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Junos Intermediate Routing

11.a

High-Level Lab Guide

Worldwide Education Services


1194 North Mathilda Avenue Sunnyvale, CA 94089 USA 408-745-2000 www.juniper.net Course Number: EDU-JUN-JIR

This document is produced by Juniper Networks, Inc. This document or any part thereof may not be reproduced or transmitted in any form under penalty of law, without the prior written permission of Juniper Networks Education Services. Juniper Networks, Junos, Steel-Belted Radius, NetScreen, and ScreenOS are registered trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. in the United States and other countries. The Juniper Networks Logo, the Junos logo, and JunosE are trademarks of Juniper Networks, Inc. All other trademarks, service marks, registered trademarks, or registered service marks are the property of their respective owners. Junos Intermediate Routing High-Level Lab Guide, Revision 11.a Copyright 2011, Juniper Networks, Inc. All rights reserved. Printed in USA. Revision History: Revision 10.aMay 2010 Revision 10.bDecember 2010 Revision 11.aJune 2011 The information in this document is current as of the date listed above. The information in this document has been carefully verified and is believed to be accurate for software Release 11.1R1.10. Juniper Networks assumes no responsibilities for any inaccuracies that may appear in this document. In no event will Juniper Networks be liable for direct, indirect, special, exemplary, incidental or consequential damages resulting from any defect or omission in this document, even if advised of the possibility of such damages.

Juniper Networks reserves the right to change, modify, transfer, or otherwise revise this publication without notice. YEAR 2000 NOTICE Juniper Networks hardware and software products do not suffer from Year 2000 problems and hence are Year 2000 compliant. The Junos operating system has no known time-related limitations through the year 2038. However, the NTP application is known to have some difficulty in the year 2036. SOFTWARE LICENSE The terms and conditions for using Juniper Networks software are described in the software license provided with the software, or to the extent applicable, in an agreement executed between you and Juniper Networks, or Juniper Networks agent. By using Juniper Networks software, you indicate that you understand and agree to be bound by its license terms and conditions. Generally speaking, the software license restricts the manner in which you are permitted to use the Juniper Networks software, may contain prohibitions against certain uses, and may state conditions under which the license is automatically terminated. You should consult the software license for further details.

Contents
Lab 1: Protocol-Independent Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-1
Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-2 Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring Static and Aggregate Routes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-4 Part 3: Working with Routing Instances . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1-7

Lab 2:

Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-1


Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Load Balancing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-2 Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring Filter-Based Forwarding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2-4

Lab 3:

Open Shortest Path First . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-1


Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring OSPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-2 Part 2: Performing Basic OSPF Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3-7

Lab 4:

Border Gateway Protocol . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-1


Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring IBGP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-2 Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring EBGP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-4 Part 3: Implementing a next-hop self Policy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4-8

Lab 5:

IP Tunneling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-1
Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring a GRE Tunnel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-2 Part 2: Configuring the GRE Interface to Participate in OSPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5-4

Lab 6:

High Availability . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-1


Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Graceful Restart . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-2 Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring BFD . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-6 Part 3: Configuring and Monitoring VRRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6-7

Lab 7:

IPv6 (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-1


Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Interfaces . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-2 Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring Static Routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-4 Part 3: Configuring and Monitoring OSPF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-6 Part 4: Tunneling IPv6 over IPv4 Using GRE Encapsulation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7-7

Lab 8:

IS-IS (Optional) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-1


Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring IS-IS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-2 Part 2: Performing Basic IS-IS Troubleshooting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8-5

Appendix A: Lab Diagrams . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A-1

Contents iii

iv Contents

Course Overview
This two-day course provides students with intermediate routing knowledge and configuration examples. The course includes an overview of protocol-independent routing features, load balancing and filter-based forwarding, OSPF, BGP, IP tunneling, and high availability (HA) features. This course is based on Junos operating system Release 11.1R1.10. Through demonstrations and hands-on labs, students will gain experience in configuring and monitoring the Junos OS and monitoring device operations.

Objectives
After successfully completing this course, you should be able to: Describe typical uses of static, aggregate, and generated routes. Configure and monitor static, aggregate, and generated routes. Explain the purpose of Martian routes and add new entries to the default list. Describe typical uses of routing instances. Configure and share routes between routing instances. Describe load-balancing concepts and operations. Implement and monitor Layer 3 load balancing. Illustrate benefits of filter-based forwarding. Configure and monitor filter-based forwarding. Explain the operations of OSPF. Describe the role of the designated router. List and describe OSPF area types. Configure, monitor, and troubleshoot OSPF. Describe BGP and its basic operations. Name and describe common BGP attributes. List the steps in the BGP route selection algorithm. Describe BGP peering options and the default route advertisement rules. Configure and monitor BGP. Describe IP tunneling concepts and applications. Explain the basic operations of generic routing encapsulation (GRE) and IP over IP (IP-IP) tunnels. Configure and monitor GRE and IP-IP tunnels. Describe various high availability features supported by the Junos OS. Configure and monitor some of the highlighted high availability features.

Intended Audience
This course benefits individuals responsible for configuring and monitoring devices running the Junos OS.

Course Level
Junos Intermediate Routing is an intermediate-level course.

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Course Overview v

Prerequisites
Students should have basic networking knowledge and an understanding of the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI model) and the TCP/IP protocol suite. Students should also attend the Introduction to the Junos Operating System (IJOS) and Junos Routing Essentials (JRE) courses prior to attending this class.

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Course Agenda
Day 1
Chapter 1: Course Introduction Chapter 2: Protocol-Independent Routing Lab 1: Protocol-Independent Routing Chapter 3: Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding Lab 2: Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding Chapter 4: Open Shortest Path First Lab 3: Open Shortest Path First

Day 2
Chapter 5: Border Gateway Protocol Lab 4: Border Gateway Protocol Chapter 6: IP Tunneling Lab 5: IP Tunneling Chapter 7: High Availability Lab 6: High Availability Appendix A: IPv6 Lab 7: IPv6 (Optional) Appendix B: IS-IS Lab 8: IS-IS (Optional) Appendix C: RIP

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Course Agenda vii

Document Conventions
CLI and GUI Text
Frequently throughout this course, we refer to text that appears in a command-line interface (CLI) or a graphical user interface (GUI). To make the language of these documents easier to read, we distinguish GUI and CLI text from chapter text according to the following table. Style Franklin Gothic Courier New Description Normal text. Console text: Screen captures Noncommand-related syntax commit complete Exiting configuration mode Usage Example Most of what you read in the Lab Guide and Student Guide.

GUI text elements: Menu names Text field entry

Select File > Open, and then click Configuration.conf in the Filename text box.

Input Text Versus Output Text


You will also frequently see cases where you must enter input text yourself. Often these instances will be shown in the context of where you must enter them. We use bold style to distinguish text that is input versus text that is simply displayed. Style Normal CLI Normal GUI Description No distinguishing variant. Usage Example Physical interface:fxp0, Enabled View configuration history by clicking Configuration > History. CLI Input GUI Input Text that you must enter. lab@San_Jose> show route Select File > Save, and type config.ini in the Filename field.

Defined and Undefined Syntax Variables


Finally, this course distinguishes between regular text and syntax variables, and it also distinguishes between syntax variables where the value is already assigned (defined variables) and syntax variables where you must assign the value (undefined variables). Note that these styles can be combined with the input style as well. Style CLI Variable GUI Variable Description Text where variable value is already assigned. Usage Example policy my-peers

Click my-peers in the dialog. CLI Undefined Text where the variables value is the users discretion and text where the variables value as shown in the lab guide might differ from the value the user must input. Type set policy policy-name. ping 10.0.x.y Select File > Save, and type filename in the Filename field.

GUI Undefined

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Additional Information
Education Services Offerings
You can obtain information on the latest Education Services offerings, course dates, and class locations from the World Wide Web by pointing your Web browser to: http://www.juniper.net/training/education/.

About This Publication


The Junos Intermediate Routing High-Level Lab Guide was developed and tested using software Release 11.1R1.10. Previous and later versions of software might behave differently so you should always consult the documentation and release notes for the version of code you are running before reporting errors. This document is written and maintained by the Juniper Networks Education Services development team. Please send questions and suggestions for improvement to training@juniper.net.

Technical Publications
You can print technical manuals and release notes directly from the Internet in a variety of formats: Go to http://www.juniper.net/techpubs/. Locate the specific software or hardware release and title you need, and choose the format in which you want to view or print the document.

Documentation sets and CDs are available through your local Juniper Networks sales office or account representative.

Juniper Networks Support


For technical support, contact Juniper Networks at http://www.juniper.net/customers/support/, or at 1-888-314-JTAC (within the United States) or 408-745-2121 (from outside the United States).

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x Additional Information

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Lab 1
Protocol-Independent Routing

Overview
This lab demonstrates configuration and monitoring of protocol-independent features on devices running the Junos operating system. In this lab, you use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure and monitor interfaces, static and aggregate routes, and routing instances. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and verify proper operation of network interfaces. Configure and monitor static and aggregate routes. Configure routing instances and share routes between them using routing table groups.

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Protocol-Independent Routing Lab 11 11.a.11.1R1.10

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Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Interfaces


In this lab part, you configure network interfaces on your assigned device. You then verify that the interfaces are operational and that the system adds the corresponding routing table entries for the configured interfaces.
Note

The instructor will tell you the nature of your access and will provide you with the necessary details to access your assigned device. Step 1.1 Ensure that you know to which device you are assigned. Check with your instructor if necessary. Consult the management network diagram, provided by your instructor, to determine your devices management address. Question: What is the management address assigned to your station?

Step 1.2 Access the CLI at your station using either the console, Telnet, or SSH as directed by your instructor. The following example shows simple Telnet access to srxD-1 using the Secure CRT program.

Step 1.3 Log in as user lab with the password supplied by your instructor. Step 1.4 Enter configuration mode and navigate to the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level.

Lab 12 Protocol-Independent Routing

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Step 1.5 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Refer to the network diagram and configure the interfaces for your assigned device. Use the VLAN-ID as the logical unit value for the tagged interface. Use logical unit 0 for all other interfaces. Remember to configure the loopback interface! Step 1.6 Display the interface configuration and ensure that it matches the details outlined on the network diagram for this lab. When you are comfortable with the interface configuration, issue the commit-and-quit command to activate the configuration and return to operational mode. Step 1.7 Issue the show interfaces terse command to verify the current state of the recently configured interfaces. Question: What are the Admin and Link states for the recently configured interfaces?

Step 1.8 Issue the show route command to view the current route entries. Question: Does the routing table display an entry for all local interface addresses and directly connected networks?

Question: What are the route preferences for the Local and Direct route entries?

Question: Are any routes currently hidden?

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Protocol-Independent Routing Lab 13

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Step 1.9 Use the ping utility to verify reachability to the neighboring devices connected to your device. If necessary, check with the remote student team and your instructor to ensure that their devices have the required configuration for the interfaces.
Note

Use Ctrl + c to stop a continuous ping operation. Question: Are the ping tests successful?

Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring Static and Aggregate Routes


In this lab part, you configure and monitor static and aggregate routes. Step 2.1 Refer to the network diagram for this lab and answer the following question. Question: Based on the network diagram, which IP address does your device use as a next hop to reach the Internet host?

Step 2.2 Enter configuration mode and define a default static route. Use the IP address identified in the last step as the next hop for the default static route. Step 2.3 Activate the newly added static route and issue the run show route 172.31.15.1 command. Question: Does the IP address associated with the Internet host show a valid route entry?

Question: What is the route preference of the default static route?

Lab 14 Protocol-Independent Routing

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Step 2.4 Issue the run ping 172.31.15.1 command to ping the Internet host.
Note

The Internet host should contain the required routes to send traffic back to the student devices. Question: Does the ping operation succeed?

Step 2.5 Use the preference statement to ensure that the default static route maintains the default route preference of 5, and that all future static routes use a route preference of 20.
Note

Refer to the network diagram, as necessary, for the next lab step. Step 2.6 Add a static route to the loopback address of the directly attached virtual router. Step 2.7 Activate the configuration and issue the run show route protocol static command to view all static routes. Question: Are both static routes active? What is the route preference of each static route?

Step 2.8 Ping the loopback address of the directly attached virtual router.
Note

The virtual routers have a preconfigured default static route using their directly connected student devices as the next hop. Question: Does the ping operation succeed?

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Protocol-Independent Routing Lab 15

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Step 2.9 Add an aggregate route for the 10.1.0.0/16 prefix by issuing the set aggregate route 10.1.0.0/16 command. Step 2.10 Activate the newly added aggregate route and issue the run show route protocol aggregate command. Question: Is the newly added aggregate route active? If not, why?

Step 2.11 Delete the 10.1.0.0/16 aggregate route and define a new aggregate route using the 172.20.64.0/18 prefix. Activate the configuration change and issue the run show route protocol aggregate detail command. Question: According to the route summary details for the inet.0 routing table, does your device currently have any hidden routes?

Question: Is the new aggregate route active? What is the route preference of this aggregate route?

Question: What are the contributing routes for the 172.20.64.0/18 aggregate route?

Question: Based on the next-hop type associated with the 172.20.64.0/18 aggregate route, what action will your device take if it receives a packet destined for a prefix for which a more specific routing table entry does not exist?

Lab 16 Protocol-Independent Routing

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STOP

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote team within your pod is ready to begin Part 3.

Part 3: Working with Routing Instances


In this lab part, you configure a routing instance and use routing table groups to share routes between the master routing table and user-defined routing tables. Step 3.1 Navigate to the [edit routing-instances] hierarchy level. Step 3.2 Define a routing instance named instance-a that uses the virtual-router instance type and includes the ge-0/0/1.0 and ge-0/0/2.0 interfaces. Step 3.3 Define two static routes: the first static route is for the loopback addresses assigned to the remote teams device and the remote virtual router; the second static route is for the remote subnet that connects the remote teams device with the remote virtual router. Both static routes should include two next-hop addresses in the form of 172.20.66.z and 172.20.77.z, where z is the interface address assigned to the remote teams device. Refer to the network diagram for this lab as necessary. Step 3.4 Activate the changes and display the routing tables using the run show route command. Question: Which routing tables does the output display?

Question: Which routes are installed in the new routing table?

Step 3.5 Verify reachability to the remote student device using the run ping 172.20.66.z command, where z is the host address assigned to the remote teams device.

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Protocol-Independent Routing Lab 17

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Question: Did the ping operation succeed? If not, why not?

Step 3.6 Add the routing-instance instance-a option to the command referenced in the previous step. Question: Did the ping operation succeed?

Step 3.7 Attempt to ping the loopback address of the remote student device. Source the ping operation from the instance-a routing instance. Question: Did the ping operation succeed? What do the results indicate?

Step 3.8 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level. Step 3.9 Issue the set rib-groups inet.0-to-instance-a import-rib [inet.0 instance-a.inet.0] command to create a routing table group that imports routes from inet.0 into instance-a.inet.0. Step 3.10 Issue the set rib-groups instance-a-to-inet.0 import-rib [instance-a.inet.0 inet.0] command to create a routing table group that imports routes from instance-a.inet.0 into inet.0.
Note

Ensure that the remote team finishes the previous step before proceeding Step 3.11 Apply the inet.0-to-instance-a routing table group to import interface and static routes from the inet.0 routing table to the instance-a.inet.0 routing table. Activate the changes and display the instance-a.inet.0 routing table to ensure that the routes were properly imported.

Lab 18 Protocol-Independent Routing

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Question: Were the interface and static routes from inet.0 imported into instance-a.inet.0?

Step 3.12 Navigate to the [edit routing-instance instance-a] hierarchy level. Step 3.13 Apply the instance-a-to-inet.0 routing table group to import interface and static routes from the instance-a.inet.0 routing table to the inet.0 routing table. Step 3.14 Activate the configuration changes and return to operational mode. Next, display the inet.0 routing table to ensure that the routes were properly imported from the instance-a.inet.0 routing table. Question: Were the interface and static routes from the instance-a.inet.0 routing table imported into the inet.0 routing table?

Note

Ensure that the remote team finishes the previous step before proceeding. Step 3.15 Attempt to ping the loopback address of the remote student device from the master inet.0 instance and user-defined instance-a instance. Question: Do the ping operations succeed?

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 1.

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Lab 110 Protocol-Independent Routing

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Lab 2
Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding

Overview
This lab demonstrates configuration and monitoring of load balancing and filter-based forwarding (FBF) on devices running the Junos operating system. In this lab, you use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure and monitor load balancing and FBF. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and monitor the effects of a load-balancing policy. Configure and monitor FBF.

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Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding Lab 21 11.a.11.1R1.10

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Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Load Balancing


In this lab part, you modify your routers configuration in preparation for subsequent lab tasks. You then verify the default load-balancing behavior. Finally, you configure and monitor load balancing. Step 1.1 Enter configuration mode and delete the [edit routing-instances] hierarchy. Step 1.2 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level and issue the delete rib-groups, delete interface-routes, and delete static rib-group commands to remove the current routing table group definitions and application. Step 1.3 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Define two static routes to the loopback addresses of the remote teams device and the remote virtual router and the remote subnet that connects the remote teams device and the remote virtual router. Both static routes should include two next hops in the form of 172.20.66.z and 172.20.77.z, where z is the interface address assigned to the remote student device. Once you are satisfied with the configuration, activate the changes and return to operational mode. Step 1.4 Display the routing table entries for the loopback addresses of the remote teams device, the remote virtual router, and the remote subnet that connects the remote teams device and the remote virtual router. Question: Which next-hop interface was selected for these two static routes?

Step 1.5 Display the forwarding table entries for the same destination prefixes and answer the question that follows. Question: Which next-hop interfaces does the output list for the specified forwarding entries?

Lab 22 Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding

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Step 1.6 Enter configuration mode and navigate to the [edit policy-options] hierarchy level. Step 1.7 Define a load-balancing policy named balance-traffic that will load-balance traffic over all equal-cost paths. Step 1.8 Navigate to the [edit routing-options forwarding-table] hierarchy level and apply the balance-traffic policy as an export policy. Issue the commit command to activate the configuration change. Step 1.9 Once again, display the forwarding table entries for the loopback addresses of the remote teams device and the remote virtual router (192.168.z.0/30) and the remote subnet that connects the remote teams device and the remote virtual router (172.20.11v.0/24). Compare this output with the previous output (shown in Step 1.5) and answer the following question. Question: Compared with the previous snapshot of the forwarding table entries for these same prefixes, what is different with this output?

Step 1.10 Navigate to the [edit forwarding-options] hierarchy level and configure your device to evaluate Layer 3 and Layer 4 port data when performing the load-balancing hash operation for IP version 4 (IPv4) traffic. Activate the configuration changes and return to operational mode. Step 1.11 Perform a series of traceroute operations (at least three instances) from your assigned device to the loopback address assigned to the remote virtual router.

Note

The results illustrated in this lab step may not be the same for all Junos platforms. Some platforms will not allow this type of verification and will require you to pass traffic through the device i.e. not sourced from the device (as in this step).

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Based on the traceroute results, does your device load-balance the UDP traceroute packets across both equal-cost paths?

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 1.

Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring Filter-Based Forwarding


In this lab part, you configure and monitor FBF. Step 2.1 Enter configuration mode and navigate to the [edit firewall family inet] hierarchy level. Step 2.2 Issue the edit filter my-fbf-filter command to define a firewall filter named my-fbf-filter. Create a term named match-172-subnet that matches and forwards traffic sourced from the local 172.20.11v.0/24 subnet to a forwarding instance called instance-66. Create a second term named match-192-subnet that matches and forwards traffic sourced from the local 192.168.z.0/30 subnet to a forwarding instance named instance-77. You will define the referenced forwarding instances in subsequent lab steps. Step 2.3 Navigate to the [edit interfaces ge-0/0/4] hierarchy level and apply the new match filter as an input IPv4 filter to the defined logical 11v interface. Step 2.4 Navigate to the [edit routing-instances] hierarchy and create a new instance named instance-66 using the forwarding instance type. Step 2.5 Define two static routes for instance-66 for the remote 192.168.z.0/30 and 172.20.11v.0/24 subnets. Use the 172.20.66.z address assigned to the remote student device as the next hop for both static routes. Step 2.6 Use the copy command to copy the contents defined in the instance-66 routing instance to a new routing instance named instance-77.

Lab 24 Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding

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Step 2.7 Issue the edit instance-77 command to navigate to the [edit routing-instances instance-77] hierarchy level. Next, issue the replace pattern 66 with 77 command to modify the next-hop addresses for the static routes. Step 2.8 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level and define an import routing table group named fbf-rib-group that includes the inet.0, instance-66.inet.0, and instance-77.inet.0 routing tables. Step 2.9 Issue the set interface-routes rib-group inet fbf-rib-group command to apply the newly defined routing table group to import interface routes between the master and user-defined routing instances. Step 2.10 Activate the configuration and issue the run show route command to ensure that the routing tables for the user-defined routing instances have the required routing information. Question: Were the static and interface routes added to the routing tables for the new instances?

Note

The next lab steps require you to log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device. The virtual routers are logical devices created on a J Series Services Router. Refer to the management network diagram for the IP address of the virtual router device.

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Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding Lab 25

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Step 2.11 Open a separate Telnet session to the virtual router device.

Step 2.12 Log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device using the login information shown in the following table: Virtual Router Login Details Student Device srxA-1 srxA-2 srxB-1 srxB-2 srxC-1 srxC-2 srxD-1 srxD-2 Step 2.13 From your assigned virtual router, perform several traceroute operations (at least three instances) to the loopback address assigned to the remote virtual router. Username a1 a2 b1 b2 c1 c2 d1 d2 Password lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123

Lab 26 Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding

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Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab. Question: Which path did the traceroute packets take?

Step 2.14 Using your virtual routers loopback address as the source address, perform a new series of traceroute operations (at least three instances) to the loopback address assigned to the remote virtual router.
Note

Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab. Question: Which path did the traceroute packets take?

Step 2.15 Use the ping utility to verify that your assigned virtual router can reach the Internet host. Remember to reference the appropriate routing instance. Question: Was the ping test successful? If not, why not?

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Step 2.16 Return to the session opened to your assigned student device. Navigate to the [edit routing-instances] hierarchy level and define a default static route that directs matching traffic to the inet.0 routing table for both routing instances. Activate the configuration change and return to operational mode. Step 2.17 Issue the show route table instance-66 protocol static command and ensure that the default static route was installed and directs traffic to the inet.0 routing table. Question: Do each of the user-defined instances now have a default static route installed that directs matching traffic to the inet.0 routing table?

Step 2.18 Return to the session opened to the virtual router and perform the ping test to the Internet host again. Question: Was the ping test successful?

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 2.

Lab 28 Load Balancing and Filter-Based Forwarding

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Lab 3
Open Shortest Path First

Overview
This lab demonstrates configuration and monitoring of the Open Shortest Path First (OSPF) protocol. In this lab, you use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure, monitor, and troubleshoot OSPF. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and monitor a multi-area OSPF network. Perform basic OSPF troubleshooting.

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Open Shortest Path First Lab 31 11.a.11.1R1.10

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Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring OSPF


In this lab part, you configure and monitor a multi-area OSPF network. You will first prepare your device by removing all filter-based forwarding (FBF) configuration. Next you define a router ID for your assigned device. You then configure your device to participate in a multi-area OSPF network and verify operations using CLI operational mode commands. Step 1.1 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Enter configuration mode and delete the configuration defined under the [edit routing-instances] and [edit firewall] hierarchy levels. Next, remove the application of the input filter assigned to the ge-0/0/4.11v interface. Step 1.2 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level and remove the defined routing table group and the application of that routing table group for interface routes. Step 1.3 Define the router ID on your router using the IP address assigned to the lo0 interface as the input value. Step 1.4 Navigate to the [edit protocols ospf] hierarchy level and configure OSPF Area 0. Refer to the network diagram as necessary and remember to include lo0.0. Step 1.5 Activate the configuration and issue the run show ospf neighbor command. Question: Which neighbor state is shown for the listed interfaces?

Question: Which value is listed under the ID column?

Question: Which value is listed under the Pri column? What does this value help determine?

Lab 32 Open Shortest Path First

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Step 1.6 Issue the run show ospf interface command to display OSPF interface details. Question: Which interfaces are listed in the output? What are the states of those interfaces?

Step 1.7 Issue the run show ospf database command to display the OSPF database details. Question: How many and what types of link-state advertisements (LSAs) exist in OSPF database?

Step 1.8 Display routes advertised to and received from OSPF using the run show ospf route command. Question: What is the current metric associated with the displayed OSPF routes?

Question: Why does the output show two entries with the same prefix?

Step 1.9 Associate a metric of 100 with the ge-0/0/2.0 interface and activate the change.

Question: Based on your change, which interface do you expect OSPF to choose toward the remote student device?

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Open Shortest Path First Lab 33

Junos Intermediate Routing Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 1.10 Question: Reissue the run show ospf route command to see your changes.What is the current metric associated with the 172.20.66.0/30 OSPF route?

Question: What was the effect of the increased metric on the remote 192.168.z.1 OSPF routes?

Step 1.11 Issue the run show route protocol ospf command to view OSPF routes installed in the routing table. Question: Which OSPF routes exist in the routing table?

Question: Why are the 172.20.66.0/30 and 172.20.77.0/30 routes not listed in the generated output?

Step 1.12 Configure your device to function as an area border router (ABR), joining Area 0 with a second area (either Area 1 or Area 2, depending on your assigned device). Refer to the network diagram for this lab for the area and interface details. Once it is configured, activate the configuration changes and return to operational mode. Step 1.13 Issue the show ospf neighbor command to verify the current OSPF adjacency details.
Lab 34 Open Shortest Path First www.juniper.net

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Question: How many OSPF neighbors exist and what are the states of those adjacencies?

Step 1.14 Issue the show ospf database command to display the current OSPF database. Question: How many OSPF databases are present in the output?

Question: Which LSA types are represented in the current OSPF databases?

Question: Based on the database entries, which devices are injecting external prefixes in to OSPF?

Question: Which command lists only external entries in the OSPF database?

Step 1.15 Enter configuration mode and navigate to the [edit policy-options] hierarchy level. Step 1.16 Define a new routing policy named inject-default-route. Include a single term named match-default-route that matches and accepts the default static route into OSPF.

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Open Shortest Path First Lab 35

Junos Intermediate Routing

Step 1.17 Navigate to the [edit protocols ospf] hierarchy and apply the newly defined policy as an export policy. Next, activate the configuration change using the commit command. Step 1.18 Issue the run show ospf database advertising-router self command to view all OSPF LSAs in the database that the local device originated. Question: Is a matching LSA entry present for the recently injected default static route?

Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 1.19 Issue the run show route 0/0 exact command to view the current routing table entries for the default route. Question: Based on the current default route entry, what would happen if your devices direct connection to the Internet failed?

Step 1.20 Issue the save /var/tmp/working-ospf.conf command to save the current OSPF configuration.

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 1.

Lab 36 Open Shortest Path First

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Part 2: Performing Basic OSPF Troubleshooting


In this lab part, you perform basic OSPF troubleshooting. First, you modify your devices current configuration to make it incompatible with the attached virtual router. You then enable OSPF traceoptions to log protocol activity. Finally, you display the traceoptions log and the OSPF statistics to view the associated errors. Step 2.1 Issue the run show ospf statistics to display the current OSPF errors and statistics. Question: Does your device show any registered errors?

Step 2.2 Rename the nonbackbone area (Area 1 or Area 2 depending on your assigned device) to area 3. Step 2.3 Activate the configuration change and issue the run show ospf neighbor command. Question: How many OSPF neighbors does your assigned device currently have?

Step 2.4 Define traceoptions for OSPF so that OSPF errors write to a file named trace-ospf. Include the detail option with the error flag to capture additional details for the OSPF errors. Activate the configuration change using the commit command. Step 2.5 Issue the run show log trace-ospf command to view the contents written to the trace-ospf trace file. Question: Does the generated error in the trace file explain the current OSPF adjacency issue?

Step 2.6 Issue the run show ospf statistics command to verify any current error counters.
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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Are any error counters listed?

Step 2.7 Rename area 3 back to the correct area number (Area 1 or Area 2 depending on your assigned device). Next, assign the correct nonbackbone area an area type of stub and activate the configuration changes. Step 2.8 Issue the run clear log trace-ospf command to clear the contents of the defined trace file. Wait a moment, then issue the run show log trace-ospf command to view any new entries in the trace file. Question: Does the generated error in the trace file explain the current OSPF adjacency issue?

Step 2.9 Issue the run show ospf statistics command to verify the current error counters. Question: Are any new error counters listed?

Step 2.10 Issue the delete command and confirm the operation to delete the current OSPF configuration. Next, issue the load merge /var/tmp/working-ospf.conf command to load the configuration you saved earlier in this lab. Activate the restored configuration and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command. Step 2.11 Verify that the OSPF neighbor adjacency has returned to the Full state between your device and the directly attached virtual router. Question: Did the OSPF adjacency with the directly attached virtual router return to the Full state?

Lab 38 Open Shortest Path First

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STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 3.

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Open Shortest Path First Lab 39

Junos Intermediate Routing

Lab 310 Open Shortest Path First

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Lab 4
Border Gateway Protocol

Overview
This lab demonstrates configuration and monitoring of the Border Gateway Protocol (BGP). In this lab, you use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure and monitor BGP. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and monitor BGP. Export aggregate routes to an EBGP peer. Configure and apply a next-hop self policy.

www.juniper.net

Border Gateway Protocol Lab 41 11.a.11.1R1.10

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Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring IBGP


In this lab part, you configure and monitor internal BGP (IBGP). You first define the autonomous system (AS) number for your device. Next, you establish IBGP peering sessions using loopback addresses. You then monitor the established IBGP peering sessions using CLI operational mode commands. Step 1.1 Enter configuration mode and deactivate the OSPF export policy referenced under the [edit protocols ospf] hierarchy level. Step 1.2 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level and deactivate the default static route. Activate the configuration changes using the commit command. Step 1.3 Define the AS number designated for your network. Refer to the network diagram for this lab as necessary. Step 1.4 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Navigate to the [edit protocols bgp] hierarchy level. Configure a BGP group named my-int-group that includes the three devices within your assigned network as IBGP peers. Use the loopback address assigned to your device as the local address and the remote loopback addresses of the devices within your AS number as the peer addresses. When you are satisfied with the newly defined BGP configuration, issue the commit command to activate the changes. Question: Was the commit operation successful? If not, why not?

Step 1.5 Configure the my-int-group for the internal BGP session type. Next, issue the commit command to activate the configuration. Step 1.6 Issue the run show bgp summary command to view the current BGP summary information for your device.

Lab 42 Border Gateway Protocol

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Question: How many BGP neighbors does your device currently list?

Question: Has your device received any routes from its IBGP peers?

Step 1.7 Issue the run show route receive-protocol bgp neighbor command, where neighbor is the loopback address of each IBGP peer. Question: From which IBGP peers are you currently receiving routes?

Question: What is the AS path associated with the received BGP routes?

Question: What is the local preference of the received BGP routes?

Question: Which routing table group does the referenced command consult? Which operational mode command displays BGP routes in the routing table (RIB-Local)?

Step 1.8 Issue the run show route advertising-protocol bgp neighbor command, where neighbor is the loopback address of each IBGP peer.

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Border Gateway Protocol Lab 43

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Question: Which routing table group does the command referenced in this step consult?

Question: Is your device currently advertising BGP routes to any of its IBGP peers?

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 1.

Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring EBGP


In this lab part, you configure and monitor EBGP. You first establish an EBGP peering session with the external peer. You then advertise aggregate routes to your EBGP peer to represent the prefixes reachable from your AS. Finally, you monitor the established EBGP peering session using CLI operational mode commands. Step 2.1 Refer to the network diagram for this lab and configure an EBGP peering session with the connected AS. Name the associated EBGP group my-ext-group. Once configured, activate the configuration changes using the commit command.
Note

Before proceeding, ensure the remote student team in your pod has finished the previous step. Step 2.2 Issue the run show bgp summary command to view the current BGP summary information. Question: How many BGP groups and peers does your device currently list?

Question: Has your device received any routes from its EBGP peer?

Lab 44 Border Gateway Protocol

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Step 2.3 Issue the run show bgp neighbor 172.18.z.1 command to view details for the EBGP peering session. Replace z with the IP address value assigned to your EBGP peer. Use the generated output to answer the following questions: Question: What is the current state for this peer? What was the previous state for this peering session?

Question: Which values are set for the keepalive interval and holddown timer?

Question: What is the last recorded event for this EBGP session?

Question: Which network layer reachability information (NLRI) is supported for this peering session?

Step 2.4 Display the BGP routes received from the EBGP peer using the run show route receive-protocol bgp 172.18.z.1 command, where z is the IP address value assigned to your EBGP peer. Question: How many prefixes originated from AS number 65531?

Question: What do the ?, E, and I indicators within the AS path represent?

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Border Gateway Protocol Lab 45

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Step 2.5 Issue the run show route advertising-protocol bgp 172.18.z.1 command, where z is the IP address value assigned to your EBGP peer. Question: Is your device currently advertising the BGP routes received from its IBGP peers to its EBGP peer? If not, explain why.

Step 2.6 Issue the set advertise-inactive command to override the default behavior and advertise BGP routes that are not currently selected as active because of route preference. Activate the configuration change by issuing the commit command. Step 2.7 Once again, issue the run show route advertising-protocol bgp 172.18.z.1 command, where z is the IP address value assigned to your EBGP peer, to determine whether your device is advertising BGP routes to its external BGP peer. Question: Is your device now advertising the BGP routes received from its IBGP peers to its EBGP peer?

Step 2.8 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy and define additional aggregate routes that represent the remainder of the internal prefixes that are part of your AS. (Hint: In addition to the current aggregate route, you will need to summarize the 172.21.z.0/24, 172.22.z.0/24, 192.168.y.z/32 prefixes.) Step 2.9 Navigate to the [edit policy-options] hierarchy and define a new policy named adv-aggregates that includes two terms. Name the first term match-aggregate-routes. It should match and accept the defined aggregate routes. Ensure that you match the aggregate protocol. Name the second term deny-other. It should reject all other routes. Step 2.10 Navigate to the [edit protocols bgp] hierarchy level and apply the newly defined policy as an export policy for the external BGP group named my-ext-group. Activate the configuration changes using the commit command.
Lab 46 Border Gateway Protocol www.juniper.net

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Step 2.11 Verify the effects of the newly defined and applied policy by issuing the run show route advertising-protocol bgp 172.18.z.1 command, where z is the IP address value assigned to your EBGP peer. Question: Is your device advertising all of the expected aggregate prefixes? If not, which prefix is not being advertised?

Step 2.12 Examine the routing table entry for the 192.168.z.0/30 aggregate route representing the loopback addresses for the remote side to determine why it is not being advertised into BGP. Question: Based on the contents of the routing table, can you explain why the 192.168.z.0/30 aggregate route is not currently advertised into BGP? How might you remedy this situation?

Step 2.13 Decrease the route preference for the aggregate route representing the loopback addresses of the remote student and virtual router devices to 19. Activate the change and issue the run show route 192.168.z.0/30 command to verify that the aggregate route is now active. Question: Is the aggregated route now active?

Step 2.14 Verify that the effects of the route preference change by issuing the run show route advertising-protocol bgp 172.18.z.1 command, where z is the IP address value assigned to your EBGP peer. Question: Is your device now advertising all of the expected aggregate prefixes?

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Border Gateway Protocol Lab 47

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Question: Use the summary details of the generated output to determine whether your device currently has hidden routes. If so, how many?

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 2.

Part 3: Implementing a next-hop self Policy


In this lab part, you define and apply a next-hop self policy to alter the next-hop value associated with routes received from your EBGP peer. You monitor the effects of this policy.
Note

The following lab steps require you to log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device. The virtual routers are logical devices created on a J Series Services Router. Refer to the management network diagram for the IP address of the virtual router. Step 3.1 Open a separate Telnet session to the virtual router.

Lab 48 Border Gateway Protocol

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Step 3.2 Log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device using the login information shown in the following table: Virtual Router Login Details Student Device srxA-1 srxA-2 srxB-1 srxB-2 srxC-1 srxC-2 srxD-1 srxD-2 Step 3.3 From your assigned virtual router, issue the show route table vr11v.inet.0 protocol bgp command, where v is the value assigned to your virtual router. Question: How many BGP routes display using the referenced command? Username a1 a2 b1 b2 c1 c2 d1 d2 Password lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123

Question: Does your virtual router currently have hidden routes?

Step 3.4 View the hidden routes by issuing the show route table vr11v.inet.0 hidden extensive command, where v is the value assigned to your virtual router. Question: What are the protocol next-hop values associated with these hidden routes?

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Border Gateway Protocol Lab 49

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Question: Why are these routes hidden?

Step 3.5 Return to the session opened for your assigned student device and navigate to the [edit policy-options] hierarchy level. Define a policy named change-next-hop with no terms and no defined match conditions, which alters the next-hop value to the local devices IP address used for peering sessions. Step 3.6 Navigate to the [edit protocols bgp] hierarchy and apply the change-next-hop policy as an export policy to the my-int-group BGP group. Activate the changes and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command.
Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 3.7 Return to the Telnet session opened to the virtual router attached to your assigned device. Issue the show route table vr11v.inet.0 protocol bgp extensive command, where v is the value assigned to your virtual router. Question: What are the protocol next-hop values associated with the displayed BGP routes?

Question: Are there any hidden routes present on your assigned virtual router?

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 4.

Lab 410 Border Gateway Protocol

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Lab 5
IP Tunneling

Overview
This lab demonstrates using the command-line interface (CLI) to configure and monitor a generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnel. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and monitor a GRE tunnel. Use the defined GRE tunnel to merge two remote OSPF domains.

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IP Tunneling Lab 51 11.a.11.1R1.10

Junos Intermediate Routing

Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring a GRE Tunnel


In this lab part, you configure and monitor a GRE tunnel. Using static routes, you direct traffic to the remote subnets in your pod through the newly formed GRE tunnel. Step 1.1 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Enter configuration mode and navigate to the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level. Next, disable the ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/0/2 interfaces. Finally, set the mtu of the ge-0/0/3 interface to 1524.

Question: Why increase the MTU to 1524?

Step 1.2 Define a new GRE interface and tunnel using the IP address assigned to the loopback interface on your device as the source address and the IP address assigned to the loopback interface on the remote student device as the destination address. Use unit 0 for the logical point-to-point interface. Step 1.3 Activate the changes and issue the run show interfaces terse gr-0/0/0 command to verify the state of the newly defined GRE interface. Question: What is the current state of the gr-0/0/0.0 interface?

Step 1.4 Navigate to the [edit routing-options static] hierarchy and modify the static routes for the subnets associated with the remote team to use only the newly defined GRE interface. Ensure that you delete the current next-hop values assigned to those static routes. Step 1.5 Activate the changes using commit and issue the run show interfaces terse gr-0/0/0 command several times to monitor the state of the GRE interface.

Lab 52 IP Tunneling

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Question: What is the state of the gr-0/0/0.0 interface?

Note

In the current state, the routing table purges the static route for the remote 192.168.z.0/30 prefix when the gr-0/0/0.0 interface goes down. Once the 192.168.z.0/30 prefix is removed from the routing table, the remote tunnel endpoint address is resolved through the default BGP route received from the EBGP peer. Once the remote tunnel endpoint address is resolved through the default BGP route, the gr-0/0/0.0 interface returns to the up state and the GRE tunnel re-establishes. When the GRE tunnel is re-established, the static route for the remote 192.168.z.0/30 prefix is added back to the routing table, at which time the same problem repeats. This cycle continues until corrective action is taken. You will correct this issue in a subsequent step. Step 1.6 Define a new static route for the remote tunnel endpoint address (the loopback address of the remote student device) using the 172.18.y.1 address as the next hop, where yis the value assigned to your WAN connection. Issue the commit command to activate the changes. Step 1.7 Issue the run show interfaces terse gr-0/0/0 command several times to monitor the state of the GRE interface. Question: What is the current state of the gr-0/0/0.0 interface?

Step 1.8 Use the routing table to determine the next hop associated with the remote 172.20.11v.0/24 subnet.

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IP Tunneling Lab 53

Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: What is the next hop associated with the route for the remote 172.20.11v.0/24 subnet?

Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 1.9 Use the ping utility to verify reachability to the remote virtual router. Use a destination host address of 172.20.11v.10, where v is the value assigned to the remote subnet between the remote student device and the virtual router. Use a source host address of 172.20.11v.1, where v is the value assigned to the local subnet between your device and the virtual router. Refer to the network diagram for this task as necessary. Question: Is the ping operation successful? What does this ping test indicate?

Part 2: Configuring the GRE Interface to Participate in OSPF


In this lab part, you configure the GRE interface to participate in OSPF, thus allowing the GRE tunnel to merge the two remote OSPF domains back to a single OSPF domain. You will then re-enable the ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/0/2 interfaces and ensure that the gr-0/0/0.0 interface serves as the backup link for OSPF area 0. Step 2.1 Verify the current state of the OSPF neighbors using the run show ospf neighbor command. Question: How many OSPF neighbors does your assigned device currently show?

Step 2.2 Navigate to the [edit protocols ospf] hierarchy level and add the gr-0/0/0.0 interface under OSPF Area 0.0.0.0.
Lab 54 IP Tunneling www.juniper.net

Junos Intermediate Routing Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 2.3 Activate the configuration change by issuing the commit command and then issue the run show ospf neighbor command several times to verify that a new OSPF neighbor was added and that the new neighbor session is stable. Question: Has a new neighbor been detected and, if so, is the associated neighbor session stable?

Question: Based on the generated output, what is the address of the newly detected OSPF neighbor?

Question: Other than through the OSPF protocol, how is your device learning the route for the address of the remote student devices loopback interface?

Question: What is the route preference currently assigned to the static route for the remote devices loopback interface address? How might the current route preference for this route be contributing to the unstable OSPF session?

Step 2.4 Navigate to the [edit routing-options static] hierarchy and modify the route preference of the static route for the remote devices loopback interface address to a value of 5. Activate the configuration change and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command.

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IP Tunneling Lab 55

Junos Intermediate Routing Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 2.5 Issue the show route 192.168.z.1 command, where z represents the value assigned to the loopback interface address of the remote student device. Question: From which sources does your device learn the referenced prefix? Which source is selected as active and why?

Step 2.6 Issue the show ospf neighbor command several times to verify that the new OSPF neighbor has been added and that the new neighbor session is stable. Question: How many OSPF neighbors does your assigned device currently show? Are the detected OSPF sessions stable?

Step 2.7 Enter configuration mode and re-enable the ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/0/2 interfaces. Activate the changes using the commit command. Step 2.8 Ensure that the remote team in your pod has finished the previous task, then issue the run show ospf neighbors command. Question: How many OSPF neighbors does your assigned device currently show?

Step 2.9 Add a metric value of 200 to the gr-0/0/0.0 interface under the [edit protocols ospf area 0.0.0.0] hierarchy to ensure that the tunnel serves as a backup path when the ge-0/0/1.0 and ge-0/0/2.0 interfaces are operational. Activate the configuration change using the commit command.

Lab 56 IP Tunneling

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Step 2.10 Issue the run show ospf route command to confirm that OSPF routes are not currently using the gr-0/0/0.0 interface. Question: Are any of the OSPF routes using gr-0/0/0.0?

Step 2.11 Disable the ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/0/2 interfaces once again. Commit your changes and issue the run show ospf route command to confirm that the remote OSPF routes are now learned through the gr-0/0/0 interface. Question: Are the OSPF routes associated with the remote side of your assigned pod using gr-0/0/0.0?

Step 2.12 Re-enable the ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/0/2 interfaces. Activate the configuration changes and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command.

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 5.

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IP Tunneling Lab 57

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Lab 58 IP Tunneling

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Lab 6
High Availability

Overview
This lab demonstrates how to configure and monitor some high availability (HA) features using the command-line interface (CLI). The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and monitor graceful restart. Configure and monitor the Bidirectional Forwarding Detection (BFD) protocol. Configure and monitor the Virtual Router Redundancy Protocol (VRRP).

www.juniper.net

High Availability Lab 61 11.a.11.1R1.10

Junos Intermediate Routing

Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Graceful Restart


In this lab part, you configure and monitor graceful restart. Before enabling graceful restart, you perform some verification tasks using the directly attached virtual router. You then enable graceful restart and perform the same verification tasks to determine the impact that graceful restart can have in a network. You should refer to the diagram for this lab part for topological details.
Note

This lab part requires you to log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device. Refer to the management network diagram for the IP address of the virtual router. Step 1.1 Open a separate Telnet session to the virtual router.

Lab 62 High Availability

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Step 1.2 Log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device using the login information shown in the following table: Virtual Router Login Details Student Device srxA-1 srxA-2 srxB-1 srxB-2 srxC-1 srxC-2 srxD-1 srxD-2 Step 1.3 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Initiate a continuous ping from your assigned virtual router to the loopback address of the remote virtual router. Refer to the network diagram for this lab part as necessary.
Note

Username a1 a2 b1 b2 c1 c2 d1 d2

Password lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123

Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab. Step 1.4 On your assigned student device, restart the routing process while the ping operation initiated on the directly attached virtual router continues. Step 1.5 Return to the session opened to the attached virtual router and monitor the ping operation for a moment. Next, type Ctrl + c to stop the continuous ping operation.

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High Availability Lab 63

Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Did a disruption occur to the packet forwarding operation through your assigned student device?

Step 1.6 On your assigned student device, enter configuration mode and navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level. Step 1.7 Enable graceful restart and activate the change using the commit command.
Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 1.8 Return to the session opened with the directly attached virtual router and initiate a continuous ping from your assigned virtual router to the loopback address of the remote virtual router.
Note

Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing ICMP traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab. Step 1.9 On your assigned student device, issue the run restart routing command to restart the routing process once again while the ping operation on the attached virtual router continues. Step 1.10 Return to the session opened to the attached virtual router and monitor the ping operation for a moment. Next, type Ctrl + c to stop the continuous ping operation. Question: Did a disruption occur to the packet forwarding operation through your assigned student device with graceful restart enabled?

Lab 64 High Availability

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Step 1.11 Return to your student device and issue the run show bgp neighbor 172.18.z.1 command, where z represents the value assigned to the EBGP peer connected to your student device. Question: In the generated output, which evidence indicates that graceful restart is enabled for this EBGP peering session?

Step 1.12 Navigate to the [edit protocols bgp] hierarchy level and disable graceful restart for the EBGP neighbor defined under the my-ext-group BGP group. Step 1.13 Activate the configuration change and issue the run show bgp neighbor 172.18.z.1 command once again, where z represents the value assigned to the EBGP peer connected to your student device. Question: In the generated output, which evidence indicates that graceful restart is now disabled for this EBGP peering session?

Step 1.14 Re-enable graceful restart for the EBGP peering session. Issue the commit command to activate the change. Step 1.15 Navigate to the [edit protocols ospf] hierarchy and enable traceoptions to track graceful restart operations for OSPF. Use a file name of trace-GR and enable the graceful-restart flag with the detail option. Activate the configuration changes using the commit command. Step 1.16 Issue the run restart routing command. After a moment, issue the run show log trace-GR command to display the contents of the log file. Question: Did the restart events write to the log file?

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High Availability Lab 65

Junos Intermediate Routing

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 1.

Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring BFD


In this lab part, you configure and monitor BFD. You should refer to the diagram for this lab part for topological details. Step 2.1 Issue the run show bfd session command to determine whether your student device has any active BFD sessions. Question: Does your student device currently have any active BFD sessions?

Step 2.2 Enable BFD on the interfaces participating in OSPF (except lo0.0). Use 300 ms as the minimum transmit and receive interval value. Activate the configuration changes using the commit command.
Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 2.3 Issue the run show bfd session command to determine whether your student device has any active BFD sessions. Question: Does your student device currently have any active BFD sessions?

Question: What are the current transmit intervals? Do all of these values match the values you defined? If not, explain why.

Lab 66 High Availability

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Based on the BFD session details, how many BFD hellos must be missed before one of the established sessions goes down?

Step 2.4 Issue the run show bgp neighbor 172.18.z.1 command, where z represents the value assigned to the EBGP peer connected to your student device. Question: Does the output clearly indicate whether BFD is enabled for this EBGP peering session?

Step 2.5 Navigate to the [edit protocols bgp] hierarchy and enable BFD for the EBGP peering session. Use a minimum interval value of 300 ms for this BFD session and activate the change using the commit command. Step 2.6 Issue the run show bgp neighbor 172.18.z.1 command once again, where z represents the value assigned to the EBGP peer connected to your student device. Question: Does the output clearly indicate whether BFD is enabled for this EBGP peering session?

Question: What would be the effects of a firewall filter inadvertently blocking BFD hello packets?

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 2.

Part 3: Configuring and Monitoring VRRP


In this lab part, you configure and monitor VRRP. You should refer to the diagram for this lab part for topological details. Note that the lab diagram used for this lab part is different than the lab diagram used for the previous parts of this lab.
www.juniper.net High Availability Lab 67

Junos Intermediate Routing

Step 3.1 Navigate to the [edit interfaces ge-0/0/4] hierarchy and define two new logical interfaces using the details provided on the network diagram for this lab part. Step 3.2 Activate the configuration change and ensure that you can ping the remote student device and the virtual routers. Note that each of the defined subnets has an assigned virtual router. Question: Can you ping the remote student device and virtual routers?

Step 3.3 Configure VRRP on the newly defined logical interfaces. Associate the new logical interface with the lower VLAN-ID with vrrp-group 1z and the new logical interface with the higher VLAN-ID with vrrp-group 2z. Refer to the network diagram associated with this lab part for all interface and VRRP configuration variables for your assigned pod and device. Question: Based on the newly defined VRRP configuration, which VRRP state should each participating interface assume?

Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote student team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 3.4 Activate the configuration changes using the commit command then issue the run show vrrp command to determine the current VRRP state for each VRRP group. Question: Which VRRP state has each participating interface assumed within its respective VRRP group?

Lab 68 High Availability

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Step 3.5 Open a separate Telnet session to the virtual router.

Step 3.6 Log in to the virtual router attached to your teams device using the login information shown in the following table: Virtual Router Login Details Student Device srxA-1 srxA-2 srxB-1 srxB-2 srxC-1 srxC-2 srxD-1 srxD-2 Step 3.7 From the virtual routers associated with your pod, ping the Internet host listed on the network diagram. Note that each virtual router used in this lab part has a default static route with the virtual IP (VIP) address associated with each respective subnet as the gateway address. Username a1 a2 b1 b2 c1 c2 d1 d2 Password lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123 lab123

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High Availability Lab 69

Junos Intermediate Routing Note

Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing ICMP traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab. Question: Do the ping operations succeed?

Step 3.8 From the virtual routers associated with your pod, ping the gateway address for each virtual routers respective subnet.
Note

Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing ICMP traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab. Question: Do the ping operations succeed? If not, explain why not.

Step 3.9 Return to your assigned student device and enable the accept-data configuration option for both VRRP groups. Activate the configuration changes using the commit command. Step 3.10 From the virtual routers associated with your pod, ping the gateway address for each virtual routers respective subnet once again.
Note

Remember to reference the appropriate instance name when sourcing ICMP traffic from a virtual router. The instance names match the virtual router names listed on the network diagram for this lab.

Lab 610 High Availability

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Do the ping operations now succeed?

Step 3.11 Return to the console session opened for your assigned student device. Enable the interface tracking option for the VRRP group for which your device is currently functioning as master VRRP router. Track the ge-0/0/3.0 interface and reduce the priority value by 101 if the tracked interface goes down. Activate the configuration change and return to the root of the configuration hierarchy.
Note

If you are assigned srxX-1, you should enable interface tracking only for vrrp-group 1z. If you are assigned srxX-2, you should enable interface tracking only for vrrp-group 2z. Refer to the network diagram for this lab part for the z values. Step 3.12 Disable the ge-0/0/3.0 interface and activate the change using the commit command. Step 3.13 Issue the run show vrrp track command to view the current interface tracking details. Question: According to the output, what is the current interface state of the tracked interface? Also, what is the current VRRP state and priority value for the associated VRRP group?

Step 3.14 Re-enable the ge-0/0/3.0 interface and activate the change by using the commit command. Step 3.15 Verify the current status of the tracked interface and its associated VRRP group by issuing the run show vrrp track command.

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High Availability Lab 611

Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: What is the current status of the tracked interface? Which VRRP state and priority value are now assigned to the VRRP interface?

Step 3.16 Reload the reset configuration by issuing the load override /var/tmp/ reset.conf command. Activate the reset configuration and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command. Log out of all open sessions.

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 6.

Lab 612 High Availability

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Lab 7
IPv6 (Optional)

Overview
This lab demonstrates configuration and monitoring of IP version 6 (IPv6) interfaces on devices running the Junos operating system. In this lab, you use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure and monitor interfaces, static routing, basic OSPF, and generic routing encapsulation (GRE) tunnels. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and verify proper operation of IPv6 network interfaces. Configure and monitor static IPv6 routing. Configure and monitor OSPF with IPv6 interfaces. Configure a GRE interface to tunnel IPv6 traffic over an IP version 4 (IPv4) network.

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IPv6 (Optional) Lab 71 11.a.11.1R1.10

Junos Intermediate Routing

Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring Interfaces


In this lab part, you will configure network interfaces on your assigned device. You will then verify that the interfaces are operational and that the system adds the corresponding route table entries for the configured interfaces.
Note

Depending on the class, the lab equipment used might be remote from your physical location. The instructor will inform you as to the nature of your access and will provide you with the details needed to access your assigned device. Step 1.1 Ensure that you know to which device you are assigned. Check with your instructor if you are unsure. Consult the management network diagram, provided by your instructor, to determine your devices management address. Question: What is the management address assigned to your station?

Step 1.2 Access the CLI at your station using either the console, Telnet, or SSH as directed by your instructor. The following example shows simple Telnet access to srxA-1 using the Secure CRT program

Step 1.3 Log in as user lab with the password supplied by your instructor. Step 1.4 Enter configuration mode and load the reset configuration by issuing the load override /var/tmp/reset.conf command.
Lab 72 IPv6 (Optional) www.juniper.net

Junos Intermediate Routing

Step 1.5 Enable IPv6 on the router using the set security forwarding-options family inet6 mode packet-based command. Activate the configuration and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command. Step 1.6 Issue the show route table inet6 to display the contents of the IPv6 route table. Question: Are any routes shown?

Step 1.7 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Refer to the network diagram and configure the interfaces for your assigned device. Use logical unit 0 for all interfaces. Remember to configure the loopback interface! Step 1.8 Display the interface configuration and ensure that it matches the details outlined on the network diagram for this lab. When you are comfortable with the interface configuration, issue the commit-and-quit command to activate the configuration and return to operational mode. Step 1.9 Issue the show interfaces terse command to verify the current state of the recently configured interfaces.

Question: How many IPv6 addresses are associated with each one of your interfaces?

Question: How are the other addresses created on the router?

Step 1.10 Issue the show route table inet6 command to view the current IPv6 route entries.
www.juniper.net IPv6 (Optional) Lab 73

Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: How many routes were installed for each one of the configured interfaces?

Question: Are any routes currently hidden?

Step 1.11 Use the ping utility to verify reachability to the neighboring devices connected to your device. If needed, check with the remote student team and your instructor to ensure that their devices have the required configuration for the interfaces.
Note

The first ping of the twenty-five may be lost and show up as a . (period). Question: Are the ping tests successful?

Step 1.12 Issue the show ipv6 neighbors command.

STOP

Before continuing, ensure that the remote team in your pod is ready to proceed.

Part 2: Configuring and Monitoring Static Routing


In this lab part, you will configure and monitor a default static IPv6 route. Step 2.1 Attempt to ping the Internet host referenced on the network diagram for this lab.
Note

Use Ctrl+c to stop a continuous ping operation. Question: What does the result from the ping operation indicate?

Lab 74 IPv6 (Optional)

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Based on the network diagram, which IP address would your device use as a next hop to reach the Internet host?

Step 2.2 Enter configuration mode and define a default static route. Use the IP address identified in the last step as the next hop for the default static route. Step 2.3 Activate the newly added static route and return to operational mode. Issue the show route 2001:172:31:15::1 command.

Question: Does the IPv6 address associated with the Internet host now show a valid route entry?

Question: What is the route preference of the default static route?

Step 2.4 Issue the ping 2001:172:31:15::1 command to ping the Internet host.
Note

The Internet host should contain the required routes to send traffic back to the student devices. Question: Does the ping operation succeed this time?

STOP

Notify your instructor that you have finished Part 2. Before proceeding, ensure that the remote team within your pod is ready to continue on to Part 3.

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IPv6 (Optional) Lab 75

Junos Intermediate Routing

Part 3: Configuring and Monitoring OSPF


In this lab part, you will configure and monitor an IPv6 interface in OSPF. You will configure a single OSPF Area 0 based on the network diagram for this lab. Finally, you will perform some verification tasks to ensure that OSPF works properly.
Note

RIP and OSPF both require new versions to support IPv6. These new versions are known as RIPng and OSPFv3. No changes are necessary for IS-IS because it supports IPv6 natively. Step 3.1 Define OSPF Area 0 and include the internal interface that connects to the remote teams device. Ensure that you also include the lo0 interface. Also, recall that only OSPF version 3 supports IPv6. Issue the show command to view the resulting configuration.
Note

Remember to specify the appropriate logical interface! If the logical unit is not specified, the Junos OS assumes a logical unit of zero (0). Question: With the OSPF configuration in place, how many OSPF neighbor adjacencies should form?

Step 3.2 Activate the candidate configuration using the commit and-quit command to return to operational mode. Issue the show ospf3 neighbor command to verify OSPF neighbor adjacency state information.
Note

The OSPF adjacency state for each neighbor is dependent on that neighbors configuration. Ensure that the neighboring team has added the required OSPF configuration and committed the changes. The virtual routers contain preconfigured settings added by your instructor.

Question: Which state do the OSPF neighbor adjacencies show?

Lab 76 IPv6 (Optional)

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Why does the neighbor ID show as an IPv4 address?

Step 3.3 Issue the show route protocol ospf3 to view the active OSPF routes in your devices route table.

Question: What is the ff02::5/128 address?

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 3.

Part 4: Tunneling IPv6 over IPv4 Using GRE Encapsulation


In this lab part, you configure a GRE tunnel to carry IPv6 traffic over IPv4. You should refer to the diagram for this lab part for topological details. Note that the lab diagram used for this lab part is slightly different from the lab diagram used for the previous parts of this lab. Step 4.1 First, delete the protocols and routing-options stanzas. Second, delete interfaces ge-0/0/2, ge-0/0/3 and the loopback interface. Step 4.2 Configure IPv4 addressing as per the lab diagram on your devices loopback and ge-0/0/3 interfaces. Finally, using the ge-0/3/0 address as a next-hop, configure a static route to the remote student devices loopback. Step 4.3 Display your changes and ensure they match the details outlined on the network diagram for this lab. When you are comfortable with the interface configuration, issue the commit-and-quit command to activate the configuration and return to operational mode. Step 4.4 At this point, you now have a basic IPv4 network. Test the reachability of the remote student devices loopback using the ping command. Be sure to source the ping from your devices loopback. Question: Are the ping tests successful?

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IPv6 (Optional) Lab 77

Junos Intermediate Routing

Step 4.5 Define a new GRE interface and tunnel using the IP address assigned to the loopback interface on your device as the source address and the IP address assigned to the loopback interface on the remote student device as the destination address. Use unit 0 for the logical point-to-point interface. Step 4.6 Activate the changes and issue the run show interfaces terse gr-0/0/0 command to verify the state of the newly defined GRE interface. Question: What is the current state of the gr-0/0/0.0 interface?

Step 4.7 Configure an IPv6 address on your tunnel interface. Refer to the lab diagram for the IPv6 address to use. When you are satisfied, activate your changes with the commit command. Step 4.8 Verify you can reach the remote student devices IPv6 tunnel address using the ping command. Question: How is the IPv6 traffic forwarded across the tunnel?

Step 4.9 Issue a run show route 2001:c0ff:ee:100::z command to show that the IPv6 destination is, indeed, the tunnel interface. Step 4.10 Issue a run show interfaces gr-0/0/0.0 command. Note the IP-Header line.

Question: What does the IP Header line tell you?

Lab 78 IPv6 (Optional)

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: What does the number 47 in the IP Header line signify?

Step 4.11 Issue a run show route 192.168.z.1 command to see how our encapsulated IPv6 packets are leaving the router. Question: What have these outputs proven?

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 7.

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IPv6 (Optional) Lab 79

Junos Intermediate Routing

Lab 710 IPv6 (Optional)

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Lab 8
IS-IS (Optional)

Overview
This lab demonstrates configuration and monitoring of the IS-IS protocol. In this lab, you use the command-line interface (CLI) to configure, monitor, and troubleshoot IS-IS. The lab is available in two formats: a high-level format designed to make you think through each step and a detailed format that offers step-by-step instructions complete with sample output from most commands. By completing this lab, you will perform the following tasks: Configure and monitor a multi-level IS-IS network. Perform basic IS-IS troubleshooting.

www.juniper.net

IS-IS (Optional) Lab 81 11.a.11.1R1.10

Junos Intermediate Routing

Part 1: Configuring and Monitoring IS-IS


In this lab part, you configure and monitor a multi-level IS-IS network. You will first prepare your device by removing all filter-based forwarding (FBF) configuration. Next you define a router ID for your assigned device. You then configure your device to participate in a multi-level IS-IS network and verify operations using CLI operational mode commands. Step 1.1 Enter configuration mode and delete the configuration defined under the [edit routing-instances] and [edit firewall] hierarchy levels. Next, remove the application of the input filter assigned to the ge-0/0/4.11v interface. Step 1.2 Navigate to the [edit routing-options] hierarchy level and remove the defined routing table group and the application of that routing table group for interface routes. Step 1.3 Variable references are used throughout the labs to distinguish various parts of CLI input. Variable v is used for the vlan-id remainders as per the table in the lab diagrams. Variable z is used to distinguish IP addresses on the local and remote devices. Define the router ID on your router using the IP address assigned to the lo0 interface as the input value. Step 1.4 Navigate to the [edit interfaces] hierarchy level and add family ISO and the Network Entity Title (NET) address to the lo0 interface. Pad each octet of the router ID with leading zeros to form the system ID portion of the NET address. For instance, if the routers lo0 address is 192.168.1.1, the system ID portion of the net address will be 1921.6800.1001. The N-selector (SEL) field is 00. Step 1.5 Add family iso to the transit interfaces. Step 1.6 Navigate to the [edit protocols isis] hierarchy level and configure IS-IS levels. Make interfaces lo0, ge-0/0/1 and ge-0/0/2 level 2 only. Refer to the network diagram as necessary and remember to include lo0.0. Step 1.7 Activate the configuration and issue the run show isis adjacency command. Question: Which neighbor state is shown for the listed interfaces?

Lab 82 IS-IS (Optional)

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Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Which value is listed under the L (Level) column?

Step 1.8 Issue the run show isis interface command to display IS-IS interface details. Question: Which interfaces are listed in the output?

Step 1.9 Issue the run show isis database command to display the IS-IS database details. Question: How many link-state protocol data units (LSPs) exist in the IS-IS database?

Step 1.10 Display routes advertised to and received from IS-IS using the run show isis route command.
Note

Before proceeding, ensure that the remote team in your pod finishes the previous step. Step 1.11 Issue the run show route protocol isis command to view IS-IS routes installed in the routing table. Question: Which IS-IS routes exist in the routing table?

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IS-IS (Optional) Lab 83

Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Why are the 172.20.66.0/30 and 172.20.77.0/30 routes not listed in the generated output?

Step 1.12 Configure your device with a level 1 adjacency to the virtual router. Refer to the network diagram for this lab for the area and interface details. Once it is configured, activate the configuration changes and return to operational mode. Step 1.13 Issue the show isis adjacency command to verify the current IS-IS adjacency details. Question: How many IS-IS adjacencies exist and what are the states of those adjacencies?

Step 1.14 Issue the show isis database command to display the current IS-IS database. Question: How many link-state protocol data units (LSPs) exist in the IS-IS database now?

Question: Which command lists only level 2 entries in the IS-IS database?

Step 1.15 Enter configuration mode and navigate to [edit protocols isis]. Issue the save /var/tmp/working-isis.conf command to save the current IS-IS configuration.

Lab 84 IS-IS (Optional)

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Junos Intermediate Routing

STOP

Do not proceed until the remote team finishes Part 1.

Part 2: Performing Basic IS-IS Troubleshooting


In this lab part, you perform basic IS-IS troubleshooting. First, you modify your devices current configuration to make it incompatible with the attached virtual router. You then enable IS-IS traceoptions to log protocol activity. Finally, you display the traceoptions log to view the associated errors. Step 2.1 Modify the ISO NET address to cause a mismatch with the virtual router. Step 2.2 Activate the configuration change and issue the run show isis adjacency command. Question: How many IS-IS adjacencies does your assigned device currently have?

Step 2.3 Navigate to [edit protocols isis] and define traceoptions for IS-IS so that IS-IS errors write to a file named trace-isis. Include the detail option with the error flag to capture additional details for the ISIS errors. Activate the configuration change using the commit command. Step 2.4 Issue the run show log trace-isis command to view the contents written to the trace-isis trace file. Question: Does the generated error in the trace file explain the current IS-IS adjacency issue?

Step 2.5 Navigate to [edit interfaces lo0 unit 0] and delete the incorrect NET address and activate the correct address. Configure IS-IS Level 1 for simple authentication with juniper as the password. Step 2.6 Issue the run clear log trace-isis command to clear the contents of the defined trace file. Wait a moment, then issue the run show log trace-isis command to view any new entries in the trace file.
www.juniper.net IS-IS (Optional) Lab 85

Junos Intermediate Routing

Question: Does the generated error in the trace file explain the current IS-IS adjacency issue?

Step 2.7 Issue the delete command and confirm the operation to delete the current IS-IS configuration. Next, issue the load merge /var/tmp/working-isis.conf command to load the configuration you saved earlier in this lab. Activate the restored configuration and return to operational mode using the commit and-quit command. Step 2.8 Verify that the IS-IS adjacencies have returned to the Up state between your device and the directly attached virtual router. Question: Did the IS-IS adjacency with the directly attached virtual router return to the Up state?

STOP

Tell your instructor that you have completed Lab 8.

Lab 86 IS-IS (Optional)

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Junos Intermediate Routing


Appendix A: Lab Diagrams

Junos Intermediate Routing

A2 Lab Diagrams

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Lab Diagrams A3

Junos Intermediate Routing

A4 Lab Diagrams

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Lab Diagrams A5

Junos Intermediate Routing

A6 Lab Diagrams

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Lab Diagrams A7

Junos Intermediate Routing

A8 Lab Diagrams

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