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Knit So Fine

D e s i g n s w i t h S k i n n y Ya r n

Lisa R. Myers,
Laura Grutzeck,
and Carol J. Sulcoski
Introduction
skinny yarns get a really bad rap. knitters somehow have the idea that they’re slow,
fussy, or old-fashioned. We’re here to prove otherwise. thin yarns offer a world We’ll give you some small
of possibilities; in fact, they can do anything a thick yarn can do, and more—and projects that you can finish
often, they do it better. Projects knitted with thin yarns can be quick, easy, daring, or quickly for a satisfying sense of
bold—though it’s certainly true that they can be elaborate, refined, or demure. the accomplishment. We’ll also show
you how to use fine yarns in
projects in this book are designed to disprove the myths you may have heard about
different ways—double-stranding
fine yarns and to show you things you haven’t imagined.
or knitting at looser gauges—for
times when speed is important.

Style showcases some of the


We’ll start our journey by educating What is a “Fine” Yarn? contemporary and fashionable
you about fine yarns: what they are, For purposes of this book, a “fine” yarn is any yarn that knits at a ways to use fine yarns—no
the many advantages of knitting with gauge finer than worsted weight (i.e., yarns that knit up at 5.5, 6, potato-sack garments here.
fine yarns, and tips and techniques to 7, or more stitches per inch, or yarns that are classified by the Craft
make the process more enjoyable. Then Yarn Council in categories 3, 2, 1, or finer). Admittedly, this is an Shine contains boundary-busting
we’ll show you some patterns: patterns arbitrary way to look at it, but our experience is that most knitters possibilities and more advanced
that are contemporary and stylish and draw a conceptual line between worsted-weight yarns (i.e., yarns that projects to get your creative juices
demonstrate some of the wonderful uses knit up at 5 stitches to the inch) and thinner yarns. We’ve tried to use flowing, including lace, traveling
of fine yarns. To make it even easier to a variety of yarn weights within the category of “fine” yarns so you’ll stitches, and cables.
dive in, we’ve grouped the patterns into have ample opportunity to experiment with a variety of skinny yarns.
four sections, depending on the kind of Throughout the book, we’ve
project you’re looking for: standard yarn, Needle sizes, and Gauges included sidebars to help you
GAuGe yARN size NeeDLe size (stitcHes/4”)
through unfamiliar techniques
Simplicity includes patterns that #1 Super Fine U.S. 1–3 27–32 and design challenges, and to
are particularly accessible to knitters (fingering) 2.25–3.25 mm point you toward areas you may
who don’t have a lot of experience #2 Fine (sport) U.S. 3–5 23–26 want to explore in greater depth
with fine yarns; it’s the perfect way to (sport) 3.25–3.75 mm on your own.
get accustomed to working with thin #3 Light (DK) U.S. 5–7 21–24
needles and skinny yarns. (DK) 3.75–4.5 mm So cast aside those misconcep-
#4 Medium U.S. 7–9 16–20 tions, abandon those preconceived
Speed debunks the myth that projects (worsted) 4.5–5.5 mm notions and allow us to bust some
in fine yarns take forever to finish. #5 Bulky U.S. 9–11 12–15 myths. It’s time to get the skinny
(chunky) 5.5–8 mm on fine yarns.

2 3
Introduction
skinny yarns get a really bad rap. knitters somehow have the idea that they’re slow,
fussy, or old-fashioned. We’re here to prove otherwise. thin yarns offer a world We’ll give you some small
of possibilities; in fact, they can do anything a thick yarn can do, and more—and projects that you can finish
often, they do it better. Projects knitted with thin yarns can be quick, easy, daring, or quickly for a satisfying sense of
bold—though it’s certainly true that they can be elaborate, refined, or demure. the accomplishment. We’ll also show
you how to use fine yarns in
projects in this book are designed to disprove the myths you may have heard about
different ways—double-stranding
fine yarns and to show you things you haven’t imagined.
or knitting at looser gauges—for
times when speed is important.

Style showcases some of the


We’ll start our journey by educating What is a “Fine” Yarn? contemporary and fashionable
you about fine yarns: what they are, For purposes of this book, a “fine” yarn is any yarn that knits at a ways to use fine yarns—no
the many advantages of knitting with gauge finer than worsted weight (i.e., yarns that knit up at 5.5, 6, potato-sack garments here.
fine yarns, and tips and techniques to 7, or more stitches per inch, or yarns that are classified by the Craft
make the process more enjoyable. Then Yarn Council in categories 3, 2, 1, or finer). Admittedly, this is an Shine contains boundary-busting
we’ll show you some patterns: patterns arbitrary way to look at it, but our experience is that most knitters possibilities and more advanced
that are contemporary and stylish and draw a conceptual line between worsted-weight yarns (i.e., yarns that projects to get your creative juices
demonstrate some of the wonderful uses knit up at 5 stitches to the inch) and thinner yarns. We’ve tried to use flowing, including lace, traveling
of fine yarns. To make it even easier to a variety of yarn weights within the category of “fine” yarns so you’ll stitches, and cables.
dive in, we’ve grouped the patterns into have ample opportunity to experiment with a variety of skinny yarns.
four sections, depending on the kind of Throughout the book, we’ve
project you’re looking for: standard yarn, Needle sizes, and Gauges included sidebars to help you
GAuGe yARN size NeeDLe size (stitcHes/4”)
through unfamiliar techniques
Simplicity includes patterns that #1 Super Fine U.S. 1–3 27–32 and design challenges, and to
are particularly accessible to knitters (fingering) 2.25–3.25 mm point you toward areas you may
who don’t have a lot of experience #2 Fine (sport) U.S. 3–5 23–26 want to explore in greater depth
with fine yarns; it’s the perfect way to (sport) 3.25–3.75 mm on your own.
get accustomed to working with thin #3 Light (DK) U.S. 5–7 21–24
needles and skinny yarns. (DK) 3.75–4.5 mm So cast aside those misconcep-
#4 Medium U.S. 7–9 16–20 tions, abandon those preconceived
Speed debunks the myth that projects (worsted) 4.5–5.5 mm notions and allow us to bust some
in fine yarns take forever to finish. #5 Bulky U.S. 9–11 12–15 myths. It’s time to get the skinny
(chunky) 5.5–8 mm on fine yarns.

2 3
Bohus-Inspired Yoke Pullover
inspired by the beautiful sweaters of the swedish Bohus tradition,
this yoked pullover is knitted in a laceweight wool/silk blend yarn
that is double-stranded throughout for quicker knitting and greater
color interest. the soft heathery color gradations in the yoke are
achieved by changing the color of one strand at a time according
to a regular stripe sequence. the sweater is worked in the round
from the hem to the yoke; a bit of lace decorates the three-quarter-
length sleeves.

Finished size 32 (36, 40, 44, 48)” Needles Body and sleeves—U.S. size Stitch Guide
(81.5 [91.5, 101.5, 112, 122] cm) bust 4 (3.5 mm): 24” (60 cm) circular (cir) YOKE COLOR PATTERN
circumference. Sweater shown measures and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (dpn).
32” (81.5 cm). Edging—U.S. size 3 (3 mm): 24” (60 Work 5 (6, 6, 7, 7) rounds of each
cm) cir and set of 4 or 5 dpn. Adjust of the following color combinations.
yarn Laceweight. needle size if necessary to obtain the 2 strands CC1.
Shown here: Jaggerspun Zephyr (50% correct gauge. 1 strand each of CC1 and CC2.
merino wool, 50% tussah silk; 630 yd 2 strands CC2.
[576 m]/2 oz): ice blue (MC) 3 (4, 4, Notions Markers (m); stitch holders or 1 strand each of CC2 and CC3.
4, 5) balls; marine blue (CC1), Aegean waste yarn; safety pin or small stitch 2 strands CC3.
blue (CC2), juniper (CC3), peacock holder; tapestry needle. 1 strand each of CC3 and CC4.
(CC4), jade (CC5), and teal (CC6), 1 2 strands CC4.
ball each. Gauge 28 stitches and 40 rounds = 1 strand each of CC4 and CC5.
4” (10 cm) in stockinette stitch worked 2 strands CC5.
in the round on larger needles with two 1 strand each of CC5 and CC6.
strands of yarn. 2 strands CC6.

4 5
Bohus-Inspired Yoke Pullover
inspired by the beautiful sweaters of the swedish Bohus tradition,
this yoked pullover is knitted in a laceweight wool/silk blend yarn
that is double-stranded throughout for quicker knitting and greater
color interest. the soft heathery color gradations in the yoke are
achieved by changing the color of one strand at a time according
to a regular stripe sequence. the sweater is worked in the round
from the hem to the yoke; a bit of lace decorates the three-quarter-
length sleeves.

Finished size 32 (36, 40, 44, 48)” Needles Body and sleeves—U.S. size Stitch Guide
(81.5 [91.5, 101.5, 112, 122] cm) bust 4 (3.5 mm): 24” (60 cm) circular (cir) YOKE COLOR PATTERN
circumference. Sweater shown measures and set of 4 or 5 double-pointed (dpn).
32” (81.5 cm). Edging—U.S. size 3 (3 mm): 24” (60 Work 5 (6, 6, 7, 7) rounds of each
cm) cir and set of 4 or 5 dpn. Adjust of the following color combinations.
yarn Laceweight. needle size if necessary to obtain the 2 strands CC1.
Shown here: Jaggerspun Zephyr (50% correct gauge. 1 strand each of CC1 and CC2.
merino wool, 50% tussah silk; 630 yd 2 strands CC2.
[576 m]/2 oz): ice blue (MC) 3 (4, 4, Notions Markers (m); stitch holders or 1 strand each of CC2 and CC3.
4, 5) balls; marine blue (CC1), Aegean waste yarn; safety pin or small stitch 2 strands CC3.
blue (CC2), juniper (CC3), peacock holder; tapestry needle. 1 strand each of CC3 and CC4.
(CC4), jade (CC5), and teal (CC6), 1 2 strands CC4.
ball each. Gauge 28 stitches and 40 rounds = 1 strand each of CC4 and CC5.
4” (10 cm) in stockinette stitch worked 2 strands CC5.
in the round on larger needles with two 1 strand each of CC5 and CC6.
strands of yarn. 2 strands CC6.

4 5
GALLERY OF PROJECTS

Contents
siMPLicity
Ruffle Scarf
Drapey Silk Top
Cabled Vest
Fair Isle Jacket
Cowlneck Pullover
Kimono Top

sPeeD
Ribby Vest
Anemone Beret
Eyelet Halter
Mohair T-Neck Top
Dolman Top

styLe
Skater Top
Lace-Trimmed Raglan
Wrap Dress DRAPEY SILK TOP EYELET HALTER ELBOW-LENGTH FINGERLESS GLOVES

Bamboo Skirt
Asymmetric Cardigan

sHiNe
Traveling Stitch Legwarmers
Elbow-Length Fingerless Gloves
Bohus-Inspired Pullover
Lattice Lace Pullover
Lace Stole
Zip-Front Hoodie

WRAP DRESS

6 COWLNECK PULLOVER DOLMAN TOP TRAVELING STITCH LEGWARMERS SKATER TOP 7


GALLERY OF PROJECTS

Contents
siMPLicity
Ruffle Scarf
Drapey Silk Top
Cabled Vest
Fair Isle Jacket
Cowlneck Pullover
Kimono Top

sPeeD
Ribby Vest
Anemone Beret
Eyelet Halter
Mohair T-Neck Top
Dolman Top

styLe
Skater Top
Lace-Trimmed Raglan
Wrap Dress DRAPEY SILK TOP EYELET HALTER ELBOW-LENGTH FINGERLESS GLOVES

Bamboo Skirt
Asymmetric Cardigan

sHiNe
Traveling Stitch Legwarmers
Elbow-Length Fingerless Gloves
Bohus-Inspired Pullover
Lattice Lace Pullover
Lace Stole
Zip-Front Hoodie

WRAP DRESS

6 COWLNECK PULLOVER DOLMAN TOP TRAVELING STITCH LEGWARMERS SKATER TOP 7


Knit Skinny
KNIT SO FINE: DESIGNS WITH SKINNY YARN will get knitters to look again
at the creative possibilities of thin yarns.

Perfect for all skill levels, the 20 stylish projects in Knit So Fine show that gar-
ments knitted with lightweight yarns can range from quick, easy, and daring
to bold, elaborate, refined, and sophisticated. “skinny” knits:
- are more flattering to the figure
- feel better against the skin
- are ideal for layering
- offer more versatility for fashion elements like ruching, ruffles, gauzy layers,
and drape.

Knit So Fine educates knitters about fine yarns: what they are, their advan-
tages over chunky yarns, plus tips and techniques to make the knitting process
more enjoyable. knitters will also find stylish and contemporary patterns,
including a drapey silk top, a supple zippered cable hoodie, a bamboo
skirt with stunning drape, a bohus-inspired pullover, a wrap dress, a ruffled
scarf, and much more! knitters will discover the versatility of knitting with fine
yarns—from quick knits and small projects to long-term projects that are worth
the wait.

Paperbound, 8½ × 9, 144 pages Lisa r. Myers is the author of THE JOY OF KNITTING and THE JOY OF KNITTING COMPANION. Her
100 photographs, 40 illustrations designs have been published by INTERWEAVE KNITS and Classic Elite, and Lisa designed patterns for

ISBN 978-1-59668-052-4 GETTING STARTED KNITTING (Interweave Press, 2006). She is also the owner of Rosie’s Yarn Cellar,
a retail yarn shop in Philadelphia. Lisa regularly designs patterns for her shop, including for the very
$24.95 US/$29.95 CANADA
successful RosieKnits line marketed to yarn shops across the country.
June 2008
Laura grutzeck has knitted for more than twenty years. Her patterns have appeared in STITCH ‘N
BITCH NATION and are frequently featured as part of the RosieKnits line.

Carol J. sulcoski has had designs published by Knitty.com, KnitNet.com, MenKnit.net,


Interweave Press LLC is distributed to the book
trade in the U.S. and Canada by Independent MagKnits.com, and the book BIG GIRL KNITS. She is a staff member of Rosie’s Yarn Cellar and
Publishers Group, in the U.K. and Europe by regularly designs for the RosieKnits pattern line. She is also the author of the popular knitting blog
Search Press, in New Zealand by David Bateman
Ltd., and in Australia by Keith Ainsworth Pty GoKnitInYourHat and proprietress of Black Bunny Fibers, which offers handdyed yarns and spinning fiber.
Ltd. Interweave Press LLC is also the publisher
of 14 craft magazines including Interweave
Knits, Interweave Crochet, Spin-Off, PieceWork,
and Fiberarts.