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NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011

Fees & Registration BOSH 2011 Registration Fees are as follow: Normal Fee NIOSH Member/Registered SHO/Government Student Early Bird : RM 800.00 : RM 700.00

About BOSH 2011 The Borneo Conference and Exhibition on Occupational Safety and Health (BOSH) is an event held in the Borneo region and organised by NIOSH in your aim to provide a platform to issues and challenges of Occupational Safety and Health (OSH). The event was first held in Kota Kinabalu in 2009 and is to be continued this year in the beautiful city of Kuching, Sarawak. This conference can be regarded as the sister event to the just concluded Conference and Exhibition on Occupational, Safety and Health 2011(COSH 2011). BOSH 2011 will be the ideal convergence point for OSH professionals in the region as well as other counterparts to share and update their OSH knowledge and skills to meet the dynamic changes in the working environment and move towards a common aspiration which is to achieve a safer and healthier workplace for all. More detail : http://www.niosh.com.my/bosh2011/

: RM 650.00 : RM 700.00 (applicable for the first 50 participants with confirmed payment)

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011

Theme As the worlds economy is facing a downturn, many organizations have taken the step to forsaken safety and health as a cost cutting measure. This measure not only has turned the workplace into an accident prone area but it has as well collapsed businesses. Safety and health is in fact part of the solution of this growing problem. It has been proven and documented as a business advantage because a safe workplace indirectly increases productivity and increased productivity increases the financial output of an organization. Hence, the theme for BOSH 2011, A Business Advantage : Safety and Health Issues At the Workplace. Venue Pullman Hotel, Kuching 1A Jalan Mathies 93100 Kuching, Sarawak Tel : (+60)82/222888 Fax : (+60)82/222999 E-mail : H6332@accor.com Website : http://www.pullmanhotels.com/gb/hotel-6332-pullmankuching/location.shtml Location and access From the airport arrival hall, purchase the public taxi voucher to Pullman Kuching. The taxi ride will take between 15 and 30 minutes depending on traffic. Click here for the Pullman Kuching room rate offer & reservation form

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011

Contact Us
For further information, please contact: BOSH 2011 Secretariat National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Sarawak Regional Office (Kuching) No 90 Sublot 11, Lot 324, Section 54, Jalan Petanak, 93100 Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia. Tel. No.: +6082-256500 Fax : +6082-253020 Sarawak Regional Office (Bintulu) No 285, Phase 4, Parkcity Commerce Square, Jalan Tun Ahmad Zaidi, 97100, Bintulu, Sarawak, Malaysia. Tel. No.: +6086-315501 Fax :+6086-315501 Sarawak Regional Office (Miri) Lot 10620, Miri Commercial Shop Lot, Airport Road 98000 Miri Sarawak, Malaysia. Tel. No.: +6085-406085 Fax : +6085-406086 Sabah Regional Office (Kota Kinabalu) Wisma PERKESO Ground Floor, East Wing No. 11, Lorong Sempelang Tanjung Aru, 88100 Kota Kinabalu, Sabah Tel: 088-264252 Fax : 088-263252 Sabah Regional Office (Labuan) 1st Floor, Lot 1 & 2, Block A, Shermadef Commercial Centre, KM1.5, Jalan Patau-Patau 87018 Federal Territory Labuan. Tel: 087-423 254 Fax: 087-423 255 Email : bosh2011sarawak@gmail.com

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011 OSH INFO:


Overview Air Fresheners are a common commercial product used to create a pleasant smelling and clean indoor atmosphere in homes and businesses. They are known to contain a number of different chemical agents in order to neutralize offensive odors and create a more pleasant scent. The basic ingredients in air fresheners are formaldehyde, petroleum distillates, 1,4 dichlorobenzene and aerosol propellants. Recently many of these chemicals have been investigated for their safety. Some common chemicals found in air fresheners have been found to be toxic to humans and may increase the incidence of many different health problems. Natural and healthy air fresheners are now being used as alternatives to conventional air fresheners in order to minimize health hazards and environmental pollution. Best Practices Enhance Ventilation - Good ventilation systems reduce the need for air fresheners by eliminating the need to mask odors and naturally eliminates unpleasant odors. Air fresheners cannot substitute for good ventilation. Minimize Air Freshener Use - Air fresheners only mask the offensive odors and do not remove them. Avoid using air fresheners as often, but when necessary use as little as possible in order to reduce the amount of hazardous chemicals in the air. Air fresheners should only be programmed to run if needed and should only be used for odors that are unable to avoid. Use Natural and Safe Air Freshener Alternatives - Many products are available that offer healthy alternatives to commercial air fresheners. Organic soy and beeswax candles, natural potpourri, fresh flowers or herbs, natural essential oils, environmentally friendly non-aerosol pump sprays, and baking soda are all safe alternatives. Businesses that are looking to find non-toxic air fresheners should investigate available products to ensure their safety. Currently, regulations do not require manufacturers to list ingredients or require them to perform health and safety testing. Businesses and consumers should be aware of this and should take time to find air fresheners that are known to be safe. Use Low-level Phthalate Air Fresheners - Use air freshener products known to have low levels of phthalates and other hazardous chemicals present in order to reduce potential health risks. Most products do not have labels that inform consumers of the presence of toxic chemicals. Consumers should be aware that the majority of air fresheners contain at least a low level of these dangerous chemicals and should understand that they are using them at their own risk.
References : http://toxipedia.org/display/toxipedia/Air+Fresheners

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011 OSH INFO:


What is diabetes? Diabetes (also known as diabetes mellitus) is a condition in which the body either can't make or can't use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone normally produced by the pancreas. Insulin is very important because it regulates the sugar level in the blood, and it allows the body to use this sugar for energy. Without enough insulin, the body's cells can't get the energy they need, the sugar level in the blood gets too high, and many problems can result. Diabetes is not curable, but, fortunately, it is treatable. There are two main types of diabetes. They are known as type 1 and type 2. Type 1 diabetes (also known as juvenile-onset or insulin-dependent diabetes) usually affects children and young adults. People with type 1 diabetes can't make insulin, so they need to take insulin shots to stay alive. Type 2 diabetes (also known as adult-onset or non insulin-dependent diabetes) is much more common than type 1 diabetes. In fact 90-95% of diabetes is type 2. This type of diabetes is more common in people who are over the age of 40 and overweight. It also tends to run in families. People with type 2 diabetes make some insulin but either it's not enough, or their bodies just aren't able to use it properly. Many people with type 2 diabetes can control their blood sugar with diet and oral medication, but some people also need to use insulin shots. There are many complications that come from diabetes and poor blood sugar control. People with diabetes can develop nerve problems, kidney disorders, blindness, and severe infections. They also have a higher risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and certain cancers, like pancreatic and uterine cancer. Each year almost 200,000 Americans die from diabetes and its complication. Another Type of Diabetes: Gestational Diabetes About 3-5 % of women develop diabetes during pregnancy, called gestational diabetes. Usually a temporary condition that goes goes away after giving birth, gestational diabetes can nevertheless cause problems for both mother and baby. Some complications include certain types of birth defects, abnormally large babies, and an increased risk of caesarian section. Even if the diabetes disappears after the baby is born, women who have had gestational diabetes also have a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes later in life.

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011 OSH INFO:


How common is diabetes? Diabetes is very common in the United States. Almost 16 million people have it, and the numbers are growing. Most people with diabetes have type 2. Who is at risk of diabetes? Anyone can develop diabetes, but most people that have diabetes are adults over the age of 40, and the risk increases with age. African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asians and Pacific Islanders are at higher risk of developing diabetes compared to whites. Also, people who are overweight, inactive, smoke or have family members with diabetes are at a higher risk. How can you lower your risk of diabetes? There are things you can do to reduce your risk of developing diabetes: Maintain a healthy weight Get regular exercise Don't smoke Eat a healthy diet that focuses on whole grains and "good" fats (like olive and canola oil) Who should be screened? Screening for diabetes is very important because millions of people have this disease and don't know it. Everyone age 45 and older should have their blood sugar checked by a doctor at least once every 3 years. People who are at higher risk may need to be tested earlier and more often. Screening is easy with simple blood and urine tests that can have important benefits. If you find out you have the disease, you can take steps to treat it and prevent complications. What are the symptoms? Some people develop symptoms like strong thirst, increased feelings of hunger, frequent urination and wounds that don't heal. However, many people with diabetes have no symptoms. That is why screening is important.

For more information about diabetes, visit these web sites: A Few Facts About Diabetes: Joslin Diabetes Center Basic Diabetes Information: American Diabetes Association

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011 OSH INFO:


Factors that increase a person's risk of Type 2 diabetes but cannot be changed include: Age and diabetes The risk of type 2 diabetes increases with age, and it is most common in people over the age of 40. Personal history of diabetes or high blood sugar People who have had problems with high blood sugar in the past may be at higher risk of developing diabetes. Women who have had diabetes during pregnancy (called gestational diabetes) are also at higher risk of developing diabetes later in life. Family history and diabetes A person with a close relative who had diabetes has a higher risk of developing the disease. This increased risk is probably due to a combination of shared genes and shared lifestyle factors. Race and ethnicity Type 2 diabetes is more common in African Americans, Latinos, Native Americans, Asians and Pacific Islanders, compared to whites. Most risk factors for diabetes can be modified to reduce risk, either through lifestyle changes or through medication, if needed. These include: Weight, waist size and diabetes The risk of Type 2 diabetes goes up as body weight increases. This is especially true for people who carry extra body fat around the waist (called "apple shaped"). Extra weight affects the body's sensitivity to insulin and it also puts extra strain on the whole body, increasing the risk of heart disease, stroke, high blood pressure and high cholesterol. Maintaining a healthy weight has been proven to decrease the risk of cancer of the colon, kidney, breast and uterus.

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011 OSH INFO:


Tobacco smoke and diabetes Smoking increases the risk of diabetes. Smoking can increase blood sugar levels and decrease the body's ability to use insulin. It can also change the way the body stores excess fat - increasing fat around the waist, which is linked to diabetes. The damage that tobacco chemicals do to blood vessels, muscles and organs may also increase the risk of diabetes. Tobacco exposure also increases your risk of heart disease, stroke, peripheral vascular disease, emphysema, bronchitis, osteoporosis, and cancers of the lung, bladder, kidney, pancreas, cervix, lip, mouth, tongue, larynx, throat and esophagus. For many people, quitting smoking is the single best thing they can do to improve their health. Physical activity and diabetes Exercise is one of the best ways to help maintain a healthy weight, a key factor in lowering the risk of diabetes. Exercise also helps the body's cells use insulin effectively, which makes it easier to control blood sugar levels. In addition, exercise also helps prevent other diseases such as heart disease, stroke, osteoporosis, and colon cancer. Even just 30 minutes of moderate exercise (like walking) daily can decrease your risk of disease. Diet and diabetes Diet can be a powerful tool for lowering the risk of diabetes. The best approach? Eat a diet that focuses on whole grains, cereal fiber, and liquid vegetable oils and limits refined starches (like potatoes and white bread). Alcohol and diabetes Moderate alcohol (about one drink a day for women and two for men) has been shown to decrease the risk of diabetes compared to nondrinkers. Limited use of alcohol may also decrease the risk of developing heart disease. However, it is not recommended that non-drinkers start drinking. Alcohol use has many of its own risks like increasing blood pressure, body weight, heart failure, addiction, suicide and accidents. People who limit their use of alcohol also have a lower risk of colon cancer, and breast cancer.

Info from : http://www.yourdiseaserisk.wustl.edu/hccpquiz.pl?lang=english&func=show&quiz=diabetes&page=risk_list

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011


BOOK REVIEW:
Editorial Reviews Product Description Twenty-five years ago, how many people were thinking about the internet on a daily basis? Now you can find everything, including technical and instruction manuals, online. But some things never change. Users still need instructions and warnings to guide them in the safe and proper use of products. Good design, clear instructions and warnings, placement of graphics, all the traditional elements hold true whether designing for print or online materials. And technical writers still need those two most valuable commoditiestime and informationto do their jobs well. Another constant, Writing and Designing Manuals and Warnings, now in its fourth edition, offers real-world guidance based on real-world know-how for the development of product documentation. See Whats New in the Fourth Edition: New organization to clarify the principles of manual and warning development Coverage of the digital revolution and the global marketplace Expanded section on product safety and warnings Information on international standards for warnings Backed by Research and Collective Experience Drawn from the collective experience of hundreds of technical writers, graphic artists, and product safety engineers, along with the authors nearly 30 years of experience helping companies improve instructions and warnings, this how-to book covers every aspect of developing state-of-the-art product manuals and safety warnings. Filled with examples that show how good manuals and effective warnings can add value to your companys products and build repeat business, while at the same time reducing liability exposure, the text demonstrates how to create manuals that give products a competitive edge and improve customer satisfaction. Solidly grounded in research, but not a stuffy academic treatise, this down-to-earth, practical book is a survival guide for writers in the real world of short deadlines and tight budgets. About the Author Coranado Consulting Services, Wisconsin, USA

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011


CONTBOOK REVIEW:

Product Details Hardcover: 352 pages Publisher: CRC Press; 4 edition (June 15, 2009) Language: English ISBN-10: 1420069845 ISBN-13: 978-1420069846 Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1 inches Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies) Average Customer Review: Be the first to review this item Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,001,626 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

**Book for reference only :More details of this book, please refer NIOSH Library and to browse list of collection please visit; http://www.niosh.com.my

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 19, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : HARIAN METRO 01/10/2011 11 Macam perang
Letupan kuat tong gas di Terminal Bas Segamat musnahkan lima gerai

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : BERITA HARIAN 03/10/2011 27 Ujian tong gas elak kes letupan berulang

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : UTUSAN MALAYSIA 06/10/2011 06 Hasil kajian projek rintis Program Minda Sihat di peringkat sekolah Tahap stres pelajar kita tinggi

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : HARIAN METRO 06/10/2011 35 Selangor catat kes kebocoran petroluem tertinggi

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : HARIAN METRO 06/10/2011 15 Ramai pelajar murung

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : HARIAN METRO 05/10/2011 06 Bilah mesin tusuk kepala Lelaki koma tersilap tekan suis mesin pemotong rumput ketika mahu tukar mata pisau baru dibeli

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : THE STAR 05/10/2011 03 Giant crane falls on pre-war house One killed and three hurt in George Town

NIOSH Updates : Volume 4, Number 18, 2011

OSH :
Publication Date Page Headline : : : : BERITA HARIAN 05/10/2011 13 Ditindih kren tapi selamat Warga tua cerita pengalaman menakutkan kena hempap

**More details of OSH newspaper cutting, please refer NIOSH website http://www.niosh.com.my/# , under online services e-sumber (NIOSH Library)