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ROBERT MUNSCH By Deb Boettcher Robert Munsch was born in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania on June 11, 1945.

He was the fourth of nine children. Mr. Munsch claims to have done poorly in elementary school and spent his time daydreaming and writing poetry. He attended a Catholic High School and decided to study to become a Catholic priest. To escape attending classes in philosophy Mr. Munsch worked parttime in an orphanage. He discovered he like working with kids in daycare situations and went back to school and earned his M.A. in early childhood education. While working as a student teacher he created his first story, Mortimer. For ten years he continued to tell stories to children during their naptimes. Mr. Munsch and his wife moved to Canada after finding themselves out of work. They both were employed at the University of Guelph in Ontario. A childrens librarian encouraged him to publish his stories. Mud Puddle was his first published book. Mr. Munsch finally quit his job and became a full-time writer. He became Canadas best-selling author and has published over 35 books. He continues to use real kids as characters in his books. Mr. Munschs Books Aarons Hair Alligator Baby Andrews Loose Tooth Angelas Airplane A Promise is a Promise Davids Father 50 Below Zero From Far Away Get me Another One Get Out of Bed Good Families Dont I Have To Go Jonathan Cleaned Up Love You Forever Makeup Mess Millicent and The Wind MMM, Cookies Moiras Birthday More Pies Mortimer

Mud Puddle Murmel Murmel Murmel Pigs! Playhouse Purple Green and Yellow Ribbon Rescue Show and Tell Something Good Stephanies Ponytail The Boy in the Drawer The Dark The Fire Station The Giant The Paper Bag Princess Thomas Snowsuit Up, Up, Down Wait and See We Share EVERYTHING Where is Gah-Ning?

Munschworks, The First Munsch Collection Munschworks 2, The Second Munsch Treasury Munschworks 3, The Third Munsch Treasury Munschworks Grand Treasury Websites
http://www.robertmunsch.com/

Books Whats New Poems Photos Storytime With Robert Munsch

Biography Class Pictures Mail Robert

Kids Art Something Special Class Visits

http://www.spaghettibookclub.com/author.php3?first=100&first_letter=m&grade=

10 books reviewed by students: Thomas Snowsuit The Paper Bag Princess Ribbon Rescue MMM Cookies Get Out of Bed Andrews Loose Tooth Purple, Green, and Yellow Hit M for Munsch and then Interview Transcript. Room Environment

Stephanies Ponytail Love You Forever 50 Below Zero

http://www2.scholastic.com/teachers/authorsandbooks/authorstudies/authorhome.html

There will be enlarged characters from Robert Munschs books hanging from the ceiling in the room. Some examples would be Stephanie, Andrew, Thomas, Elizabeth, Michael, Sheila, Julie, David, Megan, Mortimer, Murmel, Robin, Tyya, Jule Ann, Jillian, Aaron, Amanda, and Jerimah. Using the opaque projector will enable me to enlarge these to the size that would be most effective. Bulletin Board Who Is Munsch? There will be photographs of Robert Munsch, which have been copied from his website. Biographical information will be displayed on the bulletin board. There will be an area for students to display additional information that they locate on his official website or from the Scholastic interview. Bulletin Board This will contain book covers copied from Robert Munsch Books. I had many of them scanned and have set up a picture file for this material. This will allow me to copy the covers in color. I will also display a list of books written by Robert Munsch. Bulletin Board This board would deal with the main illustrator of Robert Munsch books, Michael Martchenko. Biographical information would be displayed along with a list of books he has illustrated. An additional area would be reserved in the room where the students could display their book reports and original stories. Book Rack /Tubs A collection of Robert Munsch books would be arranged in a book rack or in individual tubs near the bulletin board, Who Is Munsch? There will be a rack of books illustrated by Michael Martchenko, preferably ones that have not been written by Robert Munsch.

Lesson Plan #1
LESSON PLAN TITLE: Who Is Munsch? CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Brainstorming/Readers Theater STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experiences. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. Media/Technology Standards A.4.2 Identify and use common media formats B.4.1 Define the need for information. GENERAL GOALS: literature. The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The students will be able to state various facts about Robert Munsch. They will begin to participate in group discussions by conveying their own thoughts and become attentive listeners while others are speaking. They will acquire information about Robert Munschs official website for future exploration. REQUIRED MATERIALS: Munsch Characters suspended from ceiling (Might include Stephanie, Andrew, Mortimer, Thomas, Rene, Christopher, Elizabeth, Murmel, Tyya, Brigid, and Jule Ann.) Bulletin Board Whos Robert Munsch? (Photos of Robert Munsch) LCD Projector Screen Chart Paper Markers Copies of Readers Theater Script Invitations to Munsch Rebus Story Biography of Robert Munsch Audio Tape of Munsch ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): Prior to activities I will have many of the characters from Robert Munsch books suspended from the ceiling. There would also be a bulletin board containing several humorous photos of Robert Munsch. These would have been copied from his official website. I would have the students sit in a U-

shaped on the floor near the bulletin board. The chart paper would be sitting on an easel near the bulletin board. I would point to the pictures of Robert Munsch and ask students if they know who he is. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Lead-In 2. I would ask the students to begin brainstorming a list of Robert Munschs books. I would then List the titles given to me on the chart paper. Im assuming that the students are already familiar with some of his books. I would remind them to use their attentive listening skills when others are speaking. 3. We would then discuss and list reasons why his books are so popular. The students could also discuss why his books are so enjoyable and what they like best about the books they have read. 4. Use Invitation to Munsch, a Readers Theater Script (Found in Invitation to Munsch Raczuk and Smith, 1996, p.17.). Copies will be distributed to the students and parts will be assigned. We will read the script through once. The second reading will be with more expression. 5. Read a rebus story, which gives biographical information about Robert Munsch (Found in Invitation to Munsch Raczuk and Smith, 1996, p.16.). 6. Use LCD Projector to project Robert Munsch official website. Show the various areas dealing with background on books, poems he has written to children, samples of class photos and childrens art sent to him, and instructions for emailing him. 7. Students will listen to audiotape of one of Robert Munschs books We Share Everything! CLOSURE: Students will discuss what they liked best about the book and share personal experiences. ASSESSMENT BASED ON OBJECTIVES: Observations during discussion and reflections. ADAPTATIONS (For Students With Learning Disabilities): Many of the oral activities would help to encourage the students with special needs to participate and develop their speech and language skills within a whole group situation. EXTENSIONS: Students would be allowed to revisit the Readers Theater Script, the rebus story, and the official website. They could also begin to explore other books by Robert Munsch that are displayed in the classroom. TROUBLESHOOTING: I would have paper printouts and diagram sketch of Robert Munsch official website and information contained there in case we have a problem with the computers. Lesson #2 LESSON PLAN TITLE: What Ya Know?!? CONCEPT.TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: KWL/Acquiring Knowledge on Computer STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experience. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Writing B.4.1 Create or produce writing to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes. B.4.3 Understand the function of various forms, structures, and punctuation marks of standard American English and use them appropriately in communications.

Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. Media/Technology B.4.3 Locate and access information sources. B.4.5 Record and organize information. B.4.6 Interpret and use information to solve the problem or answer the question. NETS 1. Basic operations and concepts 2. Technology communications tools. 3. Technology research tools. GENERAL GOALS: literature. The student will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The students will be able to state various known facts about Robert Munsch. The students will be able to express what they would like to learn about Robert Munsch. They will acquire information about Robert Munsch from exploring his official website. REQUIRED MATERIALS: KWL Chart Markers Computers Paper/Pencils Die-Cut paper Shapes ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): Students will be given die-cut shapes that represent one of Munschs books. Each shape will reflect something of significance about one of Munschs books. Some examples of the shapes could be an airplane, tooth, boy, girl, dragon, crayon, birthday cake, pie, pig, fire truck, and crown. The students will then locate another student with the same die-cut shape. These will be partners for the days activities. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Lead-In 2. Students will sit with their partners at the front of the room. The students will be instructed to think back to yesterday and what we have learned about Robert Munsch. 3. We will then begin to fill in the KWL chart on the easel in front of the group. Students will be reminded to use their good listening skills and raise their hands rather than shouting out answers. Each student will be given the opportunity to provide information for our chart. 4. We will then move on to discussing what we would like to know about Robert Munsch. These ideas will be added to our KWL chart. 5. Students will then be instructed to look at their die-cut shapes and see which book they will be looking at today. Instructions will be given as to how they will work with their partners. One student will take on the role of the recorder and will take notes on the background information they find. The other student will be the computer technician. These roles will also be written on the shapes so there will be no disagreements. The

6. 7. 8. 9.

students will be told that at a later date they will be switching roles, so that everyone gets the opportunity to be the computer technician and recorder. Students will be given a list of printed questions. They will be directed to read over their questions and ask for further clarification. I will then instruct them to move quietly to the computer lab. They will sit in pairs at each computer, which has been preset at Robert Munschs official website. Students will move quietly to the computer lab. They will be instructed to go to the section background on books. They will click on the particular book title written on their di-cut shapes and begin looking for information, as it is located. After answering the questions, students will be allowed to explore other parts of the website. They can add additional interesting information to their printed sheet. Students will be allowed about thirty minutes for this activity. Student will return to the classroom and sit down around the easel and the KWL chart. We will share information located on the website and additional entries on the KWL chart.

CLOSURE: Students will be given the opportunity to share what they liked best about todays activities. ASSESSMENT BASED ON OBJECTIVES: Students will be evaluated on contributions made to KWL chart and how well questions were answered and shared with group. Students will be observed during computer time to see how well they performed their roles and cooperated with their partner. ADAPTATIONS (For Students With Learning Disabilities): Depending on the special needs they would be placed with a student with higher skills to allow assistance with necessary skills. The oral activities would help to encourage special needs students to participate and develop their speech and language skills within a whole group and partner situation. TROUBLESHOOTING: In case there was a problem with the computer lab accessibility, information would be available in paper form prior to this activity. Students would then be instructed to look over their information sheets and answer questions on the printed sheet. Lesson Plan #3 LESSON PLAN TITLE: What Is An Illustrator? CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Common Elements/Role of Illustration in Literature STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. GENERAL GOALS: literature. The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The students will come to understand what the role of an illustrator is in literature. The students will realize how important illustrations are in literature. The students will be able to recognize humor in Michael Martchenkos illustrations. REQUIRE MATERIALS: LCD Projector

Screen Slide Presentation Power Point Drawing Paper Crayons/Colored Pencils Books ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): As the students enter the room they will view a new bulletin board. It will contain the words What Is An Illustrator? Several pictures of other authors/illustrators will be featured on the bulletin board, such as Eric Carle and Jan Brett. Students will be asked to take a few moments to look at the bulletin board. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Ask the students, What Is An Illustrator? 2. Students will have a few minutes to discuss their ideas with the person next to them. 3. They will share their responses with the class in an orderly fashion. They will raise their hands and wait to be called on. A definition will be written on the white board. 4. I will then refer to the other illustrators displayed on the bulletin board. I will ask the students what we have learned about these people in the past. We will talk about the illustrators and their techniques. 5. I will then tell the students that we are going to learn about a new illustrator, Michael Martchenko. As I display his picture on the bulletin board I will give a short biography of Martchenko. 6. I will move to the LCD projector and begin the slide presentation. While showing the slides we will talk together about what we are seeing and what makes his illustrations appealing. This should lead to evidence of Martchenkos humor and what is funny about his drawings. 7. Students will then pair up with their partner from yesterday. They will be given a copy of the book they did background information on. I will ask them to look through the book together and see if they notice anything about the pictures. They will have about ten minutes to look through the books. 8. We will then discuss what they discovered in the drawings. I will point out that many of Martchenkos illustrations are done with pencil and water colors before they are printed for the books. 9. I will have the students think of a funny situation they might have experienced. They will then make their own one-page illustration. I will allow them to use pencils, colored pencils, and crayons. 10. As they complete their illustrations we will display them on the white board. Students will be allowed to look at other books containing Michael Martchenkos illustrations while they are waiting for everyone to finish. CLOSURE: Students will walk around and view the illustrations on the board. I will state that we have discovered how illustrations can help create humor in a book. I will tell them that tomorrow we will explore what other techniques make a book funny. ASSESSMENT: The students will be observed as they examine books with their partners and participate in oral discussion. The illustrations will be used to see how well they understood the assignment and completed the task. TROUBLESHOOTING: I would use books to show illustrations in case there were problems with the LCD projector. I could also have paper copies of the slides. Lesson #4 LESSON PLANS TITLE: What Makes A Book Funny? CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Writing Activity/Choral Reading STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading.

A.4.2 Read, interpret, and critically analyze literature. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experiences. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Writing B.4.1 Create or produce writing to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes. Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. Media/Technology A.4.1 Identify and use common media formats. GENERAL GOALS: The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his literature. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The students will be able to identify what makes a book funny through writing and sharing of ideas. REQUIRED MATERIALS: Paper/Pencils Overhead Transparency What Makes a Book Funny? Overhead Markers Book Stephanies Ponytail ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): Prior to this activity I will send a note home to parents informing them that we are planning a crazy hair day. Students will be encouraged to come to school with an interesting hairstyle without any indication of what is planned. The classroom computers will be set on Robert Munschs official website. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Ask the students What makes a book funny? 2. Students will have three minutes to write or draw their ideas on the topic. 3. They will then share their responses, while making a list of ideas on the overhead. (Some examples might include what characters say and do, their appearances, silly actions, and nonsense words.) 4. Show students the cover of Stephanies Ponytail. Ask them to make predictions about the story and possible characters. 5. Explore expressions on characters faces. (Questions Why do you think they look that way? What might they be thinking?) 6. Read aloud to students some information about where Munsch got his idea for this story. (Mention that he is a storyteller first and a writer second. He usually makes up stories for the kids he is working or talking with.) 7. Read aloud Stephanies Ponytail. 8. Have students discuss which parts they thought were funny. Relate items to previous list on overhead and add new ideas (Like unexpected problems that arise, characters expressions, etc.).

CLOSURE: Students will participate in a choral reading. As I read the narrative text, the students will respond in appropriate places with dialogue. ASSESSMENT: Written/drawn ideas on topicWhat makes a book funny? and observations during question and response segments. ADAPTATIONS (For Students With Learning Disabilities): Adjustments were made for special needs students by allowing them to draw their ideas instead of writing for three minutes. The development of their speech and language skills would be encouraged by the oral activities. Lesson #5 LESSON PLAN TITLE: What Makes A Book Funny? Part II CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Comparing Literature/Writing Activity STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading. A.4.2 Read, interpret, and critically analyze literature. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experiences. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Writing B.4.1 Create or produce writing to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes. B.4.2 Plan, revise, edit, and publish clear and effective writing. B.4.3 Understand the function of various forms, structures, and punctuation marks of standard American English and use them appropriately in communications. Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. Language D.4.1 Develop their vocabulary words, phrases, and idioms as a means of improving communications. GENERAL GOALS: literature. The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Students will be equipped to compare and contrast two Robert Munsch books. Students will then be able to write their own class book. REQUIRED MATERIALS:

Paper/Pencils Colored Pencils/Crayons Overhead Transparency What Makes A book Funny? Overhead Markers Books Stephanies Ponytail and Aarons Hair STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Review the transparency What Makes a Book Funny? from yesterday. 2. Show students the cover of Aarons Hair. Ask them to make predictions about story and possible characters. 3. Do a picture walk through the book recalling questions from yesterday. 4. Read aloud to students the information about Munschs ideas for this story. 5. Read aloud Aarons Hair. 6. Using overhead and transparency compare and contrast the two books and how they are funny. 7. Have students work together to create their own class story or book. All students will be given the opportunity to contribute ideas for the story. 8. Teacher and students will then work through the editing of their first draft. 9. Students will work together to create illustrations for each page of the story. CLOSURE: Students will read their class book together. They will send a copy of their book to Robert Munsch, along with pictures of their class on crazy hair day. ASSESSMENT BASED ON OBJECTIVES: Students will be observed during the compare and contrast discussion and the creation of their class book. Lesson # 6 and #7 LESSON PLANS TITLE: Learning More About Robert Munsch Writing Style CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Independent Reading/Partner Choral Reading STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading. A.4.2 Read, interpret, and critically analyze literature. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experiences. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Writing B.4.3 Understand the function of various forms, structures, and punctuation marks of standard American English and use them appropriately in communications. Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communication. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion.

Media/Technology A.4.1 Use common media and technology terminology and equipment. A.4.2 Identify and use common media formats. B.4.3 Locate and access information sources. B.4.6 Interpret and use information to solve the problem or answer the question. D.4.1 Participate productively in workgroups or other collaborative learning environments. GENERAL GOALS: literature. The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Students will become more familiar with Munschs writing style by reading as many books from the collection as possible. Students will develop an understanding of audio equipment and computer listening to books. REQUIRED MATERIALS: Computer Lab (with headphones) Audio/CD Players AudioTapes/Compact Discs Paper/Pencil Collection of Munsch Books Overhead Overhead Transparency What Makes A Book Funny? ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): Review the What Makes A Book Funny? overhead transparency from yesterday. Tell the students that they will spend the next two days reading other books written by Robert Munsch. They will be reminded to look for what makes the books funny. Explain that these items will be added to the transparency later. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Lead-In 2. Select another Robert Munsch title and read the background information on the book. 3. Have students select a book. They will work on their own or with partners. Some of the students will use computers and audio/CD players to listen to their books. Other students will read the books on their own. The second day the remaining students will use the technology. 4. Students will record the title and at least three main points about the book. They are instructed to look for what makes the book funny and certain characteristics of Munschs writing style. 5. Students will spend as much time as is possible reading Munsch books over the next two days. CLOSURE: Students will share thoughts on the books they have read and add other information to the chart. ASSESSMENT BASED ON OBJECTIVES: Students will be observed as they interact with each other and the technology equipment. Students will be observed on how well they work and read together with their partners or on their own. Their responses will be noted and critiqued. TROUBLESHOOTING: If there is a problem with computer lab the students will be able to continue this activity using the collection of books and audio/CD equipment.

Lesson #8 LESSON PLANS TITLE: Book Responses on Website CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Analyze Book Responses STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading. A.4.2 Read, interpret, and critically analyze literature. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experiences. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. Media/Technology A.4.1 Use common media and technology terminology and equipment. A.4.2 Identify and use common media formats. B.4.2 Develop information-seeking strategies. B.4.7 Communicate the results of research and inquiry in an appropriate format. C.4.2 Appreciate and derive meaning from literature and other creative expressions of information. D.4.2 Use information, media, and technology in a responsible manner. NETS 1.) Basic operations and concepts GENERAL GOALS: literature. The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: The students will be able to use website to view and read book responses of Robert Munsch books. Students will be able to compare and contrast the various forms of book responses.

REQUIRED MATERIALS: Computer Lab Paper/Pencils Overhead Projector Overhead Transparency Book Response to Andrews Loose Tooth ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): I will display a sample book response Andrews Loose Tooth on the overhead projector. We will explore the text and illustration. I will explain to the students that this book response was written by a second grade student. I will that I found this really neat website that I want them to look at today. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Lead-In 2. Students will move quietly to the computer lab. The computers will be preset on the required website http://www.spaghettibookclub.com/author.php3?first=100&first_letter=m&grade=. 3. I will explain that there are ten Robert Munsch books reviewed by students in the second grade. I want them to click on one and begin reading the response. They are to continue reading through the available book responses. 4. If anyone get through early they can log on to an additional website http://www2.scholastic.com/teachers/authorsandbooks/authorstudies/authorhome.html. Once they log on they will hit M for Munsch and then Interview Transcript. They can look through the interview with Robert Munsch and see if they can discover additional information about the author or his books. 5. This activity will take about 30 to 45 minutes. CLOSURE: Students can share their reactions to the book responses. They will be respectful listeners while others are speaking and exhibit good manners. We will add information to our KWL chart about Robert Munsch. ASSESSMENT BASED ON OBJECTIVES: The students will be observed during the session in the computer lab and evaluated on their contributions during the group discussion. TROUBLESHOOTING: If there would be a problem with the computer lab I would have paper copies of the responses available for student viewing.

Lesson #9 LESSON PLANS TITLE: My Book Response CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Book Response Format STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purpose in reading. A.4.2 Read, interpret, and critically analyze literature. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Writing B.4.1 Create or produce writing to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes.

B.4.2 Plan, revise, edit, and publish clear and effective writing. B.4.3 Understand the function of various forms, structures, and punctuation marks of standard American English and use them appropriately in communications. Oral Language C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. Media/Technology A.4.1 Use common media and technology terminology and equipment. A.4.4 Use a computer and communications software to access and transmit information. B.4.7 Communicate results of research and inquiry in an appropriate format. C.4.2 Appreciate and derive meaning from literature and other creative expressions of information. GENERAL GOALS: literature. The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his

SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Student will become familiar with book response format. Students will respond individually to one of Robert Munschs books. REQUIRED MATERIALS: Collection of Robert Munsch Books Alpha Smarts Overhead Projector Overhead Transparency What We Can Write About Books Paper/Pencil ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): Students will look through the collection of Robert Munsch books that are displayed on the book rack or tubs. They will select one that they have already read and want to discuss in a book response. More than one student can select the same book. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Lead-In 2. Review chart What We Can Write About Books. Discuss each type of response and what is needed in a quality response. 3. Students will reread the book. 4. They will then write a book response using paper and pencil for first draft. 5. They will meet with the teacher to edit their written material. 6. Students will use Alpha Smarts for their final draft. 7. Student will illustrate their book response. CLOSURE: Students will display their book responses on an available area in the room. As time permits they can read each others responses. ASSESSMENT BASED ON OBJECTIVES: The 6-traits writing rubric will be used to assess the students work. ADAPTATIONS (Students With Special Needs): A tape recorder could be used for students with special needs rather than paper and pencil. They could give their response verbally rather than in written form. TROUBLESHOOTING: If the Alpha Smarts were not available, students would write their book response by hand.

Lesson #10 LESSON PLANS TITLE: Robert Munschs Fingerprints CONCEPT/TOPIC TO BE TAUGHT: Repetitive Phrases/Writing Style STANDARDS ADDRESSED: Reading/Literature A.4.1 Use effective reading strategies to achieve their purposes in reading. A.4.2 Read, interpret, and critically analyze literature. A.4.3 Read and discuss literary and nonliterary texts in order to understand human experiences. A.4.4 Read to acquire information. Writing B.4.1 Create or produce writing to communicate with different audiences for a variety of purposes. B.4.2 Plan, revise, edit, and publish clear and effective writing. B.4.3 Understand the function of various forms, structures, and punctuation marks of standard American English and use them appropriately in communications. Oral Language C.4.1 Orally communicate information, opinions, and ideas effectively to different audiences for a variety of purposes. C.4.2 Listen to and comprehend oral communications. C.4.3 Participate effectively in discussion. Language D.4.1 Develop their vocabulary words, phrases, and idioms as a means of improving communications. Media/Technology A.4.1 Use common media and technology and equipment. A.4.2 Identify and use common media format. A.4.3 Use a computer and productivity software to organize and create information. B.4.3 Locate and access information sources. B.4.7 Communicate the results of research and inquiry in an appropriate format. C.4.2 Appreciate and derive meaning from literature of personal interest NETS 3. Technology productivity tools 4. Technology communications tools

GENERAL GOALS: The students will develop an understanding and enthusiasm for Robert Munsch and his literature. SPECIFIC OBJECTIVES: Students will become familiar with Robert Munschs style of writing via books. Students will be able to state fingerprints of Robert Munsch writing style and locate substantial support in books. Students will create their own Munsch-style story. REQUIRED MATERIALS: Collection of Robert Munsch Books Recording Sheet Pencils Alpha Smarts Colored Pencils/Crayons What Makes A Book Funny? Chart White Board Markers ANTICIPATORY SET (LEAD-IN): See if students can identify a book is written by Robert Munsch from reading just a small portion of the book. STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURES: 1. Lead-In 2. Ask the students what they think makes a Robert Munsch book. Have them brainstorm in small groups at least four ideas. Examples might be repetitive phrases, using characters from other books, familiar problems, sound words, unexpected events, kids as main characters, NNNOOO, or WHAP, WHAP, WHAP. 3. Students will return to large group and share their ideas and record on white board. 4. They will form groups of two or three students and become reading detectives. They will then select four or five ideas (fingerprints) and attempt to locate evidence in previously read books. They will record their findings on a recording sheet. 5. Return to large group and discuss the supporting material they discovered in their books. 6. Review the information compiled on the white board and What Makes A Book Funny? chart. Have the students use this information to create their own Munsch-style stories. EXTENSIONS: It might be necessary to allow an extra day for the writing activity. Students would be encouraged to work through the editing process and us the Alpha Smarts for their final draft. On the additional day they would be able to illustrate their story and present it to the class. ASSESSMENT: Students would be observed working in small groups and during discussion. The information on their recording sheets would be a good form of assessing their ability to stay on task. The 6 Traits Rubric would be used to evaluate the final draft of their stories. ADAPTATIONS (For Students With Learning Disabilities): It could be possible for students to work in pairs on creating their own stories. Special needs students could also use the tape recorder for developing their stories. These could be left as an oral presentation or their stories could be typed on the Alpha Smarts. They could draw their own illustrations first before writing their stories if that would help the creative process. TROUBLESHOOTING: If the discussion requires additional time it would be wise to leave the story writing to another day. If some students complete the activity early, they could revisit Robert Munsch official website. They could read poems written for kids or listen to additional stories. They might be encouraged to create their own poem.

COMPARISON WEB

BOOK INFORMATION

Name____________________ Title of Story__________________________________________________ Author_______________________________________________________ Setting_______________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Characters_____________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________

_____________________________________________________________ What happened first in the story? _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Second: _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Third: _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Last: _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ Was there a problem? ____________________________________________________________ What was the problem? ____________________________________________________________ ____________________________________________________________

Read All About It!


Title_____________________________________ Author___________________________________ This book was about___________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ My favorite character was_______________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ I like this book because_________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ This picture shows what I like best about the book.

I would recommend this book because_____________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________ _____________________________________________________________

Name_____________________________ Date______________________

KWL

WHAT DO I KNOW?

WHAT DO I WANT TO KNOW?

WHAT HAVE I LEARNED?

CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT:

1. Students will work in various group situations large, small, partners, and individually. 2. Students will be reminded to be respectful listeners when others are talking. They will be encouraged to share thoughts and ideas with others and to work in a cooperative manner. It will be stressed that part of their assessment for these activities will be determined by how well they can work in various group situations. 3. Computer time will need to be scheduled at times when there are open time periods. If it proves necessary other teachers will be contacted about using some their scheduled time slots. It would be necessary to have two thirty-minute periods allotted for some of the activities so that there would be adequate work time while in the lab. The time frame for the various activities might need to be adjusted according to computer availability. Flexibility would be the key here. 4. Learning stations would be incorporated in the classroom for listening /reading books, editing writing activities, and using Alpha Smarts. Students could be working on illustrations or reading additional material while others are going through the editing process or using Alpha Smarts. 5. Students would also be encouraged to participate in peer editing. Before their final draft they would be required to meet with the teacher; however, fellow students could provide feedback while working with the editing process. 6. This author study would be implemented over a two-week period. Students would work on the study on a daily basis. If there are outside conflicts with the schedule, the next lesson could be delayed until the following day. This might mean that the actual study would last more than ten days. 7. It would be helpful to elicit the help of parent volunteers or student aides during the computer time and writing activities. This would insure that students remain on task and provide additional hands to help students with difficulties in the process. 8. I have personal copies of Robert Munsch books. There are also copies of some of his books in our school library. I would ask teachers to loan me additional copies they might have in their rooms. I have used the South Central Library System in the past. This has worked out effectively. I usually plan ahead and put books on hold. I am then able to receive the books required before actually needing them for a lesson. In the future I would provide Rhonda Belmonte with a book list and request that she purchase a supply of Robert Munsch books when there is money allotted for new purchases. 9. There might also be money in the Title I budget to allow for the purchase of additional copies of Munsch books. Our PATT (Parents and Teachers Together) organization often helps with purchasing additional items for the classrooms. That might be another avenue for obtaining extra books.

SUMMARY: This unit was not designed for my students or classroom since I teach Title I Math. I am working with a second grade classroom for Project Write. I actually designed this unit for them and was focused on trying to help improve their word choice. I selected Robert Munsch because of his repetitive phrases, sound words, and interesting terminology. He is basically fun to read. I felt that I could also incorporate this into my summer school classes, which deal with Cooking with Literature.

I have to admit that literature is definitely my passion. I am hoping to be teaching Reading and Language Arts in the future. I believe very much in doing anything that excites students and turns them on to reading. My main concern with using Robert Munsch was the readability level of his books. I was sure that some of the students would struggle with his text. Because of his humorous writing style and kid characters, I felt it was important to use him as my selected author. The adaptations I made were using the audio equipment and story reading on his official website. My reading to the class and the choral readings would enable the students with difficulties to become engaged in the activities and meet with success. I also felt it was important to select partner groupings when working on the computer. This would allow students with high and low computer knowledge to work together in a positive situation. The taking on different roles would also address the issue skill levels. I expect that the students will be very enthusiastic about the books and information on the author. I also feel that they will become engaged in most of the activities. The only problem I foresee is possibly the writing activities. Many of the students have not experienced enough practice in creative writing. I do feel that Robert Munschs literature will help motivate them. It would help if they can find some relationship to the various characters. I also believe that this author study will help enrich the language arts curriculum. The basal textbooks have their place in the curriculum; however, they dont see to inspire the students like an effective author study can. When students become excited about reading it also affects their oral and written language as well. We all know that the same skills and strategies can be taught and reinforced using trade books along with the regular curriculum. I am hoping that it will encourage other teachers to incorporate author studies into their curriculum. It would be nice to also have teachers sharing their units with each other. It might be nice to see more helping hands out there or cooperation among the teachers. Sometimes we become too set in our ways and are afraid to take a risk. We cant inspire our students if we dont inspire ourselves first.

RESOURCES
http://teachers.net/lessons/posts/1517.html

- Robert Munsch author study Michael Martchenko biography

http://www.annickpress.com/ai/martchenko.html

Kasper, Joanne. Circling with Robert Munsch. Saskatchewan Teachers Federation; 1998.
http://www.stf.sk.ca/teaching_res/library/teach_mat_centre/mc/P11233/P11233.htm

Raczuk, Helen & Smith, Marilyn. Invitation to Munsch. U-Otter-Read-It, Canada, 1996.