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K L E Society's

Institute of Management Studies and Research, HubIi


1


Declaration

I rchana B Kulkarni studying in MB IV semester hereby
declare that the project work titled 'Evaluating The Effectiveness Of
Training Module t Telcon" at Telco Construction Equipment Co. Ltd
is written and submitted by me under the guidance of Dr M M Bagali of
K L E Society's Institute Of Management Studies and Research. %his
is my original work and has not been submitted earlier to Karnatak
University, Dharwad or to any other institution.

%he report is for the fulfillment of the Master's Degree in Business
dministration from Karnatak University Dharwad.

%he matter in this report is based on the data collected by me at
'Telco Construction Equipment Co. Ltd" .under the guidance
Of Mr. sit Morice Minj, sst Manager Human Resource, Telco
Construction Equipment Co. Ltd.



Place: Hubli

Date: rchana B Kulkarni










K L E Society's
Institute of Management Studies and Research, HubIi


cknowledgement
Before we get deep into the project, I would like to take this opportunity
to express my profound thanks to people who have become
part of this project.

I would like to express my sincere and profound sense of gratitude
to my project co-ordinator and external guide for my project, Mr. sit
Morice Minj, sst Manager Human Resource, Telco Construction
Equipment Co. Ltd., for giving me this opportunity to do a live project,
and for his support, motivation and valuable guidance and assigning great
challenges throughout my project period.

I would also extend my sense of gratitude to Mr.Naveen Kumar,General
Manager, Telco Construction Equipment Co. Ltd and Mr shish
Sharma,HR Manager,Telcon for encouraging me all the time and giving
me valuable support and advise needed to carry on the project
successfully and effectively.

I extend my heartfelt and sincere thanks to my internal guide
Dr, M.M Bagali, I/c Director, KLE'S IMSR for his valuable and timely
guidance and support ,and for his constant motivation throughout my
project period.

I would also like to thank the entire departmental staff of Telco
Construction Equipment Co. Ltd who were very kind and supportive
enough to spare their busy schedules ,and for giving each and every
details I needed to complete my project.

I would fail in my duty if I can't remember the encouragement given by my
parents and friends in my endeavor.

rchana B Kulkarni


K L E Society's
Institute of Management Studies and Research, HubIi



TabIe of Contents Page No
Executive Summary 4-6

Chapter One
ntroduction 7-1

Chapter Two
Methodology 1-

Chapter Three
Literature Search/Review of Relevant Studies 1-58

Chapter Four
Organizational Profile 59-74

Chapter Five
Data Collection and Results 75-95

Chapter Six
Discussion and Conclusion 96-99

Chapter Seven
Recommendations 1-14

Bibliography 15




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Executive Summary

About Company

Telco Construction Equipment Co. Ltd. is a joint venture company
between ndian automobile giant Tata Engineering Ltd., Mumbai and world
leaders in hydraulic technology, Hitachi Construction Machinery Co. Ltd.,
Japan.

Starting operations in 1961 with the manufacture of friction machines in
collaboration with P&H, USA, today Telcon is a market leader in ndia. The
product range includes hydraulic excavators, crawler cranes, wheel
loaders, backhoe loaders, off-highway dumpers, motor graders, skid steer
loaders, cane loaders and truck loader cranes. t is now spreading its
reach overseas and has already supplied equipment to some Asian,
African and Middle Eastern countries.

Telcon's credentials lay together in its Design capabilities, in its
associations with world leaders such as Hitachi, John Deere, Euclid,
Tadano, ZF and the like, state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities in
Jamshedpur and Dharwad and excellent and wide-spread customer
support, the key to smooth running of capital equipment is well taken care
of by its network of more than offices and many more service
associates.









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Institute of Management Studies and Research, HubIi
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About Project

This project mainly deals with evaluating the effectiveness of training
module followed at Telcon and suggestions to improve the training
modules further. This project undertakes Kirk Patrick Model's 1
st
stage
of evaluation i.e. "Reaction Stage"


Need for the study of project

Need For Checking Effectiveness Of Training Programs
Training managers are always hard-pressed to prove the effectiveness of
the training programmes they conduct
Organisations are under pressure to justify various expenses. The training
budget is, often, not exempted from this purview. There are a number of
questions raised on the value derived from training programsboth
directly and indirectly. Business heads and training managers are under
pressure to prove the effectiveness of training. So there is a need for every
organization to check the effectiveness of training provided to its
employees.

Need For Evaluating The Effectiveness Of Training Program at
Telcon

Telcon has recently provided a behavioral training to all the office staff
level employees on "Enhancing Team Work Through nter Personal
Relations. Therefore Telcon needs to measure effectiveness of the
program in terms of business objectives.



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Through the study conducted, Telcon wants to better its training system
dentify gaps if any and adopt the good things of the present training
systems.


Objectives of Study
:
To determine the effectiveness of the training

To measure benchmarks in the training program.

To evaluate whether the training objectives were achieved.

To find out if training material was relevant to the employees.

Analyze and report results

Translate organizational needs into specific training programs


ConcIuding Remarks

Overall the study provided me the basic insights of the relevance and
importance of Training and Development in today's organization.The
project period in Telcon was of great help to me in learning various skills
and gaining corporate experience.








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Introduction to Topic of Project

Statement of the probIem
Telcon was in need of checking the effectiveness of training provided to its
employees on behavioural skills. This constituted the need to undertake a
project on checking the effectiveness of training provided at Telcon.


A Iook at the New Age Organization

The wave of the future of training is breaking on the shore. t's dissolving
old ways of thinking and asking organizations to look at training in a whole
new way. Why? Because much of what organizations did for years in
training failed to produce the desired results, if expected outcomes were
defined at all. Yes, results. t's no longer acceptable to hope an employee
learns something - or maybe gets entertained - at a training session. The
agile, changing organizations that will succeed in the future are
thoughtfully developing their most important resource: the people they
employ. Several of the trends highlighted have already attracted attention
and followers for a number of years but not all organizations have caught
the wave. Others are just beginning to dissolve traditional training
methods.
Adopt a Performance ConsuIting Strategy
Not another word for needs assessment, a training professional who can
provide performance consulting is in demand.
The training function is no longer a catalog of classes. Even the best of
generic classes is not positioned to meet the needs of various people and
job functions. nteracting with the potential internal or external customer to
learn their needs and then to develop custom content to help them achieve
their desired outcome is the recommended approach. This requires that
the training professional can assess needs and make recommendations



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about activities, reading, lessons, classes, work assignments and
approaches that will help the customers create their success. Scheduling a
class for the customer will rarely achieve this goal.
To do performance consulting well, trainers need education in organization
development, group process, and various other methods that will help
them serve customer needs. They also need the active support of their
managers as their performance becomes more independent. t is harder
for an organization to see the results that are obtained from consulting
engagements and follow-up. n a training session, you have the end of
class "smile" sheet ratings to tally and average to get a score. A valid
measure? Not entirely, but it's something a manager can see and hold.
You can measure the success of performance consulting and training as
the next trend demonstrates, but it's harder.
Measure ResuIts to See Impact
Long accepted as a good example of the "right" way to measure training
success, Donald Kirkpatrick's (1979) four levels of training evaluation are
hard for organizations to do, so especially level three and four evaluation
is infrequent. The first level measures the learners' reaction to the training
program. The second level measures the learning that has occurred. Third
level training evaluation measures the changes in behavior the participants
exhibit on the job as a result of the training program. Level four measures
the results of the training program as these results affect the organization's
bottom line.
Training professionals who want to stay in business and add value to their
organization are evaluating training processes and programs on all four
levels. According to the Learning Resources Network, 77 percent of
organizations use reaction measures; 6 percent use learning evaluations;
15 percent measure behavior change; and eight percent measure results.
All of the measures of effectiveness are increasingly used to assess



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Training. Organizations that are maximizing the potential of the money
they invest in learning processes are asking about measurable outcomes.
Define the concept
E Ev va al lu ua at ti io on n i is s a standard practice in training that measures changes in
behavior that occur as a result of the training. Evaluations can be used to
measure whether or not specific objectives were met, the participant's
opinions of the experience, the training environment, and the trainer's
performance.

Various Dimensions of The Concept
At a basic level, evaluation consists of defining objectives, specifying
those objectives measurably, and then assessing the extent to which
learners have mastered those objectives. To determine the results of
training, management must establish baseline performance metrics
based on the needs assessment. That is, "What measurement is used
to identify the gap?" After the training has been conducted, these
performance metrics can be evaluated to determine the effect of the
training. Of course, other influences (e.g., a change in procedures, new
technology) should be noted to ensure the positive or negative effect
was due to training.
Training programs should be evaluated on four levels:
1. Reaction: What are the participants' feedback on the training? This
is typically measured through a survey and usually covers such items
as program methodology, group and individual exercises, quality of
materials and media, facilitator capabilities, facilities, etc.
. Learning evaIuation: This is the process of collecting, analyzing
and reporting information to assess how much the participants learned
and applied in the learning environment.



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3 AppIication to the job: This step assesses the degree to which the
knowledge, skills and abilities taught in the classroom are being used on
the job.

4 EvaIuating the impact and ROI: This is the process of
determining the impact of training on organizational productivity, improved
customer satisfaction and the organization's strategic business plan. What
is the change in business metrics attributable to training? What is the
return on the training investment (typically calculated by dividing the net
dollar value of the benefit by the costs of training)?


Benefits of Concept

Training personnel must be responsive to the needs of the
organization, working hand-in-hand with line managers and
supervisors to ensure that training needs are properly analyzed,
and that training is developed and implemented in the most
effective and efficient way possible.

The training organization must actively and continually
communicate with the line organization. Hence training evaluation
serves utmost benefit to any organization.



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Why Present Study?

nception of idea: The need for checking the effectiveness of
training provided arouse in Telco Construction Equipment Co. Ltd.

Telcon had provided training on behavioral aspects on the topic
Enhancing Team Work through Inter PersonaI ReIations
which was conducted on September
rd
and 4
th
to entire staff level
employees.

This training was conducted by the trainers Mrs Odette
Mascarenhas and Mr Joe Mascarenha on
rd
and 4
th
od
September at Telcon.

This project provides organization useful insights on their training
module which is followed at present and provides suggestions to
improve their present system of training.

Training is a very challenging and a necessity element in any
organization, which provides utmost use to the organization.

This involves interacting with every employee, preparing an useful
Questionaire, collecting data, processing it, analyzation of the
existing facts and figures using SPSS software and concluding by
using graphs regarding the effectiveness.

SPSS software is used to fill in the data collected through all the
respondents, and to analyze the results through graphs and
interpret it.



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METHODOLOGY

Research Design

Research ProbIem: Need to check the effectiveness of training module at
Telcon. Accumulated facts and figures of every employee data need to be
collected.

Data coIIection method: Survey Method, which consisted of distributing
questionaire to the staff and asking them to fill the required data.
Secondary data like company manuals,internet were used.

Measurement technique: Distribution of Questionaires and analyzation
done using SPSS software.

SampIe: The survey was mainly done at the staff level whose strength is
around 4.

Research Objectives

To determine the effectiveness of the training.

To measure benchmarks in the training program.

To evaluate whether the training objectives were achieved.

To find out if training material was relevant to the employees.

Analyze and report results





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MethodoIogy A

GeographicaI Area

This study was undertaken at TeIco Construction Equipment Co Ltd
On the topic EvaIuating the effectiveness of training moduIe at
TeIcon" at Dharwad unit

About the Company Chosen For Study

Telco Construction Equipment Co. Ltd. is a joint venture company
between ndian automobile giant Tata Engineering Ltd., Mumbai and world
leaders in hydraulic technology, Hitachi Construction Machinery Co. Ltd.,
Japan.

Starting operations in 1961 with the manufacture of friction machines in
collaboration with P&H, USA, today Telcon is a market leader in ndia. The
product range includes hydraulic excavators, crawler cranes, wheel
loaders, backhoe loaders, off-highway dumpers, motor graders, skid steer
loaders, cane loaders and truck loader cranes. t is now spreading its
reach overseas and has already supplied equipment to some Asian,
African and Middle Eastern countries.

Telcon's credentials lay together in its Design capabilities, in its
associations with world leaders such as Hitachi, John Deere, Euclid,
Tadano, ZF and the like, state-of-the-art manufacturing facilities is
Jamshedpur and Dharwad and excellent and wide-spread customer
support, the key to smooth running of capital equipment is well taken care
of by its network of more than offices and many more service
associates.




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SampIing PopuIation

Questionaire was mainly prepared for the staff level employees
Whose strength is near to 4 which covered everyone who
attended the training provided in Telcon on the topic Enhancing
Teamwork Through InterpersonaI ReIations"

Due to time constraint entire staff could not be interviewed.


Data coIIection

1. Primary Data CoIIection

a) Employee nteraction

b) Survey Method


2 Secondary Data CoIIection

a) Manuals Given by Company

b) Text Book as Reference and some Journals

c) nternet References







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1 Primary Data CoIIection-First Hand Data CoIIection

a) EmpIoyee interaction

nteraction was done with employees to gather maximum information
on their experience and views.This interaction provided maximum inputs in
gathering data required to fill in the questionaire. Some informal
interactions were also made so as to know whether the employees were
satisfied with the present training module and to gather their suggestions
to improve the current system.

b) Survey Method

Survey was conducted by providing every employee a questionnaire
and requesting to fill the exact information and to frankly express their
views. This format was provided to nearly 4 employees and data was
collected according to the codes assigned to every employee.


2 Secondary Data CoIIection

a) Company ManuaIs

Company contains some manuals which consist of information
related to company history, present profile, its products and customers.
This acts as base to understand the company background and its
functioning.
The exact training provided to employees was taken from the HR
manager and maximum questions were framed based on the training
provided.




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b) Text Books

These act as guiding source for project. The theoretical aspect of
Training like Meaning; mportance and objectives were studied using text
books. They were very helpful in planning contents to include in actual
questionnaire.
.

c) Internet Sources

nternet was used to collect information required to know what
exactly evaluating the effectiveness of training means,internet was used to
collect the company information and some theoretical aspects regarding
training


Mode of data coIIection

Providing a blank questionnaire consisting of questions relevant to
checking the effectiveness, and every employee was requested to fill the
accurate and exact information



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MethodoIogy B

Different aspects of Enquiry

The questionaire consisted of some relevant questions to collect
information regarding the satisfaction level of employees who attended
the training session and the employees were interviewed through the
same questionnaire.

Some questions were pertaining to personality related questions, so
exact and accurate assessment could not be done. Some judgments
regarding the change in personality could also be made through
interactions..


AnaIysis of the resuIts

O The results were accurate as far as the reality of the answers was
concerned.
O Analysis part was mainly carried using SPSS software and
interpreted using graphs.
O Overall study of each individual employee was done covering every
important aspect.

Duration of study
This study was for the period of four months.This project was pre planned
and related information was carried accordingly.





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Limitations of Study

O The time duration was very short to arrive at a greater observation
and conclusion
O All the information were difficult to collect. For some open ended
questions the answers were not exact and some not relevant.


&niqueness of the study

O The study was unique in its own way because it involved checking
the effectiveness of behavioral training in shorter period which is
usually very difficult to assess.
O The study involved only those who attended the training and
covered entire staff of Telcon.


















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ntroduction to HR
According to Leon C. Megginson, the term human resources can
be understood as "the total knowledge, skills, creative abilities, talents
and aptitude of an organisation's work force, as well as the value attitude
and beliefs of the individuals involved". The term human resources can
also be explained in the sense that it is a resource like any natural
resources. t does mean that the management can get and use the skills,
knowledge ability etc. through the development of skills, tapping and
utilizing them again and again by developing a positive attitude among
employees. The aspect of 'attitude' among the human resources aspects
gained along with globalization. Managing of these human resources
deals with the above area and also provides an answer to the question
referred above.


Meaning and Definition of HRM:
n simple sense, human resource management means employing
people, developing their resources and utilising, maintaining and
compensating their services in tune with the job and organisation,
individual and the society requirements with a view to contribute to the
goals of the organisation, individual and the society.
Human Resource Management (HRM) can be defined as
managing (planning, organizing, directing and controlling) the functions of
employing, developing and compensating human resources resulting in
the creation and development of human relations with a view to contribute
proportionately to the organizational, individual and social goals.





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Features of Human Resource Management:
Features of Human Resource Management include:
Human Resource Management is concerned with employees both as
ndividuals and as a group in attaining goals. t is also concerned with
behavior, emotional and societal aspects of personnel.
t is concerned with the development of human resource with the
development of human resources i.e. knowledge, capability skills,
potentialities and attaining and achieving employee goals including job
satisfaction.
Human Resource Management covers all levels Qow, middle and top)
and categories (unskilled, skilled, technical, professional clerical and
managerial) of employees, it covers both organized and unorganized
employees.
t applies to all the types of organisation in the world (industry, trade
services, commerce, economic, social, religious, political and
government department.) Thus, it is common in all types of
organisation.
Human resource management is a continuous and never ending
process.
t aims at attaining the goals of organisation, individual and society in
an integrated approach.
Organisation goals may include survival, growth and development in
addition to profitability, productivity, innovation, excellence etc.
ndividual employee goals consist of job satisfaction, job security, high
salary, attractive fringe benefits, challenging work, pride, status,
recognition, and opportunity for development.



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Functions of HRM:
The function of HRM can be broadly classified into two categories, viz. (i)
Managerial Function and (ii) Operative Functions.
(i) Managerial Functions
Managerial functions of personnel management involve planning,
organizing, directing and controlling. All these functions influence the
operative functions.
PIanning:
t is predetermined course of action. Planning pertains to
formulating strategies of personnel programmes and changes that will
contribute to the organizational goals. n other words, it involves
forecasting of personnel needs, changing values, attitudes and behaviour
of employees and their impact on the organization.


Organising:
An organisation is a means to an end. t is essential to carry out the
determined course of action. n other words of J.C. Massie, an
organisation is a "structure and a process by which a co-operative group
of human beings allocates its task among its members, identifies
relationships and integrates its activities towards a common objective."
Complex relationships exist between the specialized departments and the
general departments as many top managers are seeking the advice of the
personnel manager. Thus, an organisation establishes relationships
among the employees so that they can contribute to the attainment of
company goals.


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Directing:

The next logical function after completing planning and organising
is the execution of the plan. The basic function of personnel management
at any level is motivating, commanding, leading and activating people.
The willing and effective co-operation of employees for the attainment of
organizational goals is possible through proper direction. Tapping the
maximum potentialities of the people is possible through motivation and
command. Co-ordination deals with the task of blending efforts in order to
ensure successful attainment of an objective. The personnel manager has
to co-ordinate various managers at different levels a far as personnel
functions are concerned.


ControIIing:

After planning, organising and directing various activities of
personnel management, the performance is to be verified in order to know
that the personnel functions are performed in conformity with the plans
and directions of an organisation. Auditing training programmes, analysing
labor turnover records, directing morale surveys, conducting separate
interviews are means for controlling the personnel management function
and making it effective.



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(ii) Operative Functions:
The operative functions of human resource management are related to
specific activities of personnel management viz., employment, development,
compensating and relations. All these are interacted with the managerial
functions
EmpIoyment:
t is the first operative function of human resource management (HRM).
Employment is concerned with securing and employing the people
possessing the required kind and level of human resource necessary to
achieve the organizational objectives. t covers the functions such as:
Job analysis
Human resource planning
Recruitment
Selection
Placement

nternal Mobility
Human Resource DeveIopment:
t is the process of improving, moulding and changing the skills,
knowledge, creative ability, aptitude, values, commitment etc., based on
present and future job and organizational requirements. This functional
include:


Performance Appraisal
Training and Development
Management Development
Career Planning and Development
nternal Mobility
> Transfer


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Compensating:
t is the process of providing adequate, equitable and fair remuneration to
the employees. t includes:
Job evaluation
Wage and salary administration
ncentives
Bonus
Fringe benefits
Social security measures

Human ReIations:
Practicing various human resource policies and programmes like the
employment, development and compensation and interaction among
employees create a sense of relationship between the individual worker and
management, among workers and trade unions and the management.
IndustriaI ReIations:
ndustrial relations refer to the study of relations among employers,
employees, government and the trade unions. t also deals in managing the
HR most effectively and efficiently.










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INTROD&CTION ABO&T TRAINING AND DEVELOPMENT

Organization & individual for their survival & attainment of mutual goals
should develop & progress simultaneously; this can be done mainly through
training technique. Because training is the most important technique & it is
value addition to the organization through Human Resource Development for
the development of the employee. The employee she/he been selected,
placed & introduced in an organization should be provided with training
facilities in order to adjust & make them suitable for the jobs, as no
organization can get a candidate who exactly matches with the job &
organizational requirements. The trained employees are the valuable assets
to any organization. Training in the organization mainly Vega the difference
between the job requirements & employees present specifications. So
employee training is the most important sub-system, specialized & one of the
fundamental operative functions of Human Resource Development.
Organizational efficiency, productivity, progress & development, also
organization viability, stability & growth to greater extent depends on training.
f the required training is not provided it leads to the failure of the performance
failure of the employees. Training enhances the competence, commitment,
creativity & contribution for the organization.

Training is the act of increasing the knowledge & skill of an employee for
doing a particular job. n other words, training improves change & moulds the
employee's knowledge, skill, behavior, & aptitude & attitude towards the
requirements of the job & organization for a definite purpose.







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NEED FOR TRAINING:

i. To match the employee specifications with the job requirements &
organizational needs. Training is needed to fill these gaps by
developing & molding the employee's skill, knowledge, attitude,
behavior etc to tune the organization needs & job requirements.

ii. For the organizational viability & transformation process so the
organization has to train its employees to impart specific skills &
knowledge in order to contribute to organizational efficiency & to cope
with the changing environment

iii. Every organization in order to survive & to be effective should adopt
the latest technology i.e. mechanization, computerization &
automation. So to adopt these technologies the organization should
train the employee to operate them & enrich them in the areas of
changing technical skills & knowledge from time to time.

iv. For the organizational complexity it occurs because of the increased
mechanization & automation manufacturing the products & by-products
or dealing in services of diversified lines extension of operations to
various regions & overseas countries. This creates a complex problem,
& this situation calls for training in the skills of coordination, integration,
& adaptability to the requirement of growth, diversification & expansion.

v. Training is necessary when existing employee is promoted to higher
level in the organization or when there is some new job due to transfer.
t is also necessary to equip the old employee with the new techniques
or technology & advanced disciplines.




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vi. t is necessary for maintaining human relation besides maintaining
sound industrial relations & also to deal with the human problems.

The Training needs aIso arise to:
ncrease productivity
mprove the quality of the product/service
mprove organizational climate.
Effect personal growth
Help a company to fulfill its future personnel needs.
Prevent obsolescence
Minimize the resistance to change

Objectives of training:

To prepare both the old & new employee to meet the present as well
as changing requirements of the job & the organization.
To prevent obsolescence.
To prepare employee for the higher-level tasks.
To ensure smooth & efficient working of the department.
To ensure economical output of the required quality.
To impart knowledge & skills for new entrants for an intelligent

How to make training effective:
Determine the training needs through job description, performance
appraisal, potential appraisal and discussion with employees.
Prepare a training calendar in discussion with the managers concerned.
Define the training objectives specifically.
Select the efficient faculty




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Training Process:
Steps:
1) Design the training needs
2) Job and organizational analysis
3) Evaluate the trainee
4) Prepare cost budget and foresee budget
5) Design training content, teaching methods and media
6) Prepare the instructions
7) Get ready to teach
8) mplement the training program
9) Present the operations
10) Gain the acceptance of the program
11) Try out the trainees performance
12) Evaluate the results
13) Update the program

Methods of Training EvaIuation:
mmediate assessment of trainee's reaction to the program.
Trainee's observation during the training program.
Knowing trainees expectations before the training program and collecting
their views regarding the attainment of the expectations after training.
Seeking opinion of the trainee's superior regarding his / her job
performance and behavior before and after training.
Evaluation of trainee's skill level before and after training program.
Measurement of improvement in trainees on the job.



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Cost benefit analysis of the training program
Seeking opinion of trainees colleagues regarding his / her job performance
and behavior
Measurement of levels in absenteeism, turnover, wastage / scrap,
accidents, breakage of the machinery during pre and post period of the
training program.
Seeking opinions of trainee's subordinates regarding his / her job
performance and behavior.


The Systems Approach to Training and DeveIopment
Four Phases
Needs assessment
Program design
ImpIementation
EvaIuation

Phase 1: Conducting the Needs Assessment












OrganizationaI
AnaIysis


Task anaIysis



Person AnaIysis

.of environment, strategies, and
resources to determine where to
emphasize training
.of the activities to be performed in
order to determine the KRAs needed
.of performance, knowIedge, and
skiIIs in order to determine who needs
training


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Phase : Designing the Training Program







Phase : mplementing the Training Program













Issues in training
design
InstructionaI objectives
Trainee readiness and
motivation
PrincipIes of Iearning
Characteristics of successfuI
trainers
Choosing the instructionaI
method
Nature of training
Type of trainees
OrganizationaI extent of
training
Importance of training
outcomes


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Phase 4: Evaluating the training Program








Training Program EvaIuation
Training and Iearning evaIuation, feedback forms, action pIans and
foIIow-up
There have been many surveys on the use of evaluation in training and
development. While surveys might initially appear heartening, suggesting that
many trainers/organisations use training evaluation extensively, when more
specific and penetrating questions are asked, it is often the case that many
professional trainers and training departments are found to use only
'reactionnaires' (general vague feedback forms), including the invidious
'Happy Sheet' relying on questions such as 'How good did you feel the trainer
was?', and 'How enjoyable was the training course?'. As Kirkpatrick, among
others, teach us, even well-produced reactionnaires do not constitute proper
validation or evaluation of training.

Measuring program
effectiveness
Criterion 1: Trainee reactions
Criterion 2: Extent of Iearning
Criterion 3: Learning transfer
to job
Criterion 4: ResuIts
assessment


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For effective training and Iearning evaIuation, the principaI significant
questions shouId be:
O To what extent were the identified training needs objectives achieved
by the programme?
O To what extent were the learners' objectives achieved?
O What specifically did the learners learn or be usefully reminded of?
O What commitment have the learners made about the learning they are
going to implement on their return to work?
And back at work,
O How successful were the trainees in implementing their action plans?
O To what extent were they supported in this by their line managers?
O To what extent has the action listed above achieved a Return on
nvestment (RO) for the organization, either in terms of identified
objectives satisfaction or, where possible, a monetary assessment.
Organizations commonly fail to perform these evaluation processes,
especially where:
O The HR department and trainers, do not have sufficient time to do so,
and/or
O The HR department does not have sufficient resources - people and
money - to do so.
Obviously the evaluation cloth must be cut according to available resources
(and the culture atmosphere), which tend to vary substantially from one
organization to another. The fact remains that good methodical evaluation
produces a good reliable data; conversely, where little evaluation is
performed, little is ever known about the effectiveness of the training.



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EvaIuation of Training
There are the two principal factors which need to be resolved:
O Who is responsible for the validation and evaluation processes?
O What resources of time, people and money are available for
validation/evaluation purposes? (Within this, consider the effect of
variation to these, for instance an unexpected cut in budget or
manpower. n other words anticipate and plan contingency to deal with
variation.)

ResponsibiIity for the EvaIuation of Training
Traditionally, in the main, any evaluation or other assessment has been left to
the trainers "because that is their job..." The contention is that a 'Training
Evaluation Quintet' should exist, each member of the Quintet having roles and
responsibilities in the process Considerable lip service appears to be paid to
this, but the actual practice tends to be a lot less.
The 'Training Evaluation advocated consists of:
O senior management
O the trainer
O line management
O the training manager
O the trainee
Each has their own responsibilities, which are detailed below.





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Senior Management - Training EvaIuation ResponsibiIities
O Awareness of the need and value of training to the organization.
O The necessity of involving the Training Manager (or equivalent) in
senior management meetings where decisions are made about future
changes when training will be essential.
O Knowledge of and support of training plans.
O Active participation in events.
O Requirement for evaluation to be performed and require regular
summary report.
O Policy and strategic decisions based on results and RO data.

The Trainer - Training EvaIuation ResponsibiIities
O Provision of any necessary pre-programme work etc and programme
planning.
O dentification at the start of the programme of the knowledge and skills
level of the trainees/learners.
O Provision of training and learning resources to enable the learners to
learn within the objectives of the programme and the learners' own
objectives.
O Monitoring the learning as the programme progresses.
O At the end of the programme, assessment of and receipt of reports
from the learners of the learning levels achieved.
O Ensuring the production by the learners of an action plan to reinforce,
practise and implement learning.





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The Line Manager - Training EvaIuation ResponsibiIities
O Work-needs and people identification.
O nvolvement in training programme and evaluation development.
O Support of pre-event preparation and holding briefing meetings with
the learner.
O Giving ongoing, and practical, support to the training programme.
O Holding a debriefing meeting with the learner on their return to work to
discuss, agree or help to modify and agree action for their action plan.
O Reviewing the progress of learning implementation.
O Final review of implementation success and assessment, where
possible, of the RO.

The Training Manager - Training EvaIuation ResponsibiIities
O Management of the training department and agreeing the training
needs and the programme application
O Maintenance of interest and support in the planning and
implementation of the programs, including a practical involvement
where required
O The introduction and maintenance of evaluation systems, and
production of regular reports for senior management
O Frequent, relevant contact with senior management
O Liaison with the learners' line managers and arrangement of learning
implementation responsibility learning programs for the managers
O Liaison with line managers, where necessary, in the assessment of the
training RO.



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The Trainee or Learner - Training EvaIuation ResponsibiIities
O nvolvement in the planning and design of the training programme
where possible
O nvolvement in the planning and design of the evaluation process
where possible
O Obviously, to take interest and an active part in the training programme
or activity.
O To complete a personal action plan during and at the end of the
training for implementation on return to work, and to put this into
practice, with support from the line manager.
O Take interest and support the evaluation processes.
Although the principal role of the trainee in the programme is to learn, the
learner must be involved in the evaluation process. This is essential, since
without their comments much of the evaluation could not occur. Neither would
the new knowledge and skills be implemented. For trainees to neglect either
responsibility the business wastes its investment in training. Trainees will
assist more readily if the process avoids the look and feel of a paper-chase or
number-crunching exercise. nstead, make sure trainees understand the
importance of their input - exactly what and why they are being asked to do.

Training EvaIuation And VaIidation Options
As suggested earlier what you are able to do, rather than what you would like
to do or what should be done, will depend on the various resources and
culture support available. The following summarizes a spectrum of
possibilities within these dependencies.



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1 - Do nothing
Doing nothing to measure the effectiveness and result of any business activity
is never a good option, but it is perhaps justifiable in the training area under
the following circumstances:
O f the organization, even when prompted, displays no interest in the
evaluation and validation of the training and learning - from the line
manager up to the board of directors.
O f you, as the trainer, have a solid process for planning training to meet
organizational and people-development needs.
O f you have a reasonable level of assurance or evidence that the
training being delivered is fit for purpose, gets results, and that the
organization (notably the line managers and the board, the potential
source of criticism and complaint) is happy with the training provision.
O You have far better things to do than carry out training evaluation,
particularly if evaluation is difficult and cooperation is sparse.
However, even in these circumstances, there may come a time when having
kept a basic system of evaluation will prove to be helpful, for example:
O You receive have a sudden unexpected demand for a justification of a
part or all of the training activity. (These demands can spring up, for
example with a change in management, or policy, or a new initiative).
O You see the opportunity or need to produce your own justification (for
example to increase training resource, staffing or budgets, new
premises or equipment).
O You seek to change job and need evidence of the effectiveness of your
past training activities.
Doing nothing is always the least desirable option. At any time somebody
more senior to you might be moved to ask "Can you prove what you are
saying about


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How successful you are?" Without evaluation records you are likely to be at a
loss for words of proof.
2 - MinimaI action
The absolutely basic action for a start of some form of evaluation is as
follows:
At the end of every training programme, give the learners sufficient time and
support in the form of programme information, and have the learners
complete an action plan based on what they have learned on the programme
and what they intend to implement on their return to work. This action plan
should not only include a description of the action intended but comments on
how they intend to implement it, a timescale for starting and completing it, and
any resources required, etc. A fully detailed action plan always helps the
learners to consolidate their thoughts. The action plan will have a secondary
use in demonstrating to the trainers, and anyone else interested, the types
and levels of learning that have been achieved. The learners should also be
encouraged to show and discuss their action plans with their line managers
on return to work, whether or not this type of follow-up has been initiated by
the manager.

3 - MinimaI desirabIe action Ieading to evaIuation
When returning to work to implement the action plan the learner should
ideally be supported by their line manager, rather than have the onus for
implementation rest entirely on the learner. The line manager should hold a
debriefing meeting with the learner soon after their return to work, covering a
number of questions, basically discussing and agreeing the action plan and
arranging support for the learner in its implementation. As described earlier,
this is a clear responsibility of the line manager, which demonstrates to senior


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management, the training department and, certainly not least, the learner,
that a positive attitude is being taken to the training. Contrast this with, as
often happens, a member of staff being sent on a training course, after which
all thoughts of management follow-up are forgotten.
The initial line manager debriefing meeting is not the end of the learning
relationship between the learner and the line manager. At the initial meeting,
objectives and support must be agreed, then arrangements made for interim
reviews of implementation progress. After this when appropriate, a final
review meeting needs to consider future action.
This process requires minimal action by the line manager - it involves no
more than the sort of observations being made as would be normal for a line
manager monitoring the actions of his or her staff. This process of review
meetings requires little extra effort and time from the manager, but does much
to demonstrate at the very least to the staff that their manager takes training
seriously.

4 - Training program basic vaIidation approach
The action plan and implementation approach described in () above is
placed as a responsibility on the learners and their line managers, and, apart
from the provision of advice and time, do not require any resource
involvement from the trainer. There are two further parts of an approach
which also require only the provision of time for the learners to describe their
feelings and information. The first is the reactionnaire which seeks





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The views, opinions, feelings, etc., of the learners about the program. This is
not at a 'happy sheet' level, nor a simple tick-list - but one which allows
realistic feelings to be stated.
This sort of reactionnaire is described in the book ('Assessing the Value of
Your Training', Leslie Rae, Gower, ). This evaluation seeks a score for
each question against a 6-point range of Good to Bad, and also the learners'
own reasons for the scores, which is especially important if the score is low.
Reactionnaires should not be automatic events on every course or
programme. This sort of evaluation can be reserved for new programs (for
example, the first three events) or when there are indications that something
is going wrong with the programme.
The next evaluation instrument, like the action plan, should be used at the
end of every course if possible. This is the Learning Questionnaire (LQ),
which can be a relatively simple instrument asking the learners what they
have learned on the programme, what they have been usefully reminded of,
and what was not included that they expected to be included, or would have
liked to have been included. Scoring ranges can be included, but these are
minimal and are subordinate to the text comments made by the learners.
There is an alternative to the LQ called the Key Objectives LQ (KOLQ) which
seeks the amount of learning achieved by posing the relevant questions
against the list of Key Objectives produced for the programme. When a
reactionnaire and LQ/KOLQ are used, they must not be filed away and
forgotten at the end of the programme, as is the common tendency, but used
to produce a training evaluation and validation summary. A factually-based
evaluation summary is necessary to support claims that a programme is
good/effective/satisfies the objectives set'. Evaluation summaries can also be
helpful for publicity for the training programme, etc.



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Example Learning Questionnaires and Key Objectives Learning
Questionnaires are included in the set of free evaluation tools.

5 - TotaI EvaIuation Process
f it becomes necessary the processes described in () and (4) can be
combined and supplemented by other methods to produce a full evaluation
process that covers all eventualities. Few occasions or environments allow
this full process to be applied, particularly when there is no Quintet support,
but it is the ultimate aim. The process is summarized below:
O Training needs identification and setting of objectives by the
organization
O Planning, design and preparation of the training programs against the
objectives
O Pre-course identification of people with needs and completion of the
preparation required by the training programme
O Provision of the agreed training programs
O Pre-course briefing meeting between learner and line manager
O Pre-course or start of programme identification of learners' existing
knowledge, skills and attitudes, ('-Test' before-and-after training
example tool and manual version and working file version)
O nterim validation as programme proceeds
O Assessment of terminal knowledge, skills, etc., and completion of
perceptions/change assessment ('-Test' example tool and manual
version and working file version)
O Completion of end-of-programme reactionnaire
O Completion of end-of-programme Learning Questionnaire or Key
Objectives Learning Questionnaire
O Completion of Action Plan



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O Post-course debriefing meeting between learner and line manager
O Line manager observation of implementation progress
O Review meetings to discuss progress of implementation
O Final implementation review meeting
O Assessment of RO

ConcIusion
Do something The processes described above allow considerable latitude
depending on resources and culture environment, so there is always the
opportunity to do something - obviously the more tools used and the wider the
approach, the more valuable and effective the evaluation will be. However be
pragmatic. Large expensive critical programmes will always justify more
evaluation and scrutiny than small, one-off, non-critical training activities.
Where there's a heavy investment and expectation, so the evaluation should
be sufficiently detailed and complete. Training managers particularly should
clarify measurement and evaluation expectations with senior management
prior to embarking on substantial new training activities, so that appropriate
evaluation processes can be established when the programme itself is
designed.
Where large and potentially critical programmes are planned, training
managers should err on the side of caution - ensure adequate evaluation
processes are in place. As with any investment, a senior executive is always
likely to ask, "What did we get for our investment?", and when he asks, the
training manager needs to be able to provide a fully detailed response.


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The Trainer's OveraII ResponsibiIities - Aside From Training
EvaIuation
Over the years the trainer's roles have changed, but the basic raison-d'tre
for the trainer is to provide efficient and effective training programmes. The
following suggests the elements of the basic role of the trainer, but it must be
borne in mind that different circumstances will require modifications of these
activities.
1. The basic role of a trainer (or however they may be designated) is to offer
and provide efficient and effective training programmes aimed at enabling the
participants to learn the knowledge, skills and attitudes required of them.
. A trainer plans and designs the training programmes, or otherwise obtains
them (for example, distance learning or e-technology programmes on the
nternet or on CD/DVD), in accordance with the requirements identified from
the results of a TNA (Training Needs dentification and Analysis) for the
relevant staff of an organizations or organizations.
. The training programmes cited at (1) and () must be completely based on
the TNA which has been: (a) completed by the trainer on behalf of and at the
request of the relevant organization (b) determined in some other way by the
organization.
4. Following discussion with or direction by the organization management
who will have taken into account costs and values (eg RO - Return on
nvestment in the training), the trainer will agree with the organization
management the most appropriate form and methods for the training.
5 . f the appropriate form for satisfying the training need is a direct training
course or workshop, or an ntranet provided programme, the trainer will
design this programme using the most effective approaches, techniques and
methods, integrating face-to-face practices with various forms of e-technology
wherever this is possible or desirable.


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6. f the appropriate form for satisfying the training need is some form of open
learning programme or e-technology programme, the trainer, with the support
of the organization management obtain, plan the utilization and be prepared
to support the learner in the use of the relevant materials.
7. The trainer, following contact with the potential learners, preferably through
their line managers, to seek some pre-programme activity and/or initial
evaluation activities, should provide the appropriate training programme(s) to
the learners provided by their organization(s). During and at the end of the
programme, the trainer should ensure that: (a) an effective form of
training/learning validation is followed (b) the learners complete an action plan
for implementation of their learning when they return to work.
8. Provide, as necessary, having reviewed the validation results, an analysis
of the changes in the knowledge, skills and attitudes of the learners to the
organization management with any recommendations deemed necessary.
The review would include consideration of the effectiveness of the content of
the programme and the effectiveness of the methods used to enable learning,
that is whether the programme satisfied the objectives of the programme and
those of the learners.
9. Continue to provide effective learning opportunities as required by the
organization.
1. Enable their own CPD (Continuing Professional Development) by all
possible developmental means - training programmes and self-development
methods.
11. Arrange and run educative workshops for line managers on the subject of
their fulfillment of their training and evaluation responsibilities.




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Dependent on the circumstances and the decisions of the organization
management, trainers do not, under normal circumstances:
1. Make organizational training decisions without the full agreement of the
organizational management.
. Take part in the post-programme learning implementation or evaluation
unless the learners' line managers cannot or will not fulfil their training and
evaluation responsibilities.
As a final reminder, unless circumstances force them to behave otherwise,
the trainer's role is to provide effective training programmes and the role of
the learners' line managers is to continue the evaluation process after the
training programme, counsel and support the learner in the implementation of
their learning, and assess the cost-value effectiveness or (where feasible) the
RO of the training. Naturally, if action will help the trainers to become more
effective in their training, they can take part in but not run any pre- and post-
programme actions as described, always remembering that these are the
responsibilities of the line manager.

A Note about ROI (Return on Investment) In Training
Attempting financial RO assessment of training is a controversial issue. t's a
difficult task to do in absolute terms due to the many aspects to be taken into
account, some of which are very difficult to quantify at all, let alone to define
in precise financial terms. nvestment - the cost - in training may be easier to
identify, but the benefits - the return - are notoriously tricky to pin down. What
value do you place on improved morale? Reduced stress levels? Longer
careers? Better qualified staff? mproved time management? All of these can
be benefits - returns - on training investment. Attaching a value and relating
this to a single cause, ie,


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training, is often impossible. At best therefore, many training RO
assessments are necessarily 'best estimates'.
f RO-type measures are required in areas where reliable financial
assessment is not possible, it's advisable to agree a 'best possible' approach,
or a 'notional indicator' and then ensure this is used consistently from
occasion to occasion, year on year, course to course, allowing at least a
comparison of like with like to be made, and trends to be spotted, even if
financial data is not absolutely accurate.
n the absence of absolutely quantifiable data, find something that will provide
a useful if notional indication. For example, after training sales people, the
increased number and value of new sales made is an indicator of sorts. After
motivational or team-building training, reduced absentee rates would be an
expected output. After an extensive management development programme,
the increase in internal management promotions would be a measurable
return. Find something to measure, rather than say it can't be done at all, but
be pragmatic and limit the time and resource spent according to the accuracy
and reliability of the input and output data. Also, refer to the very original
Training Needs Analysis that prompted the training itself - what were the
business performance factors that the training sought to improve? Use these
original drivers to measure and relate to organizational return achieved.
The problems in assessing RO are more challenging in public and non-profit-
making organizations - government departments, charities, voluntary bodies,
etc.
RO assessment in these environments can be so difficult as to be
insurmountable, so that the organization remains satisfied with general
approximations or vague comparisons, or accepts wider forms of justification
for the training without invoking detailed costing.



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None of this is to say that cost- and value-effectiveness assessment should
not be attempted. At the very least, direct costs must be controlled within
agreed budgets, and if it is possible, attempts at more detailed returns should
be made.
t may be of some consolation to know that Jack Philips, an American RO
'guru', recently commented about training RO: "Organizations should be
considering implementing RO impact studies very selectively on only 5 to 1
per cent of their training programme, otherwise it becomes incredibly
expensive and resource intensive."

Training EvaIuation Research
This research extract is an example of the many survey findings that indicate
the need to improve evaluation of training and learning. t is useful to refer to
the Kirkpatrick Learning Evaluation model to appreciate the different stages at
which learning and training effectiveness should be evaluated.
Research published the UK's British Learning Association in May 6 found
that 7 (of a representative sample) of the UK's leading learning
professionals considered that learning tends not to lead to change.
Only 51 of respondents said that learning and training was evaluated
several months after the learning or training intervention.
The survey was carried out among delegates of the 6 conference of the
UK's British Learning Association.





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Speaking on the findings, David Wolfson, Chairman of the British Learning
Association said, "These are worrying figures from the country's leading
learning professionals. f they really do reflect training in the UK, then we
have to think long and hard about how to make the changes that training is
meant to give. t suggests that we have to do more - much more - to ensure
that learning interventions really make a difference..."
Central to improving training and learning is the question of bringing more
meaning and purpose to people's lives, aside from merely focusing on skills
and work-related development and training courses.Learning and training
enables positive change and improvement - for people and employers - when
people's work is aligned with people's lives - their strengths, personal
potential, goals and dreams - outside work as well as at work.

Kirkpatrick's Learning and Training EvaIuation Theory
DonaId L Kirkpatrick's Training EvaIuation ModeI - The Four LeveIs of
Learning EvaIuation
Donald L Kirkpatrick, Professor Emeritus, University Of Wisconsin (where he
achieved his BBA, MBA and PhD), first published his ideas in 1959, in a
series of articles in the US Training and Development Journal. The articles
were subsequently included in Kirkpatrick's book Evaluating Training
Programs (1975 and since revised), published by the American Society for
Training and Development (ASTD), for whom Kirkpatrick previously served as
president and with whom he maintained strong connections. Donald
Kirkpatrick has written several other significant books about training and
evaluation, more recently with his similarly inclined son James, and has
consulted with some of the world's largest corporations.



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Donald Kirkpatrick's 1975 book Evaluating Training Programs defined his
originally published ideas of 1959, thereby further increasing awareness of
them,
so that his theory has now become arguably the most widely used and
popular model for the evaluation of training and learning. Kirkpatrick's four-
level model is now considered an industry standard across the HR and
training communities. The four levels of training evaluation model was later
redefined and updated in Kirkpatrick's 1998 book, called 'Evaluating Training
Programs: The Four Levels'.
The four levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation model essentially measure:
O Reaction of student - what they thought and feIt about the training
O Learning - the resuIting increase in knowIedge or capabiIity
O Behavior - extent of behavior and capabiIity improvement and
impIementation/appIication
O ResuIts - the effects on the business or environment resuIting
from the trainee's performance
All these measures are recommended for full and meaningful evaluation of
learning in organizations, although their application broadly increases in
complexity, and usually cost, through the levels from level 1-4.

Quick Training EvaIuation and Feedback Form, based on -
Kirkpatrick's Four LeveIs Of Training EvaIuation
This grid illustrates the basic Kirkpatrick structure at a glance.




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IeveI
EvaIuation
type (what
is
measured)
EvaIuation
description and
characteristics
ExampIes of
evaIuation tooIs and
methods
ReIevance and
practicabiIity
1 Reaction
O Reaction
evaluation is
how the
delegates
felt about
the training
or learning
experience
O E.g., 'happy
sheets',
feedback
forms
O Also verbal
reaction, post-
training
surveys or
questionnaires
O Quick and very
easy to obtain
O Not expensive to
gather or to
analyze
Learning

Learning
evaluation is the
measurement of
the increase in
knowledge - before
and after





O Typically
assessments
or tests before
and after the
training
O nterview or
observation
can also be
used



O Relatively simple
to set up; clear-
cut for
quantifiable skills
O Less easy for
complex learning


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Behavior
O Behavior
evaluation is
the extent of
applied
learning
back on the
job -
implementat
ion


Observation and
interview over time
are required to
assess change,
relevance of change,
and sustainability of
change



O Measurement of
behavior change
typically requires
cooperation and
skill of line-
managers
4 ResuIts
O Results
evaluation is
the effect on
the business
or
environment
by the
trainee

O Measures are
already in
place via
normal
management
systems and
reporting - the
challenge is to
relate to the
trainee
O ndividually not
difficult; unlike
whole
organization
O Process must
attribute clear
accountabilities





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Since Kirkpatrick established his original model, other theorists (for example
Jack Phillips), and indeed Kirkpatrick himself, have referred to a possible fifth
level, namely RO (Return On nvestment). n my view RO can easily be
included in Kirkpatrick's original fourth level 'Results'. The inclusion and
relevance of a fifth level is therefore arguably only relevant if the assessment
of Return on nvestment might otherwise be ignored or forgotten when
referring simply to the 'Results' level.
Learning evaluation is a widely researched area. This is understandable since
the subject is fundamental to the existence and performance of education
around the world, not least universities, which of course contain most of the
researchers and writers.
While Kirkpatrick's model is not the only one of its type, for most industrial and
commercial applications it suffices; indeed most organizations would be
absolutely thrilled if their training and learning evaluation, and thereby their
ongoing people-development, were planned and managed according to
Kirkpatrick's model.

EvaIuation of HRD Function Performance
A HR Manager is responsible for HR functions and services to internal and/or
external customers, he might find it useful to go beyond Kirkpatrick's
evaluation of training and learning, and to evaluate also satisfaction among
staff/customers with HR department's overall performance. The parameters
for such an evaluation ultimately depend on what your HR function is
responsible for - in other words, evaluate according to expectations.




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Like anything else, evaluating customer satisfaction must first begin with a
clear appreciation of (internal) customers' expectations. Expectations -
agreed, stated, published or otherwise - provide the basis for evaluating all
types of customer satisfaction.
f people have expectations which go beyond HR department's stated and
actual responsibilities, then the matter must be pursued because it will almost
certainly offer an opportunity to add value to HR's activities, and to add value
and competitive advantage to the organization as a whole. n this fast
changing world, HR is increasingly the department which is most likely to see
and respond to new opportunities for the support and development of the
people - so respond, understand, and do what you can to meet new demands
when you see them.
f you are keen to know how well HR department is meeting people's
expectations, a questionnaire, and/or some group discussions will shed light
on the situation.
Here are some example questions. Effectively questions should be asked to
people to say how well HR or HRD department has done the following:
O Helped me to identify, understand, identify and prioritise my personal
development needs and wishes, in terms of: skills, knowledge,
experience and attitude (or personal well-being, or emotional maturity,
or mood, or mind-set, or any other suitable term meaning mental
approach, which people will respond to)
O Helped me to understand my own preferred learning style and learning
methods for acquiring new skills, knowledge and attitudinal capabilities
O Helped me to identify and obtain effective learning and development
that suits my preferred style and circumstances




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O Helped me to measure my development, and for the measurement to
be clear to my boss and others in the organisation who should know
about my capabilities
O Provided tools and systems to encourage and facilitate my personal
development
O And particularly helped to optimise the relationship between me and
my boss relating to assisting my own personal development and well-
being
O Provided a working environment that protects me from discrimination
and harassment of any sort
O Provided the opportunity for me to voice my grievances if have any,
(in private, to a suitably trained person in the company whom trust)
and then if so wish for proper consideration and response to be given
to them by the company
O Provided the opportunity for me to receive counselling and advice in
the event that need private and supportive help of this type, again
from a suitably trained person in the company whom trust
O Ensured that disciplinary processes are clear and fair, and include the
right of appeal
O Ensured that recruitment and promotion of staff are managed fairly and
transparently
O Ensuring that systems and activities exist to keep all staff informed of
company plans, performance, etc., (as normally included in a Team
Briefing system)
O (if you dare...) ensuring that people are paid and rewarded fairly in
relation to other company employees, and separately, paid and
rewarded fairly when compared to market norms (your CEO will not
like this question, but if you have a problem in this area it's best to
know about it...)
O (and for managers) helped me to ensure the development needs of my
staff are identified and supported


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This is not an exhaustive list - just some examples. Many of the examples
contain elements which should under typical large company circumstances be
broken down to create more and smaller questions about more specific
aspects of HR support and services.
f you work in HR, or run an HR department, and consider that some of these
issues and expectations fall outside your remit, then consider who else is
responsible for them.
repeat, in this fast changing world, HR is increasingly the department which
is most likely to see and respond to new opportunities for the support and
development of the your people - so respond, understand, and do what you
can to meet new demands when you see them. n doing so you will add value
to your people and your organization - and your department.

















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Industry ProfiIe
Encouraged by huge prospect of ndia's mining sector, almost all the major
mining equipment makers are trying to enlarge their presence in the country.
While some like Caterpillar of the US and Komatsu Ltd. of Japan have set up
their own units, others like Bucyrus, Atlas Copco, and P&H have extended
operations through units in partnership with ndian companies.
ncidentally, ndia plans to increase its coal production to over 65 million
tons, including that from captive blocks, from about 417 million tons in 6-
7 to meet the growing energy demand and not only this, production of other
minerals like iron ore and bauxite too is expected to increase significantly in
coming years.
Though a large number of mining equipment makers are providing opencast
tools, Joy Global is perhaps the only player, both among domestic and foreign
players, which is providing both underground mining equipment as well as
opencast machines through P&H Joy Mining Equipment ndia Ltd.
Going by the current focus of Coal ndia Ltd. which produces nearly 8
percent of country's total coal and plans to increase its underground
production by about 5 percent to 75 million tons per annum by 11-1, it is
expected that main center of activities among mining equipment providers will
remain centered around underground section.
n this scenario, companies like Joy Mining, which provides almost all the
methods of underground mining stands to benefit. However, opencast
equipment providers might not lag behind as production from opencast route
is likely to increase by over 5 percent to 445 million tons by 11-1.




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Despite the opportunities, equipment makers, specially from abroad, might
have to face tough competition in the ndian mining sector, largely ruled by
Coal ndia. According to sources in the industry, the major challenge that
Companies might face is the current mind set of the senior officials, who are
generally not that willing to adopt global standards.
Even Coal ndia Chairman P S Bhattacharyya acknowledges the need for
change in mindset when he says that the company needs to think big in terms
of project size.
Another problem is basic skills and mining training and terms and conditions
that are imposed by government run mining companies while floating tenders.
According to an official of a company 'adhering to terms and conditions
imposed by government run companies is the biggest challenge.'
However, it is expected that with more and more private companies entering
coal mining in coming years, the situation would improve drastically as private
companies would focus on production instead of 'unnecessary' conditions.
Besides government run Bharat Earth Movers Ltd (BEML), the major
domestic companies providing opencast equipments in the country are L&T
and Telco, while overseas companies present in this sector are
ngersol-Rand, Joy Global nc., Caterpillar, Atlas Copco, Bucyrus and
Komatsu Ltd. of Japan..
Following is a brief profile of mining equipment making companies operating
in ndia.
BEML:
Bharat Earth Movers Limited (BEML), the state run and second largest
manufacturer of earthmoving equipment in Asia, plans to diversify into varied


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activities including underground mining equipment and joint ventures abroad
to meet the growing demand of mining equipment in ndia.
BEML has technology tie-ups with global mining companies like Bucyrus,
Komatsu, Omnipol, Voest Alpine, GM and Bumar Labedy.
The company claims that it commands 7 percent market share in domestic
earthmover industry.
L&T
Larsen & Toubro Limited is ndia's largest engineering and construction
conglomerate, with diverse interests such as construction, mining equipment,
hydraulic equipment, electrical and electronic power services, fertilizer
projects, medical electronics and information technology.
t has also entered into a joint venture with Komatsu Asia & Pacific Pte. Ltd.,
Singapore, to manufacture hydraulic excavators and other such components
and is also actively pursuing business opportunities in China, Middle East and
Africa as it sees immense potential in these regions.
L&T Komatsu Ltd
Sensing opportunity in ndia's mining equipment market, Komatsu Group of
Japan came to ndia in 1998 by setting up a joint venture in association with
Larsen and
Toubro Ltd., The ndian outfit is called L&T-Komatsu Limited (LTK)
TeIco:
Telco Construction Equipment Company is the largest manufacturer of
hydraulic excavators in ndia, with over 6, machines in the market. t
possesses indigenous design and development capabilities, and the
company's manufacturing facilities are SO 91-certified.


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Company ProfiIe

JEHANGIR RATANJI DADABHOY (JRD) TATA:

J.R.D. TATA was born on July 9, 194 in paris. He was second child
of Ratanji Dadabhoy Tata and his French wife Coni. He spends his early
years in Hardelot a beach town in France, where his interest in flying comes
out. His interest varied like he was desired to become a scholar at
Cambridge, had a passion for fast cars. He has served in regiment called Les
Sap his (The Sepoys) with the French Army in 194.

On the death of Nouroji Saklatvala, Chairman of Tata and sons in the
year 198 JRD Tata was 4
th
old, catapulted to the head of ndia's largest
industrial empire. He guided the destiny of ndia's largest business house
over half a century. n the year 199 Tata Chemicals started its struggle
towards pioneering a self reliant, basic inorganic chemical industry for ndia in
the face of repeated crisis in the year 1945 just before ndia's independence,
Tata Steel promoted the Tata Engineering and Locomotive Company
(TELCO) with the objective of making locomotives for the ndian Railways.
Today, TELCO has emerged as the largest Commercial Vehicle producers.

n the year 19 it pioneered civil aviation on the subcontinent by
launching the group's Airline, which is today The National Airline. Dr. Homi
baba's ambition to catapult ndia in to the nuclear age was found by JRD
Tata, also initiated in the family planning movement, preserving the country's
priceless flock arts. Other than these most important were his guidance for
ndia's largest business group employing more than a quarter million over half
a century.





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RATAN TATA :
Under him the Tata Engineering and locomotive company was
incorporated in the year 1945 in Jameshedpur for the manufacture of
commercial vehicles. TELCO now has manufacturing units in Pune, Lucknow
and Dharwad with turnover of Rs. 667 cores ($1475 million) and asset of Rs.
76 cores ($16 million) as on march .


VISION OF TELCON

"TELCON shall strive to maximize the creation of wealth for its stakeholders
by providing Constructive Solution for its Customers in the Construction,
Mining nfrastructure and other End-Use Sectors

MISSION OF TELCON

"TELCON shall strive to fulfill the aspirations of its stakeholders with
the proactive nvolvement of its employees and other business partners.

Q&ALITY POLICY

TELCON is committed to maximizing customer satisfaction & delight. t
shall strive to achieve this goal through the continuous improvement of its
design & development: manufacturing: sales & services of its products. t
shall also ensure that its products are reliable , sale, environment friendly &
cost effective & its services are of the highest order,







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ACTIVITIES

Environment

n an environment protection drive several multiple thousands of tree
samplings were planted in Dharwad and Jameshedpur inside the factory
premises and in the TELCON townships. This remains an ongoing annual
activity, never to give up.

EducationaI Assistance to the PhysicaIIy DisabIed

Assistance is extended to schools imparting special education such as
the Spastic Society of Southern ndia School and Karnataka School for the
Deal. Sponsorship of education for children of leprosy patients residing in
self-settled colonies, in collaboration with Nav Jagarn Manav Samaj.

SociaI DeveIopment
Awareness programs for women in villages in areas of hygiene,
education and all-around development. ndustrial training to worthy school
children.

Infrastructure Support To LocaI EducationaI Institutions:

Construction of boundary wall and toilets and supply of furniture to
village schools in Belur. Assistance to schools in Jameshedpur to set up
computer laboratories and sports facilities.








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PubIic HeaIth and FamiIy WeIfare

TELCON sponsors immunization programs in collaboration with
Parivar Kalyan Sansthan that extends medical help to thousands of children
who have no access to basic health programs. The year is dotted

with blood donation and medical camps. Family planning counseling and
programs arre held in collaboration with Parivar Kalyan Sansthan where by
people are imparted lecture and operations are performed.

TELCON VAL&ES

Ethical Behavior
ntegrity
Credibility
Transparency
Customer Orientation
Agility, Speed & Competitive Urgency
nnovation
Meritocracy
Team Work as well as Respect for ndividuals
Face Based
Socially Responsible
Learning Organization.

IMPORTANT GRO&P COMPANIES
TATA Tetley
TATA Consultancy Services
Titan
TATA Steel
ndian Hotels
TATA Power


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TATA CODE OF COND&CT

The values and principles, which have governed the manner, in which the
TATA group of companies and their employees have conducted themselves
have never been articulated. t was therefore considered worthwhile to
prepare a clear document, which would serve as a guide to each employee
on the values, ethics and business principles expected of him or her. Brief
notes of documents are given below.
National nterest
Financial Reporting and Records
Competition
Gift and Donations
Government agencies
Political non-alignment
Health Safety and Environment
Quality of products and services
Corporate Citizenship
Co-Operation of TATA companies
Public representation
Group Policies
Ethical conduct
Regular compliance
Concurrent employment
Confidential information
Protecting Company assets
Citizenship
ntegrity of data furnished
Reporting concern






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PROD&CTS MAN&FACT&RED AT TELCON

1 HYDRA&LIC EXCAVATORS
Types of Excavators
EX-7
EX-11
EX-
EX-4

2 BACK HOE LOADER
TYPE
TATAJD15-V

APPLICATIONS

Mining
Tunneling
Cable/Pipe Laying
Agriculture
Digging
Earth Work
Civic Utilities.

TELCON IS HAVING 4 GRADES OF EMPLOYEES
1. EG = EXECUTVE GRADE ()
. TM = TATA MANAGERS (18)
. TS = TATA SUPERVSORS (9)
4. TE = TATA EMPLOYEES (54)
5. TRANEES = 14
6. APPRENTCES = 8



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THE MAIN THREE SHOPS IN TELCON ARE AS FOLLOWS
1. MD SHOP = EX-7 EX-1 EX-11
. MN SHOP = EX- EX-4
. WHEEL SHOP = BACKHOE LOADERS
There is also a paint shop.

ACTIVITIES IN ALL THREE SHOPS ARE AS FOLLOWS
MIDI SHOP
Product name
O EXCAVATOR-7
O EXCAVATOR-1
O EXCAVATOR-11
F&NCTIONS
O Digging purpose
O Pipes lifting
O Stone breaking
O Mountain leveling

MINI SHOP
Product name
O EXCAVATOR-
O Army machines TJD-15-SE

F&NCTIONS
O Digging purpose
O Pipes lifting
O Stone breaking
O Mountain leveling
This shop is divided into three main parts
O Sub assembly area (left)
O Main line (middle)
O Sub assembly area (right)


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WHEEL SHOP
Product name
Backhoe loader-TATA JD 15
Functions
O For digging purpose
O For loading purpose
This shop is divided into three parts
O Sub assembly area (left)
O Main line (middle)
O Sub assembly area (right)
Again main line is divided into 1 sections.

COMPETITORS OF TELCON

L & T
ESCORTS
VOLVO
CATERPLLA
BHEL
HNDUSTAN MOTORS

C&STOMERS OF TELCON

CONSTRUCTORS
BULDERS
LAND SCRAPPERS
CONTRACTORS






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DEPARTMENTS IN TELCON

1. Production Department
. Design and Supply Chain Management
. Quality Assurance Department
4. Human Resource & Administration Department
5. Finance Department
6. Planning Department
7. Materials Department


PROD&CTION DEPARTMENT

This department is responsible for manufacturing the excavators and
backhoe loaders and other products which are decided by the board of
directors.


DESIGN AND S&PPLY CHAIN MANAGEMENT

t handles the ancillary development activities. Supply chain
management procurement department places the orders on the suppliers to
supply as per schedule.
The orders on suppliers generated in SAP. Through SAP the orders
are generated and send to suppliers.
The suppliers send the materials as per the schedule with all related
documents.






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Q&ALITY ASS&RANCE DEPARTMENT
This department has to maintain the good standard quality of products. t had
also been certified SO91 in order to increase the customer satisfaction,
this department will check the quality of all the products manufactured and
also quality of raw materials.

H&MAN RESO&RCE DEPARTMENT
FUNCTONS OF HRM
1. Managerial Functions
O Planning
O Organizing
O Directing
O Controlling
. Operative Functions
O Procurement
O Development
O Compensation
O ntegration
O Maintenance

FINANCE DEPARTMENT
Finance department is one of the departments in TELCON. Finance
department lays a very important role in organization. TELCON has made a
huge investment in the project. The success of finance depends upon how
finance is planned.








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PLANNING DEPARTMENT

Planning department is one of the most important department in
TELCON. Planning department also carries out forecasting and research.
Planning is thinking before doing. Planning is one of the predetermined
course of action.

AREA COVERED
TELCON at Dharwad covers an area of 118.75

B&SINESS VAL&ES

Customer satisfaction and loyalty
Maintaining high standards
Profitability
Commitment to productivity
Environment friendly products and processes

C&LT&RAL VAL&ES
Corporate Ethics
Discipline
Developing People
Team Building

SOCIAL VAL&ES
Resource conversation
Environment protection
Social consciousness






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LATEST ACHIEVEMENTS:

India's Largest Achievements:

TELCON launched ndia's largest excavator the TATA HTACH EX-
1-V. t was launched on
th
March at assembly shop Jameshedpur.

The first customer was the TATA Steel. These 1 tones
EXCAVATOR has 6.5 cum bucket and is a product of the joint collaboration
between TATA Engineering & HTACH.

The first machine was produced in a time period of four months but
they could produce the second within a period of one month.


















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Data CoIIection and ResuIts

Questionaire Format

Questionnaire
TeIco Construction Equipment Co Ltd

Dear Sir/Madam
am very much pleased to introduce myself as a student of MBA from
KLES'S MSR, Hubli. am conducting a survey on "Evaluating the
Effectiveness of Training Module in Telcon. This study is conducted to check
the effectiveness of training provided on 'Enhancing Teamwork Through
Interpersonal Relations" on
rd
and 4
th
September. request you to extend
your kind co-operation and assure that the information provided by you will
be kept strictly confidential.


EMPLOYEE CODE: ****

. PERSONNEL INFORMTION

O ID No:
O Name:
O #esidential Address:
O ontact No :

O mergency ontact No:
O Birth date:
O Age:
O $ex:


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O Date of joining:
O ducational Qualification:
O $pecialization done if any:
O !revious xperience:
O arital $tatus:
arried Unmarried:
O Nature of mployment
!ermanent %emporary
O ob Designation
O Department


1) %o what extent do you feel you have learned from the program? (!lease
ring the score number that you feel most closely represents your views)

Lot 5 4 3 2 Nothing


2) %o what extent have you learned on the course about your behavioral
skills?

Lot 5 4 3 2 Nothing


3) %o what extent have you improved your team building skills?


Lot 5 4 3 2 Nothing






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4) %o what extent have your skills in the subject of the program improved or
increased as a result of the program?

Lot 5 4 3 2 Little


5) %o what extent do you feel your personal learning objectives have been
achieved?

Fully Achieved
Achieved
Average
$omewhat Achieved
Not Achieved


6) #ight balance of skills in team formation is met in %elcon.omment.

H.gree gree vg Ds.gree H.Ds
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )


7) %he inception of $elf anaged %eams can contribute to a rise in
employee's morale and retention.

$trongly Agree
Agree
$ometimes Agree
Disagree
$trongly Disagree


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8) How capable are you in performing the tasks assigned to you in a team?


V.Good Good vg Poor V.Poor
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )


9) What level of confidence have you developed in communicating with your
team? (!lease ring the score number that you feel most closely
represents your views)


High 5 4 3 2 Low


10) %o what extent do you extend your help to other members of team?
(!lease ring the score number that you feel most closely represents your
views)


Lot 5 4 3 2 Never


11) How efficient are you in resolving conflicts occurring in your team?

Very fficient
fficient
Average
$omewhat fficient
Never fficient


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12) %eams provide more results than individual contribution. omment on this
statement.

H.gree gree vg Ds.gree H.Ds
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )


13) A high level of trust and strong commitment in team is met in %elcon.

H.gree gree vg Ds.gree H.Ds
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )


14) Brainstorming sessions contribute to the generation of new ideas and
thinking in team.

$trongly Agree
Agree
$ometimes Agree
Disagree
Highly Disagree


15) How would you rate the overall program?

Very useful 5 4 3 2 Little use

Very Interesting 5 4 3 2 Of Little Interest



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AnaIysis using SPSS Software

Analysis regarding the effectiveness of the training provided is done through
the help of SPSS. Graphical representation of facts and figures is made and
Satisfaction level is studied. Graphical representation is made to every
question for detailed analysis.

1) %o what extent do you feel you have learned from the program? (!lease
ring the score number that you feel most closely represents your views)


Lot 5 4 3 2 Nothing


extent of learning from program
highly learnt learnt average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
5
4


Findings: Over 48 of employees feel they have highly learnt, 8 say that
they have learnt and have average opinion.


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2) To what extent have you learned on the course about your behavioral
skills?

Lot 5 4 3 2 Nothing



learnt on behavioural skills
highly learnt learnt
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
1
8
6
4


Finding: over 8 of employees feel they have highly learnt on behavioral
skills, 16 say that they have learnt on behavioral skills, from the training
program.


3) %o what extent have you improved your team building skills?

Lot 5 4 3 2 Nothing




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learnt on team building skills
highly learnt learnt
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: over 58 of employees feel they have highly learnt on team building
skills, 4 say that they have learnt from the training program..


4) %o what extent have your skills in the subject of the program improved or
increased as a result of the program?


Lot 5 4 3 2 Little









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skills in subject increased or decreased
45. highly learnt learnt average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: over 5 of employees feel they have learnt the subject, 8 say
that they have highly learnt and 6 say that they have learnt average from
the training program..


5) %o what extent do you feel your personal learning objectives have been
achieved?

Fully Achieved
Achieved
Average
$omewhat Achieved
Not Achieved




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extent personel learning ojectives achieved
f ully achieved achieved average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: over 58 of employees feel they have highly learnt on team building
skills, 4 say that they have learnt from the training program..


7) #ight balance of skills in team formation is met in %elcon.omment.

H.gree gree vg Ds.gree H.Ds
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )








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right balanceof skills in team whether met or not
Highly agree agree average disagree
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
7
6
5
4



Finding: over 56 of employees agree that right balance of skills in team is
met in telcon, 5 say that they highly agree that right balance of skills in
team is met in telcon,9 say that they disagree and 4 are of average
opinion.


7) %he inception of $elf anaged %eams can contribute to a rise in
employee's morale and retention.

$trongly Agree
Agree
$ometimes Agree
Disagree
$trongly Disagree



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inception of SMT's contribute to employee's morale and retention
Highly agree agree average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
8
6
4



Finding: over 68 of employees highly agree that inception of SMT's
contribute to employee's morale and retention, say that they agree that
inception of SMT's contribute to employee's morale and retention and 4 are
of average opinion.


9) How capable are you in performing the tasks assigned to you in a team?

V.Good Good vg Poor V.Poor
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )






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how capable in performing tasks in team
very good good average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: over 5 of employees feel they are good in their capability to
perform tasks in team, feel they are very good in their capability to
perform tasks in team and 14 have average opinion.


9) What level of confidence have you developed in communicating with your
team? (!lease ring the score number that you feel most closely
represents your views)


High 5 4 3 2 Low






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level of confidence developed in communicating with team
very high high average low
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
5
4



Finding: Over 4 of employees feel they have highly developed confidence
in communicating with their team,8 feel they have very highly developed
confidence in communicating with their team,1 have average opinion and
4 have low opinion.


10) %o what extent do you extend your help to other members of team?
(!lease ring the score number that you feel most closely represents your
views)


Lot 5 4 3 2 Never





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extent of helping other members of team
very high high average low
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: Over 48 of employees feel they highly extend their help to other
members of team, 4 feel that they very highly extend their help to other
members of team, 5 of employees have average and low opinion.


11) How efficient are you in resolving conflicts occurring in your team?

Very fficient
fficient
Average
$omewhat fficient
Never fficient





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how efficient in resolving conflicts?
very ef ficient eff icient average somewhat ef f icient
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: Over 58 of employees feel that they are very efficient in resolving
conflicts in team, 14 feel that they are very efficient in resolving conflicts in
team.


12) %eams provide more results than individual contribution. omment on this
statement.


H.gree gree vg Ds.gree H.Ds
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )





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teams provide more rsult than individual contribution
Highly agree agree average disagree
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
7
6
5
4



Finding: Over 55 of employees feel that they highly agree that teams
provide more result than individual contribution, feel that they agree that
teams provide more result than individual contribution, over 5 are
disagreeing with this fact and some 5 are of average opinion.


13) A high level of trust and strong commitment in team is met in %elcon.

H.gree gree vg Ds.gree H.Ds
5 4 3 2
( ) ( ) ( ) ( ) ( )






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a level of trust and strong commitment in team is met
Highly agree agree average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4




Finding: Over 5 of employees agree that a level of trust and strong
commitment in team is met in Telcon, highly agree that a level of trust
and strong commitment in team is met in Telcon,14 are of average opinion.


14) Brainstorming sessions contribute to the generation of new ideas and
thinking in team.

$trongly Agree
Agree
$ometimes Agree
Disagree
Highly Disagree



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brainstorming contributes to generation of new ideas and thinking in tea
Highly agree agree average disagree
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: Over 59 of employees highly agree that brainstorming sessions
contribute to generation of new ideas and thinking, 9 agree that
brainstorming sessions contribute to generation of new ideas and thinking,
1 have average opinion,1 disagree with this fact.


15) How would you rate the overall program?

Very useful 5 4 3 2 Little use


Very Interesting 5 4 3 2 Of Little Interest




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how do u rate overall program?
very usef ul usef ul average
P
e
r
c
e
n
t
6
5
4



Finding: Over 51 of employees feel that the training program has been
very useful to them in enhancing their team building skills, 8 feel that the
training program has been useful to them in enhancing their team building
skills and 19 have average opinion.












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Inferences

W From the findings and interpretation of the graphs we can infer that the
trainees have highly learnt from the program and their behavioral skills
regarding the team work importance and inter personal relations have
been gradually improved.

W Maximum no of the trainees were of the opinion that they have highly
learnt about the significance of team building skills and their personal
learning objectives were achieved to high extent.

W This training program has initiated brainstorming sessions and the
concept of self managed teams has highly gained its significance.

W The study revealed that the trainees have highly developed the
confidence of communicating with team and they have been highly
efficient in resolving conflicts.

W From this study we can infer that Telcon's module of training has
received positive response by the respondents in the "Reaction stage
and same response is expected in the further stages of research and
evaluation.

O nference can be made that Telcon should focus on maintaining right
balance of skills in team to achieve high productivity and achievement
of objectives and should arrange for such behavioral training sessions
which can enhance capability of employees to perform the assigned
tasks in team.




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ConcIusion

W Telcon should continue following the Kirk Patrick Method Of Training
and should give more importance to the sustainability and effect of the
training program in the long run and should align business strategies
with the training objectives.

W All the four levels of Kirk Patrick model should be given equal
importance and effective measures should be taken to check their
effectiveness.

W The effectiveness evaluation of behavioral training is very difficult and
Telcon should effectively maintain the results gained after training.

W Another aspect of a comprehensive training program is continuing
education. The most effective programs make it an ongoing
responsibility of one person in a department. This is an important
function that will keep all staff members current about policies,
procedures and the technology used in the department.
W Assessment of training needs should be done perfectly to match the
trainees requirements, and individual needs should be given priority.

W From the overall study we can conclude that the behavioral training
provided to staff regarding team building skills have received a positive
response from the respondents and the training is going to benefit
them in the long run and can surely contribute to the change in their
behavioral skills in the organization.




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W Working in Telcon was good learning experience for me. The project
allotted to me by the company was challenging as it was very much
implementation oriented and it provided me the knowledge of how
actually teams work in Telcon and its importance in achieving
organizational objectives.

W also had the chance of doing some Recruitment work at Telcon which
gave me many insights on how TATA'S follow recruitment procedure.

W The one satisfaction what had with my project was that it gave me a
good foundation for evaluating training programs for company and also
helped me to get in depth knowledge about it. Though the limitations
were there in the study but these helped me in understanding them and
overcoming these limitations in my next coming projects.















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Recommendations/Suggestions
Proposed training moduIe for teIcon
Research &ndertaken
This project has been undertaken to evaluate behavioral training modules
effectiveness at Telcon.
This project has mainly dealt with the 1
st
stage i.e. "Reaction Stage
The reaction stage is effectively carried out to gather the reaction of the
respondents regarding training through distribution of questionnaires and also
through verbal communication.
The response is fairly good and the implication part is yet to be evaluated
through the next three stages.
So recommendation for Telcon would be to carry the further three stages as
follows.

2
nd
Stage: Learning Stage
The Learning stage should be carried out after 4 months to analyze the
accurate implication.
The behavior of individuals in team should be measured either by
observing or by determining the number of times this identified
behavior is occurring under existing conditions.





K L E Society's
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Questions to be anaIyzed in this stage are







Tests to be conducted
Pre training test to check behavior
Post behavioral training to check the improvement after some period.
nterview or observation can be used before and after training to collect
essential data.
Hindrances to Learning Stage
Relatively simple to set up, but more investment and thought required
than reaction evaluation highly relevant and clear-cut for certain
training such as quantifiable or technical skills
Less easy for more complex learning such as attitudinal development,
which is difficult to assess.



Questions to AnaIyze
Did the trainees learn what intended to be taught?
Did the trainee experience what was intended for them to
experience?
What is the extent of advancement or change in the
trainees after the training, in the direction or area that was
intended?


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Cost escalates if systems are poorly designed, which increases work
required to measure and analyze.
Telcon should overcome these hindrances to manage Learning stage to
successfully carry on the next stage "Behavior Stage.

3
rd
Stage: BehavioraI Stage
O Behavior evaluation is the extent to which the trainees applied the
learning and changed their behavior, and this can be immediately and
several months after the training, depending on the situation:
Questions to AnaIyze
Did the trainees put their learning into effect when back on the job?
Were the relevant skills and knowledge used?
Was there noticeable and measurable change in the activity and performance of
the trainees when back in their roles?
Was the change in behavior and new level of knowledge sustained?
Would the trainee be able to transfer their learning to another person?
s the trainee aware of their change in behavior, knowledge, skill level?






K L E Society's
Institute of Management Studies and Research, HubIi
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Suggestions for successfuI BehavioraI Stage"
Observation and interview over time are required to assess change,
relevance of change, and sustainability of change
Arbitrary snapshot assessments are not reliable because people
change in different ways at different times
Assessments need to be subtle and ongoing, and then transferred to a
suitable analysis tool.
6-degree feedback is useful method and need not be used before
training, because respondents can make a judgment as to change
after training, and this can be analyzed for groups of respondents and
trainees
Self-assessment can be useful, using carefully designed criteria and
measurements

Suggestions for successfuI ResuIts Stage"
Results evaluation is the effect on the business or environment
resulting from the improved performance of the trainee - t is the acid
test
Measures would typically be business or organizational key
performance indicators, such as: Volumes, values, percentages, ,
return on investment, and other quantifiable aspects of organizational
performance,
For instance; numbers of complaints, staff turnover, attrition, failures,
wastage, non-compliance, quality ratings, achievement of standards
and accreditations, growth, retention, etc.





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BIBLIOGRPHY

Fred Luthans , (2005) Organizational Behavior, Mc Graw Hill
International Edition.

Gary Dessler (2003), Human Resource & Personnel
Management, Eastern Economy Edition.

P. Subba Rao,(2004) Personnel and Human Resource
Management, Himalaya Publishing House.

Luis R. Gomez-Mejia;David B Balkin;Robert L
Cardy.(2006) 'Managing Human Resources".

K shwathappa (2000) 'Human Resource and
Personnel Management",Tata Mc Graw Hill
Publications.

Dr B Ratan Reddy (2008), Effective Human Resource Training
nd Development Strategy, Himalaya Publishing House


WEBSITES REFERRED

wwwteIconcoin
wwwbusinessbaIIscom
wwwgoogIecom
wwwhumanresourcecom
wwwworkforcecom