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SOEST Faculty Meeting 11 May 2011
SOEST Faculty Meeting 11 May 2011
SOEST Faculty Recognition • Chip Fletcher EPA Environmental Award for Climate Change Science • Murli
SOEST Faculty Recognition
• Chip Fletcher
EPA Environmental Award
for Climate Change Science
• Murli Manghnani
Fellow of the American Ceramic Soc.
• Nikolai Maximenko
New Associate Dean for Academic Affairs: Chip Fletcher Replacing: Pat Cooper (New Dean of Graduate
New Associate Dean for Academic Affairs:
Chip Fletcher
Replacing: Pat Cooper
(New Dean of Graduate Division)xx
New tenure track faculty
offer to Angelicque White (OCE)
Emeritus Professors
Barry Huebert (OCE)
Roy Wilkens (HIGP)
New SOEST Young Investigators
Pedro DiNezio (IPRC)
Margo Edwards: CIMES
Peter Isaacson
(HIGP)
island, maritime & extreme
environment security
Peter Rappa 5/14/1951-5/9/2011
Peter Rappa
5/14/1951-5/9/2011
2011 Promotion & Tenure - recommendations to the BOR G&G: Garrett Apuzen-Ito I5 HIMB: Ruth
2011 Promotion & Tenure
- recommendations to the BOR
G&G:
Garrett Apuzen-Ito I5 HIMB: Ruth Gates R5
Katherina Pahnke R4
Eric Hellebrand S4
Judy Lemus S4 &T
HIGP:
Benedicte Dousset R4
Cecily Wolfe I5
Rob Wright R4
Matt Church I4 &T
OCE: Brian Glazer I4 &T
OEST:
Barb Bruno S5
SeaGrant: Ephraim Temple A3
2011 Legislature: Cut $8.1M from UH G-budget (~$5.7M UHM) Restored furlough savings but then cut
2011 Legislature:
Cut $8.1M from UH G-budget (~$5.7M UHM)
Restored furlough savings but then cut
UHPA pay back & fringe (~$11.2M UHM)
No C.I.P., <half R&M ($30M UHM)
Governor:
State hiring freeze through June 2011
Exempts offers in hand & instructional faculty
No Federal Earmarks FY11-FY12
Rule XLIV of the Standing Rules of the United States
”congressionally directed spending Senate means recommending a
specific amount of discretionary budget … to an entity, or
targeted to a specific State, locality or Congressional district,
other than through a statutory or administrative formula-driven
i i
d
$140,000,000 SOEST Funding Profile $120,000,000 $100,000,000 Total funding Extramural awards State general funds
$140,000,000
SOEST Funding Profile
$120,000,000
$100,000,000
Total funding
Extramural awards
State general funds
Returned overhead & tuition
$80,000,000
$60,000,000
$40,000,000
$20,000,000
$0
1989
1991
1993
1995
1997
1999
2001
2003
2005
2007
2009
2011
State Fiscal Year
Chancellor’s cluster hires • 20% of retiree/resignee salaries “reinvested” 1 st two clusters of 5
Chancellor’s cluster hires
• 20% of retiree/resignee salaries “reinvested”
1 st two clusters of 5 faculty:
-Scholars in native Hawaiian programs
-Sustainability
Vice-Chancellor’s
Sustainability $1M Award
The Seaver Institute will give $100K to
Brian Bowen & Richard Pyle for one year of
their studies of mesophotic (foundation) reefs
Authority to Plan SOEST-CNS joint graduate degree program in Marine Biology G& G: MGeo Coming
Authority to Plan
SOEST-CNS joint graduate
degree program in Marine Biology
G& G: MGeo
Coming this fall:
SOEST Open House 21-22 Oct
APEC 12-20 Nov
Ocean/Earth/Sky
Health/Life Sciences
Renewable Energy
Business Tourism
Ugrad & Grad Commencement Reception: May 14t
Ugrad & Grad Commencement Reception: May 14t
C-MORE Hale: $22.5M LEEDS Platinum 15 April 2009 centerpiece of the Life Sciences May 2010
C-MORE Hale:
$22.5M LEEDS
Platinum
15 April 2009
centerpiece of the Life Sciences
May 2010
October 2010 – April 2011
Complex
“We shape our buildings,
thereafter they shape us”
Sir Winston Churchill
May 2011
“Scientific laboratories are
the temples of humanity”
Louis Pasteur
UHMC move: Ships to pier 35 Boats to METC July-Dec 2014 Environmental Assessment (TEC): Dec
UHMC move:
Ships to pier 35
Boats to METC
July-Dec 2014
Environmental Assessment (TEC): Dec
2011
Building meets & bounds, Improvements geotech & (Pacific structure, Architects): traffic Jul
2014
Site revise Work layout, (R.M.Towill): cost est., design Dec 2014 1/13, work 7/13-7/14
grade, culvert, power, sewer,
design 6/13, work 12/13-12/14
R/V Kilo Moana Seafloor maps around the Hawaiian Islands Google
R/V Kilo Moana
Seafloor maps around the Hawaiian Islands
Google
“Given budget guidance for FY 2012 from the NSF, the USIO will only be able
“Given budget guidance for FY 2012 from the NSF, the USIO
will only be able to conduct three expeditions next year (the
JOIDES Resolution will be in tie up for the remaining six
months of the year). We have been requested to defer
implementation of Southern Alaska Margin Tectonics,
Climate, and Sedimentation (Expedition 341) to FY 2013.”
Hawaii’s future is on trend to be warmer, drier, susceptible to severe storms and coastal
Hawaii’s future is on trend to be warmer,
drier, susceptible to severe storms and
coastal erosion, with depleted fisheries and
stressed coral reef ecosystems.
0.5 feet/century
January 19-20, 2011 The Science of Climate Change in Hawai`i
January 19-20, 2011
The Science of Climate Change in Hawai`i
Leonidas and the Hawaii Space Flight Lab HSFL - PMRF - Sandia NL - Aerojet
Leonidas and the Hawaii Space Flight Lab
HSFL - PMRF - Sandia NL - Aerojet - NASA-AMES working
together are developing a game-changing satellite launch &
deployment system:
• High heritage, low risk
• Capable of rapid response (< week)
• Low-cost for small spacecraft
Recurring launch costs at $10-12M (inclusive of range costs)
are a fraction of current alternatives.
This enables new paradigms of satellite development, cal/val,
& deployment (e.g., constellations of small satellites)
This promises a new economic driver & high-tech workforce
for Hawaii
SPARK Launch Vehicle  Redesign Sandia Strypi  Three-stage solid propellant motor stack.  Leverage
SPARK Launch Vehicle
 Redesign Sandia Strypi
 Three-stage solid propellant motor stack.
 Leverage heritage devices that have flown on other rockets.
 Fin & spin stabilized vehicle, with attitude control system.
 Payload objective: 250kg to 400km Sun-synchronous Orbit
from Kauai. Higher payload mass can be achieved to lower
inclination orbits.
 Aerojet Corp. – Strategic Alliance Agreement signed
with UH in October, 2010 to provide all 3 motor stages
 Optimized motor design: exceeds payload objectives.
 Maximize performance & minimize cost by simplifying design
& manufacturing process.
 Meet quick response launch requirement
Designed to Reduce Cost, Simplify Launch & Increase Reliability
Launch Site: Pacific Missile Range Facility SPARK Launcher Pacific Missile Range Facility • Existing launch
Launch Site: Pacific Missile Range Facility
SPARK Launcher
Pacific Missile Range Facility
• Existing launch range on Kauai
• Partnering with UH and ORS
• Provide Range Safety support
Pad Modifications
• Professional execution & supervision of
LEONIDAS launches
SPARK Rail Launch System
• Rail imparts stability & directional control for
rocket launch
PMRF Mission Control
• Adjusting launcher trajectory allows multiple
orbit tracks
Polar & Sun-synchronous launch options
from PMRF (Kauai)
Launch Trajectories
UH-Aerojet Partnership: Launch Services Provider 501(c)3 LLC being planned to benefit: • Aerojet: Increase solid
UH-Aerojet Partnership: Launch Services Provider
501(c)3 LLC being planned to benefit:
• Aerojet: Increase solid rocket motor production,
Hawaii “skunkworks” for new R&D
• UH:
Workforce training,
Self-funded Science & Engineering Missions
• Joint:
Lower Overhead & Costs
Handle Risk Management
Hold Intellectual Property
Mark & Amber Kaufman
Aerojet Exec Dir Strategic Programs
Luke Flynn
HSFL Director
“Whether it’s improving our health or harnessing clean energy, protecting our security or succeeding in
“Whether it’s improving our health or harnessing clean
energy, protecting our security or succeeding in the
global economy, our future depends on reaffirming
America’s role as the world’s engine of scientific
discovery and technological innovation.”
- President Barack
Obama
“We need to out-innovate, out-educate, and out-build
the rest of the world.”
Of all the challenges we face as a
nation and as a planet, none is as
pressing as the three-pronged
challenge of climate change,
sustainable development and the
need to foster new and cleaner
sources of energy. (OSTP)
NOC Priority Objectives • Ecosystem-Based Management • Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning • Inform Decisions
NOC Priority Objectives
• Ecosystem-Based Management
• Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning
• Inform Decisions and Improve
Understanding
• Coordinate and Support
• Resiliency and Adaptation to Climate
Change and Ocean Acidification
• Regional Ecosystem Protection and
Restoration
• Water Quality and Sustainable Practices
on Land
• Changing Conditions in the Arctic
• Ocean, Coastal, and Great Lakes
Observations, Mapping, and
Infrastructure
NSF Science, Engineering and Education for Sustainability FY12 & FY10 • Water Sustainability and Climate
NSF Science, Engineering and
Education for Sustainability
FY12 & FY10
• Water Sustainability and Climate
• Ocean Acidification
• Climate Change Education Partnership
• Decadal & Regional Climate Prediction
Using Earth System Models
FY11
• Dimensions of Biodiversity
• Partnerships for International Research &
Education
• Research Coordination Networks
FY12
• Sustainable Energy Pathways
• Sustainability Research Networks
Integrated Sci/Eng Research on Env/Econ/Energy Systems
• Creating a More Disaster Resilient America
SEES Portfolio Funding (Dollars in Millions) FY 2010 Enacted/ Annualized FY 2011 CR FY 2012
SEES Portfolio Funding
(Dollars in Millions)
FY 2010
Enacted/
Annualized
FY 2011 CR
FY 2012
Request
Biological Sciences
Computer & Information Science & Eng.
Engineering
Geosciences
Mathematical & Physical Sciences
Social, Behavioral & Economic Sciences
Office of Cyberinfrastructure
Office of International Science & Eng.
Office of Polar Programs
Office of Integrative Activities
Subtotal, Research & Releated Activities
Education and Human Resources
Total, SEES
(cf total GEO
$121.00
$146.00
17.00
46.36
108.20
162.00
195.50
282.70
87.00
160.00
20.78
56.98
5.50
5.00
2.50
17.00
65.26
83.65
26.50
26.50
$649.24
$986.19
11.50
12.00
$660.74
$998.19
$891.87
$976.16)
SEES – Geosciences Foci Sustainable Energy Pathways • Characterize and understand existing energy systems and
SEES – Geosciences Foci
Sustainable Energy Pathways
Characterize and understand existing energy
systems and their limitations (e.g. wind,
geothermal, hydro)
• Understand risks and stressors associated
with new and emerging energy sources (e.g.
tidal, clean coal, carbon sequestration)
Sustainability Research Networks
Interdisciplinary research and education
partnerships involving government, academe,
and the private sector
• Address fundamental issues of use in
improving policy and practices with regard to
energy, the environment, and human well-
being
Creating a More Disaster Resilient America (CaMRA) • New $10 million GEO-wide program for FY12
Creating a More Disaster Resilient
America (CaMRA)
• New $10 million GEO-wide program for
FY12
• CaMRA will catalyze basic research efforts
in hazard-related science to improve
forecasting and prediction of natural and
man-made hazardous events
• A formal solicitation is anticipated
11 March M=9 Tohoku earthquake & tsunami
11 March M=9
Tohoku earthquake & tsunami
Tohoku M9.0 ruptured area of multiple previous M7.5 ‐M8 earthquakes M7 ‐ M8 earthquakes
Tohoku M9.0 ruptured area of multiple previous M7.5 ‐M8 earthquakes
M7 ‐ M8 earthquakes
Fault Rupture about 100,000 km 2 Japan M 9.0 2011 Both affected large areas of
Fault Rupture about 100,000 km 2
Japan M 9.0 2011
Both affected large areas of
seafloor, generating tsunamis
Chile M 8.8 2010
Mw 9.0 Tohoku 2011 Mw 8.8 Chile 2010 Hours to Hawaii Mw 9.5 Chile 1960
Mw 9.0 Tohoku 2011
Mw 8.8 Chile 2010
Hours to Hawaii
Mw 9.5 Chile 1960
Kwok Fai Cheung 1946 Alaska Tsunami Illustration of Regional Resonance
Kwok Fai Cheung
1946 Alaska Tsunami
Illustration of Regional Resonance
Kwok Fai Cheung 1946 Alaska Tsunami at Kahului Harbor Wave Transformation over Reefs and Inundation
Kwok Fai Cheung
1946 Alaska Tsunami at Kahului Harbor
Wave Transformation over Reefs and Inundation
Tsunami Magnitude ≥ 9 1837 Valdivia, Chile 9.3 1841 Kamchatka 9.0 1868 Arica, Chile 9.0
Tsunami Magnitude ≥ 9
1837
Valdivia, Chile 9.3
1841
Kamchatka 9.0
1868
Arica, Chile 9.0
1877
Iquique, Chile 9.0
1946
Aleutians 9.3
1952
Kamchatka 9.0
1957
Aleutians 9.0
1960
Chile 9.4
1964
Anchorage, Alaska 9.1
2004
Sumatra, Indonesia
9.0
2011
Tohoku, Japan 9.1
Moment magnitude scales size as 10 1.5 ~32: hence 0.2 = factor of 2
Earthquake
Christchurch, New Zealand Earthquakes Magnitude 7.0 on September 3, 2010 Magnitude 6.3 on February 21,
Christchurch, New Zealand Earthquakes
Magnitude 7.0 on September 3, 2010
Magnitude 6.3 on February 21, 2011
March 2008 - 2011 Kilauea March 5-9, 2011 1 2 3
March 2008 - 2011
Kilauea
March 5-9, 2011
1
2
3
KITV Measurement of Kilauea SO 2 (~1000 tons/day) Keith Horton & USGS Steve Businger Forecasting
KITV
Measurement of Kilauea
SO 2 (~1000 tons/day)
Keith Horton & USGS
Steve Businger Forecasting Kilauea VOG dispersal
Mauna Loa: Threat to S. Kona, Ka`u • Four 20 th century flows cut highway
Mauna Loa: Threat to S. Kona, Ka`u
• Four 20 th century flows cut highway 11
in a total of six places
• Fast moving lavas
• Short lead‐ times
1950 3.5 h
• Rapid development on slopes
1950
14h
• Few evacuation routes
1950
18h
• > 60 years ago, memories fading
1919
12h
1950
1926
8d
1868 3.5h
1907
15d
1887 20h
Mauna Loa: Threat to Hilo • Long ‐travelled (ample warning) • BUT high vulnerability 1984
Mauna Loa: Threat to Hilo
• Long ‐travelled
(ample warning)
• BUT high vulnerability
1984 lava
to 4 miles
from Hilo
Photo David Little