Sie sind auf Seite 1von 12

Chr

NOV

EMB 9TH ER B LOC K

is Y oo
F

AMERICAN CIVIL WAR!

The Union will triumph our brothers from the South!

Maecenas pulvinar sagittis enim.

Rhoncus tempor placerat.

Rhoncus tempor placerat.

TABLE OF CONTENTS!

PAGE

Resources......................................3 Preparation...................................4 Leaders.........................................5 Engagements................................6 Minority Groups...........................7 Camp Life.....................................8 Life on the Home Front...............9 Effects of the War.......................10 Reconstruction...........................11 Bibliography................................12
Dedicated to myself

SECTION 1: READYING FOR WAR!

PAGE

Union cannon

Wheat

RESOURCES

The Union had an advantage over the Confederacy in resources, ranging from man power to military and agricultural goods. The Union had a superior communication system due to its advanced railroad and telegraph wires.

SECTION 1: READYING FOR WAR!

PAGE

PREPARATION
The Union drafted men as disease swept across the army. Draft riots occurred as the citizens opposed the draft into the federal army. Most men, though, voluntarily fought to defeat the Confederacy.
Union Flag

The Union Army prepared their soldiers with great generals. They divided the army and also allowed blacks to join, although they were segregated and originally paid less.

A house divided against itself cannot stand. -Abraham Lincoln

SECTION 2: COMMANDERS AND CONFLICT!

PAGE

Leaders
George McClellan was a Union general who was extremely meticulous in his planning for battle. First serving in the Mexican-American War, McClellan served as general in chief before being sacked by Abraham Lincoln after failing to capture Richmond in his Peninsular Campaign. He held a grudge against Lincoln, and ran against him for Democratic nominee in the 1864 Presidential Nominations. William Henry Seward served as Senator and Governor of New York as well as the US Secretary of State under Lincoln and Andrew Johnson. He spoke against slavery as a Republican gure. He was loyal to Lincoln throughout the war and prevented foreign intervention. He was also targeted by the conspirators the same night Lincoln died, but survived. He also helped in annexing Alaska. William Sherman was a general for the Union, who focused mainly on the Western Theater of the war. A great strategist, he participated in numerous battles including The First Battle of Bull Run, Battle of Shiloh, and the Carolinas Campaign. Sherman succeeded Grant as Commanding General of the Army in 1869 and published the Memoirs. a detailed book on the civil war.

George Mcclellan

William Seward

William Sherman

SECTION 2: COMMANDERS AND CONFLICT!

PAGE

Engagements
Battle of Fort Henry and Donelson were both fought in Tennessee on February 1862. Ulysses S. Grant and Andrew Foote led the Union to a decisive victory in the Western Front. T h e e f f e c t i v e N av y d e s t r o ye d Confederate ranks. In Donelson, Grant surrounded the Fort and eventually captured all the Confederate soldiers. The Union continued to win battles in the Western front. The Battle of Hampton Roads, also known as the Battle of Monitor and Mer rimack, was the most important and memorable naval battles. It featured two ironclad warships for the rst time. The prototypical ironclad warships were copied all around the world. John Marston of the Union was the senior ofcer present. The Battle occurred on March 1862 near Virginia and ended with an indecisive conclusion. The Battle of Cold Harbor was fought from May 31 to June 12, 1864. Ulysses Grant and George Meade of the Union fought against Robert E. Lee. Located in Hanover County, Virginia, the Union suffered heavy casualties despite the huge number advantage. Part of Grants Overland Campaign, the Union soldiers had no chance of penetrating the frontal assault of the Confederate Army. The Union retreated after the heavy loss.

Battle of Fort Henry and Fort Donelson

Monitor VS. Merrimack

Battle of Cold Harbor

SECTION 2: COMMANDERS AND CONFLICT!

PAGE

Minority Groups
African Americans were given the choice to ght for the Union, and thus ght for their own independence of all blacks. Although generally put together and segregated, they still fought hard and obeyed the commanders. Women were especially valuable to the Union Army. Many women such as Clara Barton were out at the battleeld to retrieve injured men and provide medication. While most women provided medication or took over a mans job in the house, some participated in the battleeld themselves. Spies were prized, as they delivered infor mation of the Confederate Army. Spies such as Lafayette Baker and Allan Pinkerton worked undercover for Abraham Lincoln.

Lafayette Baker

Allan Pinkerton

Clara Barton

SECTION 3: AMERICANS DURING CIVIL WAR!

PAGE

Union Camp

Amputation

CAMP LIFE

Union soldiers suffered in army camps in many diverse ways. They were plagued with disease, deaths, boredom, and fear. The camps were damp and strictly regulated into xed patterns. Drills were routinely practiced. Water and other vitalities such as food were often in low demand. The Union, however, was in better shape than the Confederates, that did not have enough coffee for the soldiers. Soldiers played cards and wrote letters back to loved ones about the sorrow they feel on the battle ground. Despite regulations, alcohol, gambling, and prostitution was also rampant in the camps.

Although a soldier by profession, I have never felt any sort of fondness for war, and I have never advocated it, except as a means of peace. -Ulysses S. Grant

SECTION 3: AMERICANS DURING CIVIL WAR!

PAGE

Destroyed railroads

Woman in disguise

LIFE ON THE HOME FRONT

Civilians back at home suffered along with the soldiers in the Civil War. Women had to often ll in for the men in jobs such as tending the farms, taking care of children, managing the house, and continuing business operations. Some women joined the army, disguised as men such as Mary Livermore and Sarah Edmonds Seelye. Railiroads, homes, and entire towns were decimated by the war. Many civilians had to ee from their home town with their belongings. The Northern civilians were in better position than the South, as riots broke out over ination and the high price of food. The Norths economy stayed strong amidst the war.

SECTION 4: THE AFTERMATH OF THE CIVIL WAR!

PAGE

10

Effects of the War


The North was not a major battleeld for the Civil War, so the effects on the civilians was not vast. Economy actually thrived after the war due to the continuation of industry and manufacturing companies. Casualty number was high, but the sacrice of individuals led to a greater achievement for the nation as a whole. African Americans were granted freedom and the right to vote. African churches were established. A tragic also struck, as John Wilkes Booth assassinated Abraham Lincoln at Ford Theater. The conspirators loathed the abolition movement. They were hanged in Washington D.C. The Union essentially won the battle against the South, and therefore enforced the abolition of slaves. The wooden mill and meat-packaging industry prospered greatly.

African Church

SECTION 4: THE AFTERMATH OF THE CIVIL WAR!

PAGE

11

Reconstruction
Reconstruction was viewed as something vital to reunite the union and strengthen the economy of the United States as a whole. However, president Lincoln, Andrew Johnson, and Congress all had different ideas. After Congress took over Andrew Johnson, they decided to partially punish the South by placing federal troops in the area. They also believed in giving blacks freedom to vote and general liberty protected under the Constitution. Reconstruction was generally successful, as the South was brought back into the Union and plans were made to boost their economy. The South suffered from cotton being valued less, so plans were accommodated to reconstruct railroads and industry. The main goal, which was to grant blacks freedom, was accomplished.

SECTION 5: BIBLIOGRAPHY!

PAGE

12

Works Cited "American Civil War History.com Articles, Video, Pictures and Facts."History.com History Made Every Day American & World History. Web. 09 Nov. 2011. <http:// www.history.com/topics/american-civil-war>. "American Civil War." American Civil War History Timelines Battle Map Pictures. 1997. Web. 09 Nov. 2011. <http://americancivilwar.com/>. Blanton, DeAnne. "Prologue: Selected Articles." National Archives and Records Administration. The

U.S. National Archives and Records Administration, Spring 1993. Web. 09 Nov. 2011. <http:// www.archives.gov/publications/prologue/1993/spring/women-in-the-civil-war-1.html>. "The Civil War . Images of the Civil War | PBS." PBS: Public Broadcasting Service. 2002. Web. Nov. 2011. <http://www.pbs.org/civilwar/images/>. "Civil War." Civil War. Web. 09 Nov. 2011. <http://www.civilwar.com/>. "The Civil War." The Civil War Home Page. Web. 01 Nov. 2011. <http://www.civil-war.net/>. Danzer, Gerald A., and Larry S. Krieger. The Americans. Evanston, IL: McDougal Littell, 2009. Print. "Selected Civil War Photographs." American Memory. The Library of Congress, 15 Jan. 2000. Web. 1 Nov. 2011. "U.S. Civil War 1861-1865." The History Place. The History Place, 1996. Web. 09 Nov. 2011. <http://www.historyplace.com/civilwar/>. "U.S. Civil War Effects on People: Primary Sources." Kentucky Educational Television: Explore Kentucky. Explore the World. KET, 2011. Web. 09 Nov. 2011. <http://www.ket.org/civilwar/primary.html>.