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Turmeric

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Turmeric

Curcuma longa

Scientific classification Kingdom: Order: Family: Genus: Species: Plantae Zingiberales Zingiberaceae Curcuma C. longa Binomial name Curcuma longa
Linnaeus[1]

Turmeric (Curcuma longa) is a rhizomatous herbaceous perennial plant of the ginger family, Zingiberaceae.[2] It is native to tropical South Asia and needs temperatures between 20C and 30C and a considerable amount of annual rainfall to thrive.[3] Plants are gathered annually for their rhizomes, and propagated from some of those rhizomes in the following season. When not used fresh, the rhizomes are boiled for several hours and then dried in hot ovens, after which they are ground into a deep orange-yellow powder commonly used as a spice in curries and other South Asian and Middle Eastern cuisine, for dyeing, and to impart color to mustard condiments. Its active ingredient is curcumin and it has a distinctly earthy, slightly bitter, slightly hot peppery flavor and a mustardy smell. In medieval Europe, turmeric became known as Indian saffron, since it was widely used as an alternative to the far more expensive saffron spice.[4] Erode, a city in the south Indian state of Tamil Nadu, is the world's largest producer and most important trading center of turmeric in Asia. For these reasons, Erode in history is also known as "Yellow City" [citation needed] or "Turmeric City".[citation needed] Sangli, a town in the southern part of the Indian western state of Maharashtra, is the

second largest and most important trading center for turmeric in Asia.Tumeric is known as "Manjal" and tumeric powder is known as "Manjal Thool" in Tamil language and in Tamil Nadu,India.
Contents
[hide]

1 Nomenclature and taxonomy 2 Usage

o o o o o o o

2.1 Culinary uses 2.2 Uses in folk medicine 2.3 Preliminary medical research 2.4 Cosmetics 2.5 Dye 2.6 Gardening 2.7 Ceremonial uses

3 Composition 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

[edit]Nomenclature

and taxonomy

Kingdom | Plantae (plants), Phylum | Magnoliophyta (flowering plants), Class | Liliopsida (monoctyledons), Order | Zingiberales (gingers, bananas, birds-of-paradise, heliconias, costus, cannas, prayer plants, arrowroots, etc.), Family | Zingiberaceae (ginger family), Genus | Curcuma (curcuma), Species | Curcuma longa (common turmeric),
This section requires expansion.

[edit]Usage [edit]Culinary

uses

Turmeric powder is used extensively in South Asian cuisine.

Commercially packaged turmeric powder

Turmeric grows wild in the forests of Southeast Asia. It has become the key ingredient for manyIndian, Persian and Thai dishes, not only in curry, but also in many more. In Indonesia, the turmeric leaves are used for Minangese or Padangese curry base of Sumatra, such as rendang, sate padang and many other varieties. Although most usage of turmeric is in the form of root powder, in some regions (especially inMaharashtra), leaves of turmeric are used to wrap and cook food. This usually takes place in areas where turmeric is grown locally, since the leaves used are freshly picked. This imparts a distinct flavor. In recipes outside South Asia, turmeric is sometimes used as an agent to impart a rich, custard-like yellow color. It is used in canned beverages and baked products, dairy products, ice cream, yogurt, yellow cakes, orange juice, biscuits, popcorn color, sweets, cake icings, cereals, sauces, gelatins, etc.[citation needed] It is a significant ingredient in most commercial curry powders. Turmeric is mostly used in savory dishes, as well as some sweet dishes, such as the cake sfouf. Nestle, who owns Gerber foods for babies, also uses Turmeric extract for coloring purposes. Although usually used in its dried, powdered form, turmeric is also used fresh, much like ginger. It has numerous uses in Far Eastern recipes, such as fresh turmeric pickle, which contains large chunks of soft turmeric. Turmeric (coded as E100 when used as a food additive)[5] is used to protect food products from sunlight. The oleoresin is used for oil-containing products. The curcumin/polysorbate solution or curcumin powder dissolved in alcohol is used for water-containing products. Over-coloring, such as in pickles, relishes, and mustard, is sometimes used to compensate for fading. In combination with annatto (E160b), turmeric has been used to color cheeses, yogurt, dry mixes, salad dressings, winter butter and margarine. Turmeric is also used to give a yellow color to some prepared mustards, canned chicken broths and other foods (often as a much cheaper replacement for saffron).

Turmeric is widely used as a spice in South Asian and Middle Eastern cooking. Many Persian dishes use turmeric as a starter ingredient for almost all Iranian fry ups (which typically consist of oil, onions and turmeric followed by any other ingredients that are to be included). In Nepal, turmeric is widely grown and is extensively used in almost every vegetable and meat dish in the country for its color, as well as for its medicinal value. In South Africa, turmeric is traditionally used to give boiled white rice a golden color. In Goa and Dakshina Kannada (Karnataka state, India), turmeric plant leaf is used to prepare special sweet dishes, patoleo, by layering on the leaf rice flour, and coconut-jaggery mixture, and then closing and steaming in a special copper steamer (goa).

[edit]Uses

in folk medicine

Turmeric plant

Main article: Curcumin In Ayurvedic practices, turmeric has many medicinal properties and many in South Asia use it as a readily availableantiseptic for cuts, burns and bruises. It is also used as an antibacterial agent. It is taken in some Asian countries as a dietary supplement, which allegedly helps with stomach problems and other ailments. It is popular as a tea in Okinawa, Japan. Indians also use it as an anti-inflammatory agent, and remedy for gastrointestinal discomfort associated with irritable bowel syndrome, and other digestive disorders. In Afghanistan and northwest Pakistan, turmeric is applied to a piece of burnt cloth, and placed over a wound to cleanse and stimulate recovery. Indians, in addition to its Ayurvedic properties, use turmeric in a wide variety of skin creams that are also exported to neighboring countries.

[edit]Preliminary

medical research

Turmeric is currently being investigated for possible benefits in Alzheimer's disease,[6] cancer, arthritis, and other clinical disorders.[7]

Turmeric rhizome

In the latter half of the 20th century, curcumin was identified as responsible for most of the biological effects of turmeric. According to a 2005 article in the Wall Street Journal, research activity into curcumin and turmeric is increasing, with supplement sales increased 35% from 2004. The U.S. National Institutes of Health currently has registered 19 clinical trials underway to study use of dietary turmeric and curcumin for a variety of clinical disorders (dated February 2010).[8]

[edit]Cosmetics
Turmeric paste is traditionally used by Indian women to keep them free of superfluous hair and as an antimicrobial. Turmeric paste, as part of both home remedies and Ayurveda, is also said to improve the skin and is touted as an anti-aging agent. Turmeric figures prominently in the bridal beautification ceremonies of India, Bangladesh, and Pakistan. Staining oneself with turmeric is believed to improve the skin tone and tan. Turmeric is currently used in the formulation of some sunscreens.[citation needed] The government of Thailand is funding a project to extract and isolate tetrahydrocurcuminoids (THC) from turmeric. THCs are colorless compounds that might haveantioxidant and skin-lightening properties, and might be used to treat skin inflammations, making these compounds useful in cosmetics formulations.

[edit]Dye

Inflorescence in Goa, India.

Turmeric makes a poor fabric dye, as it is not very light fast (it fades with exposure to sunlight). However, turmeric is commonly used in Indian clothing, such as saris.

[edit]Gardening
Turmeric can also be used to deter ants. The exact reasons why turmeric repels ants is unknown, but anecdotal evidence suggests it works.[9]

[edit]Ceremonial

uses

Turmeric is considered highly auspicious in India and is used extensively in various Indian ceremonies for millennia. Even today it is used in every part of India during wedding ceremonies and religious ceremonies. It is used in Pujas to make a form of Hindu god Vinayagar. Lord Vinayagar, the remover of obstacles, is invoked at the beginning of almost any ceremony and a form of Ganesh for this purpose is made by mixing turmeric with water and forming it into a cone-like shape. During the south Indian festival Pongal, a whole turmeric plant with fresh rhizomes is offered as a thanksgiving offering to Suryan, the Sun god. Also, the fresh plant sometimes is tied around the sacred Pongal pot in which an offering of pongal is prepared. In southern India, as a part of the marriage ritual, dried turmeric tuber tied with string is used to replace the Thali necklace temporarily or permanently. The Hindu Marriage act recognizes this custom. Thali necklace is the equivalent of marriage rings of west. Modern Neopagans list it with the quality of fire, and it is used for power and purification rites. Friedrich Ratzel in "The History of Mankind" reported in 1896 that in Micronesia the preparation of turmeric powder for embellishment of body, clothing and utensils had a highly ceremonial character. [10] He quotes an example of the roots being ground by four to six women in special public buildings and then allowed to stand in water. The following morning, three young coconuts and three old soma nuts are offered by a priestess with prayer, after which the dye which has settled down in the water is collected, baked into cakes in coconut moulds, wrapped in banana leaves, and hung up in the huts till required for use.

[edit]Composition

Curcumin keto form

Curcumin enol form

Turmeric contains up to 5% essential oils and up to 5% curcumin, a polyphenol. Curcumin is the active substance of turmeric and curcumin is known as C.I. 75300, or Natural Yellow 3. The systematic chemical name is (1E,6E)-1,7-bis(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-1,6-heptadiene-3,5-dione. It can exist at least in two tautomeric forms, keto and enol. The keto form is preferred in solid phase and the enol form in solution. Curcumin is a pH indicator. In acidic solutions (pH <7.4) it turns yellow, whereas in basic (pH > 8.6) solutions it turns bright red.

Turmeric
Turmeric has a peppery, warm and bitter flavor and a mild fragrance slightly reminiscent of orange and ginger, and while it is best known as one of the ingredients used to make curry, it also gives ballpark mustard its bright yellow color. Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma longa plant and has a tough brown skin and a deep orange flesh. Turmeric has long been used as a powerful anti-inflammatory in both the Chinese and Indian systems of medicine. Turmeric was traditionally called Indian saffron because of its deep yelloworange color and has been used throughout history as a condiment, healing remedy and textile dye.

Health Benefits
Turmeric (Curcuma longa), the bright yellow of the spice rainbow, is a powerful medicine that has long been used in the Chinese and Indian systems of medicine as an anti-inflammatory agent to treat a wide variety of conditions, including flatulence, jaundice, menstrual difficulties, bloody urine, hemorrhage, toothache, bruises, chest pain, and colic.

A Potent, Yet Safe Anti-Inflammatory


The volatile oil fraction of turmeric has demonstrated significant antiinflammatory activity in a variety of experimental models. Even more potent than its volatile oil is the yellow or orange pigment of turmeric, which is called curcumin. Curcumin is thought to be the primary pharmacological agent in turmeric. In numerous studies, curcumin's anti-inflammatory effects have been shown to be comparable to the potent drugs hydrocortisone and phenylbutazone as well as over-the-counter anti-inflammatory agents such as Motrin. Unlike the drugs, which are associated with significant toxic effects (ulcer formation, decreased white blood cell count, intestinal bleeding), curcumin produces no toxicity.

An Effective Treatment for Inflammatory Bowel Disease


Curcumin may provide an inexpensive, well-tolerated, and effective treatment for inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) such as Crohn's and ulcerative colitis, recent research suggests. In this study, mice given an inflammatory agent that normally induces colitis were protected when curcumin was added to their diet five days beforehand. The mice receiving curcumin not only lost much less weight than the control animals, but when researchers checked their intestinal cell function, all the signs typical of colitis (mucosal ulceration, thickening of the

intestinal wall, and the infiltration of inflammatory cells)were all much reduced. While the researchers are not yet sure exactly how curcumin achieves its protective effects, they think its benefits are the result of not only antioxidant activity, but also inhibition of a major cellular inflammatory agent called NF kappa-B. Plus, an important part of the good news reported in this study is the fact that although curcumin has been found to be safe at very large doses, this component of turmeric was effective at a concentration as low as 0.25 per centan amount easily supplied by simply enjoying turmeric in flavorful curries.

Relief for Rheumatoid Arthritis


Clinical studies have substantiated that curcumin also exerts very powerful antioxidant effects. As an antioxidant, curcumin is able to neutralize free radicals, chemicals that can travel through the body and cause great amounts of damage to healthy cells and cell membranes. This is important in many diseases, such as arthritis, where free radicals are responsible for the painful joint inflammation and eventual damage to the joints. Turmeric's combination of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory effects explains why many people with joint disease find relief when they use the spice regularly. In a recent study of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, curcumin was compared to phenylbutazone and produced comparable improvements in shortened duration of morning stiffness, lengthened walking time, and reduced joint swelling.

Help for Cystic Fibrosis Sufferers


Curcumin, the major constituent of turmeric that gives the spice its yellow color, can correct the most common expression of the genetic defect that is responsible for cystic fibrosis, suggests an animal study published in the Science (April 2004). Cystic fibrosis, a fatal disease that attacks the lungs with a thick mucus, causing life-threatening infections, afflicts about 30,000 American children and young adults, who rarely survive beyond 30 years of age. The mucus also damages the pancreas, thus interfering with the body-ability to digest and absorb nutrients. Researchers now know that cystic fibrosis is caused by mutations in the gene that encodes for a protein (the transmembrane conductance regulator or CFTR). The CTFR protein is responsible for traveling to the cell-surface and creating channels through which chloride ions can leave the cell. When the protein is abnormally shaped because of a faulty gene, this cannot happen, so chloride builds up in the cells, which in turn, leads to mucus production. The most common mutation, which is called DeltaF508, results in the production of a misfolded protein. When mice with this DeltaF508 defect were given curcumin in doses that, on a weight-per-weight basis, would be well-tolerated by humans, curcumin corrected this defect, resulting in a DeltaF508 protein with normal appearance and function. In addition, the Yale scientists studying

curcumin have shown that it can inhibit the release of calcium, thus allowing mutated CTFR to exit cells via the calcium channels, which also helps stop the chloride-driven build up of mucus. Specialists in the treatment of cystic fibrosis caution, however, that patients should not self-medicate with dietary supplements containing curcumin, until the correct doses are known and any adverse interactions identified with the numerous prescription drugs taken by cystic fibrosis sufferers.

Cancer Prevention
Curcumin's antioxidant actions enable it to protect the colon cells from free radicals that can damage cellular DNA-a significant benefit particularly in the colon where cell turnover is quite rapid, occuring approximately every three days. Because of their frequent replication, mutations in the DNA of colon cells can result in the formation of cancerous cells much more quickly. Curcumin also helps the body to destroy mutated cancer cells, so they cannot spread through the body and cause more harm. A primary way in which curcumin does so is by enhancing liver function. Additionally, other suggested mechanisms by which it may protect against cancer development include inhibiting the synthesis of a protein thought to be instrumental in tumor formation and preventing the development of additional blood supply necessary for cancer cell growth.

Inhibits Cancer Cell Growth and Metastases


Epidemiological studies have linked the frequent use of turmeric to lower rates of breast, prostate, lung and colon cancer; laboratory experiments have shown curcumin can prevent tumors from forming; and research conducted at the University of Texas suggests that even when breast cancer is already present, curcumin can help slow the spread of breast cancer cells to the lungs in mice. In this study, published in Biochemical Pharmacology(September 2005), human breast cancer cells were injected into mice, and the resulting tumors removed to simulate a mastectomy. The mice were then divided into four groups. One group received no further treatment and served as a control. A second group was given the cancer drug paclitaxel (Taxol); the third got curcumin, and the fourth was given both Taxol and curcumin. After five weeks, only half the mice in the curcumin-only group and just 22% of those in the curcumin plus Taxol group had evidence of breast cancer that had spread to the lungs. But 75% of the mice that got Taxol alone and 95% of the control group developed lung tumours.

How did curcumin help? "Curcumin acts against transcription factors, which are like a master switch," said lead researcher, Bharat Aggarwal. "Transcription factors regulate all the genes needed for tumors to form. When we turn them off, we shut down some genes that are involved in the growth and invasion of cancer cells." In another laboratory study of human non-Hodgkin's lymphoma cells published in Biochemical Pharmacology (September 2005), University of Texas researchers showed that curcumin inhibits the activation of NF-kappaB, a regulatory molecule that signals genes to produce a slew of inflammatory molecules (including TNF, COX-2 and IL-6) that promote cancer cell growth. In addition, curcumin was found to suppress cancer cell proliferation and to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis (cell suicide) in the lung cancer cells. Early phase I clinical trials at the University of Texas are now also looking into curcumin's chemopreventive and therapeutic properties against multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer, and other research groups are investigating curcumin's ability to prevent oral cancer.

Turmeric and Onions May Help Prevent Colon Cancer


Curcumin, a phytonutrient found in the curry spice turmeric, and quercitin, an antioxidant in onions, reduce both the size and number of precancerous lesions in the human intestinal tract, shows research published in the August 2006 issue of Clinical Gasteroenterology and Hepatology. Five patients with an inherited form of precancerous polyps in the lower bowel known as familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP) were treated with regular doses of curcumin and quercetin over an average of six months. The average number of polyps dropped 60.4%, and the average size of the polyps that did develop dropped by 50.9%. FAP runs in families and is characterized by the development of hundreds of polyps (colorectal adenomas) and, eventually, colon cancer. Recently, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs such as aspirin, ibuprofen) have been used to treat some patients with this condition, but these drugs often produce significant side effects, including gastrointestinal ulcerations and bleeding, according to lead researcher Francis M. Giardiello, M.D., at the Division of Gastroenterology, Johns Hopkins University. Previous observational studies in populations that consume large amounts of curry, as well as animal research, have strongly suggested that curcumin, one of the main ingredients in Asian curries, might be effective in preventing and/or treating cancer in the lower intestine. Similarly, quercetin, an anti-oxidant flavonoid found in a variety of foods including onions, green tea and red wine, has been shown to inhibit growth of colon cancer cell lines in humans and abnormal colorectal cells in animals.

In this study, a decrease in polyp number was observed in four of five patients at three months and four of four patients at six months. Each patient received curcumin (480 mg) and quercetin (20 mg) orally 3 times a day for 6 months. Although the amount of quercetin was similar to what many people consume daily, the curcumin consumed was more than would be provided in a typical diet because turmeric only contains on average 3-5 % curcumin by weight. While simply consuming curry and onions may not have as dramatic an effect as was produced in this study, this research clearly demonstrates that liberal use of turmeric and onions can play a protective role against the development of colorectal cancer. And turmeric doesn't have to only be used in curries. This spice is delicious on healthy sauted apples, and healthy steamed cauliflower and/or green beans and onions. Or, for a flavor-rich, low-calorie dip, try adding some turmeric and dried onion to creamy yogurt.

Turmeric Teams Up with Cauliflower to Halt Prostate Cancer


Prostate cancer-the second leading cause of cancer death in American men with 500,000 new cases appearing each year-is a rare occurrence among men in India, whose low risk is attributed to a diet rich in brassica family vegetables and the curry spice, turmeric. Scientists tested turmeric, a concentrated source of the phytonutrient curcumin, along with phenethyl isothiocyanates, a phytochemical abundant in cruciferous vegetables including cauliflower, cabbage, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, kohlrabi and turnips. When tested singly, both phenethyl isothiocyanate and curcumin greatly retarded the growth of human prostate cancer cells implanted in immunedeficient mice. In mice with well-established prostate cancer tumors, neither phenethyl isothiocyanate nor curcumin by itself had a protective effect, but when combined, they significantly reduced both tumor growth and the ability of the prostate cancer cells to spread (metastasize) in the test animals. The researchers believe the combination of cruciferous vegetables and curcumin could be an effective therapy not only to prevent prostate cancer, but to inhibit the spread of established prostate cancers. Best of all, this combinationcauliflower spiced with turmeric-is absolutely delicious! For protection against prostate cancer, cut cauliflower florets in quarters and let sit for 5-10 minutes; this allows time for the production of phenethyl isothiocyanates, which form when cruciferous vegetables are cut, but stops when they are heated. Then sprinkle with turmeric, and healthy saut on medium heat in a few tablespoons of vegetable or chicken broth for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and top with olive oil, sea salt and pepper to taste.

Reduce Risk of Childhood Leukemia


Research presented at a recent conference on childhood leukemia, held in London, provides evidence that eating foods spiced with turmeric could reduce the risk of developing childhood leukemia. The incidence of this cancer has risen dramatically during the 20th century, mainly in children under age five, among whom the risk has increased by more than 50% cent since 1950 alone. Modern environmental and lifestyle factors are thought to play a major role in this increase. Childhood leukemia is much lower in Asia than Western countries, which may be due to differences in diet, one of which, the frequent use of turmeric, has been investigated in a series of studies over the last 20 years by Prof. Moolky Nagabhushan from the Loyola University Medical Centre, Chicago, IL. "Some of the known risk factors that contribute to the high incidence of childhood leukemia are the interaction of many lifestyle and environmental factors. These include prenatal or postnatal exposure to radiation, benzene, environmental pollutants and alkylating chemotherapeutic drugs. Our studies show that turmeric-and its colouring principle, curcumin-in the diet mitigate the effects of some of these risk factors." Nagabhushan has shown that the curcumin in turmeric can:

inhibit the mutagenicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) (carcinogenic chemicals created by the burning of carbon based fuels including cigarette smoke) inhibit radiation-induced chromosome damage prevent the formation of harmful heterocyclic amines and nitroso compounds, which may result in the body when certain processed foods, such as processed meat products that contain nitrosamines, are eaten irreversibly inhibit the multiplication of leukemia cells in a cell culture

Improved Liver Function


In a recent rat study conducted to evaluate the effects of turmeric on the liver's ability to detoxify xenobiotic (toxic) chemicals, levels of two very important liver detoxification enzymes (UDP glucuronyl transferase and glutathione-Stransferase) were significantly elevated in rats fed turmeric as compared to controls. The researchers commented, "The results suggest that turmeric may increase detoxification systems in addition to its anti-oxidant properties...Turmeric used widely as a spice would probably mitigate the effects of several dietary carcinogens." Curcumin has been shown to prevent colon cancer in rodent studies. When researchers set up a study to analyze how curcumin works, they found that it

inhibits free radical damage of fats (such as those found in cell membranes and cholesterol), prevents the formation of the inflammatory chemical cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), and induces the formation of a primary liver detoxification enzyme, glutathione S-transferase (GST) enzymes. When the rats were given curcumin for 14 days, their livers' production of GST increased by 16%, and a marker of free radical damage called malondialdehyde decreased by 36% when compared with controls. During this two week period, the researchers gave the rats a cancer-causing chemical called carbon tetrachloride. In the rats not fed curcumin, markers of free radical damage to colon cells went up, but in the rats given turmeric, this increase was prevented by dietary curcumin. Lastly, the researchers compared giving turmeric in the diet versus injecting curcumin into the rats' colons. They found injecting curcumin resulted in more curcumin in the blood, but much less in the colon mucosa. They concluded, "The results show that curcumin mixed with the diet achieves drug levels in the colon and liver sufficient to explain the pharmacological activities observed and suggest that this mode of administration may be preferable for the chemoprevention of colon cancer."

Cardiovascular Protection
Curcumin may be able to prevent the oxidation of cholesterol in the body. Since oxidized cholesterol is what damages blood vessels and builds up in the plaques that can lead to heart attack or stroke, preventing the oxidation of new cholesterol may help to reduce the progression of atherosclerosis and diabetic heart disease. In addition, turmeric is a good source of vitamin B6, which is needed to keep homocysteine levels from getting too high. Homocysteine, an intermediate product of an important cellular process called methylation, is directly damaging to blood vessel walls. High levels of homocysteine are considered a significant risk factor for blood vessel damage, atherosclerotic plaque build-up, and heart disease; while a high intake of vitamin B6 is associated with a reduced risk of heart disease. In research published in the Indian Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, when 10 healthy volunteers consumed 500 mg of curcumin per day for 7 days, not only did their blood levels of oxidized cholesterol drop by 33%, but their total cholesterol droped 11.63% , and their HDL (good cholesterol) increased by 29%! (Soni KB, Kuttan R).

How Turmeric Lowers Cholesterol


Tumeric's cholesterol-lowering effects are the result of the curry spice's active constituent, curcumin, which research reveals is a messaging molecule that communicates with genes in liver cells, directing them to increase the production of mRNA (messenger proteins) that direct the creation of receptors for LDL (bad) cholesterol. With more LDL-receptors, liver cells are able to clear more LDL-cholesterol from the body.

LDL-receptor mRNA increased sevenfold in liver cells treated with curcumin at a concentration of 10 microM, compared to untreated cells. (Liver cells were found to tolerate curcumin at levels of up to 12. microM for 24 hours). (Peschel D, Koerting R, et al. J Nutr Biochem) Practical Tips: Help increase your liver's ability to clear LDL-cholesterol by relying on turmeric, not just for delicious fish, meat or lentil curries, but to spice up healthy sauteed onions, potatoes and/or cauliflower; or as the key flavoring for a creamy vegetable dip. Just mix plain yogurt with a little omega-3-rich mayonnaise and turmeric, salt and pepper to taste. Serve with raw cauliflower, celery, sweet pepper, jicama and broccoli florets. Be sure to choose turmeric rather than prepared curry blends. Recent research indicates the amount of turmeric (and therefore curcumin) in curry blends is often minimal.(Tayyem RF et al.,Nutr Cancer) For the most curcumin, be sure to use turmeric rather curry powder-a study analyzing curcumin content in 28 spice products described as turmeric or curry powders found that pure turmeric powder had the highest concentration of curcumin, averaging 3.14% by weight. The curry powder samples, with one exception, contained very small amounts of curcumin. (Tayyem RF, Heath DD, et al. Nutr Cancer)

Protection against Alzheimer's Disease


Growing evidence suggests that turmeric may afford protection against neurodegenerative diseases. Epidemiological studies show that in elderly Indian populations, among whose diet turmeric is a common spice, levels of neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's are very low. Concurrently, experimental research conducted recently found that curcumin does appear to slow the progression of Alzheimer's in mice. Preliminary studies in mice also suggest that curcumin may block the progression of multiple sclerosis. While it is still unclear how it may afford protection against this degenerative condition, one theory is that it may interrupt the production of IL-2, a protein that can play a key role in the destruction of myelin, the sheath that serves to protect most nerves in the body. A number of studies have suggested that curcumin, the biologically active constituent in turmeric, protects against Alzheimer's disease by turning on a gene that codes for the production of antioxidant proteins. A study published in theItalian Journal of Biochemistry (December 2003) discussed curcumin's role in the induction of the the heme oxygenase pathway, a protective system that, when triggered in brain tissue, causes the production of the potent antioxidant bilirubin, which protects the brain against oxidative (free radical) injury. Such oxidation is thought to be a major factor in aging and to be responsible for

neurodegenerative disorders including dementias like Alzheimer's disease. Another study conducted jointly by an Italian and U.S. team and presented at the American Physiological Society's 2004 annual conference in Washington, DC, confirmed that curcumin strongly induces expression of the gene, called hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) in astrocytes from the hippocampal region of the brain.

Curcumin Crosses Blood-Brain Barrier, May Help Prevent Alzheimer's Disease


Research conducted at UCLA and published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry (December 2004), which has been confirmed by further research published in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry (April 2006), provides insight into the mechanisms behind curcumin's protective effects against Alzheimer's disease. Alzheimer's disease results when a protein fragment called amyloid accumulates in brain cells, producing oxidative stress and inflammation, and forming plaques between nerve cells (neurons) in the brain that disrupt brain function. Amyloid is a general term for protein fragments that the body produces normally. Amyloid is a protein fragment snipped from another protein called amyloid precursor protein (APP). In a healthy brain, these protein fragments are broken down and eliminated. In Alzheimer's disease, the fragments accumulate, forming hard, insoluble plaques between brain cells. The UCLA researchers first conducted test tube studies in which curcumin was shown to inhibit amyloid aggregation and to dissolve amyloid fibrils more effectively than the anti-inflammatory drugs ibuprofen and naproxen. Then, using live mice, the researchers found that curcumin crosses the blood brain barrier and binds to small amyloid- species. Once bound to curcumin, the amyloid- protein fragments can no longer clump together to form plaques. Curcumin not only binds to amyloid-, but also has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant properties, supplying additional protection to brain cells.

Turmeric Boosts Amyloid Plaque Clearance in Human Alzheimer's Patients


The most active ingredient in turmeric root, bisdemethoxycurcumin, boosts the activity of the immune system in Alzheimer's patients, helping them to clear the amyloid beta plaques characteristic of the disease. In healthy patients, immune cells called macrophages, which engulf and destroy abnormal cells and suspected pathogens, efficiently clear amyloid beta, but macrophage activity is suppressed in Alzheimer's patients.

Using blood samples from Alzheimer's patients, Drs. Milan Fiala and John Cashman have shown that bisdemethoxycurcumin boosts macrophage activity to normal levels, helping to clear amyloid beta. Fiala and Cashman also observed that bisdemethoxycurcumin was more effective in promoting the clearance of amyloid beta in some patients' blood than others, hinting at a genetic element. Further study revealed the genes involved are MGAT III and Toll-like receptors, which are also responsible for a number of other key immune functions. Bisdemethoxycurcumin enhances the transcription of these genes, correcting the immune defects seen in Alzheimer's patients. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2007 Jul 31;104(31):12849-54.

Description
Turmeric was traditionally called Indian saffron since its deep yellow-orange color is similar to that of the prized saffron. It has been used throughout history as a condiment, healing remedy and textile dye. Turmeric comes from the root of the Curcuma longa plant and has a tough brown skin and a deep orange flesh. This herb has a very interesting taste and aroma. Its flavor is peppery, warm and bitter while its fragrance is mild yet slightly reminiscent of orange and ginger, to which it is related.

History
Turmeric is native to Indonesia and southern India, where it has been harvested for more than 5,000 years. It has served an important role in many traditional cultures throughout the East, including being a revered member of the Ayurvedic pharmacopeia. While Arab traders introduced it into Europe in the 13th century, it has only recently become popular in Western cultures. Much of its recent popularity is owed to the recent research that has highlighted its therapeutic properties. The leading commercial producers of turmeric include India, Indonesia, China, the Philippines, Taiwan, Haiti and Jamaica.

How to Select and Store


Even through dried herbs and spices are widely available in supermarkets, explore the local spice stores or ethnic markets in your area. Oftentimes, these stores feature an expansive selection of dried herbs and spices that are of superior quality and freshness than those offered in regular markets. Just like with other dried spices, try to select organically grown turmeric since this will give you more assurance that the herb has not been irradiated. Since the color of turmeric varies among varieties, it is not a criterion of quality. For the most curcumin, be sure to use turmeric rather curry powder-a study analyzing curcumin content in 28 spice products described as turmeric or curry

powders found that pure turmeric powder had the highest concentration of curcumin, averaging 3.14% by weight. The curry powder samples, with one exception, contained very small amounts of curcumin. (Tayyem RF, Heath DD, et al. Nutr Cancer) Turmeric powder should kept in a tightly sealed container in a cool, dark and dry place. Fresh turmeric rhizome should be kept in the refrigerator.

How to Enjoy
For some of our favorite recipes, click Recipes.

Tips for Preparing Turmeric:


Be careful when using turmeric since its deep color can easily stain. To avoid a lasting stain, quickly wash any area with which it has made contact with soap and water. To prevent staining your hands, you might consider wearing kitchen gloves while handling turmeric. If you are able to find turmeric rhizomes in the grocery store, you can make your own fresh turmeric powder by boiling, drying and then grinding it into a fine consistency.

A Few Quick Serving Ideas:


Add turmeric to egg salad to give it an even bolder yellow color. Mix brown rice with raisins and cashews and season with turmeric, cumin and coriander. Although turmeric is generally a staple ingredient in curry powder, some people like to add a little extra of this spice when preparing curries. And turmeric doesn't have to only be used in curries. This spice is delicious on healthy sauted apples, and healthy steamed cauliflower and/or green beans and onions. Or, for a creamy, flavor-rich, low-calorie dip, try mixing some turmeric and dried onion with a little omega-3-rich mayonnaise, salt and pepper. Serve with raw cauliflower, celery, sweet pepper, jicama and broccoli florets. Turmeric is a great spice to complement recipes that feature lentils. Give salad dressings an orange-yellow hue by adding some turmeric powder to them. For an especially delicious way to add more turmeric to your healthy way of eating, cut cauliflower florets in half and healthy saut with a generous spoonful

of turmeric for 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and toss with olive oil, salt and pepper to taste. Be sure to choose turmeric rather than prepared curry blends. Recent research indicates the amount of turmeric (and therefore curcumin) in curry blends is often minimal.(Tayyem RF et al.,Nutr Cancer)

Individual Concerns
Turmeric is not a commonly allergenic food and is not known to contain measurable amounts of oxalates or purines.

Nutritional Profile
Turmeric is an excellent source of both iron and manganese. It is also a good source of vitamin B6, dietary fiber and potassium. For an in-depth nutritional profile click here: Turmeric.

In-Depth Nutritional Profile


In addition to the nutrients highlighted in our ratings chart, an in-depth nutritional profile for Turmeric is also available. This profile includes information on a full array of nutrients, including carbohydrates, sugar, soluble and insoluble fiber, sodium, vitamins, minerals, fatty acids, amino acids and more.

Introduction to Food Rating System Chart


In order to better help you identify foods that feature a high concentration of nutrients for the calories they contain, we created a Food Rating System. This system allows us to highlight the foods that are especially rich in particular nutrients. The following chart shows the nutrients for which this food is either an excellent, very good, or good source (below the chart you will find a table that explains these qualifications). If a nutrient is not listed in the chart, it does not necessarily mean that the food doesn't contain it. It simply means that the nutrient is not provided in a sufficient amount or concentration to meet our rating criteria. (To view this food's in-depth nutritional profile that includes values for dozens of nutrients - not just the ones rated as excellent, very good, or good - please use the link below the chart.) To read this chart accurately, you'll need to glance up in the top left corner where you will find the name of the food and the serving size we used to calculate the food's nutrient composition. This serving size will tell you how much of the food you need to eat to obtain the amount of nutrients found in the chart. Now, returning to the chart itself, you can look next to the nutrient name in order to find the nutrient amount it offers, the percent Daily Value (DV%) that this amount represents,

the nutrient density that we calculated for this food and nutrient, and the rating we established in our rating system. For most of our nutrient ratings, we adopted the government standards for food labeling that are found in the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's "Reference Values for Nutrition Labeling." Read more background information and details of our rating system. Turmeric, powder 2.00 tsp 4.52 grams 16.04 calories Nutrient manganese iron vitamin B6 (pyridoxine) dietary fiber potassium World's Healthiest Foods Rating excellent very good good Amount 0.36 mg 1.88 mg 0.08 mg 0.96 g 114.48 mg DV Nutrient World's Healthiest (%) Density Foods Rating 18.0 10.4 4.0 3.8 3.3 20.2 11.7 4.5 4.3 3.7 Rule DV>=75% OR Density>=7.6 AND DV>=50% OR Density>=3.4 AND DV>=10% DV>=5% excellent excellent good good good

DV>=25% OR Density>=1.5 AND DV>=2.5%

In-Depth Nutritional Profile for Turmeric

Turmeric is so common in Indian kitchens but we still don't know the benefits it has. It is an antiseptic and anti oxidant. It has uses in beauty treatments. It also strengthens the bones. Read on to know more benefits of turmeric.

While many of us are aware of the numerous benefits of this deep, exotic yellow spice, few incorporate turmeric in our daily use, other than sprinkling a little of it in our daal and subzi. Turmeric, a member of the ginger family, has been used for healing by Ayurvedic means, since time immemorial. Turmeric has anti-inflammatory properties, and is an excellent antiseptic. In addition, it is great for the skin. So before investing in an expensive beauty product, take a look in your kitchen. The turmeric you get in packets is not the pure form, which is why it is best that you try and find someone who supplies pure turmeric powder, or use the root andmake your own paste. Here are just a few of the various benefits of turmeric: Reduces Pigmentation Plagued with pigmentation? Turmeric can help even out your skin tone and colour. Simply apply a little turmeric mixed with cucumber juice or lemon to the affected area. Leave on for fifteen minutes or more, and wash off. Do this everyday, and gradually you will notice your skin colour returning to normal.

Strengthens Bones Drink a quarter glass turmeric juice every night, with milk. The best way to have this is to take a 1/2 inch piece of turmeric and boil it with half a glass of milk. Once the milk has turned yellow, remove from fire, let it cool slightly, and sip this. This will cure numerous ailments. Women especially should drink this every night, as it strengthens bones and reduces the risk of developing osteoporosis.

Softens the Body Turmeric is a wonderful body scrub, which is why Indian brides apply a turmericand gram flour (besan) mix to their entire body, the morning of the wedding. It leaves your skin soft, smooth and glowing. Of course, a single application will not really make that much of a difference. Do this regularly, and watch your skin change for the better - much better.

Makes the Skin Supple If you are planning a pregnancy, apply a mixture of turmeric and malai or turmericand curd to your stomach and waist before going for a bath. Leave it on for fifteen minutes, and wash off. If desired, you could even apply this mixture after bathing. After you have washed off the soap, apply the malai and haldi mixture, leave it on for five minutes, and wash off only with water. Gently, wipe your stomach with the towel. The sooner you start this routine, the more supple and elastic your skin will become, and after giving birth, you will not be left with unsightly stretch marks.

Inhibits Cell Damage Turmeric is an excellent anti-oxidant, which essentially means that it stabilizes unstable oxygen molecules. These are known as free radicals, and are what cause damage to cells, leading to ageing and various other diseases such as cancer.

Fights Diarrhoea

Turmeric fights the bacteria that causes diarrhoea, so the next time your stomach starts 'running', reach for some haldi. German health authorities have officially declared turmeric herbal tea to be a cure for loose stools.

All around the world you can now avail of turmeric in the form of teas, capsules, tinctures, lotions, ointments and powder. However, here, you have access toturmeric in its purest form, so make the most use of it.

Turmeric is a perennial herb which has short and thick stem. Its multiple branches give out a fabulous aromatic smell. The stems of turmeric develop underground, and thus are called rhizomes. The scientific and colloquial name of turmeric are Curcuma longa and haldi respectively. It finds its usage in cuisines as well as many home remedies. Turmeric is particularly more popular in the Indian subcontinent, where it is a must in any kitchen. The present article focuses on the usage of turmeric for acne. However, it will be better if you know how turmeric can cure acne and remove its scars. Let's learn it first. Is Turmeric Good for Acne? Sometimes, the pores on your skin gets filled with dead cells, natural oil and dirt. This deposition is prone to bacterial infection. The infection leads to inflammation, swelling and development of pus in the skin pores. Such a deposition in skin pores is called acne. You can get rid of acne by inhibiting the growth of bacteria, reducing the inflammation and removing the deposition from the skin pore as a whole. All these are possible when you apply something on the acne that has antibacterial, anti-inflammatory, antiseptic and soothing properties. Turmeric is one such substance which has all the above mentioned properties. Therefore, there's no doubt that turmeric is good for acne. To add to this, turmeric, being an herb, would not cause any kind of side effect to you if you use it properly and are not allergic to it naturally. Here's more on the benefits of turmeric. How to Use Turmeric for Acne? In addition to the properties mentioned in the above paragraph, turmeric is believed to have analgesic, antitumor, antioxidant, anti allergic, antispasmodic, astringent, appetizing, carminative, diuretic and digestive properties. Therefore, when you use turmeric on a regular basis, you derive a lot of health benefits, including acne treatment and acne control. You can take it both internally and externally to get great results for acne cure. There are several ways in which you can use turmeric. Some of them are described below. Method 1: Take a glass of warm milk and mix a teaspoon of turmeric into it. Stir well so that the color of the milk turns yellow. Drink it once a day, preferably before bedtime. This will boost the immune system of your body. As a result, your body will be better able to fight bacterial infection, and hence cure acne fast.

Method 2: Use turmeric as an ingredient of dishes whenever possible. It is widely used in the cuisines of South East Asian countries. So, try out some of Indian and Sri Lankan recipes to increase the amount of turmeric in your diet. This will benefit you. In fact, it will greatly reduce the chances of acne development. Method 3: You can apply turmeric directly on the acne and the skin surrounding it to treat it fast. This will also reduce the possibility of acne scars. Even if the scar forms, at least it would be of a comparatively lighter color. Here is one way by which you can use turmeric externally. Take one or two teaspoons of fresh milk and one tablespoon of turmeric powder. Mix both the ingredients well. The purpose is to give the mixture the consistency of paste. Apply it evenly on your face, covering the acne. Leave it on for 10 minutes, and then wash the turmeric mask off well with lots of plain water. You can apply an oil-free moisturizer afterward. Do it once a day to get rid of acne fast. Turmeric is believed to lighten the skin as well. Therefore, by using such a face pack made of turmeric, you should expect to enjoy a lighter skin tone over time. Read more on acne scar removal. Method 4: You can make a scrub with turmeric for acne scars. Take 2-3 teaspoons of turmeric powder, 12 drops of lemon juice and mix it with one or two drops of mustard oil. You can replace the mustard oil with olive, coconut, or jojoba oil to get similar results. Mix the oil and turmeric well to make a paste. Spread it evenly on the face. Make sure that you cover the acne. Leave it on for 15 minutes. Sprinkle a little amount of water on your face. Scrub your face gently with fingers, moving in a circular motion. You will be able to shed off the layer of turmeric and oil paste in a couple of minutes. Wash your face well with plenty of water. Do it once in two days. It will help in removing acne scars to a great extent. External application of turmeric has a staining effect on your skin. Your face may appear a bit pale even after washing it off with water. Therefore, you should use a mild face wash, which suits your skin, while washing the face mask away. If you wish to have a natural remedy for turmeric staining of the skin, then rub a slice of lemon on your face in gentle circular motions. Wash your face with plenty of water later on. In this article, you have learned how much turmeric for acne to be used and how to use it in different ways. Do try some of the suggested methods of turmeric usage for acne control at home. You will notice the difference in yourself in a couple of weeks.

Turmeric and Weight Loss (Note: Turmeric is one of the main ingredients of Slim 1-2-3) Turmeric was used more than three thousand years ago by Indian healers to treat obesity and overweight problems. Modern research has shown that Curcuma has a beneficial effect on the liver, stimulating the flow of bile, which is responsible for the breakdown of dietary fat. Therefore, the connection of turmeric and weight loss exists in the functions of the bile. The German Commission E has approved the use of turmeric for its bile-stimulating action, for its anti-inflammatory activity, and in the treatment of digestive complaints. When turmeric was given to laboratory animals with diabetes, both blood sugar levels and blood cholesterol levels showed general decreases. An apparent blocking of enzymes that convert dietary carbohydrates into sugar may be involved in lowered blood sugar, while the lessened cholesterol may be due to accelerated cholesterol

breakdown prompted by turmeric. Turmeric also may increase the bodys use of cholesterol by increasing production of bile. Because cholesterol is a major component of bile, more cholesterol may be used to produce increased bile supplies. According to the National Institute of Health, it has been said that there are fewer people with gallstones in India, which is sometimes credited to turmeric in the diet. Early animal studies report that curcumin, a chemical in turmeric, may decrease the occurrence of gallstones. Limited human research suggests that curcumin may stimulate squeezing (contraction) of the gallbladder and stimulate bile flow. However, reliable human studies are lacking in this area. The use of turmeric may be inadvisable in patients with active gallstones. Therefore, if the bile is responsible for the breakdown of dietary fat, an increase of the blow of bile could increase the breakdown of dietary fat, thus resulting in weight loss effects.
In India, you cant think about a curry without turmeric in it. However, its only now that people are realizing that turmeric has some amazing powers and is more than a spice which can be relegated to a shelf on your kitchen. Turmeric is packed with loads of benefits and today, scientists are also substantiating this fact with research to prove it. Turmeric is a wonder product that has gained fame in recent times although in India, people have been using it right from ancient times. At present, turmeric is one spice which will always be found in every Indian kitchen and is used to add flavor to curries and stir fries. But its skin benefits are more notable as turmeric is renowned for its antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties. Beauticians the world over are waking up to the amazing benefits of turmeric and its also being incorporated in beauty products. Whats wonderful about turmeric is that its easily available and you can use it in different ways using ingredients that are available right in your own house. If you are able to procure pure turmeric powder, you can use it in many ways to add glow to your skin.

Turmeric helps you reduce pigmentation on your face and even out your skin tone. It can be easily done at home. Mix a little turmeric with cucumber or lemon juice and apply to your face. Leave it for some time and wash off. A one-time application will be of little help and only regular use will give a soft glow to your face. Troubled with acne? Whether its for you or your teenager, turmeric is a beauty ingredient that is harmless and yet offers great results. Turmeric mixed with sandalwood powder and a little water, and applied to the face can greatly reduce the appearance of acne. Its definitely a cheaper alternative to all those creams and gels that are often not as effective as desired or they claim. Heres a great idea for an all over body scrub. Mix some turmeric with gram flour and water and use it to scrub all over your body before your shower. Doing this regularly will indeed help you get a glowing skin. Ask any bride in India and she will affirm that this is the beauty regimen that they dutifully follow weeks before their wedding to get a spotless skin.

One problem that often besets pregnant women is the appearance of stretch marks on their abdomen. If youve wondered how stretch marks can be avoided, try applying a mixture of turmeric with yoghurt to the abdomen and then it wipe off after five minutes. If you continue this regularly, it will help in maintaining the elasticity of the skin and prevent stretch marks. Turmeric has also been dubbed the wonder product because of its ability to fight free radicals. This excellent anti-oxidant is known to help prevent various diseases as well as cancer. In fact, turmeric is one of the best known remedies used to reduce the recovery time of various skin afflictions that are caused by chicken pox etc. Turmeric helps in reducing skin rashes as well. For those who want to reduce the hair growth on their face, turmeric again comes to the rescue. Regular washing with turmeric reduces facial hair growth significantly. Grandmothers in India often prefer to apply a paste of turmeric to minor cuts, bruises and bumps as it reduces the swelling just as an ice pack would do, without the discomfort. Its various antiseptic properties are perfect for using it for minor cuts, wounds and abrasions and it helps in quickening the healing process. If youve accidentally burnt your hand in the kitchen, heres a quick remedy to ease the burn. Mix a teaspoon of turmeric with some aloe gel and apply to the burn. So far, weve read about the cosmetic effects of turmeric for the skin. But did you know that turmeric is a fantastic natural way to beat that cough that has been troubling you for so many days? Dump those expectorants and simply mix a spoonful of turmeric in hot milk and drink it down. The hot milk eases the throat and the turmeric fights infection in the throat. Turmeric helps reducing gum infections also! Apply a mixture of turmeric, rock salt and mustard oil to the affected area around two to three times a day. Follow this by washing your mouth with a little warm water. Feeling listless and tired? If you suspect you have anemia, then a teaspoon of turmeric powder mixed with honey, taken daily can help in countering anemia. Turmeric powder mixed with water is also known to help diarrhea. Before you get started with any cosmetic or skin related treatments with turmeric, do make a note that it can stain the skin a light yellow. Its a good idea to use it at night and then wash off with water and a gentle cleanser in the morning. As youve probably figured out by now, turmeric is not only great for applying on the skin but has a host of wonderful benefits if you ingest it as well. Its a sharp and pungent spice and no Indian food is complete without it. Try adding it to your meals while cooking and while it might give off a yellow tinge, remember all the wonderful benefits you will have. Of course, the amount of turmeric used in food is rather minimal but its a good food habit. Different scientific findings about turmeric also show that it can actually prevent leukemia by protecting DNA from harmful pollutants. Turmeric is also known to minimize the ill effects of processed foods as well as smoking. One of the active compounds of turmeric, Curcumin, is held responsible for much of this benefit.

Turmeric is the herb belonging to ginger family. It is the root of the turmeric plant. It is used in India for thousands of years as a natural medicinal herb. It is an important ingredient in many of the ayurvedic preparations. Especially Indian women used turmeric and acne was their main target. The cause of acne is due to inflammation. Pimples, blackheads and whiteheads on the surface of the skin are the results of oil produced by the skin getting trapped in the oil ducts. It is found in the forehead, chests, elbows and back. Generally it appears during teens and it has to go on its own. However it is better to treat with natural herb. One of the herbs used is turmeric. Curcumin is a fantastic anti inflammation agent. It is a bio flavonoid polyphenolic compound. Bio availability of this nutrition to our health is very limited and external source is the best way to tackle acne. Since turmeric has curcumin, it is advised to use turmeric and acne resulted due to inflammation will bound to cure. Acne should be treated both from inside out and outside in. What does that mean? Oral intake is called inside out treatment and external application is called outside in treatment. Many people use two different substances, one for inside out and the other for outside in. However, turmeric is one of the rarest substances that can be used for both. Taking a pinch of turmeric powder mixed with a tumbler of boiled milk on a daily basis is considered good for acne. Also the external application of turmeric paste on the places of acne will give good results. While there is no precise dosage of turmeric for both internal and external usage, 50 mg of turmeric extract with 95% curcumin concentration as a daily intake should be ideal. In the case of oral intake, the extract should be taken with enteric coated format else benefit of curcumin will not be realized. Only enteric coated substances will reach the pancreas to provide full potency of curcumin and acne is bound to disappear. Also a holistic approach to nutrition is the best way to handle acne.

Turmeric & Weight Loss


By Katie Tonarely, eHow Contributor

Turmeric & Weight Loss

Among its many health benefits, recent research claims that turmeric also can aid in weight loss. Traditionally used for natural healing and seasoning, this powerful powder could help to inhibit the growth of fat cells. Understanding current research and dosing information might prove to be helpful for those trying to lose weight.

Identification
1. Used for over 6,000 years as traditional medicine in India and Ancient Egypt, turmeric, a member of the ginger family, is used to flavor curries and is used as yellow food coloring. According to the Advanced Health and Life Extension, numerous modern trials have only validated turmeric's use as a supplement for a wide variety of ailments. For example, turmeric contains the polyphenol curcumin, and a recent study has shown curcumin's potential for weight loss in mice.

Current Research
2. In a study by the Agricultural Research Service at Tufts University in Boston, researchers divided a group of 18 mice into three groups. A control group was fed a typical diet, while the other two were both fed high-fat diets. One group eating the high-fat diet also received a relatively small amount of curcumin. At the end of the study, researchers Mohsen Meydani and Jean Mayer found that the high-fat group fed the curcumin weighed less than the group that didn't receive the supplement, though both groups ate the same diet. In addition, the group fed curcumin had lower levels of blood cholesterol and liver fat.

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