12on12

A look at the behaviors and trends shaping the year ahead by Edelman’s consumer Marketing experts

Welcome to 12 on 12

Christina Smedley, global chair, consumer marketing

Welcome to 12 on 12, Edelman Consumer Marketing’s look at the trends we’ve observed, and expect to observe in the coming months. Our writers hail from 17 countries and have covered a fascinating range of topics, giving their perspective on the actions being taken by people across a variety of sectors, as well as providing guidance on some of the new behaviors needed for brands and marketers to succeed and thrive. We’ve written about first generation discoverists in China; what luxury means these days; how social shopping is changing the world; consumer confidence (how many times have we heard this mentioned in 201 our love affairs with food and 1?); wellness; what I call “real-ebrity”, that heady mix of everyday folks and stardom; purchasing patterns in Brazil and UAE and much, much more. It’s a great eclectic mix of writing. I put forward this thought – that the range of topics we’ve covered perhaps reflects a new truth in marketing. It’s a completely redefined consumer-scape. Old definitions and roles of consumer groups have dramatically shifted. Globally marketers are looking for firms that can frame and deliver campaigns that engage the audience. There’s a new momentum around ‘8095-ers* running the world’ and a new ‘modern family’. At Edelman, we are delivering campaigns with insights framed by shared commongraphics to reflect this new consumer-scape. We continue to see real people, in addition to countries and governments, driving the agenda for brands, fuelled by their faster than-the-speed-of-life adoption of technology. Never has it been more important to have always-on engagement campaigns. But more than that, such campaigns must be underpinned by always-on access to research. For many clients, we now deliver access to groups that deliver continuous feedback around programming. Today, brands that consumers care about need to be useful – every day. It’s the impact of our economic recession – people are much more comfortable in making own label purchases. I’d also add that ‘everyday equals mobile’ (more on that later). Value dictates what to buy, and whether to buy at all. Most global marketing teams are grappling with the impact of white/own label goods on their brands. This, combined with the increase in commodity costs (see earnings from any CPG company for a nod to this), is driving marketers to review spend and need. We see opportunity to frame a different engagement model. Brick-based retail will never be the same again; 2012 will see many more casualties, and we haven’t even seen the real impact of comparative shopping and payments via smart phones yet. The growth of a new middle class in Asia, Africa, and Latin America contrasts with the squeeze on more mature countries’ middle class, and a new value in luxury (and the everyday) will definitely emerge. If our role is to drive purchase through our activities, we must ensure more than just online touch points for people making decisions; we have to demonstrate a comprehension of the point where consumers are economically - this is a real challenge in global programming. Back to ‘everyday equals mobile.’ There continues to be much conversation about the global growth of technology products and services. The technology sector is finally adapting consumer marketing disciplines, and in approach, acknowledging the purchasing power a ‘non-geek’ will have over their brand. That same approach will need to be adopted, far faster

than it is a present, by the owners of the ‘corporate’ brand in companies. In the minds of the people, there is no difference these days between a corporate entity and its sub brands, and this, combined with an expectation that companies act to ‘put things right,’ should challenge marketing teams to ensure purpose at the heart of every campaign. “Seeing is Being” happens faster these days. We judge ourselves on images now; more images are shared, more are posted, more are at risk as privacy measures are not understood. The same applies to brands. Most of our major TV news networks and online retailers can tell us where consumers’ eyeballs go, and subsequently change programming, offers, and headlines to drive more exposure, in minutes if needed. More consumers are signing up for 4G as their new norm. Recent research indicates that consumers only believe in the validity of a story when supported by images (and their friends). It’s time for campaigns to have a toolbox of multiple rich, vibrant, and similar images that can be understood, shared, and commented on – in minutes. These need to be globally relevant; far too often this year we have seen brands ignore the immediacy of image transfer worldwide. Of course, there’s much more to take into account. Consider these events as thought-starters: A high number of significant world powers will hold elections in the next 18 months. Elections always impact consumer thinking and conversation. The London Olympics will bring fresh attention to the UK, but will also unite consumers and viewers in new ways: will more people watch the 100 meters final (as a Jamaican, I’m always rooting for Usain Bolt) on their handhelds? And what does that mean for marketers? The role of consumer marketing experts will continue to evolve. Our challenge will be to remain cognizant of new waves of change, to react faster than we ever have before, to be visually compelling, and to create multiple touch points for brands. But I’d also suggest, as we challenge ourselves to deliver great thinking, that we should also (as our last writer in this series of essays demands) ‘hit the pause button’ as well. Take a read, and participate here; we’d love to hear your perspective. Christina Smedley christina.smedley@edelman.com twitter: smedleyus 8095*- Millennial consumers born between 1980 and 1995. Note these are not teenagers playing video games, these are the new titans of business.

Welcome to 12 on 12

Table of contents
Romantics, Moms, First Generation Discoverists: From Spending Power to a Slice Off the Edge {Page 5} Lisa Levandowski and Amanda Mooney, China TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR. HOW I WONDER WHY YOU’RE HERE. {Page 10} Ashutosh Munshi and Bhavna Jagtiani, India Food Matters {Page 13} Janet Cabot, United states Lisa Collin, United Kingdom Consumer Confidence in Asia {Page 16} Kazue Hattori, Japan Corbin Hsieh, China Marketing to the Modern Family in the U.S. and Germany {Page 19} Missy Maher, United States Anja Guckenberger, Germany Life, love and the Pursuit of wellness {Page 22} Jennifer pfahler, United States Marek Matysek, Poland Connected, Social Shopping in the Palm of Your Hand {Page 25} Andres Vejarano, Hong Kong The Power of the Mamás Latinas {Page 30} Natalia Quintana, Argentina Raquel Trevezan, Brazil Compelling branded content is not an extended TVC {Page 34} Nabila Bouzouina, France Matthew Gain, Australia Multicultural Marketing - a transatlantic perspective {Page 37} Monica Bouldin, United States Maha Dhurairaj, Belgium Uae and Russia: How to Shop 3.0 {Page 40} Noëlle Camilleri, United arab emirates Ekaterina Kvasova, russia Hit the Pause Button ...and Just Think For a Minute, or an Hour {Page 44} Mitch Markson, Global Chief Creative officer

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Romantics, Moms, First Generation Discoverists: From Spending Power to a Slice Off the Edge
Lisa Levandowski and Amanda Mooney, China

“Saying ‘I’ve been to China’ is like saying ‘I’ve been to planet Earth.’ It means that maybe you’ve see a little, a nibble, a slice off the edge... China is not a destination. It is a life’s work.” -Anthony Bourdain As two lao wai (“foreigners”) preparing to move to China, we searched for and memorized every bit of data that McKinsey, Mintel, Forrester, and a million other Sino-related sources could teach: China is the second largest global economy, on track to become the largest luxury market in the world, engineering some of the world’s most dynamic infrastructure projects, consuming more commodities than any other place in the world, with more Internet users than the entire population of the US.... However, having spent even a day here, speaking with our Chinese colleagues, friends, research participants and anyone willing to spare a few minutes and a few personal insights, it became clear that the quantitative data about spending Chinese spending power, connectivity, and GDP, while compelling, goes out the window when it comes to actually starting to understand the nuances of consumers in China. China Youthology’s Kevin Lee provides a clear example of this, describing the dynamics of young affluent consumers in China. “While the large majority of young Chinese have indeed experienced prosperity for much of their lives, the term ‘prosperity’ takes on a different meaning for different Chinese youth. To some, prosperity means having more than one set of clothing. To others, it means owning their first digital mobile phone. For yet others, it means buying a separate apartment for their dog. When the media is telling you Chinese youth have “consumption power,” put it into context and think of an upsidedown funnel. Which part of the funnel are they talking about? Because it certainly isn’t the whole thing,” states Lee. China is as diverse as it is vast – each person’s story more unique and different than the last. To steal from Bourdain, understanding the real motivations, needs and actions of any one subset of consumers in China is by no means a simple or straightforward exercise. It is a life’s work. And, as lao wai, we are at the very beginning of this work. So, what follows is merely “a nibble, a slice off the edge” of three action consumers we have met during the course of our work and research so far. We have dubbed them The Romantics, Every Moment Matters Moms, and First Generation Discoverists. The goal is not to tell you everything you need to know about these action consumers, but merely to offer a taste that will inspire you to move away from general data, and start a much deeper discussion with your own action consumers. Meet The Romantics We recently talked with affluent, white collar professionals aged 20-30 in Shanghai to understand their feelings about love, romance, and, specifically, the concept of “engagement.” Here’s what they told us: “Marriage for my parents’ generation depended on a matchmaker, or their parents, making the decision. Sometimes they didn’t have the chance to get married to the one they truly loved, which is quite different from us.” - Female, 22

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“For my parents, it was more like ‘He isn’t too bad. Let’s get married.’” - Male, 25 “Love is not always making a surprise. It’s more like living a normal life, in a family.” - Male, 30 “Engagement is about two people, mature enough to decide to get engaged.” - Female, 20 “Through daily actions and communication, trust is gradually built up. Both people understand each other’s heart. You don’t have to tell them. You know they will do this for you.” - Male, 27 “A ring can express what is hard to say in words.” - Male, 25 “A ring can say ‘I know that you care about me and notice everything about me.’” - Female, 23 “If you don’t have the courage to make a promise, you can’t say that you love someone.” - Female, 22 While surface research will tell you that China is quickly adopting a fundamentally Western concept of engagement and weddings, the reality of why young people are getting engaged here, how they’re getting engaged, and what it means to them as individuals, and as a couple, is vastly different. Specifically, with a subset of couples we call, “The Romantics.” They see love and engagement as an act of deep faith, courage, and commitment. They are often the first in their family to have a choice of who to marry and, more than status or security, they’re seeking true love. They are more confident than previous generations in expressing their love, but they still see expression of love and engagement as a true act of bravery. They are fully aware of the risk involved in expressing love, the responsibility that true love brings and, with an increasing divorce rate, the challenge of making true love last. Engagement is not about “popping the question,” and it’s rarely as surprise. It’s a mutual decision, planned and discussed at length. For them, engagement is more than a moment. It is a mindset. Romance means more than a dozen roses, dinner by candlelight. It is the poetry of romance in real life. It is small acts of “engagement” to show that extraordinary love and commitment exists in the most ordinary moments. More than the traditional 4 Cs, an engagement ring signifies the courage to propose engagement, the care and preparation they take in charting their course together, the commitment to stay truly engaged in every daily moment, and the connection formed through a lifetime of engagement. Unless you want to compete purely based on “bling,” and your brand as a status symbol for couples with spending power, The Romantics will embrace and advocate for brands that can inspire their bravery in embracing these new 4 Cs. Meet the Every Moment Matters Moms “I won’t be like Amy Chua. I don’t want to pressure them... In the future, I’d like them to have their own hobbies, to develop their own abilities.” - Guo Jing, 38, Beijing “Treasure the time with your child; it is the best time.” - Mom, Guangzhou “Moments with my child make me smile. I think they are vitally needed in my life. There is so much repetition in the daily work of handling difficult situations. The fresh view from my child’s perspective reminds me, ‘Yes, life is tough, but happiness can be simple.’” - Mom, Shanghai “What really is happiness? Playing with my daughter, every day at home. That is happiness.” - Mom, Beijing The Every Moment Matters Mom was raised with Tiger Mom discipline and rigor but doesn’t want to follow the same
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path in raising her child. She recognizes that Tiger Mom discipline came at a cost: pressure, sacrifice, competition, but still no promise of success. She knows that this time with her son or daughter is special and far too fleeting. She wants to cherish and savor every minute. She believes that character, curiosity, and creativity count as much as, if not more than, test scores. This is a belief embraced so often in the West, but is a palpable shift for the Every Moment Matters Mom in China. As an adult, she knows how important it is to be a kid. She cares about communication and quality time as much as she cares about hours of study and practice. She remembers those free, playful moments she enjoyed as a kid, and she realizes that those moments, and her mentality in those moments, meant as much to her success as hours of study. For her child, she believes that the care taken each day to instill balance, connection, and creativity will mean just as much in setting him or her up for success as it has meant for her. However, faced with unprecedented opportunity, fierce competition, and the ever-looming university entrance exam, she knows that it’s harder than ever to be a kid. According to one study, one third of primary school children suffer from stress, headaches and stomachaches; 80 percent worry a great deal about exams, and two-thirds fear the repercussions from teachers and parents if they underperform.1 Every Moment Matters Mom wants to find a new, different way to set her child up for success. Her mother cared about achievement and perfection. She wants her child to excel, but with balance and fun. She yearns for the chance to recreate those sweet, simple, silly moments that mattered so much to her as a kid. Every Moment Matters Moms crave a brand that can help them reconnect with themselves and with their child in a sweet, simple, lighthearted way, every day. Meet The First Generation Discoverists “I work hard, but I also believe that enjoying life is the most important thing for me right now. We are only young once... I feel like different aspects of my personality are surfacing with each new thing I try.” - Female, 26, Shanghai “I think of myself as a very outgoing and open-minded person. I am always up for trying new things, be it a restaurant or a new product.” - Female, 26, Shanghai “I never imagined myself to have such an interest and love learning what else I can do with it.” - Female, 31, Suzhou “I’m excited about learning, and accumulating experience every day...Reading books broadens my horizon and adjusts my view of life...Brands can reflect my status and my taste/aspiration of life.” - Female, 31, Beijing For more than 200 million young people who sit at the crux between qi ling hou (‘70s generation) and ba ling hou (‘80s generation), the opening up of China and the development of technology - particularly the Internet - ushered in far more than a new economy. As one 27-year-old female from Hunan told us, “I know that I am fortunate because I was born in this era, and I have the technology to access the entire world.” The first middle class, the first babies born under the One Child policy, the first generation with the economic and political luxuries that add new dimension to their lives; they sit squarely at the intersection between ‘70s ambition and internationalism, and ‘80s self-exploration and creativity. While their parents’ generation was focused on daily survival and the development of society, they have been granted access to unprecedented opportunity - for the pursuit of wealth, the pursuit of a career and, perhaps the most profound shift, the pursuit of self-driven identity and interests. They are the First Generation Discoverists. In the West, we take hobbies, or the pursuit of a personal passion, for granted. We’ve grown up with role models in our families who show us a path for our exploration. Imagine the power of a generation growing up in China that now has unprecedented opportunity, but no roadmap or role models for exploring their personal interests. Their relationship with
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friends - online and offline - their favorite celebrities, and the brands in their lives, are suddenly very important, personal… even intimate. For First Generation Discoverists, unprecedented opportunity breeds unprecedented pressure. “In my real life, I exist as a ‘virtual me.’ I go to work. I try to live up to expectations and pressures from my parents, my coworkers, society. Then, I go home. I open my computer, and I put on some music and start to dance. That helps me to be refreshed, and to restart. That’s the real me.” They see their passions, or “disposable interests,” as termed by research firm enovate, as a chance to relax and explore new dimensions of their selves. Entertainment, personal development, social connection, and stress relief drive the exploration of their passions. Whether they are listening to music on Xiami, watching a film on Youku, or dissecting the elements of an album cover’s design in a forum on Douban, they have the chance to see a parallel for what’s possible in their lives, and what resonates with their personal taste, without the pressure of having to pursue an entirely new path in real life. In our Edelman 8095® study last year, members of the generation who participated in our study in China told us that the No. 1 reason they would consider switching brands is if a brand “helps me in other areas of my life.” To capture the attention and inspire the action of First Generation Discoverists, you must first understand this unique time of their lives, and determine how your brand can be a catalyst for them. First Generation Discoverists will, in turn, be a catalyst for your brand. A Slice Is Just the Start In summary, there is no summary. The story of consumers in China will continue to evolve and change just as quickly as the marketplace. It is critical to recognize your lao wai status - either as a foreigner to China, or a stranger to a particular subset of action consumers specifically. Be committed to exploring the complexities, embracing often contradictory insights and acting as a catalyst on a very local, personal level to motivate action. Rui Xu, a 23-year-old recent college graduate and Edelman colleague says it best: “This is the most unique and challenging time in my life. Right now in China, even a master’s degree is not a big deal. There’s a lot of competition, and it’s hard to figure everything out in this new environment: housing, transportation, friendship building, etc. But it’s exciting, too. I have the chance to prove myself and feel my own power and strength. I’m looking for companies that help support my own power and strength, too.”

1.Foster, Peter. “Third of Chinese primary school children suffer stress, study finds.” The Telegraph, January 19, 2010. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/ asia/china/7027377/Third-of-Chinese-primary-school-children-suffer-stress-study-finds.html

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TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR. HOW I WONDER WHY YOU’RE HERE.

Celebrity sightings at brand-led events – a superfluous exercise, or an indicator of a mutually beneficial relationship between brand and star? Ashutosh Munshi and Bhavna Jagtiani, India

Is Scarlett Johansson the world’s biggest movie star? She can flit effortlessly from Iron Man 2 to Vicky Cristina Barcelona. She burns up magazine covers, casting a warm glow over newsstands even in a shivery Chicago winter. And the brands are lapping her up. Six at last count: Calvin Klein, Dolce & Gabbana, L’Oreal, Louis Vuitton, Moët & Chandon, and Reebok. Kareena Kapoor isn’t far behind. The fourth-generation Indian actress stars in four of the five biggest grossers in Bollywood, is now headlining a project with a critically acclaimed director who has formed a habit of winning national awards, is enshrined at Madame Tussauds, has a Sony Vaio computer fashioned in her image, and endorses, hold your breath - 15 brands (is that you in the rear view mirror, Scarlett?). From a beauty brand for Unilever to a hair brand for P&G, from India’s biggest telecom brand, to a boutique brand of handbags, everyone is clamoring for a slice of her time. And there’s Vogue holding on line two, Harper’s on line three, and as she hops a Gulfstream V to Jamnagar en route to addressing a Young Presidents Organisation summit, she flips through sketches for the launch of a forthcoming private label. It’s all happening in India. One actress, 12 months, and three appearances. The cost of celebrity endorsement? A million dollars or so (depending on the stature of the celebrity and brand) plus the usual accoutrements: first class tickets, a luxury car to ferry them around, a suite at a five-star hotel with rooms for the entourage, and more. Not to mention dealing with long delays and tantrums. And was it worth it? Sure, if you judge the entire exercise by the pictures of the event in the newspapers and sound bites on TV. But look at the fine print, and you will find there’s hardly any brand detail. That said, be it luxury brands or FMCG, they’ve all gone the celebrity route. Audi gifted cricketer Yuvraj Singh with a Q5 SUV when he was awarded ‘Man of the Series’ at the cricket World Cup last year. Why, you might ask? The exercise was positioned as the reincarnation of a similar exercise from 1985, when Audi presented then cricket superstar Ravi Shastri with the Audi 100. Colgate engaged Bollywood star Saif Ali Khan to endorse its toothpaste brand, Max Fresh. He attended sales events, consumer engagement programmes, and appeared in an advertising campaign. One of India’s best-known fashion designers, Tarun Tahiliani, has always had a Bollywood showstopper at his ramp shows. So why does practically every brand and every fashion designer hanker after celebrity endorsements? This question can perhaps be answered as follows: In a country of 1.2 billion people of incredible diversity, the uniting common denominators (between socioeconomic classes and geographical differences) are film and cricket. India, the subcontinent where movie stars make made-in-Mumbai (Bollywood) films come alive and lend mass appeal. Where cricketers that originate from small towns turn into superheroes overnight. As a result, a celebrity at a brand-led event is simply an easy aid to draw attention. And what do brands really get from these partnerships? Some believe nothing more than a captioned photo in a newspaper, which is forgotten the same day, given the cluttered landscape. But there have been success stories too, 10

where brands have benefitted immensely from celebrity associations. The outcome is a result of how the partnership was forged and leveraged. The debate continues. Some believe the exercise is slowly losing momentum. Often, movie stars looking to promote their upcoming releases will walk the ramp at fashion shows and then talk about their latest film, instead of the clothes they just wore. Recently, a Bollywood starlet forgot the model of the watch she was on stage to present. A cricketer was spotted riding a HarleyDavidson cruiser after appearing in an advertisement for a sports bike. But sometimes the association can prove to be beneficial. If there is a visible brand fit and the celebrity truly is an advocate of the brand, then the connection is relevant and real. Leading film producer, Karan Johar, has been known to be a fan of Vertu, the luxury mobile phone. He frequently buys their phones as gifts for his friends, and talks positively about the brand to acquaintances and to media. Part of the problem though, has been intensified by media. Lifestyle and luxury magazines, who in their quest for larger sales, made real models redundant on their glossy covers by replacing them with movie stars. So, if the media subscribed to the practice, brands were only too keen to follow. When Tag Heuer entered the Indian market in the late ‘90s, it didn’t initially make a definitive mark. Here was a brand that was difficult for Indians to pronounce. Sales suffered despite heavy marketing spend. Tag Heuer then signed on India’s biggest star, Shah Rukh Khan, as a brand ambassador. A “hero” with all-India reach. What followed was a hectic marketing calendar filled with appearances, in-film placements, and ad campaigns. By early 2000, Tag Heuer was among the top watch brands in India. The key learning here is that the association with the celebrity and the brand was planned and established as a long-term one. Over time, consumers acknowledged this relationship. Compare this association with a one-off ramp walk that Mr. Khan performed for a fashion designer, and even aided memory fades from consumers’ minds. A great example of the success of the celebrity-brand relationship is that of the now world-famous Indian Premier League T20. IPL T20 is a professional cricket league competition in India, consisting of players from around the world. In 2010, IPL became the first sporting event ever to be broadcast live on YouTube. Its brand value is estimated to be close to $4 billion. It is the second highest-paid league, second only to the NBA. But what has contributed to its success? One of the main drivers is the fact that most of the teams are owned by a celebrity. Shah Rukh Khan owns the Kolkata Knight Riders; at least, that’s what the fans think. The writing on the wall is rather different. Each brands that Mr. Khan endorses actually the bankrolls his team. Nokia is the official founding sponsor, while Reebok is the apparel sponsor. Others include Kit Kat, Royal Stag whisky, Dish TV, Linc pens, Coca-Cola, Gitanjali jewels, The Telegraph newspaper, and others. Marketing genius, you would think. But it’s simple -- the celebrity gets paid, and the brand gets instant, mass publicity. And so, in the foreseeable future, we will continue to see stars sparkle as cookie brands are launched or cars are unveiled. Kareena might assist in putting more Sony Vaios in Indian homes. Cricket captain Dhoni will continue to say that Pepsi is his favorite drink. And until media and the brands themselves are happy with celebrity stunts and what they bring to the table, real brand stories might remain incidental, and never the focus. But that’s where we come in. It remains our focus, as communications consultants, to make sure the brand story is told -creatively and with high impact.

TWINKLE, TWINKLE, LITTLE STAR. HOW I WONDER WHY YOU’RE HERE.

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Food Matters

Janet Cabot, United states Lisa Collin, United Kingdom

Food matters. It matters like never before, because never has there been a more dynamic and changing food world. People are redefining their relationship with food. Engaged consumers are asking questions and wanting answers regarding when, where, and how their food is grown, raised, and made. The consumer isn’t just a food buyer. He or she is an activist. Evangelist. Voter. Skeptic. Researcher. And a self-made expert. Food plays many roles in peoples’ lives: fuel, nourishment, connection with others, and a badge that says something about who we are and what we believe. In the upcoming Edelman and StrategyOne Field to Fork survey, 50 percent of U.S. consumers say the foods they eat make a statement about their personal values, and 70 percent are willing to change their personal consumption habits if it can make tomorrow’s world a better place to live. People aspire to good health, and see eating as central to that. They expect government to take action and create a supportive environment for healthy living, and they want food industry to be partners in their quest for good health. Edelman’s own research bears this out: The Edelman Health Barometer found that, globally, 59 percent of consumers feel that business should be as engaged in maintaining and improving personal and public health as it is in maintaining and improving the environment. And, in the same research, a majority of the public globally agree that business should be helping them and their families be healthier: Brazil (79 percent) and India (78 percent) have the highest expectations. In the Edelman Field to Fork research, 67 percent of U.S. consumers say it is important for food and beverage companies to help solve community nutrition problems such as childhood obesity and hunger. In the same survey, 75 percent of U.S. consumers say it’s important for food and beverage companies to change products to make them healthier. Depending on the lens you use to look at food, you get a very different view of the food world. It’s like looking through a kaleidoscope, in which multiple images converge to form different pictures with every turn. It’s emotional and rational, personal and public. Health, nourishment, politics, culture, and values all overlap and intersect. Companies exist in a world of government and policy regulations, and a world of changing consumer expectations. Increased attention on food from all stakeholders already has brought about new industry commitments, new alliances that must think about the business of food in new ways. What companies do today matters. Their actions . . . • Resonate on an emotional and functional level. • Create opportunities and vulnerabilities across a multitude of food agendas. • Have impact across all demographics and psychographics. • Become a lens through which their credibility and reputation are viewed. • Maintain and expand their license to operate across the globe now and in the future. Companies all along the food continuum must have an understanding that we live in a world of converging influence:

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health needs converging with brand marketing, policy converging with how brands are marketed, and food sourcing concerns converging with the need to feed a hungry world. This confluence of good health, great taste, values, beliefs, and politics makes for a food world that requires attention on many channels, and with many stakeholders. Corporate actions reflect on brands. Individual food brands, in turn, speak volumes about company stands for. Solutions can’t be singular or found in isolation; they need to be broader and deeper, and more intricately connected. We believe this convergence demands a new food view: a 360-degree perspective. We act on that belief by seamlessly melding nutrition, wellness, and science with food issues, policy, and consumer insights as the foundation of brand and corporate success. We also know that companies are pulled in many directions by government and policy regulations, and by changing consumer expectations. Yet it isn’t a simple either/or choice. Our Field to Fork research found that more than half the respondents agree that government has a critical role for ensuring things like food safety and public health, but they have less appetite for regulations when it comes to actions that limit or penalize their personal choices. We see a new path forward: transformative space in the middle ground between regulation and free market for food companies who define their “food print” and then act. Navigating this complexity now and positioning organizations to engage in meaningful ways in the future is at the heart of our approach to food.

Food Matters

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Consumer Confidence in Asia
Kazue Hattori, Japan Corbin Hsieh, China

Asia is truly a melting pot. Its multiple languages, ethnic groups, and religions make for a rich tapestry of diversity and culture. Asia’s consumers are also very diverse. From the woman in Myanmar who may be contemplating buying her first nylon stockings, to the family in India looking for their first new car, consumerism in Asia reflects a myriad of economic and cultural circumstances. Let’s take a look at trends in consumer confidence in the region’s two largest markets, Japan and China; two countries that could be described as being at opposite ends of the economic and consumer spectrum. With two decades of economic stagnation and a rapidly aging population, it is difficult to imagine that consumer confidence in Japan is heading anywhere but downward. However, the earthquake and tsunami disaster of March 1 have resulted 1 in a consumer trend that is a first in this nation. The trend is called “contributive consumption.” For most of the post-war period, consumerism in Japan was dominated by aspiration. The “I feel good” factor. As the nation become wealthier, it produced an army of affluent consumers who wanted the latest gizmo or branded luxury good. Anyone who visited Tokyo in the late ‘90s could have spotted a young mother on her bicycle, returning from shopping with one child in the front, one child in the back and a $2,000 Louis Vuitton bag at her side. The incredible shock of the March 1 disaster provided an instant catalyst for change. For most Japanese, the “I feel good” 1 factor is now being overridden by the “Is this good for others?” factor. Despite a stagnant economy and deteriorating income levels, sales of some premium home electronic products are taking off. These are products that have a high energy-saving component. Sales of $150 room fans are outstripping those of cheaper products because the more expensive product is seen as being more contributive to energy conservation. A recent survey shows that post disaster, close to 40 percent of consumers are more conscious of recycling and avoiding over-consumption. In the same vein, there has been a trend against “conspicuous consumption.” What would previously have been regarded as aspirational consumption, or in more colloquial terms, “keeping up with the Joneses,” is now considered to be out of fashion and an indication of a wasteful lifestyle. This is not only in the area of consumer products; it is also happening in the services industry and is having an impact on premium restaurants, travel, and other industries; the new name of the game is becoming clearly “understated.” In China, exactly the opposite trends appear to be occurring. A little over twenty years ago, clothing in China existed in five basic colors. People cared less about style, since clothing is clothing and was not considered an expression of personality; clothing had nothing to do with fashion. Time passed, and China has become the second largest luxury market in 201 following the global economic downturn. The rise of China’s 1, luxury market doesn’t merely reveal consumption power, but also suggests more global purchasing trends.

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“Rich Generation II” and “Post-80s” – these new terms in our vocabulary demonstrate the outstanding characteristic of the current Chinese market. In fact, the young generation is not the first or largest consumer group – compared with the old elites – in terms of buying power. However, the size of the younger group is booming, which provides an optimistic blueprint of the luxury market that is very promising – not only for 2012, but for the next decade. Meanwhile, they help shape attribute trends: “Confidence,” “Go Digital,” and “Individual Seek.” Confidence The development of two-tier cities affords market expansion opportunity for luxury brands. Luxury goods no longer exist exclusively for the metropolitan dwellers, but are now quite reachable for the common citizens in most Chinese cities. Relevant research shows Mainland Chinese consumers expressed the greatest consumer confidence, with 92 percent of respondents intending to spend the same or more than they did last year, even while facing pressures such as inflation and economic uncertainty. Their spending counterparts in Taiwan come to only 20 percent. The results suggest that Mainland China will continue to lead the growth of the global luxury market in the coming years. Go Digital If you are a tourist on your first trip in China, you might be stunned by the scene of almost every person checking their cell phone every 10 minutes. More and more Chinese people feel they cannot live without Internet and mobile phones. No doubt that the world has changed because of the Internet and its ability to allow consumers to “go digital” before making a purchase decision. While points of sale and brand websites remain the most preferred sources of information, vertical websites and news portals ranked second and third, respectively, in online information sources; this shows there is a strong need for brands to keep their online messages up to date. And not surprisingly, micro-blogging (weibo) is a rising star among luxury information channels. Furthermore, ‘Post 80s’ consumers are more open to luxury online shopping; see the success of YOOX.com and other e-commerce luxury communities like Glamour. Individual Seek It is universally known that “Face” and “Saving-face” concepts, which originated from the annals of Confucianism, are deeply rooted in the Chinese philosophy of life. Therefore, over the past few years, status has been identified as the key driver for luxury purchases. Today, however, for young Chinese consumers, luxury purchases are mainly prompted by selforiented triggers, especially when an individual seeks to treat him/herself. Social aspects, such as showing off, are granted less importance comparatively. Comparing the two largest economies in Asia shows a remarkable, diverging difference in consumer behavior, reflecting the great diversity of this melting pot of cultures and economic development.

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Marketing to the Modern Family in the U.S. and Germany
Missy Maher, United States Anja Guckenberger, Germany

The look and make-up of families across the world is changing. In years past, a family could universally be characterized as: a Dad, a Mom, two kids, and a dog. Today, there are two global parenting commonalities: • Parents love their children, want to instill values in them, and will do just about anything to help their kids live a happy and fulfilling life. • The look of the family is changing. Much like the popular TV show, Modern Family, which is broadcast in 81 countries, families are made up of single moms, stay-at-home dads, multicultural and LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) parents. The “traditional family” - working dad, stay-at-home mom + two kids under the age of 18 - is becoming a minority group. When looking at a European country, such as Germany, there is in fact “a different, modern Germany”... at least at the surface of public perception. Germany has a female Chancellor who lives with her husband (no kids); the German President Christian Wulff is divorced and living with his new patchwork family; and Berlin Mayor Klaus Wowereit is known for his most famous quote, “I am gay - and that is just fine!” With women having more access to top leadership positions, they seem to perfectly juggle their lives between kids and career. Patchwork families or gay marriage are the rule, rather than the exception. Aiming to dive deeper into the subject of today’s family led us to conduct a study in the U.S., in partnership with StrategyOne, titled “Marketing to the Modern Family.” A diverse expert panel (made up of single and LGBT parents, working moms, multicultural heads of household, and grandparents) with a range of knowledge in technology, finance, pop culture, and health & wellness were interviewed. The expert feedback was used to develop a survey that was fielded in August 201 1 to 2,400+ modern family members with an oversample in minority groups, including LGBT and multicultural populations. The survey provided five key insights: • • • • • The Motherload Gets Heavier – Mom’s role in the modern family. Universal Parent - It’s no longer about mom and dad roles. Democratization of the Family - Children and grandparents have increasing influence. Dads demand to be involved – Dad’s evolving role. Traditional-all - What’s considered traditional, and where do values play a role?

While this study was conducted in the U.S., it’s interesting to look at how the findings translate in other countries, such as Germany. Together we took a closer look at the first insight: Mom’s role in the Modern Family. As you will see, there are strong local differences and nuances when you take a deeper look at a country’s society and psychology. Both In the U.S. and in Germany: The Motherload Gets Heavier In the U.S., mom is taking on binary roles - in charge at work and in charge in the home. She is an integral part of the modern family and she has a huge weight on her shoulders. During the recession, more women kept their jobs than their male counter parts. Mom feels responsible and has the power of the purse strings.

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It is interesting to note that when we asked members of the modern family what is different today versus when they were growing up, you see a significant shift in responsibility. • • • • • • 41 percent of moms say they are the sole decision-maker for their family purchases Plus, they are taking on more than they did in the past Managing family finances (70-86 percent) Earning money (6 1-75 percent) Buying technology oriented items (57-78 percent) Buying a car (57-84 percent)

What differs in countries like Germany and Italy, where birth rates are lower, is that the support system for modern, working moms is still a major issue. Childcare for kids under the age of three is lacking. While modern dads do take over some childcare responsibilities, the biggest portion still rests on mothers’ shoulders. In Germany, for example, less than 10 percent of fathers utilize the “Father Months” (paternity leave) that are sponsored by the German State. One of the reasons is probably rooted in German psychology and the stereotype notion of a “Rabenmutter” (the raven mom) - a “bad mom” who neglects her kids. This could be a mom who goes back to work and places her infant children in public childcare. In Germany, women can theoretically have great careers, but in reality, only two out of 50 of the largest German Corporations on the Frankfurt stock exchange have women on their executive boards. Here, the load is heavy as mothers are not able to pursue careers, or continue in the workplace; there is a layer of very traditional roles and values underneath the modern German society. The pressure on mothers to succeed in all - kids, career and partnership - prevails. Regardless of who your brand wishes to target - moms, dads, multicultural, or LGBT parents - some key points to keep in mind: No. 1 As we talked about mom specifically, find your Action Consumer... or Consumers. Not all moms are the same - what subset of this power demo is right for your brand? Take local cultural nuances and mentality into account. No. 2 Go outside your bull’s eye. Use the 80/20 rule when it comes to brand messaging. Eighty percent of your budget can be spent on a core target, but 20 percent could be used to market to new audiences. If your client says, “We want to reach moms,” look at mothers with a strategic eye, but also include those who have family decision-making power and influence, like dads or grandparents. No. 3 Think “universal parent” and view the whole family as your palette. Don’t stereotype. Mom doesn’t want to be portrayed or held up to a perfect standard. Dad doesn’t want to be made fun of or thought of as a caveman with no skills. Imagery and messaging should encompass diversity. No. 4 Rethink channel planning. Use transmedia storytelling to resonate with all family stakeholders. Brands don’t have to have one campaign, message or audience. There are cost effective ways to reach out to niche audiences, especially in the digital era. No. 5 Test and Learn. Think about how 1 to 5 percent of your overall marketing spend can be used to optimize the future and reach out to a specific audience, like fathers, grandparents, multicultural families, LGBT, and single mothers. What’s next? Look forward to a “Modern Family Score Card” coming soon! (*) For more info on the full survey and other key insights including “Universal Parent”, “Democratization of the Family,” “Dads demand to be Involved,” and “Traditional-all,” please send us an email at modernfamily@edelman.com.
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Life, love and the Pursuit of wellness
Jennifer pfahler, United States Marek Matysek, Poland

A cultural evolution in health has taken place, which has profoundly impacted how consumers are making choices and living their lives. We once defined health as the absence of disease or physical ailment. We thought about our health only when we were sick or suffering, which typically led us to the doctor or our medicine cabinet. Personal health was a private matter. We rarely talked about our physical health, unless it was a complaint; and we most certainly didn’t discuss our mental, emotional or spiritual health, if we even thought about it. Then we began to hear new health terms like “wellness,” which at first, was perceived to be either esoteric, or fringe. We have most certainly evolved. Wellness has moved from the outskirts to mainstream - a measure of “absence” to a measure of “presence” - a reactive decision to a proactive pursuit. Now, wellness is a life-enhancing and life-sustaining need state. As a result, wellness has become global business and cultural phenomenon. According to SRI International, wellness represents a $1.9 trillion global market opportunity, with 289 million consumers around the world interested in pursuing health lifestyles. And, while not every brand is a health brand, almost every brand can be a wellness brand, because of the expansive and inclusive way consumers today are thinking and activating wellness. Here are the five truths about wellness and what they teach brands about navigating this dynamic new culture of wellnessfocused consumers. No. 1 Wellness Is Universal. Whether you’re a socially minded young adult, a Gen X Mom, or an aging boomer, personal, family, and even communal health are high and universal priorities. Men and women from cultures throughout the world are actively pursuing lifestyles that embrace wellness. No. 2 Wellness Broadens the Definition of Health. According to the Edelman Health Barometer 201 adults 18+ around the 1, world define health in much broader and more personal terms, relating health to mental and emotional health, a balanced and nutritional diet, an active and fit lifestyle, the ability to exercise, and healthy weight management. We’ve left behind the dusty old family medicine cabinet filled only with prescription and over-the-counter medicines, and replaced it with our personal health pantries, filled with a range of products, including Rx-OTC medicines, nutraceuticals, personal care items, vitamins and supplements, homeopathic remedies, nutritious foods, as well as personal health devices and digital tools. No. 3 Wellness is Social. We talk about our wellness - online and offline. A lot. We discuss our intentions to be healthier, the new programs we’re trying and the tools we’re using. We talk at home, at work, and with friends. We socialize our wellness efforts, sharing tips and techniques, celebrating our successes, and banding together to try harder. We tend to spend time with friends who share our wellness mindset. No. 4 Wellness is a Personal and Public Imperative. While wellness is deeply personal, we also find ourselves taking a more societal and global point-of-view. We believe everyone deserves to be well. We want to be active participants in helping

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to resolve global epidemics like obesity and heart disease. It’s become part of our value system. We wear wellness, and the products and tools we use to enable it, like a badge of honor and are proud to show and share it. No. 5 Wellness Goes Beyond the Doctor and the Drug Store. Wellness messages and opportunities to make wellness-centric choices surround consumers every day, everywhere. The conversations are happening at the dinner table, the work place, in book clubs, and cocktail parties... and wellness purchasing decisions are no longer confined to the drugstore or supermarket aisle. Many companies and brands have a unique opportunity to lay claim in the wellness space, and to harness these trends and consumer need states, to leverage and monetize the wellness revolution.

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Connected, Social Shopping in the Palm of Your Hand – Emerging Trend Worldwide
Andres Vejarano, Hong Kong

Riding Hong Kong’s shiny MTR subway trains, an observer is immediately struck by the number of commuters wired into (or playing with) their mobile phones. The city’s buses are Wi-Fi-enabled, and taxi drivers often have three or more mobile phones on their dashboards. Despite its proximity to the global manufacturing giant, Hong Kong is not China. Social media sites like Facebook and Twitter, banned in the communist behemoth, thrive in Hong Kong. Accordingly, Hong Kong’s 7 million citizens have their own unique cell phone culture. Here, the devices are as ubiquitous and inexpensive as dim sum dumplings, and most citizens therefore indulge in more than one. The Office of the Telecommunications Authority Hong Kong reports that the city’s mobile penetration rate is 200.6 percent. Because of its geography, population density, and unique history, Hong Kong also has a distinctive culture, one that trickles down into how locals use their mobile phones. Denizens’ twin passions, shopping and eating, also have unique mobile practices. To better understand how people in Hong Kong use their cell phones to shop for goods and services, Edelman conducted a survey that asked about smartphone use related to shopping. Despite the high penetration in the community, 35 percent, the direct impact of smartphones on shopping is still developing. Smartphones in Hong Kong are heavily used by a younger demographic (aged 21-29) for researching and on-the-go information gathering of products and services (e.g., places to eat out, finding phone numbers, and reading movie reviews). Comparing prices and sharing pictures of intended purchases (or of meals about to be devoured) is also common. However, on the whole, these smartphone users do not make purchases on their devices, with only a small percentage saying they had done so. Those that do confined those purchases to what they consider low-risk items (cheap and easy to obtain products, generally priced under US$20). Fear of lack of payment security, and possible fraud, increases reluctance of making purchases by smartphones. When probed further, most respondents stated that they preferred to go to a shop and try a product themselves, even if they were relatively sure about its reliability beforehand. In fact, most stated that they find storefronts to be more convenient and fun places to shop when compared to online buying. This brings the discussion back to environment. Hong Kong is a high-density urban city with easy and ready access to retail brick-and-mortar outlets and malls with long operating hours (10 a.m. to 10 p.m. in many cases). It’s a busy, crowded place. Physical shopping is often social and a family event - in fact some laugh that it a national pastime much like sports in other countries! As the average size of a Hong Kong home is generally small, shopping locations serve a role as places to meet, socialize, and eat meals with friends. In addition, the tactile nature of shopping at a store is still important here - people trust a product more if they can feel it in their hands, especially if the product is expensive. Not surprisingly, Hong Kong consumers closely evaluate risks versus rewards when shopping. This, coupled with retail outlet saturation, means that local storefront shopping is convenient and reliable. Their shopping habits related to online
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purchases and, therefore, are culturally and environmentally informed. Given the market conditions, there is good reason to believe that opportunities to grow the mobile purchasing market in Hong Kong exist. Risk-aversion and a propensity to experience products firsthand before buying are obstacles, but not insurmountable ones. Building consumer trust will be a major factor in breaking through the barrier of apprehension. Companies and well-established brands, with known and reliable brick-and-mortar storefronts, are likely to be more trusted by shoppers to safely conduct mobile and online purchases. Companies without these advantages are likely to have more difficulty. While having a trusted, established brand and a multitude of stores is helpful, it does not eliminate the need to motivate customers to change their well-entrenched purchasing habits. Those that make it easier to scroll through meaningful information on phones by creating comprehensive online and mobile-ready catalogues of their wares will likely fare better in Hong Kong. Further, market networking, offering discounts for online and mobile purchases, sale campaigns, and couponing also will help win early adopters. In fact, more than 75 percent of respondents to the Edelman survey answered that a mobile coupon could convince them to make purchases on their phone. Location-based deals or real-time offers during key shopping times will incentivize and sway purchases to brick-and-mortar outlets. Mobile payment service providers, too, should be ready and willing to show their reliability to gain the trust of early adopters, and to build trust in their brands and services. Despite the fact that 75 percent of respondents in the Hong Kong mobile shopping survey said they never use their mobile phones for banking, the industry is expanding rapidly. PayPal alone projects $3 billion in transactions from its PayPal Mobile service in developed nations next year. It is only a matter of time before more trusted mobile payment platforms are available in Hong Kong. As they arrive, these service providers will help bring down risk associated with executing monetary transactions on mobile phones, leading to wider adoption of the trend. Mobile and online buying has potential to be explosive, but retail will survive. They may adopt mobile purchasing platforms, but Hong Kongers will always find a thrill and sense of accomplishment from lugging multiple shopping bags home like trophies after a long Sunday shopping marathon. Meanwhile, in the United States, the shopping experience starts well before you ever step foot near the local mall. And consumerism is no longer static, tethered to your house or your favorite store. It’s dynamic and constantly changing, able to go wherever you do and stay on your schedule. It’s not exclusive, but inclusive, and most of all, it’s portable. Once upon a time, we read a magazine or the Sunday paper, and we spotted something that we absolutely had to own. So we read a little more and we discovered how we could buy this shiny new life-changing item. Then we drove to the appropriate retailer with credit card in hand. It was that simple. But too often we flew in optimistically blind. Armed with sparse legitimate information, we found ourselves at the mercy of the retailers and paid the price, quite literally. But let’s buy something today. Where do we start? At our computer? Sure. Maybe we search Google or take a look around eBay (Edelman client) or Amazon. But we’re all busy. There’s no time and not a minute to waste. Probably, we’re out the door and in our cars. Luckily, we can do all of our shopping with that little thing in our pockets. And our mobile devices don’t merely provide us gateways to our favorite retailers. They allow us to interact with these venues in more efficient ways. They inform us about the products we want to own, with intelligence we wouldn’t have dreamed possible before. They connect us to communities of other shoppers, many discerning, plenty more critical. They even offer us incentives and deals for purchasing the very items we would have bought anyway.

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For example, let’s say I zoom out the front door, messy hair, make-up partially applied, on the quest for the local Starbucks (Edelman client), of which there are actually six. On this block. The official Starbucks app not only directs me to the closest store, it allows me to build a triple-shot Venti Latte, and then pay for it from my phone. Now it’s off to the mall to pick up a birthday gift for my nephew, and maybe a new outfit for myself while I’m there. A quick check of the IGN app shows that the new Legend of Zelda Wii video game scored a 10 out of 10. The app also lets us know that the game is rated E for everyone, which means that it’ll pass the parent check, too. A map search of ‘video game’ returns a nearby GameStop. That’ll do. Ten minutes later, I have the game in hand, but it’s nearly seventy bucks. Is that really the best deal available? I boot up my eBay RedLaser app to find out. It seamlessly uses my mobile’s camera to scan the Zelda package’s barcode, showing the cost of the game at eBay, Buy.com and other online retailers, as well as brick-and-mortar retailers nearby like Best Buy. A few clicks later, and the video game is purchased, and en route to my mailing address. All of this shopping for others reminds me that I haven’t purchased anything for number one. The Gap is nearby. A half hour later, I’ve got four outfits waiting in a dressing room for my perusal. Mirrors can’t always be trusted, there are no girlfriends to accompany me on this outing and the salespeople will naturally swear that everything looks absolutely fabulous. So, again, I turn to my smartphone and take a few snapshots of each outfit in the mirror, striking my best poses in the process. The Go Try It On app uploads photos of my potential outfits and allows other like-minded fashionistas to instantly vote and comment on them. Within minutes, I have honest feedback, and I’m two outfits lighter. I text pictures in group chat to four of my best friends. Estimates are that 10 percent in the U.S. with smartphones have texted photos or videos prior to purchase. I use my phone to quickly scan Gap.com to see if I can find the same items for less, which I do, so I negotiate with the store clerk to give me the online price. I check out, using the mobile check-out feature (and receipts emailed to me!), and am so excited about the deals I just scored that I post the sale on my Facebook page and “like” the Gap’s FB page while I’m at it. Shopping accomplished, and best of all, I checked in via Shopkick and earned some ‘kicks’ that I can redeem for movie tickets later. Now it’s time to eat, so I load Yelp’s monocle feature, which augments retailers over my camera screen in positionally aware real-time, and choose a five-star-rated Chinese restaurant. I need some cash, so I use Google ATM finder app to find the closest and safest ATM from my mobile. This is a snapshot into the connected shopper not of the future, but of the present. All consumers need is a mobile phone and the ability to download some apps, which do all the heavy lifting. Consumers are already using their phones to complement or bypass traditional brick-and-mortal retailers. According to data from IBM, mobile traffic increased from 5.6 percent in 2010 to 14.3 percent in 201 during the Black Friday shopping 1 time frame. Meanwhile, on Cyber Monday, 10.3 percent of shoppers used a mobile device to visit a retailer’s site, which is up from 3.9 percent the year before. That survey of 1,000 consumers found that more than half (62 percent) would be willing to make a purchase on their mobile device this holiday season if prompted by coupons, discount offers, text alerts, gift cards, or loyalty points. In a similar survey conducted by Sybase 365 a year ago, only 32 percent of respondents said that mobile incentives would encourage them to make a purchase on their device. As our mobile devices become more powerful and more capable, we turn to them again and again (and at increasing rates) to interface with our digital world. In the U.S., our phones are increasingly extensions of our selves, and we rely on them, even with their limitations. A dropped signal or slow data speeds are acceptable caveats as we browse our favorite retail store from a public park bench. Forrester reports that by 2012, almost every mobile phone in the U.S. will, in fact, be a smartphone with an Internet connection. 3G and 4G data speeds will slow up some commerce, but perhaps not for too long. By 2020, we’ll be connecting at speeds of 1 gigabyte per second, or approximately 500 times faster than we do today, according to Google.
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So, whether you are shopping in Hong Kong or Nashville, chances are your smartphone is coming with you. It is our job as marketers to understand the relationship our target audiences have with their technology and leverage that to our client’s best advantage.

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The Power of the Mamás Latinas
Natalia Quintana, Argentina Raquel Trevezan, Brazil

The old image of the traditional sweet mama walking around with several children clinging her skirt, always cooking or cleaning something, is no longer a reality for modern Latin moms. Today, mamás Latinas are becoming protagonists in their societies, recognized as the center of Latin America and Caribbean development, gaining more power, and leveraging important changes in the consumer industry. According to The World Bank, more than 70 million additional women have entered the labor force in the region since 1980, an unprecedented growth in female participation in the labor market. Girl Power Other big trend researchers find among this group is the rise of single-parent homes, where children live with their mothers as sole caretakers. Today in Brazil, the percentage of women who are solely responsible for their kids is over 15 percent, moving closer to the countries like Germany and France, where single moms represent 25 percent of their population. Recent Gallup Polls in Latin America on social trends show attitudes that no longer neatly fit into the conception of a maledominated Latin American society. Data from nine South American countries shows that the majority of men (69 percent) and women (84 percent) agree that it is easier for women than men to juggle work and family demands. Almost identical percentages agree that women should manage the household’s finances. In Brazil, for example, the last population census by the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics (IBGE) showed that women are the breadwinners in 38.7 percent of homes. Ten years ago, they were in charge of the family budget in only 24.9 percent of homes. On the other hand, in Argentina, working women earn 14.2 percent less than their male counterparts of the same age and education level, according to the Interamerican Development Bank. However, there are an increasing number of women who earn more than their partners. These women adapted to the labor market shift in the ‘90s and, because of their efforts, strength and excellence, made great strides entering into a male-dominated world. Increased education and lower mortality rates, economic growth, and new family structures explain this movement, which has also translated into higher participation in formal politics: the share of parliamentary seats held by women in the Latin America region is nearly 24 percent, the highest among all regions of the world. Triple Journey Having children affects the lives of Latin American women and men in different ways. One of the biggest differences is related to the capabilities development in business in Latin countries. In the past 20 years, female participation increased from 40.2 percent to 63.8 percent; however, this participation is a significant 77.9 percent lower than male’s. Women’s career paths are conditioned by the role they play in the home, and with the arrival of children. Their labor participation rate decreases as children are born, while men’s participation is constant. Even with a more intense participation in society, most Latin women still suffer in coping with a triple work journey - long

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hours of working outside, taking care of children, and housework - a heritage of the macho mentality, in which domestic activities and their children’s educations still rely on women’s labor. This heroic routine has accelerated behavior and consumption changes in Latin countries - consumption that occurred many years ago in more developed nations, such as the use of products and services that make cooking, cleaning, and childrearing easier. That’s when and where the Internet plays a more relevant role in their lives. Latin Moms & Technology Latin households’ buying power will be $ 1.4 trillion by 2013, and mamás Latinas are the key decision-makers and influencers of 80 percent of all purchases made in their homes. There’s no doubt how attractive this segment can be for many marketers. But Latin moms’ influence isn’t confined to within the limits of their home. Social media plays a role in influencing the Latin mom’s buying decisions: • • • • More than 90 percent of Hispanic moms consider the recommendation of a family member or a friend as a primary influence in their purchasing decisions. 60 percent of Hispanic mothers qualify as word-of-mouth influencers based on their recommending behavior and the size of social networks. In Brazil, more than half of respondents have purchased a product based on social network indications and 21 percent rely on feedback from people they know. Along with that, more and more bloggers, favorite celebrity websites, or trusted brand portals became great source of product indication and validation.

Latin “mami” bloggers are one of the fastest-growing blogging demographics (five-fold increase in 2010 versus 2009). The social nature of Latin moms finds a true space in social media, where they share everyday issues and ideas about their lives and their children. A survey conducted by Baby Center - one of the largest global interactive parenting networks - among 4,000 Latin moms living in the U.S. and Latin America countries found that Hispanic mothers are also very receptive to Internet ads: 33 percent claim to have learned more about products and brands from online publicity than from traditional media. They are also more open to companies’ content: 57 percent claimed to read emails that brands sent them – meanwhile, only 19 percent of U.S. moms do so. Latin moms are one of the fastest-growing demographics online: • • • • • • 82 percent of mid- and high-acculturated Latin moms are online. 90 percent of Hispanic moms online are engaged in social networking. 84 percent of Hispanic moms are on Facebook. Their presence in MySpace is around 40 percent. These moms rely on family and peer advice, and social networks let them extend their circle of trust. 68 percent trust word-of-mouth conversations related to brands and marketing activities.

Busy Latina moms are taking advantage of mobile connectivity. They are also heavy users of social media on-the-go (40 percent more than total women in the U.S.). Sixty percent of them access the Internet from their phones, and for one out of four, their smartphone is their primary online connectivity device. All for My Family In general, for Latin people, consumption is the key to social mobility, which also extends to their children: 73 percent

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of women say making purchases for sons and daughters is not considered consumerism or a waste of money. Though concerned about prices, these moms are more likely to extrapolate their family budget when buying items for their loved ones. Most Latin American countries have reached the maturation of consumption, with a healthy growing economy and smaller families - birth rates have never been so low. The key to a more equal and more conscious consumer society lies in the hands of these multiethnic matriarchs. A Latin Mother Will Always be a Latin Mother The concept of motherhood evolves like everything else in life. The 21st century model mother in Latin America, and in the rest of the world, has changed: they can be great business executives, online activists, or choose to stay at home and take care of their kids. But, no matter what the circumstances and how society may change, Latin mothers will always be the center of the family and a vital member of their community.

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Compelling branded content is not an extended TVC
Nabila Bouzouina, France Matthew Gain, Australia

Now, more than ever before, there are opportunities for brands and organizations to create meaningful relationships directly with their target audience through compelling content. However, there are historical lessons to consider in determining what comprises compelling content. Creating branded content is not a new concept. For a long time, brands and organizations have developed content, but it has been firmly in the province of marketing. The content that brands have traditionally created is short form; be that a TVC, a print ad, or radio commercial. In order to engage audiences today, and to create the type of content that will be shared by consumers, simply extending the traditional marketing style content into a longer form will not work. Today we are seeing brands like Red Bull through their creation of sports properties, KFC restaurants in Indonesia that host live music performances, and McDonald’s in the U.S. and Quiksilver France launching their own TV networks, creating the kind of quality content that, traditionally, we have associated with traditional media players. They have done this by focusing on what the audience wants first, and how they can benefit as a brand second. To understand the opportunity for brands and organizations with regard to content, it is worth spending some time looking at what content consumers have traditionally engaged with, and look at the evolution of content up to today. Where We’ve Been Traditionally, content was created by a few people. The delivery systems and the means of production were expensive. Only a few very wealthy individuals had access to the type of investment required to run huge print machines, or to buy the licenses and the studios required to deliver content via broadcast. This scenario meant that those who did create content had enormous power. The scarcity of content producers meant the content that was produced was highly valuable to the audience. There wasn’t much of it, so what was created was seen by many. This was the era of mass audiences, grouped together due to the scarcity of quality content. What Changed in the Late ‘90s Like the arrival of the printing press in the 1400s that dramatically changed access to printed content, the self-publishing phenomenon that arrived in the late ‘90s revolutionized content once more. No longer was content creation limited to the few with great means or great connections; now anyone could publish materials and gain an audience very cheaply and simply. The outcome of this was a mass fragmentation of the audience. No longer were audiences forced to watch a small amount of mass content, but could indulge in their favorite niches that were no longer controlled by geographical borders or high barriers to entry. There was, however, a yawning gap between the quality of content that was made for niche audiences, and those created for the masses. The mass audience content was still superior in quality and still attracted larger audiences.

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Fast Forward to Today Most of the formerly niche platforms have gone mainstream, and there are now very few discernible differences between the likes of the new-media Huffington Post and traditional media outlets in the U.S.; political opinion blogs like Crikey in Australia and traditional political publications and Rue89 in France share readers and media space. Further, the arrival of Facebook pages, branded YouTube channels, Google+ pages, and Twitter has meant that brands are doing more than merely creating content directly for their audience - they are talking with their audience like peers. Traditionally brand content (or ads) were seen jammed between the bits of content we are really interested in. We watched them only through sufferance. They were a nuisance that paid for the stuff we were really interested in. However, in order to gain traction in a world with more content and a fragmented audience, brands need to evolve their content. The content needs to be less about marketing messages and be truly entertaining, informative, or educational. In short, it needs to resemble much more the content that brands used to buy ad space around, and a lot less like the ads they have traditionally created. Tips for Brands Wanting to Make Content Today: At Edelman, we believe there are five simple tips that brands should keep in mind when planning and creating content. We call these the “Five Cs of Content.” The 5Cs of Content Creativity: Compelling storytelling is still the core component of all successful content. If we don’t care about the characters, aren’t interested in the story being told, or aren’t compelled to watch until the end, then it is unlikely the content will be successful. Context: To create great content, you need to understand what your audience wants, needs, and desires. But you also need to take into account the platforms you audience uses to consume the content, be it print, video or audio; also, when they want it, and how often they are prepared to engage. Connectivity: There is great value in creating content that connects members of your target audience together. By doing this, you create a mutually beneficial scenario that creates a virtuous circle of connectivity around your brand. Continuity: There is a reason that soap operas like Neighbours, Derrick, Columbo, and The Bold and The Beautiful are successful. They have a long-established audiences who know there will be a new episode on a regular basis. The same goes for content that brands create. There is great value provided by sustaining efforts over time, ensuring that an audience is built around your content. Though remember, no audience will be built overnight. Collaboration: Gone are the days of one-way communication with an audience. Today your audience is unlikely to want to sit idly by and consume the content you have created for them. They will want to be involved, have an impact on the direction of content, and be recognized for their contributions. What’s more, if they are involved, they are more likely to share their efforts - we all have egos, after all.

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Multicultural Marketing - a transatlantic perspective
Monica Bouldin, United States Maha dhurairaj, Belgium

As the world’s population continues to grow, cultural boundaries are shrinking. Advancements in technology and the rise of “new media” has opened new channels of communication that allow people of various ethnic and religious groups to voice their opinions and share their differences, as well as their commonalities. This sharing has created opportunities for people to learn about other cultures and beliefs, and to evaluate and blend elements of other cultures into their own lives, while remaining true to their ethnic, religious, or racial roots. In the United States, the numbers help tell the story. According to the 2010 U.S. Census report, more than 85 percent of the growth in the U.S. population over the last 10 years comes from multicultural segments, growing at a faster rate than the rest of the population. African American, Asian, Hispanic, and LGBT communities have a combined purchasing power of more than $2 trillion. Europe recently expanded to 25 member states, each having their distinct languages, customs, and traditions. One can look at Europe as a melting pot in which the “best” from each country is shared; French wines, Italian cuisine, Belgian beer and chocolate, German sausages… and the list goes on. However, when one moves to a European state, it is the norm to embrace the local norms and values. Campaigns are usually translated into the local languages to make them relevant, but the very concept of “Europe” can be broken into a multitude of localities, and there are opportunities to tailor messages based on these groups to more accurately reflect the multiculturalism that exists. Technology makes it a slightly less daunting task, as actions can be done effectively at a manageable cost in Europe. Outreach to specific groups can be executed without much hassle or repercussion; while keeping to the value of integration, which has become a topic of debate among Europeans of late. Celebrating cultural differences and leveraging similarities that exist within the U.S. and European populations, a savvy marketer needs to take advantage of the synergy of the diversity if they want to excel in today’s multi-faceted and challenging business environment. The once customary “one size fits all” mass marketing approach will become increasingly less effective as consumers around the world seek out greater personalization that fits within their lifestyles. There are three imperatives that companies must undertake, including: No. 1 Make an organizational commitment to integrate multicultural marketing into the company’s overall marketing plans. Clearly outline your company’s motivation for marketing to diverse communities as part of its business goals, beyond revenue growth. Communicate the goals internally as well as externally. Companies must be transparent about their rationale for reaching out to multicultural audiences if they are to effectively and credibly engage and create meaningful dialogue with diverse communities. No. 2 Invest in tools, processes and people that will enable the company to build relationships with diverse communities. Multicultural marketing is not a simple translation of materials into different languages. It is a specialized skill that requires a deep understanding of each culture’s individual nuances.

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No. 3 Recognize the similarities between cultures as much as the differences. Embrace dynamic learning – be open to learning about and from different cultures as a means to understand how to grow and improve business. One interesting example of how this works in Europe is McDonald’s “Swiss Weeks” campaign in Switzerland. The complexity of the “Swiss Weeks” burgers campaign comes from Switzerland’s multilingual, multicultural makeup. Each of three burgers is not only named for a region, it incorporates local ingredients and is advertised in the language - German, French, or Italian – that is appropriate to each region of the country. This may be a “fast-fix,” but definitely a step in the right direction as this concept of local (sometimes limited edition) flavors has been successful in numerous markets - rice-loving Hong Kong has Rice Burgers, in which the burger patties are sandwiched between but two cakes of glutinous rice; in India, there are no beef Big Macs because the cow is sacred in the Hindu religion; hence the Maharaja Mac, a variation of the Big Mac made with chicken meat. There’s also a vegetarian McAloo Tikki burger to cater to the large number of vegetarians in the country. PepsiCo Chief Engagement Officer Frank Cooper encapsulated this concept aptly when he opened the New Generation Latino Consortium Conference with a clip from “The Matrix,” in which Laurence Fishburne offers Keanu Reeves a choice between the blue pill and the red pill. Taking the blue pill meant going back to his “life” in the Matrix as if nothing had happened. Taking the red pill required “going down the rabbit hole” and uncovering the truth about the Matrix. Mr. Cooper told the sold-out audience in New York’s Harvard Club that marketers today are “trapped in the status quo of brand marketing,” and that we all face a similar choice: Continue doing the same old brand marketing that we have in the past, or embrace the post-advertising age and change the way we do everything in order to engage consumers with brands. Consumer needs are evolving and new needs are emerging; marketing must change, too.

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Uae and Russia: How to shop 3.0

Noëlle Camilleri, United arab emirates Ekaterina Kvasova, Russia

More than castles in the sand: The Middle East Is a Consumer Oasis The UAE might be best known for making and breaking records. It is the land of the tallest tower, the world’s only sevenstar hotel, and the largest national flag in existence. But what the UAE wants to be known for is its striving desire to be a haven for everything you could wish for, and with time, a home for unrivalled tolerance, luxury, and consumer delight. Despite the economic crisis, Dubai still lives up to its reputation as an irresistible tax-free magnet for shopping fanatics from across the Middle East and around the globe. The number of Chinese and Russian tourists traveling to the UAE increased by 50 percent in 2010. A quick walk through the Dubai Mall, the world’s largest, is enough to convince even the most skeptical. Here, consumerism is a national sport and the economic crisis is a distant mirage. The retail culture in the UAE has evolved tremendously and rapidly: from the local and vibrant (and traditional) perfume, spice, and fabric souks, to small supermarkets, organized chains, and large shopping malls. This evolution has taken place in less than 30 years, thanks to a thriving retail sector, one of the country’s fastest growing industries in recent years. It practically goes without saying that one of the key determinants in this growth is that consumers in the Middle East command vast disposable incomes, with some places, like Abu Dhabi and Qatar, ranking among the highest per capita incomes in the region, if not the world. As a result, people do not shy from spending lavishly on luxury brands and accessories, collections of cars, up-market exotic travel, and world’s best cultural attraction offerings. To put it bluntly, in general, UAE consumers are young, rich, and have lots of free time. For example, more than half of UAE nationals are under 29 years old. Among their hobbies, shopping is by far their favorite group activity, more than eating out or even going to the movies. In fact, a study conducted between April and May 2010 of 1,260 people between the ages of 17 to 29 showed that they spend an average of $1,000 US a month on luxury goods, $300 a month on accessories (leather goods, mainly) and $300 to $600 on clothing, perfumes, and cosmetics. It is little wonder that the surface area of shopping centers exploded by 145 percent in the five Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries between 2005 and 2010. Where European women have an unfailing loyalty to a brand, it is very common in the Gulf region to see customers buying makeup or perfume several times a month from different brands. In fact, women in this part of the world love spraying perfume generously on their abayas (long black robes that cover everything but their heads, hands and feet). They mix international fragrances with heady local scents, often based on strong traditional perfume called oud. It is part of their daily beauty routine and their lifestyle. A constant reminder of the local Arabian culture, lingering trails of spicy perfumes and incense are very common in the UAE. In terms of luxury consumption, the highest segment is the 20 to 29 age group, who live with their parents and have access to high disposable incomes. This is the ‘gilded’ youth of the Middle East, always on the lookout for exclusivity and novelty, more than quality and tradition. They are fascinated by luxury brands and their visibility. They are extremely knowledgeable and keep up-to-date with the latest trends and launches, not only through satellite and cable TV, print media and the Internet, but also through travel to Europe and the U.S. A recent survey shows that 81 percent of young

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people in the UAE shop regularly. They are torn between the desire to express their individual personal style and strong social moral codes. The young people of the UAE look for luxurious and trendsetting products belonging to well-known brands with instantly recognizable monograms. For most of them, the brand becomes a permit to differentiate themselves from one another, and acts as an automatic enhancer of social status. Luxury online sales also plays a major role in retailing, due in part to a regional penetration rate higher than the world’s average. Middle East Internet user penetration in 2009 was 28.8 percent, compared to a world average standing at 26.6 percent. Although Internet and online shopping sites like netaporter.com are taking off rapidly across the region, customers still prefer the “mall” experience; malls are air-conditioned places that serve as social hubs, where people come to walk, meet, shop, and dine. It is a fact: people in the Middle East have a habit of shopping in groups. As a result, luxury brands must, and are, adapting; taking this habit into account in the design of their retail space, to ensure the best possible experience for their customers, as well as accommodating everyone in a stylish way. That’s why lounge areas with large sofas and comfortable fitting rooms have became a common feature across the region. To be successful, luxury brands in the UAE have understood that they must tailor the entire shopping experience and create an emotional bond with their customers to satisfy each of his or her unique needs. The challenge for brands is not about having the right product in stock at the right price, or having a wide choice of colors and patterns; it is about achieving customer centricity; it is about selling the dream. Local groups like Al Tayer and Chalhoub have become a hotbed for upscale retailers including Prada, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, and Dior in the UAE, catering to an ever-growing population with a high disposable income. Another factor to take into account in the Middle East is censorship. It strongly influences brands’ marketing campaigns, urging them to rethink their strategies for their brands and product launches while simultaneously respecting the cultural sensitivities of the region. The challenge for brands is to ensure an accurate representation of the international brand DNA while respecting the boundaries of local merchandising. For example, marketing campaigns in Saudi Arabia limit representations of women. Instead, brands create tailored versions of their visuals with minimum skin exposure, or focus on the face of the model only, rather than the whole body. The UAE, on the other hand, is more liberal in this regard. Representations of women are allowed, but should to be respectful of culture. Even international brands have a moral responsibility to carry -- and that’s the other side of the golden coin. Is Russia’s consumer market a gold mine? Yes – if you know the rules For anyone trying to reach consumers in Russia, here’s some good news - Russia is the fastest growing market in Europe and the most prosperous of the BRIC countries. It will be the largest consumer product market in Europe by 2022-24. More than 73 percent of the population is urban, and accounts for 85 percent of the purchasing power, making the increasingly large middle class more affluent and willing to try new products than in other markets. And let’s not forget Russia will be the host for both the 2014 Winter Olympics and the 2018 World Cup. These events alone will provide a tangible stimulus to consumption among Russians, and make the country a focal point for consumers around the globe. When talking about Russia’s consumer market, it’s easy to focus on Moscow and St. Petersburg, as they are the largest cities with the greatest purchasing power. But as infrastructure continues to improve and shipping companies streamline the customs process, the Internet and online shopping allow consumers in more rural locations to buy their favorite products. Online shopping opens the consumer market: from the two key cities, to all of Russia’s citizens, across the vast country. The

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number of Internet users has been growing - 57 million are now online, with this number expected to grow to 80 million people (or 71 percent of population) by 2014. All of this makes Russia a very attractive prize for companies looking to branch out and grow their consumer base. Russian companies and state organizations are also looking to gain best practices and expertise from western companies who can help with plans to diversify and modernize the Russian economy. To help encourage these necessary partnerships, the government is implementing new legislation to improve transparency, protect IP, and provide tax breaks. These measures will help create a host of new opportunities for foreign companies looking to enter Russia over the next three to four years. While some factors may slow down interest in entering the market - lack of transparency, inconsistent regulations, preferential treatment for Russian companies - most companies find the potential benefits outweigh the risks, creating a modern day “gold rush” to carve out a piece of the Russian market, before it is too late. One of the most dramatic examples of this is the food and beverage industry. Ten years ago, a Western restaurant was cause for excitement, and Russian consumers loved the idea that they could get an affordable Western meal. Today, an expat would find more choices in the nearest neighborhood (the majority of expats live in central Moscow) than in a large city in Europe or the U.S. With so many international brands entering the Russian market, being an “international” company has definitely lost some of its cache. Being a Western brand, or selling a foreign product, is no longer enough to attract the increasingly savvy Russian consumer. A number of brands have entered the Russian market in the last few years. Marketing and communications directors confirm that the battle for the Russian consumer is getting harder. Consumers, especially those who live in big cities, are becoming pickier and more demanding, as they now have a wide range of Western brands to choose from. Ten years ago Yves Rocher Cosmetics stores were really hot among Russian women. Today L’Occitane, The Body Shop, and Lush - alongside the local players - are all competing for the same consumer at large shopping malls and on high streets. Victoria’s Secret is testing the water and just opened their first European store in Moscow (it is offering only cosmetics and accessories, but not intimate apparel). Bath & Body Works is planning to launch in Moscow 2012. Today, it is all about value for the money, as consumers are becoming more value-conscious than in previous years. Increasingly, consumers are weighing price against reliability, quality, and convenience when making purchasing decisions. But don’t think that the luxury market is suffering given this new attention to price. With the affluence of the market, and the importance traditionally given to status, the value of a product is often found in the status that comes from being able to purchase it, regardless of the expense. While striking the right balance between premium and mass market may be tough, it provides a wide spectrum of opportunities for companies. When it comes to value, it is important not to overlook the human element. Human capital is going to be the hottest commodity in Russia over the next few years. Companies that tend to invest in human capital and develop local talent will be the winners. Starbucks (Edelman client), who historically has put a major emphasis on its staff training, is appreciated by Russian consumers for offering quality service. And, similarly, no Western company can operate in Russia without a knowledgeable and confident local team able to engage in issues and navigate the Russian landscape. Often challenging - but where there is challenge, there are opportunities and potential reward.

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Hit the Pause Button ...and Just Think For a Minute, or an Hour
Let substance and silence be your guides Mitch Markson, Global Chief Creative officer I promise not to go all Mayan on you, but it is 2012 and time to make some predictions... none of which are about the world ending (sorry, “Melancholia”). However, some endings and new beginnings would be welcome. Here come the predictions - “Cross a New Time Zone,” “Renew Your Senses”, and “Act Up and Act Together”: Cross a New Time Zone • Time Reconsidered - It’s high time for “time” to make a comeback, too. Not the 24/7 work week, but quality time to think, plan, contemplate, and ruminate. The Pause button on all our devices will be rediscovered, and will become the valued feature over fast forward. Some will even opt out altogether. A recent Roper global study found that people in the Western world were opting for money over time and in the fast-growing economies of Asia, time was being valued over money. Wherever you live in the world, time will be viewed as a precious commodity, and perhaps become the new gold standard of living well. IDEO, the world-renowned design firm, has even traded traditional vacation time for what they call time to “rejuvenate and relax,” giving more color and depth to the use of time away from work. • Substance Returns - It certainly must be time for depth to make an elegant entrance and the easy, short-term fix to make a graceful exit. Depth doesn’t come easily. It requires insight, a strategy, an idea, long-term planning, and even longer term delivery. A conduit to substance in 2012 is what my colleague Robin Bruce calls “Slo-comotion.” The principles of Slo-comotion include a return to thought, exiting through the iPad into real-life experience, and an anti-microwave mindshare movement; instead of brands facilitating micro actions that last for a hot second without lasting affinity, brands, companies (and maybe even governments?) return to “baking” ideas that last. Public forum thinkers of yore like Aristotle, Mark Twain, and Martin Luther King will be re-examined and emulated, setting the tone for a new public discourse that values the quality of the idea and the richness of the content over the quantity and the pithiness of 140 characters. A Return on Substance will ensure a longer term return on investment. Renew Your Senses • The Arrival of ARR (Attention Renewal Remedy) and the departure of ADD. Twitter sections in movie theaters will be deemed unconstitutional and/or hazardous to our health. “Pay attention” will no longer be an elementary school command and “listen up” a military imperative. Both will become cultural imperatives at home and at work as we see 12-step programs designed to revive attention. According to artist and author Ed Schlossberg, “paying attention to anything will be the missing commodity in future life. You think you’ll miss nothing, but you’ll probably miss everything.” • “1 and a half D”... it’s 3D... minus the clutter and minus the frenzy, so we can connect with real meaning (back to substance again). As we debate and struggle how to communicate best in an email-only culture (and the increasing phenomenon of unanswered emails), we are increasingly forced to sacrifice quality thinking time for quick, and sometimes shallow, shortcuts. The following passages from Maureen Dowd’s column, and the new silent movie she refers to (the Artist), are worth contemplating and reflecting on: • “The sounds of silence are a dim recollection now, like mystery, privacy, and paying attention to one thing - or one person - at a time.” • “There will be fewer and fewer of what Virginia Woolf called ‘moments of being,’ intense sensations

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that stand apart from the cotton wool of daily life.” “In the case of the ‘Artist,’” silence is not only golden; it’s a reminder of how much you can articulate without words. If you take away the language, green screens and 3-D glasses, the feelings - pride, vanity, envy, fear, and love - can be more primary and fascinating. “Hazanavicius (director of the Artist) recalled that at a French screening of the movie, a group of teenagers approached him. They thanked me for letting them hear the silence, he said. It was touching to discover that these young people, always with their iPods, could like real silence.”

Act Up and Act Together • Passion Rising. Time magazine names the protester as person of the year. I think this says a lot about the return of “passion.” Brands will need to tap into this passion factor... not expecting people to be passionate about their brand, but serving as a catalyst for people’s individual passions. Passion in the last few years has been overlooked, due to struggling bottom lines and fear of change, but it is passion that creates loyalty, increased usage and longevity. • Asian Values Infusion, not just Asian economic strength. When we think about the potential of Asia today, we seem to focus solely on the economic progress so rampant in the last 20 years. In 2012, the Asian values of community, compassion, and inter-connectivity will be recognized by the West as ideals to be emulated. Add on the Asian respect for elders, experience, and artisanship and you have quite a triple threat. In Japan, an artisan, whether a mask maker or basket maker, is considered a national treasure. • Collaboration will become the new competition. Look for more collaborative consumption, collaborative capital and collaborative capabilities to emerge. Collaboration will become the competitive edge that helps reboot our economy. And one last thing to ponder as you wander… A sense of humor finds its place again. Mayan cuisine will become all the rage in 2012 as will Mayan fashion and architecture. I predict a Mayan X Factor, a Mayan Macarena craze, an all Mayan Glee episode, a Kraft Macaroni and “Mayannaise” product - and a new Woody Allen film shot on location from the Mayan ruins. No Mayans protest.

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© Copyright 2012, Edelman. All rights reserved.

photo credits: http://www.flickr.com/photos/tgkw The Courier-Mail collegefashion.net geeksugar.com culturemami.com decooda.com