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AAIS 20 AAIS 20 C R II T II C A L T H II N K II N G A B O U T R A C E :: CR T CAL TH NK NG ABOUT RACE

G L O B A L IIZ A T IIO N A N D T H E S O C IIA L C O N S T R U C T IIO N O F B L A C K N E S S GL O B A L I Z A T I O N A N D T H E SO C I A L CO N S T R U C T I O N O F BL A C K N E S S LOBAL ZAT ON AND THE OC AL ONSTRUCT ON OF LACKNESS
T. HASAN JOHNSON, PH.D. SPRING 2012 Course Meeting Time: T/Th 9:30-10:45am Phone: (559) 278-8805 Class Location: McKee-Fisk, #204 Email: THJohnson@csufresno.edu Office Location: Science Building 1, Rm#168 Office Hours: Mon 1:45-2:45pm, Tue/Thu 1112pm

C O U R S E D E S C R II P T II O N COU R S E DES CR IPT ION O U R S E E S C R P T O N That White girl is fine but her Brown friend is too fat That guy is cute but that other one is too dark!* * Actual quotes from CSU Fresno students! What does race mean? What does it mean to be Black, Brown, White, or Yellow in 2009? Who made this colorcaste system and why do we still use it? How does race get defined and who benefits? How does it relate to other social divisions such as color, class, privilege, gender, sexuality? Does the prospect of a Black president suggest that race has changed? This course will focus on the role race plays in the construction of ethnicities in Africana contexts, from its formal inception to the contemporary moment, and explore how the concept of race functions in todays highpaced, hyper-technological era. Students will be expected to read weekly assignments, participate in class discussions, complete online assignments, and articulate how race functions in their own life experiences while making sense of blackness in the new millennium. C A T A L O G D E S C R II P T II O N CAT AL OG DES C R IPT ION A T A L O G E S C R P T O N Uses critical thinking skills to discuss, analyze, and critique centuries-old ideas on race/ethnicity and the social policies that were enacted to promote prejudice and discrimination against minorities. Special focus on people of African descent and American Indians. R E Q U II R E D C O U R S E T E X T S RE Q U I R E D CO U R S E TE XT S E Q U R E D O U R S E E X T S Collins, Patricia Hill. Black Sexual Politics: African Americans, Gender, and the New Racism. New York: Routledge, 2005. ISBN: 0-415-95150-X (Approximately $33) Marable, Manning. The Great Wells of Democracy: Meaning of Race in American Life. New York: Basic Civitas Books, 2002. ISBN: 0-465-04394-1 (Approximately $20) Online reading assignments posted on BlackBoard.

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G R A D II N G P L A N GR A D I N G PL A N R A D N G L A N In-Class Oral Reviews Monthly Text Reviews (3) Midterm Exam Group Presentations Final Exam (10%) (30%) (20%) (20%) (20%)

G R A D II N G C R II T E R II A GR A D I N G CR I T E R I A R A D N G R T E R A

90 - 100 A 80 - 89 B 70 - 79 C 60 - 69 D (59 and under is an F)

C O U R S E A S S II G N M E N T S COU R S E AS S IG N MEN T S O U R S E S S G N M E N T S Achievement of the preceding goals will be demonstrated by satisfactory completion of exams, papers, group work projects, and class attendance outlined below. 1. In-Class Oral Reviews (10%): At the beginning of the semester (likely in the first class), students will each sign up to give a presentation on one of the class readings on the day were scheduled to discuss it. Presentations will be 5 minutes, and should summarizein the students own wordswhat the reading covered in detail. Students are expected to articulate the main idea of the reading, and explain why it is important. These presentations cannot be made up, so if a student is absent on the day of their scheduled presentation, they will receive a zero. ONLINE WEEKLY NOTES RUBRIC
CATEGORY +7-10% Student accurately summarized the reading, and gave examples from the text. The student presented within five minutes. Student gave an overview of the main idea of the reading, while taking the class +4-6% Student partially summarized the reading, but did not give examples from the text. The student either went slightly over on time or slightly under. Student presentation was only partially organized, and did not take the class through + 0 -3 % Student did not summarize the article, and did not give examples from the text. The student was grossly over or under on time, or had to be cut off by the professor or timekeeper. Student presentation was severely disorganized, and had little distinguishable order.

Summary

Timely

Organization

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through a step by step explication of the text.

the article sequentially.

2. Monthly Text Reviews (3) (30%): Students will submit their original notes of at least one article per week, due on the first day of class for the week. Although notes will not be lengthy, one page for a reading of your choice for the week, students must both summarize and provide an overview of one of the films watched in class for the week. Assignments are weekly and no late submissions will be accepted. Notes should be turned in by Thursday at noon. These should be turned in electronically via Blackboard ONLY (no exceptions). Discussing them in class is also part of this grade. ONLINE WEEKLY NOTES RUBRIC
CATEGORY Summarization +13-15% Student writes at least 1 singlespaced page and clearly describes what the article is about. Student complies with format guidelines. Student identifies the main points of the article and has critiqued them thoroughly. +9-12% Student writes less than 1 singlespaced page and does not accurately describe what the article is about. +5-8% Student summarizes most of the article accurately, but has overlooked key issues. +0-4% Student has great difficulty summarizing the article, writings are too short.

Identifies important information

The student lists all the main points, but fails to critique the article.

Articulates Opinion

Student accurately articulates at least 3 opinions about the article and explains critiques.

Student articulates at least 2 opinions about the article and gives a reasonable explanation of critiques.

The student lists few of the main points, overquoting the article for reference. S/he highlights unimportant points. Student accurately articulates at least 1 opinion in the article. Explanation of critique is weak.

The student cannot identify important information with accuracy.

Student has difficulty articulating any opinions about the article.

3. Midterm and Final Exam (20% each): Midterm exam will be given at mid-semester to assess student progression. MIDTERM RUBRIC
CATEGORY Errors +18-20% Most (90100%) of the answers have no errors. +15-17% Almost all (8089+%) answers have no errors. +13-16% Some (70-79+%) of the answers have no errors. +9-12% Some (6069+%) of the answers have no errors. +0-8% Most (059%) answers have errors.

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Completen ess

Answers are complete and presented in a neat, clear, organized fashion.

Answers are mostly complete and are presented in a neat and organized fashion that is usually easy to read.

Answers are mostly incomplete and are presented in an organized fashion but may be hard to read at times.

Answers are fairly incomplete and are presented in an somewhat organized fashion but are often hard to read at times.

Answers are incomplete and appear sloppy and unorganize d.

4. Group Presentation (20%): Students will be expected to present their own research and prepare presentations based on the analysis of their findings. The presentations should discuss the social and political significance of their findings. Normally, the presentation would be the same subject as the final research paper. GROUP PRESENTATION RUBRIC
CATEGORY Preparedness +9-10% Student is completely prepared and has obviously rehearsed. Stays on topic all (90-100%) of the time. Hands out material or uses PowerPoint to disseminate info. Materials are strongly tied to presentation (90100% relevance). Speaks clearly and audibly all (90100%) the time, and does not mispronounce words. Looks relaxed and confident. Establishes eye contact. Group melded individual projects into a cohesive group presentation where each subject contributed to a central argument. +6-8% Student seems pretty prepared but might have needed a couple more rehearsals. Stays on topic most (70-80+%) of the time. Hands out material that is somewhat related to the topic of discussion (7080% relevance). Speaks clearly and audibly all (70-80+%) the time, but mispronounces a word. Establishes some eye contact. +4-6% The student is somewhat prepared, but it is clear that rehearsal was lacking. Stays on topic some (50-60+%) of the time. Hands out materials that are not easily relatable to presentation (5060%). + 0 -3 % Student does not seem at all prepared to present.

Stays on Topic

Dissemination of Information

It was hard to tell what the topic was. Does not hand out or display any pertinent information.

Speaks Clearly and Audibly

Speaks clearly and audibly most (5060+%) of the time. Mispronounces several words. Establish a limited amount of eye contact. Group tried to meld individual projects into a cohesive group presentation, but each subject seem to stray from a central argument.

Often mumbles or cannot be understood OR mispronounces a number of words. Does not establish eye contact.

Group Cohesion

Group somewhat melded individual projects into a group presentation where each subject mostly contributed to a

Group poorly melded individual projects into a group presentation leading to an incoherent project.

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Content

Shows a full understanding of the article being presented.

central argument. Shows a good understanding of the article being presented.

Shows a good understanding of parts of the article being presented.

Does not seem to understand the article very well.

W E E K L Y N O T E S G U II D E L II N E S WE E K L Y NO T E S GU I D E L I N E S E E K L Y O T E S U D E L N E S Weekly notes will be submitted weekly on BlackBoard. You should summarize and critique at least one weekly readings of your choice per week. This means critically discuss the uses and problems of each of the articles you chose and include your reflections on the material conferred. Also, you MUST include page references to specific pages in the reading! 12-pt font size Times New Roman font 1.5 point line-spacing Minimum 1 page of detailed notes

No late papers will be accepted so submit them on BlackBoard by the last class of each week (by class time, so be prepared to discuss them!). Also, only submitted reviews on BlackBoard will be accepted, emails or faxes will only be acknowledged with the preobtained permission of the professor.

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Submit at least a paragraph review of the film watched in class. Submissions must take place weekly on BlackBoards discussion forum pre-established by the professor for each film (each discussion forum will be outlined by the title of the sectionthe films title). Response to others reviews/statements would be appreciated but are not required. L E A R N II N G O B JJ E C T II V E S LE A R N I N G OB J E C T I V E S E A R N N G B E C T V E S 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Students will learn relevant histories and theories regarding race from the fields of: Africana Studies, Media Studies, and History. Students will analyze historical and theoretical issues regarding the development of the concept of race over the last two centuries. Students will compare overlapping forms of socio-political oppression and describe how they function in society. Students will learn to formulate their own arguments and pose them to the class. Students will apply concepts (in an interdisciplinary fashion) to social and political issues of today.

L E A R N II N G E X P E R II E N C E S LE A R N I N G EX P E R I E N C E S E A R N N G X P E R E N C E S 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Students will attend lectures, read assigned texts, participate in class discussions, and watch in-class films. Students will write reviews on reading assignments. Students will read articles regarding micro and macro-oppressive forms of intersectionality and multidimensionality. Students will write out a protracted argument and present a unique solution regarding the problem of race. Students will present their research to the class and scrutinize each others work, engaging critique from student peers. L E A R N II N G O U T C O M E S LE A R N I N G OU T C O M E S E A R N N G U T C O M E S 1. 2. Students completing this course will be able to list the primary scholar/activists and explicate their theories. Students will learn how to write formal short reviews of academic argument-pieces, beginning with writing an abstract, an outline, and the primary sections of a paper in drafts. Students will be able to think critically about concepts of interdisciplinarity and multidimensionality, and apply them to contemporary issues. Students will learn how to formulate an original argument, develop it, and articulate in both a protracted text and an oral presentation. Students will become familiar public debate, learning to defend an argument while accepting critique. C L A S S P O L II C II E S CLAS S POL I CI E S L A S S O L C E S

3. 4. 5.

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A. Attendance and Absences: A class roster will be circulated during each class meeting. It is the students responsibility to sign it. The student is also responsible for securing notes on class lectures and announcements. B. Make-up essays and extensions of due dates: Permission for approved absences must be submitted in writing prior to missing class. Requests for an extension or make-up opportunity must be submitted prior to the assignment due date, in writing. However, submission of request in no way guarantees professors approval. C. Cell phone policy: cell phones may be kept on vibrate or silent only. If a call must be answered, it must be answered outside of the class. No text messaging or emailing should be done in class. In the best interest of the class, please be considerate of your classmates by following these guidelines. U N II V E R S II T Y P O L II C II E S UN IV ERS IT Y POL I CI ES N V E R S T Y O L C E S STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES: Upon identifying themselves to the instructor and the university, students with disabilities will receive reasonable accommodation for learning and evaluation. For more information, contact Services to Students with Disabilities in Madden Library 1049 (278-2811). CHEATING AND PLAGIARISM: Cheating is the actual or attempted practice of fraudulent or deceptive acts for the purpose of improving one's grade or obtaining course credit; such acts also include assisting another student to do so. Typically, such acts occur in relation to examinations. However, it is the intent of this definition that the term 'cheating' not be limited to examination situations only, but that it include any and all actions by a student that are intended to gain an unearned academic advantage by fraudulent or deceptive means. Plagiarism is a specific form of cheating which consists of the misuse of the published and/or unpublished works of others by misrepresenting the material (i.e., their intellectual property) so used as one's own work. Penalties for cheating and plagiarism range from a 0 or F on a particular assignment, through an F for the course, to expulsion from the university. For more information on the University's policy regarding cheating and plagiarism, refer to the Class Schedule (Legal Notices on Cheating and Plagiarism) or the University Catalog (Policies and Regulations). Any student wishing to submit a written assignment that is the partial or entire product of work completed for another course must FIRST obtain WRITTEN permission from the instructor specifying the extent to which the earlier work is acceptable, and also include a copy of the earlier work with the current submission. Note that in NO case is a paper that was prepared for another course acceptable as a submission in the General Education courses. Failure to comply with these requirements will result in the initiation of actions regarding breaches of policy on Cheating and Plagiarism. COMPUTERS: At California State University, Fresno, computers and communications links to remote resources are recognized as being integral to the education and research experience. Every student is required to have his/her own computer or have other personal access to a workstation (including a modem and a printer) with all the recommended software. The minimum and recommended standards for the workstations and software, which may vary by academic major, are updated periodically and are available from Information Technology Services (http://www/csufresno.edu/ITS/) or the

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University Bookstore. In the curriculum and class assignments, students are presumed to have 24-hour access to a computer workstation and the necessary communication links to the University's information resources. DISRUPTIVE CLASSROOM BEHAVIOR: The classroom is a special environment in which students and faculty come together to promote learning and growth. It is essential to this learning environment that respect for the rights of others seeking to learn, respect for the professionalism of the instructor, and the general goals of academic freedom are maintained. Differences of viewpoint or concerns should be expressed in terms which are supportive of the learning process, creating an environment in which students and faculty may learn to reason with clarity and compassion, to share of themselves without losing their identities, and to develop and understanding of the community in which they live. Student conduct which disrupts the learning process shall not be tolerated and may lead to disciplinary action and/or removal from class. COPYRIGHT POLICY: Copyright laws and fair use policies protect the rights of those who have produced the material. The copy in this course has been provided for private study, scholarship, or research. Other uses may require permission from the copyright holder. The user of this work is responsible for adhering to copyright law of the U.S. (Title 17, U.S. Code). To help you familiarize yourself with copyright and fair use policies, the University encourages you to visit its copyright web page. http://www.lib.csufresno.edu/libraryinformation/campus/copyright/copyrtpolicyfull.pdf Digital Campus course web sites contain material protected by copyrights held by the instructor, other individuals or institutions. Such material is used for educational purposes in accord with copyright law and/or with permission given by the owners of the original material. You may download one copy of the materials on any single computer for noncommercial, personal, or educational purposes only, provided that you (1) do not modify it, (2) use it only for the duration of this course, and (3) include both this notice and any copyright notice originally included with the material. Beyond this use, no material from the course web site may be copied, reproduced, re-published, uploaded, posted, transmitted, or distributed in any way without the permission of the original copyright holder. The instructor assumes no responsibility for individuals who improperly use copyrighted material placed on the web site. HONOR CODE: Members of the CSU Fresno academic community adhere to principles of academic integrity and mutual respect while engaged in university work and related activities. You should: a) understand or seek clarification about expectations for academic integrity in this course (including no cheating, plagiarism and inappropriate collaboration) b) neither give nor receive unauthorized aid on examinations or other course work that is used by the instructor as the basis of grading. c) take responsibility to monitor academic dishonesty in any form and to report it to the instructor or other appropriate official for action. Instructors may require students to sign a statement at the end of all exams and assignments that "I have done my own work and have neither given nor received

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unauthorized assistance on this work." If you are going to use this statement, include it here. Please refer to the policies document at http://academicaffairs.csufresno.edu/undergrad_studies/RequiiredSyllabusPolicyStateme nts.htm SPECIAL NOTE: This syllabus is subject to change in relation to the needs of the class (and in the best interest of learning) as assessed by the instructor.

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