevant examinations will need to be obtained within two years prior to applying for registration. In many cases this will require examination during a course of study.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

99

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Environmental Management
Contact: Institute of Environmental Studies Tel: +61 2 9385 4973/5687 Fax: +61 2 9663 1015 Email: ies@unsw.edu.au Website: www.ies.unsw.edu.au The UNSW Environmental Management programs combine the strengths of the six key University faculties in this field: Arts and Social Sciences, Built Environment, Australian School of Business, Engineering, Law and Science. It is coordinated by the Institute of Environmental Studies which also runs the three core courses. The Environmental Management programs are designed for people from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds, professional experience, and environmental knowledge and experience. It is envisaged that as well as environment, such backgrounds and experience may include planning, engineering, life sciences, physical sciences, social science and the humanities, finance, accounting, economics, corporate reporting, law, architecture, landscape architecture and building, business management, and the health professions. It will be useful for: Recent graduates who want to establish a career in environmental management

Articulation Students whose entry to the Graduate Diploma or Master is approved may carry 24 units of credit from the Graduate Certificate to the Graduate Diploma or Master, provided the lower degree has not been awarded. Students seeking entry to the Graduate Diploma or Master via credit-level performance in the Graduate Certificate may carry 12 units of credit to the Graduate Diploma or Master program provided that the lower degree has not been awarded. Students may carry 48 units of credit from the Graduate Diploma to the Master, provided the lower degree has not been awarded. Where a Graduate Certificate or Graduate Diploma has been awarded and students wish to enrol at the next level (the Graduate Diploma or the Master), the Program Committee will determine the courses already completed which may be credited to the new program. Note that these may not be fully credited to the new program. Master of Environmental Management Program Code: 8619 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1.5 years The Master of Environmental Management consists of a solid foundation of core and fundamental knowledge courses which provide a basis for critical appreciation of frameworks for environmental management and basic environmental literacy in key disciplinary areas. The latter is seen as a key attribute in the environmental management field which involves collaborative decision making by specialists from many disciplines. Core courses also provide for appreciation of the inter- and transdisciplinary nature of environmental management, and some experience of group work in addressing environmental management issues with colleagues from a range of different disciplinary backgrounds and experience. Beyond the foundation of practically-oriented core courses, students with the assistance of the Program Coordinator may design a balanced program to suit their specific needs. This program may draw on courses from across the entire breadth of UNSWs expertise in this area, but within any constraints due to prerequisites. Program Structure The Master of Environmental Management has courses totalling 72 units of credit (UOC). This is made up of remaining units of credit (generally 30) to be taken as electives or a combination of electives and a project. The project (only available to students with a distinction level average) may be substituted for 1, 2 or 3 electives; that is, 6, 12 or 18 units of credit.

Core Courses (18 UOC) Frameworks for Environmental Management Tools for Environmental Management Addressing Environmental Issues Plus Fundamental Knowledge Courses

UOC 6 6 6

Students normally complete four fundamental knowledge courses selected on the basis of their disciplinary background and experience. Fundamental knowledge courses to be taken will be determined following discussion of academic qualifications and experience with the Program Coordinator. Where students can demonstrate sufficient disciplinary background or experience they may, with the permission of the Program Coordinator, take fewer than four fundamental knowledge courses with additional electives in their place. In exceptional cases, and with permission of the Program Coordinator, students may be permitted to take more than four fundamental knowledge courses if their program comprises a significant specialist theme in the electives taken and there is a demonstrated need in terms of basic disciplinary knowledge. UOC Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Ecology Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Economics Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Engineering Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Law Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Physical Science Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Social Science Plus Electives Students may choose from a wide range of courses from numerous disciplinary areas. The choice of electives should take place in consultation with, and must be approved by, the Program Coordinator. Students may enhance their specialist expertise in a particular field or expand their knowledge and skills into new areas. The Program Coordinator will assist to tailor programs to meet the special needs of each student. Note: Courses may have prerequisites which need to be satisfied before students can enrol and some courses may not be available in each semester. Careful planning at the start of the program should help to optimise access to your chosen courses. To view a list of possible electives, visit: www.ies.unsw.edu.au 6 6 6 6 6 6

People working in some aspect of environmental management who want to upgrade or broaden their skills. This may include: technical or scientific specialists who wish to enhance or broaden their technical skills

technical or scientific experts who wish to set their specialist skills in the broader social, legal, economic and political contexts of environmental management people from a social sciences or humanities background who wish to expand their disciplinary expertise into the environmental area

People with considerable work experience outside the environment area who wish to move into this field

people from a social sciences or humanities background who wish to develop their understanding of the scientific and technical bases of environmental management.

People from a wide range of disciplinary backgrounds and experience who want to have a better understanding of environmental management, including planning, policy development, decision making, and the wide range of specialist knowledge that informs each of these processes. Entry Requirements A recognised Bachelor degree in any discipline of study. Relevant experience will also be considered for admission. In special circumstances, students who do not have such qualifications may be considered for admission into the Graduate Certificate. In these cases, credit level performance in the Graduate Certificate may lead to articulation with the Graduate Diploma and the Master programs. Please also refer to information regarding articulation rules.

100

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Coursework programs

Some Typical Programs Example for a student with an engineering background 1st Semester (24 UOC) Frameworks for Environmental Management Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Social Science Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Law Elective 1 2nd Semester (24 UOC) Tools for Environmental Management Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Ecology Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Economics Elective 2 3rd Semester (24 UOC) Addressing Environmental Issues Elective 3 Elective 4 Elective 5 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Graduate Diploma in Environmental Management Program Code: 5499 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 1 year Program Structure This program involves 48 units of credit of study for people wanting a solid grounding in the frameworks (especially sustainability), tools and basic disciplinary knowledge relevant to environmental management. It is fully articulated with the Master of Environmental Management. Core Courses Frameworks for Environmental Management Tools for Environmental Management Plus Fundamental Knowledge Courses Normally 4 on basis of previous disciplinary qualifications and experience Plus Elective Courses Specialist electives chosen from UNSW-wide course list UOC 12 UOC 24 UOC 6 6

Note: A 6, 12 or 18 unit of credit project may replace 1, 2 or 3 of the electives (available to students with a distinction level performance). This would normally be started in 1st semester. It may be completed between the 2nd semester and 3rd semester allowing for completion within 12 months.

Example for a student with an arts-law background 1st Semester (24 UOC) Frameworks for Environmental Management Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Engineering Elective 1 Elective 2 2nd Semester (24 UOC) Tools for Environmental Management Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Ecology Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Physical Science Fundamental Knowledge in Environmental Management: Economics 3rd Semester (24 UOC) Addressing Environmental Issues Elective 3 Elective 4 Elective 5 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6 UOC 6 6 6 6

Choice of fundamental knowledge courses is determined through consultation with the Program Coordinator and based on previous qualifications and experience. If it is determined that less than four fundamental knowledge courses are required to satisfy the fundamental knowledge component of the Graduate Diploma the remaining units of credit will be taken as specialist electives. In special circumstances the Program Coordinator may approve substitution of a fifth Fundamental Knowledge course in place of the specialist elective. Choice of specialist electives is through consultation with the Program Coordinator and based on previous experience, needs and timetabling constraints. Graduate Certificate in Environmental Management Program Code: 7339 Commencement: Semester 1 (March) or Semester 2 (July) Program Duration: 6 months Program Structure This program involves 24 units of credit of study, providing an introduction to the frameworks (especially sustainability), tools and basic disciplinary knowledge relevant to environmental management. Courses include one core course, two fundamental knowledge courses and one elective course. It is fully articulated with the Graduate Diploma and Master of Environmental Management. Note: Choice of elective and fundamental knowledge courses is through consultation with the Program Coordinator and based on previous qualifications and experience, needs and timetabling availability of courses.

Note: A 6, 12 or 18 unit of credit project may replace 1, 2 or 3 of the electives (available to students with a distinction level performance). This would normally be started in the 2nd semester. It may be completed between the 2nd semester and 3rd semester allowing for completion within 12 months.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

101

Research at UNSW

UNSW Research at a Glance UNSW achieves outstanding levels of research funding from a range of sources. In 2010, UNSW received more than A$120 million from the Australian Research Council (ARC), which included the largest number of ARC Linkage Grants and ARC Australian Professorial Fellowships. This funding provides exciting research opportunities for postgraduate students. 2010 was also an exceptional year for major national and international prizes and awards bestowed on UNSW researchers, illustrating the intellectual calibre of UNSW academic staff. Highlights included receiving top honours at the 2010 Australian Museum Eureka Prizes, the countrys most prestigious science awards, where UNSW researchers were nominated in six categories. Scientia Professor Martin Green won the prize for Leadership in Science for world-leading innovation in solar cell technology. Outstanding researchers from UNSW also won five NSW Young Tall Poppy Awards. Another success was UNSW postgraduate research candidate Alex Jordan winning the Peoples Choice Award at the inaugural Australian and New Zealand Three-Minute Thesis Competition, competing against more than 30 universities from Australasia. The UNSW Graduate Research School is the first point of contact for postgraduate research students. Prospective postgraduate research students can contact the Graduate Research School about future study at UNSW.

The University of New South Wales (UNSW) is one of Australias leading research-intensive universities. In recent years, UNSW has enjoyed a significant rise in competitive public and private research funding to support world-class research across a diverse range of disciplines. We have a commitment to provide the research environment and world-class infrastructure that is needed to build on our strengths in fundamental and applied research and attract the best researchers and postgraduate research students to undertake their work and study at UNSW. While research is conducted across a wide range of disciplines, we invest considerable resources in particular areas where we believe we can make a difference. UNSW has a reputation for international research excellence in the following areas of research strength: Biomedical Sciences Water, Environment, Sustainability Next Generation Materials and Technologies Social Policy, Government and Health Policy ICT, Robotics and Devices Business, Law and Economics UNSW also has a number of emerging and underpinning areas of research strength including: Fundamental and Enabling Sciences Contemporary Humanities and Creative Arts Defence and Security Approximately 90% of all research activity at UNSW is in areas of existing or emerging and underpinning research strength. UNSW offers a range of higher degrees by research. Research students are required to produce a thesis embodying the results of an original investigation under the guidance of an academic supervisor. Each degree requires a period of advanced study and for some candidates satisfactory performance in advanced coursework is also required. Before applying for a higher research degree you will need to match your area of research interest to one of our Faculties or Schools. The best place to start is by reading the following section of this guide and to also check the Future Students section of the website for the Faculty that best aligns with your area of research. For links to all UNSW Faculties and their Schools visit www.unsw.edu.au/gen/pad/faculties.html Once you have located a School that you believe best supports your area of research you will then need to find a supervisor in that area. For more information visit http://research.unsw.edu.au/future-students

102

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Doctor of Philosophy (PhD) Program Duration: 3 to 4 years full-time study Minimum duration for completion is 3 years

A PhD degree requires the completion of a piece of research that demonstrates a significant and original contribution to knowledge in the field of study. Candidates acquire advanced specialist research training under appropriate academic supervision. The nature and level of supervision evolves over the duration of the program. Initially the work is closely supervised but by the later stages candidates are expected to make a significant and original contribution to the direction and execution of the research, eventually acquiring sufficient skills to allow independent work. Candidates produce a thesis that summarises the research and provides evidence for independent thought and critical analysis, effective communication and expert knowledge of the discipline in the international context. Master by Research Program Duration: 1.5 to 2 years full-time study Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years

Master by Research degrees require the completion of an original piece of research, more limited in scope and nature to that required for a PhD. Candidates develop mastery of appropriate methodology and learn the fundamentals of research. These degrees are designed primarily as training in advanced work in a particular discipline. Candidates present their findings in a thesis that places their work in the wider context of their discipline. Master of Philosophy (MPhil) Program Duration: 1 to 2 years full-time study Minimum duration for completion is 1 year

Dr Brahmaputra Marjadi, Indonesia PhD in Public Health and Community Medicine Master of Public Health Graduate Dr Brahmaputra (Brahm) Marjadis research for his PhD gave him the opportunity to focus on designing an infection control program suitable for rural Indonesian healthcare facilities. He used a mixed methods approach to identify major barriers for direct implementation of infection control programs prescribed by high-resourced countries in the low-resourced rural Indonesian setting. When asked about the link between his work and recent policies or initiatives, such as those issued by World Health Organisation (WHO), Brahm explained that broadly his thesis fits very well with the WHOs Global Patient Safety initiative that was launched in 2004, the year I started my PhD. Healthcareassociated infections have been known to be one of the greatest preventable threats to patient safety. Some of my research addresses the issue of hand hygiene, which links to WHOs focus on hand hygiene (Clean Care is Safer Care campaign 2005-2006) as well as WHOs call for various nations to pilot test the WHOs Advanced Draft for Hand Hygiene in Health Care (2006). At the national level, my thesis also addresses the issue of appropriate antibiotic prescribing, for which there was a national training program in 2002-2003 where I participated as a trainer of other trainers. In addition, since I submitted my thesis in August last year, the Sub-Directorate for Special Services under the Directorate of Medical Services in the Indonesian Ministry of Health has been seeking my input into developing national infection control initiatives. With this in mind, Brahm is particularly hopeful that his research will contribute to an international awareness that programs from high-resourced countries cannot simply be implemented as plug-and-play solutions to complex problems in low-resourced settings. When asked to identify the best aspect of being a PhD student at the School of Public Health and Community Medicine (SPHCM), Brahm described the collegiality in the research and teaching community. Both academic and administrative staff members have been very approachable and supportive, from being devils advocate to a sounding board - and even to teach us how to fix a printers paper jam. This atmosphere also encourages research candidates to be open and supportive of each other. I also tremendously enjoyed the personal friendships and social interactions that keep reminding all of us there is more to life than our work.

A Master of Philosophy provides an opportunity for students to complete a component of coursework including research methodology relevant to the field of study and a thesis comprising an original piece of research work, of a limited scope but that is at least 66% of the degree. Entry Requirements In considering applications for research programs, the Faculty or School will usually assess: Whether you have an appropriate academic background refer to the academic requirements in the Research Programs Summary Table on pages 104 to 110 for the relevant program. For more details see www.grs.unsw.edu.au/futurestudents/admission.html Your ability to produce a coherent research proposal each research application must be accompanied by a research proposal of prescribed length; in general, a research proposal should include a statement of the research problem and its significance, an outline of the method to be used to analyse the problem, the names of any academics you have contacted in the School and details of previous publications and/or research undertaken in your nominated area of interest. To determine the length required for the research proposal and any additional Faculty or School specific requirements, visit: http://research.unsw.edu.au/how-apply-postgraduate-research-study-program If your research proposal can be supported by the Facultys or Schools resources If an appropriate supervisor will be available You must also refer to the following pages for research information specific to the relevant faculty.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

103

Research programs summary table


Application deadlines are 31 October for Semester 1 (March) and 30 April for Semester 2 (July), subject to available places. The entry requirements provided in the research program summary table below are a guide only and may be higher than those indicated. In all cases admission will be determined upon the receipt of an application. Cut-off scores may be increased should demand exceed the availability of places in a program. The University reserves the right to vary entry requirements to those published without further notice. Details of equivalent scores required for accepted English language proficiency qualifications can be found on page 134 in the English Language Requirements section. Please note that regardless of UNSWs English language requirements, international applicants should be aware that they must still satisfy the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship English language requirements for visa applications. The estimated annual tuition fees are calculated based on a program-prescribed full-time study load in 2011. To calculate the estimated tuition fee for a whole program which may spread over more than one academic year, please refer to the Calculation of Tuition Fees section on page 13.
Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Program Title Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Doctor of Philosophy Australian Studies Creative Writing Criminology Education English Environmental Policy and Management Health, Sexuality And Culture History History and Philosophy of Science International Studies and Global Transformations Linguistics Media, Film and Theatre Modern Language Studies: Chinese Studies European Studies French Studies German Studies Indonesian Studies Japanese Studies Korean Studies Russian Studies Spanish and Latin American Studies Music Music Education Philosophy Politics and International Relations Professional Ethics Social Policy Social Science and Policy Social Work Sociology Womens and Gender Studies Master of Arts by Research Australian Studies Creative Writing English Environmental Studies Health, Sexuality And Culture History History and Philosophy of Science International Studies and Global Transformations Linguistics

Program Code

Program Duration

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$)

1190 1200 1297 1970 1200 1211 1215 1240 1251 1212 1208 1245 1225 1235 1210 1231 1228 1221 1223 1291 1310 1280 1281 1260 1270 1265 1296 1295 1980 1300 1305

3 years of advanced full-time study leading to the submission of a thesis.

Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

$22,080

2353

1.5 to 2 years of advanced full-time study comprising both coursework and research leading to the submission of a thesis.

Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

$22,080

104

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title Media, Film and Theatre Modern Language Studies: Chinese Studies European Studies French Studies German Studies Indonesian Studies Japanese Studies Korean Studies Russian Studies Spanish and Latin American Studies Philosophy Politics and International Relations Professional Ethics Social Policy Social Work Sociology and Anthropology Womens and Gender Studies Master degrees by Research Education Educational Leadership Music Music Education Social Science Social Work Master of Philosophy Higher Education

Program Code

Program Duration

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$)

2353

1.5 to 2 years of advanced full-time study comprising both coursework and research leading to the submission of a thesis.

Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

$22,080

2354 2355 2356 2357 2358 2970 2359 1.5 years of advanced full-time study comprising both coursework and research leading to the submission of a thesis. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $22,080 1.5 to 2 years of advanced full-time study comprising both coursework and research leading to the submission of a thesis. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $22,080

Australian School of Business Doctor of Philosophy: PhD applicants must complete an expression of interest to the School before applying. For more information visit: www.asb.unsw.edu.au/futurestudents Accounting Actuarial Studies Banking and Finance Business Law and Taxation Economics Information Systems and Technology Management Marketing Organisation and Management Strategy and Entrepreneurship Taxation Master of Philosophy Accounting Actuarial Studies Banking and Finance Business Law and Taxation Economics Employment Relations Human Resource Management Information Systems and Technology Management International Business Marketing Organisational Behaviour 2585 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $21,840 1521 1545 1561 1535 1540 1525 1550 1605 1532 1745 3 to 4 years advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $21,840

www.international.unsw.edu.au

105

Program Title Master of Taxation by Research

Program Code 2455

Program Duration 1.5 to 2 years advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years.

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$) $21,840

Faculty of Built Environment Doctor of Philosophy Architecture Building Construction and Project Management Facilities Management Industrial Design Interior Architecture Landscape Architecture Property Development and Management Town Planning and Urban Design Master degrees by Research Architecture Building Built Environment Landscape Architecture Town Planning Master of Philosophy Architecture Building Construction and Project Management Facilities Management Industrial Design Interior Architecture Landscape Architecture Property Development and Management Town Planning and Urban Design COFA All COFA applicants should check the COFA research website before submitting an application: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/degrees/how-to-apply/postgrad-students The following documents are available online: The Information for COFA Applicants document will outline proposal requirements. The Master of Fine Arts (MFA) Proposal Guide will assist you to write a successful MFA proposal. The PhD Proposal Guide will assist you to write a successful PhD proposal. Doctor of Philosophy Art Education Art Theory Design Fine Arts Media Arts Visual Anthropology Visual Culture Master degrees by Research Art Education (Honours) Art Administration (Honours) Design (Honours) 2255 2264 2266 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. 2 years of advanced study with 4 courses and a research thesis. 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis or a combination of written document, studio work and exhibition. 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a combination of written document, studio work and exhibition. 1.5 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis or a combination of written document, studio work and exhibition. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $23,280 Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,280 1285 1286 1288 1287 1289 1283 3 to 4 years of advanced study involving preparation of a thesis, or combination of thesis and studio work and exhibition. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,280 2222 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Includes coursework component of 18 UOC: Design Research Method Initiating Research 1 elective course Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $24,480 2200 2210 2240 2220 2230 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $24,480 1120 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $24,480

Art Theory Fine Arts

2265 2245

Master of Philosophy

2267

106

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title Faculty of Engineering Doctor of Philosophy Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science and Engineering Electrical Engineering Food Science and Technology Industrial Chemistry Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mining Engineering Petroleum Engineering Photovoltaic Engineering Surveying and Spatial Information Systems Master of Engineering by Research Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science and Engineering Electrical Engineering Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering Mining Engineering Petroleum Engineering Photovoltaic Engineering Surveying and Spatial Information Systems Master of Science by Research Biomedical Engineering Chemical Engineering Civil and Environmental Engineering Computer Science and Engineering Food Science and Technology Industrial Chemistry Faculty of Law Doctor of Philosophy

Program Code

Program Duration

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$)

1710 1010 1630 1650 1640 1031 1016 1662 1050 1017 1655 1681 2675 2150 2650 2665 2660 2692 2180 2156 2655 2721 2795 2010 2750 2765 2031 2016 1730 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. 1 year coursework and 2 to 3 years research leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. 1.5 to 2 years advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. 1.5 years to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $30,480 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $30,480 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $30,480

Doctor of Juridical Science

1740

$24,000

Master of Laws by Research

2240

Faculty of Medicine Doctor of Philosophy Anatomy Medicine (Prince of Wales Clinical School) Medicine (South Western Sydney Clinical School) Medicine (St George Clinical School) Medicine (St Vincents Clinical School) Obstetrics and Gynaecology Paediatrics Pathology Physiology and Pharmacology Psychiatry Public Health and Community Medicine Rural Health Surgery (Prince of Wales Clinical School) Surgery (South Western Sydney Clinical School) Surgery (St George Clinical School) 1750 1770 1771 1772 1773 1820 1830 1780 1790 1800 1835 1795 1810 1811 1812 $32,880 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $32,880

$23,520

www.international.unsw.edu.au

107

Program Title Surgery (St Vincents Clinical School)

Program Code 1813

Program Duration 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years.

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$) $32,880

Master degrees by Research Health Administration Health Professions Education Medicine in Paediatrics Public Health 2960 2885 2515 2845 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. 1.5 years of study comprising 1 semester of coursework study selected from the Master of Public Health coursework program (24 UOC) and 1 year of advanced study leading to submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,520 $32,880 $23,520

Master of Science by Research Anatomy Community Medicine Medicine (Prince of Wales Clinical School) Medicine (South Western Sydney Clinical School) Medicine (St George Clinical School) Medicine (St Vincents Clinical School) Obstetrics and Gynaecology Paediatrics Pathology Physiology and Pharmacology Psychiatry Rural Health Surgery (Prince of Wales Clinical School) Surgery (South Western Sydney Clinical School) Surgery (St George Clinical School) Surgery Master of Surgery by Research Surgery (Prince of Wales Clinical School) Surgery (South Western Sydney Clinical School) Surgery (St George Clinical School) Surgery (St Vincents Clinical School) Master of Philosophy Forensic Mental Health 2712 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $32,880 2861 2860 2862 2863 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission os a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $32,880 2800 2810 2820 2821 2822 2823 2830 2805 2840 2850 2880 2835 2875 2876 2877 2878 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission os a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $32,880 $23,520

$32,880

Public Health Faculty of Science Doctor of Philosophy Applied Geology Aviation Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Biological Science Biotechnology Chemistry Climate Science Environmental Policy and Management Geography Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Microbiology and Immunology Optometry Physics

2713

$23,520

1000 1900 1410 1435 1036 1870 1476 1211 1080 1045 1880 1440 1860 1890 $29,520 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $29,520

108

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Program Title Psychology

Program Code 1400

Program Duration 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years.

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with upper first class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$) $29,520

Vision Science

1487

Doctor of Philosophy/Master of Psychology Clinical Forensic Organisational Master of Engineering by Research Materials Science and Engineering 2175 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $29,520 1404 1405 1406 4 to 5 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 4 years. $29,520

Master of Science by Research Applied Geology Aviation Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics Biotechnology Biological Science Chemistry Geography Materials Science and Engineering Mathematics Microbiology and Immunology Optometry Physics Psychology Vision Science Master of Philosophy Aviation Biological Sciences Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences Chemistry Geosciences Materials Science and Engineering Physics Vision Science UNSW@ADFA Doctor of Information Technology 9920 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,520 2475 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $29,520 2000 2905 2460 2036 2485 2910 2040 2055 2920 2490 2900 2930 2450 2487 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $29,520

Doctor of Philosophy Aerospace Engineering Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering History English Indonesian Studies Politics Business (Economics and Management) Chemistry Computer Science Geography 1663 1631 1643 1661 1241 1201 1203 1321 1541 1871 1885 1081 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years. Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,520

$23,520

www.international.unsw.edu.au

109

Program Title Mathematics and Statistics Oceanography Physics Master of Arts by Research

Program Code 1881 1082 1892 2406

Program Duration 3 to 4 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 3 years.

Minimum Academic Entry Requirements Completion of a recognised Master degree (including a substantial research component), or a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with first or upper second class Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent.

Estimated Tuition Fee Per Year for 2011 (A$) $23,520

1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years.

$23,520

Master of Engineering by Research Aerospace Engineering Civil Engineering Electrical Engineering Mechanical Engineering Master of Science by Research Chemistry Computer Science Geography Mathematics and Statistics Oceanography Physics Master of Philosophy Aerospace, Civil and Mechanical Engineering Business Humanities and Social Science Information Technology and Electrical Engineering Physical, Environmental and Mathematical Science Master Programs by coursework with Master of Philosophy Arts Engineering Studies Management Studies Science 8691 8693 8695 8694 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $23,520 2227 2226 2225 2228 2229 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a Bachelor degree in the relevant discipline from UNSW, at a level specified by the Faculty or School, or a qualification considered equivalent from a recognised university or tertiary institution. $23,520 2911 2925 2041 2921 2042 2931 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,520 2693 2651 2663 2691 1.5 to 2 years of advanced study leading to the submission of a thesis. Minimum duration for completion is 1.5 years. Completion of a recognised four-year Bachelor degree with Honours that includes a substantial research component, or the equivalent. $23,520

110

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Adeel Razi, Pakistan PhD in Engineering Adeel Razi didnt know much about Australia, but he did know cricket. When the University medal winner from Karachis NED University of Engineering and Technology began looking around for his next academic challenge abroad, the lure of a cricketplaying nation led him to UNSW in Sydney. I wanted to explore other areas and we are a cricketing nation, so I knew Australia from the cricket, says the 29-year-old, smiling. As it turned out Adeel was presented with three Australian choices; his University Medal in electrical engineering from NED and his Master degree from Germany won him offers of PhD scholarships in Sydney, Melbourne and Adelaide. He chose UNSW, he says, because it was the best match for his research into multi-antennae systems for wireless communications. His work aims to increase the capacity and speed of wireless communication links, for fast downloads of heavy files like videos and better quality voice over internet connections, for example. His work has been of such interest in Australia that Adeel has been able to give up his part-time job as a technical trouble shooter in a call centre because of an additional top up scholarship from Australias prestigious CSIRO (Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation). Adeel is keen to take his knowledge back to Pakistan, where he hopes to nurture a home-grown Research and Development capability in telecommunications and pursue an academic career. We have had a big boom in telecommunications in Pakistan, but it is mainly driven by global companies selling their products. I want to bring R and D and manufacturing into Pakistan, which would be much more beneficial to the economy than consumer spending, he says.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

111

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences


The Faculty offers over 30 different areas of study in PhD and Master by Research degrees, covering disciplines within our schools, centres and cross-disciplinary areas. The quality and influence of our research has been recognised in the 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia Report produced by the Australian Research Council, with the Faculty rating at or above world average in the majority of our disciplines and top rankings nationally. The Faculty prides itself not only on the quality and breadth of its scholarship, but also on the way that this scholarship is used to address key contemporary social issues. Our postgraduate research students are encouraged to develop a level of broad intellectual sophistication that is increasingly prized by employers in industry, the public sector, not-for-profit organisations, and education alongside their research and professional skills. Research collaboration is strongly encouraged across the Faculty and university, nationally and internationally with other researchers and academics, governments, non-government organisations and industry. UNSW Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences researchers are at the forefront of their respective fields, within five broad existing and emerging research strengths: Social Policy, Government and Health Humanities Scholarship International Studies Screen and Media Cultures Creativity, Innovation and Learning

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences is internationally recognised for excellence in both teaching and research. The Faculty provides a dynamic and interdisciplinary environment that supports postgraduate research excellence.

The Facultys research students have access to supervisors who are leaders in their field and are part of a diverse community of talented fellow researchers.

Research Centres/Units

Centre for Gender Related Violence Studies Centre for Modernism Studies in Australia Centre for Refugee Research Gifted Education, Research, Resource and Information Centre Indigenous Policy and Dialogue Research Unit John Hume Institute for Global Irish Studies Journalism and Media Research Centre National Centre in HIV Social Research Social Policy Research Centre

Student Resources and Support

The Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences is strongly committed to supporting our high quality research students. Our research supervisors are devoted to providing the best possible support and guidance. Postgraduate research students are well supported by a number of initiatives through the Faculty including: individual supervision by two academics external study grants for a period of concentrated research abroad assistance for research travel within Australia financial support to attend conferences where the student is making a presentation financial support for essential expenses such as interview transcription costs selected short seminar courses at PhD and Master level postgraduate research laboratory with common room, computer and printing facilities opportunities for part-time tutoring, teaching experience and supplementary income annual reviews of students progress by academic staff.

Contact Details

Associate Professor Stephen Fortescue, Director of Postgraduate Research Email: artsresearch@unsw.edu.au or s.fortescue@unsw.edu.au Website: www.arts.unsw.edu.au/future-students/postgraduate-research

112

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences Research programs

Education
Staff Contact: Associate Professor Paul Ayres Email: p.ayres@unsw.edu.au or education@unsw.edu.au Website: http://education.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Assessment and evaluation Cognitive processes and instructional design Educational leadership Education of gifted and talented students Higher education Language and literacy education, including teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) and languages other than English The learner and learning: socio-affective and psychological factors Mathematics, science and technology education Music education Special education Teacher professional development and identity

Languages and Linguistics


Staff Contact: Dr Seong-Chul Shin or Dr Diana Palaversich Email: s.shin@unsw.edu.au, d.palaversich@unsw.edu.au or languages@unsw.edu.au Website: http://languages.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Asian, European and Latin American studies Literary and historical studies Cultural, media and area studies Gender studies General and applied linguistics Second language acquisition and teaching Bilingualism and language policy Linguistics of languages other than English TESOL Interpreting and translation studies Intercultural communication

National Centre in HIV Social Research: Health, Sexuality and Culture


Staff Contact: Dr Jeanne Ellard Email: nchsrpg@unsw.edu.au Website: http://nchsr.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Health psychology and health communication Social and behavioural research about HIV, Hepatitis C and sexually transmitted infections Social and political dynamics of health, medicine and sex and drug practices Sexuality, gender and kinship

Social Policy Research Centre


Staff Contact: Professor Kylie Valentine Email: k.valentine@unsw.edu.au or sprc@unsw.edu.au Website: www.sprc.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Poverty, inequality and social inclusion/exclusion Communities, families and care through the life course Organisation and delivery of human services Human services outcomes and evaluations Comparative social policy analysis Dialogue and indigenous policy (Indigenous Policy and Dialogue Research Unit)

English, Media and Performing Arts


Staff Contact: Dr Michelle Langford Email: m.langford@unsw.edu.au or empa@unsw.edu.au Website: http://empa.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Literary studies and creative writing Film and cinema studies Media and communication studies and practice Music studies and music composition Theatre, dance and performance studies and practice

Social Sciences and International Studies


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Elizabeth Fernandez Email: e.fernandez@unsw.edu.au or ssis@unsw.edu.au Website: http://ssis.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Social work Political science International relations International studies and global transformation Sociology and anthropology Social science Policy studies Criminology Development studies/social development Refugee studies (Centre for Refugee Research)

Environmental Policy and Management


Staff Contact: Dr John Merson Email: j.merson@unsw.edu.au Website: www.ies.unsw.edu.au

History and Philosophy


Staff Contact: Dr Geoff Nathan or Dr Anthony Corones Email: g.nathan@unsw.edu.au, a.corones@unsw.edu.au or hist-phil@unsw.edu.au Website: http://hist-phil.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas Asian studies Australian studies Environmental policy and management European studies History and philosophy of science History Philosophy Professional ethics Womens studies

Journalism and Media Research Centre


Staff Contact: Professor Catharine Lumby Email: c.lumby@unsw.edu.au Website: http://jmrc.arts.unsw.edu.au
Research Areas The evolving media landscape Social, cultural and health impacts of media consumption Ethics and practice of journalism Digital technologies and cultures, including mobile and social media

www.international.unsw.edu.au

113

Australian School of Business

The Australian School of Business is one of the leading research-intensive business schools in the Asia-Pacific region and is internationally recognised for world-class research in issues of concern to todays business and government leaders.

The Australian School of Business has 270 academics, many of whom are internationally recognised for their research excellence. We have research strengths across all major business disciplines and 10 specialist research centres exploring business issues such as capital markets, the securities industry, environmental economics, ageing and population, biosecurity, e-health, consumer behaviour, accelerated leadership development and information systems management. The Australian School of Business is committed to undertaking research that is relevant to Australia and the rest of the world, and recognise the importance of collaboration with business and government in producing research results with real-world relevance. The research-intensive style of the Australian School of Business means that the latest business research is embedded in the teaching programs and many of our teachers write the textbooks. The Australian School of Business offers research scholarship stipends which are among the highest in Australia.

Research Centres

Asia-Pacific ubiquitous Healthcare Research Centre Australian Institute for Population Ageing Research Australian Research Centre of Excellence in Population Ageing Research Centre for Accounting and Assurance Research Centre for Applied Economic Research Centre for Energy and Environmental Markets Centre for Pensions and Superannuation Industrial Relations Research Centre Institute of Global Finance Korea Research Institute Accelerated Learning Laboratory Bibliometric and Informetric Research Group Capital Markets Co-operative Research Centre Centre for Innovation and Entrepreneurship Securities Industry Research Centre of Asia-Pacific Society of Heterodox Economists Sustainable Tourism Cooperative Research Centre

Affiliated Research Centres and Institutions

Contact Details

The Australian School of Business Research Office Tel: +61 2 9385 5144 Email: graduateresearch.business@unsw.edu.au Website: www.asb.unsw.edu.au/research

114

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Australian School of Business Research programs

Accounting
Research Areas Accounting and auditing regulation Accounting history Accounting quality and accounting policy choice Audit and assurance services quality Carbon emissions assurance and new assurance services Cognitive processes in judgmental tasks Management accounting in new organisational forms

Actuarial Studies
Research Areas Enterprise risk management and dependent risks Insurer capital management and loss reserving Risk management and product design for retirement, longevity and health risks Asset-liability modelling and optimal control in insurance Insurer optimal asset allocation and risk management Modelling and pricing of insurance, credit and operational risks Financial economics and applications in insurance and superannuation

International and comparative taxation (including double taxation treaties) Goods and services tax Tax aspects of corporate finance International trade and investment law E-business law Taxation compliance costs Taxation law reform International taxation Public sector economics Capital gains taxation Goods and services taxation Superannuation

Marketing (including Tourism and Hospitality Management)


Research Areas Consumer psychology and consumer behaviour Preference formation and consumer decision making Cross cultural marketing issues Customer relationship management Models of consumer behaviour Branding and marketing communications Service marketing issues Competitive strategy Product/service innovation International marketing Tourism and destination marketing Tourism policy and planning Corporate reputation Networks and relationships Corporate social responsibility Marketing metrics Statistical and econometric modelling

Economics
Research Areas Bayesian econometrics Development economics Econometric and statistical modelling Economic development Economic growth Economic measurement Economics of technology and structural change Environmental economics Financial economics Health economics Heterodox economics Income distribution International finance International trade Industrial organisation Labour economics Macroeconomic theory Macroeconometrics Microeconometrics Natural resource and environmental economics Pension economics Personnel economics Political economy Productivity analysis Public finance Time series analysis

Organisation and Management


Research Areas Organisation theory Institutional theory and identity Personality theory in relation to organisations Management behaviour and dynamics Human resource management and its impact on employees Comparative management systems, particularly in Asia Globalisation and work in the service economy Corporate social responsibility and sustainability Organisational change High performance work systems and employee well-being Skill formation and learning systems Careers and organisational performance Labour market and industrial relations practices Occupational health and safety Cross cultural and diversity management Foreign direct investment and inter-firm linkages Supply chains and trust relations Team dynamics and performance Transnational corporations, intellectual property rights and aspects of performance

Banking and Finance


Research Areas Asset pricing Behavioural finance Capital markets Characteristics of bank loans Corporate governance Corporate restructuring Determinants of debt type and contract terms in Asia Derivatives (including credit derivatives) Emerging markets Financial econometrics Financial risk management Initial public offerings and seasoned equity offers International finance Investments Market microstructure Private equity/venture capital Security market design Strategic and tactical asset allocation Structured finance

Information Systems, Technology and Management


Research Areas Outsourcing, innovation implementation and management Adoption and diffusion issues Agile development and process improvement Agent-oriented development and methodologies Requirements engineering and product quality Emergent/innovative ISD methodologies Service-oriented architectures E-finance and experimental markets E-health E-learning and collaborative applications E-democracy Economic, social and organisational impact of information systems Decision support systems and knowledgemanagement Risk and security management Information systems and business strategy Network and service management Global supply chain management Information and incentive in supply chain competition Service operations management Financial engineering (asset valuation, real options) Energy, asset and infrastructure management

Business Taxation and Law


Research Areas Competition and anti-trust laws Intellectual property Franchising regulation, development and international expansion Consumer protection and fair trading laws Good faith Unconscionable conduct Franchise regulation in China Legal issues in global branding Conceptual and structural issues in income tax Taxation of entities and groups of entities Corporate tax integration Industry codes of conduct Franchising code of conduct Retail leasing law Business ethics Corporate governance Directors duties Shareholder rights and remedies

Strategy and Entrepreneurship


Research Areas Strategy and diversification International business strategy Evolutionary theories in management, networks and economics Dynamics of the venture capital industry Social network analysis Decision making and learning in complex systems Corporate reputations Strategic thinking and managerial decision-making Note: Much of the research is experimental in nature, using systems dynamics modelling, experimental game theory and choice modelling.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

115

Faculty of Built Environment

Modelling Sydneys future: Example of work by Dr Jack Barton, City Futures Research Centre

The key research focus of UNSW Built Environment is in the design, development and management of the 21st-century city. Our research aims to make a difference in the way our urban areas function as places for living and working through a better understanding of the built fabric and the processes and practices that create and maintain it.

The Faculty is well placed to achieve this aim being one of the largest faculties of its kind in Australia. We offer a suite of postgraduate research degrees which are tailored to meet professional requirements, changing trends and opportunities across the built environment disciplines. We are committed to research excellence and highly value our postgraduate research students. We demonstrate this by fostering a collaborative and cross-disciplinary research community amongst students and academics. Depending on the field of study, students have the option of affiliating with one of four research groups Emergent Digital Technologies, Urban Typologies, Sustainable Design and Development, and People and Place, as well as with our flagship Research Centre, City Futures. There are currently over 100 postgraduate research students enrolled in full and part-time study. They are working on diverse topics such as: architecture, interior architecture, urban planning, urban design, landscape architecture, industrial design, construction/project management, property and sustainable development. Research publications and grants from postgraduate research students comprise 20 percent of the overall research quantum in the Faculty. Our student population is diverse and provides a rich cultural and interdisciplinary learning environment. As well as Australian students, 21 countries are represented in our postgraduate research student cohort. The Faculty maintains wide-ranging international links and receives strong government and industry support. Collaborative research with Australian and international public and private sectors provides students with extensive research and career opportunities. Combined, these factors foster a high quality, exciting and collaborative research community. For detailed information about our postgraduate research degrees visit: www.fbe.unsw.edu.au/futurestudents/pgresearch

116

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Built Environment Research programs

Research Areas

Staff Contact: Dr Christine Steinmetz Director of Postgraduate Research Students Tel: +61 2 9385 7417 Fax: +61 2 9385 5613 Email: c.steinmetz@unsw.edu.au Design - Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture and Industrial Design Community participation in the process and outcomes of design Design as social, educative and ecological knowledge Design as a speculative, creative and artistic practice Product design processes including sustainability, marketing, production and usability Science and computer-based perspectives that inform design processes and outcomes Environment and Sustainability - Urban Planning, Resource Management, Landscape Architecture, Architecture, Sustainable Development Buildings and urban environments in ecological process Creation of urban environments that are sustainable in social, ecological and economic terms Design and performance of buildings Governance and education Scale of materials and product ecology Social and cultural influences on urban design History and Theory - Architecture, Landscape Architecture, Interior Architecture Architectural theory Asian architecture and design Australian architecture History and theory of landscape architecture History and theory of interior architecture Property Development and Construction Project Management - Building and Construction Management, Real Estate, Sustainable Development, Facility Management Conflict management Design management Environmental management and sustainable development Facilities management Knowledge management Organisational behaviour, human resources and culture Property development and management Resource management Risk management Safety management Tendering practices Use of information technology and performance measurement as a management tool

Contemporary City Studies - Landscape Architecture, Urban Planning, Urban Design, Urban Policy, Sustainable Development Political, physical, demographic and economic influences on urban planning and development Urban housing markets and dynamics Urban planning and design issues in contemporary cities and urban areas Planning and urban theory and history Environmentally sustainable development Social and cultural planning 2D and 3D spatial information systems

Urban Typologies Staff Contact: Dr Judith OCallaghan or Dr Paul Hogben Email: juditho@fbe.unsw.edu.au or p.hogben@unsw.edu.au Urban Typologies undertakes cross-disciplinary research in cultural landscapes, urban morphology, architectural history, heritage and urban design. It focuses on metropolitan Sydney and the major typologies that have shaped its urban and suburban environment, drawing on cultural and critical architectural theory. Sustainable Design and Development Staff Contact: Catherine Evans Email: catherinee@fbe.unsw.edu.au The Sustainable Design and Development Research group focuses on research and scholarship across the domain of sustainability ecological, social, economic and cultural as applicable to the planning, design, construction and management of the built environment. The group recognises that sustainability is inherently cross-disciplinary and diverse, acknowledging the scale of sustainable design and development transcends room to region. People and Place Staff Contact: Dr Kate Bishop Email: k.bishop@unsw.edu.au The People and Place research group consists of researchers focused on understanding the relationship between people and their environments, with place being defined as broad as region and as small as a room. It is a cross-disciplinary group including researchers from a number of different programs with interests and expertise in the fields of urban sociology, environmental psychology, environment-behaviour studies and social planning. Research outputs from this group aim to increase and build research activity and capacity in the areas of design practice, planning and planning policy.

Research Centre

City Futures Research Centre Staff Contact: Professor Bill Randolph Email: b.randolph@unsw.edu.au Website: www.cityfutures.net.au The main focus of the City Futures Research Centre is to understand the interrelated areas of urban planning, housing, design, development and policy. Its research interests encompass the social, economic and environmental aspects of contemporary city dynamics. City Futures has close working relationships with several other UNSW research groups and has formed active research partnerships with other universities in Australia, Asia and Europe. The applied focus of the Centres research involves close partnerships with Local, State and Federal Government agencies as well as industry stakeholders and community groups. The Centres research is currently organised into a series of subgroups: The Australian Housing and Urban Research Institute The Healthy Built Environments Program Enabling Design Program High Density Living Urban Planning and Processes Built Environment Climate Change Adaptation

Research Groups

Emergent Digital Technologies Staff Contact: Jim Plume Email: j.plume@unsw.edu.au The Emergent Digital Technologies group has a focus on the development and application of digital technologies to examine, support, simulate and teach the planning, design, construction, management and utilisation of the built environment. The group supports anyone whose work touches that domain of interest.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

117

COFA - Art Design Media

COFA Annual: Student Graduation Exhibition

Research activities at COFA reflect the diversity of contribution defining the field of art and design and are directed to providing the field with the quality of investigation and high level of scholarship underpinning its support.

Academic staff at COFA have a distinguished record of achievement in art and design research and their national leadership is evidenced in the calibre of their exhibitions, publications and national competitive grants. In the 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia Report UNSW was the only institution which received a ranking of five for research with outstanding performance well above world standard in the Humanities and Creative Arts cluster. COFAs performance includes: the highest ranking nationally in the category of Film, Television and Digital Media; one of only two institutions awarded a ranking of five for Art Theory and Criticism; and one of six institutions which was awarded the top ranking of four for research above world standard in Visual Arts and Crafts. The community of researchers at COFA is renowned for its cooperative approach to the exchange, formulation and critical development of research and research supervision in the field, and for its interdisciplinary collaboration with other Faculties in UNSW. The National Institute for Experimental Arts (NIEA) at UNSW is a dynamic experimental research facility integrating COFAs research centres, groups and galleries. NIEA promotes innovative theory and practice-based research through crossdisciplinary collaboration and close partnerships with a variety of Australian and international universities, industry and community groups. COFA offers graduate research programs in art, art education, art history and theory, design studies, media arts, visual anthropology and visual culture. Masters and PhD candidates are members of the COFA research community and work alongside some of Australias most respected artists, art educators, designers and scholars in a creative and dynamic research environment. The PhD program provides opportunities for making an original contribution to knowledge via studio practice or conventional thesis, and cross-disciplinary research. The PhD program can be undertaken in any of the four schools Art, Art History and Art Education, Design Studies and Media Arts or with affiliation to NIEA. Contact Details Associate Dean, Research - Professor Jill Bennett Email: j.bennett@unsw.edu.au Director, Postgraduate Research - Associate Professor Leong K. Chan Email: l.chan@unsw.edu.au Website: www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/degrees/postgraduate/research

118

www.international.unsw.edu.au

COFA Research programs

School of Art
Email: art@cofa.unsw.edu.au The School incorporates diverse research interests, grouped loosely into the following areas in which interdisciplinary practice is encouraged: Drawing (including life drawing, anatomy, composition and design, field studies) Painting (including life painting, anatomy, composition and design, colour, digital outputting, field studies) Printmaking (including etching, lithography, relief painting, screen printing, custom printing) Sculpture/Performance/Installation (including bronze casting, figurative sculpture, electronic sculpture, installation, body works, earthworks, performance)

School of Design Studies


Email: design@cofa.unsw.edu.au Research students are encouraged to contribute to the Schools current interest in any of the following art and design studio study areas which are offered through the Master of Design (Honours) by Research, Master of Design (Coursework) and Master of Fine Art (By Research): Applied/object design studio including designing objects, furniture and lighting Ceramics design studio including designing for the table, industry, interiors, installation and experimental art and design Design management and practice Design history, theory and aesthetics Design and computing including interactive design, web design and screen interface, digital and pre-press design Design and society including ageing populations; HIV/AIDS intervention; design and national experience; and production and consumption Environment/spatial design studio including interiors, exhibition, theatre, urban and landscapes Ethical, socially aware and sustainable design Graphic media studio including visual identity design; book, magazine and electronic media; illustration; experimental typography and letterpress printing Interdisciplinary and multidisciplinary design Jewellery studio including design for the body, costume and fashion; designs for the table, interior, industry, installation and experimental object design Textiles studio including design for the body, costume design, accessories and fashion, objects, interiors and designing for the commercial textile industry, installation and experimental textile and art design Wenmin Li, China Doctor of Philosophy in Fine Arts Artist Wenmin Li uses everyday humble objects to document her personal journey from her origins in North-Western China to her current home on the coast of Australia. Lis artworks blend the spatial simplicity of traditional Chinese painting with the intuitive pencil strokes of contemporary Western drawing techniques. For Li, and viewers alike, this is a symbolic union of East and West. Ironically, Li only became interested in traditional Chinese artwork when she moved to Australia in 2002 to undertake her Master of Art at COFA. She says, I was born in China during the Cultural Revolution in 1973 and had a very Western education. I wasnt interested in Chinese tradition until I arrived in Australia and realised I was a foreigner to my own culture. I suddenly realised Im very traditional in terms of the values I hold, the things I deal with in daily life, the respect I have for friendship and family, and the importance of tradition versus the influence of globalisation. Before moving to Australia, I didnt know myself. Wenmin Li has completed her PhD at COFA and she now teaches an undergraduate drawing course.
Words - Barbara Messer Portrait photograph - Olivia Martin-Macguire Wenmin Li in front of her mixed-media work Springtime

School of Art History and Art Education


The Schools many research interests can be grouped into the following areas: Email: art_education@cofa.unsw.edu.au Art and Design Education: Visual education Qualitative research and ethnography The political nature of curriculum reform in national and state contexts Exhibition access and interaction in the public domain Practices of creativity in art and design education context Community-based practitioner research Cognitive realism and conditions for authentic artistic practice in educational settings Online communities/transformative education Critical influences on ideas and artistic practices and visual art research Histories of Australian art education Email: artht@cofa.unsw.edu.au Art History and Theory: Aesthetics Art, subjectivity and the body: trauma and memory Australian art history and visual culture: postcolonialism Contemporary art and politics; contemporary art of the Asia-Pacific region: art and anthropology Critical and cultural theory Curatorship, museology and the arts infrastructure; Modern and contemporary art New media arts and theory

Research Institutes, Centres and Groups


Centre for Contemporary Art and Politics http://blogs.cofa.unsw.edu.au/ccap Centre for Interactive Cinema Research (iCinema) www.icinema.unsw.edu.au Cicada Press www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/research/research-units/ cicada-press Environmental Research Initiative for Art www.eria.com.au Imaging the Land International Research Initiative www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/research/research-units/iliri International Drawing Research Initiative www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/research/research-units/idri National Institute for Experimental Arts www.niea.unsw.edu.au Porosity Studio www.cofa.unsw.edu.au/research/research-units/ porosity Red Objects http://redobjects.unsw.edu.au The Omnium Project www.omnium.net.au

School of Media Arts


Email: mediaarts@cofa.unsw.edu.au Research students are encouraged to contribute to research in the following areas: Digital media (including digital video, digital imaging, digital sound, interactive media, 2D and 3D animation) Photomedia (including analogue photography, digital imaging and integrated print, and installation media) Time-based art (including sound media, video art, interactive media, performance and animation)

www.international.unsw.edu.au

119

Faculty of Engineering
Constant change is the worlds one great certainty. The challenges for todays engineers are to meet the changes that arise unexpectedly, and make the changes that will protect and enhance our individual lives, our communities and our planet. The UNSW Faculty of Engineering is meeting those challenges with innovative applied and theoretical research, high level cross-disciplinary cooperation and close work with industry to develop practical solutions to real-world issues. The Faculty of Engineering at UNSW is internationally known for fundamental and applied research across a broad range of disciplines. The Faculty has attracted a large number of Australian Research Council (ARC) Grants, making UNSW the largest ARC competitive grants recipient over the last eight years. It is at the forefront of research, attracting the best and brightest students, and cooperates closely with industry and the wider community to develop collaborative research activities which impact locally and internationally. Our research is focused on key areas of energy, health, water, digital information and communications, and materials for the future.

Schools

The Facultys research programs are available across 10 schools: Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering School of Chemical Engineering School of Civil and Environmental Engineering School of Computer Science and Engineering School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering School of Mining Engineering School of Petroleum Engineering School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems
UNSW is a world leader in photovoltaic and solar energy engineering

National Research Centres

The Faculty of Engineering was the founding faculty of UNSW in 1949 and is the major centre for engineering studies and research in Australia with the widest choice of engineering disciplines and internationally renowned research programs.

The Faculty is associated with the following six National Research Centres: ARC Centre of Excellence in Advanced Silicon Photovoltaics and Photonics ARC Centre of Excellence for Autonomous Systems ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials ARC Centre for Quantum Computer Technology National Centre for Groundwater Research and Training National Information Communications Technology Australia

Cooperative Research Centres

The Faculty is associated with the following 10 Cooperative Research Centres: Advanced Composite Structures Advanced Manufacturing Australian Poultry Capital Markets Cotton Catchment Communities Environmental Biotechnology Greenhouse Gas Technology Polymers Smart Services Spatial Information

University Research Centres

The Faculty is associated with the following eight University Research Centres: Centre for Advanced Macromolecular Design Centre for Energy and Environmental Markets Centre for Infrastructure, Engineering and Safety Centre for Interactive Cinema Centre for Sustainable Materials Research and Technology Connected Waters Initiative UNESCO Centre for Membrane Science and Technology Water Research Centre

UNSW Research Institutes

The Faculty is associated with the following two UNSW Research Institutes: Centre for Energy Research and Policy Analysis Australian Centre for Space Engineering Research For more information, visit www.eng.unsw.edu.au/research

120

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Engineering Research programs

Graduate School of Biomedical Engineering


Staff Contact: Professor Nigel Lovell Email: biomedeng@unsw.edu.au Website: www.gsbme.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Biomaterials and tissue engineering Physiological measurement, modelling and neurostimulation

School of Electrical Engineering and Telecommunications


Staff Contact: Professor Chee Yee Kwok Email: c.kwok@unsw.edu.au Website: www.ee.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Biomedical engineering Computer networks Control systems Electrical power equipment Microsystems Mobile communications Photonic technologies and optical communications Power electronics and drives Power systems Quantum computing Signal processing

School of Photovoltaic and Renewable Energy Engineering


Staff Contact: Dr Alistair Sproul Email: pv.course@unsw.edu.au Website: www.pv.unw.edu.au Research Areas Crystalline silicon solar cells - design and processing techniques Electrical energy storage GaAS and SiGe devices; light trapping in thin crystalline silicon; novel semiconductor devices Photovoltaic applications in developing countries Photovoltaic device fabrication and characterisation Photovoltaic device physics, modelling, design and characterisation; photovoltaic module design Photovoltaic solar energy conversion Quantum well and advanced solar cell structures Quantum well, wire and dot structures Semiconductor device modelling Semiconductor device physics Commercially oriented silicon solar cells device design, processing and characterisation Thin film crystalline silicon photovoltaic devices

School of Chemical Engineering


Chemical Engineering and Industrial Chemistry Staff Contact: Associate Professor Jie Bao Email: j.bao@unsw.edu.au Website: www.chse.unsw.edu Research Areas Computer process control Electrochemical engineering Environmental technology Heat and mass transfer Membrane science and technology Minerals and energy; particle technology and catalysis Polymer science and technology Process modelling and optimisation Reaction engineering; supercritical fluids Food Science and Technology Staff Contact: Associate Professor Jie Bao Email: j.bao@unsw.edu.au or foodscience@unsw.edu.au Website: www.chse.unsw.edu Research Areas Food chemistry Food engineering Food microbiology Food processing Nutrition Postharvest technology of fruit and vegetables Sensory analysis/product development

School of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering


Staff Contact: Dr Victoria Timchenko Email: v.timchenko@unsw.edu.au Website: www.mech.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Aerospace engineering Applied mechanics Design Fluid and thermal engineering Industrial technology and management Mechatronics Naval architecture

School of Surveying and Spatial Information Systems


Staff Contact: School Office Email: jinling.wang@unsw.edu.au Website: www.ssis.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Precise GPS navigation GNSS algorithms GNSS receiver design Multi-sensor integration Radar interferometry studies Imaging for mapping applications New positioning technologies

School of Mining Engineering


Staff Contact: Dr Serkan Saydam Email: s.saydam@unsw.edu.au Website: www.mining.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Geomechanics: mining geomechanics, geomechanics for underground spaces Innovative education and training: knowledge and data management, innovative teaching and learning methods, general concepts of providing an enhanced alternative mining education Underground environment Sustainable mining practices

School of Civil and Environmental Engineering


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Ian Turner Email: ian.turner@unsw.edu.au Website: www.civeng.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Engineering construction Environmental engineering Geotechnical engineering Structural engineering Transport engineering Water engineering

School of Petroleum Engineering


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Sheik Rahman Email: sheik.rahman@unsw.edu.au Website: www.petrol.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Drilling and completion Production engineering Petroleum economics Reservoir characterisation Reservoir engineering and simulation

School of Computer Science and Engineering


Staff Contact: School of Computer Science and Engineering Student Office Email: research@cse.unsw.edu.au Website: www.cse.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Artificial intelligence Bioinformatics Computer architecture Computer systems engineering: database, embedded and operating systems, networks, services engineering, programming languages and software engineering

www.international.unsw.edu.au

121

Faculty of Law

The Faculty of Law at UNSW is one of Australias leading law faculties, with the research output of our academics and students establishing our reputation. Strong research performance across all areas of law and socio-legal practice was recognised in the 2010 Excellence in Research for Australia Report where both law and criminology were awarded a rating of four which is above world average.

The Faculty of Law at UNSW is home to leading scholars in a variety of legal fields, many of whom have significant international reputations. We bring together an expert team of academics, professional practitioners and international visitors to deliver specialist research programs. The Faculty currently has over 60 research students enrolled who are undertaking research in a wide range of areas such as anti-terrorism, human rights, indigenous issues, refugee law, domestic violence, international law, sports law, forensic evidence, intellectual property and internet regulation. The Faculty also hosts a range of specialist research centres and networks including: Australian Human Rights Centre Centre for Law, Markets and Regulation The Crime and Justice Research Network Cyberspace Law and Policy Centre Gilbert and Tobin Centre of Public Law Network for Interdisciplinary Studies of Law Indigenous Law Centre The Faculty also has a number of research groups including: Competition and Economic Law Research Group Initiative on Climate Change Law and Policy International Law and Policy Group Private Law Policy and Research Group Refugee Law and Policy Group Social Justice Project

122

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Law Research programs

The Faculty offers three research programs: Doctor of Philosophy, Doctor of Juridical Science and Master of Laws by Research. Applications are invited from students whose proposed research relates to one of the Facultys research strengths and also from students whose research would benefit from and contribute to the Facultys commitments to social justice and the study of law in society. Examples of the particular research strengths of the Faculty of Law are:

Intellectual Property

Business and Commercial Law

Research Areas Copyright law Patents Trade mark law Theories of intellectual property Colonial copyright Traditional knowledge Cyberlaw

Student Resources and Support

One of the Facultys distinctive characteristics is its close engagement with and active support of its research students. It offers full-time research students a workstation, some financial support for researchrelated expenses, courses in research methods, research seminars, and access to the UNSW Freehills Law Library.

Research Areas Corporate finance Corporate regulation, accountability and governance Investment and securities law Corporations and human rights Insolvency Directors duties and shareholder remedies Class actions

International and Comparative Law


Research Areas International human rights law International refugee law International law and climate change International environmental law International humanitarian law International criminal law International trade law International investment law International economic law Terrorism and national security Use of force Law of the sea Comparative constitutional law

Contact Details
Professor Theunis Roux Director of Postgraduate Research Tel: +61 2 9385 3418 Email: t.roux@unsw.edu.au Jenny Jarret Student Services Officer Tel: +61 2 9385 3821 Email: j.jarret@unsw.edu.au Website: www.law.unsw.edu.au

Constitutional and Public Law


Research Areas Constitutional law Human rights Federalism Indigenous rights Administrative law Immigration law Electoral law

Law Reform

Criminal Law, Criminal Justice and Criminology


Research Areas Policing Prisons Punishment Sentencing Juries Sexual assault law reform Domestic violence International criminal law

Research Areas Counter terrorism Law reform and human rights Criminal justice law reform Immigration and refugee law

Legal Institutions and Governance


Research Areas Police accountability Australian legal institutions Rule of law

Evidence and Civil Procedure


Research Areas Litigation Alternative dispute resolution Case management and court procedure Identification of evidence Role of experts Sexual assault Police interrogation

Legal Theory

Research Areas Legal philosophy Critical legal theory Law and social theory Analytical legal theory Continental legal theory Feminist legal theory

Juan Chen, China PhD student Juan came to Australia two years ago as a full-time PhD student and is thrilled with her decision. I am so grateful for many things provided by this university. The generous scholarship, the well resourced library, the bright and comfortable office, and most of all, peer help and my supervisors guidance, she says. Juan graduated from Beijing University before moving to Australia. For the duration of her PhD studies, Juan is delighted to call Australia home. Australia is a wonderful place to live. says Juan. I sincerely recommend the Law School of UNSW to all international students.

Human Rights and Social Justice


Research Areas Bill of rights Terrorism and human rights Development and human rights Theories of human rights Access to justice Indigenous peoples Refugee law Theories of human rights Climate change and human rights

National Security and Terrorism


Research Areas Anti-terror law Counter terrorism Terrorism and human rights National security and human rights National security and civil liberties

Private Law

Indigenous Peoples and the Law


Research Areas Social justice Land rights Native title Customary law Sovereignty Indigenous cultural property Indigenous people in international law

Research Areas Contracts Equity Law of obligations Property Succession Torts

www.international.unsw.edu.au

123

Faculty of Medicine

Lowy Cancer Research Centre

The Faculty of Medicine is one of the largest medical faculties in Australia and is superbly situated close to some of Australias finest and most successful research institutes.
The Faculty has a well-established history of excellence in the domain of medical and biomedical research, and enjoys close affiliation with a number of Australias finest hospitals, research institutes and health care organisations. A broad array of opportunities are available for postgraduate study within the Facultys schools, specialist centres and affiliated institutions where there are many examples of success with National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) grant holders as well as successful holders of other nationally competitive grants, industry awards and research contracts. Faculty Schools UNSW Medicine has nine schools: Prince of Wales Clinical School Rural Clinical School School of Medical Sciences School of Psychiatry School of Public Health and Community Medicine School of Womens and Childrens Health South Western Sydney Clinical School St George Clinical School St Vincents Clinical School

Faculty Research Centres and Institutes The Faculty is supported in our operations by our vibrant research centres. Centres of the Faculty and the University include: National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research National Cannabis Prevention and Information Centre National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre UNSW Cancer Research Centre Brain Sciences UNSW Centre for Clinical Governance Research in Health Centre for Health Informatics Centre for Infection and Inflammation Research Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity Centre for Vascular Research St Vincents Centre for Applied Medical Research Dementia Collaborative Research Centre Perinatal and Reproductive Epidemiology Research Unit Australian Advanced Treatment Centre Affiliated Research Organisations The Faculty is affiliated with several eminent research institutes including: Australian Institute of Health Innovation Black Dog Institute Childrens Cancer Institute Australia Garvan Institute Ingham Health Research Institute Neuroscience Research Australia Skin and Cancer Foundation Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute Sax Institute Contact Details Coordinator, Postgraduate Student Programs and Research Tel: +61 2 9385 2457 Email: med.rsch@unsw.edu.au Website: www.med.unsw.edu.au

124

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Research programs

UNSW Campus-based Schools, Centres and Units

School of Public Health and Community


Staff Contact: Research Student Support Officer Email: resdegree-sphcm@unsw.edu.au Website: www.sphcm.med.unsw.edu.au The School has a vibrant and active research culture, evidenced in the work of our many research students (currently over 150 enrolled students) and academic staff, our significant track record of publications, our successful history of research grants, and the trans-disciplinary backgrounds and experience of our academic and research staff. In addition to academic staff based in the School, our many conjoint staff and those within our affiliated research centres contribute significantly to our research profile. These centres focus on: Primary Care and Equity Research, Clinical Governance Research in Health, Health Informatics, and the School links with two national centres: the National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre and the National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research. Our projects range in scope from randomised controlled trials to qualitative studies, and are funded by many sources including the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council and the Australian Research Council. Research Areas Casemix based hospital funding Clinical directorates, the future of the hospital, organisational learning, health policy, health services, strategic management Clinician management relations, casemix and health care reform, management of public health Culture, health and illness Design and evaluation of educational and organisational strategies aimed at improving clinical preventive services Development and application of measures of quality in health care in order to improve physician performance and patient health gains Diabetes Economic aspects of health care, financial management, medical practice management and privatisation Educational programs for the health professions Ethics of health research General practice services Globalisation and health Health and conflict Health law, ethics, legislation for public health Health services planning, physical planning and design, asset strategic planning Health sociology and health policy analysis, especially community and consumer participation in health care Hospital services research and evaluation, epidemiology, infection control, HIV clinical and service research International health/humanitarian policy development Learning environments Management of work theories and practice: industrial and employment relations, technological change, maternal and child health systems, community development, nursing, primary care Medical management, public health management and health promotion Partnership between education and practice to ensure relevance of training and transfer of skills to practice settings Planning of human resources through the design

and conduct of health workforce studies including the design of models for planning and construction of data sets Promotion of health of less advantaged groups in Australia and the region Tobacco use and smoking cessation

Centre for Primary Health Care and Equity


Staff Contact: Professor Mark Harris Email: cphce@unsw.edu.au Website: http://www.cphce.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Research and evaluation on primary health care, particularly general practice Structured care and information systems for chronic disease (especially diabetes, cardiovascular disease and mental health) Information systems, organisational capacity, and health services integration Integration of policy and practice linking general practice and the rest of the health system

Centre for Clinical Governance Research in Health


Staff Contact: Professor Jeffrey Braithwaite Email: clingov@unsw.edu.au Website: http://clingov.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Systems and culture: Systems interconnectedness, management/clinician relationships, change management, restructuring, systems fragmentation, professional boundaries, accreditation and its effectiveness Clinician behaviour: Workforce issues, how clinician behaviour changes, management/clinician dichotomy, risk management, health professional education Systematisation of work: Clinical practice improvement, management/clinician approaches, systems interconnectedness Comparative health care systems: Comparative systems performance, clinical indicators across systems Consumer participation: Increased consumerism, accountability, health inequalities, involvement of consumers in care processes Health policy development and implementation: Commonwealth/State divide, accountability for policy implementation, risk management, changing disease trends

Muru Marri Indigenous Health Unit


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Lisa Jackson-Pulver Email: l.pulver@unsw.edu.au Research Areas Aboriginal identifiers, maternal and infant health, social, spiritual and emotional well-being, and prevention and management of chronic disease Rights-based framework for indigenous health in Australia in accordance with agreed local and national priorities, and with values and ethical guidelines for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander health research Culturally and contextually appropriate curricula and practice in health

Centre for Health Informatics


Staff Contact: Professor Enrico Coiera Email: chi@unsw.edu.au Website: www.chi.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Evidence-based decision support: Developing technologies to provide online access to clinically relevant information to support decision making by clinicians and consumers Clinical communications: Understanding how communication fundamentally supports the process of health care delivery, and how new technologies can be used to improve communication Home telecare: Monitoring patients in their home, with information passed to their primary care giver, to improve clinical outcomes and allow the elderly and the chronically ill to stay at home longer Evaluation: Assessing the effectiveness of new information and communication technologies in improving health outcomes and delivery

School of Medical Sciences


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Pascal Carrive Email: p.carrive@unsw.edu.au Website: http://medicalsciences.med.unsw.edu.au/ medsciences.nsf Research Areas Cell Biology CD15 expression Cell cytoskeleton, mRNA localisation in cells and neuronal development Neuroprogenitor cells Pancreatic islets differentiation Salicylate effects Neuroscience Aspects of neurotransmission Movement disorders, and neurodegenerative diseases (glaucoma, dementia, Parkinsons, Fragile X) Neural development Neurochemistry Neuroinjury (brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerve) Pain, fear and anxiety, speech Peptides in the periperal nervous system: functions in health and disease Physiology of nociception Sensory neuroscience: tactile and kinaesthetic sensory mechanisms Vision and cognition

www.international.unsw.edu.au

125

Faculty of Medicine Research programs

Centre for Infection and Inflammation Research Chemokine biology Chemokine receptor blockade and desensitisations in animal models Immunopathogenesis of Sjogrens syndrome Lymphocycte trafficking in animal models of disease Mast cell and rheumatic diseases New bone formation in seronegative arthritis Ocular inflammation research Studies on the effect of UV light on the ocular surface Studies on the natural history of rheumatoid arthritis Synovial biopsy studies Role of anti chemokine and matrix metalloproteinase blockade in the treatment of inflammatory eye disease Role of chemokines and metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of uveitis Role of chemokines in the pathogenesis of HIV Role of mast cell tryptase genes in the pathogenesis of disease Role of metalloproteinases in the pathogenesis of scleritis Pulmonary Research Characterisation of proteases in allergenic pollens Immunological and neuropsychological studies in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome Mechanisms of inflammation and airway wall remodelling in experimental chronic asthma Post infection fatigue research Prospective study of patients with prolonged fatigue after Ross River virus, Q fever or EBV infection Bone Biomaterials Unit Aseptic loosening of prosthetic joints Healing of skeletal tissues Effect of wear particles on skeletal remodelling Manipulation of cells and tissue reactions by altering the surface characteristics of orthopaedic and dental materials Cytokine Research Unit Effects of s100s on leukocyte migration and activation of other cell types Expression of s100s in disease assessed by immunohistochemistry and protein purification techniques and structural properties and posttranslational modifications by mass spectroscopy Mechanisms of macrophage activation contributing to expression of procoagulants and their regulation Studies relating to monocyte/macrophage procoagulants in cardiovascular disease and antiphospholidid syndrome S100 proteins in inflammatory diseases such as atherosclerosis, asthma, and rheumatoid arthritis Regulation of s100 genes in macrophages, endothelial cells and fibroblasts by cytokines, including transcriptional control Role of s100a8 in embryogenesis Molecular and Cellular Oncology Anti-idiotype vaccine strategies for cancer treatment Cause and biological significance of DNA microsatellite instability in colorectal cancer Role of promoter methylation in the development of colorectal cancer Centre for Vascular Research Endothelial cell control of platelet thrombus formation Mechanism of new blood vessel formation in tumours Molecular events involved in entry of the human immunodeficiency virus into immune cells

Drug Design and Development Bisintercalating agents Cancer drug discovery: toppisomerase poisons Effects of liver disease on drug metabolism Minor groove alkylating agenst Molecular pharmacology: regulation and functions of P450s that act on fatty acids Regulation of phosphatases in liver cells Sports Medicine Epidemiology of injuries in elite Sri Lankan athletes Exercise in cardiac rehabilitation Low back pain in athletes Maturation of anaerobic metabolism in athletes Muscle and Bone Biomechanics of joints Disease induced muscle damage Exercise induced muscle damage Mother, Baby and Fetal Health Research and Sydney Fetal Centre Development of techniques for human fetal surgery Fetal and newborn renal and cardiovascular function Effects of maternal renal disease on development of the fetal kidney Programming of fetal cardiac myocyte maturation Role of the renin angiotensin system in the aetiology of hydrops fetalis Role of endothelial dysfunction in intrauterine life in programming for hypertension in adult life Role of the renal sympathetic nerves in the development of the kidney and in fetal renal compensatory hypertrophy Development Effects of alcohol upon development of the brain and ageing processes in the brain Development of the endocrine pancreas Development of cerebellum, retina, brainstem and neurons in general Development of neural pathways controlling blood pressure and respiration Ray Williams Biomedical Mass Spectrometry Facility Application of mass spectrometry in the biomedical sciences Biomarkers of ageing Kynurenine metabolism pathway Nitric oxide metabolism Protein characterisation Microscopy and Imaging Research Facility Advanced imaging techniques including laser scanning confocal microscopy and high-resolution digital photomicrography Anatomy and Education Anatomical structures and development of educational packages in neuroscience (brainstorm), histology (fabric of life), gross anatomy (anatomy images), cell biology, and embryology (UNSW embryology) Teaching Research Unit Cell biology of the metastatic process and the role of cell adhesion molecules in signal transduction and cell-matrix interactions Complex systems in medicine Evaluation of the effectiveness of computer assisted learning and multimedia in undergraduate medical and science education Theoretical and mathematical biology

Teaching Hospitals and Clinical Schools

School of Womens and Childrens Health


Paediatrics Staff Contact: Associate Professor Richard Lock Email: r.lock@unsw.edu.au Website: http://swch.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Asthma education Brain and nervous system disorders Childhood cancers and blood disorders Development neurosciences; Diabetes, growth and syndrome X Diabetes and epidemiology Fetal surgery Gastrointestinal disorders Immunology, infectious diseases and HIV Intensive care medicine Lung disease and airway inflammation Neurosurgery; Quality use of medicines Obstetrics and Gynaecology Staff Contact: Dr Leo Leader Email: l.leader@unsw.edu.au Website: http://swch.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Reproductive Medicine and Gynaecology Assisted reproductive science and technology Recurrent implantation failure and recurrent miscarriage Pathogenesis of ectopic pregnancy Embryonic genome activation and programming Gynaecological and non-gynaecological effects of polycystic ovary syndrome New approaches for minimally invasive gynaecological surgery Pelvic floor imaging for chronic pelvic pain Outcomes of multidisciplinary care in chronic pelvic pain Fertility preservation for women who require chemo or radiotherapy Impact of menopause on bone and cardiovascular health Endocrine regulation of endometriosis Maternal and Fetal Medicine Epidemiology of adverse pregnancy outcome Effects of ART on multiparity and on pregnancy outcome Advanced fetal imaging Biology of trophoblast and trophoblast cell culture Derivation and characterisation of amniotic fluid stem cells Assessment of in utero fetal behaviour Habituation during pregnancy Causation and management of postnatal depression Perinatal and Reproductive Epidemiology Health services research, health economics and epidemiological research in reproductive and perinatal health Methodologies for population-based research in areas of perinatal research including severe maternal morbidity and mortality and utilisation Caesarean section Population-based research (including data linkage) of vulnerable reproductive and perinatal populations (infertility, perinatal mental health, substance use and women in prison)

126

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Research programs

Urogynaecology Role of urothelial cell ATP in the mechanism of urgency in the overactive bladder. Low grade bacterial cystitis in refractory detrusor overactivity Randomised controlled trial of Electromagnetic Chair versus routine PFMT for stress incontinence Randomised controlled trial of single use versus re-use catheters in patients who self-catheterize for bladder outflow obstruction; cost and microbiological implications. Gynaecological Oncology Development of an EORTC quality of life model for vulvar cancer Womens perceptions of sexuality and body image following treatment for early stage vulvar cancer. Patients choices regarding sentinel node biopsy for vulvar cancer Patterns of failure in patients with endometrial cancer HPV DNA testing as a test of cure for CIN11-111 Nutritional status, quality of life, and exercise pattern at time of diagnosis for women with gynaecological cancer Primary surgery for the management of stage 1B2 cervical cancer International multicentre randomized phase 3 clinical trial of a laparoscopic approach to endometrial cancer

St George Clinical School


Department of Medicine Staff Contact: Dr Ashish Diwan Email: a.diwan@unsw.edu.au Website: http://stgcs.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Cancer Cardiology Clinical haematology Clinical pharmacology Dermatology Gastroenterology Immunology Intensive care Nutritional studies Nephrology Neurology Nuclear medicine Orthopaedic surgery Plastic and reconstructive surgery Rheumatology Sleep disorders and respiratory failure Department of Surgery Staff Contact: Professor David Morris Email: david.morris@unsw.edu.au Website: http://stgcs.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Aortic wall tensile strength Hepatic metastases Histamine and its role in the cell-mediated immune response to tumour growth Immunosuppresive effects of tumour associated glycoproteins Modulation of tumour infiltrating lymphocyte activity by the histamine-2 receptor, cimetidine Octreotide in colo-rectal cancer Treatment of liver cancer and nonocytotoxic control of colorectal cancer Vitamin D3 analogue in cancer

South Western Sydney Clinical School


Staff Contact: Professor Minoti Apte Email: m.apte@unsw.edu.au Website: http://swscs.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Department of Medicine Asthma Blood disorders Cancer Cardiac diagnostics Diabetes Immunology (including transplantation immunology) Infectious diseases Multiple sclerosis Nephritis Neurological disease Department of Surgery Gastrointestinal diseases Cell biology and gene regulation Connective tissue Cancer Inflammation

School of Psychiatry
Staff Contact: Associate Professor Philip Ward Email: p.ward@unsw.edu.au Website: http://psych.med.unsw.edu.au Staff Contact for the Master of Philosophy in Forensic Mental Health Program (2712) Dr Elizabeth Kaziro Email: Elizabeth.Kaziro@justicehealth.nsw.gov.au Website: www.forensicmentalhealth.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Cerebrovascular disease and late-life depression Chronic fatigue syndrome Cognitive electrophysiology Cost effectiveness of treatment Epidemiology of mental disorders, including burden of disease Functional neuroimaging Gender issues in depression and anxiety Impairment issues in doctors Mental health of refugees and asylum seekers Modelling and measuring the personality disorders Neurathenia in a cross-cultural context Neurobiology of bipolar disorder using molecular biological techniques and post mortem brain tissue studies Neurobiology of schizophrenia Neuropsychology of bipolar disorder Primary care psychiatry Psychoimmunology Psychological treatments for bipolar disorder Studies into Alzheimers disease and vascular dementia Sub-typing the depressive disorders Transcranial magnetic stimulation for depression, obsessive compulsive disorder and schizophrenia Transcultural issues in psychiatry

Prince of Wales Clinical School


Department of Medicine Staff Contact: Dr Claire Vajdic or Professor Philip Crowe Email: claire.vajdic@unsw.edu.au or p.crowe@unsw.edu.au Website: http://powcs.med.unsw.edu.au Research Area Antiarrhythmic drug therapy electrophysiological evaluation Antidepressants in methadone treatment Assessment of the efficacy of cardiac rehabilitation Cellular autoimmunity in the antiphospholipid syndrome Characterisation of human mast cell protease genes Chemoprevention of colonic adenoma Clinical application of oesophageal echocardiography Complement proteins and the biological activities of the human fat cell Control of movement Efficiency of radiation therapy for coronary stents Therapy including gene to create insulin-producing cells from stem cells Gene variants and cardiovascular risk Haemodynamic and rehabilitation factors Homocysteine and vascular disease Immunotherapy in acute leukaemia Isometric exercise Isotopic investigation of renal disorder Mechanisms of mast cell accumulation and activation in rheumatoid arthritis and scleroderma Naltrexone in management of opioid dependence New isotope techniques in cardiac diagnosis Non-invasive cardiovascular imaging, in particular echocardiogram and magnetic resonance imaging Pathogenesis and treatment of chronic fatigue syndrome Post-myocardial infarction and post-coronary bypass graft surgery Post-prandial lipid behaviour in patients with chronic renal failure Prostate and bladder cancer Rapid opioid detoxification Recreational heroin use Role of cytokines in post viral fatigue syndromes Role of tissue factor in angiogenesis and extracellular matrix turnover

St Vincents Clinical School


Staff Contact: Dr Mark Danta Email: m.danta@unsw.edu.au Website: http://stvcs.med.unsw.edu.au/ Research Areas Antiarrhythmic pharmacology Arterial ageing Bone marrow transplantation Bowel cancer screening Cardiac electrophysiology Cardiac transplantation Cardiovascular haemodynamics Clinical governance - patient safety, risk management, clinical quality Clinical pharmacology Control of HIV infection and injecting drug users Coronary heart disease Drug monitoring Falls in the elderly Gene therapy Genetics of thrombosis Interventional cardiology Lung transplantation Molecular approaches to diagnosis and treatment of cancer Nitric oxide and blood vessels Nucleic acid based catalytic molecules Palliative care medicine Treatment of cancer with monoclonal antibodies Cancer - epidemiology, aetiology, chemoprevention, patterns of care, hereditary colorectal

www.international.unsw.edu.au

127

Faculty of Medicine Research programs

Role of tissue factor in renal reperfusion injury Studies in muscle endurance and the role of cytokines such as interferon Clinical pharmacology of heart failure Effect of immunosuppressive agents in monocyte tissue factor expression Role of complement proteins in tubulo-interstitial injury Role of T8 cells in the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) Tissue factor and vascular complications in dialysis patients Treatment of Crohns disease Use of pig islets as a treatment of Type 1 diabetes Vascular endothelial growth factor in flap healing Viral Hepatitis B and C Department of Surgery Staff Contact: Dr Claire Vajdic or Professor Philip Crowe Email: claire.vajdic@unsw.edu.au or p.crowe@unsw.edu.au Website: http://powcs.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas General surgery: wound healing, cancer Orthopaedic surgery: connective tissue healing; anthroplasty, prothesis design and evaluation; upper extremity biomechanics; molecular biology of osteolysis; bonegraft substitutes Plastic surgery: distraction osteogenesis; bone graft substitutes

Affiliated Teaching and Research Organisations

Childrens Cancer Institute Australia


Staff Contact: Dr Amanda Philp Email: education@ccia.unsw.edu.au Website: www.ccia.org.au Research Areas Cancer cell immortality Telomerase and haematopoietic cells Targeting the N-myc oncogene in neuroblastoma MRP genes in neuroblastoma ODC gene: another molecular target Bone marrow metastasis in neuroblastoma ABCs in adult cancers MRP4 as a therapeutic target in neuroblastoma Improving treatment for leukaemia Genetic suppressors of neuroblastoma ATP-Binding Cassette transporters in adult cancers Drug resistance in childhood leukaemia Pre-clinical evaluation of new therapies for childhood leukaemia New therapies for AML Long term follow up for survivors of childhood cancer Mechanism of relapse in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia Neuroblastoma tumour initiation Retinoid therapy for neuroblastoma and skin cancer Initiation of childhood leukaemia Histone modification in cancer Causes of childhood cancer Treatment-related outcomes of childhood cancer Cytoskeletal proteins and cancer Aurora kinases in cancer Using Nanotechnology to deliver cancer treatments

National Drug and Alcohol Research Centre


Staff Contact: Professor Richard Mattick Email: r.mattick@unsw.edu.au Website: http://ndarc.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Analysis of large data sets bearing on health care utilisation Analysis of harm reduction methods such as injecting centres, needle and syringe programs, interventions in prison systems Clinical trials of pharmacological and psychological treatments for alcohol and other drug dependence (such as cannabis dependence, amphetamine dependence, and cocaine dependence), including methadone, buprenorphine, LAAM, clonidine, naltrexone and acamprosate, brief interventions, cue exposure and cognitive behavioural methods Economic evaluations of such treatment, including cost analysis, cost-effectiveness analysis, cost-utility analysis, and work on prescribed medications under the pharmaceutical benefits scheme Epidemiological studies of harms caused by alcohol and their drug use, including heroin overdose death and non-fatal overdose Epidemiology of alcohol and other drug use Epidemiology of comorbidity between alcohol and other drug dependence and other mental disorders, such as the affective and anxiety disorders

Rural Clinical School


Staff Contact: Dr Lesley Forster or Dr Craig McLachlan Email: l.forster@unsw.edu.au or cmac@unsw.edu.au Website: http://rcs.med.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Medical education and educational modelling for rural and remote regions: undergraduate and postgraduate training Medical student ethics Indigenous health, refugee medicine Cardiovascular disease, stroke, diabetes, metabolic disease Surgical science, cancer, radiotherapy, imaging Quality assurance in surgery, efficacy of rural and remote surgery, oesophageal cancer management, liver cancer Translational medicine, genetics, biomarkers, medical devices Psychiatry, psychology, rural mental health, ADHD, stress, quality of life, cancer distress, depression, anxiety Addiction medicine, infectious diseases, environmental health, pharmacology Epidemiological studies in rural and remote communities, data sets Health care delivery, including primary health care, in rural and remote Australia Aged care, chronic care, chronic conditions, rehabilitation medicine, respiratory medicine Global health and disease

Neuroscience Research Australia


Staff Contact: Professor Peter Schofield Email: p.schofield@unsw.edu.au Website: www.powmri.edu.au

(Formerly Prince of Wales Medical Research Institute)

Garvan Institute
Staff Contact: Dr Shane Grey Email: s.grey@garvan.org.au Website: www.garvan.org.au Research Areas Cancer Diabetes and obesity Alzheimers and Parkinsons disease Osteoporosis Arthritis, asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and other immune disorders Pituitary disorders

National Centre in HIV Epidemiology and Clinical Research


Staff Contact: Professor David Cooper Email: dcooper@nchecr.unsw.edu.au Website: web.med.unsw.edu.au/nchecr Research Areas Surveillance and monitoring of HIV infection and AIDS Epidemiological studies of transmission and disease progression Identification of social and behavioural factors affecting HIV disease Laboratory investigations into the pathogenesis of HIV disease and the establishment of Australia as the primary site for clinical trials of HIV therapy Epidemiological and clinical research into other blood borne viruses, particularly hepatitis C and sexually transmitted infections International clinical research and provision of research expertise and training to countries of the Asia-Pacific region

Research Areas Biochemical basis of brain function Childhood injury Consequences of nerve and spinal cord injury Construction of atlases of the brain and spinal cord in humans and experimental animals Developmental neurobiology of schizophrenia Dyslexia Falls prevention, particularly in the elderly Genetics and neuropathology of dementia including Alzheimers disease, dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia Genetics of mental illness including bipolar disorder and depression Human balance, postural control and movement Human sensation and mechanisms of transmitting sensory information to the brain Injuries from road accidents Macular degeneration Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy Mechanisms of acute and chronic pain Molecular biology of arteriovenous malformations Motor neurone disease Muscle function and fatigue in health and disease Neural regulation of blood flow Neurodegeneration and related diseases Neuropathology and cellular biochemistry of Parkinsons disease Post-polio syndrome Sleep apnoea Syringomyelia

128

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Medicine Research programs

St Vincents Centre for Applied Medical Research


Staff Contact: Professor Samuel Breit Email: s.breit@amr.org.au Website: www.amr.org.au Research Areas Applied neurosciences Blood, stem cell and gastro-oesophageal cancer Clinical research program HIV immunovirology Inflammation/cytokine Structural biology

any of the Australian universities, although university staff have significant roles in both the colleges and hospitals. Training positions are competitive and often not easily available, particularly to nonresidents. Enquiries should be directed to the relevant professional college. For details of all professional medical colleges in Australia, visit the Committee of Presidents of Medical Colleges website at: www.cpmc.edu.au Foreign medical practitioners who wish to arrange a period of training in Australia should ensure that they are eligible for an appropriate visa. Enquiries for hospital positions should be directed to appropriate hospitals, or to the relevant professional body. Contact Details of Relevant Professional Bodies and Principal Professional Colleges Australian Medical Council PO Box 4810 Kingston ACT 2604 Tel: +61 2 6270 9777 Fax: +61 2 6270 9799 Website: www.amc.org.au Email: amc@amc.org.au Information Service for Overseas Trained Health Professionals NSW Department of Health Locked Mail Bag 961 North Sydney NSW 2059 Tel: +61 2 9391 9000 Fax: +61 2 9391 9101 Email: othpinfo@doh.health.nsw.gov.au Royal Australian College of General Practitioners PO Box 534 North Sydney NSW 2060 Tel: +61 2 9886 4700 Fax: +61 2 9886 4790 Website: www.racgp.org.au Email: nswact.faculty@racgp.org.au Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists 94-98 Chalmers Street Surry Hills NSW 2010 Tel: +61 2 9690 1001 Fax: +61 2 9690 1321 Website: www.ranzco.edu Email: ranzco@ranzco.edu Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists 254-260 Albert Street East Melbourne VIC 3002 Tel: +61 3 9417 1699 Fax: +61 3 9419 0672 Website: www.ranzcog.edu.au Email: ranzcog@ranzcog.edu.au Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists PO Box 280 Rozelle NSW 2039 Tel: +612 9352 3600 Fax: +612 9810 5073 Website: www.ranzcp.org Email: ranzcp.nsw@ranzcp.org Australasian College of Dermatologists PO Box 3785 Rhodes NSW 2138 Tel: +61 2 8765 0242 Fax: +61 2 9736 2194 Website: www.dermcoll.asn.au Email: admin@dermcoll.asn.au

Australasian College of Emergency Medicine 34 Jeffcott Street West Melbourne VIC 3003 Tel: + 61 3 9320 0444 Fax: +61 3 9320 0400 Website: www.acem.org.au Royal Australasian College of Medical Administrators Suite 10, Milton Parade Malvern VIC 3144 Tel: +61 3 9824 4699 Fax: +61 3 9824 6806 Website: www.racma.edu.au Email: info@racma.edu.au Royal Australasian College of Physicians 145 Macquarie Street Sydney NSW 2000 Tel: +61 2 9256 5444 Fax: +61 2 9252 3310 Website: www.racp.edu.au Email: racp@racp.edu.au Royal Australasian College of Surgeons College of Surgeons Gardens 250-290 Spring Street East Melbourne VIC 3002 Tel: +61 3 9249 1200 Fax: +61 3 9249 1219 Website: www.surgeons.org Email: college.sec@surgeons.org Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists ANZCA House 630 St Kilda Road Melbourne VIC 3004 Tel: +61 3 9510 6299 Fax: +61 3 9510 6786 Website: www.anzca.edu.au Email via: www.anzca.edu.au/contact-info Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists Level 9, 51 Druitt Street Sydney NSW 2000 Tel: +61 2 9268 9777 Fax:+61 2 9268 9799 Website: www.ranzcr.edu.au Email: ranzcr@ranzcr.edu.au Royal College of Pathologists of Australasia Durham Hall 207 Albion Street Surry Hills NSW 2010 Tel: +61 2 8356 5858 Fax: +61 2 8356 5828 Website: www.rcpa.edu.au Email: contact@rcpa.edu.au

Victor Chang Cardiac Research Institute


Staff Contact: Professor Robert Graham Email: vvcriadmin@victorchang.unsw.edu.au Website: http://www.victorchang.edu.au/ Research Units Biocomputing Unit Cardiac Mechanics Unit Coronary Vascular Unit Developmental Biology Unit Electrophysiology and Biophysics Unit Enzyme Research Unit Gene Regulation Unit Molecular Cardiology Unit Transplant Unit Vascular-Ventricular Interactions Unit Research Areas Cardiac physiology and transplantation Developmental and stem cell biology Molecular cardiology and biophysics Molecular genetics Structural and computational biology

Registration for Doctors and Specialist Medical Practitioner Training in Australia


At the University of New South Wales (UNSW) some graduate vocational coursework Master programs are conducted, for example, in Health Services Management, Forensic Mental Health and Public Health. However, graduates of these programs do NOT automatically become eligible to work as medical practitioners. UNSW also provides research training, for example, PhD and Master of Science degrees, but this training again is NOT a qualification to practice medicine. Registration for medical practice in Australia is regulated by separate laws in each state and territory which are administered by the medical boards. A medical practitioner must be registered under the laws of the state or territory in which he/she intends to practice. Information on the registration requirements and procedures for overseas trained doctors is available from the Australian Medical Council (AMC). Information is also available from the Information Service for Overseas Trained Health Professionals. Australian universities do not have responsibility for the conduct of programs providing training for medical practitioners wishing to become specialists these are controlled by professional medical colleges. To become a specialist, a medical practitioner must be accepted into and complete a training program arranged by one of the recognised professional colleges. A major part of this training takes place in teaching hospitals but is NOT the responsibility of

www.international.unsw.edu.au

129

Faculty of Science
The Faculty of Science is internationally renowned for fundamental and applied scientific research. Our goal is to educate the next generation of science and scientifically-aware graduates, and through teaching and research, add significantly to innovation through scientific and technological knowledge and practice.
The Faculty of Science has 447 academic staff, of whom 203 are designated research only and 244 who teach as well. We have a cohort of about 700 research students of whom, 33% are international students. Research within the Faculty is international, with interdisciplinary collaborations within the University as well as affiliations with Collaborative Research Centres and specialist facilities, both local and international. Award winning Laureate fellows, Federation fellows, Eureka prize winners and Rhodes scholars are among the UNSW scientific research staff and their expertise is reflected in our teaching programs. Researchers of the Faculty include world leaders in their field and their high standing has resulted in strong research funding for the Faculty. Every year, the Faculty successfully secures a significant level of funding from major internal and external sources, with annual research funding in excess of A$44 million. The Faculty is involved in collaborative research initiatives with partners from industry, commerce, the government and tertiary education sectors. There are extensive research interactions with industry sectors such as manufacturing and natural resources and with government organisations both locally and internationally.

Cooperative Research Centres


Advanced Composite Structures Bushfire Coal in Sustainable Development Environmental Biotechnology Greenhouse Gas Technologies Spatial Information Sustainable Tourism Vision

The Faculty is associated with the following eight cooperative research centres:

Specialist Research Centres

The faculty has the following 26 specialist research centres: Applied Polymer Science Centre Australian Rivers and Wetland Centre Chemical Analysis Centre Climate Change Research Centre Energy and Environmental Markets Centre Entomological Research and Insecticide Technology Centre Environmental Modelling and Prediction Centre Evolution and Ecology Research Centre Gene Function Analysis (Clive and Vera Ramaciotti Centre) Injury Risk Management Research Centre Macromolecular Analysis Centre Marine Biofouling and Bio-Innovation Centre Membrane Science and Technology (UNESCO Centre) Post-traumatic Mental Health Centre Particle and Catalyst Technologies Centre Remote Sensing and Geographic Information Systems Centre Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems Centre Sustainable Materials Research and Technology (SMaRT@UNSW) Tsunami Centre ARC Centre of Excellence for Design in Light Metals ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials ARC Centre of Excellence for Mathematical and Statistical Modelling of Complex Systems ARC Centre of Excellence for Quantum Computation and Communication Technology ARC Centre of Excellence for Climate System Science Centre for Eye Health Centre for Groundwater Research (in conjunction with the Faculty of Engineering)

Specialist Facilities and Laboratories

The Faculty offers the following specialised facilities and laboratories:

Aircraft for Flight Training and Research (including scanning laser and hyperspectral camera) Astrobiology Centre Atomic Fabrication Facility Behavioural Science Research Laboratories Bioanalytical Mass Spectrometry Unit Biomechanics Laboratory Cellular Analysis Facility Chemical Safety and Applied Toxicology Laboratories Driving (road and train) Simulators for Road Safety Research Electron Microscope Unit Ergonomics and Usability Laboratories Flight Simulator for Flight Training and Research Genome, Proteome and Gene Function Analysis Instrumented Car for Road Safety Research Microbiology and Immunology Consulting Laboratory Molecular and Image Analysis Facility Molecular Ecology and Evolution Facility National Pulsed Magnet Laboratory Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Facility Optics and Radiometry Laboratory Optometry Clinic Psychology Clinic Psychology Driving Simulator Semiconductor Nanofabrication Facility Surface Analysis Facility Sydney Region Combinatorial Research Facility X-Ray Crystallographic Analysis Facility

130

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Research programs

Aviation
Staff Contact: Professor Jason Middleton Tel: +61 2 9385 6747 Fax: +61 2 9385 6637 Email: aviation@unsw.edu.au Website: www.aviation.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Accident investigation Airport operations and management Aviation human factors and safety Aviation meteorology Airborne remote sensing of the earths surface Cabin safety Flight deck design and operation Forecasting and financial analysis Scheduling and fleet planning

Systems and Cellular Biology The Systems and Cellular Biology (SCB) group undertakes research in the biology of eukaryotes. Members of the group have overlapping research foci, many of which have been cemented by active collaborations and joint research grants and projects. Research foci of the group include: Cell stress and ageing: Professors Dawes and Ballard, Associate Professor Yang and Dr Perrone investigate the molecular basis of stress and ageing in the model organisms yeast and Drosophila Cholesterol and sterols: Associate Professors Brown and Yang are investigating the role of sterols in Niemann Pick disease and cholesterol in prostate cancer Genetic mapping of phenotype and disease: Professor Ballard and Drs Wilton and Lin use genetic and genomic analyses to understand the connection of genotype to phenotype in complex traits Protein interaction networks and systems biology: Professors Wilkins and Dawes use proteomic and transcriptomic technology to define and understand pathways and networks on a global scale. The group has been successful in attracting competitive funding and is currently funded by the Australian Research Council, NHMRC, NSW State Government Science Leveraging Fund, the Prostate Cancer Foundation and the UNSW Goldstar Scheme. The group has also been active in securing infrastructure funding in genomics, proteomics and systems biology. SCB staff are also responsible for the establishment and operation of two major centres in the School Ramaciotti Centre for Gene Function Analysis and the NSW Systems Biology Initiative. Molecular Medicine Molecular Medicine within BABS has a unique strength in combining fundamental biological and biomolecular sciences with a strong applied biotechnology and medical focus. The School facilitates collaborative research efforts across discipline boundaries for fundamental discoveries, generation of commercial opportunities and clinical research. Molecular medicine represents a significant proportion of research output from BABS within the medical area. Major research strengths of the group currently exist in medical bacteriology, biomaterials, medical virology, immunology, bioinformatics, cancer, and genetics. The group uses a wide range of cutting-edge molecular and bioinformatic tools to understand and combat disease. Expertise from members of molecular medicine naturally integrates into projects within the Schools research areas in studies such as ageing, water research and proteomics. A number of specific research foci involve several academics and include: Medical bacteriology: Professor Mitchell, Associate Professor White and Drs ORourke, Lan and Zhang investigate medically important bacteria such as helicobacter pylori and salmonella enterica and studies involve evolution, antibiotic resistance and their role in diseases Biomaterials: Associate Professor Foster and Drs Bulmus, Foong and Marquis conduct research that encompasses biomaterials, such as microbially produced biopolymers, bioplastics for medical applications, novel polymeric nanoparticles as antitumor drug delivery systems and biofuels Medical Virology: Associate Professor White and Drs Whitaker and Bull work in the area of medical virology involving viruses such as hepatitis C virus, human papillomavirus and norovirus.

Biological, Earth and Environmental Sciences


Biological Science Staff Contact: Associate Professor Peter Banks Tel: +61 2 9385 2066 Fax: +61 2 9385 1558 Email: p.banks@unsw.edu.au Website: www.bees.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Ecology of chemical defences against herbivores in marine algae; ecology, evolution and biogeography of marine plant/herbivore interactions; seaweed population biology, including impact of nutrient enrichment; ecology of marine biofouling and development of novel antifoulants Ecology of coastal vegetation (including description and classification of communities and autecology of particular species); habitat assessment; wetland and river ecology Ecology of predation as it influences native and feral mammals Functional morphology in mammalian teeth and skeletons; evolutionary history of vertebrates; fossil history of Australian mammals and vertebrate faunas; species-level diversity in Australian mammals; phylogenetic studies in marsupials Evolution of plant adaptive strategies across environments; relating variability in plant form and life history to diversity and distribution Evolutionary biology of ageing Ecological, evolutionary and genetic dynamics associated with sexual reproduction Relationships between sexual selection, inbreeding and extinction Biodiversity of arid zone faunas, behavioural ecology of macropods (kangaroos, wallabies and rat kangaroos), road ecology, management of wildlife tourism interactions Plant and fungal development, with especial interest in the early establishment of patterns that are elaborated in later growth Biostratigraphy, tertiary and quaternary palynology, and history of the vegetation Marine benthic ecology, human impacts on marine environments, invasive species ecology, the ecology of subtidal rocky reefs, ecology and evolution of herbivorous amphipods, evolution of modular organisms, phenotypic plasticity Anatomy, development and function of the invertebrate nervous system Molecular ecology and evolution - DNA techniques are becoming the method of choice for addressing some questions on population biology and conservation. Parentage, social structures, and dispersal are all readily accessible by genetic methods. These methods are being applied to everything from endangered Australian mammals to introduced pests in our laboratory. As well as being important for management, molecular ecology helps us analyse the evolutionary basis of fascinating behaviours, such as group formation in dolphins. All this work is supported by mathematical and computer modelling, in our laboratory or by collaborators Biological oceanography, early life history of fish, fisheries, ecology of the plankton; temperate reef fish ecology, home range; upwelling, zooplankton abundance and condition of larval fish; comparison of estuaries with and without rivers; impacts of polluted estuaries on plankton

Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences


Staff Contact: Associate Professor Peter White Tel: +61 2 9385 3780 Fax: +61 2 9385 1483 Email: p.white@unsw.edu.au Website: www.babs.unsw.edu.au The School of Biotechnology and Biomolecular Sciences has a strong international reputation for quality research in fundamental and applied science in many disciplines, with distinctive strengths in applied environmental microbiology and biotechnology. Research Areas Note: Active research areas may vary over time. Environmental Microbiology UNSW has one of the strongest gatherings of worldclass microbiologists and biotechnologists in Australia; a research area in which UNSW has for decades been recognised for our internationally competitive advantage. Environmental microbiology forms a top-level research grouping at UNSW that is not only the best in Australia by any comparison, but one of the best worldwide. An underlying philosophy of the research in most Schools in the Faculty of Science is that of bench-to-business, that is, fundamental to applied. Coupled with the biotechnology sector, the School has a strong precedent for the pure and applied biosciences. The members of this research group form a strong critical mass underpinned by research excellence that collectively creates effective and non-redundant synergies and addresses globally relevant research themes in: environmental genomics, environmental health and sustainability, microbial processes, biomaterials and nanotechnology, biodiversity and conservation, and bioprospecting for enzyme and drug discovery. These areas of research excellence translate fundamental discovery science using the latest enabling technologies in the biosciences into practical societal and economic benefits in the areas of: Biofilm and biofouling control Bioremediation and biofuels Novel bioactives Novel biocatalysts Monitoring and maintaining the health of Australian ecosystems Water quality and water re-use

www.international.unsw.edu.au

131

Faculty of Science Research programs

Faculty of Science Research programs

Effects of water resource development on the ecology of rivers and wetlands, using remote sensing, GIS and hydrological analyses; ecology of Australian waterbirds, including reproductive success, movements, habitat use Adaptive management of environmental flows in regulated and unregulated rivers Ecology of desert systems; role of ecosystem engineers in soil and landscape processes in deserts; the ecology of biological soil crusts; plantsoil interactions in rangelands Global scale ecology - the ecology and evolution of plant life histories, plant-animal interactions, and the evolution of invasive species across ecosystems Ecology and behaviour of Australian and Antarctic marine mammals Evolution and behaviour in fish Behavioural ecology of lizards Invertebrate systematic and evolution Phenotypic plasticity in modular organisms Sexual selection and sexual conflict Geology Staff Contact: Dr Paul Lennox Tel: +61 2 9385 8096 Fax: +61 2 9385 1558 Email: p.lennox@unsw.edu.au Website: www.bees.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Applied mineralogy Clays and industrial minerals Coal geology Coastal and estuarine geology Environmental geology Environmental geophysics Exploration and environmental geochemistry Exploration and environmental geophysics Geological evolution of significant Australian fossil localities Geospatial information systems Groundwater contamination - landfill studies, leachate plume characterisation Hydrochemical modelling and application of environmental isotopes in groundwater systems Hydrogeochemistry and water-rock interaction in different rock type environments Hydrogeology including groundwater studies in porous and fracture aquifer systems Igneous petrology Mineral and energy resources Petroleum geology and geophysics Regional geology Remote sensing and image processing Salinisation dry land and irrigation salinity Salinisation and contaminant studies Sedimentology and basin analysis Soil salinity assessment and management Soil science Structural geology Surface water - groundwater interaction and sea water intrusion into coastal aquifers Water quality in ground and surface water environments

Marine and Coastal Studies Staff Contact: Associate Professor Iain Suthers Tel: +61 2 9385 2065/2073 Email: marsci@unsw.edu.au Website: www.marine.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Coastal management Coastal sedimentary processes and oceanography Fisheries management Fisheries oceanography Genetics Invasive species Marine ecology Marine ecotoxicology Physical Geography, Remote Sensing, GIS, Human and Urban Geography Staff Contact: Dr John Triantafilis Tel: +61 2 9385 8087 Fax: +61 2 9385 1558 Email: j.triantafilis@unsw.edu.au Website: www.bees.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Aquaculture: management, integrated farming systems, degraded pond restoration, diseases of aquatic organisms, classification schemes for brackishwater aquaculture and finfish mariculture Catchment management Coastal development and management including in the Asia-Pacific region Coastal geomorphology Development of cultural industries Disturbance ecology: impacts of development on ecosystems Environmental and socio-economic impact assessment Environmental planning and policy Fluvial geomorphology Geocomputation GIS methods and applications International development International migration, transnationalism and multiculturalism Nearshore processes Pacific and indigenous studies Palaeoenvironmental reconstruction: environmental change of the late Quaternary and Holocene Palynology, charcoal analysis, geochemistry, mineral magnetic analysis Remote sensing Rural and urban land capability assessment Soils: soil science, soil acidification, soil use and management Sustainable development Geography of racism and anti-racism Urban geography Vegetation and climate of the postglacial period Vegetation and forest assessment Water quality assessment, lake and river limnology

Chemistry
Staff Contact: Associate Professor Jonathan Morris Tel: +61 2 9385 4733 Fax: +61 2 9385 6141 Email: jonathan.morris@unsw.edu.au Website: www.chem.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Bioactive Molecules The need for new therapeutics and drugs is greater than ever, with ever-growing levels of resistance to current antibiotics, high levels of toxicity of current anti-cancer agents and limited availability of anti-viral agents. The dramatic advances in disease prevention have been driven by developments in medicinal chemistry. Synthetic methodologies have become sufficiently sophisticated to allow the design and synthesis of completely new yet active structural types. Specific programs are: The design and understanding of bioactive molecules; heterocyclic chemistry for therapeutic compounds, exploration of DNA-drug interactions Natural product chemistry; flavinones as dietary supplements, mode of action of antifreeze proteins Chemical and Biological Catalysis Improved strategies for chemical synthesis are now imperative to achieve the reduction of waste and energy demands as well as provide the capability to create new molecules for the fine chemical industry with high levels of selectivity. Challenges of catalysis include the capture of nitrogen for agrochemicals, value adding to the by-products of the petrochemical industry and enhancing catalytic activity using biological templates. Specific programs are: Homogeneous catalysts for efficient and selective synthesis; efficient routes to pharmaceuticals, nitrogen fixation and carbon sequestration Structure and dynamics in catalysis using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, X-ray crystallography and modelling Functional Materials The ability of chemists to control matter on the molecular level is now being exploited to develop a new generation of materials with properties not previously accessible. The fabrication of new materials using molecular scale building blocks is one of the fundamental principles of nanoscience. Functional materials we are developing have important applications in analytical chemistry, electrochemistry and surface science. Specific programs are: Designer surfaces leading to super hydrophobic surfaces, biosensors, optoelectronic devices, organic electronics, biomaterials Nanostructured materials for catalysis, gas adsorption and molecular sieves

132

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Faculty of Science Research programs

Mathematics and Statistics


Staff Contact: Dr Thanh Tran Tel: +61 2 9385 7041 Fax: +61 2 9385 7123 Email: thanh.tran@unsw.edu.au Website: www.maths.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Applied Mathematics: Biomathematics; Geophysical fluid dynamics; Non linear phenomena; Computational mathematics; Optimisation and applied analysis Pure Mathematics: Algebra and representation theory; Algebraic and metrical geometry; Discrete mathematics; Functional analysis; Harmonic analysis; and Mathematical physics Statistics: Bayesian statistics and Monte Carlo methods; Biostatistics and computational biology; Stochastic processes and financial analysis; Space and time series modeling; and Statistical machine learning Interdisciplinary Research: Centre for Energy and Environmental Markets; Mathematics and statistics in biosciences

Other features of the School are: The Optics and Radiometry Laboratory (ORLAB) which is an unparalleled international facility for photometry and colorimetry The Orthokeratology research group (ROk) which has established a unique and productive facility. Research Areas Anterior segment and contact lenses: Mechanisms and treatment of dry eye; Contact lens design and material technology; Ocular homeostasis, inflammation, infection and the effect of contact lenses on the defence systems of the eye; Epidemiology of contact lens-related infection; Orthokeratology; Biomarkers in ocular surface and other diseases Glaucoma and posterior segment: Corneal and ocular biomechanics in glaucoma; Role of the immune system in posterior segment disease; Biomarkers in ocular surface and other diseases; Neuroscience: cellular structure/function in health and disease; Ocular melanoma Optics: Applied vision research, Applications of holography in vision Public Health Optometry: Eye care delivery, Development of refractive error, Access to eyecare services in New South Wales, Occupational optometry Vision Science: Development of the visual system; Visual function in disease; Low vision and visual rehabilitation; Visual processing; Visual perception in sport; Visual psychophysics (form and motion in the visual scene)

Tests of Grand Unification theories Theoretical physics Varying constants (cosmology) Violation of the fundamental symmetries Vocal tract acoustics - singing and speech

Psychology
Staff Contact: Associate Professor Gavan McNally Tel: +61 2 9385 3044 Fax: +61 2 9385 3641 Email: g.mcnally@unsw.edu.au Website: www.psy.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Associative learning Behavioural neuroscience Cognitive science Developmental psychology Forensic psychology Health psychology Language Neuropsychology Organisational psychology Perception Psychological treatments Psychopathology Psychophysiology Social psychology

Materials Science and Engineering


Staff Contact: Professor Charles Sorrell Tel: +61 2 9385 4421 Fax: +61 2 9385 5956 Email: c.sorrell@unsw.edu.au Website: www.materials.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Biomaterials Ceramics coal in sustainable development Composites Electronic and superconducting ceramics Fracture, failure and wear High-temperature materials Iron, steel and alloy processes Nanotechnology Nanomaterials hydrogen storage group Particle science and technology Photocatalytic materials and physical metallurgy Polymers Property optimisation by texture control Pyrometallurgical processes Sustainable processing of materials

Physics
Staff Contact: Professor Michael Ashley Tel: +61 2 9385 5465 Fax: +61 2 9385 6060 Email: m.ashley@unsw.edu.au Website: www.phys.unsw.edu.au Research Areas Acoustics of brass and woodwind instruments Astronomy and astrophysics Astrobiology Astronomy from Antarctica Atomic electronics Atomic theory Atomic and nuclear clocks Biophysics Brown dwarfs and free-floating planets Cellular mechanisms of salt tolerance Condensed matter physics Collaborative projects between the School of Physics and the School of Music and Music Education Electronic devices based on semiconductor nanowires Extrasolar planetary science High speed quantum devices High-temperature superconductivity Isotope shifts- quantum electrodynamic effects and relativistic effects in many-electron atoms Lyapunov modes and correlation time scales Massive star formation Musical acoustics Nuclear theory Optoelectronics Plant membrane biophysics Planetary atmospheres Quantum computing Quantum properties of black holes Semiconductor nanostructures Strongly correlated electron systems

Optometry and Vision Science


Staff Contact: Dr Blanka Golebiowski Tel: +61 2 9385 4502 Fax: +61 2 9313 6243 Email: b.golebiowski@unsw.edu.au Website: www.optom.unsw.edu.au The Schools multidisciplinary approach to research is one of its key strengths. The School is regarded internationally for strengths in contact lens, anterior segment and vision science research. Staff members are internationally recognised as being at the forefront of contact lens research, including the development and commercialisation of research in this area The School has a unique position as it is co-located with a varied range of eye research and education institutes including the Brien Holden Vision Institute, International Centre for Eyecare Education, International Association for Contact Lenses Educators, Optometric Vision Research Foundation and the Cooperative Research Centre for Vision.

Caroline Moul, United Kingdom Doctor of Philosophy in Psychology Caroline studied natural sciences as an undergraduate at Cambridge University before working as a research assistant in the areas of criminology and psychiatry. Caroline moved to Sydney in July 2009 to begin a PhD in clinical child psychology. She investigates the psychophysiology of children with emotional and behavioural problems, specifically the biological causes and correlates of severe antisocial and hard-to-manage behaviour in young children. In the short time that Caroline has been a PhD student at UNSW she has found the department to foster a very friendly and supportive environment which actively encourages excellence through the provision of first-rate facilities, opportunities to develop skills and dedicated supervision.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

133

English language requirements

All applicants for admission to UNSW programs, either in Australia or overseas, whose first language is not English must provide evidence that their English language ability meets the requirements for admission. The required evidence may take the form of results from an acceptable English language test undertaken no more than two years prior to the commencement of the program at UNSW. Alternatively, applicants whose first language is not English but who have undertaken at least one year of full-time academic study at a university or other post-secondary or approved secondary educational institutions where the sole language of instruction and examination was English may not be required to undertake a language test if they can provide a statement or certificate issued by the Registrars office of that institution confirming this. This study must have been undertaken no more than two years prior to the commencement of the program at UNSW. Medium of English instruction cases are reviewed carefully and do not automatically meet UNSW English language proficiency requirements. All candidates who provide an English test score which does not meet the Universitys minimum requirement or who do not provide evidence of English language proficiency will be assessed for admission and, if they meet the academic entry requirements, will be issued with a Conditional Offer of admission. After the English language requirement has been met a Full Offer of admission will be issued for the next available semester. Similarly, applicants who meet the academic entry requirements for the University may apply for a Conditional Package Offer. A Conditional Package Offer enables candidates to apply for a student visa for the duration of their English language program and UNSW studies. All university applicants are obliged to meet separate minimum language proficiency requirements set by the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship when applying for a student visa. www.immi.gov.au/students

Accepted tests of English proficiency

International English Language Testing System (IELTS) The academic test modules must be undertaken. For most UNSW programs, an overall minimum score of 6.5 is required together with a minimum score of 6.0 in each of the sub-tests of listening, reading, speaking and writing. UNSW Institute of Languages is an official IELTS test centre. www.languages.unsw.edu.au/testing/IELTS.html www.ielts.org Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) (UNSW ETS Institution Code is 0890) Internet-based test: Applicants must achieve an overall minimum score of 90 with a minimum in writing of 24. Paper-based test: Applicants must achieve an overall minimum score of 577 with a minimum score of 5.0 in the TWE (Test of Written English). The paper-based test must include the TWE. UNSW Institute of Languages is an official TOEFL test centre. www.languages.unsw.edu.au/testing/TOEFL.html www.ets.org/toefl University English Entry Course (UEEC) UEEC is an intensive English language course conducted at the UNSW Institute of Languages. The minimum acceptable score is completion of the UEEC with a grade of C+ (grade point 7.0) and with a minimum score of at least 20 in the writing component. Some UNSW programs require a higher grade. www.languages.unsw.edu.au/engforuniversity/ueec.html Other qualifications In addition to the English language proficiency tests and prior study outlined above, UNSW also accepts a number of academic qualifications as meeting the English language requirements. Information about these qualifications and the full English language requirement policy can be found at: www.unsw.edu.au/futureStudents/undergrad/sad/engregpolicy.html

134

www.international.unsw.edu.au

UNSW Institute of Languages


UNSW Institute of Languages Course Fees
Course Fees Per 5 weeks Term 2011 ** (A$) $220 $2,175 $4,350 4 Jan - 4 Feb 2011 Dates 2012 Dates 3 Jan - 3 Feb Enrolment fee Per 10 weeks Term 1 Term 2 Term 3* Term 4* Term 5 Term 7 Term 6* Term 8* Term 9* Term 10

7 Feb - 11 Mar 2 May - 3 Jun 6 Jun - 8 Jul

14 Mar - 15 Apr

6 Feb - 9 Mar

12 Mar - 13 Apr

16 Apr - 18 May 2 Jul - 3 Aug

18 Jul - 19 Aug

21 May - 22 Jun 6 Aug - 7 Sep

22 Aug - 23 Sep 10 Oct - 11 Nov not available 14 Nov - 16 Dec

10 Sep - 12 Oct 15 Oct - 16 Nov 19 Nov - 21 Dec

* UECC course available, ** 2012 fees may change.

Quality English language preparation courses

The UNSW Institute of Languages offers courses that provide firstclass preparation for study at UNSW through its English for Academic Purposes Programs. Courses are specifically designed to improve students English language skills in order to meet the UNSW English entry requirements and to enable them to successfully undertake their studies at UNSW. Courses at the UNSW Institute of Languages include: The University English Entry Course (UEEC) - developed for students who have received a Conditional Offer of admission from UNSW provided that UNSW English entry requirements are met. UEEC classes are based on lectures and articles sourced from UNSW academics. The course is further enhanced through the use of online learning and teaching activities. Students are continuously assessed throughout the course with regular feedback provided on their progress. Students who successfully pass this course are not required to sit a further external English proficiency test and will be admitted directly to UNSW. Overall, the UEEC provides the ideal introduction and preparation for study at UNSW. The Tertiary Orientation Program (TOP) - aimed at students who have received a Full Offer of admission from UNSW but wish to enhance their English language ability for academic studies at UNSW. The course also enables students to develop study skills, critical thinking, and advanced reading and discussion skills. The Pre-Foundation Year English Course (PFY) - designed for students seeking to enter the UNSW Foundation Studies programs. In this course students learn language and study skills through integrated lessons which feature speaking and pronunciation, grammar, academic reading and writing. In addition, the Institute provides a range of General English and Professional English courses including English for Business Communication and English for Law. The Institute is also an authorised test centre for the IELTS and TOEFL tests.

When to apply

There is no fixed application deadline. However, as the demand for the Institutes programs is very high, we suggest you apply at least three months before the date you intend to start your language studies. As a general guide, 10 weeks language study is required to increase an IELTS score by 0.5 of a band point and a TOEFL score by about 25 points. If, for example, you have an overall IELTS score of 5.5 and you require 6.5 to gain entry into UNSW then you may need between 20 to 30 weeks of English study. The Institute of Languages can recommend the appropriate course length based on a recent IELTS score or from a placement test on the first day of term. Please refer to page 149 for an application form.

Packaged visas

The Institutes courses and UNSW degrees can be packaged into a single visa covering the entire period of study. Students requiring English language studies should apply to UNSW and the Institute of Languages. On successful admission, students can obtain one visa for the entire duration of their studies.

More information

Further information may be obtained from: UNSW Global Student Services 223 Anzac Parade Kensington UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia T: +61 2 9385 5396 F: +61 2 9662 2651 E: admissions@unswglobal.unsw.edu.au W: www.languages.unsw.edu.au

Facilities and services

The Institutes Library Support Unit provides leading-edge facilities for independent learning and can be used by students both inside and outside classroom hours. The Institutes on-campus location also allows students to have access to cafes offering international cuisine, internet access and resources including UNSW libraries, sporting services (UNSW Fitness and Aquatic Centre and a variety of sports clubs) and support services (Arc, University Health Service). Welfare and further studies counselling services available to students include accommodation service, airport pickup and social activities and excursions.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

135

What do I need to know?

Student Development International

Services for international students Student Development International (SDI) at UNSW assists international students to discover the academic and cultural rewards of studying in Australia through the provision of a wide range of programs and services. To assist new students on their arrival at Sydney International Airport, an International Student reception desk is available for general information and directions. This service operates for five weeks before the commencement of each semester. Just before the start of each semester, a comprehensive orientation program, StepUp, is provided for new students. StepUp is a free of charge, three-day intensive program which covers topics such as teaching and learning in Australia, cultural transition, time management and career planning. In addition, a series of workshops discussing a range of issues affecting international students is offered during Orientation Week. Other programs and services offered by Student Development International include: Individual consultations with an International Student Adviser International student lounge Language programs Peer mentoring Social activities Transition programs Workshops Visiting Address Ground Floor, Goodsell Building, UNSW Kensington campus Postal Address Student Development International University of New South Wales Sydney NSW 2052 Australia T: +61 2 9385 5333 F: +61 2 9385 6369 E: international.student@unsw.edu.au W: www.internationalstudent.unsw.edu.au

Visas, spouses and children

Student visas All international students must obtain a valid student visa from the Australian Government for the duration of their degree program. Visa application procedure, visa types and requirements are determined and governed by the Australian Department of Immigration and Citizenship. www.immi.gov.au/students Studying at UNSW as an Australian permanent resident If you obtain Australian permanent residency before enrolling in the program or prior to the census date of the semester of first enrolment in that program, your offer of enrolment as an international student will lapse. You will then be considered for admission as a local student. If you are granted Australian permanent resident status after the census date of your first semester of enrolment or after the census date of any subsequent semester, you will have an obligation to pay international fees for that semester. In the following semester your status will change to that of a local student and you will be assessed for both a Commonwealth Supported Place (CSP) and a domestic fee-paying place. Because of government controls on the number of local students who can be enrolled, students who obtain permanent residency may not qualify for a CSP. Students undertaking summer semester course/s will be liable for international tuition fees unless granted permanent residency prior to the census date of the course/s. In accordance with UNSW standard teaching periods, students may be assessed for a CSP under the above guidelines. Note: In order to be considered as a local student for any given semester/ teaching period, evidence must be presented to the University prior to the census date for the given enrolment (refer to UNSW Fee Policy). Students who provide proof of residency after the census date will remain liable for the international tuition rate for that semester, regardless of when the residency was granted. Entry of spouse and dependants Students who wish to bring their spouse and children must provide evidence that they have sufficient funds to support them while they are in Australia. A dependent spouse can obtain permission to work but obtaining employment can be difficult. It is not advisable to plan your income on the basis of a spouse obtaining work. A student may need to budget an additional minimum of A$8,000 a year for living expenses for a spouse and up to A$3,400 a year for each child (not including schooling costs).

136

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Schooling for dependent children The current policy of the New South Wales Department of Education and Training is that dependent children of international students, with the exception of those studying a PhD or on full scholarships funded by the Australian Government or a publicly funded Australian higher education institution, are required to pay the Temporary Resident Administration and Education Fee. Fees to enrol in a government school for 2011 are A$4,500 per year for kindergarten to Year 6, A$4,500 per year for Year 7 to Year 10 high school students and A$5,500 per year for Year 11 and Year 12 high school students. An application fee of A$110 applies. Confirmation of Enrolment forms are required for dependent children to enter Australia. Applications for schools and visas will need to be planned well in advance of leaving your home country. Note: Some PhD students are not eligible for the school tuition fee waiver. Please check the Department of Education and Training website for more information. www.detinternational.nsw.edu.au/schools/study_options/temporary_ residents/temporary_residents.htm Childcare If you plan to come to Australia with babies or small children, it is important to consider the availability and cost of childcare. Attitudes, facilities and costs of child-minding are probably different compared to those in your home country. Full-time care is difficult to find, especially for children under three years of age, and costs approximately A$68 to $87 a day. There are four childcare centres on the Kensington campus including Honeypot, House at Pooh Corner, Kangas House and Tiggers Place. There is a long waiting list for places for younger children and it is recommended that you apply early for a place at a UNSW childcare centre. www.earlyyears.unsw.edu.au

You must pay for OSHC before being issued with a student visa or, in the case of continuing students, before being granted a further Temporary Entry Permit. For OSHC Worldcare, the cost of OSHC in your first year of study will be approximately A$420 for single cover and A$840 for family cover. Note: Membership of health insurance schemes in your home country does not exempt you from paying the OSHC. Medical treatment The Australian Government sets a recommended schedule fee for medical services but some doctors charge above this amount. OSHC Worldcares scheme covers 100% of the Medicare Benefits Schedule (MBS) fee for a visit to your doctor (outside hospital). For medical services while you are an inpatient at a hospital (when you stay overnight in the hospital) OSHC Worldcare will pay 100% of the MBS fee. In both situations, if your doctor charges above the MBS you must pay the difference. Hospital treatment UNSWs preferred provider, OSHC Worldcare, pays 100% of the rate determined by Medicare for services charged to a patient in a shared ward in any public hospital. The scheme will pay 100% of the insurable costs of medical and hospital services while you are an inpatient at a contracted private hospital (minimum shared accommodation). If a private hospital or doctor charges above the insurable costs, you will have to pay the difference. OSHC Worldcare covers 100% of the rate determined by Medicare for services charged to a patient if you receive treatment as an outpatient of a public hospital. The scheme also provides cover for the cost of ambulance transport if medically necessary for admission to hospital or for emergency treatment. Exclusions Students with pre-existing conditions will need to serve a 12-month waiting period for treatment under OSHC Worldcares scheme. As with any health insurance, certain services are currently not covered by OSHC Worldcares policies. These include optical, physiotherapy, dental and pharmaceutical. If you wish to be covered for these expenses, you need to have additional insurance. For a full list of conditions and further information check with OSHC Worldcare. www.oshcworldcare.com.au University Health Service The University Health Service provides general medical and dental services to students and staff of UNSW at the Kensington campus. You must make an appointment to meet with a doctor or dentist and services are available between 8:30am to 5:30pm on Mondays to Thursdays and 8:30am to 5pm on Fridays.

Health care in Australia

Standards of health care in Australia are high. At UNSW, medical, dental and physiotherapy services are available on campus. There are also many medical practices in the suburbs surrounding the University. Public and private hospitals are also located nearby. Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) The Australian Government requires that all international students with student visas pay for health insurance in Australia through the Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) scheme and maintain insurance for the full duration of their student visa. The only exceptions to this requirement are for students from Belgium, Norway and Sweden (covered by CSN or Kammarkollegiet only), who are not required to pay for OSHC if they can provide proof of official health insurance cover from their home government provider. New students must purchase OSHC cover for the length of their student visa. The OSHC Worldcare fees are listed on the offer of admission letter. There are four registered providers of OSHC and UNSWs preferred provider is OSHC Worldcare (www.oshcworldcare.com.au). If you decide to purchase your OSHC from the Universitys preferred provider, you can arrange it yourself or through the University when paying your tuition fee deposit. If you ask the University to arrange it for you, we will receive a commission which is used to improve services to students. If you decide to purchase your OSHC from one of the other providers, you will not be disadvantaged but you must arrange it directly with the provider yourself. The other OSHC providers are BUPA Australia Health, Medibank Private and Australian Health Management. Further information about other OSHC providers is available from the Australian Department of Health and Ageing website. www.health.gov.au/internet/main/Publishing.nsf/Content/Overseas+Stud ent+Health+Cover+FAQ-1

www.international.unsw.edu.au

137

Daily life
Moving to a new country can be a daunting experience. On this page you will find practical information about living in Sydney on a daily basis.

Living expenses

The University estimates that in 2012 a single international student will require approximately A$20,000 per year to cover living expenses. The amount spent depends on requirements, budget and accommodation. These estimates do not include the costs of large non-essential items such as electrical equipment or a car. In addition, new students should have at least A$2,000 when they arrive in Sydney to cover initial establishment expenses such as rental bond payment (security deposit); electricity, gas and telephone connection fees; and to purchase basic furniture and household items. Note: All costs quoted are subject to inflation and currency fluctuations. The current inflation rate in Australia is approximately 2.5-3.5% per year.

Clothing

Warm clothes such as jackets and jeans are necessary in Sydney during the winter months as night temperatures can drop to less than 10 degrees celsius. Simple, casual clothing is standard dress on campus. In summer months, light clothes such as t-shirts are recommended.

Public transport

Summer vacation expenses

The summer vacation time (December to February) requires special financial planning. Expenses for this period must be carefully estimated and added to costs for the academic year in order to give a realistic total budget for the calendar year.

UNSW is well served by modern public buses. Many students travel to UNSW by regular bus services and there are dedicated frequent bus services from Sydneys main train station, Central Railway Station. An extensive train system, approximately 15 minutes by bus from the University, can take you throughout much of the Sydney metropolitan area, NSW country and interstate. Regular and express bus services connect UNSW with all the major transport hubs including Central Railway Station, Bondi Junction and with the Harbour Ferry services operating from Circular Quay. Unfortunately, international students in the state of New South Wales are not eligible for state-determined travel concessions as at June 2011. www.131500.com.au

Part-time and vacation work

Under immigration regulations, international students are allowed to work up to 20 hours per week during semester and full time during university vacations. Students are not permitted to work until they have commenced their studies. While some students are able to earn extra money from part-time and vacation work, availability of suitable jobs is not guaranteed. It is not advisable to plan your study budget expecting to find work for the maximum allowable hours. There are many ways to find casual and part-time work such as through local newspapers, friends, and the University Careers and Employment Office. www.careers.unsw.edu.au

Religion

Australia is a secular state. People have freedom of religion and worship. While the main religion is Christianity, there are also large communities which follow Islam, Buddhism, Judaism, Taoism and Hinduism. A Religious Centre is located on the Kensington campus and is available for all students and staff. The Religious Centre is currently attended by Anglican, Buddhist, Catholic, Coptic and Greek Orthodox, Pentecostal, Presbyterian and Uniting Church Chaplains. Chaplains conduct worship services, lead Bible studies, hold prayer meetings, and offer spiritual counselling. There is also a Jewish Chaplain on campus. The Islamic Society has an Imam in attendance with meeting and prayer rooms available for Muslim students. Other religious societies on campus include the Coptic Society, Bahai Society, Catholic Asian Students Association, Chinese Christian Fellowship and the Pragathi Hindu Society. http://studentlife.unsw.edu.au/life/religious-centre

Books, stationery and equipment

Do not rush into buying textbooks. It is advisable to wait until your first lectures and tutorials and then ask academic staff which are the essential purchases. The UNSW Bookshop is located on campus. Second hand textbooks are available from the Second Hand Bookshop at the Blockhouse and are also advertised on notice boards around the campus. Arc, the Universitys student organisation, operates a number of outlets on campus which provide stationery items and other essential student equipment at reasonable prices. www.bookshop.unsw.edu.au

Food and shopping

Banking and postal facilities

There are two banks (the Commonwealth Bank and the ANZ Bank) and a credit union (Unicom Credit Union) on the Kensington campus with full banking facilities. Automated teller machines (ATMs) are available at all hours. The banks and credit union have full financial services including telegraphic transfer of funds from any major bank in the world, within 24 hours of deposit. Postal services are available at the Kensington upper campus Post Office.

Sydney is renowned for the variety and quality of its food. In the suburbs surrounding the University, there are many reasonably priced, good quality restaurants, cafs and shops selling food from all around the world. Halal meat is available at butcher shops near the University. On campus, there are a range of cafs and take-away food outlets. There is bound to be an eatery on campus that will satisfy your taste whether it is sushi and miso, croissants and coffee, vegetarian food, or laksa and noodles! You can find food, clothing, pharmaceuticals, books and stationery in the shops on campus or in the shopping areas around the campuses. www.facilities.unsw.edu.au/Maps/pdf/Kensington_Retail_Outlets.pdf

138

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Student organisations and sport and recreation

Arc@UNSW

Arc is your student organisation on campus. Whether you are in your first or last year or just studying for a semester, Arc has something for you. Your student experience at UNSW extends beyond obtaining a university degree it is also about making new friends, trying new things and having fun. Arc helps you get involved and take advantage of the opportunities available only at a university like UNSW. Arc is run by an elected board made up of student representatives, alumni and UNSW employees. Arc exists solely to provide services to its members. Every student who enrols at UNSW has the opportunity to become a member of Arc and to take advantage of the benefits Arc provides. Student resources, events and activities provided by Arc include: Student representation on issues including those affecting women, international students, indigenous students and the environment Events such as Orientation Week, Oktoberfest, International Festival and Artsweek Activities such as volunteer programs and student clubs to join Venues such as the Roundhouse which hosts weekly events and activities including trivia, bands and cheap meals and drinks Facilities such as the Postgraduate Lounge, music rooms, Kudos Art Gallery, computer and training rooms, rehearsal rooms and other such spaces Student support services such as a solicitor and advocates Free publications such as the student newspaper Tharunka, the weekly Whats On magazine Blitz and a student diary

UNSW Fitness and Aquatic Centre

At UNSW there is a range of health, fitness, sporting and recreational facilities and programs available to help make your stay in Australia fun and healthy. UNSW Sport and Recreation offers a variety of facilities and programs including an indoor 50-metre swimming pool, a fully equipped strength and fitness gym with the latest cardio training equipment, and up to 60 different fitness classes per week ranging from relaxed yoga to highimpact body attack. All programs are provided on a fee for service basis, but at affordable student rates. If sport is of more interest to you, there are squash courts, volleyball courts, basketball courts, and a multi-purpose soft floor for martial arts. Outdoor facilities include tennis courts, a synthetic hockey field, a rowing clubhouse and extensive playing fields for a variety of outdoor sports like soccer, cricket, rugby union, hockey, Australian rules football, baseball and softball. You can join one of the 31 UNSW sporting clubs this is a great way to meet new people from across the University, as the clubs provide a great social calendar. Most clubs are student run and provide for all levels of skill, with coaching available for beginners in most sports. The clubs offer regular competitive opportunities, social sport or more recreational activities like waterskiing, surfing or scuba diving. UNSW Sport and Recreation also offers a range of social sport competitions. UNSW is an elite athlete friendly university. Students can be selected to represent the University at national and international university sporting events. The major national event is the Australian University Games held in late September with over 5,000 students from around Australia competing in 28 different sports. For more information on health and fitness opportunities for students and details on club and University sport visit: www.sportandrec.unsw.edu.au

Arc is located in the Blockhouse at the Kensington campus. www.arc.unsw.edu.au

The world on campus

There are many international student associations on campus. These groups provide a range of recreational and cultural activities as well as providing social support to students away from their family and friends. Some of these student associations include: Anjali Tamil Society, Chinese Student Association, Filipino Student Society of UNSW, Hellenic Society, Hong Kong Students Society, Indonesian Student Association, Iranian Student Association, Italian Society, Korean Students Association, Malaysian Student Organisation, Nippon Students Association, Pacifika Student Association, Scandinavian Society, Serbian Society, Singapore Students Association, Spanish and Latin American Students Association, Sri Lankan Students Association (Serendib), Taiwanese Students Association, Taj Indian Society, Thai Students Association, UNSW United Nations Society, Vietnamese Student Association. www.arc.unsw.edu.au/club-List-55.aspx

ELITE ATHLETE FRIENDLY UNIVERSITY


STATE INSTITUTES AND ACADEMIES OF SPORT PARTICIPATING PROFESSIONAL PLAYERS ASSOCIATIONS
SP 32023

www.international.unsw.edu.au

139

A place to live
While studying at UNSW, you can choose to live in university accommodation (on and off campus) or in private accommodation options (such as shared houses or apartments, full board, homestay and room facilities).

As an international student, there are several long-term accommodation options available to you, including UNSW accommodation options (UNSW residential college or university self-catered apartments) and independent accommodation options (private rental accommodation, full board, Homestay or room and facilities). UNSW strongly recommends that students live in university accommodation in their first year to fully experience the benefits of living on or close to campus. These include security, opportunities to make friends, easy access to university facilities and the convenience of moving straight into fully furnished accommodation. However, university accommodation fills up very quickly, so it is best to apply as early as possible.

Independent accommodation options


Rental property Rental properties are available in suburbs around the University. Rents vary according to the number of bedrooms, condition and location of the flat/apartment or house. Electricity, gas and telephone costs are additional. When renting a flat/apartment or house it is usual to sign a sixmonth lease and pay rent in advance plus a refundable security deposit, called a bond. Houses and flats/apartments are usually unfurnished. It is important to make allowances for establishment costs including the purchase of furniture and equipment. See the Living Expenses section of this guide on page 138 for further details. Sharing a house or flat/apartment will reduce the cost. Usually, students have their own room and share the cost of rent and other expenses such as bond, electricity, gas, telephone with the other people living in the household. Buying food and cooking is done either individually or on a group basis. Per-person rent in a shared household can vary from A$140 to A$220 per week plus establishment costs. Accommodation may be cheaper in some suburbs further away from the Kensington campus, but you need to consider travel time and transport costs. Full board Full board comprises a furnished room and use of facilities in a private home, usually living with a family or single person, with dinner and breakfast provided. Some may include bed linen, laundry service and weekly room cleaning. The UNSW Accommodation Services Office has a limited number of full board places listed with its off-campus listing service. Cost for full board is approximately between A$200 to A$280 per week. Homestay Homestay can be used as temporary accommodation on arrival, allowing time to settle in and look for long-term accommodation, or as a longterm accommodation option. Contracts are usually on a monthly basis. Though the UNSW Accommodation Services Office does not arrange Homestays, it does recommend a few Homestay networks. These are private companies that operate independently of the University. They usually charge a placement fee of A$150. Room and facilities Room and facilities is similar to Homestay, however, meals are not provided and you will be responsible for buying your own food, doing your own cooking, cleaning your room and doing your washing. Use of the telephone in the home is an extra cost but expenses such as gas and electricity are usually included in the rent. Average cost is between A$140 to A$220 per week.

How to find accommodation

UNSW accommodation includes eight residential colleges and independent self-catered apartments. See page 141 for more information about these options. For application forms and detailed information on accommodation options visit the UNSW Housing website. If on-campus accommodation is not available, Student Development International (SDI), which operates the International Student Housing Assistance (ISHA), can help you find suitable accommodation. It is best to arrive three to four weeks before classes start to allow sufficient time to look for accommodation, settle in and attend the orientation sessions. The UNSW Accommodation Services Office is also able to assist with off-campus housing needs. UNSW Accommodation Services manages the Listing Service which enables students to access local private rental accommodation. The Listing Service advertises vacancies for shared housing, full board, room and facilities, and some rental flats/apartments in suburbs surrounding the University. It also provides lists of local real estate agents, hotels, motels and hostels. If you require temporary accommodation for the first few days or weeks of living in Sydney, it is best to organise this before arriving in Australia. Temporary accommodation can include private hotels, motels, hostels, lodges and furnished apartments ranging from A$45 to A$300 per day. www.housing.unsw.edu.au www.internationalstudent.unsw.edu.au/student_services/isha.html

140

www.international.unsw.edu.au

University accommodation options


Residential Colleges UNSW residential colleges provide full board accommodation for UNSW students, which includes the provision of meals and a regular cleaning service in addition to academic and pastoral support. There are eight residences on or near the Kensington campus. Each college offers a distinctive environment which varies from college to college, as do facilities and fees. In addition to basic residence fees of about A$245 to A$465 a week, most colleges have additional charges
College Kensington Colleges www.kensingtoncolleges.unsw.edu.au The Kensington Colleges comprise Basser, Goldstein and Philip Baxter Colleges. Each College accommodates both men and women, with all meals provided in the Colleges Dining Hall throughout the academic year. Creston College - www.crestoncollege.edu.au Creston College provides pleasant, secure accommodation for female students of all backgrounds and beliefs. The spiritual care of the college is entrusted to Opus Dei, a personal prelature of the Catholic Church. International House - www.ihunsw.edu.au International House is a multicultural college for more than 166 senior undergraduate and postgraduate residents from over 80 countries, including Australia. New College - www.newcollege.unsw.edu.au New College is an Anglican College but admission is not on the basis of religion, race or sex. The College sponsors a wide range of academic, cultural, sporting and social activities. Shalom College www.shalomcollege.unsw.edu.au Shalom College is an independent, multicultural residential college open to all men and women, regardless of religion, race or nationality. It was established by Sydneys Jewish community. Warrane College - www.warrane.unsw.edu.au Warrane College offers accommodation for male students of all ages, backgrounds and beliefs. The spiritual care of the college is entrusted to Opus Dei, a personal prelature of the Catholic Church. Rent (A$ Per Person Per Week for 2011) $375 Who can live here? Full-time UNSW students

for such items as registration fees, damage deposit and power charges. College accommodation is limited and there are always waiting lists. Each college has its own admissions process and selection criteria and applications must be made to each college independently, preferably three to four months before starting at UNSW. For more information, please visit the individual college websites.

Furniture in Bedroom Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair, desk lamp

Meals/Kitchen Facilities Meals included, kitchenette available

Facilities Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection included in fees

Student Services Resident academic staff provide both academic and personal support for a broad range of academic disciplines Tutors, residential advisors, chapel

$330 - $352

Women who are full-time students of UNSW. Preference is given to first year students Full-time UNSW students, except first year undergraduates Full-time UNSW students

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair, desk lamp

Meals included, kitchenette available

Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection included in fees Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection included in fees Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection included in fees Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer internet connection included in fees

$245 - $260

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair, desk lamp

Meals included, kitchenette available

Alumni Connect and mentoring program

$369 - $465

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair, desk lamp

Meals included, kitchenette available

Tutors, residential advisors

$385 - $465

Full-time or part-time UNSW students and students from its associated institutions

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair, desk lamp

Meals included, kitchenette available

Tutors

$362 - $420

Male UNSW students

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair, desk lamp

Meals included, kitchenette available

Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection included in fees, library, study rooms

Tutors, residential advisors, chapel

Self-Catered Apartments UNSW provides independent, apartment-style accommodation for a range of student requirements, including undergraduates, postgraduates, couples and families with children. Some apartments require tenants to share responsibility for meeting utilities costs, while others, such as UNSW Village, include utilities in the weekly rent. The popular student apartments are located both on and close
Self-Catered Apartments Barker Apartments - www.asc.unsw.edu.au The Barker Apartments are on the Kensington campus - mostly five-bedroom furnished units. A number of smaller units are available for family groups, and there are some units with wheelchair access. Rent (A$ Per Person Per Week for 2011) $193 for room in five- bedroom apartment to $450 for large room in two-bedroom apartment plus establishment costs of approximately $850 $1,800 (four weeks rent and bond - refundable on leaving, plus household items) Who can live here? All UNSW students

to campus. In comparison with rental charges for local apartments in the private sector, the rents for the university apartments are very competitive. Application details and more information are available on the UNSW Housing website: www.housing.unsw.edu.au

Furniture in Bedroom Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair

Meals/Kitchen Facilities Stove top, oven, refrigerator

Facilities Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection point available

Student Services No

Mulwaree Apartments - www.asc.unsw.edu.au The Mulwaree Apartments are a 15-minute walk from the Kensington campus. These are furnished, shared apartments each with five single bedrooms. Accommodation is for single students only. 46 High Street Apartments - www.asc.unsw.edu.au Located opposite the University entrance Gate 9, the block of apartments contain 9 two-bedroom apartments and 6 one-bedroom apartments. The block has a secure private car park and all units are fully furnished. UNSW Village - www.unswvillage.com.au Located on the Kensington campus, the Village offers independent student living in modern, fully furnished one to eight-bedroom apartments. All apartments have private bedrooms, large kitchens and spacious lounge areas. New College Village - www.ncv.unsw.edu.au The New College Village provides new, highquality, fully furnished accommodation on lower campus. All bedrooms include a private ensuite. Unilodge - www.unilodge.com.au UniLodge, just five minutes from the Kensington campus, offers a choice of modern fully furnished studio and multi-share serviced apartments with 24-hour security and student support.

$172 for room in five- All UNSW students bedroom apartment plus establishment costs of (four weeks rent and bond - approximately $800 refundable on leaving plus household items) $306 for room in onebedroom apartment to $410 for medium sized room in two-bedroom apartment $232 for a room in fourto-eight bedroom apartment to $321.50 $343.50 for room in one-bedroom apartment $298 for a superior room with private bathroom in multi-share apartments to $335 for small studio with private bathroom $340.35 for room in mulit-share apartment to $437.35 for deluxe studio with private bathroom and balcony All UNSW students

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair

Microwave, stove top, oven, refrigerator

Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer

No

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair

Stove top, oven, refrigerator

Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer

No

All UNSW students

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair

Microwave, stove top, oven, refrigerator

Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection point available Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection point available Common rooms, coin-operated laundry and dryer, internet connection point available

Student support and Resident Assistants to organise social events and activities Resident social committee

Postgraduate students at UNSW and selected undergraduates

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair

Microwave, stove top, oven, refrigerator

All UNSW students

Mattress and bed, wardrobe, desk, chair

Microwave, stove top, oven, refrigerator

Residential committee and on-site manager

www.international.unsw.edu.au

141

Representative offices

Oslo Copenhagen Utrecht London Brussels Paris Munich Lyon Madrid

Vancouver

Tripoli

Monterrey Guadalajara Mexico City Puebla

Valencia Medelln Ibagu Cali Quito Guayaquil Trujillo Lima Arequipa

Caracas Bucaramanga Bogot

La Paz Rio de Janeiro Sao Paulo

Antofagasta

Porto Alegre

Map Notes
UNSW Office UNSW Representative Office

Santiago Concepcin

Mendoza Buenos Aires

Location with UNSW Office and Representative Office

For an up-to-date listing of all officially approved UNSW representatives visit the following website and click on the Overseas Representatives tab: www.international.unsw.edu.au/contact-us/ If an agent claims to represent UNSW but does not appear on this list, to confirm their status please contact internationaloffice@unsw.edu.au

UNSW Offices
UNSW International Office

Australia

Europe

Street Address: Ground Floor, East Wing, Red Centre University of New South Wales Sydney NSW 2052 Postal Address: UNSW International Office University of New South Wales Sydney NSW 2052

UNSW International Coordinator (Europe) T/F: +48 12 444 1470 E: a.wyzykowska@unsw.edu.au

Hong Kong

Suite 2006, 20th Floor The Centrium 60 Wyndham Street Central, Hong Kong

India

415, 4th Floor, Raheja Chamber Free Press Journal Marg, Nariman Point, Mumbai 400021 T: +91 22 2288 3347-50 F: +91 22 2288 3345 E: infoindia@unsw.edu.au www.unswindiaoffice.com

North America

UNSW International Coordinator (North America) T: +1 202 577 9216 E: a.waggener@unsw.edu.au

T: +852 2841 2800 F: +852 2588 1724 E: info@unsw.com.hk www.hongkong.unsw.edu.au

T: +61 2 9385 6996 F: +61 2 9385 9907 E: internationaloffice@unsw.edu.au 142 www.international.unsw.edu.au

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Stockholm

Berlin Essen Krakw Cadca Vienna Harbin Changchun Shenyang Multan Chandigarh Ludhiana Gurgaon Tehran New Delhi Agra Jaipur Kuwait Dubai Sharjah Doha Karachi Abu Dhabi Muscat Vadodra Vallabh Vidya Nagar Ahmedabad Mumbai Pune Beijing Tianjin Taiyuan Dalian Seoul Sapporo

Beirut Cairo Amman Al Khobar Bahrain Riyadh Jeddah

Busan Tokyo Qingdao Osaka Nagoya Shandong Fukuoka Nanjing Xian Hefei Shanghai Islamabad Wuhan Chengdu Hangzhou Nanchang Chongqing Lahore Wenzhou Kathmandu Changsha Thimphu Taipei Xiamen Taichung Guwahati Kunming Kaohsiung Dimapur Patna Dongguan Nanning Dhaka Bhopal Guangzhou Hanoi Kolkata Raipur Shenzhen Chiang Mai Bhubaneswar Zhongshan Danang Vizag Bangkok Khon Kaen Hong Kong Hyderabad Jinan Lanzhou Zhengzhou Chennai Ho Chi Minh City Manila Can Tho Hat Yai Sabah Penang Medan Ipoh Bandar Seri Begawan Johor Bahru Nilai Kuching Kuala Lumpur Batam Subang Jaya Pontianak Balikpapan Singapore Makassar Jakarta Bandung Semarang Surabaya Solo Bali Malang Phnom Penh

Bangalore Coimbatore Kochi Trivandrum

Colombo

Mauritius Noumea Brisbane Perth Adelaide Sydney Auckland Melbourne

Singapore

#13-07 International Plaza 10 Anson Road Singapore 079903 T: +65 6227 8921 F: +65 6220 3026 E: info@unsw.com.sg www.singapore.unsw.edu.au

U Chu Liang Building, 28th Floor 968 Rama IV Road, Silom, Bangrak Bangkok 10500 T: +66 2 632 4477 F: +66 2 632 4479 E: unswbangkok@unswthailandoffice.com www.unswthailandoffice.com

Thailand

Vietnam

Hanoi Office 1, 5th Floor, HAREC Building 4A Lang Ha, Ba Dinh District, Hanoi T: +84 4 377 27 337 F: +84 4 377 27 339 E: info.hn@unsw.edu.vn www.unsw.edu.vn

Ho Chi Minh City 5th Floor, Lucky Star Building 102 Bis Le Lai District 1 Ho Chi Minh City T: +84 8 3925 2679 F: +84 8 3925 6765 E: info.hcmc@unsw.edu.vn www.unsw.edu.vn

www.international.unsw.edu.au

143

Applying to study at UNSW


A step-by-step guide
1. Decide what it is you wish to study - read the details in this guide and visit: www.international.unsw.edu.au If you are a research applicant, you should contact a potential supervisor in your preferred area of research and write a research proposal. For more details, visit http://research.unsw.edu.au/how-apply-postgraduate-research-study-program 2. Check the entry qualifications you need and the structure of the relevant program(s) by viewing Faculty websites and the UNSW Online Handbook at: www.handbook.unsw.edu.au You can also view the Research Student Handbook at: http://research.unsw.edu.au/research-student-publications 3. Apply online at: www.apply.unsw.edu.au Coursework Programs Programs are based on lectures and/or seminars, assignments and/or formal examinations Programs lead to Master degrees, Graduate Diplomas or Graduate Certificates Program duration: - 1 to 2 years for Master programs - 1 to 1.5 years for Graduate Diplomas - 6 months for Graduate Certificates Some Master programs may be a combination of coursework and research Quotas may apply to coursework programs The fee for applying to coursework programs online is A$50, otherwise a fee of A$100 is required if you apply using a paper-based application. You should only use the paper application form in this guide if you do not have access to the internet, and/or do not have access to a credit card. Research Programs Programs are based on undertaking research and preparation of a thesis Some coursework studies may be required Programs lead to the award of PhD, Master by Research or Master of Philosophy Program duration - 3 to 4 years for PhD programs with 3 years as the minimum duration for completion - 1.5 to 2 years for Master by Research programs with 1.5 years as the minimum duration for completion ome Faculties have specific application requirements. For further S information, visit the Graduate Research School website at: http://research.unsw.edu.au/how-apply-postgraduate-research-study-program Applicants for research programs should initially provide all supporting documentation (transcripts, IELTS results, research proposals, testamurs etc) as scanned electronic copies (pdf, word documents etc) to the Graduate Research School by email to international.grs@unsw.edu.au. Please name all email file attachments using the following naming convention: UNSW ID SURNAME, First name document type, for example,1234567 NGUYEN, Minh transcript, 1234567 NGUYEN, Minh research proposal, 1234567 NGUYEN, Minh IELTS result.
4.

For coursework programs, provide certified or original copies of the required documents to the Direct Admissions Office. For research programs, provide initial scanned electronic copies to the Graduate Research School by email to international.grs@unsw.edu.au. Please name all email file attachments using the following naming convention: UNSW ID SURNAME, First name document type, for example 1234567 NGUYEN, Minh transcript, or 1234567 NGUYEN, Minh research proposal. Complete applications usually take four to six weeks to process. Dont forget - an application fee is required so you should use all three preferences on your application. Remember to choose carefully as late subsequent program changes may incur an additional application fee and can delay the resolution of your application. Quotas apply to coursework programs: Once a set number of offers at a Faculty have been issued for a particular semester, any subsequent applications received may be assessed for the next available semester. A quota may be reached before the application deadline. It is advisable to submit your complete application as early as possible and not to leave your application till the deadline. Applications received after the deadline may still be considered in programs where vacancies remain. The University cannot guarantee that applications will be processed in time for the commencement of the desired semester.
5.

An application receipt will be issued - this will contain your student ID number and may also request further documents and information from you.
6.

Application tracking at myUNSW - Once you have your student ID number you can monitor the status of your application online at: www.my.unsw.edu.au
7.

You will be normally informed of the outcome of your application by email, either directed to you or to the UNSW representative office through which you applied (if relevant). Please nominate a valid legible email address that you check regularly and ensure that email filters are set up to allow emails from @unsw.edu.au domains.
8.

Successful applicants wishing to accept the offer should follow the instructions in the offer letter. The preferred acceptance method is to accept online at myUNSW.
9.

Upon receipt of your acceptance, an electronic confirmation of enrolment (eCoE) will be issued to you; you will need this to apply for a student visa.
10.

Before the start of semester you will receive a pre-departure information pack, including information about enrolment.

Calendar of Dates for 2012


Semester 1 Applications due Orientation dates Semester dates End of October 20 Feb 24 Feb 27 Feb 25 June Semester 2 End of April 11 July 13 July 18 July 13 Nov

Note: The application processes in this guide are not to be used to apply for graduate study programs at UNSW@ADFA (Australian Defence Force Academy). Information on UNSW@ADFA closing dates and the application process can be viewed at http://sas.unsw.adfa.edu.au/future_students/pg_coursework/index.html You should contact UNSW@ADFA (sas@adfa.edu.au) for application advice and requirements.

144

www.international.unsw.edu.au

11.

Follow the enrolment instructions to complete enrolment online. Online enrolment usually starts one to two months before the start of semester. Note: This option may not be available for research applicants. Research applicants will receive email advice from the Graduate Research School prior to the start of semester regarding contacting the relevant School directly for enrolment purposes.
12.

Other things to consider


Am I an international student? If you have Australian or New Zealand citizenship or have full Permanent Residence status of Australia then you must apply as a domestic student. If you gain permanent residence status after applying but before you start your studies (in the case of research students, before census date), then you must inform the Direct Admissions Office/Graduate Research School and provide proof of this change. What if I am going to be sponsored? Students who will have their tuition and other associated fees paid by a UNSW approved sponsor do not need to pay the normal acceptance deposit provided they provide evidence of that arrangement and complete the International Sponsored Student Agreement form. This information should be supplied at the time of application. Further information can be viewed at: www.international.unsw.edu.au/courses-applying/sponsored/ Can I defer the start date of my studies? It is possible to defer the start of your studies. All deferment requests should be made online at myUNSW before the start of the commencing semester at: www.my.unsw.edu.au If approved you will be sent a new offer letter for the deferred period. In the instance that the quota has been filled for the semester you wish to defer to, your deferral will be considered for the next available semester. Note: Apart from research scholarships which may not be deferred, all other research applicants must have confirmation from the Faculty that appropriate supervision and resources will be available in the next semester to be able to defer their studies. Applying for a student visa? Applying for a student visa can be quite a lengthy and complex process. There can be extended visa processing times for students from particular countries, and this includes the need to present an acceptable IELTS/TOEFL (or other acceptable) test score irrespective of how UNSW views your English language proficiency. Unless applying through a (UNSW) Department of Immigration and Citizenship approved e-visa agent, students should not accept offers for admission until they are in a position to provide evidence of successful pre-visa assessment. Plan ahead and make sure you have plenty of time. Refer to the Australian Government websites for more details about visa matters: www.immi.gov.au and www.studyinaustralia.gov.au What if I have a disability? If you have a disability or pre-existing medical condition that is likely to disadvantage you during your university studies, you are advised to contact the Student Equity and Disabilities Unit. Any information you supply is confidential and will not be taken into account when determining admission. Service provision is based on Australian standards and may not be the same as you receive at your home institution. For more information, visit: www.studentequity.unsw.edu.au

For coursework students, orientation will normally take place in the week prior to the semester commencement date. Postgraduate research student induction events will take place in April or September each year for all new postgraduate research students commencing in Semester 1 or Semester 2 respectively.

Contacts at UNSW after you submit your application

Please quote your student ID number in all correspondence. For undergraduate and postgraduate coursework programs The Direct Admissions Office Email: direct.admissions@unsw.edu.au Tel: +61 2 9385 3656 Fax: +61 2 9662 1049 For research programs (except ADFA admission applications) Graduate Research School Tel: +61 2 9385 5500 Email: international.grs@unsw.edu.au For UNSW@ADFA research program admission applications UNSW@ADFA Tel: + 61 2 6268 6000 Email: sas@adfa.edu.au Please note: Admission to programs at UNSW is competitive. This application is not an enrolment form, nor does it guarantee admission. There are two different application processes: Coursework Programs and Research Programs. Please remember: Your application cannot be considered unless all essential attachments are included: The application fee (non-refundable) of A$100 payable to The University of New South Wales by bankdraft or cheque. If you apply online (all research program applicants must apply online) the application fee is only A$50. Original or certified copies of all academic documents (completed or incomplete) and their official English translations. Self-translated documents are not accepted and are considered fraudulent. Copy of the grading or marking system used by the institution attended. Original English test certificates, if applicable. Additional documents required specifically for some programs, for example curriculum vitae, evidence of work experience, statement of study. Refer to the entry requirements of the Coursework Programs Summary Table of this guide for more details or if you are a research applicant visit: http://research.unsw.edu.au/how-apply-postgraduate-research-study-program

www.international.unsw.edu.au

145

Scholarships
UNSW offers a wide range of scholarships for international students undertaking postgraduate programs, mainly for students commencing a postgraduate research degree. Scholarships range from annual stipends, living allowances and tuition fee costs to travel scholarships and supplements. The table below provides information on some of the Australian Government and University funded scholarships available. UNSW Faculties, Schools, Donors and Researchers may offer disciplinespecific scholarships for postgraduate study for which international students are eligible. Information on these scholarships can be found
Scholarship UNSW INTERNATIONAL RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIPS Only one application is required to be considered for a UNSW International Research Scholarship. All applications for these scholarships will be considered each round using a competitive merit based ranking procedure. International Postgraduate Research Scholarship (IPRS) Study Level/Requirement Masters by Research or PhD Awarded for academic excellence Funded by the Australian Government and UNSW

on the UNSW Scholarships website for coursework programs (www.scholarships.unsw.edu.au) and the Postgraduate Research Scholarships website for research programs (http://research.unsw.edu. au/postgraduate-research-scholarships). These websites also detail a complete list of available scholarships. In some instances, international governments may offer scholarship funding or sponsorship schemes to support postgraduate study. For further information, check with your local government. http://research.unsw.edu.au/postgraduate-research-scholarships
Amount (A$) Provides tuition fees, Overseas Student Health Cover, visa charges, travel concessions and UNSW provides a living allowance stipend in the range of approximately $20,000 to $27,000 per year. Provided for three years for PhD study and two years for a Master by Research. Provides tuition fees and a living allowance stipend in the range of approximately $20,000 to $27,000 per year. Provided for three years for PhD study and two years for a Master by Research. Please refer to the Postgraduate Research Scholarships website For further information http://research.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate-researchscholarships

University International Postgraduate Awards (UIPA)

Master by Research or PhD Awarded for academic excellence Funded by UNSW

http://research.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate-researchscholarships

Tuition Fee Scholarship (TFS) plus a Faculty Research Stipend

Please refer to the Postgraduate Research Scholarships website

http://research.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate-researchscholarships

Tuition Fee Scholarship (TFS)

Please refer to the Postgraduate Research Scholarships website

Please refer to the Postgraduate Research Scholarships website

http://research.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate-researchscholarships

AUSTRALIAN GOVERNMENT SCHOLARSHIPS

Australian Development Scholarships (ADS)

Funded by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Scholarships for undergraduate and postgraduate study for citizens of eligible partner ADS countries

Provides tuition fees, a fortnightly living allowance, Overseas Student Health Cover and other benefits

www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar

Australian Leadership Awards (ALA)

Funded by the Australian Agency for International Development (AusAID) Postgraduate scholarships for professionals for study at Master or Doctoral level and fellowships for professionals for short-term research, study or professional attachments For citizens of eligible partner countries Funded by the Australian Government Recipients to undertake short or long term study, research and professional development in a broad range of disciplines For citizens of eligible partner countries

Benefits vary: scholarship provides tuition fees, a fortnightly living allowance, Overseas Student Health Cover and other benefits

www.ausaid.gov.au/scholar

Endeavour Awards Program

Provides a wide range of scholarships and fellowships. Endeavour study and research programs vary in duration, conditions and benefits.

www.deewr.gov.au/International/ EndeavourAwards/Pages/ Home.aspx

OTHER

Various

UNSW Faculty, School, Donors and Research Grant funded Scholarships, Sponsorship and other Government Funding

Various

http://research.unsw.edu.au/ postgraduate-researchscholarships and www.scholarships.unsw.edu.au

146

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Coursework Programs Application for International Students


Master by Coursework, Graduate Diploma, Graduate Certificate Programs
(Please write in BLOCK LETTERS using black ink) Office use only 1. Personal Details Have you applied to UNSW before? If yes, what is your Student ID Number? Family Name: Given Name(s): Date of Birth (dd/mm/yy): Home Address (Compulsory) (Do not use PO Box) Sex: M F Yes No

CRICOS PROVIDER CODE: 00098G

Office Use Only for waiver: Name and Date: Signature: Application Code: AUD $50 Application Fee for online applications www.apply.unsw.edu.au AUD $100 Application Fee for paper applications (Payable to The University of New South Wales by bankdraft, cheque or credit card) Fax No. I wish to pay the UNSW application fee of AUD $100 by credit card Mastercard Card Number: Cardholders Name: Expiry Date: / / / Signature: Date: Visa

Telephone No.

(including COUNTRY and AREA codes)

Email (compulsory): Address for Correspondence (If different from home address) (Do not use PO Box)

Agent Address (if applicable)


* To make sure you always receive important emails from UNSW add unsw.edu.au to your address book or safe senders list. This will ensure that emails from UNSW will be delivered directly to your inbox.

2. Visa Details Passport Number: Country of Birth: Country of Citizenship: Are you already in Australia? No Yes - Visa Category: / / DD/MM/YY If yes, you must provide a copy of your visa Expiry date:
Australian citizens or permanent residents or New Zealand citizens must apply on the application form for local students: www.unsw.edu.au > Future Students > Postgraduate Coursework > How to Apply

3. Scholarship/Sponsorship Have you applied for a scholarship/sponsorship? Yes - Name of Authority:


If you have been awarded a scholarship or sponsorship from a UNSW recognised organisation please attach a completed sponsorship registration form. For details, visit: www.international.unsw.edu.au/courses-applying/ sponsored/

No

4. Program Preferences (You may nominate three coursework program choices) Preferred semester and year of commencement (e.g. Semester 1 2013) Year Note: Not all programs have a Semester 2 start Preference 1st 2nd 3rd * Program codes are listed in the Coursework Programs Summary Table of this guide. Note: 1. Applications for Doctorate or Master by Research programs must use the application form for research programs available at: http://research.unsw.edu.au/how-apply-postgraduate-research-study-program 2. Not all courses in a degree program are available in every academic semester. 5. Tertiary Studies Note: All attempts at tertiary study whether current, completed or abandoned, must be disclosed Degrees and diplomas held or being completed, e.g. Bachelor of Arts Completed? Yes or No* Years of Study e.g. 2007-2010 Year of Graduation Semester 1 (March) Program Code* e.g. 8404 Semester 2 (July) Academic Plan or Major Area of Study Award Title and Program (e.g. MEngSc in Electrical Engineering, MScTech in Remote Sensing)

Institution and Country

* If no and applicable, please indicate the final date the final results will be available / / DD/MM/YY Note: 1. You are required to supply with each application a full official transcript or your academic record. This must be accompanied by a certified translation when the transcript is not in English. 2. If you have changed your name and your documents are in your former name, you must provide evidence of name change. 3. If you are currently enrolled in a program you should attach an official transcript of your results to date immediately and send the final results of your present program as soon as they are available. All documents must be originals or certified true copies. ORIGINALS CANNOT BE RETURNED.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

147

Coursework Programs Application for International Students


6. Details of other Qualifications held and Details of Professional Experience Please provide details on an attachment of any membership of professional bodies such as Institute of Chartered Accountants (ICAA), IEAust, IPESMA, etc. Applicants applying for admission to programs requiring a professional experience requirement must attach a curriculum vitae/resume which details their experience including name of employer, dates of service and nature of duties or position occupied. 7. English Language Proficiency ( Please refer to the Universitys Policy on English Proficiency Requirements) 1. English is my first language 2. The language of instruction in my Bachelor degree (within the past two years) was English (attach evidence) 3. I have undertaken other studies (within the past two years) of at least one year duration in which the language of instruction was English (Please give details and supply documentation) Yes No Yes Yes No No

4. I hold a certificate of English proficiency from an approved test (e.g. IELTS, TOEFL) undertaken within the past two years Test Name: Test Score: 5. I will be Test Name: Test Date: sitting for a test Test Date: (must attach original documentation) receiving my results from a test on

6. I will be attending an English for Academic Purposes course offered by UNSW Institute of Languages Term Commencement: Application attached: Yes No Date:

Note: . Students can apply without having satisfied the Universitys English language requirements, however, a confirmed offer will not be issued until the English 1 language requirements have been met. 2. Applicants who have sat the TOEFL test must arrange for an official score report to be sent directly to the University of New South Wales - institution code 0890. 8. Privacy The information you provide in this application is personal information as defined by the Privacy and Personal Information Act 1998 (NSW) [the Act]. It is collected and held by UNSW in order to process your application, admission and enrolment; to send you information regarding UNSW or third party courses or other university matters determined to be of potential interest to you; for administrative and statistical purposes; and (if this application isnt accepted) to process your application in relation to other courses offered by UNSW or related parties that may be of interest of you. We may disclose your information to others inside and outside NSW, including our related entities such as UNSW Global Pty Ltd, for the same purposes, and you consent to such bodies (including UNSW Global) acting upon your information and communicating with you regarding such courses, up to and including making offers in relation to those courses. You have the right of access to, and alteration of, the information concerning yourself in accordance with the Act and UNSW Privacy Management Plan. UNSW will not disclose your personal information without your consent and without due cause, except as authorised by law. You have the right to refuse this consent, but if the consent is not given your application may not be processed. By signing this document you accept these conditions. 9. Declaration and Signature I declare that the information declared on this application is complete and correct. I authorise the University to obtain information from any educational institution previously or currently attended by me. If any information supplied by me is considered to be untrue, incomplete or misleading in any respect, I understand the University may take such action as it believes necessary including the disclosure of the information to any person or body the University considers has a legitimate interest in receiving it and I consent to such disclosure. I understand the University reserves the right to vary or reverse any decision made on the basis of untrue, incomplete or misleading information. I have made this application having had access to sufficient information regarding UNSW programs, courses, fees, costs, facilities and services. I understand the University reserves the right to make alterations to any matter offered in this publication without notice and that this agreement does not remove my right to take further action under the Australian consumer protection laws. Signature: Name: Date: Unsigned applications will not be processed. UNSW will accept copies of documents certified by: Australian Overseas Diplomatic Mission Official Representatives of UNSW UNSW Offshore Office Public Notary Office Justice of the Peace (with a Registration Number) The Administration of the Institution which issued the document An Australian university (for example Student Central at UNSW, the International Office at UNSW) Retention of Applications Application and documents will be destroyed two years after notification of the result of the application. Where an offer has not been made, these applications and documents will be destroyed after a six month period.

RETURN YOUR COMPLETE APPLICATION AND APPLICATION FEE TO: Postal Address: Direct Admissions Office, The University of New South Wales, UNSW Sydney NSW 2052 Australia OR Courier Address: Direct Admissions Office, The University of New South Wales, Lower Ground Floor, Chancellery Building, Gate 8 or 9, High Street, Kensington, NSW, Australia

148

www.international.unsw.edu.au

UNSW Institute of Languages Application Form Languages Application Form UNSW Institute of
1. Personal Details (please print clearly) Family Name (as in passport) Given Names Other names (your English name, if any) English for Academic Purposes (EAP) q Introduction to EAP (IEAP) q Academic English Level 1 3 q University English Entry Course (UEEC)+ q Extended UEEC +10-week course q Pre-Foundation English Year (PFY)+ q Tertiary Orientation Program (TOP) q IELTS Test Preparation Course (ITPC) +10-week course General Proficiency English (GPE)

q Female q Male
Birthdate (dd/mm/yy) Will you be under 18 years of age on arrival? q Yes q No Please note: if you are under 18 years of age on commencement of study, certain visa regulations apply. Country of Birth Nationality (Citizenship) Passport No. 2. Citizenship (please tick relevant box) Are you a citizen or permanent/temporary resident of Australia? q Yes q No* What type of visa will you be applying for? q Student q Student Dependant q Tourist q Working Holiday If you ticked a box with an asterisk (*), you will need Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC). This can be arranged by UNSW Institute of Languages (see Overseas Student Health Cover section). 3. Home/Postal Address Address in Home Country (compulsory)

q General Proficiency English (beginner to advanced) q GPE Cambridge Exam Preparation


Professional English q English for Business Communication (intermediate & advanced) q English for Medical Professionals q English for Law Which term and date do you want to start your English course? How many weeks do you intend to study English? Number of weeks (in 5 week blocks) Have you been granted a scholarship?

q Yes q No Scholarship Name or Sponsors Name


5. English Language Test Scores If you have taken an IELTS or TOEFL test, please give details and attach a copy of the test result. IELTS Score (Overall) IELTS Writing Score Cambridge Score TOEFL/IBT/PBT Score PTE Score 6. Future Study Plans Do you intend to do academic studies in Australia after this course? q Yes q No If Yes, where? q UNSW Foundation Studies q UNSW q Other university Level of program: q Bachelor Degree (Undergraduate) q Master Degree (Postgraduate) q PhD (Doctorate) Name of program Faculty

City Postcode Tel Email Address in Australia Fax

State Country

City Postcode Tel Email Fax

State Country

4. English Language Programs CRICOS Code 067186J Which course would you like to apply for? Placement in an English course is subject to a placement test on arrival or results of an IELTS of TOEFL test.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

149

Do you have a Letter of Offer? q Yes q No If Yes, is it for: q Full offer q Package offer q Conditional offer Commencement date: Student ID Number (if available) 7. Accommodation 2011 For single students only Do you require us to arrange accommodation? q Yes q No If yes, please complete the following: Do you smoke? q Yes q No Are you happy to live with a host family with children? q Yes q No Are you happy to live with a family with pets? q Yes q No Are there any foods you cannot eat? q Yes q No If Yes, please specify Do you have any allergies/health problems? q Yes q No If Yes, please specify Other special requests? q Yes q No If Yes, what are they? Accommodation fees $245* accommodation booking fee $1020*** part-board (4 weeks) $760*** room only (4 weeks) $410*** under 18 years old fee *includes GST **under 18 years old: care arrangement fees apply ***students under 18 have different accommodation prices fees subject to change Accommodation date: / / from to / /

The length of OSHC will be calculated and advised, depending on your proposed enrolment period. q No, I will make my own arrangements for the duration of my student visa If you have a current OSHC, please quote your OSHC policy number: and expiry date 9. Agent Information Agency Name Contact name Email address 10. Additional Information How did you hear about UNSW Institute of Languages? Name of any relatives or friends who have completed a course here: Year 11. Checklist

q Have you filled out the Application Form completely


and correctly? q Have you attached copies of all required documents? q Have you listed your course preferences and commencement date? q Have you signed the declaration on this form? If under 18 years of age, your parent/legal guardian must also sign. Declaration I certify that the information on the form is correct and complete in every detail, and I understand that inaccuracies or omissions may result in non-acceptance or cancellation of enrolment at any time. I agree to the Conditions of Enrolment1 and acknowledge that the personal information provided is covered under the Privacy Policy2 (required by law). Signature of Student Date If applicant is under 18 years of age the signature of a Parent or Guardian is required. Signature of Parent/Guardian: (If student is under 18 years of age) Unsigned applications cannot be processed. Education Representatives cannot sign on behalf of the student. Correspondence Lodge the completed form with a UNSW Institute of Languages agent or representative in your country or post to: UNSW Institute of Languages, P Box 853, Kensington NSW 1465, Australia .O. Telephone: 61 2 9385 5396 Facsimile: 61 2 9662 2651 Email: admissions@unswglobal.unsw.edu.au ABN 62 086 418 582 UNSW Global Pty Limited CrICOS Provider No. 01020K
1. www.languages.unsw.edu.au/documents/conditions_ of_enrolment_international.pdf 2. Published on the website www.languages.unsw.edu.au

Do you require airport pick-up? q Yes q No If Yes, please complete the following: Airport pick-up: $150 Please provide arrival details at least two weeks (14 days) prior to scheduled departure. Arrival date: Airline/Flight number: 8 Overseas Student Health Cover It is a condition of a student visa that you maintain Overseas Student Health Cover (OSHC) for the proposed duration of your student visa. UNSW Institute of Languages can arrange visa-length cover with OSHC Worldcare, its preferred provider of OSHC. q Yes, I would like OSHC to be to arranged: q Single rate OSHC for myself Or q Family rate OSHC for myself and my dependant/s
150

Arrival time:

www.international.unsw.edu.au

Where can I find information?

Useful Websites
UNSW home page www.unsw.edu.au International students access point www.international.unsw.edu.au Apply online www.apply.unsw.edu.au Student portal access point www.my.unsw.edu.au UNSW online TV channel www.tv.unsw.edu.au Online handbook www.handbook.unsw.edu.au UNSW scholarships www.scholarships.unsw.edu.au Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences www.arts.unsw.edu.au Australian School of Business www.asb.unsw.edu.au Faculty of Built Environment www.fbe.unsw.edu.au

UNSW online
www.unsw.edu.au

COFA www.cofa.unsw.edu.au Faculty of Engineering www.eng.unsw.edu.au Faculty of Law www.law.unsw.edu.au Faculty of Medicine www.med.unsw.edu.au Faculty of Science www.science.unsw.edu.au UNSW@ADFA www.unsw.adfa.edu.au Student Life@UNSW www.studentlife.unsw.edu.au Postgraduate Coursework programs www.unsw.edu.au/futureStudents/postgradCourse/sad/ postgradcourse.html Postgraduate Research programs http://research.unsw.edu.au/future-students UNSW Alumni www.alumni.unsw.edu.au UNSW Institute of Languages www.languages.unsw.edu.au UNSW Foundation Studies www.ufs.unsw.edu.au Accommodation Services www.housing.unsw.edu.au University Library www.library.unsw.edu.au Study abroad www.studyabroad.unsw.edu.au Student exchange www.international.unsw.edu.au/exchange Which Course? Which University? www.goingtouni.gov.au Student visa issues www.immi.gov.au Australian diplomatic missions www.dfat.gov.au/missions

The best source of detailed information is the UNSW website. You can also find out information about what is happening on campus on the Universitys facebook page and Twitter feed. www.facebook.com/unsw http://twitter.com/UNSW

UNSW TV

Another great source of information is UNSW TV. UNSWTV is the new digital media management system for the University. It allows staff and students to easily upload, publish and manage content, including videos, audio and PDFs. A simple wizard upload system allows users to direct content to a variety of publishing outlets, including UNSW on YouTube and UNSWs iTunesU channel. Academics can send content only to a particular course cohort by setting up a collection into which students can post coursework. The choice of publishing outlet is determined by what level of access users want to grant and what copyright they want to assign to the material. Your social space is UNSWs Student Channel. Any student with a YouTube account can share videos here by tagging content UNSWTV. This is also the place to shop for your needs through the Classifieds Ads section. Go here to find secondhand books, cars, rental accommodation anything you need. www.tv.unsw.edu.au www.youtube.com/unsw www.studentchannel.tv.unsw.edu.au

UNSW Offices

UNSW-owned offices are located in Australia (Sydney), Europe (Poland), Hong Kong, India (Mumbai), North America (Washington, D.C.), Singapore, Thailand (Bangkok) and Vietnam (Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City) details are listed on pages 142 and 143. Staff at all UNSW offices are available to help you with any questions you have about studying at UNSW. UNSW also has representative offices located in major cities in over 90 countries throughout the world.

www.international.unsw.edu.au

151

152

www.international.unsw.edu.au

www.international.unsw.edu.au

153