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The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are facilitating cooperation ininternational law, international

security, economic development, social progress, human rights, and achievement of world peace. The UN was founded in 1945 after World War II to replace the League of Nations, to stop wars between countries, and to provide a platform for dialogue. It contains multiple subsidiary organizations to carry out its missions. There are currently 193 member states, including every internationally recognised sovereign state in the world but the Vatican City. From its offices around the world, the UN and its specialized agencies decide on substantive and administrative issues in regular meetings held throughout the year. The organization has six principal organs: the General Assembly (the main deliberative assembly); the Security Council (for deciding certain resolutions for peace and security); the Economic and Social Council (for assisting in promoting international economic and social cooperation and development); the Secretariat (for providing studies, information, and facilities needed by the UN); the International Court of Justice (the primary judicial organ); and the United Nations Trusteeship Council (which is currently inactive). Other prominent UN System agencies include the World Health Organization (WHO), the World Food Programme (WFP) and United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). The UN's most visible public figure is the Secretary-General, currently Ban Ki-moon of South Korea, who attained the post in 2007. The United Nations Headquarters resides in international territory in New York City, with further main offices atGeneva, Nairobi, and Vienna. The organization is financed from assessed and voluntary contributions from its member states, and has six official languages: Arabic, Chinese, English, French, Russian, and Spanish.[2]
No Acronyms Logo . Established in

Agency

Headquarters

Head

FAO

Food and Agriculture Organization

Rome, Italy

Jacques Diouf

1945

IAEA

International Atomic Energy Agency

Vienna, Austria

Yukiya Amano

1957

ICAO

International Civil Aviation Organization

Montreal, Canada

Raymond Benjamin

1947

IFAD

International Fund for Agricultural Development

1977 Rome, Italy Kanayo F.

Nwanze

ILO

International Labour Organization

Geneva, Switzerland

Juan Somava

1946 (1919)

IMO

International Maritime Organization

London, United Kingdom

Efthimios E. Mitropoulos

1948

IMF

International Monetary Fund

Washington, D.C., USA

Christine Lagarde

1945 (1944)

ITU

International Telecommunication Union

Geneva, Switzerland

Hamadoun Tour

1947 (1865)

UNESCO

United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

Paris, France

Irina Bokova

1946

10

UNIDO

United Nations Industrial Development Organization

Vienna, Austria

Kandeh Yumkella

1967

11

UPU

Universal Postal Union

Bern, Switzerland

Edouard Dayan

1947 (1874)

12

WB

World Bank

Washington, D.C., USA

Robert B. Zoellick

1945 (1944)

13

WFP

World Food Programme

Rome, Italy

Josette Sheeran

1963

14

WHO

World Health Organization

Geneva, Switzerland

Margaret Chan

1948

15

WIPO

World Intellectual Property Organization

Geneva, Switzerland

Francis Gurry

1974

16

WMO

World Meteorological Organization

Geneva, Switzerland

Alexander Bedritsky

1950 (1873)

17

UNWTO

World Tourism Organization

Madrid, Spain

Taleb Rifai

1974

1. A chemical change must occur. You start with one compound and turn it into another. That's an example of a chemical change. A steel garbage can rusting is a chemical reaction. That rusting happens because the iron (Fe) in the metal combines with oxygen (O2) in the atmosphere. When a refrigerator or air conditioner cools the air, there is no reaction. That change in temperature is a physical change. Nevertheless, a chemical reaction can happen inside of the air conditioner. 2. A reaction could include ions, molecules, or pure atoms. We said molecules in the previous paragraph, but a reaction can happen with anything, just as long as a chemical change occurs (not a physical one). If you put pure hydrogen gas (H2) and pure oxygen gas in a room, they can be involved in a
rate of reaction will have the atoms bonding to form water very slowly. If you were to add a spark, those gases would create a reaction that would result in a huge explosion. Chemists would call that spark a catalyst. 3. Single reactions often happen as part of a larger series of reactions. Take something as simple as moving your arm. The

reaction. The slow

requires sugars for energy. Those sugars need to be metabolized. You'll find that proteinsneed to move in a certain way to
contraction of that muscle

make the muscle contract. A whole series (hundreds actually) of different reactions are needed to make that simple movement happen.