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inspection

Definition
Critical appraisal involving examination, measurement, testing, gauging, and comparison of materials or items. An inspection determines if the material or item is in proper quantity and condition, and if it conforms to the applicable or specifiedrequirements. Inspection is generally divided into three categories: (1) Receiving inspection, (2) In-process inspection, and (3) Final inspection. In quality control (which is guided by the principle that "Quality cannot be inspected into a product") the roleof inspection is to verify and validate the variance data; it does not involve separating the good from the bad.

inspection
Definition
Physicalexaminationof apropertyorcommoditytoconfirmthat itmeetsthestandardsof thecontract.

INSPECTION, comm. law. The examination of certain articles made by law subject to such examination, so that they may be declared fit for commerce. The decision of the inspectors is not final; the object' of the law is to protect the community from fraud, and to preserve the character of the merchandise abroad. 8 Cowen, R. 45. See 1 John. 205; 13 John. R. 331; 2 Caines, R. 312; 3 Caines, R. 207. Source: Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856)

INSPECTION, practice. Examination. 2. The inspection of all public records is free to all persons who have an interest in them, upon payment of the usual fees. 7 Mod. 129; 1 Str. 304; 2 Str. 260, 954, 1005. But it seems a mere stranger who has no such interest, has no

right, at common law. 8 T. R. 390. Vide Trial by inspection. Source: Bouvier's Law Dictionary, Revised 6th Ed (1856)

inspection A formal evaluation technique in which software requirements, design, or code are examined in detail by a person or group other than the author to detect faults, violations of development standards, and other problems. (1996-05-22) Source: The Free On-line Dictionary of Computing (27 SEP 03)

Inspection \In*spec"tion\, n. [L. inspectio: cf. F. inspection.] 1. The act or process of inspecting or looking at carefully; a strict or prying examination; close or careful scrutiny; investigation. --Spenser. [1913 Webster] With narrow search, and with inspection deep, Considered every creature. --Milton. [1913 Webster] 2. The act of overseeing; official examination or superintendence. [1913 Webster]

Definition and Purpose


by Phil Bartle, PhD

Workshop Handout

This explains what monitoring is and the purposes it serves

What is Monitoring?

Monitoring is the regular observation and recording of activities taking place in a project or programme. It is a process of routinely gathering information on all aspects of the project. To monitor is to check on how project activities are progressing. It is observation; systematic and purposeful observation. Monitoring also involves giving feedback about the progress of the project to the donors, implementors and beneficiaries of the project. Reporting enables the gathered information to be used in making decisions for improving project performance.

Purpose of Monitoring:
Monitoring is very important in project planning and implementation. It is like watching where you are going while riding a bicycle; you can adjust as you go along and ensure that you are on the right track. Monitoring provides information that will be useful in:

Analysing the situation in the community and its project; Determining whether the inputs in the project are well utilized; Identifying problems facing the community or project and finding solutions; Ensuring all activities are carried out properly by the right people and in time; Using lessons from one project experience on to another; and Determining whether the way the project was planned is the most appropriate way of solving the problem at hand.

Community Based Monitoring Workshop:

Defining supervision There are many different ideas about what constitutes 'supervision' and, therefore, many definitions. The following document outlines the major conceptualisations of supervision in Counselling Psychology. Some practitioners may prefer the term 'consultative support'; in this document, the terms are to be considered interchangeable. *Style notes: Although supervisor and supervisee are referred to in the singular, the plural is implied for cases of peer and group supervision. 1. EXTENDED DEFINITION OF SUPERVISION:

Supervision is:

An activity where one or more practitioners discuss issues about their work, in order to reflect on that work and have the work reflected on by one or more other professionals. Because it is conducted in a boundaried space the supervisee is supported in a way that allows for uncensored and even playful reflection as a basis for analysing and evaluating the work that has been done and the possibilities for work to come. Supervision is also an ethical activity that recognises the complexity of involvements and relationships in human interaction and the critical importance of support for all participants in the supervisory process beyond Codes and Guidelines. A process of ongoing, collaborative, experiential and transformational learning using theoretical understanding and evidence from research and practice that is reflected upon and applied to practice. Intersubjectivity or the willingness and ability of all participants in the supervisory process to be equally involved is particularly valued. However, supervision is not therapy and the activity of supervision is separate from line management.

Investigation
The act of investigating; the process of inquiring into or following up; research; study; inquiry, esp. patient or thorough inquiry or examination; as, the investigations of the philosopher and the mathematician; the investigations of the judge, the moralist.

What does investigation mean?

we found 4 entries for the meaning of investigation

Investigation \In*ves`ti*ga"tion\, n. [L. investigatio: cf. F. investigation.] The act of investigating; the process of inquiring into or following up; research; study; inquiry, esp. patient or thorough inquiry or examination; as, the investigations of the philosopher and the mathematician; the investigations of the judge, the moralist. [1913 Webster] Source: The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.48

65 Moby Thesaurus words for "investigation": airing, amassing evidence, analysis, buzz session, canvassing, close inquiry, colloquium, conference, consideration, debate, debating, deliberation, delving, department of investigation, detection, detective work, dialectic, dialogue, discussion, enquiry, examination, exchange of views, exhaustive study, exploration, forum, hearing, indagation, inquest, inquiry, inquisition, interrogation, investigative bureau, joint discussion, legislative investigation, legwork, logical analysis, logical discussion, observation, observing, open discussion, open forum, panel discussion, perscrutation, probe, probing, quest, questioning, rap, rap session, research, review, scrutiny, search, seminar, sifting, sleuthing, sounding, study, survey, surveying, symposium, town meeting, treatment, ventilation, witch-hunt Source: Moby Thesaurus II by Grady Ward, 1.0

investigation noun 1: an inquiry into unfamiliar or questionable activities; "there was a congressional probe into the scandal" [syn:probe] 2: the work of inquiring into something thoroughly and systematically [syn: investigating] Source: WordNet (r) 2.0

Investigation \In*ves`ti*ga"tion\, n. [L. investigatio: cf. F. investigation.] The act of investigating; the process of inquiring into or following up; research; study; inquiry, esp. patient or thorough inquiry or examination; as, the investigations of the philosopher and the mathematician; the investigations of the judge, the moralist. Source: Webster's Revised Unabridged Dictionary (1913)

Investigation is the process of inquiring into a matter through research, follow-up, study, or formal procedure of discovery.