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In your unassuming way, you always encouraged us to explore new vistas, and provided us with opportunities to develop and

grow in the arts and music. Thanks for always being there.

To Betty Kestenbaum:

Book 1 Credits | 1

Section 1. Contents Getting Started


Lesson 1.
I I I I I I

Lesson 2.
I I I I I I

All Cs Page 18 All Ds Page 19 All Es Page 20 Introducing the Quarter and the Half Notes Page 21 Playing with Your Fingers Page 22 Exercise: C, D, E Notes Playing a Real Song Page 24 Exercise: Mary Had a Little Lamb

Lesson 3.
I I I I I

All Fs Page 27 All Gs Page 28 Introducing the Whole Note Page 29 Playing a Classic Page 30 Exercise: Jingle Bells Playing Another Classic Page 32 Exercise: Lightly Row

Lesson 4.
I I I I I

All As Page 35 All Bs Page 36 Introducing the 4/4 Time Signature Page 37 Down on the Farm Page 38 Exercise: Old Macdonald At the Track Page 40 Exercise: Camptown Races

Section 1. Review Page 42

Book 1 Section 1 Contents | 2

Section 1. Contents

7 Notes, 7 Colors Page 9 Creating Your ColorKeys Keyboard (Applying Stickers) Page 10 If Youre Sitting Comfortably(Proper Piano Posture) Page 12 Then Well Begin (Fingering) Page 13 The Grand Staff Page 14 Starting in the Middle Page 16

Section 2. Contents Getting To Play Real Songs


Lesson 1.
I I

Lesson 8.
I

Lesson 2.
I

Song 3. ~ Brother John Page 55 Grand Staff Playing with Both Hands Rests Octaves Mezzo Forte Song 4. ~ Twinkle,Twinkle, Little Star Page 58 Review of Concepts Introducing the Dotted Half Note Page 62 Introducing the 3/4 Time Signature Page 63 Exercise:Three Blind Mice Page 64 Exercise: Beautiful Brown Eyes Page 66 Your Pre-Rowing Stretch Page 69 Stretching Fingers Exercise: Row Your Boat Page 71 Stretching Fingers Song 5. ~ Row Your Boat Page 72 Stretching Fingers Tied Notes Melody Alternates Between Hands Song 6. ~ POP! Goes the Weasel Page 76 Accents Intervals Song 7. ~ Chiapanecas Page 80 Playing Different Notes in Each Hand at the Same Time Introducing the 2/4 Time Signature Page 85 Song 8. ~ Sea Chantey Page 86 Octaves Cross-Over Finger Slides Same-Note Finger Changes Repeat Signs Introducing the Half Step and Sharps Page 92 Song 9. ~ Bingo Page 94 F# Played in Both Hands Octaves Same-Note Finger Change Introducing the Eighth Note Page 99 Song 10. ~ Ten Little Indians Page 100 Eighth Notes Counting Rhythm with Eighth Notes in 2/4 Time

Song 13. ~ London Bridge Page 111 Mastering Rhythm Dotted Quarter Notes Song 14. ~ Good Night, Ladies Page 114 Putting It All Together

Lesson 9.
I I I

Lesson 3.
I I I I I

Introducing Flats Page 118 Introducing F for Accompaniment Page 120 Song 15. ~ Aura Lee Page 121 Flat Slurs Mezzo Piano Song 16. ~ Camptown Races Page 124 Melody Splits Between Right Hand and Left Hand Introducing E for Accompaniment Page 128 Song 17. ~ Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay Page 129 Musical Phrases Accompaniment F# D# Rhythm: Something New Introducing D for Accompaniment Page 132 Song 18. ~ Good Morning to You Page 133 Musical Introduction Before the Melody Starts Fermata

Lesson 10.
I I

Lesson 4.
I I I

I I

Lesson 11.
I

Lesson 5.
I I

Song 19. ~ This Old Man Page 137 Intervals as Accompaniment C Position Song 20. ~ Shell Be Comin Round the Mountain Page 140 Pickup Bar More Challenging Accompaniment D in the Bass Clef Song 21. ~ Theme by Mozart Page 145 G Position Intervals as Accompaniment Italian Tempo Markings Song 22. ~ Four Seasons: Spring Page 148 Allegro New Type of Accompaniment Song 23. ~ Minuet in G Page 151 Beamed Eighth Notes G Notes in Every Octave Andante

Lesson 12.
I

Lesson 6.
I I

Lesson 7.
I I

Glossary Page 156

Book 1 Section 2 Contents | 3

Section 2. Contents

Song 1. ~ Ode to Joy Page 47 Dynamic Signs Forte Boxed Measure Numbers Some Fingering Numbers Removed Song 2. ~ Jingle Bells Page 50 Tempo Markings Brightly Lyrics

Song 11. ~ Skip to My Lou Page 102 Eighth Notes in 4/4 Time Accompaniment Held-Note Accompaniment Writing a Lower B Note for the Right Hand Song 12. ~ Mary Ann Page 106 Tied Notes of Different Durations Echoing Accompaniment

Introduction
Introduction
Hi! Im Sarah and this is my piano book. I know, I know: Youre probably thinking, every kid on the block has a piano book these days. That may be true, but no one has a book like mine. No one! See, I love music. I mean I REALLY love music. But I never learned how to play an instrument. So I decided to teach myself to play. First, I bought myself a keyboard and a piano book. I got through the first few lessons and then crash landing! I lost interest. Playing the piano just wasnt much fun anymore. I still loved music, but all those black notes and squiggles and lines? What a headache! But my love of music won the day. With no other option available, I persevered. With a great deal of time and tremendous effort, I learned piano the old-fashioned way. Not only that, but I also began reading every piano book available on the market. Why? I decided I had to try and figure out why so many people struggle with learning how to play. I became an expert in analyzing the difficulties faced by new piano players. Soon I realized that most people who try to learn piano find that learning to read sheet music is like learning a new language. And unless you know that language fluently, playing piano is next to impossible. I knew there had to be a better way to learn to read sheet music. I worked hard to develop a solution to the problem. Finally, I struck the right note: I invented The ColorKeys Method. The ColorKeys Method makes learning to play music both easy and fun. If youre interested in learning how to play popular music on the piano, let me walk you through the steps. The ColorKeys Method will get you playing familiar songs almost immediately. You wont have to worry about a page full of hard-to-read black notes. And youll find that every lesson is both challenging and fun, so youll want to keep going. By the time youre done, youll be able to play piano for the rest of your life. While most music-instruction books focus on teaching you everything there is to know about music, my book is more selective. In The ColorKeys Method, you will still get accurate, complete information. But you will learn only those concepts and techniques that are absolutely essential to get you playing quickly at each specific level. I know how frustrating it can be to be bogged down by text. Page after page of jargon, theory and history can really take the fun out of music. And so, to keep it funand to keep you moving quickly Ive kept the tone light and created summary boxes to highlight the information you need to know. Are you ready to begin the ColorKeys adventure? Just take a seat at your piano and keep on reading.
Book 1 Introduction | 4

The ColorKeys Method is simple to use. The first book is broken up into two sections with practical, get-you-playing-quick lessons in each section. Each lesson begins with a Lesson Contents page that gives you a preview of what the lesson is all about. In the first section, you will learn about The ColorKeys Advantage, the seven standard notes and other important piano basics. Mastering those introductory concepts wont take long and will get you ready to move on. At the end of the first sectionand interspersed throughout the second sectionare ruled pages where you can write notes and ideas. These pages are a great place to chart your progress.

Section 2 is designed to get you playing real songs quickly. Each lesson includes a real song and the materials that you will need to know in order to play it. In most other books, boring, tedious exercises are the norm, followed by a song thrown in as a reward. But in The ColorKeys Method, the songs themselves are the vehicles for teaching new ideas. As you continue to play more advanced and exciting pieces, you wont even realize that you are learning new skills at the same time. You will always be able to read the text for a full understanding of the key concepts in each lesson. But you can also scan the summary boxes for a quick review whenever you like. Heres a list of all the summary boxes and CD track icons that youll find in this book:

This icon tells you that something on the page is being spoken about in a track on the CD.

This icon tells you which CD track taps out the rhythm of the exercise or piece.

This icon tells you which CD track to listen to for a perfect performance of the piece.

Know This
The Know This box is amber. It either provides an overview of the primary concepts on each page or it conveys essential information that cant be missed. Always read the Know This boxes!

Do This
The Do This box is bright green. It contains instructions on how to play an exercise or song.Think of it as a private tutor giving you step-by-step instructions as he sits next to you at the piano. Following the Do This instructions will allow you to play the music more quickly and easily.

Learn This
The Learn This box is bright pink. In it you will find simple definitions of any new concepts and terms taught in the lesson. If you read nothing but the Know This boxes and the Learn This boxes, you should still be able to understand the lessons and play through the book. Always read the Learn This boxes!

Practice This
The Practice This box is light green. It gives you an opportunity to practice challenging, new techniques before encountering them in the actual song.

Remember This
The Remember This box is light pink. It provides a quick reminder and review of information from previous lessons.

Behind the Scenes


The Behind the Scenes box is blue. It provides additional, interesting information about the song or concepts being taught.

Book 1 How to Use This Book | 5

How to Use This Book

How to Use This Book

Section 1. Getting Started

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 6

Section 1. Contents
Lesson 1.
I I I I I I

Lesson 2.
I I I I I I

All Cs Page 18 All Ds Page 19 All Es Page 20 Introducing the Quarter and the Half Notes Page 21 Playing with Your Fingers Page 22 Exercise: C, D, E Notes Playing a Real Song Page 24 Exercise: Mary Had a Little Lamb

Lesson 3.
I I I I I

All Fs Page 27 All Gs Page 28 Introducing the Whole Note Page 29 Playing a Classic Page 30 Exercise: Jingle Bells Playing Another Classic Page 32 Exercise: Lightly Row

Lesson 4.
I I I I I

All As Page 35 All Bs Page 36 Introducing the 4/4 Time Signature Page 37 Down on the Farm Page 38 Exercise: Old Macdonald At the Track Page 40 Exercise: Camptown Races

Section 1. Review Page 42

Book 1 Section 1 Contents | 7

Section 1. Contents

7 Notes, 7 Colors Page 9 Creating Your ColorKeys Keyboard (Applying Stickers) Page 10 If Youre Sitting Comfortably(Proper Piano Posture) Page 12 Then Well Begin (Fingering) Page 13 The Grand Staff Page 14 Starting in the Middle Page 16

Lesson 1.

Section 1. Lesson 1. Contents


7 Notes, 7 Colors Page 9

Creating Your ColorKeys Keyboard (Applying Stickers) Page 10

If Youre Sitting Comfortably (Proper Piano Posture) Page 12

Then Well Begin (Fingering) Page 13

The Grand Staff Page 14

Starting in the Middle Page 16

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 8

Lesson 1. Contents

The ColorKeys Method is the quick and easy way to learn how to read music and play piano. All you have to do is learn the seven colors associated with the seven notes.

Do This
Turn on the lights! Playing in good light will help improve color contrast and reduce eye strain.

The seven musical notes are:

AB C D E F G
In The ColorKeys Method, each note has its own unique color:

AB C D E F G

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 9

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1. 7 Notes 7 Colors

Lesson 1.

Creating Your ColorKeys Keyboard


Before you begin playing, you will need to create a ColorKeys Keyboard for yourself. Look at the first white key on the far left of your keyboard. Now, look at the Keyboard Type 1 and Keyboard Type 2 illustrations. All pianos start with an A note (see the Keyboard Type 1 illustration). Electronic keyboards may start with an A note or with a C note (see the Keyboard Type 2 illustration). Take another look at your keyboard. Start at the far left: Do your first seven white keys and five black keys look like Keyboard Type 1? If so, place an A sticker as shown (place the stickers directly below the black keys, leaving room on the white keys for your fingers) and then place the remaining six stickers on the white keys in this order:

Behind the Scenes


The musical alphabet has only seven letters that repeat across the keyboard. These seven notes form the basis for all music in Western culture.

Or
Do your first seven white keys and five black keys look like Keyboard Type 2? If so, place a C sticker as shown and then place the remaining six stickers on the white keys in this order:

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 10

Creating Your ColorKeys Keyboard


On your keyboard, you may have the same number of keys that are displayed in the illustration below. But dont worry if you dont. The number of keys you have depends on whether you are using a piano or an electronic keyboard. The keyboard shown below begins on the far left with a key that plays a C note.

Either way, there are two simple patterns to learn:


1. The white keys repeat in groups of 3s and 4s. Each group of 3 and 4 forms a repeating pattern of seven. 2. The black keys repeat in groups of 2s and 3s: 2 black keys are always surrounded by 3 white keys. 3 black keys are always surrounded by 4 white keys. Take another look at your keyboard and find these repeating patterns. Now, finish applying the stickers to the remaining keys.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 11

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1.

If Youre Sitting Comfortably


Throughout the day, you place your hands on many commonplace objects: a coffee cup, the telephone, your steering wheel. You dont think about it: you just do it. But when youre at the piano, you have to be careful how you place your hands. Why? Because placing your fingers properly will make piano playing much easier. So let your arms hang loosely at your sides. See how your fingers curve naturally? Now bring your hands up to the piano and place them on the middle of the white keys. But keep those fingers curved. By curving your fingers, you keep them all the same length. This will make it easier to control their movement across the keys. Now that you know how to place your hands, lets position the rest of you. The best way to sit is on the edge of your chair. Put your right leg a little in front of your left leg, and keep your head tilted slightly down towards the keys. Just look at the picture on the right to see what I mean. Youll know if you are sitting correctly when you feel your weight resting on your right heel. This will help prevent fatigue and keep you more relaxed while you play.

Behind the Scenes


If you are having trouble keeping your fingers curved correctly, it may be that your nails are too long. Keeping your nails short will improve your ability to play.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 12

...Then Well Begin


In the illustration below, the corresponding fingers of both hands are always numbered the same. The thumb, for example, is always number 1; and the little finger is always number 5. Knowing the fingering numbers well will get you playing more quickly.

Learn This
Fingering: Fingering refers to the fingers used to play specific keys. If you follow the fingering instructions, you will reduce the need to look at the keys while you play.

Practice This
Tap each finger of your right hand on a table while calling out its number. Do the same for your left hand.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 13

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1.

The Grand Staff


Words are written between the lines of a notebook. Music notes are written on a staff. A Staff is a group of five lines and four spaces. At the far left of the staff, there is a Clef that tells you whether you are playing higher- or lower-range notes and which hand to use when playing them. The Treble Clef indicates that the staff is for writing and playing higher notes. The notes written in the treble clef are usually played with the right hand. The Bass Clef indicates that the staff is for writing and playing lower notes. The notes written in the bass clef are usually played with the left hand. The Grand Staff is the combination of the treble clef and bass clef staffs. Music for the piano is generally written on the grand staff because two different ranges can be played at oncea higher range with the right hand and a lower range with the left.

The Grand Staff

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 14

The Grand Staff


The Symbols of the Grand Staff

Learn This
Treble Clef: The treble clef is used for writing and playing higher notes, usually with the right hand. Bass Clef: The bass clef is used for writing and playing lower notes, usually with the left hand. Grand Staff: The grand staff is the combination of the treble clef and bass clef staffs. Brace: The brace connects the treble and bass clef staffs and shows you that both hands play together. Time Signature: The time signature provides information on how to play the music rhythmically. Bar Lines: A bar line divides the music into measures, making it easier to read. Measure: A measure is simply a section of music.

Behind the Scenes


The symbol for the treble clef ( ) comes from an old-fashioned G. The symbol for the bass clef ( ) comes from an old-fashioned F.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 15

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1.

Starting in the Middle


Now that you know a little bit about where music is written, its time to see how each written note corresponds to a key on your keyboard. The first and most important note to learn is Middle C. Middle C is easy to find on a piano because it is the C key closest to the middle of the keyboard. On an electronic keyboard, you may need to find middle C a little differently. If youre having trouble, count all the C notes and choose the one in the middle. If that still doesnt work, cover the C key at the farthest right of your keyboard and count again to find the one in the middle. Middle C can be written in either the treble clef or the bass clef. On the grand staff, middle C is positioned between the treble clef staff and the bass clef staffas shown in the diagram below. There are two ways to write middle C on the grand staff, but there is only one middle C key on the keyboard.

Learn This

w w

This is a whole note.

A ledger line is a short line that is used to extend the range of the staff.

Know This
1. Regardless of the model or type of keyboard, there can be only one middle C key. 2. Regardless of the model or type of keyboard, middle C is always the C key closest to the middle of the keyboard. 3. Whether middle C is written in the treble or the bass clef, it is always the same key on the keyboard.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 16

Section 1. Lesson 2. Contents


All Cs Page 18

All Ds Page 19

All Es Page 20

Introducing the Quarter and the Half Notes Page 21

Playing with Your Fingers Page 22 Exercise: C, D, E Notes

Playing a Real Song Page 24 Exercise: Mary Had a Little Lamb

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 17

Lesson 2. Contents

Lesson 2.

Lesson 2. All Cs
In The ColorKeys Method, C notes are BLACK. Learning the location of middle C is important. But learning the location of the rest of the C notes is just as important. The C key is always to the left of each set of two black keys. Ive marked the diagram below with all the Cs used in this book and their corresponding positions on the keyboard.

Lesson 2.

Know This
There are 2 ways to find C on the keyboard: 1. Color: All C notes are BLACK. 2. Position: C is always to the immediate left of each set of two black keys.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left C of your keyboard, use finger 5 of your left hand to play all the Cs up to and including middle C. These are the Cs of the bass clef. Notice that middle C can be part of the bass clef. 2. Now, starting with middle C, use finger 1 of your right hand to play all the Cs to the right of middle C. These are the Cs of the treble clef. Notice that middle C can be part of the treble clef.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 18

All Ds
In The ColorKeys Method, D notes are PURPLE. The illustration below shows you the grand staff with all the D notes used in this book and their corresponding positions on the keyboard. The D note is always purple. The D key is the white key that is always to the right of C.

Know This
There are 3 ways to find D on the keyboard: 1. Color: All D notes are PURPLE. 2. Position: D is always in between each set of two black keys. 3. Relationship: D is always the white key just to the right of C.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left D of your keyboard, use finger 4 of your left hand to play all the Ds up to middle C. These are the Ds of the bass clef. 2. Now, with finger 2 of your right hand, play all the Ds to the right of middle C. These are the Ds of the treble clef. 3. Finally, using your left hand, start at the far left of your keyboard and play each C-D note pattern up to middle C. Use finger 5 for C and finger 4 for D. Next, continuing up the keyboard, use your right hand to play each C-D note pattern, starting with middle C. Use finger 1 (your thumb) for C and finger 2 for D.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 19

Lesson 2.

All Es
In The ColorKeys Method, E notes are GREEN. The illustration below shows you the grand staff with all the E notes used in this book and their corresponding positions on the keyboard. The E note is always green. The E key is the white key that is always to the right of D.

Lesson 2.

Know This
There are 3 ways to find E on the keyboard: 1. Color: All E notes are GREEN. 2. Position: E is always just to the right of each set of two black keys. 3. Relationship: E is always the white key just to the right of D.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left E of your keyboard, use finger 3 of your left hand to play all the Es up to middle C. These are the Es of the bass clef. 2. Now, with finger 3 of your right hand, play all the Es to the right of middle C. These are the Es of the treble clef. 3. Finally, using your left hand, start at the far left of your keyboard and play each C-D-E note pattern up to middle C. Use finger 5 for C, finger 4 for D and finger 3 for E. Next, use your right hand to play each C-D-E note pattern, starting with middle C and moving to the right. Use finger 1 (your thumb) for C, finger 2 for D and finger 3 for E.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 20

1,2,3

Introducing the Quarter Note and the Half Note


Now that you know all about Cs, Ds and Es, youre almost ready to play a real song. But its not enough to know which notes to play. You also have to know how long to play them. We musicians use different note symbols to indicate how long each note should be played. Well start with two basic note durations.

Quarter Note

Half Note

A quarter note is played for a single count. Think of the quarter-note symbol as the picture of a short sound. Count ONE while clapping once. Now, keeping an even pace, tap any finger four times while counting: one, two three, four. Each of these four taps is a quarter note.

A half note is played for twice as long as a quarter note. Think of a half-note symbol as the picture of a long sound. The count is twice as long as it is for the quarter note. Count ONE-TWO but clap just once. Now, keeping an even pace, tap your finger two times but hold each tap down for twice as long as you did for the quarter-note exercise, and count one-two, three-four. Each of these two taps is a half note.

Practice This
1. Tap and count each of the following measures out loud. Make sure that each measure adds up to four counts. Dividing the music into measures makes it easier to tell when to start counting at ONE again. 2. When you count each measure out loud, place the emphasis on the ONE; for example, ONE, two, three, four . . . ONE, two, three, four. Each count must be the same length.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 21

Lesson 2.

Playing with Your Fingers


Now that you know some basics, its time to play. One of the most important skills for you to master right now is note recognition. This simple association exercise will help you recognize the notes and give you some practice moving your fingers on the keyboard. Ready? The illustration below shows you where to position your hands on the keyboard and which notes you will be playing in the exercise on the next page.

Lesson 2.

Do This
1. First, read each note of the next exercise out loud. Ill start you off with the first measure: C, C, C, C. I know, I know. It feels awkward to talk to yourself. But in order to learn the notes quickly, its important for you to hear yourself repeat them out loud. So make sure no ones around and then go ahead and read the rest of the notes out loud. 2. Learning note durations is the next step. Make sure you can tap out the count for the entire piece. Listen to audio track 5 of the ColorKeys CD to hear me count and tap out this exercise. I also recommend that you listen to track 6 to hear what the pulse of this music will sound like. In fact, you can even listen to track 6 in the background while you play.

3. Now, use the fingering diagram to set up your hands properly. The circled fingering number at the start of each hand also draws your attention to the correct starting position for each song. Play each note with the proper finger according to the fingering across the top of each note. 4. Keeping both hands on the keyboard for the entire piece, play the exercise. It is important to get used to playing with both hands on the keyboard. Keeping both hands on the keyboard will also help you switch from one hand to the other more smoothly. So play both lines of the treble clef staff with your right hand and then play both lines of the bass clef staff with your left hand without breaking between the two. 5. Practice the exercise until you can play it without hesitation.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 22

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 23

Lesson 2.

Playing a Real Song


Ready for a real song? I thought you might be. Here youll get a chance to put your new skills to use: note recognition, rhythm, fingering and, of course, playing.

Lesson 2.

Do This
1. Make sure you can identify the notes in this song, just as you did in the last exercise. Start by reading each note out loud. Ill get you started with the first measure: E, D, C, D. 2. Next, you need to practice the count for each measure. But Ive added a little twist this time. Ive left spaces under some of the notes, and its up to you to fill in the appropriate count. Go ahead and do that now. 3. Once youve filled in the blanks, you can

tap out the count. Check yourself against track 7 on the ColorKeys audio CD. 4. Use the illustration to set up your hands properly. And dont forget the fingering! Ive included the proper fingering across the top of each note. 5. Now youre ready to play. Keeping both hands on the keyboard, play the song. Play both lines of the treble clef staff with your right hand, and then play both lines of the bass clef staff with your left hand. 6. Practice the song until you can play it as easily as you can sing it.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 24

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 25

Lesson 2.

Section 1. Lesson 3. Contents


All Fs Page 27

All Gs Page 28

Introducing the Whole Note Page 29

Playing a Classic Page 30 Exercise: Jingle Bells

Playing Another Classic Page 32 Exercise: Lightly Row

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 26

Lesson 3. Contents

Lesson 3.

Lesson 3. All Fs
In The ColorKeys Method, F notes are ORANGE. The illustration below shows you the grand staff with all the Fs used in this book and their corresponding positions on the keyboard. The F note is always orange. The F key is the white key that is always to the right of E. It is always to the left of each set of three black keys.

Know This
There are 3 ways to find F on the keyboard: 1. Color: All F notes are ORANGE. 2. Position: F is always just to the left of each set of three black keys. 3. Relationship: F is always the white key just to the right of E.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left F of your keyboard, use finger 2 of your left hand to play all the Fs up to middle C. These are the Fs of the bass clef. 2. Now, with finger 4 of your right hand, play all the Fs to the right of middle C. These are the Fs of the treble clef. 3. Finally, using your left hand, start at the far left of your keyboard and play each C-D-E-F note pattern up to middle C. Use finger 5 for C, finger 4 for D, finger 3 for E and finger 2 for F. Next, continuing up the keyboard, use your right hand to play each C-D-E-F note pattern, starting with middle C. Use finger 1 for C, finger 2 for D, finger 3 for E and finger 4 for F.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 27

Lesson 3.

All Gs
In The ColorKeys Method, G notes are BLUE. The illustration below shows you the grand staff with all the Gs used in this book and their corresponding positions on the keyboard. The G note is always blue. The G key is the white key that is always to the right of F.

Lesson 3.

Know This
There are 3 ways to find G on the keyboard: 1. Color: All G notes are BLUE. 2. Position: G is always in between the first two black keys of each set of three black keys. 3. Relationship: G is always the white key just to the right of F.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left G of your keyboard, use finger 1 of your left hand to play all the Gs up to middle C. These are the Gs of the bass clef. 2. Now, with finger 5 of your right hand, play all the Gs to the right of middle C. These are the Gs of the treble clef. 3. Finally, using your left hand, start at the far left of your keyboard and play each C-D-E-F-G note pattern up to middle C. Use finger 5 for C, finger 4 for D, finger 3 for E, finger 2 for F and finger 1 for G. Next, continuing up the keyboard, use your right hand to play each C-D-E-F-G note pattern, starting with middle C. Use finger 1 for C, finger 2 for D, finger 3 for E, finger 4 for F and finger 5 for G.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 28

9,10

11

Introducing the Whole Note


Remember This
The quarter note gets one count. The half note gets two counts.

q = one h = one-two

A whole note is played four times as long as a quarter note and twice as long as a half note. You can recognize the whole note quickly because it is the only note without a stem. The whole note gets four counts: One-Two-Three-Four. Think of the whole-note symbol as the picture of a very long sound. Tap your finger once, but hold it down four times as long as you did for the quarter note, and count 1-2-3-4. This one tap is a whole note.

Practice This
1. Tap and count each of the following measures out loud. Make sure that each measure adds up to four counts. 2. When you count each measure out loud, place the emphasis on the ONE; for example, ONE, two, three, four . . . ONE, two, three, four. Each count must be the same length.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 29

Lesson 3.

So far, youve played quarter notes and half notes. But you have yet to try the Whole Note. So here it is:

Playing a Classic
Heres a winter classic that everyone knows. There are more notes in this one, so watch out. In fact, this is the first time youll be using all your fingers to play a song. But youre ready for it. Here we go.

Lesson 3.

Do This
1. Start by reading each note out loud. Ill get you going with the first measure: E, E, E. 2. Next, fill in the space under each note with the appropriate count. Keep an eye out for the whole note. 3. Tap out the count so that it sounds like audio track 12 on the ColorKeys CD. Now, youre ready to go. Remember to hold that whole note for 4 counts.

4. Use the illustration to set up your hands properly. Watch the fingering. This is the first time youll be playing notes that are not next to each other. So use those fingering numbers across the top of the notes. 5. Now lets play Jingle Bells. Keeping both hands on the keyboard for the entire piece, play both lines of the treble clef staff with your right hand. Then, without moving your hands, play both lines of the bass clef staff with your left hand. 6. Practice this piece until all your bells jingle, not jangle.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 30

12

13

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 31

Lesson 3.

Playing Another Classic


Here we go with another fun piece. Just as you did in Jingle Bells, youll be playing some notes that are not next to each other. So flex those fingers and get ready for some fun as you lightly row your way to success.

Lesson 3.

Do This
1. Begin by reading each note out loud. The first measure is G, E, E. 2. Then, fill in the space under each note with the appropriate count. 3. Now, tap out the count so that it sounds like audio track 14 on the ColorKeys CD. Remember that the whole note is held for 4 counts. 4. Use the illustration to set up your hands properly. Keep an eye on that fingering, too.

Once again, youll be playing notes that are not next to each other, so take advantage of those fingering numbers.

5. With both hands on the keyboard for the duration of the piece, play the song. Use your right hand to play both lines of the treble clef staff. Then use your left hand to play both lines of the bass clef staff. 6. Keep practicing this piece until you can row with ease.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 32

14

15

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 33

Lesson 3.

Section 1. Lesson 4. Contents


All As Page 35

All Bs Page 36

Introducing the 4/4 Time Signature Page 37

Down on the Farm Page 38 Exercise: Old MacDonald

At the Track Page 40 Exercise: Camptown Races

Section 1. Review Page 42

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 34

Lesson 4. Contents

Lesson 4.

Lesson 4. All As
In The ColorKeys Method, A notes are RED. The illustration below shows you the grand staff with all the As used in this book and their corresponding positions on the keyboard. The A note is always red. The A key is the white key that is always to the right of G.

Know This
There are 3 ways to find A on the keyboard: 1. Color: All A notes are RED. 2. Position: A is always in between the last two black keys of each set of three black keys. 3. Relationship: A is always the white key just to the right of G.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left A of your keyboard, use finger 3 of your left hand to play all the As up to middle C. These are the As of the bass clef. 2. Now, with finger 3* of your right hand, play all the As to the right of middle C. These are the As of the treble clef.
* You will get to do fancy fingerwork later. For now, use finger 3.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 35

Lesson 4.

All Bs
In The ColorKeys Method, B notes are BROWN. The illustration below shows you the grand staff with all the Bs used in this book and their corresponding positions on the piano keyboard. The B note is always brown. The B key is the white key that is always to the right of A. It is also always to the left of C.

Lesson 4.

Know This
There are 3 ways to find B on the keyboard: 1. Color: All B notes are BROWN. 2. Position: B is always just to the right of each set of three black keys. 3. Relationship: B is always the white key just to the right of A.

Do This
1. Starting at the very left B of your keyboard, use finger 3 of your left hand to play all the Bs up to middle C. These are the Bs of the bass clef. 2. Now, with finger 3* of your right hand, play all the Bs to the right of middle C. These are the Bs of the treble clef.
* No, its not a mistake. Use finger 3 again..

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 36

Introducing the 4/4 Time Signature


Youve seen a time signature before, but now its time to talk about it. The Time Signature tells you how many counts are in each measure and which notes get one count. The time signature consists of two numbers that appear at the beginning of a piece of music.

Remember This
In 4/4 time, every measure adds up to 4 beats using a combination of these notes:

q quarter note gets one beat h half note gets two beats w whole note gets four beats

When you count in 4/4 time, put the emphasis on the first beat so that you are saying, ONE, two, three, four . . . ONE, two, three, four.

This Time Signature is called Four Four Time


Lesson 4.

Learn This
Rhythm: Rhythm is the pattern formed by a group of notes and the emphasis placed on them. For example, in 4/4 time, the rhythm places the emphasis on the first beat of each measure. Beat: A beat is one unit of time assigned to a note.The note that gets one beat is indicated by the time signature. The number of beats in a measure is also indicated by the time signature. Until now, weve used the term counts instead of beats.

The four illustrations below show you how four different rhythmic combinations add up to four beats.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 37

Down on the Farm


Youve now learned all 7 notes (A, B, C, D, E, F, G) and 3 different durations (quarter, half and whole note) for each of them. Youve learned about fingering and counts (which we will now call beats). Now youre ready to put it all into practice. So lets head back to the farm and pay a visit to Old MacDonald.

Do This
1. First, lets review all the notes by reading each measure out loud. The first measure is G, G, G, D. Its still important to read these notes out loud. This is a key concept in The ColorKeys Method, and if you keep practicing you will be sight reading in no time. 2. Next, check the time signature to make sure you know how many beats are in each measure and which notes get 1 beat. Fill in the spaces provided with the appropriate beats. 3. When youre ready, tap out the count. Its important to keep tapping out the count in each exercise because this helps you learn the rhythm. It will also help you identify the quarter, half and whole notes more quickly.You can hear the count tapped out on track 16 of the ColorKeys audio CD. 4. Now that youve got the basics, go ahead and

Lesson 4.

put your hands on the keyboard. But wait! Ive taken away the fingering diagram. Do you feel as though Ive just taken the training wheels off your first bike? Not to worry. Take a moment to read the Song Range illustration box below. From now on, this illustration will replace the fingering diagram in our exercises. I've circled the fingering number for the first note of each hand so that you'll know which finger to use. Ill also circle the fingering numbers each time you have to move your hands; for example, in measure 3. Lets give it a whirl!

5. Put both hands on the keyboard and play the piece. Use the fingering above each note and remember to move your hands when you see a fingering number circled. Play both lines of the treble clef staff with your right hand. Then play both lines of the bass clef staff with your left hand. 6. Always practice each piece until you can play it comfortably, without hesitation.

Song Range
This song range illustration shows you all the notes from lower C to upper C even notes that are not used in this song. The arrows show you which notes are used in this song.

LH indicates which notes are played with the Left Hand. All the notes for LH are between lower and middle C.

RH indicates which notes are played with the Right Hand. All the notes for RH are between middle and upper C.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 38

16

17

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 39

Lesson 4.

At the Track
Congratulations! Youve made it to the final exercise in Section 1. Youve already learned a lot of new skills. Heres one more song for you to practice before moving on to new challenges in the second section. Off to the races we go!

Do This
1. Start by reading each measure out loud. You should be comfortable with the notes by now, but Ill start you off with the first measure: G, G, E, G. 2. Now, check the time signature so that you can fill in the appropriate beats in the spaces provided. 3. Once youve filled in the blanks, youre ready to tap out the count. Listen to track 18 on the ColorKeys audio CD so that you know youve got it. 4. Check the fingering. Ive circled the last note

in each clef to show you when you have to move your finger over from a D to a C.

5. Just before you start to play, check the Song Range illustration box below. It will show you which keys you will be using and which hand will be playing the notes. 6. All right, go ahead and show me your stuff. Play the piece using your right hand for the treble clef and your left hand for the bass clef. Remember to keep both hands on the keyboard for the duration of the song. 7. Practice each piece until you can play it comfortably, without hesitation.

Lesson 4.

Song Range
This song range illustration shows you all the notes from lower C to upper C even notes that are not used in this song. The arrows show you which notes are used in this song.

LH indicates which notes are played with the Left Hand. All the notes for LH are between lower and middle C.

RH indicates which notes are played with the Right Hand. All the notes for RH are between middle and upper C.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 40

18

19

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 41

Lesson 4.

Review Section 1. Review


Section 1. Review
To ensure your success in the next section, take a few minutes to review the important musical information you have just learned. It is important for you to be comfortable with all these concepts before moving on.

Questions
Hand Position and Fingering
1. Write the correct number over each finger.

Seven Music Notes: Music is made up of notes that are named after the first seven letters of the alphabet: A, B, C, D, E, F and G. Specialized ColorKeys Colors: In The ColorKeys Method, each note has a specialized color. The notes are colored as follows:

ABCDEFG
Keyboard Patterns: Your keyboard has two patternsone for the white keys and one for the black keys. The white keys appear in groups of 3 and 4, forming a repeating pattern of 7 keys. The black keys repeat in groups of 2 and 3. Two black keys are always surrounded by three white keys. Three black keys are always surrounded by four white keys. The Staffs: Music notes are written on a group of five lines and four spaces called a staff. At the beginning of the staff (on the left) there is a clef. The treble clef indicates that the staff is for writing and playing higher notes. Notes written in the treble clef are usually played with the right hand. The bass clef indicates that the staff is for writing and playing lower notes. Notes written in the bass clef are usually played with the left hand. When the staffs of the treble clef and bass clef are combined, they make the grand staff.

Rhythm and Counting


2. What does the top number of the time signature indicate? 3. What does the bottom number of the time signature indicate? 4. In 4/4 time how many beats are in a measure? 5. In 4/4 time what note gets one beat? 6. How long is a quarter note played for? 7. How long is a half note played for? 8. In 4/4 time what beat is emphasized?

Answers
2. It tells you the number of beats in a measure. 3. It tells you what kind of note gets one beat. 4. 4 5. The quarter note. 6. 1 beat. 7. 2 beats. 8. The first beat of each measure.

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 42

Rhythm and Counting Fingering 1.

Notes

Book 1 Section 1 Getting Started | 43

Section 2. Getting To Play Real Songs

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 44

Section 2. Contents
Lesson 1.
I I

Lesson 8.
I

Lesson 2.
I

Song 3. ~ Brother John Page 55 Grand Staff Playing with Both Hands Rests Octaves Mezzo Forte Song 4. ~ Twinkle,Twinkle, Little Star Page 58 Review of Concepts Introducing the Dotted Half Note Page 62 Introducing the 3/4 Time Signature Page 63 Exercise:Three Blind Mice Page 64 Exercise: Beautiful Brown Eyes Page 66 Your Pre-Rowing Stretch Page 69 Stretching Fingers Exercise: Row Your Boat Page 71 Stretching Fingers Song 5. ~ Row Your Boat Page 72 Stretching Fingers Tied Notes Melody Alternates Between Hands Song 6. ~ POP! Goes the Weasel Page 76 Accents Intervals Song 7. ~ Chiapanecas Page 80 Playing Different Notes in Each Hand at the Same Time Introducing the 2/4 Time Signature Page 85 Song 8. ~ Sea Chantey Page 86 Octaves Cross-Over Finger Slides Same-Note Finger Changes Repeat Signs Introducing the Half Step and Sharps Page 92 Song 9. ~ Bingo Page 94 F# Played in Both Hands Octaves Same-Note Finger Change Introducing the Eighth Note Page 99 Song 10. ~ Ten Little Indians Page 100 Eighth Notes Counting Rhythm with Eighth Notes in 2/4 Time

Song 13. ~ London Bridge Page 111 Mastering Rhythm Dotted Quarter Notes Song 14. ~ Good Night, Ladies Page 114 Putting It All Together

Lesson 9.
I I I

Lesson 3.
I I I I I

Introducing Flats Page 118 Introducing F for Accompaniment Page 120 Song 15. ~ Aura Lee Page 121 Flat Slurs Mezzo Piano Song 16. ~ Camptown Races Page 124 Melody Splits Between Right Hand and Left Hand Introducing E for Accompaniment Page 128 Song 17. ~ Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay Page 129 Musical Phrases Accompaniment F# D# Rhythm: Something New Introducing D for Accompaniment Page 132 Song 18. ~ Good Morning to You Page 133 Musical Introduction Before the Melody Starts Fermata

Lesson 10.
I I

Lesson 4.
I I I

I I

Lesson 11.
I

Lesson 5.
I I

Song 19. ~ This Old Man Page 137 Intervals as Accompaniment C Position Song 20. ~ Shell Be Comin Round the Mountain Page 140 Pickup Bar More Challenging Accompaniment D in the Bass Clef Song 21. ~ Theme by Mozart Page 145 G Position Intervals as Accompaniment Italian Tempo Markings Song 22. ~ Four Seasons: Spring Page 148 Allegro New Type of Accompaniment Song 23. ~ Minuet in G Page 151 Beamed Eighth Notes G Notes in Every Octave Andante

Lesson 12.
I

Lesson 6.
I I

Lesson 7.
I I

Glossary Page 156

Book 1 Section 2 Contents | 45

Section 2. Contents

Song 1. ~ Ode to Joy Page 47 Dynamic Signs Forte Boxed Measure Numbers Some Fingering Numbers Removed Song 2. ~ Jingle Bells Page 50 Tempo Markings Brightly Lyrics

Song 11. ~ Skip to My Lou Page 102 Eighth Notes in 4/4 Time Accompaniment Held-Note Accompaniment Writing a Lower B Note for the Right Hand Song 12. ~ Mary Ann Page 106 Tied Notes of Different Durations Echoing Accompaniment

Lesson 1.

Section 2. Lesson 1. Contents


Song 1. ~ Ode to Joy Page 47 Dynamic Signs Forte Boxed Measure Numbers Some Fingering Numbers Removed Song 2. ~ Jingle Bells Page 50 Tempo Markings Brightly Lyrics

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 46

Lesson 1. Contents

Know This
Signs and Markings: Dynamic Signs Signs and Markings: Forte Signs and Markings: Boxed Measure Numbers Technique: Some Fingering Numbers Removed

Youll also notice numbers in boxes at the start of each line in this song. These are Measure Numbers. They will help you find each measure more easily when there is something important to point out.

Learn This 3.
Boxed Measure Numbers: The boxed number at the start of each line tells you the number of the first measure of that line. In this song there are a total of 16 measures.

When you listen to your favorite music, do you like it loud or soft? It probably depends on the song. Some songs wouldnt sound right if they were played too loudlythink of Limp Bizkit playing a lullaby. Others like this oneare better when played a little louder. The way to tell how loudly or softly to play a piece of music is by looking at its Dynamic Sign.

Learn This 1.
Dynamic Signs: These signs show you how loudly or softly to play the music. Play according to the dynamic sign until the end of the piece or until a new dynamic sign is encountered.
And the first dynamic sign to master is fforte. Forte means loudly. So when you play Ode to Joy, do it with a little more force on the keys than usual. You only need to change the loudness of a song when you encounter a new dynamic sign. So if there is only one sign, the song is played the same way all the way through. Youll find the first dynamic sign underneath the time signature at the beginning of the first measure.

Now that youve seen the new stuff, lets make sure you still remember the basics. So just as you did with the previous exercises, practice your note recognition and rhythm by reading the notes and tapping the count out loud. If youre having trouble with the notes, you can refer to the Song Range illustration. And if youre unsure about the count, check page 24 for a quick review. One last thing: Youll also notice that Ive included the Fingering Numbers for you as I did in the previous section. The difference is that this time I dont repeat the fingering number for the same note in the same measure. Take a look at measure 1 to see what I mean. The second E note has no fingering number because its fingering hasnt changed. Also, the first fingering number of each clef is always circled. Circling a fingering number draws your attention to an important finger change or starting position. Now youre ready to go. Follow the Do This instructions on the next page and start playing. When your performance sounds like mine (track 21 on the CD), youre ready to move on.

Learn This 2.
f (Forte): This italian word
means Loud. When you see this dynamic sign, play with more force on the keys.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 47

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1. Song 1. ~ Ode to Joy

Lesson 1.

Song 1. ~ Ode to Joy


Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes: Read the notes of each measure out loud. 2. Rhythm: Check the time signature. Then tap and count the rhythm out loud. Listen to audio track 20 on the CD to hear this song tapped and counted properly. 3. Fingering: Use the Song Range illustration to place your hands properly. Remember to use the fingering above each note as you play. For notes that do not have a fingering number, use the last fingering number indicated for that note.

4. Signs and Markings: New Concept: Dynamic Signs: Check the dynamic sign at the beginning of the music. Dynamic signs are described in the Learn This 1 box on the previous page. 5. Clef: Play the measures in the treble clef with your right hand and the measures in the bass clef with your left. But keep both hands on the keyboard regardless of which clef youre playing. 6. Practice: Keep practicing until you can play the entire piece without hesitation. Listen to track 21 for a perfect rendition of the song.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 48

20

21

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 49

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1.

Song 2. ~ Jingle Bells

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 50

Song 2. ~ Jingle Bells


Know This
Signs and Markings: Tempo Markings Signs and Markings: Brightly Technique: Lyrics
In this new, improved version of Jingle Bells, the tempo marking tells you to play Brightly. In other words, play with enthusiasmhave fun. Tempo markings appear at the top left corner of the music. To get an idea of just how important they can be, try singing this song really slowly. It just doesnt sound right, does it?

Just as the last song sounded better when played a little louder, so will this one. But it wont sound very good played slowly. Tempo Markings tell you how fast or how slowly to play a song and with what mood. Since you can count beats very slowly or very quickly, its important to use the tempo markings as a guide when you play.

Learn This 2.
Brightly: This tempo marking tells you to play with enthusiasm.

Learn This 1.
Tempo Markings: At the top left corner of the music, youll find tempo markings. They tell you how fast and with what mood to play the piece.You have considerable freedom as to how you interpret a tempo marking.

Singing along will not only help you learn the rhythm, but it will also help you recognize when youve mastered it. Ive included the Lyrics this time, so you can sing while you play. If you can play it as well as you can sing it, youve got it. So go ahead and sing along (I wont tell anyone). While youre singing along, dont forget to keep your eyes on the music and not on your fingers.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 51

Lesson 1.

Lesson 1.

Song 2. ~ Jingle Bells


Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes: Read the notes of each measure out loud. 2. Rhythm: Check the time signature and then tap and count the rhythm out loud. Check audio track 22 on the CD to hear this song tapped and counted properly. Singing along will help you learn the rhythm more quickly. 3. Fingering: Use the Song Range illustration to place your hands properly. Remember to use the fingering above each note as you play. Some fingering numbers have been removed. 4. Dynamic Signs: Find the dynamic signs to see how loudly or softly to play the piece.

5.Tempo Markings (New Concept): Look for the tempo markings at the top of the music to find out how fast or slowly to play the song. The tempo marking for this song is Brightly, telling you to play with enthusiasm. 6. Clef: Play the piece, first with the right hand for the treble clef and then with the left hand for the bass clef until you can play without hesitation. Keep both hands on the keyboard for the duration of the song. 7. Practice: Practice until you can play the song as well as you sing it.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 52

22

23

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 53

Lesson 1.

Section 2. Lesson 2. Contents


Song 3. ~ Brother John Page 55 Grand Staff Playing with Both Hands Rests Octaves Mezzo Forte

Lesson 2.

Song 4. ~ Twinkle,Twinkle, Little Star Page 58 Review of Concepts

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 54

Lesson 2. Contents

Lesson 2. Song 3. ~ Brother John


Know This
Concept: Grand Staff Technique: Playing with Both Hands Signs and Markings: Rests Concept: Octaves Signs and Markings: Mezzo Forte
Take a look at the example in measure 7. Notice how the melody starts with a C in the right hand, moves to a G in the left hand and then goes back to a C in the right hand. This splits the melody between the right hand and the left hand. The corresponding rests tell you when each hand doesnt play.

Measure 7

Youre going to do something new in this song. Actually, youre going to do a few new things. For the first time, Im going to combine the treble clef and bass clef into the grand staff. If you remember the Grand Staff from page 15 of the first section, youll remember that its used to indicate that higher and lower notes are played together. Whenever you see it, you will have to read and Play Both Hands Together. In this song, that only happens in four measures (measures 7, 8, 15 and 16). But what, you may wonder, do you do with your hands when theyre not playing together? Why, youre going to rest them, of course. A Rest is like a pause button. You pause playing for the length of the rest and then resume playing. For every note that you have learned so far (quarter, half, whole note), there is an equivalent rest. See the Learn This 1 box. Rests serve a practical purpose for singers and wind instrument players: They give the musician time to breathe. For pianists, rests tell you when not to play.

Playing this way may seem a little confusing at first, but thats only because you havent done it before. If you practice this song a few times, youll have no problem. But before you get to practicing, let me tell you about one more thing: octaves. An Octave is simply the distance from one note to the next note of the same letter. But guess what? You already played a whole series of octaves in the first exercises, when you were learning each note color. When you played each C note in sequence, for example, you were playing octaves. In this song, the octaves are in the last two measures. Notice that you are going from lower C to middle C and back to lower C.

Learn This 1.
Rests: A rest tells the pianist when not to play a note. For every note duration you have learned so far, there is an equivalent rest as shown in the following illustration.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 55

Lesson 2.

Song 3. ~ Brother John


Learn This 2.
Octave: An octave is the distance from one note to the next note of the same letter. Lower C to middle C in the illustration is an example of an octave.

Do This
1. Notes: Read the notes of each measure out loud. 2. Rhythm: Check the time signature and then tap and count the rhythm out loud. Even though the melody is split between both hands, read it as if it were written in only one staff. In other words, dont count each staff separately. Check audio track 24 on the CD to hear this song tapped and counted properly. Singing along is not only fun, but will also help you learn the rhythm. 3. Fingering: Use the Song Range illustration from the last song to place your hands properly. Most fingering numbers have been removed. The circled fingering numbers (like those in measure 7) indicate where you need to pay extra attention. 4. Signs and Markings: Check the dynamic signs and tempo markings to see how to play the piece. 5. Clef: Since this song is written on the grand staff (treble clef and bass clef staffs written together), you will need to read and play both hands together. 6. Practice: Keep practicing until you can play without hesitation.

Lesson 2.

Also notice the new tempo marking: mezzo forte. Mezzo Forte is written mf and means moderately loud. Play with more strength on the keys but not as much as when you played forte.

Learn This 3.
mf (Mezzo Forte): This means
moderately loud. Play with more strength on the keys but not as loudly as forte.

So when you start to play this song, remember the four important new concepts: playing with both hands, rests, octaves and mezzo forte. You may need to take some extra time to practice this pieceespecially reading and playing both hands together. But try to keep your eyes on the music and not on your fingers. If you get stuck, just take a deep breath and listen to track 25 on the audio CD for a perfect performance of the piece.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 56

24

25

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 57

Lesson 2.

Song 4. ~ Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star


Know This
Lesson 2.
Concept: Practice

Do This Checklist:
1. Notes: Read the notes of each measure out loud. 2. Rhythm: Check the time signature and then tap and count the rhythm out loud. Check the track symbol at the top of each song to see which track on the audio CD has a perfect tap and count of the rhythm. 3. Fingering: Use the Song Range illustration to place your hands properly. Watch the fingering numbers above the notes. Pay extra attention to circled fingering numbers. 4. Signs and Markings: Check the dynamic signs and tempo markings to see how to play the piece. 5. Clef: Play with both hands when the music is written on the grand staff. Play the treble clef with your right hand and the bass clef with your left. Always keep both hands on the keyboard for the duration of the piece. 6. Practice: Keep your eyes on the music and not on your fingers. Keep practicing until you can play comfortably, without hesitation. If there are lyrics, singing along will help you learn the rhythm more quickly. When you can play the song as well as you sing it, youve got it.

One of the most important aspects of learning anything new is practice. And learning to play piano is no different. Practice means repeating things until you know them instinctively. For many people, this repetition can be boring. But its still necessary if you really want to learn how to play. Some people call this a necessary evil. But what if I took out the evil part of it? Learning to read sheet music is like learning a new language. And so, even if you practice, you may forget something now and then. Perfect examples are the half and whole rests. It is really easy to get them confused because they look so similar. The only difference is that the half rest sits on the line and the whole rest hangs from the line. To me the half rest looks like a hat and the whole rest points down, like a hole. Take a look at the Remember This box to see the difference. From this point forward, Im going to simplify my standard instructions for each song in an easy-to-use checklist. Instead of repeating the full instructions each time, I will simply use keywords to remind you of what you need to do. It will be up to you to follow them. If there is any new information related to one of these standard elements, Ill tell you about it in the Do This box for that song.

Remember This
Its easy to confuse the half and whole rests. Remember that the half rest looks like a hat. And the whole rest points down like a hole.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 58

Song 4. ~ Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star


Song Range
Lesson 2.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 59

Notice the wider range of notes in this song.

Do This
1. Notes: You will be playing an A note with your right hand. Middle C is played with your left hand. 2. Rhythm: In measures 1, 4, 9 and 12, the melody is split between both hands. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings 5. Clef 6. Practice

26

27

Lesson 2.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 60

Section 2. Lesson 3. Contents


Introducing the Dotted Half Note Page 62

Introducing the 3/4 Time Signature Page 63

Lesson 3. Contents
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 61

Exercise: Three Blind Mice Page 64

Exercise: Beautiful Brown Eyes Page 66

Lesson 3.

Lesson 3. Introducing the Dotted Half Note


We have notes for 1 beat, 2 beats and 4 beats. But what if you want to play a note for 3 beats? Introducing the dotted half note

28,29

30

This one tap is a dotted half note. As with the half note, the stem can point up or down.

Lesson 3.

A dotted half note is played for three times as long as a quarter note. Adding a dot to a note increases its duration by half the value of the original note. In this case, a half note is two beats and the dot adds one beat (half of a half note). Therefore the dotted half note is played for three beats. Tap your finger once, but hold it down three times as long as you did for the quarter note, and count ONE-TWO-THREE.

Behind the Scenes


Watch out! Many piano beginners get used to counting four beats in each measure. Now that the time signature has changed, though, there are only three beats in each measure. So make sure you count to three when you count the rhythm. Dont count to four and dont hold the third beat longer than the first two.

Practice This
1. Tap and count each of the following measures out loud. Make sure that each measure adds up to three beats. Dividing the music into measures makes it easier to tell when to start counting at ONE again. 2. When you count each measure out loud, place the emphasis on the ONE; for example, ONE, two, three . . . ONE, two, three. Each beat must be the same length.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 62

Introducing the 3/4 Time Signature


Remember This
In 3/4 time every measure adds up to three beats using a combination of these notes:

q quarter note gets one beat h half note gets two beats h. dotted half note gets
three beats

When you count in 3/4 time, put the emphasis on the first beat so that you are saying, ONE, two, three ONE, two, three.

This Time Signature is called Three Four Time

The four illustrations below show you how four different rhythmic combinations add up to three beats.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 63

Lesson 3.

Exercise: Three Blind Mice


Rhythm can be a tricky thing to master. So were going back to playing with separate hands for a moment. This will give you a chance to get more comfortable with dotted half notes and the new time signature. When you count in 3/4 time, put the emphasis on the first beat: ONE, two, three ONE, two, three. Three different rhythmic patterns that add up to three beats are used in this exercise. They can be found in the first measure, the fifth measure and the sixth measure.

Behind the Scenes


If this exercise sounds familiar, its because it is based on the song Three Blind Mice. Try it again, and see if you can hear the song.

Lesson 3.

Song Range

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Remember to check the time signature. Its a new one for this exercise. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings: There are none for this exercise, so you can play it however you like fast or slow, loud or soft. 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 3.

Exercise: Beautiful Brown Eyes


Here is another exercise to help you practice 3/4 time, which is also known as Waltz Time. There can never be a whole note or two half notes in a single measure of 3/4 time.

Song Range
Lesson 3.

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Remember to check the time signature. Find the three different rhythmic patterns in this exercise. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings: There are none for this exercise, so you can play it however you like fast or slow, loud or soft. 5. Clef 6. Practice

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 66

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Lesson 3.

Section 2. Lesson 4. Contents


Your Pre-Rowing Stretch Page 69 Stretching Fingers

Exercise: Row Your Boat Page 71 Stretching Fingers

Song 5. ~ Row Your Boat Page 72 Stretching Fingers Tied Notes Melody Alternates Between Hands

Song 6. ~ POP! Goes The Weasel Page 76 Accents Intervals

Song 7. ~ Chiapanecas Page 80 Playing Different Notes in Each Hand at the Same Time

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Lesson 4. Contents

Lesson 4.

Lesson 4. Your Pre-Rowing Stretch


Know This
Technique: Stretching Fingers
As the songs become more challenging, you will have to play keys that are farther and farther apart. This exercise will help you develop the ability to stretch your hands in order to reach those far-apart keys. You will be required to stretch more in your right hand than in your left for this particular exercise. By practicing this stretching technique now, you will be able to play measures 17 to 24 of the following song with greater ease. Thats why Ive given you this practice exercise first. So take your time, flex those fingers and reach for those keys.

If youre comfortable with the new 3/4 time signature, then its time to introduce you to Stretching. I dont mean the thing you do when you get up in the morning. I mean the technique that will allow you to play piano better.

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Lesson 4.

Your Pre-Rowing Stretch


Song Range

Lesson 4.

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: This exercise is in 3/4 time. 3. Fingering: Really extend your fingers whenever you see the word S-T-R-E-T-C-H in the music. 4. Signs and Markings 5. Clef 6. Practice

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 70

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Lesson 4.

Song 5. ~ Row Your Boat


Know This
Technique: Stretching Fingers Signs and Markings: Tied notes Concept: Melody Alternates Between Hands
So now that youve worked out with your fingers and Stretched yourself silly, you just might be ready to get into the actual song. Lets try it. Remember to watch the fingering closely, as it will show you where to stretch your fingers to reach all the notes. Another thing to watch out for is the new marking the Tied Note. A tie is a way to extend the duration of a note. When you see a curved line connecting two notes, you need to hold the first note for the duration of both notes. For example, our Learn This illustration has two dotted half notes tied together. Play those notes for a total of six beats without lifting your finger. The six beats are equal to the three beats of the first dotted half note and the three beats of the second dotted half note together. Ties can only connect two same-letter notes from the same octave. For example, the Learn This illustration has two G notes from the same octave connected together . You cant connect G notes of different octaves, because you only play the note once and hold it down for the duration of the tie. Thats also the reason you cant tie together notes of different colors. And speaking of tying things together, this song does something very Interesting with the Melody:

Learn This
Tie: A tie is a curved line that connects two same-color notes in the same octave. The tie extends the duration of the first note by the length of the second note. For example, two tied dotted half notes are played for six beats. When playing tied notes, keep your finger on the key for the entire tied duration.

Lesson 4.

First, play the melody with your right hand. Then repeat it with your left hand. Then switch back to your right hand and continue the melody before switching back to your left hand again. Think of it as two singersone with a higher voice and one with a lower voicealternating back and forth. In this song, your right hand plays the higher part and your left hand plays the lower part. Finally, this is the first song that contains all three Cslower C (measure 24), middle C (measure 1) and upper C (measure 17). It has the widest range on the keyboard of any song youve played so far.

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Check the time signature. 3. Fingering: Remember to really reach with your fingers when you see those S-T-R-E-T-C-H signs in measures 17 to 24. 4. Signs and Markings: Hold the tied notes in measures 11 to 12, 15 to 16 and 27 to 28 for their combined duration (3 beats + 3 beats). 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Song 5. ~ Row Your Boat


Song Range
In Section 1, I told you that middle C could be written in either the treble clef or bass clef. In this song, you get it in both.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 73

Lesson 4.

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Lesson 4.
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Lesson 4.

Song 6. ~ POP! Goes the Weasel

Lesson 4.
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Song 6. ~ POP! Goes the Weasel


Know This
Signs and Markings: Accents Concept: Intervals

Learn This 2.
Interval: An interval is two notes played together at the same time. It is named according to the number of notes involved. The top fingering number refers to the higher note. See Learn This 1 for an example of a G-A interval.

Learn This 1.
(Accent): An accent shows you which note receives greater emphasis.You accent a note by playing it louder than the notes that surround it. In the next song, the accent is on the interval to accentuate the POP! See the illustration for an example of an accented interval. The top fingering number refers to the higher note.

Interval

Practice This
Aside from being accented, the POP in the next song is also an interval. Whats an interval? An Interval is simply two notes played at the same time. Take a look at measure 13. Notice how the two note heads are on one stem? This shows you that the two notes need to be played together. The top fingering number refers to the higher note; the bottom, to the lower note. In the following song, the notes of the interval G and A in measure 13 are played together. This is an interval of a 2nd. Now play any intervals of a 2nd on your keyboard now. Some examples of intervals of a 2nd are: C-D, G-A, E-F, etc.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 77

Lesson 4.

When you hear the word accent, I bet it reminds you of someone speaking strangely. Foreigners place the emphasis on different vowels and consonants, and the result is that they sometimes sound funny. Accents in music are not that different. A musical Accent is a way of marking a note that gets a different emphasis from the other notes around it. You play an accent by playing the note a little louder than normal. In the next song, for instance, the POP is accented so that youll know to play it a little louder.

It is important to know that intervals can be made up of notes that are close together or very far apart. The way to tell how far apart the two notes are, other than by looking at the music, is by the name of the interval. An interval can be called by two names: It can be called by its letter-names; or by the number of notes that separate the two letter-names of the interval. For example, in this song the interval notes are G and A. This is an interval of a 2nd, because there are two notes to count; G and A. If the interval notes are C and E, it is an interval of a 3rd because there are three notes to count: C, D, and E. A C-G interval is called an interval of a 5th because there are five notes to count: C, D, E, F and G.

Song 6. ~ POP! Goes the Weasel


Perhaps you think that Ive made a mistake using the whole rest (which Ive used as a four-beat rest) in 3/4 time (which can only have three beats in a measure). The truth is that a whole rest is used to indicate a rest for the whole measureregardless of the time signature. Now that you know about intervals and accents, you will be able to play POP! Goes the Weasel properly. So go ahead and read the Do This box on this next page and start popping away.

Remember This
(Whole Rest): A whole rest indicates a rest for the entire measure regardless of the time signature.

Lesson 4.

Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Count the rests as part of the rhythm, but dont play them. 3. Fingering: In measure 13, play both interval notes at the same time. The top fingering number is for the higher note. The bottom fingering number is for the lower note.

4. Signs and Markings: Play the accented notes louder than the other notes. The dynamic sign changes from mf to f in measure 13. 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 4.

Song 7. ~ Chiapanecas

Lesson 4.
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Song 7. ~ Chiapanecas
Know This
Technique: Playing Different Notes in Each Hand at the Same Time
a look at the Practice This box for an example. There is a note in the treble clef for your right hand and a different note for your left hand in the bass clef, played at the same time. This is the first time Youre Playing Different Notes in Each Hand at the Same Time. To make it easier, Ive kept the note in the bass line the same so that you can focus on the changing notes in the treble clef. Id say thats worthy of some clapping!

Remember This
mf (Mezzo Forte): This dynamic
sign means moderately loud.

f (Forte): This dynamic sign


means loud.

Of course, there is something a little different about those loud, accented notes at the end of each line. Take

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 81

Lesson 4.

This song was originally a Mexican favorite, but now youre more likely to hear it at hockey games. If you take a look at the music, youll notice how the last two notes of every line are accented. Youll have to play them louder than the other notes. But also pay attention to the changing dynamic signs in this song. Every line starts as mfmezzo forte. But the last two notes are always fforte. Towards the end of each line the song gets louder and the notes get accented. So play the last two notes of each line loudly, like a clap.

Practice This
Practice the left hand by itself. Play the accented note with more emphasis. When you can play the left hand without hesitation, add in the right-hand notes.

Song 7. ~ Chiapanecas
Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Lesson 4.

Do This
1. Notes: Notice the B note in the left hand for the first time. 2. Rhythm: Tap and count the rhythm out loud as if it were written in only one staff. In other words, dont count each staff separately. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings: Play the accented notes louder than the other notes like a clap. 5. Clef: Play both hands together. This will be the first time that you play different notes in each hand at the same time. 6. Practice

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Lesson 4.

Section 2. Lesson 5. Contents


Introducing the 2/4 Time Signature Page 85

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 84

Lesson 5. Contents

Song 8. ~ Sea Chantey Page 86 Octaves Cross-Over Same-Note Finger Change Move Hand Repeat Signs

Lesson 5.

Lesson 5. Introducing the 2/4 Time Signature

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In 2/4 time, every measure adds up to two beats using a combination of quarter notes and half notes.

Remember This

a quarter note ONE-TWO.

q (Quarter Note): A quarter note is played for a single beat ONE. h (Half Note): A half note is played for two beats, twice as long as

This Time Signature is called Two Four Time

Practice This
1. Tap and count each measure out loud. Make sure that each measure adds up to two beats. 2. When you count each measure out loud, place the emphasis on the first beat. For example,ONE, two . . . ONE, two. This time signature indicates that each measure adds up to two quarter notes.

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Lesson 5.

Song 8. ~ Sea Chantey


Know This
Concept: Octaves Technique: Cross-Over Technique: Same-Note Finger Change Technique: Move Hand Signs and Markings: Repeat Sign
Speaking of quick and easy, let me introduce a new challenge to you: the cross-over. Cross-Over is not an actual musical term. Its simply a reminder that you have to move your fingers differently than normal. Take a look at measure 8. You will notice a G note being played with finger 1 of the left hand. In the next measure, you have an A note being played with finger 2. Since A is to the right of G, the easiest way to play this combination is to cross finger 2 of your left hand over finger 1 to reach the A note. Then, when you switch to the B note in measure 11, your hand will be in a more comfortable position and ready to keep playing. This technique may sound challenging, but just practice it for a few minutes right now and youll get the hang of it. Take a look at the cross-over illustration in the Learn This 1 box. Until now, you havent had to move your hands very much when you play. But in order to play all the notes more comfortably, you will need to move your hands farther across the keyboard. To help you with that, Ive changed the fingering in some places. Take a look at measure 13, for example. The instruction there is to Move Hand, meaning to move your hand from one note to the next. Its necessary to move your hand so that your hand is repositioned for the notes that follow. Once youve mastered the cross-over and the move hand, there is another technique to learn: the same-note finger change. The what? The Same-Note Finger Change. Take a look at measure 5, where you play a G note with finger 2 of your left hand. In measure 6, the fingering is circled to show that you need to change

As you can see from the Know This box above, this song will teach new things in each categorya concept, a sign and three new techniques. Lets start with something youre already familiar with: octaves. As you know, an Octave is the distance between a note and the closest note of the same name. For example, lower C to middle C is an octave. In Brother John, you played octaves one note at a time. In Sea Chantey, youll be playing both octave notes at the same timeone with each hand. If you listen carefully, you will hear how the same note in two different places reinforces the sound of both. This is an important concept to be aware of: Playing octaves makes the sound of the notes stronger. When sheet music was black and white, it was difficult to read octaves. But with The ColorKeys Method, octaves are quick and easy to find. Take a look at measures 5, 6, 9 and 10 and see how quick and easy it is to identify the octaves. Read the Practice This 1 box.

Lesson 5.

Practice This 1.
Octave Exercise: Heres a quick little exercise to help you become more familiar with octaves. Start on lower C and middle C and move up. Use finger 3 of each hand to play the notes and keep those fingers curved.

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Song 8. ~ Sea Chantey


Learn This 1.
Cross-Over: The cross-over tells you to cross one finger over another. Its not a musical term; its just a ColorKeys reminder to move your fingers differently than normal.

your fingering. Use finger 1 of your left hand to play the G note in measure 6. The reason for this switch is to get your hand into a more comfortable position to play the C note in measure 7. Shifting the position of your hand earlier makes it easier to reach for the next note. Shifting from finger 2 to finger 1 is pretty easy. And by doing so, you dont have to stretch as much to play the C note with finger 5. See the Practice This 2 box.

Now, it may sound like a lot, but if youre comfortable with the new concept and the new techniques, lets repeat. No, not the lesson; I mean the repeat sign. A Repeat Sign appears at the end of a piece of music. It tells you to play the whole song again from the beginning one more time.

Learn This 2.
Repeat Sign: A repeat sign tells you to repeat the piece once from the beginning. Its located at the end of the last measure.

Practice This 2.
Same-Note Finger Change: Measures 5 and 6 mark the first time that you make a same-note finger change. Practice this technique a few times. It comes up often. Changing fingers on the same note helps to keep you anchored.

So there you go: Four new elements, covering a little bit of everything. Two final reminders before you start: Notice the accents on the Way! Hey! and count the rhythm as if you were playing the melody in only one staff. Now off you go, sailor!

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Lesson 5.

Song 8. ~ Sea Chantey


Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Lesson 5.

Do This
1. Notes: Notice the new A note in the left hand.Youve now covered the entire octave from lower C to middle C in the left hand. 2. Rhythm: The time signature is 2/4. 3. Fingering: There are tricky challenges here with the cross-over from measures 8 to 9, the same-note finger change from measures 5 to 6 and the move hand in measure 13. Keep practicing these techniques until youre comfortable. 4. Signs and Markings: Notice the repeat sign at the end of the song. 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 5.

Lesson 6.
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Section 2. Lesson 6. Contents


Introducing the Half Step and Sharps Page 92

Lesson 6. Contents
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Song 9. ~ BINGO Page 94 F# Played in Both Hands Octaves Same-Note Finger Change

Lesson 6.

Lesson 6. Introducing the Half Step and Sharps


Learn This 1.
Half Step: A half step is the distance from a key to the very next key right or left, black or white.

Practice This 1.
Pick any octave and find all the half steps. How many are there? Play all the half steps shown in the illustration.

Learn This 2.
Lesson 6.
the note a half step higher by using the next key to the right whether its black or white. The sharp symbol appears to the left of a note on the staff. The following diagram depicts an F# in both clefs.

# (Sharp): A sharp symbol tells you to play

The black keys do not have their own names. When a black key is used to play a sharp, it borrows its name from the key to the left of it. In Bingo on the following page, all Fs are played sharpso dont use the white key marked F. Instead, use the black key between F and G which is the F# key. A little trick I use to help me remember how to find a sharp note is: A sha(r)p is always to the (right) of the named key. (Sharp = r = right.)

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 92

Answer Practice This 1 = 12

Introducing the Half Step and Sharps


Learn This 3.
Since the black keys are shorter than the white keys, you will need to move your hand forward on the keyboard to play them comfortably. When you go from a white key to a black key, roll your hand forward, pivoting from the wrist. Dont stretch. When you have played the black key, move your hand back to the original position.

Practice This 2.
Starting from middle C and going up (right), play all the keys, white and black, of one octave while saying their names out loud.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 93

Lesson 6.

Song 9. ~ Bingo
Know This
Signs and Markings: F# Played in Both Hands Concept: Octaves Technique: Same-Note Finger Change
pivot your wrist forward to reach the black keys. You will also notice some Octaves in this song. Between measures 9 and 16, you play octaves of A, B and C. Finally, you will have another Same-Note Finger Change. This time its a little more challenging. In order to play all the notes more comfortably, you will need to move your hands farther across the keyboard. Ive made a same-note finger change between measures 17 and 18, where there isnt much going on, so that your hands will be in position for the hard-to-reach notes coming up in measure 21. By the way, with the addition of the upper C and B notes in the right hand of this song, you have now covered the whole octave from middle C to upper C in the right hand and from lower C to middle C in the left hand. Congratulations!

Now that youve learned all about sharp notes, Im sure youre excited to try playing them. Heres your chance. Take a look at the Song Range illustration. Youll notice that the orange F Notes Have the Sharp Symbol next to them. This tells you to play all orange F notes as sharp. So instead of playing F, play the black key to the right of F. This is the F# key. Remember to

Practice This
Practice the octave exercise below as you did in the previous song (Sea Chantey). Start with middle C in the right hand and lower C in the left hand. Use finger 3 of each hand.

Lesson 6.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 94

Song 9. ~ Bingo
Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes: There is a new B note in the right hand and F# notes in both hands (measures 21, 22, 25 and 26).

3. Fingering: Same-note finger change from measures 17 to 18 and the wrist pivot for the F# notes in measures 21, 22, 25 and 26. 4. Signs and Markings 5. Clef 6. Practice

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 95

Lesson 6.

2. Rhythm: 2/4 time signature.

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Lesson 6.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 96

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 97

Lesson 6.

Section 2. Lesson 7. Contents


Introducing the Eighth Note Page 99

Song 10. ~ Ten Little Indians Page 100 Eighth Notes Counting Rhythm with Eighth Notes in 2/4 Time

Song 11. ~ Skip to My Lou Page 102 Eighth Notes in 4/4 Time Accompaniment Held-Note Accompaniment Writing a Lower B Note for the Right Hand Song 12. ~ Mary Ann Page 106 Tied Notes of Different Durations Echoing Accompaniment

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Lesson 7. Contents

Lesson 7.

Lesson 7. Introducing the Eighth Note


The Eighth Note
An eighth note is played for half as long as a quarter note. Think of an eighth note symbol as the picture of a very short sound. When eighth notes are paired they are connected by a beam:

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Two eighth notes are played in the time of one quarter note.

Counting Eighth Notes


To count eighth notes, split each beat in half. Each beat is now counted as 1-and or 1-&. When a piece contains eighth notes, every beat must be counted 1 and.

Using Eighth Notes in 2/4 Time

Practice This
1. Tap and count each measure out loud. Whenever a song contains eighth notes, every measure must be counted with ands. 2. When you count each measure out loud, place the emphasis on the first beat. For example,ONE, and, two, and . . . ONE, and, two, and.

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Lesson 7.

Song 10. ~ Ten Little Indians


Know This
Signs and Markings: Eighth Notes Concept: Counting Rhythm with Eighth Notes in 2/4 Time
would be counted one and two and three and four and. Sometimes its hard to remember that last and. Make sure you count it at the end when you count rhythm with eighth notes. It is important to count with ands from the beginning of any song that has an eighth note in it even if there is only one such note in the whole song. Counting with ands is pretty challenging. So take your time and dont get frustrated if you dont get it right away. Using eighth notes allows you to create more varied rhythmic combinations. But the best way to understand how this works is to sing along in the next song. By singing along while you play, you will quickly see how eighth notes are used. In the following song, there are only two measures for your left hand, so you can focus on learning the new 2/4 time signature and practice playing eighth notes.

Now you know about Eighth Notes. Youve come pretty far since the first song in this section. I hope youre comfortable with everything youve learned until now, because with the introduction of eighth notes, a whole new range of challenges opens up for you. When counting with eighth notes, you need to Count with Ands. In other words, instead of counting the first beat of the measure as one, count it as one and. So, a measure in 2/4 time, for instance, would be counted one and two and. A measure in 4/4 time

Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Lesson 7.

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Count the rhythm with ands since there are eighth notes. 3. Fingering

4. Signs and Markings 5. Clef 6. Practice: Once youve mastered playing this song, it will be worthwhile to tap and count the rhythm out loud again.

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Lesson 7.

Song 11. ~ Skip to My Lou


Know This
Concept: Eighth Notes in 4/4 Time Concept: Accompaniment Concept: Held-Note Accompaniment Signs and Markings: Writing a Lower B Note for the Right Hand
This song teaches you something new and also gives you more practice with eighth notes. Skip to My Lou is the first song with significant Accompaniment, which we will call Held-Note Accompaniment. What does that mean? It means that in this song, you will be holding a note in the left hand while your right hand continues to play the melody.

Learn This 1.
Having Eighth Notes in 4/4 Time means that you still need to count with ands as you did in the last song. The difference is that each measure will add up to four beats instead of two (one and two and three and four and). Check the Practice This 1 box for an example of the rhythmic combinations used in this song.

Accompaniment: In this book, accompaniment is a catch-all phrase that refers to anything other than the melody that is played with the left hand.

Remember This
The illustration below shows you how three different rhythmic combinations add up to four beats.

Lesson 7.

Practice This 1.
Tap and count the rhythm out loud for each of the following measures. Make sure that you count the ands in each example.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 102

Song 11. ~ Skip to My Lou


Take a look at the first line of the bass clef. Notice that the C whole note is tied for two measures (4 beats + 4 beats) and then the G whole note is tied for two measures (4 beats + 4 beats). Hold both of these notes in the left hand while your right hand continues to play the melody. By holding these accompanying notes, you enrich the sound of the piece. But play those accompanying notes a little softer so that they dont overpower the melody. Now that the songs have accompaniment, its important to first practice the right-hand melody alone. When you are comfortable with the melody, move on to the left-hand accompaniment. Practicing the melody and the accompaniment separately with a focus on the count will help you to put them together more easily. You will have to be flexible in order to master this song. It can be a bit tricky getting each hand to do different tasks. Its a good idea to work on your hand coordination, because you will be adding more challenging accompaniments in the next few songs. Also notice a Lower B Note in the Treble Clef in measure 3. Take a look at the Learn This 2 box. You will have to play this note with your right hand even though it is below middle C. So keep your mind and your fingers flexible.

Practice This 2.
Before you play the song, practice the left-hand transition from C (finger 5) to G (finger 1). See the illustration below. Hold each note for two beats, alternating back and forth between them. Practice the transition until you can do it without looking. This exercise will help you focus more attention on the right-hand melody when both hands are played together. When you play the left-hand accompaniment, play it softer than the melody.

Learn This 2.
In Ten Little Indians you played this B in the left hand. In Skip To My Lou the same B is played in the right hand.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 103

Lesson 7.

Song 11. ~ Skip to My Lou


Song Range
For the first time in this book, you play a note below C with your right hand. The new note is the B the to the left of lower C.

Do This
1. Notes: B note below lower C for the first time. B note below middle C is played with your RIGHT hand in this song. 2. Rhythm: Return to 4/4 time. Be sure to count every and in every measure when you tap and count the rhythm out loud. 3. Fingering

Lesson 7.

4. Signs and Markings: Hold the tied notes for their entire tied duration. 5. Clef 6. Practice

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 104

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Lesson 7.

Song 12. ~ Mary Ann

Lesson 7.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 106

Song 12. ~ Mary Ann


Know This
Concept: Tied Notes of Different Durations Concept: Echoing Accompaniment
note. Play that note for 2 beats + 4 beats for a total of 6 beats. To count these tied notes, you have to be careful. Each note gets counted in its own measure. In other words, count the first measure as: one, two, three-four, where the three-four is the half note. Count the second measure as: one-two-three-four, where the entire measure is the whole note tied to the half note from the first measure. In other words, dont count the tied notes as one-two-three-four-five six. Even though there are six held beats, count only four beats per measure. In Skip to My Lou, you learned how to play a single-note accompaniment by adding a held note (C and G) in the left hand to the melody line of the right hand. Now, in Mary Ann, you are going to use your left hand to echo the melody of the right hand. Take a look at the PracticeThis diagram to see what I mean. In the diagram and the last measure of every line, hold the note in the right hand while your left hand Echoes the Melody. Since there arent any eighth notes in this song, you dont need to count with ands when tapping out the rhythm.

In the last two songs, you learned all about eighth notes and how to play them. But for this song, well put some new twists on a couple of familiar concepts without worrying about any eighth notes. Back in Row Your Boat, you learned that a tied note extends the duration of the first note by the length of the second. Until now, any time youve encountered tied notes, they have been two notes of the same duration. Two whole notes tied together, for instance, would be held for eight beats. In this song, you will notice something new about tied notes: They can be Tied Notes of Different Durations. Take a look at the Practice This diagram. You will notice that the first measure ends with a half note that is tied to a whole

Practice This
Practice counting and coordinating your hands.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 107

Lesson 7.

Song 12. ~ Mary Ann


Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes: The new B note below middle C is played with your right hand in measures 6 and 14. 2. Rhythm 3. Fingering: There is a big stretch between measures 5 and 6 and measures 13 and 14. 4. Signs and Markings: Notice the tied notes of different durations in the last two measures of each line.

Lesson 7.

5. Clef: When you play the left-hand accompaniment, play it softer than the melody. 6. Practice

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Lesson 7.

Section 2. Lesson 8. Contents


Song 13. ~ London Bridge Page 111 Mastering Rhythm Dotted Quarter Notes

Song 14. ~ Good Night, Ladies Page 114 Putting It All Together

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Lesson 8. Contents

Lesson 8.

Lesson 8. Song 13. ~ London Bridge


Know This
Concept: Mastering Rhythm Signs and Markings: Dotted Quarter Notes
The same principle is true when you add a dot to a quarter note. You extend the duration of the quarter note by half. Does it sound strange to add half the duration to a note that only gets one beat? Im sure it does. But now that youve learned about eighth notes, you can do it. A dotted quarter note gets one and a half beats, or the equivalent of a quarter note tied to an eighth note. See the Learn This box.

Just about everyone is familiar with this famous childrens song. It dates back several centuries and has outlived several London bridges. One of the first things youll notice is that the version I have for you here is very short. Its only eight measures long. But they are tricky measures, so dont be fooled. The reason Ive left the piece so short is that I really want you to focus on Mastering Rhythm. This song really challenges you to use all of the concepts youve learned so far. Youll need to practice extra hard to keep the song from falling down. So why is it so tricky? Well, in this song, Im going to introduce you to Dotted Quarter Notes. You may remember that adding a dot to a half note extends its duration by half, as shown in the Remember This box.

Learn This q. (Dotted Quarter Note): In


the case of the dotted quarter note, we add a quarter note and an eighth note together to make 1 1/2 beats.

Remember This
In the case of the dotted half note, we add a half note and a quarter note together to make three beats. When you start to practice this song, you will probably find it easier to start with the melody line. Once youve mastered that, you can practice the accompaniment line. And when youre comfortable with both, you can put them together to play the whole song. One final point thats worth repeating is that there is a repeat sign at the end of the piece. But before you do any of that, do the Practice This boxes first.

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Lesson 8.

59

Song 13. ~ London Bridge


Practice This 1.
Tap and count the rhythm out loud in the following measure. The dotted quarter note is equal to a quarter note plus an eighth note.

Practice This 2.
The following four measures demonstrate four different ways to count four beats with ands. Play and count the following measures. In 4/4 and 3/4 time, dotted quarter notes are almost always followed by an eighth note.

Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Lesson 8.
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Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Pay extra attention when you tap and count the rhythm out loud in this piece. Remember to count with ands for the whole song. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings: Notice the repeat sign and dotted quarter notes.

6. Practice: Practice the melody line. Then practice the accompaniment line. When you can play both without hesitation, put them together.

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Lesson 8.

5. Clef

Song 14. ~ Good Night, Ladies


Know This
Concept: Putting It All Together
you are going to put together many of the concepts youve been working on over the last few pieces. This is also a good time to remind you about the checklist. Even though you should be very comfortable with all its elements by now, this song really highlights why its important to continue following each step. Ive written out the Do This in more detail to highlight the important concepts in this song.

Ready to Put It All Together? All right then. Youre not going to work on anything new in this song. But

Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Lesson 8.
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Song 14. ~ Good Night, Ladies


Do This
1. Notes: You should be comfortable recognizing all the notes by now. But its still a good idea to check the Song Range illustration to get an idea of which notes will be used and if there are any sharps. 2. Rhythm: This is becoming even more important than before. Not only must you be aware of the time signature but you must also check what kinds of notes you will be playing so that you can more easily master the rhythm. In this song, for instance, you may not realize that you have to count the rhythm using ands. Its not until measure 9 that you will notice the dotted quarter note followed by an eighth note. And if there is even one eighth note somewhere, the whole song needs to be counted with ands. Counting and tapping the rhythm out loud is not just an exercise. Its an important tool to help you play more quickly. Its also one of the trickiest things to learn. By the way, the accompaniment in the last eight measures of Good Night, Ladies is the same as the accompaniment in London Bridge. And the last eight measures of the melody have almost exactly the same rhythmic patterns too. 3. Fingering: Watch for the circled fingering
numbers. They indicate notes that may be hard to play. For example, in this song you will notice that middle C is played in both the right hand and the left hand. To prevent your thumbs from colliding when your right hand has to play middle C, you will need to keep your thumb lifted off the keyboard when its not playing. Its important to watch out for these kinds of things.

4. Signs and Markings: Check the dynamic signs, tempo markings and any other signs and markings, so that you will know how to play the piece. 5. Clef: Always check the two clefs ahead of time so that you will get an idea of what each hand will have to play. If you do this for Good Night, Ladies, for instance, you will notice that the melody is split between both hands in the first half of the song. In the second half, however, you will be playing single-note accompaniment in the left hand while the right hand plays the melody. Always practice each hand separately until you are comfortable, and then put both hands together. 6. Practice: Keep your eyes on the music and not on your fingers. Keep practicing until you can play comfortably, without hesitation. If there are lyrics, singing along will help you learn the rhythm more quickly. When you can play the song as well as you sing it, youve got it.

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Lesson 8.

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Lesson 8.
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Section 2. Lesson 9. Contents


Introducing Flats Page 118

Introducing F for Accompaniment Page 120

Song 15. ~ Aura Lee Page 121 Flat Slur Mezzo Piano

Song 16. ~ Camptown Races Page 124 Melody Splits Between Right Hand and Left Hand

Lesson 9. Contents
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Lesson 9.

Lesson 9. Introducing Flats


Remember This 1.
Half Step: A half step is the distance from a key to the very next key right or left, black or white.

Practice This 1.
Starting at any C, play all the half steps shown in the illustration.

Learn This 1.

b (Flat): A flat symbol tells you to play the


note a half step lower by using the very next key to the left. The flat symbol appears to the left of a note on the staff.

The black keys do not have their own names. When a black key is used to play a flat, it borrows its name from the key to the right. In Aura Lee on the following page, all Bs are played flat, so dont use the white key marked B. Instead, use the black key between A and B, which is the Bb key. A little trick I use to help me remember how to find a flat note is: A f(l)at is always to the (l)eft of the named key. (Flat = l = left)

Remember This 2.
Since the black keys are shorter than the white keys, you will need to move your hand forward on the keyboard to reach them comfortably. When you go from playing a white key to a black key, roll your hand forward, pivoting from the wrist. Dont stretch. When you have played the black key, move your hand back to the original position.

Lesson 9.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 118

Introducing Flats
Practice This 2.
Starting from middle C and going down (left), play all the keys of one octave while saying their names out loud. Remember that there are 12 keys in an entire octave when you include the black ones.

Learn This 2.
Enharmonic Notes: This refers to any notes that can be called by two names. For example, C# is the same as Db.

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Lesson 9.

64

Introducing F for Accompaniment


You have already used C and G as accompaniment. Now you will learn to use F. This practice exercise is useful for three reasons: First, it will give you practice playing accompaniment with your left hand. Second, it will help you recognize the bass clef notes and their positions on the keyboard for your left hand. Finally, it will get you used to the progression of notes used in the next song. Practicing this now will get you playing the next song faster.

Practice This
Practice transitioning between these three bass clef notes. It will familiarize you with the progression of notes used in the next song.

Lesson 9.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 120

Song 15. ~ Aura Lee


Know This
Signs and Markings: Flat Signs and Markings: Slur Signs and Markings: Mezzo Piano
In the first measure of this song, you will also notice a new dynamic sign: mpMezzo Piano. When you see mp, play the piece moderately softly, with a little less force on the keys.

Learn This 2.
mp (Mezzo Piano): This sign
tells you to play moderately softly. Play the piece with less force on the keys.

Just as you did when you learned about sharps in Bingo, youll get a chance to practice a Flat in this song. Take a look at the Song Range illustration. You will notice that the B note above middle C has a flat symbol next to it. This tells you to play that B note flat. So instead of playing B, play the black key to the left of B. This is the Bb key. Remember to pivot your wrist forward to reach the black keys. You will notice something else thats new in this song: a long line crossing over several notes. This is called a Phrasing Mark or a Slur. Notes connected by a slur are played in a flowing manner. In other words, hold each note until you start playing the next note. This will make the notes sound smoother. Except for the octaves in measures 9 and 10, the entire song is played in slurs. See the Learn This 1 box for more information.

Finally, you will have to watch out for the circled fingering number in measure 9 of the melody. If you look at measure 8, you will notice that you use finger 4 to play the F key. In measure 9, you will have to use finger 4 to play the A key. To get from F to A, you will have to move your finger up the keyboard.

Learn This 1.
Slur: The slur indicates a sentence of music the most that can be sung in one breath. Play the slurred notes in a flowing manner by holding each note until you begin the next one. At the end of the slur, lift your hand off the keyboard to take a breath. A slur is also called a Phrasing Mark.

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Lesson 9.

Song 15. ~ Aura Lee


Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes: Watch out for the Bb note in measure 13. This is the first time you will be playing a flat. 2. Rhythm: There are no eighth notes, so dont count with ands. 3. Fingering: Move your finger up the keyboard from measure 8 to measure 9 of the Melody. 4. Signs and Markings: Play the slurs in a flowing manner. Also, notice how the song changes from mp at the beginning to mf later on in the song. 5. Clef 6. Practice

Lesson 9.
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Lesson 9.

Song 16. ~ Camptown Races


Know This
Technique: Melody Splits Between Right Hand and Left Hand.
Youve split the melody before in songs like Ten Little Indians. Remember to count and tap the rhythm out loud as if the melody were written in only one staff. See the Remember This diagram. But watch out! There are two measures (11 and 12) where the melody stays in the treble clef. Instead of splitting the melody in those measures, there is a single-note accompaniment using a Bb and an A. Youve done this kind of accompaniment before, but it will be the first time that youve used these notes. By the way, just to avoid confusion, dont count the accompaniment for those measures as part of the rhythm. Also remember to pivot your wrist when you play the Bb note with the left hand in measures 7, 11 and 15.

Do you remember playing Jingle Bells in the first part of this book and then again in the second? Now youll get a chance to do the same with Camptown Races. The second version of Camptown Races is longer and has more depth than the first. If you follow the Do This instructions and examine the notes, youll notice immediately that the Melody is Split Between the Right Hand and the Left Hand.

Remember This

Lesson 9.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 124

Song 16. ~ Camptown Races


Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Do This
1. Notes: Bb and A in bass clef as accompaniment. 2. Rhythm: When tapping and counting the rhythm out loud, read the melody as if it were written in only one staff. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 9.

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Lesson 9.
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Section 2. Lesson 10. Contents


Introducing E for Accompaniment Page 128

Song 17. ~ Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay Page 129 Musical Phrases Accompaniment F#, D# Rhythm: Something New

Introducing D for Accompaniment Page 132

Song 18. ~ Good Morning to You Page 133 Musical Introduction Before the Melody Starts Fermata

Lesson 10. Contents


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Lesson 10.

Lesson 10. Introducing E for Accompaniment

69

You have already done exercises with C, G and F as accompaniment. Now you will learn to use E. This practice exercise is useful for three reasons: First, it will give you practice playing accompaniment with your left hand. Second, it will help you recognize the bass clef notes and their positions on the keyboard for your left hand. Finally, it will get you familiar with the notes used in the next song. Practicing this now will get you playing the next song faster.

Practice This
Practice transitioning between these four bass clef notes. It will familiarize you with the progression of notes used in the next song.

Lesson 10.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 128

Song 17. ~ Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay!


Know This
Concept: Musical Phrases Concept: Accompaniment Signs and Markings: F#, D# Concept: Rhythm: Something New
using the C, E, F and G notes. For the second half, the accompaniment consists of octaves that mimic the melody. There are octaves of C (measure 10), D (measure 14) and G (measure 12). Each of these octaves is also accented in both hands. A careful reading will also reveal that F and D are sometimes Sharp. A bar line cancels the sharp, so make sure that you play the note sharp only where there is a sharp symbol beside it. And if youve been particularly observant, you will also notice that each phrase in the melody starts with a rest. This is where the Rhythm Does Something New. You may remember learning about the time signature in the first section. In 4/4 time, for instance, the first note gets emphasis: ONE, two, three, four. By adding a rest for the first beat, the emphasis changes a little bit. You dont emphasize the second beat any more than usual. So the effect is to create a shift in the rhythm. The song sounds a little different because it begins on a weaker beat than normal. This also increases the emphasis on the boom in the second half of the phrase, which starts on a played note instead of a rest. Singing while you play will really help you learn the rhythm. As Ive said before, because music relies so much on rhythm, its worth taking extra time whenever you encounter a new rhythmic concept. So focus on really hearing the rhythm in this song.

Rhythmeither you have it or you dont. Fortunately, even if you dont, you can learn it. There are so many things that can be done with rhythm, and Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay is the perfect song to teach you something new. Before I tell you about the new twist on rhythm, though, let me tell you about musical phrases. When we speak, we speak in sentences. When we play, we play in Musical Phrases. In this song, each musical phrase is two measures long. Just as Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay is spoken like a sentence in English, its also played like a sentence in music. Youll notice that it takes two measures to say it (musically). If you examine the song two measures at a time, youll probably notice some other interesting patterns. First of all, there is some kind of accompaniment in the second measure of each phrase. This Accompaniment highlights the boom of boom-de-ay. For the first two lines, there is a single held-note accompaniment

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 129

Lesson 10.

Song 17. ~ Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay!


Song Range
The range in this song goes from lower C to upper C.

Do This
1. Notes: Pay Attention: Both F and D are sometimes sharp in this song. 2. Rhythm: Count with ands, as there are eighth notes in this song. 3. Fingering: You will need to move your left hand in the bass clef between measures 10 and 12. Keep your eyes on the music and not on your fingers. 4. Signs and Markings: There is a switch from mf to f in measure 9. 5. Clef 6. Practice: Singing along will help you learn the rhythm.

Lesson 10.
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Lesson 10.

72

Introducing D for Accompaniment


You have already done exercises using C, G, F and E as accompaniment. Now you will also use D. This practice exercise is useful for three reasons: As before, it will give you practice playing accompaniment with your left hand. It will also help you recognize the bass clef notes and their positions on the keyboard for your left hand. Finally, the patterns in the exercise below are just like the accompaniment in the next song. Thats why this exercise is in 3/4 time. Pay attention to the fingering and the count.

Practice This
Practice transitioning between these four bass clef notes. It will familiarize you with the progression of notes used in the next song.

Lesson 10.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 132

Song 18. ~ Good Morning to You


Know This
Concept: Musical Introduction Before the Melody Starts Signs and Markings: Fermata
Im sure youll recognize this song as soon as you start playing it. Its a fun, well-known piece. But it may be a little confusing when you first start. Why? Because this song starts with an Introduction Before the Melody Starts. Until now, all of our songs have started with the melody and added some kind of accompaniment. Now, you will use the left hand to play an introduction. Aside from changing things a little bit, an introduction is also a good way to synchronize your playing with a singer. Notice the mf in measure 8 for the treble clef and the mp in measure 9 for the accompaniment. When the singer joins in, the melody is played a little louder, while the accompaniment gets a little softer. You are now using C, D, E, F and G for single-note accompaniment. The other important marking to notice is the strange little hat symbol in measure 14. This is called a Fermata. When you encounter a fermata, you can play the note for as long as you like. In other words, ignore the duration of the note and play it for as long as it seems best to you. If you were playing in an orchestra, you would hold the note until the conductor indicated that it was time to continue.

Learn This
Fermata: When a fermata appears over a note, it means that you should ignore the duration of the note. Hold the note for however long you feel is appropriate. If you were playing in an orchestra, you would hold the note until the conductor indicated that it was time to release it. In this song, the fermata is in both hands in measure 13.

By the way, the note with the fermata in the bass clef of measure 14 is also sharp. So make sure you pivot your wrist to get to the black key. And just to make things a little more interesting for you, there is a finger cross-over in the treble clef from measures 13 to 14. You will have to cross finger 2 of your right hand over your thumb to play the notes properly. Even though this song may seem like a simple childrens song, it has a very wide range of notes more than any other so far. One look at the Song Range illustration and youll quickly see that the notes cover the range from lower C to the G above upper C. Pretty impressive!

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Lesson 10.

Song 18. ~ Good Morning to You


Song Range
This song has the widest range so far. The new notes in the right hand are the D, E, F and G above upper C. There are Gs in three octaves lower C, middle C and upper C.

Do This
1. Notes: There are several F notes in this song but only the one in measure 13 is sharp. 2. Rhythm: Tap and count the fermata quarter note in measure 13 as a regular quarter note but play it as long as you like. 3. Fingering: There is a cross-over between measures 13 and 14. 4. Signs and Markings 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 10.

Section 2. Lesson 11. Contents


Song 19. ~ This Old Man Page 137 Intervals as Accompaniment C Position

Song 20. ~ Shell Be Comin Round the Mountain Page 140 Pickup Bar More Challenging Accompaniment D in the Bass Clef

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Lesson 11. Contents

Lesson 11.

Lesson 11. Song 19. ~ This Old Man


Know This
Concept: Intervals as Accompaniment Concept: C Position
Now, if you thought that was easy, wait till you learn the next new thing: C position. Your hand is in C Position when it covers all the notes from C to G. If finger 1 of your right hand is on C and finger 5 is on G, youre in C position. The same is true if finger 5 of your left hand is on C and finger 1 is on G. In both cases, your hands are in C position.

There is nothing new in this song, but youll find some familiar things done differently. For example, youve played intervals before. Intervals, as you may remember, are two notes played together. In this song, youre going to play intervals again. But this time, youre going to play them as accompaniment. Take a look at the first two measures. For the first time, you will be playing two notes together as accompaniment. In this song, we combine the C and G notesan interval of a 5th (see Interval diagram)to make a C-G interval for accompaniment. Try it now.

Interval Diagram

The harmony sounds pretty good, doesnt it? And it wasnt too tough either.

Measures 11 and 12 of this song require both of your hands to be in C position. The first three songs of this section were all played in C position. As you play each note of the C position in measures 11 and 12, you will also notice that you are playing octaves. Neat, isnt it? And definitely easy.

Practice playing the following measures:

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 137

Lesson 11.

Practice This 1.

Song 19. ~ This Old Man


Practice This 2.
Practice playing C position with each hand separately before playing with both hands together.

Song Range
The range in this song goes from lower C to Upper C.

Lesson 11.

Do This
1. Notes: There are eighth notes in this song. Remember to count with ands. 2. Rhythm: This song is in 2/4 time. 3. Fingering: The top number of an interval fingering refers to the higher note of the interval.The

bottom number refers to the lower note.

4. Signs and Markings: Hold both notes of the tied intervals for the entire tied duration (2 beats + 2 beats). Notice the repeat sign at the end of the last measure. 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 11.

Song 20. ~ Shell Be Comin Round The Mountain


Know This
Concept: Pickup Bar Technique: More Challenging Accompaniment Concept: D in the Bass Clef
This song is really going to stretch your musical muscles. Youve already learned that in 4/4 time, you place greater emphasis on the first beat of the measure (ONE, two, three, four). But what if you want to shift the emphasis? Well, there is a way to do that and its called the pickup bar. A Pickup Bar usually appears at the beginning of a piece of music and has fewer beats in it than the time signature indicates. Pickup bars are used to shift the emphasis of the rhythm to match the musical phrase. I know, I know. That sounds confusing. So think about it this way: Instead of emphasizing the first note you play, a pickup bar allows you to shift the emphasis to another beat just like you did in Ta-Ra-Ra Boom-De-Ay. When you sing the words shell be comin round the mountain when she comes, you automatically emphasize the word coming. Try singing it again now and really emphasize the third word: shell be

comin round the mountain when she comes. The word coming is the first beat of the first full measure, while the words shell be are part of the pickup bar. Using the pickup bar allows you to shift the emphasis of the rhythm to match the musical phrase. Also, be aware that the musical phrase doesnt always have to contain lyrics. A pickup bar can also be used in a song without words. Youll see what I mean in Four Seasons: Spring. The missing beats from the pickup bar appear at the end of the music. Take a look at the first and last measures of this song. If you add them both up, youll have one full measure of 4/4 time. The first full measure after a pickup bar is considered the first measure of the song. One thing that often confuses people is how to count the rhythm for a pickup bar. The easiest thing to do is to start counting as you normally would. Count the pickup bar from one, as if there were rests before the notes. For example, there are two quarter notes in the pickup bar for Shell Be Comin Round the Mountain, yet the time signature tells us that there need to be four beats in each measure. So count one, two, three, four, but only start playing on the third beat. Assume that there are two quarter rests to start the measure.

Learn This 1.
Pickup Bar: A pickup bar usually appears at the beginning of a piece of music and has fewer beats in it than the time signature indicates. Pickup bars are used to shift the emphasis of the rhythm to match the musical phrase. The missing beats from the pickup bar can be found at the end of the music. Pickup bars are also called Incomplete Measures or Upbeats.

Lesson 11.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 140

Song 20. ~ Shell Be Comin Round The Mountain


Of course, once youve mastered the concept of a pickup bar, it will be easier to master the next challenge too. There is a More Challenging Accompaniment in this song that will require a little extra attention. The accompaniment is going to echo the melodyas youve done before. But this time, it wont start at the same time as the melody. Take a look at the example in measures 3 and 4. In measure 3, a tied note is played for the melody. But the accompaniment starts with a rest. The challenge for you will be to master the timing by getting your left hand to start at a different time than your right hand. Sounds hard? Its not that difficult. Understanding the rhythm really well will help you master this challenge. Also notice that the D Above Middle C is Written in the Bass Clef Staff and is played with the left hand.

Measures 3 & 4
Learn This 2.
You have already played B and C in both hands. Here is D.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 141

Lesson 11.

Song 20. ~ Shell Be Comin Round The Mountain


Song Range
There are Ds in each octave lower C, middle C and upper C. The D just above middle C is played in both hands.

Do This
1. Notes: All Fs are sharp for both hands. C and C# of the middle C octave are written for and played by the left hand. D of the middle C octave is written for and played by both hands. 2. Rhythm: When you count a pickup bar, count it as a full measure according to the time signature. Assume the missing beats are at the start of the measure and that they are rests. There are no eighth notes in this song, so dont count with ands. 3. Fingering: There is a move hand between measures 10 and 11. There is a cross-over between measures 11 and 12. 4. Signs and Markings: Play the accompaniment mp. Play the melody mf. 5. Clef 6. Practice: Singing along will help you learn the rhythm.

Lesson 11.
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Lesson 11.

Section 2. Lesson 12. Contents


Song 21. ~ Theme by Mozart Page 145 G Position Intervals as Accompaniment Italian Tempo Markings

Allegro: lively

Song 22. ~ Four Seasons: Spring Page 148 Allegro New Type of Accompaniment

Song 23. ~ Minuet in G Page 151 Beamed Eighth Notes G Notes in Every Octave Andante

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 144

Lesson 12. Contents

Lesson 12.

Lesson 12. Song 21. ~ Theme by Mozart


Know This
Concept: G Position Concept: Intervals as Accompaniment Signs and Markings: Italian Tempo Markings
Theme by Mozart has more in common with This Old Man than you might think at first glance. For instance, in This Old Man you learned about C position. In Theme by Mozart, you will learn to play in G position. You are in G Position when your hand covers all the notes from G to D. So if finger 1 of your right hand is on G and finger 5 is on D, you are in G position. The same is true if finger 5 of your left hand is on G and finger 1 is on D. This whole song is played in G position. 5th (G and C in measures 1 and 9). You played the G-C interval in This Old Man. The G-D interval is new. Notice the octaves of B, A and G, which are played in the last two measures.

Interval Diagram

Learn This
Italian Tempo Markings: Traditionally, tempo markings are written in Italian. Until now I have given you the English translation. On traditionally written scores, however,moderatelyis written as moderato.

Playing Intervals as Accompaniment is the second similarity between this song and This Old Man. In Theme by Mozart, you will be playing intervals of a 4th (G and D in measures 3 and 11) and intervals of a

Remember This
Ties: Ties connect two of the same notes to extend their duration. Hold the tied notes for the entire tied duration. Slurs: Slurs indicate that a group of different notes are to be played smoothly. Play the slured notes in a flowing manner.

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Lesson 12.

Now, before you get going on this song, notice the change in Tempo Markings. Traditionally, tempo markings are written in Italian. Until now I have simplified them by giving you the English translation. On traditionally written scores, however, moderately is written as moderato. From this point forward, I will give you the Italian words as they would normally appear on a piece of traditional sheet music.

Song 21. ~ Theme by Mozart


Practice This
Practice transitioning between the following intervals until you can play them comfortably without looking at your fingers.

Song Range
The notes in this illustration are the only notes in the song.

Lesson 12.

Do This
1. Notes: D above middle C is played with the left hand. 2. Rhythm: 3/4 time signature. 3. Fingering 4. Signs and Markings: Make sure to differentiate between slurs and ties. 5. Clef 6. Practice

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Lesson 12.

Song 22. ~ Four Seasons: Spring


Know This
Signs and Markings: Allegro Technique: New Type of Accompaniment
Not only does this song have the four types of accompaniment you already know, but now there is also a New Type of Accompaniment I want to introduce you to. The new type of accompaniment will have you playing different notes in each hand. Take a look at measures 8, 10 and 11 to see three examples. In each of those measures, your right hand is playing a note while your left is playing a different note that is not an octave. Since this is your first time, Ive kept it pretty simple. Both hands are moving in the same direction down the keyboard. The pattern is exactly the same in all three measures. With all these different accompaniments going on, it will be very important to practice each hand separately. Once youve mastered the melody, go ahead and work on the accompaniment. When you can play each part without hesitation, put both hands together. It may take some time to get both hands doing different things at the same time. Finally, a reminder about the pickup bar: a pickup bar is used to shift the emphasis of the rhythm to match the musical phrase. It has fewer beats in it than normal, which are made up at the end of the song. In Four Seasons: Spring, the pickup bar is one beat and the last measure has the missing three beats. First count one, two, three, and then begin playing the pickup bar on four. By using the pickup bar in this song, the second note of the musical phrase will receive greater emphasis.

There arent any new concepts to teach in this beautiful song by Vivaldi but there is a new type of accompaniment and a new type of tempo marking: Allegro. First, lets define Allegro. Allegro is Italian for lively. So play this song a little faster than moderato. Pretty simple.

Learn This
Allegro: Allegro is Italian for lively. Play the song a little faster than moderato.

And what about the new type of accompaniment? So far, you have learned four types of accompaniment. I hope youre comfortable with them, because youll be playing them all in this song. You have:

Lesson 12.

single held-note accompaniment (measure 9) accompaniment that echoes the melody (measure 5) intervals as accompaniment (measure 1) octaves (measure 6)

Practice This
Practice these three measures to get your fingers used to moving together at the same time.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 148

Song 22. ~ Four Seasons: Spring


Remember This
Pickup Bar: A pickup bar has fewer beats in it than the time signature indicates. The missing beats are made up at the end of the song. In this song, the pickup bar is one beat and the last measure has the missing three beats.

Song Range

Do This
1. Notes 2. Rhythm: Tap and count the rhythm out loud for each hand separately. Dont forget the ands. 3. Fingering: Watch for the circled fingering numbers and a cross-over in measure 12. 4. Signs and Markings: Play the piece allegro. Notice the phrasing marks in the melody. 5. Clef 6. Practice: Practice each hand separately before playing with both hands together.

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 149

Lesson 12.

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Lesson 12.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 150

Song 23. ~ Minuet in G


Know This
Signs and Markings: Beamed Eighth Notes Concept: G Notes in Every Octave Signs and Markings: Andante
This is itthe final song. Congratulations on your accomplishments so far. Just one more song and youre finished the first book of The ColorKeys Method. One of the first things to notice about this song is what appears to be a new type of note. Take a look at the diagram below. These notes are called Beamed Eighth Notes because they are all eighth notes connected by one beam. The only difference is that these eighth notes are grouped in 4s instead of 2s. It also has an optional G indicated in parenthesis (in the last measure) in the octave below lower C. Youll have to keep your fingers flexible to get to all those notes. By the way, you have now played all the notes from lower C to middle C as accompaniment in the left hand. To play this piece well, you will have to put together all the concepts you learned in previous songs. Minuet in G includes: playing with sharps (F is sharp for the whole song), cross-overs, phrasing marks (which are important to the melody in this song) and counting with ands. The most important conceptthe one you really have to have a handle onis rhythm. As before, practice each hand separately until you are comfortable. Then put both hands together. Oh, and dont forget Andante. Not the Abba song of course, but the Italian phrase that means, walking pace. Thats how you should play the song. And once youve got the walking pace down pat, youll be able to start running. But well leave that for Book Two.

Eighth Note Diagram

Learn This
Andante: This tempo marking is Italian for walking pace. Play the song a little slower than moderato (moderate pace).

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 151

Lesson 12.

The next thing you may notice is that there are notes at all ends of the grand staff. There are very high notes and very low notes. In fact, if you look at the Song Range illustration, you will see just how wide the range of notes is in this song. This song has G Notes in Each Octavelower C, middle C and upper C.

Song 23. ~ Minuet in G


Song Range
Notice all four Gs! This is the widest song range youve played so far.

Do This
1. Notes: All the Fs are sharp. 2. Rhythm: Count with ands,as there are eighth notes in this song.

Lesson 12.

3. Fingering: There are two cross-overs in this song. Watch out for the big jumps in measures 4 and 12 (and optionally in measure 16). 4. Signs and Markings: Play the piece andante. Make sure that you change from mf to mp where indicated. 5. Clef 6. Practice

Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 152

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Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 153

Lesson 12.

Notes

Lesson 12.
Book 1 Section 2 Getting To Play Real Songs | 154

Bravo! Youve now worked your way through twenty-three piano pieces. I hope you found the experience challenging and rewarding. In this book weve concentrated on learning to read sheet music and having fun at the same time. But reading sheet music is only the first step; I want you to really play piano. The next step is to put together more exciting accompaniments. In Book 2 well do that by using chords. Ill also show you how to play in different melodic keys. You dont want to trip over the new challenges, so if youve had difficulty coordinating the melody and the accompaniment, its worth the extra effort to go back and work on the pieces in this book again. Review the material and strengthen the skills that require more practice. Dont move on to the next book without being able to play each piece here with confidence. Now that you are familiar with how ColorKeys works, youll recall that Book 1 led you from song to song in a laddered progression. Well, dont worry! Book 2 works the same way: Each new song builds on what youve already learned and adds a new, exciting challenge. I cant wait to hear your encore. See you in Book 2.

Book 1 Conclusion | 155

Conclusion

Conclusion

Glossary

Glossary
2/4 Time

Please Note: Words in boldface type appear as separate items in the glossary.
A time signature indicating that each measure in the piano piece contains two beats. The quarter note gets one beat. Music written in 2/4 time has a march-like rhythm (ONE, two; ONE, two . . .). A time signature indicating that each measure in the piano piece contains three beats. The quarter note gets one beat. Music written in 3/4 time has a waltz-like rhythm (ONE, two, three; ONE, two, three . . .). A time signature indicating that each measure in the piano piece contains four beats. The quarter note gets one beat. Music written in 4/4 time has a march-like rhythm (ONE, two, three, four; ONE, two, three, four . . .). A symbol indicating that a given note should receive greater emphasis than the notes surrounding it. An accented note is played louder. A musical background added to the melody.

3/4 Time

4/4 Time

Accent

Accompaniment

Allegro

A tempo marking that tells you to play in a lively manner. Play a little faster than moderato. A tempo marking that tells you to play at a walking pace. Play a little slower than moderato. Vertical lines that divide the music into measures according to the number of beats indicated in the time signature. A symbol used for writing and playing lower notes, usually with the left hand. It is found in the bass clef staff. Eighth notes are joined with a beam to make them easier to read. Many eighth notes can be beamed together. One unit of time assigned to each note.

Andante

Bar Lines

Bass Clef

Beamed Eighth Notes

Beat

Brace

A symbol used to connect the treble clef staff and the bass clef staff. It indicates that both hands play together. A tempo marking that tells you to play with enthusiasm and cheerfulness. A symbol used to indicate the range of notes written on the staff.

Brightly

Clef

Dotted Half Note

A note that receives three beats.

Dotted Note

A dot is added to a note to indicate that it should be played for an additional half of its normal value. A note played for one and a half beats the equivalent of a quarter note and an eighth note together. Indicates the end of a piece of music.

Dotted Quarter Note

Double Bar

Book 1 Glossary | 156

Glossary
Dynamic Sign A symbol that indicates how loudly or softly the music is to be played. A note that receives half of one beat.

Eighth Note

Enharmonic Notes

Any notes that can be called by two names; for example, C# is the same as Db. A symbol that tells you to ignore the duration of the note and hold it for as long as you feel is appropriate. The specific finger used to play a particular note.

Fermata

Fingering

Flat

A symbol that tell you to play the note a half-step lower by using the next key to the leftwhether its black or white. The flat symbol appears to the left of a note on the staff. A dynamic sign that tells you to play loudly; i.e., with more force on the keys. The combination of the treble clef staff and the bass clef staff.

Forte

Grand Staff

Half Note

A note that receives two beats.

Half Rest

A symbol that sits on line 3 of the staff and indicates a pause of 2 beats. The distance from a key to the very next keyright or left, black or white. Describes the placement of the whole hand on the keyboard; for example, C Position. The hand position is chosen to provide the easiest and most efficient fingering. Two notes played together at the same time.

Half Step

Hand Position

Interval

Keyboard

Keys on a piano that actuate the hammers that hit the strings. Or an electronic device designed to mimic the sound of an acoustic piano or other instrument. A group of sharps or flats that appears between the clef and the time signature.

Key Signature

Ledger Line

A short line that is used to extend the range of the staff. It may appear above or below a staffor both above and below it. The space between two bar lines.

Measure

Measure Numbers

A small number placed at the beginning of a line of music to indicate how many measures there are up to and including that measure.

Book 1 Glossary | 157

Glossary

Glossary

Glossary
Melody A songs tune. The sequence of notes that makes up a piece's musical phrases. A dynamic sign that tells you to play moderately loud. Play with more force on the keys, but not as loudly as forte. A dynamic sign that tells you to play moderately soft. Play with less force on the keys. The C note directly between the treble clef staff and the bass clef staff. Also, the C closest to the middle of the keyboard. A tempo marking that tells you to play at a moderate pace.

Mezzo Forte

Mezzo Piano

Middle C

Moderato

Octave

The distance from one note to the next note of the same letter name. The term stems for the Latin word for eight. A large acoustic string instrument played using hammers that are levered and actuated by keys. A measure with fewer beats than the time signature indicates. It is used to shift the emphasis of the rhythm. It is also called an incomplete measure or upbeat. A note that receives one beat.

Piano (instrument)

Pickup Bar

Quarter Note

Quarter Rest

A pause of 1 beat indicated by a squiggly line in the staff.

Repeat Sign

A symbol that tells you to go back to the beginning of the song and play the piece a second time. A symbol that indicates a pause.

Rest

Rhythm

The pattern formed by a group of notes and the emphasis played on them. A symbol that tells you to play the note a half-step higher by using the next key to the rightwhether its black or white. The sharp symbol appears to the left of a note on the staff. A curved line that indicates a sentence of music; the most that can be played in one breath. A slur is also called a phrasing mark. A set of five horizontal lines that, when placed together, produce nine positions (five lines and four spaces) for writing notes. There are two staffs: the bass clef staff and the treble clef staff. A word (or words) at the top left of a piece of music that indicate(s) how fast and with what mood to play the piece. You have considerable freedom as to how you interpret a tempo marking. A curved line that connects two same-color notes in the same octave. The tie extends the duration of the first note by the length of the second note.

Sharp

Slur

Staff

Tempo Marking

Tie

Book 1 Glossary | 158

Glossary
Time Signature A set of numbers placed after the clef that tells you how many beats are in each measure and which notes get one beat. A symbol used for writing and playing higher notes, usually with the right hand. It is found in the treble clef staff. A note that receives four beats.

Treble Clef

Whole Note

Whole Rest

A symbol that hangs from line 4 of the staff and indicates a pause lasting the entire measure in any time signature.

Book 1 Glossary | 159

Glossary