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n Vilas County authori-


ties raided an Arbor
Vitae home Monday,
arresting one suspect.
Pg. 6
Drug bust nets
250 pot plants
VOL. 126, NO. 47
$1.25
Section A
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012
VILAS COUNTY
NEWS-REVIEW
EAGLE RIVER, WI 54521 (715) 479-4421 www.vcnewsreview.com
BUS ACCIDENT An Eagle River woman was
injured when her pickup truck collided with the
rear end of a school bus on Highway 70 East in
the town of Lincoln last Tuesday just after 4 p.m.
See another photo and more details on Page 5.
Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
BIKINI RUN A bikini-clad racer took off after the green flag
dropped during Angry Daves Bikini Run for charity. The event was
part of the eighth annual Snowmobile Radar Run held on Little St.
Germain Lake in St. Germain. Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW
A record 285 teams will
converge on Eagle River for
the seventh annual LaBatt
Blue/USA Hockey Pond Hock-
ey Championship on Dollar
Lake this Friday through Sun-
day, Feb. 10-12.
The four-on-four pond hock-
ey tournament has become
one of USA Hockeys most
popular amateur events,
attracting nearly 2,000 play-
ers from 31 states.
We look forward to seeing
familiar faces and many new
teams for the experience of a
lifetime, said Ashley Bevan,
senior director of adult hockey
for USA Hockey. This years
event is shaping up to be yet
another tremendous success.
Our continued growth is a
sign, both of the success of this
event and the hard work of
our staff, sponsors and local
volunteers.
Games will get under way
on 24 rinks on the ice of Dollar
Lake, located just east of
Eagle River off Highway 70, at
8 a.m. Friday. Admission is
free to the public, and conces-
sions will be available.
The event was named the
recipient of SportTravel mag-
azines 2009 SportsTravel
Award for the best amateur
single-sport event; and last
year, NBC Sports was on hand
to capture the action and
aired its footage during NBCs
Hockey Day in America.
The exposure from last
years NBC Sports Pond Hock-
ey Special greatly increased
the level of excitement for the
2012 Labatt Blue/USA Hock-
Record 285 teams
to play pond hockey
Wisconsins open enroll-
ment application window for
the 2012-13 school year
opened Feb. 6, allowing par-
ents an opportunity to send
their children to any public
school district in the state.
The open enrollment period
for students to apply to attend
other school districts has been
expanded as a result of 2011
Wisconsin Act 114 signed by
Gov. Walker Feb. 1, according
to Northland Pines District
Administrator Mike Richie.
Under the former law,
open enrollment applications
began on the first Monday in
February and went to the
third Friday, Richie said. The
new law expands the period
from Feb. 6 to April 30.
Richie said he supports the
added time it gives parents to
decide if they want to look at
other districts for their chil-
dren.
I like it, he said. In our
district, which is small, I dont
think it will have an impact,
but it gives parents more time
to decide and gives districts
more time to assess their
available space.
School boards still have to
determine the number of reg-
ular and special education
spaces available which
under the former law they had
to do in January. Because the
new law wont go into effect
until Feb. 15, schools should
establish the number of
spaces available at the first
available board meeting if
Deadline extended
for school choice
Edward Spang Reid, a St.
Germain businessman and
community leader for 40
years, died last Tuesday, Jan.
31, at the age of 83.
Reid and his wife, Ruth,
owned and operated Spangs
Italian Restaurant in St. Ger-
main since the early 1970s.
Reid was born in Chicago,
Ill., June 11, 1928, to Joseph
and Olive (nee Epler) Reid. He
attended Calumet High
School where he excelled at
basketball and was a champi-
on swimmer.
After graduation, he mar-
ried Ruth Rosie Clemons
June 11, 1949. Spang worked
as a pipe fitter for many years
in the Chicago area and
worked on many of its famous
downtown buildings.
After many years of vaca-
St. Germain businessman,
Spang Reid, dies at 83
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
___________
BY NEWS-REVIEW STAFF
___________
LAND O LAKES Con-
sidered one of the premier
spectator races in the Mid-
west, the Three Bear Sled
Dog Races & Games are set
for this Saturday and Sun-
day, Feb. 11-12, in Land O
Lakes.
Fast-paced sled-dog
teams of up to 12 or more
dogs will charge through
more than 20 miles of trails
in both Wisconsin and the
Upper Peninsula of Michi-
gan.
The Three Bear Sled Dog
Races & Games Committee
has attracted a wide variety
of racers from the Midwest
and Canada, ranging from
those who are new to the
sport to those whose names
are well known in the
dogsledding world.
The races will be under
the direction of the Wiscon-
sin Trailblazers, one of the
premier sled-dog racing
clubs. The race is sanctioned
by International Sled Dog
Racing Association Inc.
(ISDRA).
Sponsored by Conserve
School and Headwaters
State Bank, mushers will
compete for a shared $5,000
purse.
Racing will start Satur-
day at 10 a.m. with the open
class competition with
teams of eight to 16 or more
dogs. This race will be run
on national forest land
between Land O Lakes and
Watersmeet, Mich., with
some scenic viewing areas
along the way for spectators.
The six- and four-dog,
junior and skijoring races
are scheduled to follow, with
teams running on Wisconsin
trails with some added
viewing areas. One of the
popular spectator attrac-
tions Saturday will be the
dual-start races with the
six- and four-dog competi-
tions.
It sure adds to the
excitement to see some of
these teams taking off neck
and neck, said Pete Schin-
delholz, DDS, chairperson of
the Three Bear Sled Dog
Race Committee. The
crowds really enjoy it.
Sundays races will start
at 9 a.m. with the same
order of classes. An awards
EDWARD SPANG REID
Sled-dog teams from across the country will compete in
Land O Lakes this weekend. STAFF PHOTO
Land O Lakes going to the dogs
Sled-dog races, outdoor games set this weekend
Sign-up period now runs
from Feb. 6 to April 30
___________
BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
To HOCKEY, Pg. 4
To CHOICE, Pg. 7
To REID, Pg. 5
To WINTER GAMES, Pg. 2
2 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
NEWS
CONOVER The 53rd
annual Winter Frolic will be
this Sunday, Feb. 12, from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. at the Conover
Town Park, located one block
east of Highway 45 on High-
way K in Conover.
The event will be hosted by
the Conover Lions Club and
will feature sled races for chil-
dren and raffles.
Races for children will begin
at 1 p.m. with awards for win-
ners in every age group.
Food and beverages will be
sold at the parks shelter.
Winter games: FROM PAGE 1
AUXILIARY ACTIVITIES The eighth annual Snowmobile
Radar Run in St. Germain on the west end of Little St. Ger-
main Lake featured extra fun Saturday, as Angry Daves Biki-
ni Run for charity (above) drew a crowd. Below, Angry Dave
interviewed a Bikini Run participant before she raced her
sled at top speed down a 660-foot snow track. Camps
SuperValu also sponsored an entertaining grocery cart race
(left) during the day. Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW
ceremony will be at the end of
the day Sunday.
The races will start and end
on the grounds of the Land O
Lakes Town Hall along High-
way B.
Winter games
Adding to the races, the
Land O Lakes community has
planned a weekend of winter
activities for the entire family.
On Saturday, the chamber
will hold its Winter Outdoor
Games. The childrens mutt
race will have registration at
noon both days, with racing to
start at 1 p.m. Children are
welcome to take their dogs
from home to race in a 50-yard
dash. Harnesses and a sled will
be provided.
Also at noon Saturday is
Fidos Fashion Show and
Parade. Children 12 and
younger are welcome to enter
their dogs in homemade cos-
tumes. Contestants will be
asked to walk or parade their
dogs around while judges and
spectators watch. Three area
judges will look for dogs
dressed with the most original-
ity, creativity and best behav-
ior.
Following Fidos Fashion
Show, the Barkalounger race
will get started. This competi-
tion is run by a three-person
team. While two team members
push the customized recliner,
the third teammate sits and
cheers.
New this year will be the
Cans for Canines drive benefit-
ing the Humane Society of
Vilas County. Everyone is wel-
come to take an offering of dog
food or treats and leave them in
a receptacle at the site of the
outdoor games.
There is no entry fee for any
of these events, said Schindel-
holz. We just want people to
come out and have a good time.
Everyone is welcome.
The Land O Lakes Chamber
of Commerce also invites every-
one to the Winter Festival Craft
Sale and Flea Market Saturday
from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. at the
elementary school next to the
Town Hall grounds.
For evening fun, head over
to the historic Gateway Lodge
for the annual Mushers Ball
Saturday night, said Schindel-
holz.
The dance will feature the
music of DJ Wild Fire, who will
play tunes from 8 p.m. until
midnight. Admission is free.
WEATHER
CORNER
Note: Precipitation amounts are recorded at 8 a.m. for the previous 24 hours.
ONE YEAR AGO
LAST YEAR
COMPARISON
SNOW
CONDITIONS
LAST SEVEN DAYS
STREAMS
AND LAKES
OUTLOOK
(PORTIONS OF THE WEATHER CORNER ARE THROUGH THE COURTESY OF
KEVIN BREWSTER, EAGLE RIVER and NEWSWATCH 12 METEOROLOGIST.)
Wednesday will start out chilly but sunny in the afternoon, with
a high of 27 and a low of 1. Thursday should be warmer with
flurries late, with a high of 30 and a low of 10. Friday lake-effect
snow is expected and cold, with a high of 10 and a low of 6. Sat-
urday should be partly cloudy and chilly, with a high of 12 and a
low of 12. Sunday is expected to be mostly cloudy with lake-
effect snow showers, with a high of 14 and a low of 7.
Anglers are driving vehicles on most lakes, but caution is
urged due to slush. Due to the slush, snowmobilers are
reminded to stay on marked trails when crossing lakes.
Days precipitation recorded since Jan. 1, 2012, 16 days;
2011, 24 days.
Average high of past 30 days, 2012, 28; 2011, 20. Average
low of past 30 days, 2012, 7; 2011, 3.
The average daily high at this time last year for the next sev-
en days was 23, while the average overnight low was 8.
There was snow on three days totaling .7 of an inch.
Hi Lo Prec.
Wed., Feb. 1 ...........38 20 None
Thurs., Feb. 2..........32 18 .6"S
Fri., Feb. 3...............40 25 None
Sat., Feb. 4 .............42 8 None
Sun., Feb. 5 ............38 8 None
Mon., Feb. 6............35 17 None
Tues., Feb. 7 ...........26 13 Tr.S
Hi Lo Prec.
Tues., Feb. 1 ...........17 0 1"S
Wed., Feb. 2 ...........20 3 None
Thurs., Feb. 3..........25 3 None
Fri., Feb. 4...............29 2 None
Sat., Feb. 5 .............30 13 .5"S
Sun., Feb. 6 ............27 17 None
Mon., Feb. 7............18 8 .5"S
The warm tempera-
tures last week took a
toll on the snow cover,
with 11 inches now on
the ground. While the
trails are open, more snow is needed to improve conditions.
2010-11 11-12
Snowy days 51 36
Inches to date 46.28 43.44
Ground cover 20" 11"
Winter Frolic set this Sunday
State Rep. Dan Meyer (R-
Eagle River), who has repre-
sented the 34th Assembly Dis-
trict since 2000, announced Fri-
day he will not seek re-election
to the state Assembly.
Meyer said his 12 years of
service have been very reward-
ing and humbling, but that its
time to move on.
I never wanted to be a
career politician, said Meyer.
Twelve years seems like a
good term limit to impose on
myself.
Meyer said that a represen-
tative has an obligation to
make decisions in the best
interest of the state, but also to
advocate on issues of specific
interest to his or her district.
Meyer cites three issues upon
which he believes he had the
greatest impact.
In terms of statewide
importance, putting Wiscon-
sins fiscal house in order was
very controversial, but also
very important, Meyer said.
Eliminating a $3 billion-plus
deficit without raising taxes,
giving local governments and
schools the tools and flexibility
to continue to provide the ser-
vices people expect, while
avoiding mass layoffs was not
easy, but it was the right thing
to do.
In terms of issues critical to
the 34th Assembly District,
Meyer cites his success provid-
ing resources to fight invasive
species and his work on behalf
of veterans as sources of great-
est accomplishment during his
Assembly tenure.
When you represent the
worlds largest concentration of
freshwater lakes, being a
strong advocate for lake protec-
tion is just part of the job
description, Meyer said.
What we saw were local gov-
ernments, volunteers and lake
associations doing all they
could to fight invasive species.
Meanwhile, the state seemed to
be taking the backseat.
Meyer said he changed that
by getting the Department of
Natural Resources to make the
invasive species fight a higher
priority and ensure there was
funding to fight invasive
species and help the local units
as well.
In the 2005-07 session, we
were able to provide millions of
dollars to this effort, Meyer
said, adding that this was a
small price to pay to protect our
lakes.
Working on veterans issues
was also important, according
to Meyer.
As a retirement area, Onei-
da and Vilas counties are home
to a very large senior popula-
tion and a large number of vet-
erans as well, he said.
Wisconsin Department of
Veterans Affairs presented
Meyer with an Iron Mike
award for leading the charge
for Wisconsin veterans for his
work on the 2005-07 Wisconsin
biennial budget.
My staff and I worked very
diligently serving these con-
stituencies, and I worked very
hard to protect the veterans
trust fund from being raided,
Meyer said.
Meyer, who lives in Eagle
River, said he has no immedi-
ate plans for the future, but he
will stay in the area.
The first step to reduce the
number of committees on the
Vilas County Board of Super-
visors was taken last week in
a joint meeting of the county
Executive, Ethics and Insur-
ance Committee and the Leg-
islative & Judicial Committee.
A directive sent to all com-
mittee chairs and department
heads asked them to identify
which micromanaging agenda
items could be eliminated
from monthly meetings.
Presently, the county board
has 22 standing committees. A
recent recommendation from
the Schenck SC report on cost
savings suggested the county
should look at a much lower
number.
A draft put together by
county board Chairman Steve
Favorite restructured the 22
committees down to six, plus
an executive committee made
up of the county board chair,
first and second vice chairper-
sons and the six committee
chairpersons.
Were unique in our own
way, Supervisor Chris Mayer
told the group, saying the
county needs to streamline
committees to increase effi-
ciency. While there are some
statutory obligations we have
to consider, we need to be pol-
icy makers and not microman-
age our departments.
Mayer asked those supervi-
sors present how they felt
about consolidating commit-
tees and what their functions
should be.
Supervisor Jim Behling
supported restructuring fol-
lowing a more private-sector
model.
More often than not, deci-
sions are being made not by
experts, said Behling. We
should act more like a board of
directors. County government
has grown over the years, and
we havent improved the way
we manage and the way we do
business.
Supervisor Sig Hjemvick
said change was inevitable
but struggled with comparing
government with private
enterprise as a role model.
As needs change, we have
to also change, but I caution
us to do this in a reasonable
manner, he said. We need to
look at this periodically. It
may work in some areas, but
others do well the way they
are.
Supervisor Erv Teichmiller
said reorganization should be
explored.
I hope were open to
explore and examine possibili-
ties related to cost and effi-
ciency and to allow manage-
ment to manage and not have
the county micromanage,
Teichmiller said. Consolida-
tion has to better serve the
public and some departments
serve the same people, so we
should also look at this.
Supervisor Al Bauman sug-
gested the county move slowly.
(It) looks positive, but
(lets) make sure all board
members are involved in the
decision, said Bauman,
adding that the county could
make a start by going to 14
committees.
Admitting this would be a
radical change, Supervisor
Charles Rayala also suggested
to go slowly and expressed the
need for departments to have
good managers.
Supervisor Linda Thorpe
said she was willing to look at
which committees might be
joined.
While there are some statu-
tory obligations for the county,
Corporation Counsel Martha
Milanowski said those obliga-
tions could be met in the com-
mittee standing rules. Public
hearings requiring published
legal notices within a certain
time on zoning issues was
used as an example.
Supervisors referred to
agenda items such as out-of-
county travel and equipment
purchases covered in depart-
ment budgets that could be
handled by department heads
without going through a com-
mittee meeting.
County Clerk Dave Alle-
man said supervisors usually
let department heads set the
meeting agendas and that
should be changed.
It was a failure by us on
committees, Alleman said,
reflecting back when he was
on the county board. We nev-
er took control of the agenda;
it was done by department
heads. They gave us a lot of
information. The county board
members and committee
chairpersons need to control
their agendas.
But Teichmiller countered
by pointing out until they
(department heads) are given
authority, you will have long
agendas.
Behling added that the way
the county functions, we cre-
ate managers and have
removed management from
them via our committee
actions.
Mayer, who chairs the
Finance Committee, gave
direction to the supervisors.
In order to step forward,
we need to compile all the
things we can change and
then look at streamlining to
find how many committees we
should have, he said. One big
change would be to start with
zero-based budgets every year.
That would be a big change.
Hjemvick said the county
had to make rapid changes,
due to the budget repair bill in
a short period of time, but now
has some breathing room.
Now we can move at a
speed that can make this
work, said Hjemvick. But
you (supervisors) cant come
into a meeting and open your
packet for the first time at the
meeting. We have to do our
homework. I want committee
chairmen to tell us what they
are micromanaging.
Alleman was directed to
send out a memo to depart-
ment heads and committee
chairpersons to identify those
items they feel could be han-
dled without having every
decision approved by a com-
mittee in an effort to elimi-
nate micromanaging.
The joint committees will
meet again Tuesday, Feb. 28,
to continue looking at commit-
tee consolidation and how
committees conduct monthly
meetings.
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 3
VILAS COUNTY
NEWS-REVIEW
Published weekly by
Eagle River Publications, Inc.
Eagle River, WI 54521
www.vilascountynewsreview.com
Consolidation of the Vilas County News,
the Eagle River Review and
The Three Lakes News
Publication #659480
Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association
and the National Newspaper Association
Entered as periodical mail matter at
the post office, Eagle River, WI 54521,
under act of March 3, 1879. Sub scription
price in Wisconsin, Vilas and Oneida coun -
ties only, is $50.00 per year, all of Wiscon-
sin except for Vilas and Oneida counties,
$57.00 per year. Out of Wis consin, $68.00
per year. Subscription payable in ad vance.
Published every Wednesday.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes,
form 3579, to Vilas County News-Review,
Inc., P.O. Box 1929, Eagle River, WI 54521,
phone 715-479-4421, fax 715-479-6242.
NEWS
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Open Mon.-Sat. Walk-ins welcome
8010 Hwy. 70 East, St. Germain (715) 479-7444
Cut To Perfection
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BOONES BUILDING SUPPLY
Hours: Mon.-Fri. 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m. - noon
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A Family Tradition
OF QUALITY BUILDING MATERIALS AT COMPETITIVE PRICES
Complete line of building materials
Free delivery 40-mile radius
Free estimates
Vilas works on plan to reduce committees
with ultimate goal of less micromanaging
Meyer will not seek
re-election in 34th
ST. GERMAIN The Vilas
County Sheriffs Department,
with assistance from the Lac
du Flambeau Tribal Police
Department, has arrested two
suspects in the burglary of the
St. Germain Pharmacy Feb. 1.
Dixie R. Allen, 38, and Doug -
las W. LaBarge, 32, both of Lac
du Flambeau, were arrested on
burglary charges. The are
being held on $5,000 cash
bonds.
According to a sheriff s
department press release, the
vehicle believed to be used by
the suspects during the bur-
glary has been impounded.
Law enforcement officers
were dispatched to the phar-
macy at 252 South Highway 70
last Wednesday to investigate
an alarm at the pharmacy at
6:38 p.m. Officers discovered a
rear door to the pharmacy was
ajar, and at least two people
had gained entry to the phar-
macy, taking a quantity of pills.
According to a sheriff s
department press release,
there were at least two sus-
pects involved in the incident.
Investigators used surveil-
lance videos from the pharma-
cy and other businesses for
leads in the case.
Anyone having information
regarding the burglary or sus-
picious activity in the vicinity
of the St. Germain pharmacy
between 5:30 a.m. and 6:30
a.m. Feb. 1, should call the
Vilas County Sheriffs Depart-
ment at (715) 479-4441.
Two suspects arrested
in pharmacy burglary
MEYER
GROOMER SHOWWalker Equipment Inc., home of Arrow-
head Groomers, recently hosted its annual groomer show, with
vendors from Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota who fea-
tured the latest technology in snow-grooming equipment. Reg-
istered guests were encouraged to test-drive various trail-
grooming tractors and drives.
Above: The two-day event attracted a number of people who
viewed the various equipment on display, including an Arrow-
head Ultra Lite groomer
Right: Tucker Snow Cat Dealer Steve Bauer of Lakeville, Minn.
shares information with Sales Manager Rick Keith of Farming-
ton, Minn.
Below: Spectators check out a Dubie Groomer displayed by
Dubie Welding & Fabrication of Gaylord, Mich.
Photos By Wally Geist
___________
BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
Fighting Heart Disease
and Stroke
4 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
NEWS OBITUARIES
Dale L. Bruss of Three
Lakes died Tuesday, Jan. 31,
2012, at Aspirus Wausau Hos-
pital in Wausau. He was 69.
He was born July 10, 1942,
in Green Bay, the son of Leroy
and Elaine (nee Sylvester)
Bruss.
Mr. Bruss taught English for
32 years in both Northland
Pines and Three Lakes high
schools.
He is survived by his wife of
38 years, Jean; five sons, Bill
(Susan) of Evans, Ga., Bryan
(Maryanne) of Fontana, Bren-
dan (Stephanie) of Green Bay,
Jeffrey (Kim) of Three Lakes
and Colyn (Barbara) of Pulas-
ki; one daughter, Bevin (Phil)
Hahn of Three Lakes; one
brother, Lee (Judy) of Over-
land Park, Kan.; one sister,
Debbie (Tim) Sadler of Moun-
tain Home, Ark.; and 13 grand-
children.
A memorial service was
held Feb. 3 at St. Theresa
Catholic Church in Three
Lakes.
Memorials may be made to
American Legion Post 431
Scholarship Fund in Three
Lakes.
Dale L. Bruss
Robert Bob L. Kafka Sr. of
Eagle River died Monday, Jan.
23, 2012, at Howard Young
Medical Center in Woodruff.
He was 78.
Mr. Kafka was born Aug.
10, 1933, in Chicago, Ill., the
son of William and Grace Kaf-
ka. He grew up in Chicago
and spent much of his youth
at the family vacation home
in Sugar Camp.
He owned and operated
Kafka Trucking in Iron Moun-
tain, Mich., for a number of
years before his employment
with Pitlik & Wick Inc.
Mr. Kafka served as a cor-
poral in the U.S. Army from
1953 to 1955.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; and one
daughter, Joy Mauge.
His survivors include one
son, Robert Jr.; one daughter,
Terri (Todd) Grover; one
brother, William Jr. (Helen);
eight grandchildren; and four
great-grandchildren.
A funeral service was held
Jan. 26 at Gaffney-Busha
Funeral Home in Eagle River
Burial was at Sugar Camp
Cemetery.
Robert Bob L. Kafka Sr.
Paul G.
Milz Jr. of
Ev a n s v i l l e
and a season-
al resident of
Phelps for
more than 30
years died
Feb. 1, 2012.
He was 80.
He was
born June 23, 1931, in Mon-
roe, the son of Peter and Lois
(nee Boeck) Milz Sr. He grad-
uated from Bellville High
School in 1949.
In June 1959 he purchased
Union Tavern where he was a
businessman up until the
time of his death.
He was involved with many
activities throughout his life
including Wisconsin Tavern
League, Brooklyn Sports-
mans Club, Ducks Unlimited,
Pheasants Forever, Waterfowl
USA, and multiple mens and
womens sports teams.
He was an avid Wisconsin
Badgers, Green Bay Packers,
Milwaukee Brewers and
Bucks fan.
He enjoyed boxing hunting,
fishing (especially muskie),
golf, darts and billiards.
He was preceded in death
by his parents; one brother,
Frank; one sister, Mary Lou;
one son, Tom; three grandchil-
dren, Brian, Shannon, and
James; and a great-grand-
daughter, Natalie.
Mr. Milz is survived by his
wife, Janeace; one daughter,
Judy (Dan) Booker; two sons,
Steve (Holly) and Dan (Jen-
nifer); two step-sons, Jim
(Rhonda) Crans and Randy
(Diana) Crans; one step-
daughter, Lori (Bill) Lenz; two
brothers, Tony and Norman
(Janet); 19 grandchildren; and
30 great-grandchildren.
A funeral service was held
Feb. 7 at St. Johns Lutheran
Church in Evansville with the
Rev. Matthew Poock officiat-
ing. Burial followed in Maple
Hill Cemetery in Evansville.
Donations to Evansville St.
Johns Lutheran Church or
AGrace HospiceCare Inc. in
Janesville, may be made.
Paul G. Milz Jr.
ANTIQUES WANTED
PAYING CASH
FOR THE FOLLOWING:
Crocks, jugs, earthenware bowls & pitchers;
art pottery, Roseville, Hull, etc.; cookie jars;
hand-decorated china; glassware before
WWII; patchwork quilts & fancywork; Orien-
tal rugs; picture frames; clocks, watches &
fobs; jewelry; oil lamps; elec. lamps w/glass
shades; old advertising items, signs,
posters, containers, boxes, mixing bowls,
etc., especially from Eagle River; coin-oper-
ated machines, slots, peanut, etc.; shot-
guns, rifles & handguns; hunting knives;
wooden duck & fish decoys; old tackle box-
es & lures; rods, reels & creels; glass min-
now traps; old tools; toys of all kinds, trains,
trucks, tractors, tin wind-ups, games, dolls,
etc.; enamelware, especially bright colors;
old photos of interiors & outdoor activities;
all magazines before WWII; postcards (pre-
1920); coin & stamp collections; old wood
carvings of animals, etc. Check with me
before you sell.
Call Jim at (715) 479-1459
4946
Francis Frank
Alois Sailer
6289
Edward Barich, 95, a resi-
dent of Eagle River and for-
merly of Milwaukee since
1979, died Monday, Feb. 6,
2012, at Milestone Senior Liv-
ing in Rhinelander.
He was born Sept. 29, 1916,
in Lake Mine, Mich., the son of
Michael and Mary Barich.
Mr. Barich retired from
Bucyrus-Erie Heavy Equip-
ment after 20 years as an
industrial engineer. He en -
joyed gardening until the age
of 93 and was an Eagle River
Knights of Colum bus member.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Rose, in 1986.
Mr. Barich is survived by
two daughters, Jo-Ann (Eu -
gene) Tarczewski of Sturgeon
Bay and Constance Barich of
Oakland, Calif.; two sons,
Dennis (Mary) of Rocklin,
Calif., and Edward (Sue) of
Santa Rosa, Calif.; one sister,
Frances Romano of San Jose,
Calif.; a special friend, Chris-
tine Excell of Eagle River;
eight grandchildren; and 11
great-grandchildren.
A funeral service will be
held Friday, Feb. 10, at 2 p.m.
at St. Peter the Fisherman
Catholic Church in Eagle Riv-
er. Visitation will be held one
hour prior to the service at the
church.
Edward Barich
Dale Drayna, 57, formerly
of Eagle River, died Monday,
Feb. 6, 2012, in Clarksville,
Tenn.
Funeral services are pend-
ing with Gaffney-Busha
Funeral Home.
A complete obituary will be
published in next weeks
paper.
Dale Drayna
Marie Maja Vladic, age 75,
a resident of Eagle River, Wis.,
since 2000, and formerly of
Antioch, Ill., and Berwyn, Ill.,
died on Sunday, Feb. 5, 2012, at
St. Claires Hospital in Weston,
Wis.
She was born in Chicago, Ill.,
on Aug. 12, 1936, to Joseph and
Marie Kostka.
She married Dan Vladic on
April 12, 1958, at Blessed Agnes
Church in Chicago.
Maja worked for Western
Electric for many years and at
AT&T in the Retiree Benefits
Office.
She enjoyed knitting, cro-
cheting and reading. She liked
to water-ski and spent a lot of
time boating in Illinois and
Eagle River.
Maja was a former president
and resided as secretary of the
Eagle River Memorial Hospital
Auxiliary. She was a member of
the American Sokol Organiza-
tion in Berwyn.
She was preceded in death by
her parents.
Maja is survived by her hus-
band, Dan Vladic of Eagle Riv-
er; sons, Dan (Janette) Vladic of
Lake Villa, Ill., and Dale Vladic
of Fox Lake, Ill.; grandchildren,
Danny, Megan, Dan and
Michael; cousins, Roberta, Terry
and Wayne.
Funeral services will be held
at 11 a.m. on Friday, Feb. 10,
2012, at Gaffney-Busha Funer-
al Home in Eagle River. Visita-
tion will be held from 4 to 8 p.m.
on Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012, and
one hour prior to services on
Friday at the funeral home.
Memorials may be made to
the Eagle River Memorial Hos-
pital Auxiliary.
PAID OBITUARY
Marie Maja Vladic
6290
Edward Spang Reid, a 40-
year businessman and resi-
dent of St. Germain and for-
merly of Evergreen Park, Ill.,
died Tuesday, Jan. 31, 2012, in
Oak Forest, Ill. He was 83.
He was born June 11, 1928,
in Chicago, Ill. He married
Ruth Rosie Clemons on June
11, 1949, in Chicago. They
owned Spangs Italian restau-
urants in St. Germain and
Minocqua for many years.
Survivors include his wife,
Ruth; three daughters, Nancy
(Jack) Koch of Cape Coral,
Fla., Connie (Salvatore) Aparo
of Oak Forest, Ill., and Laura
Vance of Madison; two sons,
Edward (Kathy) of Minocqua
and Joe (Debbie) of Sayner; 13
grandchildren; and 10 great-
grandchildren.
A memorial service will be
Saturday, Feb. 11, from 11
a.m. to 3 p.m. at Spangs Ital-
ian Restaurant, located at
6229 Highway 70 E in St. Ger-
main, with Rev. Joshua Reese
of St. Germain Evangelical
Free Church officiating.
Memorials may be made to
St. Judes Childrens Research
Hospital, P.O. Box 3704, Mem-
phis, TN 38101-2132.
Edward Spang
Reid
Francis (Frank) Alois Sailer,
83, passed away peacefully
with family by his side, on Fri-
day, Feb. 3, 2012, at Seasons of
Life Hospice in Woodruff, Wis.
Frank was born to Francis
Joseph Sailer and Esther
Marie Sailer (Carlson) on Feb.
15, 1928, in Rhinelander, Wis.
To some he will be forever
remem bered as Esthers
Bundy!
After spending his childhood
in Eagle River, graduating from
Eagle River High School in
1945, he proudly entered the
U.S. Military Academy at West
Point, graduating with a B.S. in
1950.
After graduation Frank
served 21 years on active duty,
receiving a Purple Heart dur-
ing his service in the Korean
War and the Bronze Star while
serving in Vietnam.
He retired from his Army
career in 1971, after serving
posts in Germany, Virginia,
Kansas, Japan, Pennsylvania
and SHAPE headquarters in
Mons, Belgium.
During his years of active
duty and beyond, Frank was
devoted to higher learning,
earning an M.S. from the Uni-
versity of Kansas in Lawrence
(1963) and his Ph.D. from
Pennsylvania State University
(1973).
He enjoyed his teaching
career in the University of Wis-
consin System from 1973 until
1988.
After retiring from teaching,
Frank returned to what he
always referred to as the
greatest place in the world,
Eagle River. In his retirement
years, he and his wife, Karen,
traveled extensively.
He was an avid tennis play-
er and enjoyed cross-country
and downhill skiing. Frank
loved to read, had a strong
interest in military history, and
a passion for genealogy.
Frank was a member of the
Eagle River tennis club GER-
TA and the Easy Eagles.
He was preceded in death by
his parents, Francis and Esther
Sailer; and his granddaughter,
Katherine Lynn Sailer.
Frank is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 28 years, Karen Sail-
er (Blount), of the home and his
children, Francis Joseph
(Robin), Steve (Paula), Bill
(Eileen), Amy (Scott) Fiss and
Jennifer (Jonathan) Sailer-
Kain, as well as 16 grandchil-
dren and one great-grandson.
He also is survived by his
beloved dog, Wolf.
The family would like to
express sincere and heartfelt
thanks to the gentle and caring
staff at Seasons of Life Hospice
in Woodruff, Wis.
Visitation will be held at
Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home
in Eagle River from 4 to 7 p.m.
Thursday, Feb. 9, 2012.
The funeral will take place
on Friday at St. Theresas
Catholic Church in Three
Lakes, Wis., at 11 a.m. A second
visitation will be held for one
hour prior to the 11 a.m. ser-
vice. PAID OBITUARY
Thousands of pond hockey
competitors will take to the ice
Feb. 10-12 on Dollar Lake in
Eagle River.
Labatt Blue and USA Hock-
ey plus many local volunteers
will bring one of the most suc-
cessful gatherings of like-
minded sportsmen to the area.
Pat Weber of Eagle River
has been the coordinator for
the Labatt Blue USA Hockey
National Pond Hockey Cham-
pionship since its inception in
2006.
Weber, utility manager for
Eagle River Light & Water
Department, oversees and,
with help from a large crew of
volunteers, has been very
busy.
In recent days, he and his
crew used 10 pickups to plow
snow off the ice (See photos
posted on USA Hockey web-
site.), built rows where 24
rinks would be located, and
then flooded rinks before com-
petition begins. Rinks will be
flooded again Friday and Sat-
urday nights. Sometimes a
skid steer is used to smooth
uneven rinks before skaters
take to the ice.
Weber ensures electricity is
on-site and heated tents are in
place and has coordinated the
availability of a sports
medicine/emergency medical
technician volunteer during
the tournament.
More than 50 volunteers
associated with the fire
department work in prepara-
tion prior to or on tournament
days. Forty-eight scorekeepers
and referees are needed solely
for each round of games.
The Eagle River Chamber
of Commerce, the town of
Washington, local businesses,
organizations and individuals
all help to provide a positive
experience for skaters and
spectators.
Weber began planning for
this years championship last
March.
We reviewed results from
2011 then decided whether or
not to make changes. Mid-
summer through December we
held conference calls or met
face-to-face, he said.
USA Hockey began adver-
tising in November. Once Jan-
uary arrived, we communicat-
ed more intensely and USA
Hockey personnel arrived in
the area this past weekend,
he explained.
Each year brings different
challenges.
Mother Nature has a mind
of her own. That first year we
had 40 teams and wind chill
temperatures of minus 40
degrees. Another year high
temperatures created ponds
on the pond. As an experi-
ment, we drilled holes in the
corners of each rink; the water
actually ran off because the ice
had bowed. It turned colder
and formed beautiful ice,
Weber stated.
I worry about when we can
safely get onto the lake; snow
must be removed because it
insulates the ice, preventing it
from thickening, he contin-
ued. One year temperatures
warmed and the ice didnt
hold the tent stakes; it col-
lapsed. Thankfully, the tent
crew was still around, so we
moved it onto shore. You just
never know. We are at the
mercy of the weather.
Weber, who will skate with
the Frozen 7 of Eagle River,
also is president of the Wis-
consin Hockey Hall of Fame,
which is housed at the Eagle
River Area Recreation Arena,
and is the Eagle River Fire
Department chief.
Having a busy schedule and
coordinating such a growing
venture takes organization
and produces stress.
Weber admitted, Im
relieved when Sunday of com-
petition arrives. I know its all
been worth it when people tell
me that everything went
smoothly. They thank the
entire team of workers for a
job well done. I never tire of
hearing that competitors and
spectators have had a great
time and will be back next
year!
Weber: a volunter on the ice
PAT WEBER
___________
BY SONIA DIONNE
FEATURE WRITER
___________
Hockey: fans, spectators urged to use shuttle
FROM PAGE 1
ey Pond Hockey National
Championships, said Bevan.
We look forward to celebrating
the thrill of hockey in its purest
form in the frozen tundra of
northern Wisconsin.
Bevan said the pond hockey
event is a special experience for
the players.
This event is about the
teams, the experience and the
camaraderie while enjoying
hockey the way it used to be,
said Bevan.
The event will feature teams
of adults 21 years or older
divided into 16 no-check divi-
sions for men and women,
including a new 60-and-older
division. The tournament will
be structured using a round-
robin format, and each team
will be guaranteed three
games.
Bevan said the event is coor-
dinated with the help of the
Eagle River Recreation Associ-
ation (ERRA) and the Eagle
River Area Fire Department.
With the volunteerism here
in Eagle River, its been great
for us, he said.
Pat Weber, fire chief and
ERRA volunteer, said the num-
ber of rinks were expanded to
24 for the 2011 and 2012 events
to accommodate all the teams.
Use the shuttle
Due to just 15 or 16 inches of
ice on Dollar Lake this year,
Weber said no vehicles will be
allowed on the lake, except for
vehicles that are loading or
unloading players.
We will have two or three
shuttles running from the
Chanticleer Inn to take players
and fans from the parking
areas to the lake, said Weber.
We are asking players and
workers to carpool as much as
possible. Workers and players
can gather at the fire station in
Eagle River or at the Sports
Arena, though there wont be
shuttle to those two locations.
A meeting for referees and
scorekeepers for the anticipat-
ed 551 games is set for Wednes-
day, Feb. 8, at 6:30 p.m. at Gor-
dos on Highway 45 North in
Eagle River.
Gaffney-Busha Funeral Home
Alpha Crematory & Chapel
Tom & Joe Busha, Barry Wallis, Funeral Directors 715-479-4777
www.gaffney-busha.com
Locally owned and operated since 1908
VILAS COUNTYS ONLY CREMATORY
Traditional Services Prearrangements Cremation Monuments
Thank You
To all who attended Jerry Ayers celebration of life, sent
cards, made a donation or offered assistance when we need-
ed you. Your expression of sympathy is greatly appreciated.
The Family of Jerry Ayers
9965
MILZ
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 5
NEWS
A 25-year-old Birnamwood
woman, charged with multiple
counts of obtaining prescrip-
tion drugs with fraud and
manufacturing or delivery of
prescription drugs at an Eagle
River pharmacy, reached a plea
agreement in Vilas County Cir-
cuit Court last week.
Suzanne A. Miller pleaded
no contest to one count of
obtaining a prescription drug
and three counts of manufac-
turing or delivery of a prescrip-
tion drug.
Vilas Circuit Judge Neal A.
Nielsen III found Miller guilty
and ordered a presentence
investigation. Her sentencing
was set for March 19 at 2 p.m.
Twelve other charges of
obtaining a prescription drug
with fraud, manufacturing or
delivery of prescription drugs
and obstructing an officer were
dismissed.
According to the complaint,
Miller obtained prescriptions
at Wall Street Pharmacy in
Eagle River under the name of
Sofia Lopez, who had a Florida
address, in November of 2010
and January and February of
2011.
In other felony cases, Har-
vey J. Frank Jr., 28, of Lac du
Flambeau, charged with oper-
ating a motor vehicle while
intoxicated, fourth offense in
five years, was in Vilas County
Circuit Court last week for a
sentencing hearing on revoca-
tion. Judge Nielsen sentenced
Frank to four years, six months
in the Wisconsin Prison Sys-
tem, with one year, six months
of confinement and three years
of extended supervision.
Frank was arrested July 6,
2010, in Lac du Flambeau and
originally had his sentence
withheld and was placed on
probation for 36 months. Frank
violated conditions of his
parole on Aug. 30, 2011, when
he consumed alcohol and acted
in a disorderly manner toward
law enforcement officers. He
received credit for 319 days
served in jail.
Alex J. Abbott, 21, of Lac du
Flambeau, charged with sexual
assault of a child under age 16,
waived his preliminary hear-
ing last week in Vilas County
Court. Probable cause was
found that Abbott had commit-
ted a crime and he was bound
over. Abbott entered a plea of
not guilty and a pretrial confer-
ence was set for March 20 at
11:15 a.m.
Abbott is alleged to have
sexual intercourse with a 15-
year-old female three times
during January in Lac du
Flambeau.
According to the complaint,
Abbott met the girl on Face-
book while he was living in
Minnesota and moved to Lac
du Flambeau to get a job. He is
free on a $250 cash bond and
$2,000 signature bond. Condi-
tions of his bond include to
have no contact with the victim
and he is not to leave Vilas or
Oneida counties.
Michael N. Larson, 26, of
Conover, charged with at -
tempting to flee or elude a traf-
fic officer and second-degree
reckless endangerment,
entered a plea of not guilty and
a pretrial conference was set
for March 20 at 10:45 a.m. Lar-
son is alleged to elude a police
officer on his motorcycle on
Highway 70 east of Eagle Riv-
er. According to the complaint,
Larson was traveling in excess
of 130 mph with a female pas-
senger on the back of the
motorcycle Aug. 5, 2011, in the
town of Lincoln.
Michael W. Wahlberg, 39, of
Eagle River, charged with pos-
session of a firearm by a felon,
had a pretrial conference set
for Feb. 7. His attorney,
Michael W. Schiek, has made a
motion to suppress evidence in
the case, claiming there was no
reasonable suspicion or proba-
ble cause to stop Wahl berg in
his vehicle Nov. 19, 2011, in the
town Washington. It was dur-
ing that stop that a weapon
was found in his vehicle.
Steven Lee Batiste, 27, of
Lac du Flambeau, charged
with delivery of schedule I, II
or III non-narcotics, had a pre-
liminary hearing adjourned to
April 2 at 9 a.m. His $2,500 sig-
nature bond was continued.
Batiste is alleged to have sold
Suboxone sublingual strips for
$40 in a controlled purchase in
his driveway Sept. 27, 2011, in
Lac du Flambeau.
Arlene M. Poupart, 41, of
Lac du Flambeau, charged
with manufacturing/delivery of
marijuana, possession with
intent to deliver marijuana
and possession of drug para-
phernalia, was bound over for
arraignment and entered a
not-guilty plea. A pretrial con-
ference was set for March 27 at
1:45 p.m. Poupart was arrested
during the execution of a
search warrant at her resi-
dence Sept. 9, 2011, in Lac du
Flambeau.
Patricia L. Roche, 42, of Lac
du Flambeau, charged with
delivery of a schedule I, II or III
substance, had a preliminary
hearing set for March 19 at 9
a.m. Roche is alleged to have
sold seven hydrocodone pills
for $35 during a controlled pur-
chase at her residence in Lac
du Flambeau in August of
2011.
Marcella Wayman, 48, of
Lac du Flambeau, charged
with second-degree reckless
endangerment, misdemeanor
battery and disorderly conduct,
had a preliminary hearing set
for March 19 at 11 a.m. Way-
man is alleged to have stabbed
her boyfriend in the back with
a kitchen knife at her home
Jan. 4 in Lac du Flambeau. He
had nonlife-threatening
injuries.
James A. Johnson III, 24, of
Lac du Flambeau, charged
with burglary of a building or
dwelling, repeater, had a pre-
trial conference was set for
Feb. 14 at 9 a.m. Johnson is
alleged to taking items, includ-
ing a cell phone and tackle box,
from a residence in Lac du
Flambeau July 25 and July 26,
2010.
Jedediah G. Maulson, 19, of
Lac du Flambeau, charged
with felony bail jumping and
obstructing an officer, was
bound over for arraignment
and entered a not-guilty plea.
A pretrial conference was set
for March 6 at 10:15 a.m.
Judge Nielsen said the defen-
dant may appear by telephone.
Maulson was arrested Jan. 1 in
Lac du Flambeau for allegedly
violating a condition of his
bond, which was not to possess
or consume intoxicants.
Vilas County Court report
Birnamwood woman found guilty
of obtaining medications with fraud
Vilas County Sheriff
A total of 286 complaints
were entered by Vilas County
Sheriff s Department dis-
patchers last week.
In addition to those with
sufficient detail to report be -
low, a review shows at least 15
vehicle accidents, two aban-
doned vehicles, eight requests
for agency assistance, three
am bulance requests, one ani-
mal problem, two attempts to
locate, two burglaries, five bur-
glar alarms, nine requests for
citizen assistance, three dis-
turbances, one report of
domestic violence, three fires,
seven reports of found proper-
ty, two reports of fraud, seven
re ports of hazardous condi-
tions, one hit and run, four
juvenile problems/runaways,
one report of loitering, one
lost/missing person, 11 reports
of suspicious circumstances,
six thefts, three threats, 11
traffic violations, one report of
trespassing, two vacation
checks, one weapons offense,
nine welfare checks, 19 911
hang ups, two snowmobile
accidents and five snowmobile
violations.
At least 26 calls were re -
ferred to the Eagle River
Police De partment and there
were at least 16 informational
or procedural entries.
In the past two weeks, at
least 24 people were booked at
the Vilas County Jail, including
three for probation violations,
three for operating a snowmo-
bile while intoxicated, two for
disorderly conduct, one for pos-
session of paraphernalia, three
for resisting/obstruction, one
for burglary, two for delivery of
narcotics, one for criminal
damage to property, two for
operating while intoxicated,
one for operating without a
license, three for bail jumping
and one for intentionally caus-
ing bodily harm to a child. The
in mate population ranged
from 67 to 78. As of Feb. 6,
there were 78 inmates.
Saturday, Feb. 4
- 11:11 a.m. - A vehicle / -
snowmobile accident was
reported on Fallon Road near
Rintleman Road in Boulder
Junction, involving Arthur H.
Juedes of Wausau and Roger
W. Nixon. Juedes was north-
bound on Fallon Road. His
vehicle was struck on the pas-
senger side by a snowmobile
operated by Nixon traveling
westbound from a snowmobile
trail.
Tuesday, Jan. 31
- 4:03 p.m. - A two-vehicle
accident was reported on
Highway 70 near Hemlock
Lane in the town of Washing-
ton involving a stopped school
bus operated by Charles D.
McDonald and a vehicle oper-
ated by Jill A. Helgeson, both
of Eagle River.
Monday, Jan. 30
- 8:08 a.m. - A two-vehicle
accident was reported on
Swenson Road near Lemma
Creek Road in Arbor Vitae,
involving Richard T. Trapp of
Woodruff and Eric S. Warchol
of Minocqua. Warchol was cit-
ed for failure to yield while
turning left at an intersection.
Thursday, Jan. 26
- 8:03 p.m. - A one-vehicle
accident was reported on
Chain O Lakes Road near
Carrie Lane in the town of
Washington, involving Vicki J.
Polich of Eagle River. Polich
was cited for driving too fast
for conditions.
Eagle River Police
Among the calls received by
Vilas County dispatchers were
at least 26 calls for the Eagle
River Police. These included
two vehicle accidents, three
ambulance requests, one bur-
glary, one domestic violence
report, three information
reports, five reports of found
property, one report of loiter-
ing, one vacation check, one
report of smoke, one snowmo-
bile accident, two reports of
hazardous conditions, two
reports of suspicious circum-
stances, three traffic viola-
tions and one welfare check.
Three Lakes Police
This police department
reported two 911 hang ups,
five vehicle accidents, two bur-
glar alarms, two ambulance
requests, one animal problem,
two apprehension requests,
two requests for agency assis-
tance, one attempt to locate,
one vacation check, one nar-
cotics violation, one operating
while intoxicated, two reports
of reckless driving, six traffic
violations, and one report of
hazardous conditions.
POLICE REPORT
Feed for ALL the animals!
Horse, Deer, Dog,
Cat, Chicken, Bird
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OF THE NORTHWOODS!
Vilas County Public
Health Committee
Wednesday, Feb. 8, 9:45 a.m.,
courthouse. Agenda: Animal
control ordinance and a quo-
rum of the Public Property
Committee may be present.
Oneida County Plan-
ning & Zoning Committee
Wednesday, Feb. 8, 1 p.m.,
Oneida County Courthouse.
Agenda: Review revisions to
Chapter 9 of the Oneida
County Zoning and Shoreland
Protection Ordinance.
Eagle River Municipal
Golf Course Committee
Thursday, Feb. 9, 9 a.m., City
Hall. Agenda: Golf pro and
superi ntendent/ manager
business with a possible
majority of the City Council
present.
Vilas County Commis-
sion on Aging Thursday,
Feb. 9, 11 a.m., courthouse.
Agenda: program and com-
mittee reports.
Northland Pines School
District Board of Educa-
tion Monday, Feb. 13, 6
p.m., Northland Pines High
School. Agenda: Work on
Employment Handbook for
Support Staff.
GOVERNMENT MEETINGS
MINOR INJURIES Jill Helgeson, 43, of Eagle River sustained
only a wrist injury when her vehicle collided into the rear of a
Schilleman Bus Service bus last Tuesday afternoon on Highway 70
East in the town of Lincoln at Hemlock Lane. Authorities said sev-
en children on the bus and the driver, Charles McDonald, 62, of
Eagle River, were transported by bus to Ministry Eagle River
Memorial Hospital as a precautionary measure. Two students were
treated and released for minor injuries. The westbound bus was
stopped in the highway, preparing to unload students at Hemlock
Lane. Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
FROM PAGE 1
tioning in the St. Germain
area with their five children,
the Reids fell in love with the
North Woods and decided to
make it their permanent
home.
In 1972, the Reids headed to
St. Germain with a semitrailer
loaded with antique church
pews to use as seating for a
new Italian restaurant they
planned to open. They pur-
chased and remodeled a small
bar called Hearth at 6229
Highway 70 E.
Daughter-in-law Debbie
Reid tells a story about that
first business transaction.
The morning they signed
the papers at the bank, they
decided to have a celebratory
breakfast at a local caf. Seat-
ed at a table behind the
counter, they overheard two
local businessmen talking
about the idiots from Chicago
who were coming up to open
an Italian restaurant and
watched as they made a $100
bet that they wouldnt make it
a year, said Debbie Reid.
Spang said at the time it was
hard to hear, but during the
difficult times, it was the
greatest motivator that they
could have had. Long after
those two businessmen have
gone out of business, Spangs
celebrates its 40th year in
business in 2012.
Spang and Rosie settled
into St. Germain quickly and
became involved in many local
organizations including the
Bo-Boen Snowmobile Club, the
St. Germain Lions Club and
the St. Germain Chamber of
Commerce, where he served as
its president for several years.
After five years of living in a
two-bedroom trailer home, the
family of seven built their
dream home on Lake Content
in St. Germain.
The home served as a
haven for many happy family
events and celebrations, said
Debbie Reid. Spang loved the
lake and taught his grandchil-
dren how to fish, swim and
water-ski there.
In 1981, Spang opened a
second restaurant in Minoc-
qua and, when he and Rosie
retired in 1988, they sold the
St. Germain location to their
son, Joe, and the Minocqua
location to son Ed. Tragically
the Minocqua location burned
to the ground in 2007 under
sister Lauras ownership.
Son Joe still continues to
manage the St. Germain loca-
tion and said he thinks of his
dad as he rolls out the home-
made bread each day for the
restaurant, which is some-
thing Spang taught his broth-
er and him at an early age.
At one time or another,
every member of Spangs fam-
ily, including his children and
grandchildren, have worked at
Spangs restaurants.
The experience earned
there prepared them well for
life as did the work ethic
passed to them by Spang and
Rosie, said Debbie Reid.
Spang and Rosie didnt stay
retired for long and bought an
apartment complex in St. Ger-
main, where Spang served as
head maintenance man and
handled all snow removal
tasks.
The couple re-entered the
food business and opened
Rosies Place, a little hot dog
and hamburger stand in the
Camps SuperValu parking lot.
Even though they were in
their 70s and 80s, they operat-
ed it for the past five years.
Spang and Rosie Reid
would have been married 64
years this coming June 11 and
were a beautiful example to all
that you can live, work hard,
have fun, go through good
times and bad times and stay
together, said Debbie Reid.
Funeral services for Reid
are planned this Saturday,
Feb. 11, from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
at Spangs Italian Restaurant
in St. Germain. See a complete
obituary on Page 4.
Reid: opened second restaurant in Minocqua in 1981
6 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
NEWS
VILAS COUNTY EMPLOYMENT
Vilas County is now accepting applications for a full-time
Account Technician II. Authorization to fill this position is
contingent upon County Board approval.
DUTIES AND RESPONSIBILITIES: The Account
Technician II is responsible for performing lead duties for
the Social Services Financial Department. Also, this posi-
tion is responsible for posting vouchers/receipts/disburse-
ments appropriately, prepares reports accurately and time-
ly, reviews budget monthly, and prepares annual budget.
All duties and responsibilities are performed under and
subject to the direction of the Director of Social Services.
TRAINING AND EXPERIENCE: Two-year Associates
Degree in Bookkeeping/Accounting or related field is
required. Two-plus years in a similar accounting role is
required.
STARTING RATE: $13.73 per hour, increasing to $17.00
per hour, subject to a 6-month probationary period, plus
excellent benefits. HOURS OF WORK: 7
1
2 hours per day,
Monday through Friday, 8 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Interested individuals must complete and sign an Applica-
tion for Employment form. Application materials, includ-
ing a full position description are available in the Vilas
County Clerks Office, 330 Court Street, Eagle River, WI
54521, or visit our website at http://www.co.vilas.wi.us.
Successful applicants must undergo an extensive back-
ground check, drug screen, oral interview and may be
required to pass a written examination.
APPLICATION DEADLINE: Friday, Feb. 3 at noon
VILAS COUNTY IS AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER 1954
7362
7363
Main Street Executive Director - Job Announcement
The Executive Director is responsible for the leadership, development, conduct,
execution and documentation of the award-winning Eagle River Revitalization
Program (ERRP) as part of the Wisconsin Main Street Program. The Executive
Director is the principal on-site staff person responsible for coordinating all
project activities, overseeing daily operations, and providing the hands-on
involvement critical to a successful program.
The ERRP Executive Director should have education and/or experience in one or
more of the following areas: economics, finance, public relations, sales and
marketing, design, journalism, planning, business administration, public
administration, retailing, volunteer or nonprofit administration, small-business
development, grant writing, fundraising and event coordination. Overall, this
person must be entrepreneurial, dynamic, imaginative, well organized, capable of
functioning effectively as a self-starter in an independent situation, detail- and
results-oriented, and able to sell the concept of each ERRP project and event. Must
have fantastic customer service, interpersonal, verbal and written communication
skills.
For a detailed description of job responsibilities, qualifications, salary and
benefits, and application process, email ERRPSearch@gmail.com. The
application deadline is Wednesday, Feb. 29, 2012. 1962
FULL-TIME HELP WANTED
The Highway G Landfill has an immediate opening
for a full-time, year-round employee. Including
health insurance and retirement plan. Starting wage
is $10 per hour. An application and job description
can be picked up at the Landfill office, 7001 High-
way G, or Eagle River City Hall, 525 E. Maple Street
in Eagle River. Applications will be accepted at
either location until 3 p.m., Feb. 17, 2012. 1949
LATE CLASSIFIEDS
Classifieds published here are those received too late for our Trader deadline, which is 10 a.m. Thursday.
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT: Side-by-side, 2-bdrm. apart-
ment. No stairs, close to Eagle River. Easy
access, large yard, nonsmoking, no pets.
$400/month, one-year lease and security
deposit. (715) 367-1816. 2c-2364-48
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR RENT WITH OPTION TO BUY: 4-
bdrm. house partially furnished, conve-
nient location on lake in Three Lakes.
$650/month plus utilities. Available now.
(715) 617-0444. 3p-2366-49
--------------------------------------------------------
FOR SALE: Fresh brown eggs also
turkey, geese, ducks. Call (715) 477-2254
for prices! 2p-2365-48
--------------------------------------------------------

FOR SALE: Jiffy ice auger, model 30,


like new, 10 inch, 3-hp; Otter Resort
portable shack, flip down on large Otter
sled 7' long, opens up to 7'x9'; 340
Yamaha long-track snowmobile, 2-up
w/cargo box on back; dogsled for ice
fishing; Winchester model 70 7mm.
Rem. mag stainless w/Leopold 3x9
scope; Winchester mod 94, lever action,
30-30; 20-gauge single-shot shotgun;
1911 Winchester semi-auto 12 gauge.
(715) 545-3802. 1p-2367-47
CAXCA
The Vilas County Forestry
& Land Committee received
three bids from out-of-state
firms and one bid from within
Wisconsin to plant 158,000
trees this spring on the Vilas
County Forest, awarding the
job to an Arkansas firm that
submitted the low bid.
According to assistant
county forest administrator
John Gagnon, the trees to be
planted include 140,000 jack
pine, 9,000 red pine and 9,000
white pine on a total of 182
acres. Bids ranged from a high
of $12,639 from Northwoods
Forestry in Eleva, Wis., to a
low of $8,873 from Superior
Forestry of Tilly, Ark.
Meanwhile, Gagnon gave
the committee a report on
county timber sales that
showed many of the completed
sales produced more timber
and revenue than what the
county had originally project-
ed.
As an example, the North
Fire Lane sale by Cloverland
Logging had a scaled value of
$65,220 when the estimate
was $44,343. A completed sale
on pine in the Cooks Lake
area had an estimated value
to $8,500 and produced
$14,944.
Other business
In other action, the commit-
tee gave permission to the
Greater Eagle River Tennis
Association to resurface the
courts at the Vilas County
Fairgrounds with an artificial
surface product called Ver-
saCourt athletic tile that
interlocks.
Sherry Stecker, represent-
ing the club, told the commit-
tee that resurfacing the courts
with blacktop would be too
expensive for their members.
With VersaCourt tile, the club
could install it themselves at a
cost of about $30,000 for the
two courts.
The committee also agreed
to keep an undeveloped lot on
Camp 12 Lake in public own-
ership, as it provides the only
public access to the lake.
Committee members were
informed the proposed all-ter-
rain vehicle route system to
use county highway lands in
the town of Phelps is being
modified by a local committee.
The new plan will first go to
the Phelps Town Board, fol-
lowed by another joint meet-
ing of the county Highway and
Forestry committees with the
town board.
Vilas County accepts bid
to plant 158,000 seedlings
The Vilas County Sher-
iff s Department executed a
search warrant Monday at a
rental home on Farming
Road in the town of Arbor
Vitae where officers discov-
ered a large marijuana
growing operation in the
basement.
According to authorities,
the 250 to 300 plants were
of very high quality with
an estimated value to
$5,000 to $6,000 a pound.
One suspect was taken
into custody without inci-
dent by Vilas County law
enforcement officers, aided
by the Oneida County Sher-
iff s Department, Lac du
Flambeau Tribal Police and
Eagle River Police De -
partment.
This was the largest
marijuana bust our depart-
ment has experienced, said
the lead detective who orga-
nized the operation with a
tactical weapons team.
Authorities said the sus-
pect may be linked to a
rental home on Whiskey
Trail north of Eagle River
where officers found evi-
dence of 160 root balls from
harvested marijuana plants
in a similar growing opera-
tion last year after the land-
lord notified police.
Vilas drug bust nets over 250 pot plants
___________
BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
___________
BY KEN ANDERSON
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
___________
BY WALLY GEIST
NEWS CORRESPONDENT
___________
The Vilas County Sheriffs Department and
several other agencies executed a search
warrant Monday, seizing more than 250 mari-
juana plants. Photo By Ken Anderson
Among the special guests at the Republican dinner were Lt.
Gov. Rebecca Kleefisch and former Gov. Tommy Thompson.
Photo By Wally Geist
ST. GERMAIN Approxi-
mately 170 people attended
the annual Lincoln-Reagan
Day Dinner hosted by the
Vilas Countys Republican
Party at the Whitetail Inn in
St. Germain Saturday night,
including several party nota-
bles from Wisconsin.
The keynote speaker was
Rebecca Kleefisch, Wisconsins
lieutenant governor.
Commenting on the dinner,
Kleefisch said, The governor
and I are eager to take the
message of reform and accom-
plishment back to the hard-
working families and taxpay-
ers of Wisconsin.
Rep. Jeff Fitzgerald (R-
Horicon), who represents the
39th Assembly District and is
Speaker of the Assembly, was
also in attendance. Rep. Dan
Meyer, Eagle River, 34th
Assembly District, introduced
Fitzgerald, who is running for
U.S. Senate.
Under Jeff, we have devel-
oped a very conservative agen-
da for the Assembly, said
Meyer. We were able to deliv-
er more on our conservative
agenda than we have been
able to in a very long time.
Fitzgerald added, We had
to make tough choices, but we
balanced our $3.6 billion bud-
get without raising taxes.
Among the other legislation
we managed to pass is con-
cealed carry.
Former Gov. Tommy
Thompson, who also is run-
ning for U.S. Senate, was in
attendance at the dinner.
Kim Simac of Eagle River,
who ran as a Republican
against Democratic State Sen-
ator Jim Holperin in the recall
election last summer, com-
mented, It is wonderful to see
so many people coming out
and meeting so many great
conservatives of the North
Woods.
About 170 conservatives
gather in St. Germain
STOP THE SPREAD
STOP THE SPREAD OF INVASIVE AQUATIC PLANTS AND ANIMALS.
* YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE *
American Red Cross

Give the Gift of Life . . .


Donate Blood
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 7
NEWS
Participating in the first-place check presentation were, from left,
ERRP member Gary Fawcett, WRJO Manager Jim Hodges, Trish
Keeley of WRJO, winner Jason Meinholz of Soda Pops, News-
Review Publisher Kurt Krueger and Rita Fritz of ERRP.
The new Wisconsin voter
identification law will go into
effect with the primary elec-
tion scheduled for Tuesday,
Feb. 21.
This means that, with a few
exceptions, voters will need to
show an acceptable photo ID
when they go to their polling
place that day.
If you do not have such an
ID, you need to get one imme-
diately or risk not being able
to vote in the primary, said
Tom Frazier, a spokesperson
for the Wisconsin Aging Net-
work Advocacy Group.
The following is a list of
acceptable IDs for voting pur-
poses:
Wisconsin drivers license;
Wisconsin Department
of Transportation (DOT)
issued ID card;
military ID card;
U.S. passport;
ID issued by a federally-
recognized Indian tribe; or
certificate of naturaliza-
tion issued not earlier than
two years before the date of
the election.
Frazier said the drivers
license, DOT-issued ID card,
military ID card or U.S. pass-
port must be unexpired or
have an expiration date after
Nov. 2, 2011, making it valid
for voting purposes.
Frazier offered several tips
that might help make it easier
to vote for people who do not
already have an acceptable
ID.
A drivers license that has
expired before Nov. 2, 2011,
including years before, is still
recognized by the Department
of Transportation Division of
Motor Vehicles (DMV) as proof
of identification in order to
issue a Wisconsin ID card.
In other words, that is all
you need to take to the DMV
to obtain a Wisconsin ID
card, said Frazier.
On election day, if a voter
does not have an acceptable
ID, they can still vote a provi-
sional ballot.
Then, if you have an ID,
you can bring it back to the
polling place that day and
your vote will be counted,
said Frazier. If you do not
have an ID, you still have
three days (until Friday) to
get one from the DOT-DMV.
This is possible because, if you
have the necessary proof, the
DMV will issue you a Wiscon-
sin state ID card receipt that
day which is an acceptable ID
for voting purposes.
The voter must present
that receipt to the municipal
clerk by 4 p.m. Friday and the
vote will be counted.
If you do not provide an ID
by the deadline, your vote will
not be counted, said Frazier.
There is one major excep-
tion to the requirement of a
photo ID, and that is for per-
sons who are indefinitely con-
fined (permanent absentee
voters).
These people must indi-
cate on their application for
an absentee ballot that they
are indefinitely confined
because of age, illness, infirmi-
ty, or disability, said Frazier.
Then the witness certifica-
tion on the absentee envelope
will qualify as a substitute
proof of ID, and a photo ID is
not required.
Frazier said help is avail-
able in navigating this new
law. People can contact their
municipal clerks office or
their county aging office.
For more information, peo-
ple can view the website of the
Government Accountability
Board at gab.wi.gov/ -
node/1593 or the DMV at
dot.wisconsin.gov/drivers/driv
ers.
Feb. 21 primary election
will require photo ID
The Eagle River Revitaliza-
tion Program (ERRP) held its
ninth annual Winter Wonder-
land contest to wow visitors,
residents and shoppers.
The Eagle River business-
es did a wonderful job decking
out their business for the holi-
days, said Rita Fritz, execu-
tive director of the ERRP. The
city was even more beautiful
this winter.
An independent group of
judges had the task of check-
ing out all of the businesses in
the area. The contest was
judged on the most creative
use of the space a business
had available, so every busi-
ness could participate. Dis-
plays were required to be win-
ter related and include some
form of lighting.
Soda Pops in downtown
Eagle River took first place,
winning $500 in advertising
donated by WRJO 94.5-
FM/WERL 950-AM, and $250
in advertising donated by the
Vilas County News-Review.
The second-place prize of
$250, donated by Peoples
State Bank, went to North-
woods Reflections. The Flour
Sack took third place, winning
$100 in Eagle River Bucks
sponsored by the ERRP to be
spent at any business within
the city. Honorable mention
went to Arrow Gift Shop.
The Eagle River Park
Christmas Project volunteers
continue to do a spectacular job
making Riverview Park a show-
place each year, and their efforts
are greatly appreciated, said Al
Pittelko, board president and
chairman of the ERRP Organi-
zation Committee. Thank you
to everyone who participated in
helping to make Eagle River fes-
tive for the holidays.
The ERRP, Eagle River
Business Association, Eagle
River Area Chamber of Com-
merce & Visitors Center and
private contributors have col-
laborated to secure new holi-
day decorations each year.
More are still needed, said
Pittelko, who is active in all
three organizations. A fund
has been set up with the cham-
ber and any and all donations
would be greatly appreciated.
People who have any ques-
tions can call Fritz at the ERRP
office at (715) 477-0645 or stop
in to see her at City Hall.
Revitalization program announces
Winter Wonderland prizewinners
Participating in the second- and third-place
check presentation were, from left, third-place
winner Lynn Kolling of The Flour Sack, ERRP
President Al Pittelko, second-place winner Val
Duffek of Northwoods Reflections Inc. and Amy
Young, site manager of Peoples State Bank in
Eagle River.
Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW
ADVERTISEMENT PAID FOR BY THESE AREA BUSINESSES:
Land O Lakes Chamber
of Commerce
Land O Lakes Recreation
Peter Schindelholz, DDS, SC
Conserve School
The Tackle Box, LLC
Bill Spence Heating
& Repair, LLC
Headwaters State Bank
Land O Lakes, Presque Isle
Gateway Lodge Restaurant
& Lounge
Land O Lakes Village Market
Bents Camp
Walmart
Forslund Building Supply
Vilas County News-Review
&
GAMES
FREE
ADMISSION TO
ALL EVENTS
Graphic provided
by the
Design Team.
Saturday & Sunday, Feb. 11 & 12
Land O Lakes Town Hall Grounds
Sponsored by Conserve School, Headwaters State Bank and Land O Lakes Chamber
SATURDAY, FEB. 11
Land O Lakes Chambers Winter Festival, Craft Sale and Flea Market at the
Elementary School, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Outdoor Fun, Games and Prizes including Barcalounger Race and Fido Fash-
ion Show, noon
Childrens Mutt Race sponsored by the Land O Lakes Chamber of Commerce.
Registration at noon, Mutt Race begins at 1 p.m. PRIZES
Mushers Ball at historic Gateway Lodge in Land O Lakes. Music provided by
DJ Wild Fire playing dance tunes from 8 p.m. until midnight. Admission is free.
SUNDAY, FEB. 12
OPEN CLASS RACING starts at 9 a.m. Note race times are one hour earlier than
from Saturday.
Childrens Mutt Race sponsored by the Land O Lakes Chamber of Commerce.
Registration at noon, Mutt Race begins at 1 p.m.
Portions of this event may be located on National Forest System lands, and are under permit through the Ottawa National Forest.
Hot Food and
Soft Drinks
Served Both Days
Visit us at www.3bear.org or on Facebook
Choice: parents must pay transportation
FROM PAGE 1
they have not already done so.
Since the application peri-
od is now three months, dis-
tricts should be able to get a
head start on requesting
records and estimating spe-
cial education costs, according
to Richie.
You have to send resident
to nonresident districts notice
of any student behavioral
problems, Richie continued.
Nonresident districts can ask
for records once an application
is received. Act 114 requires
districts to send records by
May 11 and nonresident dis-
tricts to send cost estimates by
May 25, but it is not necessary
to wait that long.
Should the new open
enrollment not be long
enough, or if a situation
changes, there can be a mutu-
al agreement between dis-
tricts for a transfer of a stu-
dent if requested.
The intent of the law is
very good, Richie added. This
year, Northland Pines has 22
more students enrolled from
other districts than we have
students who left our district.
At Three Lakes, District
Administrator George Karling
said more than 12% of the dis-
tricts entire population comes
from outside the district.
Traditionally, children in
Wisconsin are assigned to
school districts based on the
location of their parents
home. Since legislation was
passed allowing public school
choice, interest in open enroll-
ment has continued to grow
since the 1998-99 school year.
The open enrollment appli-
cation period is the only
tuition-free opportunity for
most parents to apply for their
children to attend public school
in a school district other than
the one in which they live.
The extended open enroll-
ment application period sup-
ports parental involvement
and shared responsibility for
educating children, said
State Superintendent Tony
Evers.
Under the new legislation,
parents will be informed by
June 8 whether their open
enrollment applications have
been approved or denied.
In addition, transportation,
in most circumstances, is the
responsibility of the parent.
However, some school districts
may provide partial trans-
portation. Parents with ques-
tions should call the nonresi-
dent school district office to
find out if any transportation
will be provided. Reimburse-
ment of a portion of trans-
portation costs is available for
families whose children are eli-
gible for free or reduced-price
school lunches.
The DPI provides the fol-
lowing guidance for parents
who wish to apply for open
enrollment:
Parents are urged to
apply online directly from the
open enrollment website
dpi.wi.gov/sms/psctoc.html.
The online application will be
available until 4 p.m. April 30.
Paper applications can be
obtained from the DPI or any
public school district. Paper
application forms must be
received by the nonresident
school district no earlier than
Feb. 6 and no later than 4 p.m.
April 30. A postmark for paper
forms will not meet the
requirement.
Parents may submit
applications to up to three
nonresident school districts
for each child during the open
enrollment application period.
Forms must be filled out
completely and accurately.
Contact the local school dis-
trict office or the DPI if assis-
tance is needed in completing
the application.
Parents may request
enrollment in a specific school
or program in the nonresident
school district; however,
enrollment in the requested
school or program is subject to
space and other limitations
and is not guaranteed.
Most students who attend-
ed a nonresident school district
under open enrollment last
year are not required to reap-
ply for the 2012-13 school year.
However, if the student will
enter middle school, junior
high school or high school in
the 2012-13 school year, par-
ents should call the nonresi-
dent school district to find out
if reapplication will be
required.
Parents may apply for
their children to attend 4-
year-old kindergarten under
open enrollment only if the
resident school district also
offers a 4-year-old kinder-
garten program for which the
child is eligible.
More information is avail-
able from schools or from an
open enrollment consultant at
the DPI. Contact the DPI toll
free at 1-(888) 245-2732, or go
to the Website dpiopenenroll-
ment@dpi.wi.gov.
REMEMBER: 55 AT NIGHT
Safety First

Fishing with
the Guides
By
George Langley
SERVICE
OF:
EAGLE
SPORTS
EAGLE RIVER
GUIDES ASSOCIATION /
OUTDOORS
8 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012
Winter sports: surefire cure for cabin fever
CABIN FEVER may not have
much impact this year if the mild
winter continues, but even light
snow levels can take a toll on peo-
ple who dont find a way to enjoy
this colder season.
Short days, snow-covered yards
and icy sidewalks can be depress-
ing to some, especially if they are
locked up at home for days on end.
Some people dont have a
choice, but for those who do,
theres no better way to beat the
winter blues than by staying
active. And that does not mean sit-
ting in front of the computer or
television.
Most people have a billion
excuses for why they cant do more
in winter some very legitimate,
and others without any merit at
all. I say pick a sport or two, and
winter will pass quicker than you
ever imagined.
If you can handle the weather,
the outdoor choices include snow-
mobiling, ice fishing, cross-country
skiing, snowshoeing, downhill ski-
ing, ice skating and sledding.
Many of these sports can be
enjoyed without a huge invest-
ment in equipment and training.
If you cant deal with the snow
and cold, I can only suggest that
you might be living in the wrong
part of the country. However,
theres always pool league, bowling
league and dart league.
Even time spent at home can be
enhanced with hobbies such as
knitting, quilting, woodworking
and card playing. Thanks to tech-
nology, theres more opportunity
than ever before to stay in touch
with friends and family.
Fishing happens to be on the
top of my winter sports list, but I
know others who spend what
seems like the entire winter on
snowmobiles, skis or snowshoes.
Theres a lot of scenic country to
explore around here.
Some of the best snowmo-
bile and cross-country ski
trails in all the world are
located right here, winding
through private acreage and
public forests that are dotted
with frozen lakes.
While snowmobiling is the more
expensive of the lot, any of these
sports can turn a boring winter
into a time of year that believe it
or not many dont want to end.
There are trails to explore, chal-
lenges to meet, fish to catch,
scenery to enjoy and good times to
be had. Even working out at the
gym will help you avoid depres-
sion, helping mind and body while
keeping you active.
There are dozens of places
where people can walk off boat
landings and other public access
points to go fishing. You dont need
a four-wheel drive truck to get
some jig poles or tip-ups out to a
fishing spot. Throw the equipment
on a small sled and starting walk-
ing.
I was fishing Saturday with an
old friend who came north from
Winneconne, catching northern
pike and crappies from two differ-
ent locations that were in easy
walking distance from the truck.
We live in the North Woods,
surrounded by hundreds of good
fishing lakes and thousands of
acres of public forests. It is truly
the land of opportunity for experi-
encing the great outdoors.
The beauty of ice fishing is that
you can not only learn locations
and techniques from watching oth-
ers catch fish, but its hard to lose
a good spot once you find it.
Holes in the ice can easily be
marked for future reference. Some
people like to freeze sticks into their
favorite holes. One guy I knew left a
dog bone behind before a big snow-
storm, and then returned with the
family dog to find the holes once the
storm passed.
OK, I suppose a global position-
ing system (GPS) unit would also
work. They make those with so
many bells and whistles that
anglers can retrace their steps
months and years later.
I know people who lay down ski
and snowshoe tracks in the back
40 every winter their own pri-
vate system for getting some exer-
cise while also keeping in touch
with the great outdoors.
You just never know when you
might cut the tracks left by a slid-
ing otter, a meandering deer, a
flock of turkeys or the prolific
snowshoe hare. And if you are for-
tunate enough to have a snow-
roosting grouse explode from
between your snowshoes, you can
add an adrenaline rush to the trip.
The point is, it isnt so much
what sport or sports you pick
just as long as you pick one. Doing
nothing in winter is a surefire way
to make winter seem like an eter-
nity.
But beware. If you ever start
enjoying winter, you might dis-
cover there are years when
winter doesnt last long
enough.
Imagine that.
In the
Outdoors
By
Kurt Krueger
Anglers are experiencing an interesting set of condi-
tions out on the ice, as severe slush problems devel-
oped after the last big snow only to improve following
the warmer weather of the last week or so.
That snow has been significantly reduced on the
lakes by the sun and the slush problems have become
much more livable. This is a good thing, as many an -
glers just couldnt get out during the slush nightmare.
Anglers can now get around pretty well on all lakes
and they are looking forward to some colder weather
to firm everything up nicely.
The fishing in February can be more of a challenge, as
the North Woods usually has a lot more snow and gener-
ally the lakes have the worst conditions of the year for
getting around, but maybe this year well get lucky.
Snow conditions in the woods are still OK, but the
snow is a little crusted for those trying to use snowshoes.
The groomed cross-country ski trails are pretty good now.
All in all, not bad for this time of year. The sun is defi-
nitely much stronger and will have much more of an
effect on the snowpack from this point forward.
Walleye fishing has remained surprisingly good,
but at times it has become a little inconsistent. We are
still getting reports of good evening fishing, and the
night fishing can be great until 10 p.m. or so. As usual,
shiners and sucker minnows are the needed bait for
tip-up action. Most anglers are still getting their
action on the weed edges or shallower after dark.
Some anglers are reporting good action in deeper
water off the weeds and drop-offs during the after-
noons, usually by setting tip-ups deeper or by vertical
jigging in the 12- to 25-foot depth areas.
Northern action has remained very good in the weeds
on a daily basis. Use of large golden shiners is best and
the afternoons seem to be the best time period. North-
erns can supply extra action while jigging for panfish.
Panfish action has been improving throughout the
area, with perch and bluegills leading the way. The
gills are hitting in the weeds. Generally, keep the bait
near the bottom in the water column. Spikes or waxies
are the best baits for these fish. The perch are general-
ly a little further out in the weeds, nearer the deep
edges. Perch are hitting wigglers and minnows quite
well now. Crappie action is improving in the deeper
water and very deep weed areas. Crappie minnows are
best for these fish.
All in all, anglers should have a good week with nice
ice fishing weather and improving lake conditions.
Good luck and good fishin.
Conditions improving
on North Woods lakes
Mike Krueger of Winneconne hoists a 28-inch northern pike, a memorable
event from a sport that makes winter go quicker. Photo By The Author
Northland Pines senior John Promer got some
assistance handling this northern pike from
Eagle River fishing guide Elmer Jensen during
the outdoor pursuits class on Silver Lake.
Anglers will take to the ice
this Saturday, Feb. 11, begin-
ning at 6 a.m., for the annual
Plum Lake Ice Fishing Tour-
nament.
The event will include more
than $700 in prize money and
will feature the Chefs on Ice
competition, along with the
Miss Ice Shack Queen compe-
tition.
All fishing will be on Plum
Lake between 6 a.m. and 3
p.m. The cook-off competition
will run from 11 a.m. to 12:30
p.m. at the fish registration
tent, located at the public boat
landing.
Fishing winners will
receive cash prizes in walleye,
northern pike, perch, crappie
and bluegill categories.
More than 200 minor door
prizes will be awarded with
more than 20 major prizes,
including six power augers, a
Green Mountain pellet grill,
Fish TV Plus underwater cam-
era, Otter sleds, a StrikeMas-
ter hand auger, meat trays, and
more given away as major door
prizes and raffle prizes.
Fishing entry tickets priced
at $25 are available now at
Sayner area businesses and
will be available at the fish
registration tent the day of
the tourney.
For more information on
the fishing contest or Chefs on
Ice rules, call (715) 542-2788
or 542-3501.
Plum Lake
tourney set
Saturday
The ice of Silver Lake
became the classroom for
about two dozen Northland
Pines High School students
for three days last week.
The students were mem-
bers of the outdoor pursuits
class, taught by physical edu-
cation teacher Josh Rhode,
and their lesson was ice fish-
ing.
The outdoor pursuits class
is an elective physical educa-
tion class that is offered to
upper-class students, said
Rhode. The goal of the class is
to introduce and expose stu-
dents to outdoor activities
that are healthy and readily
available in the North Woods.
Last Monday, members of
the Eagle River Guides Asso-
ciation, under the guidance of
Yukon Jack, instructed stu-
dents in the classroom. The
guides discussed proper cloth-
Students learn about ice fishing
in Pines outdoor pursuits class
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
To PURSUITS, Pg. 12
Kirks of the North II in
Conover on Highway K will
sponsor a fishing tournament
Saturday, Feb. 25, from 8 a.m.
to 3:30 p.m.
Registration will cost $10
per person and $12 for the
dinner buffet. Cash prizes for
the fishing contest and raffles
will be available. For more
information, call (715) 545-
2750.
Kirks to host
fishing contest
Northland Pines junior Paige Healy learned how to set a tip-up
during the class. Staff Photos By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
Sports Sidelines
By Gary Ridderbusch
SPORTS
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS 9
Mitchell Elbe, a senior at Northland Pines High
School, signed a national letter of intent last week to
play college football at Division II Bemidji State Uni-
versity in Bemidji, Minn., next fall.
Elbe was a three-year, two-way
starter for Northland Pines. He was
voted first team all-conference on the
offensive line in the Western Peninsu-
la Athletic Conference (WestPAC) both
his junior and senior years. He was
named most valuable lineman for the
Eagles both his junior and senior
years, and was also a team captain his
senior year.
Elbe, at 6-foot-3, 275 pounds, will
play nose tackle on the defensive line at Bemidji. The
Beavers finished the 2011 campaign with an 8-3 over-
all record and a 7-3 mark in the Northern Sun Inter-
collegiate Conference (NSIC) to finish in a three-way
tie for fourth in the league standings. Bemidji head
football coach Jeff Tesch announced his recruits dur-
ing national signing day last Wednesday.
Ferber off to Oshkosh
Another Northland Pines senior, Lucas Ferber, an -
nounced last week he would be playing football next
season for UW-Oshkosh, a Division III college.
Ferber was a three-year, two-way
starter for Northland Pines. He was
voted second team all-conference as a
junior and first team all-conference as
a senior in the WestPAC at the
linebacker position. He was a team
captain both his junior and senior sea-
sons and named the teams defensive
most valuable player his sophomore,
junior and senior years (leading the
team in tackles all three seasons).
Ferber, a 6-foot, 205-pound
linebacker, said Oshkosh coaches liked his quickness
and nose for the football. He said he will likely be on
the scout team his freshman year.
I have very high expectations. I plan on working
just as hard and hone in on some of my skills to become
a better football player, said Ferber.
Pines coach Jason Foster said Elbe and Ferber were
more than just players at Northland Pines.
They have played a key role in turning the football
program around and leading us back into the play-
offs, said Foster. Their intelligence and work ethic is
what we have come to expect in our program and they
have taken that responsibility and ran with it.
Elbe headed for Bemidji;
Ferber to play at Oshkosh In a string of Northern
Lakes Conference (NLC) vic-
tories, the Three Lakes boys
basketball team defeated
Elcho 65-21 last Tuesday
before going on to beat Flo-
rence Thursday 61-42 and
Laona Monday 62-35.
The Bluejays established
the post early and often
throughout the game against
Laona.
Laonas tallest player is
about 6 feet, so we knew we
had a definite advantage in
the post, said Three Lakes
coach Brad Volkmann. We
established the rest of our
offense from there.
Three Lakes held a halftime
lead of 30-15, after good scor-
ing from Ross Thorn and Ben
Wales in the first two quarters.
The Jays didnt slow down
in the second half, outscoring
Laona 18-6 in the third and
tying them at 14 in the fourth.
Three Lakes held Laona in the
single digits in scoring for the
first three quarters.
Defense was also a key to
this game, said Volkmann.
Ben Wales played a nice game
and connected with a lot of
players by providing that one
extra pass, which put others
into great scoring positions.
Leading scoring for Three
Lakes was Thorn with 26
points, followed by Wales with
11 points and eight assists.
Trenten Stefonek contributed
10 points.
In the game against Flo-
rence, the Bobcats got off to a
quick pace, staying within two
points of the Bluejays at half-
time. The score saw Three
Lakes ahead 28-26.
We settled in for the sec-
ond half and built our lead
consistently through the rest
of the game, said Volkmann.
We really got things going in
the post and Ross Thorn had a
monster game and missed a
triple-double by only one
blocked shot.
The Jays outscored Flo-
rence 13-8 in the third quarter
and 20-8 in the fourth to take
home the win.
Thorn led scoring for the
Jays with 27 points and nine
blocks, followed by Wales with
14 points and five assists.
Brent LaDuke contributed 11
points.
Balanced scoring and
defense were the keys to
defeating Elcho. Three Lakes
capitalized on 20 steals during
the game.
Elchos Kyle Fisher is one
of the best guards in the con-
ference, said Volkmann. We
held him to 13 points due to
some great defensive pressure
by Trenten Stefonek.
Thorn was the leading scor-
er in the game for Three
Lakes with 16 points, followed
by Wales with 14 and LaDuke
with 10.
Jays win three in NLC
Defeat Elcho, Florence, Laona
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
Bluejays junior Riley Liebscher took the ball
down the court after a steal during the game
against the Elcho Hornets last Tuesday in Three
Lakes. Staff Photos By ANTHONY DREW
Three Lakes junior Brent LaDuke went above an Elcho defend-
er to take this jump shot during last Tuesdays NLC game.
Thinking fast, Bluejay Ben Wales (No. 20) shoveled a pass to
the 6-foot, 8-inch Ross Thorn, who went up for the shot.
The Headwaters Youth Soc-
cer Association-United
(HYSA-United) will hold its
registration night for the 2012
spring soccer season Monday,
Feb. 20, from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.
in the Northland Pines High
School large-group instruction
room.
Those ages 4 through high
school are welcome to register.
Registration is also available
online at northwoodssoccer.org.
For more information, contact
Heidi Grosskopf at (715) 891-
6164.
The association also is
seeking soccer coaches for the
competitive spring/summer
soccer season. HYSA-United
(formerly United Northwoods
Soccer) is part of the Central
Wisconsin Soccer League
(CWSL) and is a competitive
traveling soccer club.
Specifically, HYSA is look-
ing for a U12 co-ed coach, but
the association is always in
need of coaches or assistant
coaches for the club.
The CWSL requires an E
license through the U.S. Soc-
cer Federation, which HYSA-
United will assist anyone
interested in obtaining.
Indoor practices for the sea-
son will begin in April. Those
interested can contact coach
liaison Wendy McCormack at
coachwendy15@gmail.com or
(715) 891-2955.
Headwaters Youth Soccer
Association is also looking for
coaches for the fall recreation-
al season. Those interested
can contact Mike Kieffer at
mkieffer24@yahoo.com for
more information.
HYSA-United and HYSA-
Eagle River has a new website
at northwoodssoccer.org.
Soccer registration planned; HYSA-United seeks coaches
The Northland Pines boys
hockey team clinched a share
of the Great Northern Confer-
ence (GNC) championship
with victories over Medford
and Lakeland last week, and
then Lakeland beat Waupaca
on Saturday to give Pines the
outright title.
Pines opened the week with
a 10-1 victory over Medford
last Tuesday on Senior Night
at the Dome.
This was Senior Night for
for our boys and our last regu-
lar-season home game, said
Pines coach Charlie DePuydt.
With that on their minds, our
seniors wanted to play a game
that they would remember.
The first period saw all five
seniors start the game, includ-
ing Brett Hughes, Matt Mey-
er, Dakota Klessig, Matt Kait -
chuck and Duncan Hosking in
the net.
Pines put 17 shots on Med-
fords goalie and he turned all
but two of them in the first
period. Goals were scored by
Trevor Laszczkowski and Aus -
tin Ramesh.
Brett Hughes scored a
very nice goal in the second
period as he peeled out of the
corner on his forehand side
firing it past the Medford
goalie, said DePuydt. Brett
followed up with another goal
in the third period.
Senior Matt Meyer also
scored two nice goals, beating
the goalie on the short side
after taking a hit along the
boards and fighting to main-
tain possession, said De Puydt.
Other goals were scored by
Brandon Hunt, Adam Kresl
(two) and Dylan Weber. Hosk-
ing made four saves.
Pines traveled to rival
Lakeland on Thursday and
came home with a 2-0 victory.
Pines did control the play in
the first period, putting 15
shots on Lakelands goalie.
With just a little more than
four minutes left in the period,
Zach Kennedy slid the puck
down behind the net to Newey
Spencer, who made a great
pass from behind the net to
Hunt in the slot. Hunt
slammed it in to give Pines a
one-goal lead.
Late in the period, Pines
goalie Jacob Stephan kept
calm and turned away some
high-quality scoring chances
for the T-Birds.
Pines red line gave the
Eagles another goal in the sec-
ond period on a pass from
Kresl to Weber before Weber
slapped it past Lakelands
goaltender.
Stephan finished with 23
saves, while Lakeland goalie
Alex Moustakis had 35 saves.
Pines clinched sole posses-
sion of the league title on Sat-
urday as Lakeland beat Wau-
paca 4-3 in overtime.
The Eagles, 12-1 in the
GNC and 16-4-1 overall, will
play at Waupaca this Friday,
Feb. 10, at 7 p.m. in the final
game of the regular season.
Looking ahead to the WIAA
tournament, Pines got the
third seed in the Sectional and
will get a first-round bye. The
Eagles will host the winner of
11th-seeded Rhinelander and
sixth-seeded Wausau East
Thursday, Feb. 16, at 7 p.m.
Eagles win title
with two victories
ELBE
FERBER
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
The Northland Pines girls
hockey team dominated rivals
Point-Rapids 4-1 during senior
night Monday in a welcome
win after suffering a 1-0 loss to
Tomahawk last Friday, falling
to the team for the first time in
the programs history.
Pines played great against
Point-Rapids, coming out
tough from the first drop of the
puck. They outshot the co-op
team in each of the three peri-
ods.
Point-Rapids scored first,
but Pines rallied and came
back hard, as team captain
Kelly McGinnis scored at 4:34
of the first period. She was
assisted by Ali Plese.
Just 22 seconds later, the
Eagles scored again when Emi-
ly Saltenberger scored her first
high school goal on a rebound,
assisted by Sydney Moustakis.
It was a critical goal as the
momentum shift was now in
favor of the Eagles, said Pines
coach Al Moustakis.
The second period was a
back-and-forth game, featuring
good defense by the Eagles,
who gave the Panthers pre-
cious few scoring opportuni-
ties.
McGinnis gave the Eagles a
two-goal lead with 1:30 left in
the period with a great shot
high to the blocker side.
With a two-goal lead, we
came out determined not to
allow our lead to diminish,
said Moustakis. Every player
contributed by their determi-
nation and aggressive play in
this great win.
At 11:41 of the third period,
Winter Nielsen took the puck
while Pines was shorthanded
and drove past three defend-
ers, netting a low shot past the
goalie.
It was the best game the
team played this year, said
Moustakis. It was a great
night for the seniors.
Pines goalie Kim Van Brunt
stopped 23 shots during the
game.
The Tomahawk Hatchets,
led by senior Kendall Nelson,
played the spoiler last Friday
as the Eagles needed a win to
give them a possibility of tak-
ing the GNC title.
The Eagles came out strong
in the beginning of the first
period, but they fizzled as the
game went on.
The Hatchets played a good
defensive game, continually
icing the puck in the dome and
playing a four defensemen-
style game, protecting their
goaltender the entire match.
Although Pines players had
opportunities to score, the
majority of the shots were at
the goalie instead of open spots
in the net.
The game was a huge upset,
according to Pines coach Al
Moustakis.
We have four very strong
seniors this year and we
believed we were the best team
in the conference, he said.
That surely is questionable at
this time. But as they say, you
cannot bring it back. We have
to regroup, strap our skates
back on and move on to the
playoffs and prove that we are
the best team in the confer-
ence.
The lone goal of the game
came off a face-off in the Pines
zone during the second period.
Nelson, the leading scorer in
the GNC, got the puck for the
Hatchets and put a wrist shot
in the lower right corner past
the outstretched Pines goalie
Kim Van Brunt.
The remainder of the game
saw Tomahawk play a four-
man system of defensive hock-
ey in their zone.
They just iced the puck and
waited for opportunities, said
Moustakis. It worked very
well.
The Eagles will travel to
Rhinelander for a game Friday,
Feb. 10, at 7 p.m.
Pines will host the Hatchets
in the first game of the playoffs
Feb. 16 or Feb. 17. The Eagles
are now 11-7-2 on the season.
10 WEDNESDAY, FEB., 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
Following a bye the previous
week, the Eagle River Falcons
posted an 8-4 win over the
Madison Blues Friday before
falling 12-4 to the Fond du Lac
Bears Saturday.
While no statistics were
available for the Madison
game, Tony Pudlo was in the
net for the Falcons, who
claimed the win.
The Bears, competing for the
top position in the Great Lakes
Hockey League, hosted Eagle
River at the Blue Line Family
Ice Center in Fond du Lac.
Fond du Lac showed very lit-
tle hospitality, initiating a fight
at the opening face-off in retal-
iation over an incident back in
December when the two teams
last met. Fond du Lac contin-
ued the early aggression, skat-
ing to a 5-0 first-period lead.
Three minutes into the sec-
ond stanza, Fondy found the
net again and extended their
lead to six. At that point, the
Falcons made a change at
goalie and replaced Brandon
Gwidt with Pudlo.
Eagle River lit the lamp
with five minutes, 20 seconds
left in the period as Jake Dern
scored unassisted. But Fondy
continued to penetrate the Fal-
cons net, adding a pair of goals
before the end of the period to
increase their lead 8-1.
The final frame saw the
home team score four more
times, while limiting the Fal-
cons to three.
For Eagle River, Mike Otto
scored first, assisted by Nic
Weight and Brad Adamovich.
Mike Siergiej and Pudlo set up
Derek Tijan on the second, and
Adamovich connected on a
penalty shot for the final goal.
Gwidt and Pudlo combined for
32 saves in the net.
Eagle River coach Mike
Adamovich said he was
impressed with the effort of
Bears goalie Justin Demar.
Their goalie had a tremen-
dous game, saving at least ten
quality shots, he said. It made
a big difference.
The Falcons record stands
at 5-7-1. They will host
Calumet and Portage Lake on
Pond Hockey Weekend Feb. 10-
11. Both games will start at 8
p.m.
Falcons defeat Madison,
suffer loss to Fond du Lac
SPORTS
HOCKEY SCHEDULES 2011-12
NORTHLAND PINES HIGH SCHOOL BOYS
Date Opponent Time
Tues., Nov. 22 at Kingsford W 4-2
Thurs., Dec. 1 Stevens Point T 4-4
Tues., Dec. 6 at Rhinelander W 9-0
Thurs., Dec. 8 at Mosinee L 5-4
Sat., Dec. 10 Waupaca W 6-3
Tues., Dec. 13 Antigo W 7-0
Thurs., Dec.15 Tomahawk W 7-3
Tues., Dec. 20 at Houghton L 4-2
Thurs., Dec. 22 at Medford Area W 7-0
Tues., Dec. 27 at Spooner L W W
Tues., Jan. 3 Lakeland W 9-1
Tues., Jan. 10 at Tomahawk W 7-2
Thurs., Jan. 12 Rhinelander W 7-1
Tues., Jan. 17 D.C. Everest L 3-0
Fri., Jan. 20 2012 Pines Classic
Mosinee W 5-4
Sat., Jan. 21 Hayward,
University School of Milw. W 2-1
Tues., Jan. 24 at Antigo W 3-1
Sat., Jan. 28 at Wausau East W 3-0
Tues., Jan. 31 Medford Area W 10-1
Thurs., Feb. 2 at Lakeland W 2-0
Fri., Feb. 10 at Waupaca 7:00 PM
Tues., Feb. 14 WIAA Regionals TBD
NORTHLAND PINES HIGH SCHOOL GIRLS
Date Opponent Time
Sat., Nov. 19 Badger Thunder W 3-2
MSO W 7-1
Fond du Lac L 5-3
Mon., Nov. 28 Marshfield W 1-0
Fri., Dec. 2 Eau Claire North L 3-2
Sat., Dec. 3 Sun Prairie W 3-2
Fri., Dec. 9 at Lakeland W 7-0
Fri., Dec. 16 Medford Area W 4-1
Tues., Dec. 20 at Hayward L 7-1
Tues., Jan. 3 at Ashland W 11-0
Fri., Jan. 6 at Tomahawk W 5-2
Mon., Jan. 9 at Wisconsin Rapids L 2-0
Fri., Jan. 13 Antigo/Rhinelander W 7-2
Sat., Jan.14 at Appleton West T 2-2
Mon., Jan. 16 at Marshfield T 1-1
Fri., Jan. 20 Webster L 4-2
& Sat., Jan. 21 University School
of Milwaukee L 1-0
Mon., Jan. 23 Lakeland W 8-0
Thurs., Jan. 26 at Medford Area W 5-1
Fri., Feb. 3 Tomahawk L 0-1
Mon., Feb. 6 Wisconsin Rapids W 4-1
Fri., Feb. 10 at Antigo/Rhinelander 7:00 PM
EAGLE RIVER FALCONS
Date Opponent Time
Fri., Nov. 11 Brookfield W 5-2
Sat., Nov. 12 Vernon Hills Capitals L 8-4
Sat., Nov. 26 Oregon Outlaws W 8-2
Sat., Dec. 3 Vernon Hills Capitals L 9-5
Sat., Dec. 10 Fond du Lac Bears T 6-6
Sat., Dec. 17 Madison Blues W 18-6
Fri., Dec. 23 at Mosinee Papermakers L 6-3
Fri., Dec. 30 Brookfield Battalion W 11-4
Sat., Jan. 7 at Fox Cities Ice Dogs L 8-2
Sat., Jan. 14 Green Bay Deacons L 8-3
Sat., Jan. 21 Mosinee Papermakers
(Derby) L 6-1
Fri., Feb. 3 at Madison Blues W 8-4
Sat., Feb. 4 at Fond du Lac Bears L 12-4
Fri., Feb. 10 Calumet Wolverines
(Pond Hockey) 8:00 PM
Sat., Feb. 11 Portage Lakes Pioneers
(Pond Hockey) 8:00 PM
Fri., Feb. 17 at Mosinee Papermakers
(River Cup) 8:00 PM
Sat., Feb. 18 Mosinee Papermakers
(River Cup) 8:00 PM
Fri., Feb. 24 at West Bend Bombers 8:00 PM
Sat., Feb. 25 at Oregon Outlaws 8:00 PM
Fri., March 9 at Green Bay Deacons 7:30 PM
Sat., March 10 Fox Cities Ice Dogs 8:00 PM
Sat., March 17 West Bend Bombers 8:00 PM
Fri., March 23 at Calumet Wolverines 6:00 PM CT
Sat., March 24 at Portage Lakes Pioneers 5:30 PM CT
First National Bank
Eagle River, Three Lakes, St. Germain, Phelps
Nelsons Ace Hardware
715-479-4496
Lehner-Stephan Jewelers
715-479-4520
Hauswerks, Inc.
715-479-6049
Ripco Credit Union
715-479-4491
Mid-Wisconsin Bank
Eagle River
Eliason Realty
of the North
Eagle River, St. Germain
Vilas County News-Review
The Three Lakes News
715-479-4421
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The Phelps Knights boys
basketball team lost 49-38 in a
Northern Lakes Conference
game against Wabeno last
Thursday.
Competitive play on both
sides of the court led the teams
to trade baskets for the majori-
ty of the first quarter, which
ended 15-13 in favor of Wabeno.
The Logrollers built on that
lead, outscoring Phelps 11-7 in
the second, bringing the half-
time score to 26-20.
Wabeno broke the game
open in the third, holding the
Knights to six points and
putting 12 on the board.
The Knights outscored
Wabeno in the fourth 12-11, but
the gap proved too large for
Phelps to deal with, as the
Logrollers came away with the
NLC wins
It was a good, competitive
game, said Phelps coach Kregg
Mueller. The third quarter
hurt us and we never really
recovered from it.
Phelps will travel to Elcho
Friday, Feb. 10, for an NLC
game at 7 p.m.
Wabeno tops Phelps boys
in NLC basketball game
___________
BY GENE ADAMOVICH
SPECIAL TO THE NEWS-REVIEW
___________
EAGLE RIVER
301 DART LEAGUE
Results of 1/30/12
Team results: Sweetwater II 9,
Kathan Inn 4; House of Boos II 3, Club
45 10; Uncle Kents 6, Club DeNoyer 7;
Smugglers Lounge 6, House of Boos I 7;
OBriens 7, Sweetwater I 6.
Eight-dart out: Todd Anderson and
Chris Blicharz.
Nine-dart out: Josh Doyen, Greg
Maney, Eric Bolte, Bob Dutz, Chris
Blicharz.
Hat tricks: Mason Gerlach (3), Eric
Bolte, Greg Maney, Mike Jones, Ri ch
Behnke, Todd Anderson, Nick Warwick,
Bob Dutz, Chris Blicharz.
STANDINGS W L
SWEETWATER I......................156 52
SWEETWATER II ....................153 55
OBRIENS PUB .......................153 55
CLUB 45 ...................................127 81
KATHAN INN ..........................107 101
HOUSE OF BOOS II.................94 114
HOUSE OF BOOS I...................86 122
CLUB DENOYER.......................65 143
SMUGGLERS LOUNGE...........56 152
UNCLE KENTS.........................43 165
EAGLE RIVER
DARTBALL
Results of 2/1/12
Team results: BBTs II 1, Club
DeNoyer I 2; Club DeNoyer II 2, BBTs
III 1; BBTs I 1, Bucktale Inn I 2; Buck-
tale Inn II 3, Club 45 II 0; Club 45 I bye.
Top women shooters: Cheryl Nagy
6/16, Jane Klug 6/17, Pam Tinder 5/15,
Barb Schofield 5/17, Kerri Johann 4/8,
Kelly Falcetta 3/15, Missy Madl 2/9.
Top men shooters: John Olander
7/12, Skip Brunswick 6/16, Daryl
Rutkowski 6/17, C.J. Johann 5/7, Bob
Ratke 5/17, John Ariola 4/9, Cliff
Maulsoy 3/15, Randy Rein 3/17.
Home runs: John Olander.
STANDINGS W L
CLUB DENOYER I...................31 11
BUCKTALE INN I ....................29 13
CLUB DENOYER II .................27 15
BUCKTALE INN II ..................21 21
BBTS II .....................................20 22
BBTS I.......................................20 25
BBTS III....................................18 27
CLUB 45 II ................................15 27
CLUB 45 I..................................11 31
THREE LAKES DARTBALL
Results of 2/1/12
Team results: Oneida Village II 2,
American Legion A 1; OV Triple Dia-
monds 2, Oneida Village I 1; Village Peo-
ple 2, American Legion I 1; OV Wildcats 2,
OV Nomads 1.
Top women shooters: Trudy Klauk
4/14; JoAnne Wargolet 3/10; Kathy Miller
3/11; Jackie Wick and Ginny Arvey 2/7;
Rosie Obukowicz 2/5; Gail Smith 2/9; Pat
Freeman 1/9.
Top men shooters: Bob Wojtusik 5/7;
Jim Kirsch and Dave Cyrtmus 7/14; Lou
Bruckmoser and Lew Holbrook 5/9; Dick
Stoll 3/7; Eric Wick 2/7; Ed Jacobsen 2/9;
Mike Miller 1/10.
Home runs: Betty Koehler, Ann Bruck-
moser, Rita Strathmann, Jackie Wick,
Eric Wick, Kathy Miller and Morse Hintz.
STANDINGS W L
ONEIDA VILLAGE II .............37 8
OV TRIPLE DIAMONDS........27 18
AMERICAN LEGION I...........24 21
OV WILDCATS........................22.5 22.5
AMERICAN LEGION A..........20.5 24.5
OV NOMADS ...........................17 28
ONEIDA VILLAGE I...............16 29
VILLAGE PEOPLE.................16 29
Having trouble with accura-
cy from the field last Tuesday,
the Phelps Lady Knights bas-
ketball team fell 53-30 to Gre-
sham.
In game preparation, the
girls talked about cutting
movement and getting to the
free-throw line by effectively
driving with the offense,
according to Phelps coach Josh
Olivotti.
But we struggled in both
areas again, he said. We were
very stagnant in our offensive
throughout the first half, and
settled for a lot of jump shots
early in possessions.
However, the team wasnt
hitting much from the outside
and they shot 26% from the
field. The score after two quar-
ters saw Gresham ahead 28-15.
The team revisited the goal
of driving to the basket off ball
reversals and skip passes, but
the offensive adjustments did-
nt translate on the floor.
We did have a little spark
on the defensive side of the ball
and became more active on the
glass, tying up a lot of loose
balls, said Olivotti. Riley
Brockman and Ashley Volk-
mann played pivotal roles in
these two aspects and really
worked hard to slow down Gre-
sham and try to limit them to
one and done on the offensive
end.
The Lady Knights were
outscored 14-4 in the third and
matched Gresham at 11 in the
fourth.
Olivotti said the team had
opportunities to use transition
play to make runs but strug-
gled to take care of the ball in
transition.
Off the defensive rebound
and against the press, we were
able to break through their
front line on defense and push
the ball up the floor, but we
have to convert this into
points, he said, adding that the
team will continue to work on
these aspects in practice.
I have to do a better job
teaching the kids, he said. I
also need to make some adjust-
ments in our zone offense so we
can offset what teams are try-
ing to do against us. This team
is capable of winning several
more games this season if we
manage ourselves properly and
step up our efforts as a group.
Volkmann led the Lady
Knights in scoring with 15
points, 15 rebounds, two steals
and four assists. Angela
Grmick had six points and
Brockman added three points,
four rebounds and three steals.
Phelps will travel to Cran-
don for a Northern Lakes Con-
ference match Thursday, Feb. 9,
at 7:30 p.m. before traveling to
Elcho for an NLC game Mon-
day, Feb. 13, at 7 p.m.
Lady Knights take loss to Gresham Hatchets
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
DARTS
Pines players crowded the goal during an attempt to score against
Tomahawk last Friday night. The Eagles fell to the Hatchets 1-0 for
the first time in the teams program before bouncing back to beat
Point-Rapids Monday night. Staff Photo By ANTHONY DREW
Northland Pines girls beat Point-Rapids,
fall to Tomahawk 1-0 in hockey games
___________
BY ANTHONY DREW
NEWS-REVIEW ASST. EDITOR
___________
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 11
SPORTS
HIGH SCHOOL
SPORTS CALENDAR
Boys Varsity Basketball
Tues., Nov. 29 at Crandon 7:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 2 Antigo 7:30 PM
Sat., Dec. 3 Three Lakes (Doubleheader) 5:30 PM
Tues., Dec. 6 at Rhinelander 7:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 16 Lakeland 7:30 PM
Tues., Dec. 20 at Wittenberg-Birnamwood 7:30 PM
Thurs., Dec. 29 at Watersmeet 6:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 30 Hurley (Doubleheader) 7:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 3 at Medford Area 7:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 5 Houghton 6:45 PM
Fri., Jan. 13 at Tomahawk 7:30 PM
Mon., Jan. 16 at Niagara 7:15 PM
Fri., Jan. 20 Mosinee 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 24 Kingsford 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 27 at Antigo 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 31 Rhinelander 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb.3 at Lakeland 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 10 Medford Area 7:30 PM
Mon., Feb.13 at Chequamegon (Park Falls) 7:30 PM
(Doubleheader)
Fri., Feb. 17 Tomahawk 7:30 PM
Mon., Feb. 20 at Ashland 7:00 PM
Fri., Feb. 24 at Mosinee 7:30 PM
Girls Varsity Basketball
Mon., Nov. 28 at Ontonagon, Mich. 5:00 PM
Thurs., Dec. 1 at LAnse 7:20 PM
Sat., Dec. 3 Three Lakes (Doubleheader) 5:30 PM
Tues., Dec.6 Wabeno 7:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 9 Rhinelander 7:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 16 at Lakeland 7:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 30 Hurley (Doubleheader) 5:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 3 Medford Area 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 10 Prentice 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 13 Tomahawk 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 20 at Mosinee 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 24 Watersmeet 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 27 Antigo 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 31 at Rhinelander 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 3 Lakeland 7:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 7 at Niagara 7:15 PM
Fri., Feb. 10 at Medford Area 7:30 PM
Mon., Feb. 13 at Chequamegon (Park Falls) 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 17 at Tomahawk 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 24 Mosinee 7:30 PM
Thurs., March 1 at Antigo 7:30 PM
Boys Varsity Basketball
Fri., Dec. 2 at Laona 7:00 PM
Fri., Dec. 8 at Florence 5:30 PM
Sat., Dec. 9 at Watersmeet 6:00 PM
Thurs., Dec. 15 at Wabeno 7:30 PM
Thurs., Dec. 29
& Fri., Dec. 30 at Holiday Tour TBD
Tues., Jan. 3 Crandon 5:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 5 Elcho 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 10 Butternut 7:00 PM
Thurs., Jan. 12 White Lake 5:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 13 at Goodman/Pembine 7:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 17 at Three Lakes 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 20 Watersmeet 6:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 24 Laona 5:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 26 Florence 7:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 31 at Gresham 7:00 PM
Thurs., Feb. 2 Wabeno 7:00 PM
Mon., Feb. 6 at Crandon 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 10 at Elcho 7:00 PM
Thurs., Feb. 16 at White Lake 7:00 PM
Tues., Feb. 21 Goodman/Pembine 5:30 PM
Thurs., Feb. 23 Three Lakes 7:00 PM
Tues., Feb. 28 WIAA Regional 7:00 PM
Girls Varsity Basketball
Tues., Nov. 29 Lakeland 7:00 PM
Fri., Dec. 2 at Laona 5:30 PM
Tues., Dec. 6 at Watersmeet 6:00 PM
Thurs., Dec. 8 at Florence 7:00 PM
Fri., Dec. 16 Wabeno 7:00 PM
Thurs., Dec. 29
& Fri., Dec. 30 at Holiday Tour TBD
Tues., Jan. 3 Crandon 5:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 5 Elcho 5:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 10 Butternut 5:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 12 White Lake 7:00 PM
Fri., Jan. 13 at Goodman/Pembine 5:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 19 Three Lakes 7:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 24 Laona 7:00 PM
Thurs., Jan. 26 Florence 5:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 31 at Gresham 5:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 7 at Wabeno 7:30 PM
Thurs., Feb. 9 at Crandon 7:30 PM
Mon., Feb. 13 Elcho 7:00 PM
Thurs., Feb. 16 at White Lake 5:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 21 Goodman/Pembine 7:00 PM
Fri., Feb. 24 at Three Lakes 7:30 PM
Tues., March 6 WIAA Regional 7:00 PM
Boys Varsity Basketball
Thurs., Dec. 1 Wabeno 7:30 PM
Sat., Dec. 3 at Northland Pines 7:00 PM
Fri., Dec. 9 at Elcho 7:30 PM
Tues., Dec. 13 Prentice 7:30 PM
Thurs., Dec. 15 Florence 7:30 PM
Wed., Dec. 28 at Lakeland Tournament 6:00 PM
Thurs., Dec. 29 at Lakeland Tournament 6:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 3 at Laona 7:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 5 at White Lake 7:30 PM
Mon., Jan. 9 Goodman/Pembine 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 13 at Crandon 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 17 Phelps 7:30 PM
Fri., Jan. 20 at Wabeno 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 24 at Antigo 7:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 26 at Prentice 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 31 Elcho 7:30 PM
Thurs., Feb. 2 at Florence 7:30 PM
Mon., Feb. 6 Laona 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 10 White Lake 7:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 14 at Goodman/Pembine 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 17 Crandon 7:30 PM
Thurs., Feb. 23 at Phelps 7:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 28 WIAA Regional TBA
Girls Varsity Basketball
Tues., Nov. 29 Tomahawk 7:30 PM
Fri., Dec. 2 at Wabeno 7:30 PM
Sat., Dec. 3 at Northland Pines 5:30 PM
Thurs., Dec. 8 at Prentice 7:30 PM
Tues., Dec. 13 Elcho 6:00 PM
Fri., Dec. 16 at Florence 7:30 PM
Sat., Dec. 17 Crivitz 5:30 PM
Wed., Dec. 28 at Crandon Tournament 10:00 AM
Fri., Jan. 6 Laona 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 10 White Lake 7:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 12 at Goodman/Pembine 7:30 PM
Mon., Jan. 16 Crandon 7:30 PM
Thurs., Jan. 19 at Phelps 7:30 PM
Tues., Jan. 24 Wabeno 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 3 at Elcho 7:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 7 Florence 7:30 PM
Thurs., Feb. 9 at Laona 7:30 PM
Mon., Feb. 13 at White Lake 7:30 PM
Thurs., Feb. 16 Goodman/Pembine 7:30 PM
Tues., Feb. 21 at Crandon 7:30 PM
Fri., Feb. 24 Phelps 7:30 PM
Tues., March 6 WIAA Regionals TBA
Sat., Dec. 10 at Wabeno Logroller Invite 9:30 AM
Sat., Dec. 17 at Tomahawk Invite 9:30 AM
Thurs., Dec. 29 at Oshkosh Wrestling Classic 8:00 AM
Fri., Dec. 30 at Oshkosh Wrestling Classic 8:00 AM
Tues., Jan. 3 at Wabeno 7:00 PM
Sat., Jan. 7 at Wittenberg-Birnamwood
Invite 10:00 AM
Thurs., Jan. 12 at Florence 7:00 PM
Sat., Jan. 14 at Merrill Northern Exposure
Individual Tournament 9:30 AM
Thurs., Jan. 19 Elcho 7:00 PM
Sat., Jan. 21 at Wausau East Invite TBA
Thurs., Jan. 26 Crandon 7:00 PM
Tues., Jan. 31 Lakeland Union 7:00 PM
Sat., Feb. 4 at NLC Conference
Tournament TBA
Sat., Feb. 11 WIAA Regionals TBA
Sat., Feb. 18 WIAA Sectionals TBA
Three Lakes Wrestling
NORTHLAND PINES EAGLES
THREE LAKES BLUEJAYS
PHELPS KNIGHTS
Eliason Realty of the North
Eagle River St. Germain
Ripco Credit Union
Eagle River
St. Germain Sport Marine
St. Germain
Nelsons Ace Hardware
Eagle River
First National Bank
Eagle River, Three Lakes, Phelps, St. Germain
Wireless Advantage
Verizon Wireless Premium Retailer
Vilas County News-Review
& The Three Lakes News
Eagle River
Despite continued improve-
ment on the part of the play-
ers, the Lady Jays dropped
two NLC games last week,
falling to Goodman-Pembine
48-25 Monday and Elcho 53-
37 Friday.
The two losses drop the
Jays record to 3-13 overall and
2-8 in the NLC.
Against Goodman, the Lady
Jays hung with the Patriots
for the first half but trailed
21-12 at the half.
Goodman-Pembine came
into the game with two of the
conferences top three leading
scorers, Ashley Janczewski
and Rachel Stankevich.
Defensively, the team tried to
make Goodman-Pembines oth-
er girls beat them, and the
Bluejays held Janczewski to
five and Stankevich to three in
the first half, according to Three
Lakes Coach Steve Radaj.
Our guards knew where
Ashley was, and Lindsay
Schoff, Maddie Lorbetske and
Erika Running did a super job
on Rachel, he said. Our game
plan was solid and the girls
executed well.
The second half was a dif-
ferent story, however, as
Janczewski caught fire for 17
points, hitting a few 3-point-
ers along the way. Goodman
outscored the Lady Jays 27-
13 in the second half.
Goodman-Pembine made
some adjustments regarding
Janczewski, and our bottom
girls on the zone were slow in
recognizing, reacting and
fighting through screens,
which resulted in the Patriots
getting some easy three-point
looks, said Radaj. We did an
excellent job on Stankevich
however, holding her to four
points total, which is nine
under her average.
Natalie Miller led the Lady
Jays in scoring with six
points, followed by Peyton
Radaj with five and Lindsay
Schoff with four. Brooke
Welch, Kiana Liebscher, Lor-
betske and Running also
found the scoring column.
In the Elcho game, the Jays
struggled early, falling behind
19-9 in the first quarter. Once
the girls settled down, their
play improved, as Three Lakes
trailed 31-20 at the half.
Despite trailing by eleven
at the half, Radaj said he liked
his teams effort and all-out
hustle.
Brooke took over our point
guard duties since Peyton was
ill and did a nice job for us
running the show, handing out
five assists, said Radaj. I
love how she plays and what
she brings to our team.
Liebscher also stepped up
her game, finishing with nine
points according to Radaj.
She hit one 3 at the end of
the first quarter from down-
town to give us some much
needed momentum, he said.
Hopefully, this is the break
game we have been expecting
from Kiana.
The Lady Jays were sched-
uled to host Florence Tuesday,
Feb. 7. They will travel to
Laona for an NLC game
Thursday, Feb. 9, before trav-
eling to White Lake Monday,
Feb. 13. All games are set to
begin at 7:30 p.m.
Three Lakes girls take losses
to Elcho, Goodman-Pembine
POOL
BOWLING
The Northland Pines girls
basketball team split a pair of
Great Northern Conference
(GNC) games last week,
including a 52-50 win over
Lakeland Friday night.
Lakeland had the upper
hand early, as the T-Birds
jumped out to an 18-10 first-
quarter lead.
The T-Birds were up by as
many as 18 points in the first
half, but Pines cut the margin
to 29-17 at the intermission.
The girls did some soul
searching at halftime, said
Pines coach Larry Bergum.
We talked about playing
every possession and every
minute like it was their last.
We told them to forget about
the first half and play hard
the rest of the game.
The Eagles showed more
energy in that third quarter
as Pines outscored the T-
Birds 28-10 wiping out the
12-point deficit and taking a
six-point lead at the end of the
third quarter. Ashley Mai led
the charge in that fast-paced
period by scoring 10 points
with a 3-pointer, followed by a
solid six points from Abby Alft
and five points from Kelsey
Bergum, including a 3-pointer.
We performed our press
very well and rattled the T-
Bird a little bit, said coach
Bergum. Lakelands hot shoot -
ing in the first half cooled
down in the second frame as
their shots were not dropping.
But Lakeland didnt give up
in the fourth quarter. Carly
Bohnen hit a big shot to give
Pines a two-point lead and
the T-Birds got off a couple of
shots in the final seconds. But
Pines came away with a hard-
fought 52-50 win.
The girls have had a never-
say-die attitude all year long
and on this night it prevailed,
said Bergum. They deserve a
lot of credit for coming back so
well.
Mai led all scorers with 17
points and seven rebounds.
Alft added 10 points and four
rebounds. Kelsy Bergum
chipped in nine points, four
steals and three assists.
Bohnen had a big game with
eight points and 14 rebounds.
Ellie Zyhowski had another
strong showing with six points
and seven boards. Holly Dar-
ton chipped in with three
steals and two points.
In the first GNC game of the
week, Pines fell to improving
Rhinelander Hodags 64-50.
Rhinelander led 16-15 at the
quarter and built a 26-20 half-
time lead. Pines was paced by
Bergum with six points in the
first period, including two 3-
pointers. Zyhowsi also had a
strong first half chipping in
eight points and going 2-for-2
from the line.
The third quarter was all
Rhinelander as they outscored
the Eagles by 10 points to lead
54-38 heading into the fourth
quarter.
We dug ourselves a hole
and we just couldn't get back
to where we could make it
close, said coach Bergum.
Early foul trouble hurt us well
into the game.
The Eagles shot well from
the line by hitting 78% of their
free throws. The difference
was that Rhinelander made
10 more foul shots and also hit
a very high percentage from
the charity stripe.
When you play on the road,
especially in the GNC, you
have to be on your A game to
be successful, said coach
Bergum. We struggled in some
areas on this night and it did-
n't work out. Give Rhinelander
credit, they played a very solid
game overall.
Kelsey Bergum led Pines
with 12 points and Darton
chipped in 11 points. Bergum
also had four assists, three
steals and made six out of sev-
en free throws. Darton added
three steals and three assists
and made five out of six free
throws. Zyhowski had her best
offensive showing of the year
by scoring 10 points, followed
by nine points by Alft.
Zyhowski also grabbed seven
boards and had three steals.
Pines, 5-2 in the GNC and
8-5 overall, was scheduled to
play at Niagara in a noncon-
ference game on Tuesday of
this week. The Eagles will
travel to league-leading Med-
ford this Friday, Feb. 10, for a
7:30 p.m. game.
Eagles overcome 18-point deficit
in GNC victory over Lakeland
MILLER HIGH LIFE
THURSDAY NIGHT
POOL
Results of 2/2/12
Team results: Uncle Kents I 10, Hol-
iday Lodge 6; House of Boos 10, Uncle
Kents II 6, Finish Line 13, Tiny Tap 6;
Sweetwater bye.
8-ball runs: Ryan Sarkauskas and
Frank Sarkauskas.
STANDINGS W L
UNCLE KENTS I.....................125 99
FINISH LINE............................120 88
UNCLE KENTS II...................118 90
SWEETWATER.........................117 91
HOUSE OF BOOS...................106 102
HOLIDAY LODGE......................81 127
TINY TAP.....................................66 142
THREE LAKES POOL
Results of 2/1/12
Team results: Pine Lake Pub 13,
Loon Saloon 2; Irish Waters II 12,
Legion Eagles 3; Oneida Village 11,
Pine Isle II 4; Black Forest 10, Briggs
Bar 5; Jakes II 9, Legion Ravens 6;
Irish Waters I 9, Jakes I 6; Pine Isle I 9,
Bonnies Lakeside 6; Wonders Pit Stop
bye.
Eight-ball run: Rick Maney and John
Kuglitsch.
Hot shots: Denny Klopstein (21); Ter-
ry Bingham and Dennis Rackowski
(17); John Kuglitsch (16); Paul Jenkins
(13); Scott Tillman and Brian Liebscher
(12); Dean Schramke and Art Barbian
(11); Tom Muench (9); Roger Brisk (8).
STANDINGS W L
JAKES II .............................155 70
BONNIES LAKESIDE .......137 88
ONEIDA VILLAGE.............131 94
PINE ISLE I.........................124 101
IRISH WATERS II...............122 103
WONDERS PIT STOP........111 99
PINE LAKE PUB.................118 107
LEGION RAVENS...............117 108
BRIGGS BAR.......................114 111
BLACK FOREST .................109 116
IRISH WATERS I ................102 123
JAKES I.................................94 131
LEGION EAGLES.................89 136
PINE ISLE II .........................87 138
LOON SALOON ....................70 155
NORTHWOODS
NINE-BALL LEAGUE
Results of 1/30/12
Team results: Uncle Kents I 6, Pine
Isle 3; Mud Creek Saloon 6, Eagle Lanes
3; Jakes I 5, Uncle Kents II 4; Jakes II
5, Tiny Tap 4; Club DeNoyer 5, Gordos 4;
Oneida Village bye.
Nine-ball break: Randy Bender (3),
Ron Schilling (1), Jason Zdroik (2).
Nine-ball runs: Joe Garcia (2).
STANDINGS W L
PINE ISLE.................................94 41
UNCLE KENTS I .....................86 46
GORDOS ...................................69 57
MUD CREEK SALOON............65 61
CLUB DENOYER......................69 66
UNCLE KENTS II....................64 62
TINY TAP ..................................63 72
EAGLE LANES .........................59 76
ONEIDA VILLAGE...................51 75
JAKES II ...................................52 80
JAKES I.....................................45 81
SUGAR CAMP
WEDNESDAY NIGHT
POOL
Results of 1/25/12
STANDINGS W L
KATHAN INN B.........................62 28
GATORS LANDING..................47 34
MOONDANCE............................45 36
KLINGENS IDLEWILDE.........33 57
KATHAN INN A.........................29 61
TUESDAY NIGHT LADIES
T&M Lanes
Results of 1/31/12
Team results: Bents Camp 2, Sparo
Coin 5; All In The Family 5, Tackle Box 2;
T&M Lanes 7, LOL Pharmacy 0.
High team game: Tackle Box 729.
High team series: T&M Lanes 2080.
High games: Jodi Hook 199, Kari
Bartleme 178, Amy Froemming 174,
Roni Kopanski 172, Kyha Buell 171.
High series: Amy Froemming 481,
Karen Koskelin 480, Roni Kopanski
470, Renee Horst 458, Kari Bartleme
447.
Split conversion: Yvette Garrison 5-7.
STANDINGS W L
T&M LANES..........................35 14
TACKLE BOX........................33 16
BENTS CAMP.......................26 23
ALL IN THE FAMILY...........25 24
SPARO COIN.........................16 33
LOL PHARMACY..................12 37
WEDNESDAY
GOODFELLOWSHIP
T&M Lanes
Results of 2/1/12
Team results: Northern Exposure 2,
Ramesh Motorsports 5; Great Lakes
Stone 2, Lannys Fireside 5; Rusty Nail
5, bye.
High team game: Ramesh Motor-
sports 811.
High team series: Ramesh Motor-
sports 2340.
High games: Mike Bukoweicki 219,
Chad Hosey 211, Jason Wehrmeyer 203,
Mike Froemming 202, Ron Keller 195.
High series: Mike Bukoweicki 600,
Mike Froemming 550, Chad Hosey 540,
Gunk Buell Sr. 530, Russ Doscotch 518.
STANDINGS W L
LANNYS FIRESIDE...............32 17
RAMESH MOTORSPORTS ....29 20
RUSTY NAIL ..........................28 21
NORTHERN EXPOSURE.......26 23
GREAT LAKES STONE..........16 33
THURSDAY NITE
MENS LEAGUE
T&M Lanes
Results of 1/26/12
Team results: Black Bear Industries 3,
FMN Floral 4; Northern Carpets 3, North-
ern Exposure 4.
High team game: Black Bear Indus-
tries 839.
High team series: Black Bear Indus-
tries 2268.
High games: Rick Schacht and Dick
Owen 212, Craig Mansfield 205, Dale
Grosso 202, Mike Froemming 199.
High series: Dale Grosso 551, Mike
Froemming 548, Craig Mansfield 538,
Rick Schacht 529, Dick Owen 519.
STANDINGS W L
FMN FLORAL.............................23 12
BLACK BEAR INDUSTRIES...18 17
NORTHERN EXPOSURE.........15 20
NORTHERN CARPETS............14 21
Results of 2/2/12
Team results: FMN Floral 5, Northern
Exposure 2; Black Bear Industries 5,
Northern Carpets 2.
High team game: Northern Exposure
789.
High team series: Black Bear Indus-
tries 2312.
High games: Dick Owen 202, Mike
Froemming 198, Dale Grosso 193, Rich
Lambert 190.
High series: Mike Froemming 560,
Dick Owen 559, Dale Grosso 555, Rick
Schacht 522, Craig Mansfield 514.
STANDINGS W L
FMN FLORAL.............................28 14
BLACK BEAR INDUSTRIES...23 19
NORTHERN EXPOSURE.........17 25
NORTHERN CARPETS............16 26
THURSDAY SPORTSMEN
Eagle Lanes
Results of 2/2/12
Team results: XXX-OUTS 4, Harrys
Market 3; Grembans 5, Club DeNoyer 2;
Wild Eagle Corner Store 5, Miller
Sportsmen 2; Boones Building Supply
7, BBTs 0; Hiawatha Hide Away 5,
Leinenkugels 2; Dyna Manufacturing
7, Daniels Distinctive Design 0.
High team game: Harrys Market
1030.
High team series: Harrys Market
2879.
High games: Rob Erickson 280, Greg
Maney 279, Glenn Lasowski 255.
High series: Rob Erickson 776, Greg
Maney 719, Glenn Lasowski 681.
STANDINGS W
XXX-OUTS..........................................30
HARRYS MARKET...........................26
WILD EAGLE CORNER STORE......22
MILLER SPORTSMEN .....................21
DANIELS DISTINCTIVE DESIGN..17
LEINENKUGELS..............................17
BOONES BUILDING SUPPLY........16
CLUB DENOYER...............................15
GREMBANS .......................................15
HIAWATHA HIDE AWAY..................14
DYNA MANUFACTURING...............13
BBTS ....................................................4
SATURDAY YOUTH
LEAGUE
Eagle Lanes
Results of 2/4/12
Team results: 300 3, Team No. 2 1;
Team No. 1 3, bye.
High team game: 300 423.
High team series: Team No. 2 1183.
High games, girls: Morgan Gurka 122.
High series, girls: Morgan Gurka 335.
High games, boys: Dylan Haagen
181, Seth Daniel 176, Andrew DeRuiter
and Judd Klotz 142.
High series, boys: Seth Daniel 488,
Dylan Haagen 437, Judd Klotz 411.
STANDINGS W
300 ....................................................30.5
TEAM NO. 2........................................31
TEAM NO. 1.....................................30.5
SATURDAY COUPLES
T&M Lanes
Results of 1/28/12
Team results: Drinking Devils 7,
Lane 7 0; Ally-Oops 0, Wrongsiders 7;
FUBAR 0, NOO PROBLEM 7.
High team game: NOO PROBLEM
782.
High team series: Wrongsiders 2226.
High games, women: Amy Froem-
ming 181, Roni Kopanski 177, Karen
Koskelin 174, Ronee Horst 173, Diane
Grosso 171.
High series, women: Roni Kopanski
475, Diane Grosso 466, Karen Koskelin
463, Amy Froemming 444, Ronee Horst
440.
High games, men: Gunk Buell Sr.
204, Dale Grosso 202, Ron Buell Jr. 199,
Carl Reidy 185, Mike Froemming 171.
High series, men: Dale Grosso 518,
Gunk Buell Sr. 514, Ron Buell Jr. 508,
Carl Reidy 498, Rob Kopanski 462.
STANDINGS W L
WRONGSIDERS........................39 24
DRINKING DEVILS..................37 26
NOO PROBLEM........................35 28
ALLY-OOPS................................33 30
FUBAR........................................32 31
LANE 7.......................................13 50
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
The fun starts here
Wisconsins North Woods
Northland Pines sophomore guard Ashley Mai
drove to the basket and drew a foul against
Lakeland Friday night. The Eagles won the game
52-50. Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
12 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
SPORTS YOUTH HOCKEY
ing, techniques and equip-
ment for ice fishing, including
using jig poles for panfish and
tip-ups for game fish.
Students put this knowl-
edge into action Tuesday,
Wednesday and Thursday
while ice fishing at Silver
Lake, just a couple of miles
from the high school, said
Rhode.
Nine fishing guides assist-
ed the students on the ice,
including Yukon Jack, Bill
Demlow, Matt Buettell, John
Osterling, Elmer Jensen, Bob
Jacobs, Bill Jacobs, Matt Hegy
and Tom Nampel.
One of the great things
about this unit is how each and
every year we get these experi-
enced guides who generously
work with the students, said
Rhode. The fishing and
weather were great. One stu-
dent caught her first fish
through the ice.
The final day of the five-day
unit was a recap of events by
Yukon Jack, who also present-
ed a gift bag to every student of
donated tackle from fishing
manufacturers. The gifts were
provided by Jiffy Ice Drills, St.
Croix Rods, Northland Tackle,
Mepps-Mr. Twister and TTI
Blakemore Fishing Group.
Eagle Sports in Eagle River
donated all of the bait.
The students all had a pos-
itive experience on the ice,
said Rhode.
EAGLE RIVER SQUIRT As
Results of 2/4/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-1-0-1 2
D.C. Everest 0-0-1-0 1
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second period: Lochlan Siegmeier
Overtime period: Riley McGee
(Lochlan Siegmeier, Gunnar Schiff-
mann)
Saves: 16 (Brett Wilkins)
Shots on goal: 18
Results of 2/5/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-1-1 2
Mosinee 0-0-0 0
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second period: Gunnar Schiff-
mann (Riley McGee)
Third period: Lochlan Siegmeier
(Riley McGee)
Saves: 12 (Brett Wilkins)
Shots on goal: 29
Shutout: Brett Wilkins
EAGLE RIVER SQUIRT Bs
Results of 2/4/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-1-5-0 6
D.C. Everest 0-1-1-0 2
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second period: Zach Maillette
(Matthew Szafranski)
Third period: Jake Martin
(Cameron Ramesh, Sam Garske),
Zach Maillette (Max Brown), Jake
Martin (Max Brown), Cameron
Ramesh, Max Brown (Jake Martin,
Cooper Cox)
Saves: 5 (Jesse Ebert)
Shots on goal: 26
Results of 2/5/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-0-1-0 3
Mosinee 0-1-0-0 1
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Cooper Cox, Jake
Martin
Third period: Cameron Ramesh
(Abby Ahlborn)
Saves: 5 (Jesse Ebert)
Shots on goal: 20
Comments: Eagle River will rep-
resent Region 2 at the State tourna-
ment in Fond du Lac March 4-5.
EAGLE RIVER PEEWEE As
Tournament
Results of 1/27/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-0-0 0
New Richmond 0-2-0 2
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Saves: 35 (Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 26
Results of 1/28/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-3-2 7
Green Bay 0-3-1 4
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Max Zingler (Jack
Rhode), Cody Jantzen
Second period: Cody Jantzen
(Max Zingler), Cody Jantzen, Max
Zingler (Sammy Spencer, Jack
Rhode)
Third period: Max Zingler, Jack
Rhode (T.J. Burke, Max Zingler)
Saves: 41 (Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 30
Results of 1/28/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-2-1 5
Middelton 2-0-2 4
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Jack Rhode (Mikey
Alfonso, T.J. Burke), T.J. Burke
(Dawson Penn)
Second period: Mikey Alfonso
(Jack Rhode), Tyler Hunt (Mikey
Alfonso)
Third period: T.J. Burke (Max Zin-
gler)
Saves: 14 (Nick Edwards), 32
(Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 36
Results of 1/29/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-3-2 5
Madison 0-2-1 3
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second period: MIkey Alfonso
(Jack Rhode), Tyler Hunt (Max Zin-
gler), Max Zingler
Third period: Sammy Spencer,
T.J. Burke (Cody Jantzen)
Saves: 17 (Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 26
Results of 1/29/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-2-4 8
Washington County 3-1-0 4
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Jack Rhode, T.J.
Burke (Jack Rhode)
Second period: Jack Rhode (Max
Zingler), Mikey Alfonso
Third period: Max Zingler (Jack
Rhode), Tyler Hunt (Max Zingler),
Tyler Hunt (Max Zingler, Jack
Rhode), T.J. Burke (Max Zingler,
Tyler Hunt)
Saves: 19 (Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 39
Comments: First place in silver
bracket. Playmaker, Max Zingler.
Hat tricks, Max Zingler and Cody
Jantzen.
FIRST PLAYDOWN GAME
Results of 2/4/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 5-2-2 9
Mosinee 0-1-0 1
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Mikey Alfonso (Tyler
Hunt), Tyler Hunt (Cody Jantzen),
Jack Rhode (Cody Jantzen), Tyler
Hunt (Mikey Alfonso), Max Zingler
Second period: Mikey Alfonso,
Cody Jantzen
Third period: Mikey Alfonso (Tyler
Hunt, Max Zingler), Max Zingler
Saves: 11 (Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 45
SECOND PLAYDOWN GAME
Results of 2/4/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-0-1 3
D.C. Everest 1-3-2 6
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Tyler Hunt (Mikey
Alfonso), Max Zingler
Third period: Jack Rhode (Cody
Jantzen)
Saves: 29 (Ethan Polich)
Shots on goal: 25
EAGLE RIVER BANTAMS
Results of 1/28/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 1-2-1 4
Keewenaw 3-3-1 7
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Noah Weber (Colton
Raymond, Nick Dean)
Second period: Noah Weber
(Colton Raymond), Colton Raymond
(Noah Weber)
Third period: T.J. Ebert (Nick Dean)
Saves: 45 (Dillon Gagliano)
Shots on goal: 39
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-2-3 5
Keewenaw 4-6-3 13
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second period: Noah Weber,
Colton Raymond (Nick Dean)
Third period: Nick Dean (Colton
Raymond, Noah Weber), Nick Dean
(Connor Cox, Noah Weber), T.J. Ebert
Saves: 50 (Dillon Gagliano)
Shots on goal: 25
EAGLE RIVER MITES
Results of 2/4/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 1-2-0 3
Antigo 2-1-1 4
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: J.J. Albee
Second period: Hunter Bill (J.J.
Albee), J.J. Albee
Saves: 8 (Mitchell McCanles)
Shots on goal: 12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 0-2-1 3
Antigo 1-1-2 4
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
Second period: Hunter Bill (Grace
Wittkopf), Hunter Bill
Third period: Hunter Bill
Saves: 20 (Cooper Fink)
Shots on goal: 24
Results of 2/5/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-2-2 6
D.C. Everest 1-0-0 1
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Allie Kieffer (Roen
McGee), J.J. Albee (Roen McGee)
Second period: Hunter Bill,
Hunter Bill (Julia Nesbitt)
Third period: Cooper Fink, Roen
McGee
Saves: 10 (Andrew Hartwig)
Shots on goal: 11
Results of 2/5/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-2-0 4
D.C. Everest 1-0-1 2
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Hunter Bill (Julia
Nesbitt), J.J. Albee
Second period: Roen McGee,
Grace Wittkopf
Saves: 8 (Allie Kieffer)
Shots on goal: 10
EAGLE RIVER U-14 GIRLS
STATE PLAYOFF GAME
Results of 2/4/12
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 2-1-0 3
Central Wisconsin 0-0-0 0
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Gabby Herfindahl
(Mikala Rubo), Sallie Spencer
(Amanda Sergent)
Second period: Amanda Sergent
(Natalie Decker)
Saves: 8 (Jenna Paez)
Shots on goal: 20
SCORE BY PERIODS
Eagle River 1-0-0 1
Central Wisconsin 2-0-2 4
INDIVIDUAL SCORING
First period: Natalie Decker (Joi
Crass)
Saves: 25 (Jenna Paez)
Shots on goal: 9
The Bluejays wrestling team hoists its second
consecutive Northern Lakes Conference title tro-
phy after taking second place at the conference
championship tournament. --Contributed Photo
For the first time in the
schools history, the Three
Lakes High School wrestling
team won back-to-back North-
ern Lakes Conference (NLC)
championships after a second-
place finish Saturday at the
NLC Championshiptourna-
ment in Wabeno.
Three Lakes scored 167
points, placing ahead of Flo-
rence with 125 points, Wabeno
with 123 and Elcho with 116
points. Crandon won the tour-
nament championship with
186.5 points.
The Jays had four first-
place finishers, as Dalton Tiet-
sort, Jake Schneider, Hunter
Raatz and Emerson Hegeman
came away with wins.
Jordan Michalek took sec-
ond place, and placing third
were Mitch Raatz and Charlie
Starke. Austin Clouse, Jake
Fath, Matt Wilkowski and
Justin Ertz were awarded
fourth-place finishes.
Dalton, Jake, Hunter and
Emerson had great tourna-
ments, pinning all of their com-
petitors, said Three Lakes
coach Jed Lechleitner, It was
the bonus points from these
pins that separated us from
Florence, Wabeno and Elcho.
Three Lakes will host the
Regional tournament Satur-
day, Feb. 11, at 10 a.m.
Three Lakes wrestlers win
back-to-back NLC titles
TIETSORT SCHNEIDER RAATZ HEGEMAN
The Northland Pines boys
basketball team lost a pair of
Great Northern Conference
game last week, but played one
of their best games of the sea-
son against Lakeland last Fri-
day night.
After a tight ball game, the
Eagles lost to the T-Birds 50-
43. Pines trailed by just two
points heading into the fourth
quarter. I was really proud of
our teams confidence and fight
in this one, said Pines coach
Ryan Clark.
The Eagles trailed 22-20 at
halftime and also by two
points, 33-31, after three quar-
ters, but just could not make
the plays in the end to pull off
the upset.
A key play in the game was
with 3:30 to go in the fourth
quarter with Lakeland leading
39-35 and the T-Birds 6-foot,
10-inch center, Matt Iverson,
hit a 3-pointer from the right
corner and extended the lead to
seven at 42-35.
Although it hasnt trans-
formed into wins, we are mak-
ing good progress and improve-
ment, said Clark. Our pass-
ing, catching, squaring up and
pivoting has really improved.
As evidence, we had a season-
low 10 turnovers at Lakeland.
We just have to continue to win
every practice and get a little
bit better each day.
Devon Gaszak was a stag-
gering 15-18 on free throws and
finished with a team-high 19
points. Cooper Kerner chipped
in 10 points and Jon Eichman
finished with nine.
Brandon Wallace took a key
charge in the third quarter, his
team-leading seventh charge
this season, said Wallace.
Against Rhinelander last
Tuesday, Pines played well for
three quarters before the
Hodags defense shut out the
Eagles in the fourth quarter.
The Hodags led 18-6 after
one quarter and 35-20 at the
half. Pines closed the gap to 48-
37 after three quarters.
I was satisfied with our
offensive execution, said
Clark. Rhinelander played
multiple defenses and I
thought our players did a nice
job of spacing them out and
dribble penetrating.
Through the first three
quarters, Pines had only com-
mitted seven turnovers, keep-
ing them within striking dis-
tance. However, the Eagles had
seven turnovers in the fourth
quarter and, as a result, the
final margin grew in the final
eight minutes.
Eichman finished with a
game-high 14 points and Kern-
er contributed 13 points.
Pines, 3-14 overall, will host
Medford this Friday, Feb. 10,
with the tip-off set for 7:30 p.m.
It is being billed as Middle
School Night. The Eagle will
then travel to Chequa megon
High School in Park Falls Mon-
day, Feb. 13, for a nonconfer-
ence doubleheader with the
Northland Pines girls team.
Eagles tough thru three quarters
Boys Hockey Time
T
o
u
r
n
e
y
T
o
u
r
n
e
y
2012 Schedule
Regionals - Tues., Feb. 14 & Thurs., Feb. 16
Sectionals - Semifinals Tues., Feb. 21
Finals - Sat., Feb. 25
State - Thurs., March 1; Fri., March 2; Sat., March 3
Members of the Northland Pines boys hockey team include, front row,
from left, Lukas Sergent, Austin Ramesh, Edward Zyhow ski, Jacob
Stephan, Duncan Hosking, Brett Hughes, Matthew Kaitchuck, Adam
Kresl, Gabe Hartwig, Douglas Carson, Matthew Meyer, Dakota
Klessig and Devin Sauvola; second row, assistant coach Don Czara-
pata Jr., head coach Charles De Puydt, Dylan Weber, Trevor
Laszczkowski, Zachery Kennedy, Brandon Hunt, Leif Offerdahl, Evan
Hartwig, Kory Droes, Alex Kornely, Cody Droes, Spencer Oberg,
Nicholas Staege, Taylor Greene-Adamovich and assistant coach
Robert McDonald; and back row, manager Lake Edwards, Aiden
Olkowski, Bailey Ramesh, Steven Spencer, Jeromy Skibinski, Blake
Molkentine, Joseph Roach, Carson Cox, manager Terry Satran and
statistician Loren Nelson.
Photo By Kitty Sookochoff
First National Bank
Eagle River, Phelps, St. Germain, Three Lakes
Boones Building Supply
The Car Shop/
Eagle River NAPA
Nelsons Ace Hardware
Vilas County
News-Review
WalkAbout
Paddle & Apparel
Walmart
of Rhinelander
Lehner-Stephan
Jewelers
Hauswerks
19th Hole Sports Bar
& Grill
Ogren Electronics
Northern Glass Co. Inc.
Ripco Credit Union
Don Scharf Automotive
Visner Realty
THIS AD BROUGHT TO YOU BY THE FOLLOWING
NORTHLAND PINES LOYAL HOCKEY BOOSTERS:
Hockey Tournament Assignments
Northland Pines
REGIONALS
Tues., Feb. 14 Thurs., Feb. 16
SECTIONALS
Tues., Feb. 21 Sat., Feb. 25
SECTIONAL #3
___________
BY GARY RIDDERBUSCH
NEWS-REVIEW EDITOR
___________
Pursuits: FROM PAGE 8
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS 13
LIFESTYLE
Nicolet Area Technical Col-
lege will launch a series of free
workshops designed to help
entrepreneurs launch a small
business as well as to help
those who are currently in
business take their venture to
the next level.
The Explore Starting a
Business workshops will be
held in February and early
March at six locations through-
out the North Woods.
Starting and building a
successful business is a step-
by-step process and all of the
pieces have to be in place for
any business to do well, said
Michelle Madl, business devel-
opment coordinator at Nicolet
College. Well identify these
critical components and then
work with individuals to help
them bring all the pieces
together.
All of the sessions are free.
Times and locations of the
workshops are as follows:
Tuesday, Feb. 7, 5:30 to
7:30 p.m., Nicolet College
Rhinelander campus, North-
woods Center;
Thursday, Feb. 9, 11:30
a.m. to 1:30 p.m., Curran Pro-
fessional Building, downtown
Rhinelander;
Thursday, Feb. 9, 5:30 to
7:30 p.m., Tomahawk Commu-
nity Bank;
Wednesday, Feb. 15, 5:30
to 7:30 p.m., Minocqua Public
Library;
Wednesday, Feb. 22, 5:30
to 7:30 p.m., Trees For Tomor-
row, in Eagle River;
Wednesday, Feb. 29, 5:30
to 7:30 p.m., Nicolet College
Academic Success Center,
100A W. Washington St. in
Crandon; and
Tuesday, March 6, 5:30 to
7:30 p.m., Nicolet College
Rhinelander campus.
Topics will include defining
a business concept, three
must-dos to launch a busi-
ness and keep it running, cre-
ating a business plan, market-
ing, competition analysis and
financial planning.
Information also will be
available on the more in-depth,
10-session E-Seed training.
For more information or to
register, contact Madl at (715)
365-4492, 1-(800) 544-3039 ext.
4492, or mmadl@nicoletcol-
lege.edu.
Nicolet workshops
to help businesses
The Cub Scouts and Boy
Scouts of the Eagle River area
will celebrate 102 years of
Scouting in the United States
of America Sunday, Feb. 12, at
9 a.m. at Prince of Peace
Lutheran Church, located at
5030 Highway 70 W. in Eagle
River.
A Blue and Gold Banquet
and Troop Court of Honor will
be held at 4 p.m. in the cafete-
ria at Northland Pines Middle
School.
Incorporated in 1910, the
mission of the Boy Scouts of
America is to prepare young
people to make ethical and
moral choices over their life-
times by instilling in them the
values of the Scout Oath and
Law.
Since its founding, more
than 110 million young people
have benefited from its pro-
grams of citizenship training,
character development and
personal fitness.
To support Scouting pro-
grams in local communities,
the national and local councils
develop age-appropriate pro-
grams for young people, and
make available the literature,
uniforms and insignia, leader-
ship training, professional
support and camping facilities
needed to carry out these pro-
grams.
Scouting in Eagle River is
served by the Samoset Coun-
cil, the Scouting staff and ser-
vice center in Weston, and the
Crystal Lake Scout Reserva-
tion between Rhine lander and
Eagle River.
Cub Scout Pack and Boy
Scout Troop 601, serving boys
in the Eagle River area, are
chartered to Prince of Peace
Lutheran Church.
All boys are welcome to join.
For more information, call
Bruce Gates at (715) 547-3819.
Scouts to celebrate
102nd anniversary
Northland Pines High
School (NPHS) will present
the musical fable Guys and
Dolls in performances sched-
uled Friday and Saturday,
Feb. 10 and 11, at 7 p.m. and
Sunday, Feb. 12, at 2 p.m. in
the NPHS auditorium in
Eagle River.
Directed by NPHS choral
director Kate Janssen with
assistance from student direc-
tors Benn Gober and Taylor
Haugen, this is the third
annual musical production at
the high school in recent
years.
The musical is set in 1949
in New York City, N.Y., and
follows a group of gamblers
through their tribulations to
set up this weeks floating dice
game, run by Nathan Detroit.
Meanwhi l e, Nat han s
fiance of 14 years, Adelaide,
is trying to nail down a date
for their wedding. Sarah
Brown is short on sinners at
the mission she runs, and the
highest gambler of them all,
Sky Masterson, has just bet
$1000 that he could convince
Sarah to run away to Havana,
Cuba, with him.
The two-act musical will
involve a cast and crew of 60
NPHS students and a live 13-
piece pit orchestra.
The production will include
18 musical numbers, includ-
ing Luck Be a Lady, Guys
and Dolls, Adelaides
Lament, A Bushel and a
Peck, If I Were a Bell and
Sit Down, Youre Rocking the
Boat.
We have a great group of
students in cast, crew and pit
orchestra this year. They have
worked incredibly hard on cre-
ating fun, interesting charac-
terizations of the gamblers, in
addition to accents, dance
numbers, and creating a
believable group of midcentu-
r y Ne w Yo r ke r s, s ai d
Janssen.
Students who will play
major roles include sophomore
Mason Hakes as Sky Master-
son; juniors Caleb Grosskopf
as Benny Southstreet, Joe
Lovas as Big Julie, Christian
Svetnicka as Arvide Aber-
nathy and Aisha Calix as Gen.
Matilda B. Cartwright; and
seniors Elle Tryczak as Sarah
Brown, Alex Camp as Nathan
Detroit, Taylor Bolte as Ade-
laide, Timothy Hartwig as
Nicely-Nicely Johnson, Misha
Grebner as Harry the Horse,
Zach Munnik as Lt. Branni-
gan.
Tryouts were held and
rehearsals began in Novem-
ber.
Our cast, crew and pit
orchestra has been working
extremely hard. The cast has
rehearsed each school day for
two-and-a-half hours since
November, Janssen stated.
The students have given up
weekend time, completing
four Saturday rehearsals.
Our pit orchestra has
rehearsed twice a week since
December, often staying late
just to improve a section, she
added.
This year, the parents of
cast and crew members have
been extremely helpful in
building and painting sets,
providing costumes, and vol-
unteering their time. The
musical is a collective effort of
all the students involved, in
addition to many helpful par-
ents, families, staff members
and community members,
Janssen explained.
Other key players in the
production include choreogra-
pher Ann Perry, costume
designer Judy Clure, technical
director Jeff Janssen, lighting
designer Case Kramer, prop
manager Cayla Tennikait,
stage manager Spencer Gan-
der, sound manager Morgan
Showtimes announced for Guys and Dolls
this Friday, Saturday and Sunday at Pines
Mason Hakes as Sky Masterson and Elle Tryczak as Sarah
Brown will have major roles in Guys and Dolls, a musical set at
Northland Pines this weekend. STAFF PHOTO
A plan for an all-class
reunion for all former stu-
dents and former and current
staff and faculty of both Eagle
River Union High School and
Northland Pines High School
is quickly gaining momentum,
according to reunion organiz-
ers.
What began as a fun idea
among old friends who had
reconnected online through
Facebook is becoming a North
Woods reality, said Karla
(Siemering) Bryant, one of the
organizers.
According to reunion plan-
ners Jim Mulleady, Susie
(Wilsie) Govier and Bryant, all
from the Class of 1978, the
reunion will have events
throughout the weekend of
Aug. 10-12.
Fridays events will include
an informal gathering at the
Vilas County Fair, along with
discounted wristbands for
reunion attendees.
Plans are in the works for a
vintage car parade and tours
of the new high school during
the day Saturday.
The Big Gig, the reunion
event itself, will be held Satur-
day from 7 p.m. to midnight at
the Eagle River Derby Track
building.
Arrangements will be made
for attendees to gather for
brunch at Eagle Waters
Resort Sunday and all will be
welcome for boat rides on the
Eagle River Chain of Lakes
Sunday afternoon.
Reunion planners have
requested help in spreading
the word to individual classes.
So far, the following graduat-
ing classes have representa-
tion: 1947, 48, 52, 56, 59, 62,
65, 67, 70, 71, 73, 78, 79, 89
and 91.
Those whose graduating
year is not yet included should
contact reunion planners at
nphsreunion@gmail.com or
call Mulleady at (715) 617-
8581 or Bryant at (270) 392-
4834.
Planners are seeking event
sponsors, as well as donations
to help with postage, promo-
tions and more. Volunteers
also are needed to help on
committees for the individual
events.
For more information, visit
eagleriverallclassreunion.com.
Pines sets
all-class
reunion
In the depth of winter, I finally learned that there
was in me an invincible summer. --Camus
I just looked at the predictions for snow in our area
through Feb. 12. The days will be in the 30s and even
into the 40s and mostly sunny. This prediction mirrors
what has been going on in our area during January as
well. This winter has been quite unusual. I do not
know our total snow accumulation in this valley since
Thanksgiving, but it is minimal at best. The tempera-
tures have been quite mild. And though most folks I
know are deeply grateful for all this, I am missing
winter.
I miss its silence and its solitude. Spring and sum-
mer are noisy, inviting all to come out and participate,
be with everyone else, get involved. Winter is the sea-
son that invites us to go inside inside our homes
and ourselves and be still. When I look outside on a
January or February day and see folks dressed in
light jackets and even shorts as they walk their dogs
past my house, it just does not fit.
Perhaps we are creatures of habit. Having grown
up in the Chicago area and more recently in Colorado
and Wisconsin, I am used to cold, harsh winters with
snow blowing sideways past my windows. It feels
right, though challenging when it comes to driving.
When Bill and I were in our RV, we spent our win-
ters in Florida where the temperatures, at their cold-
est, got into the 60s and perhaps upper 50s on occa-
sion. It just did not feel right.
Though I am experiencing a loneliness that I have
never before experienced since Bill died, I still cherish
solitude. He and I would regularly take time to just be
alone, to discover our own inner worlds, meditate,
Where is winter?
To MUSICAL, Pg. 15
To FRIEDEL-HUNT, Pg. 15
NEW SHOE TRAILS
The official opening of the
Tara Lila snowshoe and
hiking trails off of Sund-
stein Road south of Eagle
River was held Saturday.
Visitors experienced the
trails, checked out the trail
map and tried on snow-
shoes for the first time.
STAFF PHOTOS
Reflections
By Mary Friedel-Hunt
14 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
John Schuh
Phelps
Weeks loss:
8 lbs.
I am getting support at
home from my wife. When
shopping and preparing our
meals, we are looking at
labels and ingredients. Also,
my co-workers are compli-
menting me on my progress
and the trainers are great,
helping me to keep digging
deep and not give up.
Bobbie Hall
Eagle River
Weeks loss:
0 lbs.
It should be noted that Bobbie
has already lost 57 lbs. previous
to this competition, so it is more
common to plateau at this point.
She has already taken mea-
sures to bust the plateau by
mixing up her training.
This program has
been amazing. Everyone
has been extremely help-
ful, in and out of the gym.
They want us to succeed
and do everything in their
power to make sure it
happens.
Tabitha Avery
Eagle River
Weeks loss:
1 lb.
I am getting great support
at the gym from the trainers
and my fellow workout bud-
dies. My friends, co-workers
and family are so supportive
and always asking how its
going, good job, you-can-do-
it-type words of encourage-
ment. Its been very helpful to
know they are behind me on
this and hope I do great.
Margaret Rainer
Three Lakes
Weeks loss:
3 lbs.
In the gym the trainers really push
us. On the other hand, they realize we
are at different levels or abilities. In one
way Kevin pushes us the hardest, but
he is the first to say, Good job, and
praise us. At home, my family has been
supportive in that they arent expecting
sweets in the house or big dinners
made the nights Im at the gym. I
appreciate all the support that I get
because it encourages me to make the
life changes I need to be healthier.
Rochelle Frank
Eagle River
Weeks loss:
4 lbs.
I am getting a lot of fami-
ly and friend support through
this whole process. My fami-
ly is always helping me by
eating healthy with me and
my boyfriend is really there
for me, even though I am at
the gym most of the time.
Michele Jacobson
Eagle River
Weeks loss:
3 lbs.
My family has been very
supportive, especially my
mother and my youngest
son. My co-workers ask how
things are going. It really
helps me maintain my
focus. The fitness trainers
are also supportive and
motivating, which keeps me
on my toes!
www.fnb-eagleriver.com
First National
Bank
of Eagle River
*Phelps
*St. Germain
*Three Lakes
T
h
e
B
a
n
k
That Bu
ilt
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N
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r
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d
s !
Please support our sponsors!
Sales, Rentals, Clothing, Bait
and Tackle & Much More
OPEN DAILY
Downtown St. Germain, WI 54558
(715) 479-4930
Nutrition Tip of the Week
Eating healthy is like choosing to
put premium gasoline in your car. If
you want your body to run well, you
have to fuel it well. No cheap calories
here, but choose nutrient-dense foods
that deliver!
WHAT KIND OF SUPPORT ARE YOU RECEIVING IN & OUT OF THE GYM, AND HAS IT BEEN HELPFUL?
Pauls
Rent-All
PRESENTED BY:
VILAS COUNTY
NEWS-REVIEW
&
HEALTH & FITNESS CHALLENGE
Watch the groups weight loss here weekly.
WEEK 5
The group lost a total of 19 pounds.
2012 FIT FOR LIFE 2012 FIT FOR LIFE
WSPOTLIGHT W
Julias Comment of the Week
Chart your progress. Keep a weight-lifting log and a cardio log.
It is not only inspirational to see how far youve come along, but it can
be used as a tool for getting over plateaus in the future. You will be
able to see how to mix up your routine.
Chart your weight and measurements, but take them with a grain
of salt. Be inspired by the reduction of pounds and inches by looking
at the difference over time, not day to day. The body reacts to what
we eat and how we exercise by retaining water and building muscle,
amongst other things, so a weight loss may not be realized in the
same time frame our mind demands to see it in.
Lastly, when you do see progress, go get your biggest support-
er and brag, brag, brag!
Julia John
RENTAL, LLC
Tools and Equipment for every need
Commercial and Residential
186 Hwy. 70, St. Germain, Wis.
(2 doors south of Angry Daves Restaurant)
(715) 479-5841
Shady
Gardens
3627 Deerskin Rd.
Eagle River
(715) 479-9300
shadygardenswi@gmail.com
&
The winner will receive prizes from these local businesses:
YMCA Wall Street Health Care Pharmacy Salon & Spa on Railroad Street
Beauty Resort Knockers Bar & Deli Chequamegon Adventure Healing Hands Acupuncture
I went to Florida for a week with my wife. I
was a little nervous with eating and working out,
as I am held accountable by the people who know
me and follow me in the paper each week. Lucki-
ly, we were in an area with good weather so we
could get out and walk, and eat healthy with fresh
vegetables and shrimp. We typically would have
eaten out, but did not on this vacation. I was able
to stay on track and do some exercising, but noth-
ing like what we do here in class. My first weigh-
in after returning from vacation was a success of
minus 8 pounds.
Julie LaCrosse, RD, CD
Making organic produce affordable for everyone!
Cheering you on, because when you lose, you win!
www.thesowerandtheseed.net
THE SOWER AND THE SEED
BULK/NATURAL FOODS
523 Hemlock St., Woodruff
(715) 358-6852 Mon.-Tues. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Wed. 9 a.m.-6 p.m.; Thurs.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.

Eagle Baking Company
Scratch bakery/healthy Artisan breads
Sandwich baskets to go just call ahead
Tasty sandwich combos choice of dressing, bread, cookie
XSERVING YOU FROM 2 LOCATIONS X
318A E. Wall St. Corner of Hwys. 70 & 51
Eagle River Arbor Vitae
(715) 479-1545 (715) 356-3443
Hours: Tues.-Sat. 7-4 Hours: Wed.-Sat. 7-4
JENSEN JENSEN
KINS KINS A A
Of Course!
Hardware &
Appliance
156 Hwy. 45 North
Conover, Wis.
(715) 479-8427
HOURS:
Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Sat. 9 a.m. - 4 p.m.
Weddings
Cut Flowers
Balloons
Sympathy
Silk Flowers
Antiques
Weddings
Cut Flowers
Balloons
Sympathy
Silk Flowers
Antiques
Kathy Schuh
4270 County Road B Land O Lakes, WI 54540
715.547.6100 Kathyphelp@aol.com
Forget-Me-Not
Floral
Forget-Me-Not
Floral
Kathy Schuh
4270 County Road B Land O Lakes, WI 54540
715.547.6100 Kathyphelp@aol.com
IMPROVING YOUR SMILE
(715) 479-6100
www.ggdental.org
This week we
chose to spotlight
John Schuh, to
show that while
being on a health
and fitness plan,
you can continue
to stay on task
while vacationing.
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 15
FROM PAGE 13
Munnik, and an additional
stage crew of eight stu-
dents.
Perry added, Its amazing
to watch students transforma-
tion from individuals unsure
of themselves on a stage into a
cohesive cast that can wrap
the audience in the story.
Under the direction of con-
ductor Jennifer Anderson, pit
orchestra musicians are:
music teacher Laura Plank,
piano; freshman Morgan Tom-
czyk, flute and piccolo; alum-
nus James Schwanke, clarinet
and alto saxophone; director
of bands Brandon Bautz, clar-
inet and tenor saxophone;
senior Perry Camodeca, alto
and bari saxophone; senior
Alex Krupka and Joe Chopp,
trumpet; senior Dakota Wagn-
er, trombone; junior Sam
Puffer, tuba; Margaret Jacob-
son, Martha Milanowski and
Melissa Peter, violin; and
freshman Mike Wade, percus-
sion.
Janssen added, We hope
you attend this high-energy,
comedic musical that will have
you singing along with the
wonderful music as you watch
these enjoyable New York
gamblers come to life. Youll
cheer for the two couples who
try to find their way together
as the musical progresses.
Bring a date for a Valentines
night out.
Tickets are available in the
NPHS office for $5 for adults
and $2 for seniors and stu-
dents. Tickets will also be
available at the door one hour
before the performance. Doors
will open 30 minutes prior to
the performance.
For more information, call
the NPHS office at (715) 479-
4473, ext. 1.
MEET HANDSOME DAN
Dans a 3-year-old male
American Staffordshire terrier
up for adoption at the
Vilas County Animal Shelter.
9970
STOP IN
OR CALL
THE SHELTER
AT:
715-479-9777
This lovable dog
needs a good home.
LIFESTYLE
College Goal Wisconsin, an
event to help prospective col-
lege students fill out financial
aid forms, will be held Sunday,
Feb. 19, at 2 p.m. at Rhine -
lander High School.
This free event will offer tips
on filling out the Free Applica-
tion for Federal Student Aid
(FAFSA), and will give those
attending the opportunity to
fill out the application at the
event.
Earning a college degree is
a great way to get ahead in life
and, for many, receiving finan-
cial aid is the only way they are
able to make college a reality,
said Jill Price, financial aid
director at Nicolet Area Techni-
cal College.
She added that about 80
percent of the student who
attend Nicolet receive some
form of financial aid, and about
$3 million was distributed to
qualified Nicolet students for
the current spring semester.
Applications will be entered
into a national database used
by educational institutions to
determine student eligibility
and financial aid level.
Prospective students and
their parents who plan to com-
plete the FAFSA form at the
event should take completed
income tax returns for 2011, W-
2 statements, schedules and
any other 2011 income or ben-
efit information.
Dependent students should
take their parents income and
asset information.
For more information, visit
collegegoalwi.org.
Event to help students
complete financial aid forms
Living History Encounter
Inc. (LHE) will hold its annual
meeting Saturday, Feb. 18,
beginning at 2 p.m. at Prince
of Peace Lutheran Church in
Eagle River.
The meeting will be open to
the public and refreshments
will be served. All interested
individuals are welcome.
The meeting will include a
review of the organizations
activities, an update on mem-
bership and election of new
officers. LHEs purpose is to
present historical information
about the European and
Native American people who
lived in the Great Lakes
region during the Fur Trade
Era from 1600 through 1840.
Programs are presented by
professional historical inter-
preters, who portray the
lifestyle and customs of people
who lived during the era
through demonstrations and
real-life camp settings.
For the past two years,
those programs have taken
place the first weekend in
October, drawing approxi-
mately 1,000 people, including
school groups and the public.
The groups annual pro-
grams in past years have been
supported by donations from
the Forest County Potawatomi
Foundation. In addition, the
group seeks donations from
others and has held fundrais-
ing raffles.
For more information, con-
tact Ken or Terrie Beier at
(715) 479-9339 or Bill Kroll at
479-5034.
Living history group sets meeting
Taylor Bolte as Adelaide, along with a host of
dancers and singers, will perform during the
high-energy comedic musical this Friday, Satur-
day and Sunday. STAFF PHOTO
The Nicolet College Founda-
tion is currently distributing
scholarship applications for the
2012-13 school year.
Nicolet scholarships are
available for both incoming and
continuing students enrolling
at Nicolet Area Technical Col-
lege next fall. Scholarship
funds are applied directly to
tuition costs.
To be considered, students
must turn in a completed appli-
cation, a copy of their academic
transcript, and one completed
recommendation form by the
Monday, April 2 ,deadline.
Students taking nine or
more credits per semester can
receive between $500 and
$3,000 and students taking
three to eight credits per
semester can receive a $400
scholarship. All applicants
must have a cumulative grade-
point average of at least 2.5.
The $1,000 University
Transfer Liberal Arts Program
Award and the $1,000 Robert
Steger Award also are avail-
able.
They will be awarded to cur-
rent Nicolet College students in
the University Transfer liberal
arts program, who will be
transferring to a four-year col-
lege or university.
Further requirement infor-
mation can be found on the
applications for those scholar-
ships.
Applications are available in
every building on the college
campus in Rhinelander, the
Lakeland Center, tribal educa-
tion offices, and high school
guidance offices in the Nicolet
College district. Applications
also are available at nicoletcol-
lege.edu.
Completed applications mu -
st be postmarked or delivered
by Monday, April 2, to the foun-
dation office, Room 103 of the
University Transfer Center on
the Rhinelander campus.
For more information, con-
tact the foundation office at
(715) 365-4518 or 1-(800) 544-
3039, ext. 4518, or hschal-
lock@nicoletcollege.edu.
Nicolet College
accepting names
for scholarships
Musical: tickets available at high school
Friedel-Hunt: FROM PAGE 13
pray, read and come away from
those times renewed and, most
frequently, sharing our jour-
neys with each other.
We live in a noisy world.
Libraries are no longer silent
and the environment, even in
our small town, is noisy with
tractors and trucks. There is
the background music every-
where, TVs and music are fre-
quently left on in homes, in
waiting rooms and restau-
rants. Many people fill their
heads with the noise from
iPods as they walk or work.
Hence the need for a quiet
winter to remind us of silence
and our need for it. When do
we take the time to ponder
and mull quietly? When do we
go inside to see what we are
feeling and turn over new
ideas? Before long, this so-
called winter will become a
noisy spring. Dont get me
wrong, I love May with the
noise of colorful flowers, kids
riding bikes and more. It beck-
ons to us to join the fun. But
winter tends to counterbalance
that outward living and this
winter has been meager, if
that, in its offerings.
No matter the season, it is
up to us to find quiet moments
and, in those moments, find
ourselves.
Northwoods Wildlife Cen-
ter has extended the deadline
for entries in its sixth annual
photo contest to Wednesday,
Feb. 22.
The contest is open to all
amateur photographers. The
contest rules define amateur
as someone who does not
make more than 25% of his or
her annual income from pho-
tography.
For an entry fee of $10 per
photo, entries may be submit-
ted in any of the following cat-
egories: North American
wildlife, nature and pets.
Returning this year is a cat-
egory for youths. Photogra-
phers age 14 and younger will
be able to submit entries with
a North Woods theme via the
youth category.
Prizes will be awarded to
the winner in each category.
The winner of the wildlife cat-
egory will be named artist of
the year. Judging will take
place during the gala event to
be held Saturday, Feb. 25, at
Campanile Center for the Arts
in Minocqua.
Complete photo contest
information and rules can be
obtained at north-
woodswildlifecenter.org or by
calling the center at (715) 356-
7400.
Photo contest deadline extended
Fifty-eight Northland
Pines High School (NPHS)
students got a taste of reality
recently when they were
invited to a day of transition
activities provided to them by
their teachers at Eagle River
Inn & Resort in Eagle River.
The keynote speaker was
Judge Neal Chip Nielsen
III, who spoke for more than
an hour, answering dozens of
questions the participating
students had written and
submitted to him the week
prior to the event.
In addition to addressing
his road to becoming a judge,
he also shared anecdotal sto-
ries with the students about
cases he has heard on the
bench and shared with them
words of wisdom regarding
their futures, based on his
experiences.
Following the judge was a
panel of eight high school
alumni from NPHS, Rhine -
lander High School and the
National Guard Challenge
Academy. The topic was If I
Knew Then What I Know
Now!
These young adults, many
of them single parents,
shared their thoughts on
what good choices theyve
made in the last 10 years
and some not-so-good choic-
es, in hopes that the
teenagers in the crowd would
heed some of their advice.
After lunch the students
joined staff in the large-
group room to discuss the
afternoon activity, The Reali-
ty Check.
Each student, prior to the
event, was given a life status
card whereupon they docu-
mented the profession of
their choice for the future
and its annual salary.
The staff then took that
information and gave each
student a life scenario
deciding their marital sta-
tus, whether or not they were
a parent and the ages of
their children, a pet owner,
owed college loans (based on
profession), their credit card
debt and whether they
received or paid child sup-
port, to name a few.
Students were given their
net monthly income after
20% was subtracted for tax-
es. Most monthly net
incomes ranged from $1,500
to $4,000 per month.
The students spent the
next hour visiting different
stations in the room manned
by NPHS staff to purchase
housing, utilities, a vehicle,
insurances, groceries, clothes
and, in many cases, pet
necessities, diapers, formula
and a car seat.
The object of the activity
was to purchase all the neces-
sities of life and have money
left over at the end of the
month. The students quickly
learned how expensive life
can be, even without tobacco
products, alcoholic beverages
and entertainment.
In addition to the necessi-
ties, each student drew two
scenario cards from the fate
bin to illustrate that life can
throw some curveballs into
budgets at times.
Some students were plea -
sed to add dollar amounts for
birthday presents, while oth-
ers were disappointed to sub-
tract dollars for needed new
tires on their car.
At the end of the activity,
those who were able to bud-
get their money effectively
and had a positive balance
were rewarded with a Pay-
Day

candy bar.
The day concluded with a
door prize for every student
who completed an evalua-
tion. Based on the evaluation
comments, the day was an
educational experience for
all who participated.
Program coordinators
stated the hope is that stu-
dents will remember what
they learned and use it when
making important decisions
in their lives in the future.
Reality program prepares students
Northland Pines High School students
recently attended a Transition Fair held at
Eagle River Inn and Resort in Eagle River.
Students and teachers participated in a simu-
lation event that gave students an opportuni-
ty to determine how and where to spend a
predetermined monthly income.
Contributed Photo
16 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
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Dated Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012
was mailed at the Post Office
at Eagle River, WI 54521
on Tuesday, Feb. 7, 2012.
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BADGER BRIDGE Meets every Mon. from
1 to 4 p.m. at Boondockers Lounge at Wild
Eagle Lodge in Eagle River. Reservations not
required. Partner provided if needed. A social
and learning game, players may request help
at any time. All skill levels welcome. Call (715)
362-8933.
CO-ED VOLLEYBALL Meets every Mon.
at 7:15 p.m. in the Northland Pines Middle
School gym in Eagle River. Sponsored by the
JayCees. All are welcome. Call (715) 479-
9886.
DUPLICATE BRIDGE Meets in the lower
level of First Congregational United Church of
Christ, Eagle River, Thurs. at 6:30 p.m.; Mon.
at 1 p.m. Call (715) 479-8767 (days) or 479-
8783.
MAHJONGG American mahjongg is
played Mon. at 10 a.m. at the Eagle River
Golf Course clubhouse. Reservations not
required. New players welcome. For more
info, e-mail molly@mollya.com.
NORTHWOODS CHILDRENS MUSEUM
Hands-on educational exhibits and programs.
Fun for all ages. Prime ages 1-10. Call (715)
479-4623 or visit www.northwoodschildrens-
museum.com.
NORTHWOODS SINGERS Meets Tues.,
6:30 p.m. at First Congregational United
Church of Christ, 105 N. 1st St., Eagle River.
New singers welcome. Call Barb Nehring,
(715) 547-3333.
OUTDOOR WOMENS GROUP Activities
are held the first Sun. of each month. Call
Norma Yaeger, (715) 477-1984.
SCRAPBOOK CLUB Meets the last Tues.
of each month. Call Cathy, (715) 479-3164.
WATER AEROBICS Classes at Lake For-
est Resort every Tues. and Thurs. from 8:30-
9:30 a.m. Call (715) 479-3251.
WOODCARVERS Northwoods Wood-
carvers meet every Wed. at 1 p.m. at Kalmar
Center in Eagle River. All are welcome. Call
John Modjewski, (715) 479-6093.
YMCA The YMCA Pines Fitness Center is
open for adults and youths grade six and old-
er Mon.-Thurs., 5:30 a.m.-9 p.m.; Fri., 5:30
a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat., 7 a.m.-1 p.m.; and Sun.,
noon-4 p.m. Monthly, weekly and daily mem-
berships available. Call (715) 479-9500.
COMMUNITY DINNERS Northwoods
SHARE offers free community dinners the
first and third Tues. of each month at Lincoln
Town Hall in Eagle River. Doors open at 4
p.m., dinner at 5:30 p.m. Call Donna Goed-
daeus, (715) 479-8244.
FIRST AID/CPR CLASSES The American
Red Cross offers various first aid, CPR and
AED classes in Rhinelander. Call (715) 362-
5456.
GED PREPARATION Classes are avail-
able at Nicolet Learning Center, Olson
Memorial Library, Eagle River, Mon., Wed.
and Thurs. from 4 a.m.-6 p.m. and Tues. from
4-8 p.m. Call (715) 365-4455 or 1-(800) 544-
3039.
AL-ANON Meets Wed. from 6:30-8 p.m. in
the main-floor solarium at Eagle River Memo-
rial Hospital. Call (715) 628-0023.
ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS Closed
meetings in Eagle River Mon. and Fri. at 7:30
p.m., First Congregational UCC. ; closed step
meetings every Sun., 2 p.m., Land O Lakes
Town Hall (rear entrance). Turning Point
Group meetings every Tues., 7:30 p.m., Com-
munity Church annex, Hwy. K; 7:30 p.m. St.
Theresa Church in Three Lakes; and 10 a.m.
Sat. at Holy Family Church in Woodruff.
Closed meetings are held at St. Germain
Community United Church of Christ every
Thurs. at 7 p.m. and in the Newbold Town Hall
every Wed. Call (715) 367-7920 or (715) 479-
8475. Web site: www.northwoodsaa.org.
ASSAULT SURVIVORS Tri County Coun-
cil on Domestic Violence and Assaults sexu-
al assault survivors support group meets
every Tues. Call Elizabeth (715) 362-6841.
BOOK CLUB Olson Library Book Club
meets the first Thurs. of each month (except
July, Aug. and Dec.) from 7-8:30 p.m. Call
(715) 479-8070.
BOY SCOUTS Boy Scout Troop 601
meets every Tues. in Eagle River at 6 p.m.
Call Kay Tulppo, (715) 479-7409.
CELEBRATE RECOVERY

Presented by
Birchwood Community Church. Meets every
Thurs. at 6 p.m. at 115 Division St., Eagle
River. (715) 891-1946.
CHRISTIAN COALITION Meets the last
Tues. of each month at 7 p.m. at Donnas
Cafe in Eagle River. Call Jeff Hyslop, (715)
479-4066.
CHRONIC HEALTH CONDITIONS SUP-
PORT GROUP Sponsored by the Vilas
County Commission on Aging, meets the
second Tues. of each month at 1:30 p.m. at
the Kalmar Center in Eagle River.
DIABETES SUPPORT GROUP Meets the
first Wed. of each month from 10 to 11 a.m. in
the lower level of the Land O Lakes library.
Call Mery Krause at (906) 544-2554.
DOLL CLUB The Enchanted Doll Club
meets the third Sat. of each month at 1 p.m.
at Olson Memorial Library in Eagle River. Call
Judy Wainwright, (715) 479-7132.
EAGLE RIVER GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
Meets the fourth Thurs. of each month at 7
p.m. in the Northland Pines High School library
in Eagle River. Call Sharon Rogers, (715) 889-
3157.
EASY EAGLES Meets every other Tues. at
11:30 a.m. at Riverstone Restaurant & Tav-
ern in Eagle River. Call Charlie Eggers, (715)
479-1799.
EAGLE RIVER AMERICAN LEGION Post
114 holds its regular meeting the first Mon. of
each month at 6 p.m. in Eagle River. Call (715)
479-3983 or (715) 477-0581.
EAGLE RIVER CHAPTER OF THE ORDER
OF THE EASTERN STAR Meets the first
Tues. of every month at 7:30 p.m., 610 E.
Division St., Eagle River. Call (715) 479-
8646.
EAGLE RIVER HISTORICAL SOCIETY
Meets the last Mon. of each month at 1 p.m.
at 519 Sheridan St., Eagle River. Call (715)
479-2396.
EAGLE RIVER MASONIC LODGE Meets
at 7 p.m. the second Tues. of each month at
610 E. Division St., Eagle River. Call (715)
479-8646.
EAGLE RIVER VFW AND AUXILIARY
Joint meeting the fourth Thurs. of the month at
6:30 p.m. at 624 W. Pine St., Eagle River.
GAMBLERS ANONYMOUS Meets every
Wed. at 7 p.m. at Lac Vieux Desert Transfer
Station Road in Watersmeet, Mich.
GRIEF SUPPORT A Time to Mourn, a
free support group open to any adult who has
suffered a loss. Meets the second Thurs. of
each month from 1-2:30 p.m. at Lakeland
Senior Center in Woodruff. Call Connie
DeBels, bereavement coordinator for Dr. Kate
Hospice, at (715) 356-8805.
GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP Side By Side,
a free grief support group open to everyone,
meets the third Thurs. of each month at 1
p.m. at St. Peters Catholic Church in Eagle
River. Call (715) 479-8704.
HUMANE SOCIETY OF VILAS COUNTY
Meets the first Tues. of each month at 7 p.m.
at the Vilas County Animal Shelter.
JAYCEES The Eagle River Area Jaycees
meets the second Tues. of each month at
6:30 p.m. Call Michelle at (715) 617-6384 or
Cheryl at (715) 617-0265.
KNIGHTS OF COLUMBUS Knights of
Columbus meets the first Wed. of each month
at 7 p.m. in Eagle River. Call (715) 479-4476.
KNITTING CLUB Northwoods Knitters and
Purlers meet at 12:30 p.m. the fourth Mon. of
each month at Woodruff Town Hall. Call Carol
Clauser, (715) 453-8055.
LAKELAND ART LEAGUE New members
and visitors welcome. Call Arlene, (715) 272-
1168.
LIONS CLUB The Eagle River Lions Club
meets at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth
Wed. of each month. Call (715) 479-2666.
LIONS CLUB The Three Lakes Lions Club
meets at 6:30 p.m. the first and third Mon. of
each month at Oneida Village Inn. Call (715)
546-3493.
MEMORY LOSS SUPPORT GROUP
Meets the fourth Tues. of each month at 1
p.m. at Medical Arts Building on Hospital
Road, Eagle River. Diane Bluthardt, facilita-
tor. Call (715) 362-7779 or (715) 479-3625.
MILITARY SUPPORT GROUP All Things
Military meets the second Mon. of each
month at 7 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library in
Eagle River. Family members and friends of
military personnel are welcome to attend.
Call Scott Jensen, (715) 479-3631.
MOTHERS OF PRESCHOOLERS Meets
from 9-11:30 a.m. the second and fourth
Wed. of each month at Prince of Peace
Lutheran Church in Eagle River. To register,
call Lisann Snedden, (715) 479-1946.
MUSIC BOOSTERS The Northland Pines
Music Boosters meet the second Thurs. of
each month during the school year. Call Bran-
don Bautz at (715) 479-4473, ext. 0802.
MUSKIES INC. The Headwaters Chapter
of Muskies Inc. meets the first Wed. of most
months at Eagle River Inn & Resort. Call to
confirm. Business meeting at 7 p.m., guest
speaker at 8 p.m. Nonmembers welcome. No
charge. Call Scott at (715) 891-6133.
NARCOTICS ANONYMOUS (NA) Keep It
Simple meetings are held every Thurs. at 6
p.m. at First Congregational United Church of
Christ,105 N. 1st St., the corner of 1st and
Division streets, Eagle River. (866) 310-9077.
NEW-YOU-CLUB Meets at 8:45 a.m.
Thurs. at Headwaters State Bank in Land O
Lakes. Call Elsie Conant, (715) 547-6015.
NORTHWOODS ASSOCIATION FOR THE
EDUCATION OF YOUNG CHILDREN
Training sessions are held the third Mon. of
each month from 6-8:30 p.m. Sessions will be
credited toward continuing-education hours
for child-care providers. Call 1-(800) 470-5833
or (715) 479-0337.
NORTHWOODS NEEDLEWORKERS
Meet the second Wed. of each month from 10
a.m.-4 p.m. at Cloverland Town Hall. Call (715)
479-7850, (715) 477-2579 or (715) 545-2664.
QUILTERS Cranberry Country Quilters
Inc. meets at 9:30 a.m. the third Mon. of each
month at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church in
Eagle River. New members welcome. Call
(715) 479-4302.
QUILTERS Eagle River Kreative Quilters
meet the second and fourth Mon. of each
month at Olson Memorial Library in Eagle
River.
ROTARY CLUB The Eagle River Rotary
Club meets every Mon. at noon at Eagle Riv-
er Inn. Visiting Rotarians are welcome.
THREE LAKES CENTER FOR THE ARTS IN
THE NORTHWOODS Meets Tues. at 8
a.m. at the arts center. Call Marie Moore,
(715) 546-2299.
THREE LAKES GENEALOGICAL SOCIETY
Meets the fourth Mon. of each month at
Demmer Library at 1 p.m. Call Nancy Brewster,
(715) 546-3391.
TOASTMASTERS Northwoods Toastmas-
ters meet the second Thurs. of each month at
7 p.m. at Olson Memorial Library in Eagle
River. Call Mike, (715) 479-8681.
TOPS WI 87 Meets Thurs. at Eagle River
City Hall. Weigh-in from 5-5:25 p.m., meeting
follows. All are welcome. Call Holly Schmucki,
(715) 479-5426.
TRI-COUNTY COUNCIL ON DOMESTIC
VIOLENCE AND SEXUAL ASSAULT Sup-
port groups for domestic violence and sexual
assault meet weekly. Call (715) 479-2912,
(715) 362-6841 or 1-(800) 236-1222.
VFW MEETING Eagle River Post 8637
meets the fourth Thurs. of each month. Joint
meeting with Auxiliary at 6:30 p.m.; regular
meeting at 7 p.m. Call (715) 479-8810.
VILAS COUNTY MASTER GARDENERS
Meets the second Thurs. of each month at 6
p.m. at Prince of Peace Lutheran Church,
Eagle River. Call Shirley Egan, (715) 479-
8820.
VILAS FOOD PANTRY Food pantry is
open Wed. from 8:30-10 a.m. and the first and
third Tues. of each month from 3:30-5:15 p.m.
at 1542 Hwy. 45 N., at the north end of the
Kalmar Senior Center in Eagle River. Call
Richard at (715) 479-7524 or Jerry at (715)
477-1165.
WRITERS GROUP The Writers Voice
writers group meets the second and fourth
Wed. of each month from 6 to 8 p.m. at Olson
Memorial Library in Eagle River. Call Karin at
(715) 479-5232.
WEIGHT WATCHERS Meetings are held
Tues. at 5:30 p.m in Eagle River. Call 1-(800)
651-6000.
ACT NOW Open to physically challenged
people in wheelchairs. Call Alvin Weso, (715)
478-5120.
ADVANCE HEALTH-CARE PLANNING
WORKSHOPS Meets first and third Fri. of
each month at Medical Arts Building, 150
Hospital Rd., Eagle River. For reservations
and/or information, call (715) 479-0375.
ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT GROUP Held
at Lillian Kerr Nursing Care & Rehabilitation
Center in Phelps. Call Laura Javenkowski,
(715) 545-2589.
NORTHWOODS ALZHEIMERS SUPPORT
GROUP Meets at 1:30 p.m. the first Thurs.
of each month at One Penny Place in
Woodruff. Call Joan Hauer, (715) 892-0053
or (715) 356-6540.
CANCER SUPPORT GROUP Meets the
second Thurs. of each month at 10 a.m. at
James Beck Cancer Center at Ministry Saint
Marys Hospital in Rhinelander. Call (715)
361-2027.
DAYBREAK ADULT CENTER Provides
relief to caregivers who have elderly persons
living with them. Activities include social
events, outings, noon meal and snacks.
Meets Thurs. from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at Prince of
Peace Lutheran Church, Eagle River. Call
(715) 617-0584.
KIDS IN NEED Confidential 24-hour hot
line, 1-(800) 622-9120, to teens and their
families. Call Mary Gadzalinski at Community
Mental Health Services, (715) 369-2994.
MATERNAL AND CHILD HEALTH HOT-
LINE: Mothers in need of health and nutrition
information, financial aid or advocacy can
contact the hot line 24 hours a day at 1-(800)
722-2295 or Web site www. mch-hotlines.org.
MOMS IN MOTION CLASS Free classes
for pregnant women or new mothers Tues.
and Thurs. from 6-7:30 p.m. at Saint Marys
Hospital in Rhinelander. Call (715) 369-6522.
NARCONON Provides answers to drug
addiction, free assessment, evaluation and
referral services. Call 1-(800) 468-6933; Web
site: www.stopaddiction.com.
NORTHWOODS AREA PARKINSONS DIS-
EASE SUPPORT GROUP Meets at 10
a.m. the second Tues. of the month at Ascen-
sion Lutheran Church in Minocqua. Call Den-
ny Leith, (715) 358-2207.
SEXUAL ASSAULT SUPPORT GROUP
Sponsored by Tri-County Council on Domes-
tic Violence & Sexual Assault. Meets Mon.
from 4:30-6 p.m. in Rhinelander; Thurs., 2-
3:30 p.m. in Rhine lander; Thurs., 5:30-6:45
p.m. in Minocqua. Call (715) 362-6841 Mon.-
Fri. from 8 a.m.-4 p.m.
SURVIVORS OF SUICIDE SUPPORT
GROUP Meets the third Thurs. of each
month from 5-7 p.m. at Trigs RiverWalk Cen-
ter in Rhinelander. Meetings are free and
open to the public. Call Sue Mackow ski at
(715) 275-5399 or Tina Werres at (715) 499-
3002.
Recreation
Events
Meetings
February
W T F S S M T
8 9 10 11 12 13 14
The Almanac
Racing grocery carts at the Radar Run. STAFF PHOTO
Health
REGIONAL SPELLING BEE Emily Klopp, right, recently
placed first at the Regional spelling bee held in the Phelps
School District after correctly spelling the word behest. Annalise
Callaghan, left, placed as alternate. Joe Crownhart coordinated
the bee, while June Franzen served as pronouncer. Judges were
Angela Kummerow, Laura Myszka and Marge Hiller. Klopp will
advance to the WSJ Badger State Bee Saturday, March 10, in
Madison. Klopp and Callaghan are students in the Northland
Pines School District. Photo By Sharon Gifford
Dean and Cherie Diorio of
Three Lakes announce the
engagement of their daughter,
Gina Marie Diorio, to Barrett
Parker Wagner of the Madison
area.
The bride-elect is a 2004
graduate of Three Lakes High
School and a 2008 graduate of
UW-Madison. She holds a
bachelor of science degree in
kinesiology and is currently
pursuing a doctorate degree in
physical therapy.
The prospective groom is a
2008 graduate of UW-Madison
and is currently pursuing a
medical degree at UW-Madi-
son School of Medicine.
A September 2012 wedding
is planned.
Michigan singer-songwriter
Kitty Donohoe will perform
the featured concert at the
Second Sunday Folk Dance in
Crystal Falls, Mich., Sunday,
Feb. 12, at 4 p.m. at Fortune
Lake Camp, located on High-
way 2 between Iron River,
Mich., and Crystal Falls.
Hosts Bette and Dean Pre-
mo (White Water) will perform
a short concert set and Dono-
hoe will follow immediately.
Ann Arbor-based songwriter
and Michigan Emmy recipient
Donohoe has five critically
acclaimed albums to her cred-
it.
After the concert, food and
beverages will be served and
the dance part of the evening
will begin with Bette Premo &
The Front Parlor Dance Band,
who will play tunes and pro-
vide dance instruction until 7
p.m.
Fiddler Bob Arthur will lead
an old-time music jam session
at 1 p.m. in the dining hall.
Admission will be $7 for
adults and children younger
than 15 will be free.
Second Sunday concert set Feb. 12
Patrick and Melissa Crum
of Eagle River announce the
birth of their son, Brodie
Aiden, Monday, Jan. 23, 2012,
at Ministry Saint Marys Hos-
pital in Rhinelander.
Grandparents are Pete and
Brenda Davison and Wayne
and Patty Crum, all of Cran-
don.
The baby was welcomed
home by his brother, Cole.
* * *
Kris and Erica Hultsch of
Conover announce the birth of
their daughter, Briella Jane,
Monday, Jan. 23, 2012, at Min-
istry Saint Marys Hospital in
Rhinelander.
* * *
Justin and Kim Grant of
Eagle River announce the
birth of their son, Nolan Lee,
Wednesday, Jan. 25, 2012, at
Ministry Saint Marys Hospi-
tal in Rhinelander.
* * *
Cassandra Coln of
Rhinelander announces the
birth of her son, Blaine Math-
ew, Friday, Jan. 27, 2012, at
Ministry Saint Marys Hospi-
tal in Rhinelander.
Grandparents are Annette
Coln and Chris Blanton of
Rhinelander and Bill Church
of Conover.
Great-grandparents are
Milagros Helmus of Largo,
Fla., Mary Church of Eagle
River and the late Gary and
Kathy Durand.
ENGAGEMENT
GINA DIORIO and
BARRETT WAGNER
BIRTHS

American
Red Cross
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 17
DISPLAY AD
DISPLAY ADS (2 column x 2 inch) ARE AVAILABLE
IN THE VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW and
THE THREE LAKES NEWS through Ad Network.
Coverages NE Region, NW Region, SE Region and SW
Region or Statewide, which includes all 4 regions.
Call Liz,
Vilas County News-Review
(715) 479-4421
Compiled by
Carly J. Ratliff
ONE YEAR AGO
Northwoods Alliance for
Temporary Housing opened
Frederick Place to provide
temporary emergency hous-
ing for area individuals . . .
Area Ministry Health Care
hospitals reported providing
$3.5 million in free and
reduced health care in 2010
. . . Members of the Eagle
River Area Fire Department
were busy preparing Dollar
Lake for the upcoming Pond
Hockey Tournament. Prepa-
rations included plowing
the ice and then spraying
water to build up a base.
FIVE YEARS AGO
Vilas County Health Ser-
vices merged with NEW-
CAP Inc. . . . The Citizen
Action Committee opened
bidding for the depot reno-
vation project. Funding for
this project was provided by
a grant from the Transpora-
tion Enhancement Program
and the Eagle River Rotary
Club . . . The city of Eagle
River was issued a permit to
shoot antlerless deer within
city limits by the Wisconsin
Department of Natural
Resources.
10 YEARS AGO
Wisconsin Department of
Corrections purchased an
Eagle River residence to
temporarily house proba-
tioners and parolees
. . . Vilas County supervisors
approved a recreation plan
that would enable munici-
palities to more easily apply
for state gra nts . . . Vilas
County Sheriff John
Niebuhr withdrew a propos-
al seeking a community-
based squad car program
due to lack of action by the
Personnel Committee.
15 YEARS AGO
Rewriting of a 10-year
plan over management of
Nicolet and Chequamegon
national forests threatened
to pit preservationists
against timber interests . . .
Minocqua law enforcement
officials were searching for a
robbery suspect who held up
a Minocqua businessman
the week before . . . owner-
ship of the Satran building
was signed over to the new
Northwoods Childrens
Museum.
20 YEARS AGO
The town of Lincoln and
city of Eagle River received
a $450,000 grant from the
state of Wisconsin Dump
Closure Cost Sharing Grant
Program . . . The Loonery, a
craft supply store in Three
Lakes, was destroyed in a
fire. Strong north winds
helped fuel the fire which
required seven fire depart-
ments to respond . . . A plan
that would enable Vilas
County sheriffs deputies to
take squad cars home at no
additional cost to the county
was presented to the coun-
tys police grievence com-
mittee.
30 YEARS AGO
A string of burglaries were
under investigation by the
Eagle River Police Depart-
ment . . . The underwhelm-
ing use of infant safety seats
in cars prompted the Vilas
County Safety Committee to
consider a program to pur-
chase infant safety seats
and rent them out at low
costs . . . The Vilas-Oneida
Transit Commission
requested that the state
Department of Transporta-
tion condemn the aban-
doned railroad corridor from
Gagen south of Three Lakes
to Land O Lakes in hopes of
saving the line.
40 YEARS AGO
The skyrocketing popu-
larity of snowmobiling
prompted new state legisla-
tion to regulate the sport.
Bill 886 was proposed in the
Legislature and would
enact basic regulations like
requiring rider saftey certi-
fication . . . A new grocery
store, McKeever Food
Stores, was under construc-
tion in Eagle River.
50 YEARS AGO
The Phelps-Conover Lions
Club prepared for its annual
Winter Frolic . . . The Vilas
County Chamber of Com-
merce launched a program
to purchase composite
advertisements featuring
area businesses in national-
ly syndicated newspapers.
60 YEARS AGO
The Wisconsin Conserva-
tion Commission voted to
acquire the vast marshland
acres around Thunder and
Rice lakes. This land would
become the first public
hunting grounds and
wildlife refuge in the north-
eastern part of the state
. . . An Eagle River tele-
phone operators quick
thinking saved a mans life
after he picked up the
phone and blacked out. The
operator responded to the
dead line by calling the
sheriff s department. The
young man was hospital-
ized for food poisoning.
70 YEARS AGO
Efforts were under way by
the Vilas County Sheriffs
department to determine
the amount of dynamite and
powder magazines pres ent
in the county. After the
inventory, all explosives
were to be moved and
guarded at an undisclosed
site for defense purposes . . .
The Vilas County library
project reported a nearly
25% increase in the number
of books in the countys cir-
culation from the previous
year.
80 YEARS AGO
Mrs. L.A. Bishop of Camp
Idyle Wylde was elected
president of the midwest
section of the Camp Direc-
tors association . . . Eagle
River opened its new ele-
mentary school.
This postcard was contributed by Jim Moon of Eagle River
and features the 1935 Winter Carnival at the Dome.
BACKWARD GLANCES LIFESTYLE
HOME DELIVERED PROGRAM Employees
of Davita Northern Star Dialysis in Woodruff
recently donated $500 to the Vilas County Home
Delivered Program. Taking part in the check pre-
sentation were, from left, Susan Richmond of the
Vilas County Commission on Aging; and Julie
Von der Hoff, MSSW; and Alicia Frenz, RD, CD,
of the dialysis center. STAFF PHOTO
The Oneida County Veter-
ans Service office has
announced recent changes to
some Veterans Affairs (VA)
benefits.
Following are the most
recent changes:
Increase in VA compensa-
tion and pension: Veterans
who receive service-connected
disability compensation or
non-service connected pension
received a 3.6% increase in
their benefits effective Dec. 1.
The increase did not show up
in their benefits until their
January payment, which was
actually paid Dec. 30.
Loans: Effective Dec. 1,
the Wisconsin Department of
Veterans Affairs no longer
offers home loans, personal
loans or home improvement
loans.
VA health-care eligibility:
In order to be eligible for VA
health care, a veteran has to
have a prequalifying factor or
eligibility will be based on
gross household income. The
income limit has increased
this year. Those who were inel-
igible due to their income in
past years may be eligible now.
Income limits vary from coun-
ty to county. The income limit
for Oneida County is: veteran
only, $37,785; veteran plus 1,
$43,175; Veteran Plus 2,
$48,565; and Veteran Plus 3,
$53,955.
Navy veterans and Agent
Orange: Certain Blue Water
(served on a ship off the coast
of Vietnam) and Brown Water
(served on a ship that operated
on the inland waterways of
Vietnam) Navy veterans are
eligible to file claims for dis-
eases presumed to be caused
due to Agent Orange exposure.
The list of ships was updated
in January, and there are 238
ships on the list. Anyone who
was told in the past that their
ship wasnt on the list should
check again. The list may be
viewed atp
va.gov or by contacting a
county Veterans Service office.
According to Tammy Wal-
ters of the Oneida County Vet-
erans Service office, three Sat-
urday veterans information
seminars will be held through-
out the year.
The first one will be Satur-
day, March 24, in Three Lakes
at the American Legion Club.
The second one will be in
June in Rhinelander and the
last one will be in September
in Minocqua.
No dates have been set for
the Rhinelander and Minoc-
qua seminars. The information
will be released at a later date.
Veterans Service office
explains benefit changes
Rhinelander Area Retired
Educators Association will
meet Wednesday, Feb. 8, at
noon at Best Western Claridge
Motor Inn in downtown
Rhinelander.
The program will be pre-
sented by Dawn Nordine on
Wisconsins virtual school
(Wisconsins Web Academy)
and Blended Education, a non-
profit educational organiza-
tion operated out of Coopera-
tive Service Educational Agen-
cy 9.
All retired educators living
in Rhinelander and the sur-
rounding area are welcome to
attend.
For more information or
reservations, contact Natalie
Obey at (715) 369-5582.
Retired educators to meet Feb. 8
The Oscar G. Johnson VA
Medical Center in Iron Moun-
tain, Mich., has announced new
procedures for filling prescrip-
tion medications.
The new procedures will
take effect Monday, Feb. 27.
Medication refills and new,
nonurgent prescriptions will no
longer be filled at the medical
centers pharmacy window but
will be mailed to the veteran
patients home.
All refills should be request-
ed three weeks prior to running
out of the medication.
Urgent medications pre-
scribed at any of the medical
centers seven community-
based outpatient clinics may be
filled at a local pharmacy.
To request a medication
refill, patients can call the
automated prescription refill
system at 1-(800) 805-1870,
order at myhealthe vet.com or
complete a medication refill
slip and place it in the drop box
outside the pharmacy window
or mail it to the medical center.
Medical center announces
veterans prescription changes
SMART Weight Loss for
Seniors classes will be held
Thursdays from Feb. 23 to
April 5, from 1 to 2:30 p.m. at
YMCA of the Northwoods in
Rhinelander.
If you are struggling to lose
weight or maintain a healthy
weight, this education and sup-
port program may be just right
for you, said YMCA active old-
er adult coordinator Marilyn
Duschl.
Older adults have unique
challenges and needs when it
comes to losing weight. This
program is designed to meet
their special needs, she added.
According to Duschl, past
participants have lost weight,
made positive changes in their
eating habits and exercise rou-
tine, have set realistic goals
and have learned how to be
accountable for their goals.
They also have relearned what
to eat for health and weight
loss.
The program will include
weekly weigh-ins, body mea-
surements, exercise recom-
mendations, nutritional re-
education and self-manage-
ment skill development.
The cost for the program is
$50 for members and $65 for
the general public.
For more information or to
register, contact the YMCA at
(715) 362-9622.
Senior weight-loss program
to be offered at YMCA
The public is welcome to
meet Sue Timm Saturday, Feb.
18, at the Woodruff community
building, located on Highway
47 in Woodruff, at an event
sponsored by the Lakeland
Aglow Lighthouse Chapter.
Coffee and fellowship will
begin at 9:30 a.m., followed by
Timms message, The Wind Is
Blowing Again, at 10 a.m.
Timm is an ordained minis-
ter and former Aglow area
board member.
According to Timm, she
received her calling in 1994 to
take encouragement, strength
and revival fires to believers in
Christ.
Registration will be $3 at the
door and a freewill offering will
take place.
For more information, con-
tact Marie Trettin at (715) 358-
3872.
Lakeland Aglow to host Sue Timm
The Scarlet OHatters of
the Northwoods, Eagle Rivers
chapter of the Red Hat Society,
has scheduled a gathering
Wednesday, March 7, at 11:30
a.m. at the Kalmar Senior
Community Center in Eagle
River.
The event will include
lunch followed by an afternoon
of cards and Red Hat games.
The cost is $5 payable at
the door. Advance reservations
are necessary by Friday,
March 2.
For more information or to
make a reservation, call Doris
at (715) 479-5169.
Red Hat group sets lunch March 7
Adult Family Homes
needed for individuals with
mental health disabilities,
adults who require super -
vision and support in daily
living skills, leisure activities,
health monitoring, etc.
Finan cial compensation
based on consumers needs.
For more information regard-
ing mental health needs,
please contact Donna
Shimeck at: 715-369-2215
ext. 1250 7348
BADGER BRIDGE
IN EAGLE RIVER
Results of 1/30/12
North/South, First place:
Suzanne and Joe Wallace.
Second place: Mickey Bar-
ricklow and Ron Waller.
East/West, First place:
Marge and Jerry Baerenwald.
Second place: Betty Vande-
Hey and Helen Welch.
Bridge is played every Monday
from 1 to 4 p.m. at Boondockers
Lounge at Wild Eagle Lodge in Eagle
River and is open to the public. For
information, call Ed Stoever, club
manager, at (715) 362-8933.
Kalmar Center
Senior Nutrition
Meals
Highway 45 North
Monday through Friday
Serving at noon
Sponsored by Vilas County
Commission on Aging
Reservations or cancella-
tions need to be called in 24
hours in advance between 10
a.m. and 1 p.m. Tuesdays,
Wednesdays and Fridays. Call
Penny LaFata at (715) 479-
2633. Home-delivered meals
are available based on eligibil-
ity. While there is no set fee for
a meal, the suggested dona-
tion is $4 per meal. No one will
be denied service because of
inability to contribute.
TUESDAY, FEB. 14
Chili with macaroni
Cheese slice
Corn bread
Pineapple
Strawberry-peach gelatin
dessert
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 15
Baked fish
Potatoes and onions
Carrots
Rye bread
Dutch apple crumble
FRIDAY, FEB. 17
Open-face pork sandwich
Mashed potatoes
with gravy
Sweet-sour coleslaw
Apricots
All meals include 1% milk
and coffee.
BANKRUPTCY
CREDIT CARD DEBT, MEDICAL BILLS, DEBTS
RESULTING FROM A LOST JOB OR FAILED BUSINESS?
Chapter 7 Bankruptcy may be your answer for relief from financial problems.
Phone us for a free initial consultation.
CIRILLI LAW OFFICES, S.C.
116 E. Davenport St., P.O. Box 159, Rhinelander, WI 54501-0159
Phone: (715) 369-3443 Toll-Free: 1-(888) 844-3443
[Our office is a debt-relief agency that helps people file bankruptcy for relief under the U.S. Bankruptcy Code]
NOW DELIVERING
FUEL OIL & BULK GAS.
CALL FOR PRICING. WE
WILL NOT BE UNDERSOLD!
ALL ORDERS C.O.D.
Now Delivering In Your Area
PROPANE, OIL & GAS CO.
We sell, lease & install tanks
PROPANE
$
1.79/GAL.
200-gal. min. order CASH ONLY
(888) 706-4120 (906) 265-4120
PRICES MAY CHANGE
Northwoods Patriots have
scheduled a meeting Tuesday,
Feb. 14, at 6:30 p.m. at Eagle
River Inn & Resort, located at
5260 Highway 70 in Eagle
River.
The meeting topic will be
National School Choice Week
and the movie A Tale of Two
Missions with Juan Williams
will be featured. The public is
welcome.
For more information, call
(715) 479-9187.
Patriots to hold
meeting Feb. 14
18 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
wally.geist@yahoo.com
ST. GERMAIN/SAYNER
WALLY GEIST
(715) 892-3545
8122 MELODY DR. E.
ST. GERMAIN, WI 54558
PUBLIC NOTICES
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/18-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10 CV 411
______________________________________________
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
HOLLY R. JAHNZ, et al.,
Defendant(s).
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on May 26,
2011, in the amount of $307,699.91 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: March 8, 2012 at 02:00 PM
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to
plaintiff. 2. Sold as is and subject to all
legal liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River,
Wisconsin 54521
DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in Gov-
ernment Lot 5, Section 31, Township 40
North, Range 11 East, Washington Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the
Southeast corner of Government Lot 5;
thence North 22 degrees 07' West along the
East line of Government Lot 5 a distance of
881.20 feet to an iron pipe marking the
PLACE OF BEGINNING of this description;
thence North 85 degrees 11' West a distance
of 289.70 feet to an iron pipe; thence again
North 85 degrees 11' West a distance of 16.00
feet, more or less, to the East shore of Bass
Lake; thence Northerly along the shore of
said lake a distance of 500.00 feet; thence
North 88 degrees 58' 30" East, a distance of
10.00 feet, more or less, to an iron pipe;
thence again North 88 degrees 58' 30" East, a
distance of 71.50 feet to an iron pipe on the
East line of Government Lot 5; thence South
22 degrees 07' East, along the East line of
Government Lot 5 a distance of 399.70 feet to
the place of beginning.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 1255 North Little
Bass Lake Road, Eagle River, WI 54521
TAX KEY NO.: 26-2989
Russell J Karnes
State Bar # 1054982
Blommer Peterman, S.C.
165 Bishops Way, Suite 100
Brookfield, WI 53005
262-790-5719
Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com
to obtain the bid for this sale.
Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's
attorney and is attempting to collect a debt
on its behalf.
Any information obtained will be used for
the purpose.
282081
1939
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/25-2/29/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-115
______________________________________________
JP Morgan Chase Bank, National Associa-
tion, Successor by Merger to Chase Home
Finance, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Robert J. Lafrenier and River Valley State
Bank,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on June 9,
2010 in the amount of $55,962.05 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: March 22, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certified
funds, payable to the clerk of courts (person-
al checks cannot and will not be accepted).
The balance of the successful bid must be
paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's
check or certified funds no later than ten days
after the court's confirmation of the sale or
else the 10% down payment is forfeited to the
plaintiff. The property is sold as is and sub-
ject to all liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in the NW
of the SE , Section 4, Township 40 North,
Range 5 East, Lac du Flambeau Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, more particularly
described as follows: Beginning at the North-
west corner of said Section; thence South
along the West line of said Section 600 feet
to a point; thence East and parallel to the
North line of said Section 1014 feet to a
point, being the PLACE OF BEGINNING;
thence continuing East and parallel to the
North line of said Section 163.0 feet to a
point; thence North and parallel to the West
line of said Section 438.9 feet to a point on
the South line of State Trunk Highway 47;
thence Westerly along the South line of said
highway 163.9 feet to a point; thence South
and parallel to the West line of said Section
459.0 feet to the Place of Beginning.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2831 State High-
way 47 S Lac Du Flambeau, WI 54538-9769
DATED: January 18, 2012
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1945
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/11-2/15/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-141
Code 30404
(Foreclosure of Mortgage)
______________________________________________
NORTHWOODS NATIONAL BANK,
Plaintiff,
v.
GREGORY S. VALLARTA
APRIL VALLARTA
GARY A. ANDERSON
and
HEIDI GUSTAFSON,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment
entered in the above entitled action on the
22nd day of August, 2011, the Sheriff of Vilas
County will sell at public auction on the
front steps of the Vilas County Courthouse
located at 330 Court Street, Eagle River, Wis-
consin, in said County, on:
February 23, 2012 at 2:00 p.m., all of the fol-
lowing described mortgaged presmises, to
wit:
Lots One (1), Two (2) and an undivided
2
7th
interest of Outlot One (1) of the Plat of Spi-
der Heights, being a part of Government Lot
Four, Section Eleven, Township Forty North,
Range Six East of the Fourth Principal
Meridian, Arbor Vitae Township, Vilas Coun-
ty, Wisconsin, as the same is recorded in Vol-
ume 10 of Plats, page 3.
TAX KEY NO. 002-381 & 002-382 (Tax Parcel
Nos. PL-1 & PL-2)
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 2445 Pine Acres
Road, Arbor Vitae, WI 54568
TERMS OF SALE: Cash
DOWN PAYMENT IS DUE IMMEDIATELY
FOLLOWING SALE: Ten percent (10%) of
amount bid by certified check or cash; bal-
ance to be paid following confirmation as
provided for by law.
Sale hereunder is subject to all delinquent
and unpaid real estate taxes and any and all
other legal liens and encumbrances which
affect the property described above; this sale
is also subject to the rights of tenants, if any.
The property shall be sold in its present con-
dition, as is. Any transfer tax required
shall be paid by the successful bidder.
Dated at Eagle River, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, this 9th day of December, 2011
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County , Wisconsin
John H. Priebe
PRIEBE LAW OFFICE
State Bar No. 1003481
P.O. Box 1399
Rhinelander, WI 54501
(715) 365-3232
Plaintiffs Attorney
Priebe Law Office is a law firm/debt collector
representing a creditor in the collection of a
debt that you owe to said creditor. We are
attempting to collect such debt and any
information obtained from you will be used
for that purpose.
1925
_____________
(Three Weeks, 2/1-2/15/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-401
The Honorable Neal A. Nielsen, III
Case Code 30404
(Foreclosure of Mortgage)
The amount claimed exceeds $5000.00
______________________________________________
Cenlar FSB
425 Phillips Blvd.
Trenton, NJ 08628,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Laurie-Jean Stellberg
11078 Strollers Ln
Arbor Vitae, WI 54568-9267
John Doe Stellberg
11078 Strollers Ln
Arbor Vitae, WI 54568-9267
Siegfried Stellberg
11078 Strollers Ln
Arbor Vitae, WI 54568-9267
Jane Doe Stellberg
11078 Strollers Ln
Arbor Vitae, WI 54568-9267,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
PUBLICATION SUMMONS
______________________________________________
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
To each person named above as a defendant:
You are hereby notified that the plaintiff
named above has filed a lawsuit or other
legal action against you.
Within 40 days after February 1, 2012 you
must respond with a written demand for a
copy of the complaint. The demand must be
sent or delivered to the court, whose address
is 330 Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521
and to Gray & Associates, L.L.P., plaintiff's
attorney, whose address is 16345 West Glen-
dale Drive, New Berlin, WI 53151-2841. You
may have an attorney help or represent you.
If you do not demand a copy of the com-
plaint within 40 days, the court may grant
judgment against you for the award of mon-
ey or other legal action requested in the com-
plaint, and you may lose your right to object
to anything that is or may be incorrect in the
complaint. A judgment may be enforced as
provided by law. A judgment awarding mon-
ey may become a lien against any real estate
you own now or in the future, and may also
be enforced by garnishment or seizure of
property.
Dated this 23rd day of January, 2012.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
By: William N. Foshag
State Bar No. 1020417
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
(414) 224-8118
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1956
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/18-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-226
______________________________________________
BMO Harris Bank, NA, as successor by merg-
er to M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank f/k/a M&I
Bank of Eagle River,
Plaintiff,
v.
Kevin B. Kent,
Defendant,
State of Wisconsin, Department of Children
and Families; West Bend Mutual Insurance
Company,
Added Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure
made in the above-entitled action on August
30, 2011, I will sell at public auction in the
Vilas County Courthouse, located at 330
Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, on
March 8, 2012
at 2:00 p.m., all of the following described
premises, to wit:
A parcel of land being a part of Government
Lot 5, Section 9, Township 40 North, Range 10
East, Lincoln Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at a point marking the South-
east corner of said Government Lot 5; thence
Northerly along the East line of Government
Lot 5 a distance of 265.0 feet to a point and the
Place of Beginning of the parcel to be
described; thence continue Northerly along
the East line of Government Lot 5 a distance
of 200.0 feet to a point; thence Westerly paral-
lel to the South line of Government Lot 5 to
the West line of Government Lot 5; thence
Southerly along the West line of Government
Lot 5 a distance of 200.0 feet to a point; thence
Easterly parallel to the South line of Govern-
ment Lot 5 to the East line of Government Lot
5 and the Place of Beginning.
Tax Key No. G5-4 (Lincoln Computer No.
14-739)
THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD SUB-
JECT TO ALL LEGAL ENCUMBRANCES.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH or CASHIER's
CHECK (10% downpayment at sale, bal-
ance due within ten (10) days of Court
approval).
DATED at Eagle River, Wisconsin, on
December 27, 2011.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin
BASS & MOGLOWSKY, S.C.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff
The above property is located at 2227 High-
way 45 North, Eagle River, WI 54521.
1933
_____________
(Three Weeks, 2/8-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-371
Classification (code) 30701
______________________________________________
KIMBERLY VALERIUS BOWLER
TIMOTHY J. BOWLER
7151 Crab Lake Road
Presque Isle, WI 54557,
Plaintiff,
v.
THOMAS A. DAHL
36340 Tara Court
Ingleside, IL 60041
-and-
JEFFREY S. REIMER
36340 Tara Court
Ingleside, IL 60041
-and-
HARRIS TRUST AND SAVINGS BANK
200 West Monroe Street, 19th Floor
Chicago, IL 60606,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
40 DAY SUMMONS
______________________________________________
THE STATE OF WISCONSIN
To Each Person named as a Defendant:
YOU ARE HEREBY NOTIFIED that the
Plaintiff named above has filed a lawsuit or
other legal action against you.
Within 40 days after February 8, 2012, you
must respond with a written demand for a
copy of the Complaint. The demand must be
sent or delivered to the Court, whose
address is Vilas County Courthouse, 330
Court Street, Eagle River, WI 54521 and the
Plaintiffs attorney, whose address is P.O.
Box 630, Minocqua, WI 54548-0630. You may
have an attorney help or represent you.
If you do not demand a copy of the Com-
plaint within 40 days, the Court may grant
judgment against you for the award of mon-
ey or other legal action requested in the
Complaint, and you may lose your right to
object to anything that is or may be incorrect
in the Complaint. A judgment may be
enforced as provided by law. A judgment
awarding money may become a lien against
any real estate you own now or in the future,
and may also be enforced by garnishment or
seizure of property.
Dated this 25 day of January, 2012.
Houlihan Law Firm, S.C.
Attorneys for Plaintiff, Kimberly Valerius
Bowler and Timothy J. Bowler
By: John C. Houlihan
Wisconsin State Bar No. 1016296
P.O. Box 630
Minocqua, WI 54548
(715) 356-1422
1960
WNAXLP
BUYING SCRAP METAL
Buying Copper, Brass,
Aluminum & Aluminum Cans
DON SCHARF AUTOMOTIVE
We accept ferrous & non-ferrous materials.
Call for prices. (715) 479-8597
870 Hwy. 17 South, Eagle River Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Also
paying for
old cars and
trucks.
WISCONSIN
PUBLIC
HEALTH
Weve Moved!
Vilas County
Public Health
has relocated to
302 W. Pine Street, Eagle River, WI 54521
(the Eliason Realty Bldg. - corner of Hwys. 45 & 70)
(715) 479-3656
City of Eagle River
Request for Proposal (RFP)
Building Inspection Services
The city of Eagle River is currently soliciting Request for Proposal regarding
Building Inspection Services for residential structures. Minimum Wisconsin
State certification is required for electrical, plumbing, uniform dwelling and
HVAC systems for residential structures. The application should show proof of
certification, proposed inspection fee schedule, references, certificate of insur-
ance. As part of this process, the city of Eagle River desires to review and
update the building and inspection code of ordinances please include this as
part of the RFP. By Feb. 16, 2012, please submit the applications to:
City Administrator
Eagle River City Hall
P.O. Box 1269
525 E. Maple Street
Eagle River, WI 54521
Any questions, please contact the City Administrator at (715) 479-8682 ext. 226
or administrator@ci.eagle-river.wi.us.
1967
BID NOTICE
The town of Cloverland is taking bids to operate our recycling program. The town
has 90 tons of recycling each year. We have two options for bids. The town has the
right to reject any and all bids. ALL BIDS MUST BE IN BY MARCH 1, 2012. Must
bid both options.
Option 1
The town furnishes the building and electricity. There is no heat in building.
The Contractor furnishes the employee and all containers for recyclables and garbage.
All containers must fit inside the building.
The Recycling building must be open the first and third Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon.
At this time the residents are being charged $3.00 per bag for their garbage.
Option 2
The town furnishes the building and electricity. There is no heat in building.
The Contractor furnishes the employee and all containers for recyclables and garbage.
All containers must fit within the building.
The Recycling building must be open the first and third Saturdays from 9 a.m. to noon
and the second and fourth Wednesdays from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
At this time the residents are being charged $3.00 per bag for their garbage.
ALL BIDS MUST BE IN BY MARCH 1, 2012.
MAIL BIDS TO: Scott Maciosek, Town of Cloverland Chairman
7085 Old Hwy. 70, St. Germain, WI 54558
If you have any questions, call Scott Maciosek at (715) 479-3408. 1966
READING PROGRAM St. Germain Elemen-
tary School recently launched a new program,
Hot Reads, a reading incentive program, with
members of the St. Germain Volunteer Fire and
Vilas County Sheriffs departments, who will read
to small groups of students once each month.
Kicking off the program were Lt. Gerard Ritter II
of the sheriffs department, who read to second-
through fifth-grade students while firefighter
Jesse Chuckel, center, read a story to 4K stu-
dents.
Photo By Wally Geist
The Plum Lake Womans
Club has issued a reminder
that all quilt blocks are due by
Saturday, Feb. 11.
The blocks can be mailed to
Plum Lake Womans Club,
2240 Lingering Pines Court,
St. Germain, WI 54558, or
dropped off at the Plum Lake
Public Library or Traditions
in Sayner.
Judging will take place Fri-
day, Feb. 17, by a panel of
judges for first, second and
third places.
Peoples Choice judging will
be Saturday, Feb. 18, from 4:30
to 6:30 p.m. at the Sayner com-
munity building in conjunction
with the Friends of the Plum
Lake Librarys Hobo Dinner.
The Womans Club will hold
its annual Christmas Fest
Saturday, Nov. 10. Vendors or
nonprofit organizations may
call the library to request a
form. Those who attended last
year will be mailed a new form
and complete information.
Table space is $25.
Quilt blocks to be judged Feb. 11
E-BOOK SESSION Plum Lake Public Library
recently held a program on how to make the best
use of an assortment of digital readers including
Kindle, Nook and Pandigital readers. Librarian
Ida Nemec, at right with Nancy Minx, helped par-
ticipants negotiate the librarys e-book lending
system.
Photo By Wally Geist
Prime-Time Dining
Prime-Time Dining is available at the St. Germain senior nutrition site located at Fibbers Restau-
rant, 8679 Big St. Germain Drive. Meals are served Mondays and Fridays at noon. Home-delivered
meals are available based on eligibility.
While there is no set fee for a meal, donations will be accepted. No one will be denied service because
of inability to contribute. The suggested donation is $4.
For reservations, contact Verdelle Mauthe, site manager, 24 hours in advance, at (715) 542-2951.
FRIDAY, FEB. 10
Crispy shrimp
Twice-baked potato
Coleslaw
Rye bread
Sugar cookie
MONDAY, FEB. 13
Broasted chicken
Mashed potatoes and gravy
Stuffing
Cranberry sauce
Buttermilk biscuit
Vanilla cupcake
All meals served with bread
or roll, margarine and
low-fat milk.
PUBLIC NOTICES
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/11-2/15/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-64
Classification (code) 30404
______________________________________________
OLD SECOND NATIONAL BANK
a/k/a OLD SECOND BANK YORKVILLE,
Plaintiff,
v.
MICHAEL B. GALLES and LAURA G.
GALLES
HUSBAND AND WIFE
752 SAN LUIS
NEW BRAUNFELS, TX 78132-2895,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled
action on June 22, 2011, I will sell at public
auction on the front steps of the Vilas Coun-
ty Courthouse, 330 Court Street, in the City
of Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin, on
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
the following described mortgaged premises,
to wit:
Lots One (1), Two (2), Three (3) and Four (4)
of EVERGREEN PLAT being all of lots One,
Two and Three of Certified Survey Map No.
3402 recorded in Volume 12 Certified Sur-
veys, page 81 and located in Government Lot
Five in Section Thirty-four, Township Forty
North, Range Eight East of the Fourth
Prinicpal Meridian, St. Germain Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin.
Address of Premises (per Vilas County Tax
Roll): 1015 Phillips Place, St. Germain, WI
54558
TERMS OF SALE: Cash.
DOWN PAYMENT: 10% of amount bid by
certified check
Dated this 4th day of January, 2012.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich
Vilas County, Wisconsin Sheriff
John C. Houlihan
Houlihan Law Firm, S.C.
Attorney for Plaintiff,
Old Second National Bank
P.O. Box 630
Minocqua, WI 54548
(715) 356-1422
1929
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/11-2/15/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-55
______________________________________________
JPMorgan Chase Bank, N.A. successor by
merger with Chase Home Finance, LLC,
assignee of Chase Bank USA, N.A.,
Plaintiff,
v.
Marian Wagendorf a/k/a Marian L. Wagen-
dorf and Richard D. Wagendorf, wife and
husband; Meadowlark Resort Condominium,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of a judgment of foreclosure
made in the above-entitled action on May 12,
2010, I will sell at public auction in the Vilas
County Courthouse, located at 330 Court
Street, Eagle River, WI 54521, on March 1,
2012 at 2:00 p.m., all of the following
described premises, to wit:
Unit Five (5) in Meadowlark Resort Condo-
minium and the undivided interest in the
common elements and facilities appurtenant
thereto, together with the exclusive use and
right of easement of and in the limited com-
mon elements and facilities appurtenant to
said unit(s) all in Meadowlark Resort Condo-
minium, a condominium declared and exist-
ing under and by virtue of the condominium
Ownership Act of the State of Wisconsin,
recorded by Declaration as such condomini-
um in Volume 448 of Micro Records, page 385
as Document No. 222009 and amended in Vol-
ume 449 of Micro Records, page 530 as Docu-
ment No. 222476 as the same is recorded in
Volume 2 of Condominium Plats, page 129.
Tax Key No. 4-103-55
THE PROPERTY WILL BE SOLD SUB-
JECT TO ALL LEGAL ENCUMBRANCES.
TERMS OF SALE: CASH or CASHIER's
CHECK (10% downpayment at sale, bal-
ance due within ten (10) days of Court
approval).
DATED at Eagle River, Wisconsin, on
December 22, 2011.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich
Sheriff of Vilas County, Wisconsin
BASS & MOGLOWSKY, S.C.,
Attorneys for Plaintiff
The above property is located at 4351 Mid-
dle Gresham Lane, #5, Boulder Junction, WI
54512.
1924
WNAXLP
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 19
jehintz@hotmail.com
THREE LAKES
JAN HINTZ
(715) 546-2712
1144 MEDICINE LAKE LODGE RD.
THREE LAKES, WI 54562
PUBLIC NOTICES
NOTICE
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN, that the official public test of
the automatic tabulating equipment to be used in the Feb. 21,
2012, Spring Primary Election in the town of Three Lakes will
be conducted at the Town Office at 6965 West School Street,
Three Lakes, Wis., at 10 a.m. on Monday, Feb. 13, 2012.
Susan L. Harris, Town Clerk 1959
_____________
(Six Weeks, 2/1-3/7/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 09-CV-390
______________________________________________
JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Associa-
tion, Successor by Merger to Chase Home
Finance, LLC,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Deborah M. Hess a/k/a Deborah Hess a/k/a
Deborah Flocco a/k/a Deborah M. Flocco
a/k/a Deborah M. Hess Flocco, Luis A. Flocco
a/k/a Luis Flocco a/k/a Luis Angel Flocco and
MB Financial Bank, N.A., as the successor in
interest to Broadway Bank,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on Febru-
ary 2, 2010 in the amount of $126,596.06 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: March 22, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashier's check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the court's confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is sold
as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land being a
part of Government Lot Three (3), Section
Ten (10), Township Thirty-nine (39) North,
Range Ten (10) East of the Fourth Principal
Meridian, Township of Lincoln, Vilas County,
Wisconsin, and being more particularly
described as follows:Commencing at the
Northeast corner of said Govt. Lot 3, a con-
crete monument, and the Place of Beginning,
thence S 1 00 E along the East line of said
Govt Lot 3 a distance of 542.21 feet to an iron
pipe, thence S 89 10W parallel to the North
line of said Govt Lot 3 a distance of 241.38
feet to an iron pipe, thence N 1 00W parallel
to said East line a distance of 511.53 feet to
an iron pipe on the shore of Gordon Lake,
thence N 63 50E along the shore of said lake
a distance of 46.0 feet, thence N 86 01E along
the shore of said lake a distance of 200.0 feet
to a concrete monument, the Place of Begin-
ning. Including all lands lying between the
meander line and waters edge.Together
with a non-exclusive easement 30 feet in
width for ingress and egress over an existing
road to the town road as described in an
agreement recorded in Volume 554 Micro
Records, page 269.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 560 Bloom Rd
Eagle River, WI 54521-8873
DATED: January 20, 2012
Gray & Associates, L.L.P
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1957
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/25-2/29/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11 CV-51
Foreclosure of Mortgage: 30404
______________________________________________
OLD SECOND NATIONAL BANK
375 River Street
Aurora, IL 60506,
Plaintiffs,
v.
JEANNE MARIE DRESDEN AS TRUSTEE
OF THE JEANNE MARIE DRESDEN TRUST
DATED MAY 20, 2005
P.O. Box 790
Mokena, IL 60448,
Defendant.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled
action on November 15, 2011, I will sell at
public auction on the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, 330 Court Street, in the
City of Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
on:
THURSDAY, MARCH 15, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
the following described mortgaged
premises to wit: Exhibit A
A parcel of land in part of Government Lot
Two (2), Section Twenty-seven (27), Town-
ship Forty-one (41) North, Range Eight (8)
East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Plum
Lake Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the meander corner com-
mon to Sections 27 & 28, marked by a 5"
square brass capped concrete monument in
place near the South shore of Plum Lake;
thence N 28 02' 16' E, for a distance of 505.56
feet to an iron pipe near the Easterly shore of
Plum Lake thence meandering along said
shore N 16 29' 55" E, for a distance of 593.79
feet to an iron pipe, the PLACE OF BEGIN-
NING; thence N 74 03' 04" W, for a distance of
50.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence meandering
along said shore N 07 32' 38" W, for a distance
of 78.00 feet; thence meandering along said
shore N 39 25' 43" W, for a distance of 78.00
feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said shore
N 60 00' 25" E, for a distance of 26.78 feet to
an iron pipe; thence S 74 03' 04" E, for a dis-
tance of 513.23 feet to an iron pipe; thence S
51 00' 25" W, for a distance of 44.65 feet to an
iron pipe; thence S 25 42' 16" W, for a distance
of 100.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence N 74 03'
04" W, along the Northerly line of the lands
described in Volume 1191 Records, page 420
for a distance of 343.98 feet to the place of
beginning. Including the lands lying between
the meander line and the lateral lot lines
extended to the waters edge.
EXCEPTING THEREFROM the following
parcel of land:
A parcel of land 66 feet in width lying 33
feet on each side of the following described
centerline, being a part of Government Lot
Two (2), Section Twenty-seven (27), Town-
ship Forty-one (41) North, Range Eight (8)
East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Plum
Lake Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the Southeast corner of
the above described parcel, marked by an
iron pipe; thence N 74 03' 04" W, for a dis-
tance of 54.84 feet to the PLACE OF BEGIN-
NING of said parcel, thence along said cen-
terline N 39 00' 00" E, for a distance of 140.00
feet; thence N 51 00' 00" E, for a distance of
210.00 feet; thence N 25 degrees 00' 00" E, for
a distance of 265.00 feet; thence N 51 00' 00"
E, for a distance of 82 feet, more or less to the
centerline of said Town Road and there ter-
minating. The sidelines of said parcel extend
or foreshorten to intersect the Southerly line
of the above described parcel and the West-
erly right-of-way line of Hanson Road.
Subject to a perpetual easement for over-
head powerlines.
AND
A parcel of land 66 feet in width lying 33
feet on each side of the following described
centerline, being a part of Government Lot
Two (2), Section Twenty-seven (27), Town-
ship Forty-one (41) North, Range Eight (8)
East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Plum
Lake Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the Southeast corner of
the above described parcel, marked by an
iron pipe; thence N 74 03' 04" W, for a dis-
tance of 54.84 feet to the PLACE OF BEGIN-
NING of said parcel, thence along said cen-
terline N 39 00' 00" E, for a distance of 140.00
feet; thence N 51 00' 00" E, for a distance of
210.00 feet; thence N 25 degrees 00' 00" E, for
a distance of 265.00 feet; thence N 51 00' 00"
E, for a distance of 82 feet, more or less to the
centerline of said Town Road and there ter-
minating. The sidelines of said parcel extend
or foreshorten to intersect the Southerly line
of the above described parcel and the West-
erly right-of-way line of Hanson Road.
Subject to a perpetual easement for over-
head powerlines.
AND
A parcel of land in part of Government Lot
Two (2) and part of Government Lot Three
(3), Section Twenty-seven (27), Township
Forty-one (41) North, Range Eight (8) East of
the Fourth Principal Meridian, Township of
Plum Lake, Vilas County, Wisconsin, more
particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the meander corner com-
mon to Sections 27 & 28, marked by a 5 inch
square brass capped concrete monument in
place near the South shore of Plum Lake;
thence North 28 02' 16" East for a distance of
505.56 feet to an iron pipe near the easterly
shore of Plum Lake; thence meandering along
said shore North 16 29' 55" East for a distance
of 593.79 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 74
03' 04" West for a distance of 50.00 feet to an
iron pipe; thence meandering along said
shore North 07 32' 38" West for a distance of
78.00 feet; thence meandering along said
shore North 39 25' 43" West for a distance of
78.00 feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said
shore North 60 00' 25" East for a distance of
26.78 feet to an iron pipe; thence South 74 03'
04" East along the North line of the lands
described in Document No. 449146 for a dis-
tance of 307.36 feet to the iron pipe, the
PLACE OF BEGINNING. Thence North 03 49'
23" West for a distance of 509.01 feet to an iron
pipe; thence South 89 41' 31" East along the
North line of the lands described in Volume
546, page 323 for a distance of 572.25 feet to an
iron pipe; thence South 03 50' 15" East along
the East line of said Government Lot 2 for a
distance of 328.81 feet; thence South 40 36' 52"
West for a distance of 187.95 feet to an iron
pipe; thence South 48 02' 24" West for a dis-
tance of 192.56 feet to an iron pipe; thence
South 45 05' 30" West for a distance of 195.58
feet to an iron pipe; thence South 32 degrees
59' 52" West for a distance of 180.82 feet to an
iron pipe; thence North 36 07' 51" West along
the East line of the lands described in Volume
10 Certified Survey, page 100 for a distance of
39.69 feet to an iron pipe; thence North 25 42'
16" East along the East line of the lands
described in Document No. 406390 for a dis-
tance of 197.10 feet to an iron pipe; thence
continuing North 25 42' 16" East along the
east line of the land described in Document
No. 449146 for a distance of 75.93 feet; thence
along the south line of a 66 foot wide private
road described in Document No. 449146;
North 39 00' 00" East for a distance of 41.17
feet; thence North 51 00' 00" East for a dis-
tance of 214.15 feet; thence North 25 00' 00"
East for a distance of 265.00 feet; thence
North 51 00' 00" East for a distance of 30.36
feet to an iron pipe on the westerly right-of-
way line of the Town Road known as Hanson
Road; thence along said right-of-way line
North 22 09' 06" West for a distance of 68.96
feet to an iron pipe; thence leaving said Town
Road right-of-way and along the north line of
said 66 foot wide private road described in
Document No. 449146; South 51 00' 00" West
for a distance of 65.58 feet; thence South 25
00' 00" West for a distance of 265.00 feet;
thence South 51 00' 00" West for a distance of
205.85 feet; thence South 39 00' 00" West along
the north line of said lands described in Doc-
ument No. 449146 for a distance of 130.06 feet
to the place of beginning.
Subject to the rights of the public for the
existing Town Road right-of-way which is
located on the above described parcel.
Subject to a perpetual easement for an
existing overhead powerline.
Subject property is vacant land located on
Hanson Road in the Town of Plum Lake,
Vilas County, Wisconsin.
TERMS OF SALE: Cash
DOWN PAYMENT: 10% of amount bid by
certified check.
Dated this 18th day of January, 2012.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich, Sheriff
Vilas County, Wisconsin
John C. Houlihan
Houlihan Law Firm, S.C.
Attorney for Plaintiff
Old Second National Bank
P.O. Box 630
Minocqua, WI 54548
(715) 356-1422
1948
_____________
(Six Weeks, 2/1-3/7/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-42
______________________________________________
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A., SUCCESSOR BY
MERGER TO BAC HOME LOANS SERVIC-
ING, LP, FKA COUNTRYWIDE HOME
LOANS SERVICING LP,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Gerald J. Fassbender a/k/a Jerry Fassbender
and Kathleen Fassbender,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on August
31, 2011 in the amount of $158,218.81 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: March 29, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashier's check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is
sold as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: A parcel of land in the
Southeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter
(SE SW ), Section Thirty-four (34), Town-
ship Forty-three (43) North, Range Nine (9)
East of the Fourth Principal Meridian, Land
O Lakes Township, Vilas County, Wisconsin,
more particularly described as follows: Com-
mencing at the one quarter corner common
to Sections 3 and 34, marked by a 2" iron pipe
witnessed by a 6" Maple bearing S 20 E, 8.1
feet and a 6" Maple bearing S 53W, 28.3 feet;
thence S 88 52'00" W, 428.95 feet to the place
of beginning, marked by a 1" iron pipe.
Thence continuing S 88 52' 00" W, 886.73 feet
along said section line to the one-eighth cor-
ner marked by a 2" iron pipe, witnessed by a
9" Double Oak bearing N 60W, 18.9 feet and
an 11" Maple bearing S 18 E, 13.2 feet; thence
N 0 21' 38" E, 465.31 feet along the west line
of the SE of the SW to a 2" iron pipe on
the southerly right-of-way of Forest Lake
Road; thence along said right-of-way N 48
47' 02" E, 393.00 feet to a 2" iron pipe and N
53 42' 42" E, 94.97 feet to a 1" iron pipe;
thence S 33 50' 15" E, 918.49 feet to the place
of beginning.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 6428 Forest Lake
Rd Land O Lakes, WI 54540-9760
DATED: January 24, 2012
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1955
_____________
(Three Weeks, 2/8-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT, VILAS COUNTY
PROBATE
Notice to Creditors
(Informal Administration)
Case No. 12PR05
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
MARGARET G. OXLEY, DECEASED.
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE:
1. An application for informal administra-
tion was filed.
2. The decedent, with date of birth Decem-
ber 11, 1914 and date of death December 17,
2011, was domiciled in Vilas County, State of
Wisconsin, with a mailing address of Box
285, Phelps, WI 54554.
3. All interested persons waived notice.
4. The deadline for filing a claim against
the decedents estate is May 18, 2012.
5. A claim may be filed at the Vilas County
Courthouse, Eagle River, Wisconsin, Probate
Branch.
/s/ Dawn Halverson
Probate Registrar
February 2, 2012
Justin Oxley
4210 Frontage Road
Amherst, WI 54406
(715) 824-3661
1965
WNAXLP
The Three Lakes School
District will have an informa-
tional meeting for parents of
2012-13 4-year-old kinder-
garten students tonight,
Wednesday, Feb. 8, from 5:30
to 6 p.m. in Room 110 at Three
Lakes Elementary School.
The meeting is for parents
of children turning 4 years old
on or before Sept. 1, 2012. Ear-
ly childhood teacher Debra
Boone will be in attendance.
To register prior to the
meeting, parents can pick up
papers in the elementary
school office.
Parents should take their
child's birth certificate, Social
Security number and immu-
nization information.
Those unable to attend can
call secretary Nicole Maney at
(715) 546-3323 for registra-
tion information.
It is very important that
the school has accurate num-
bers for their kindergarten
programs as soon as possible,
said Maney. An accurate
count will help us prepare the
district budget and project
student-to-teacher ratios.
School sets 4K
meeting tonight
After the move to 1805 Superior Street, Choo
Choo Store owners Janel and Dale Wolke
showed the stores train display containing more
than 300 feet of track. Photo By Jan Hintz
Something reminiscent of
an 18th or 19th century com-
munity barn raising took
place in Three Lakes Jan. 7, as
neighbors and friends came
together to relocate a small-
town business.
Twenty-five volunteers
made up of customers, friends
and family assisted store own-
ers Dale and Janel Wolke as
they moved the Choo Choo
Store two doors west from
1799 to 1805 Superior St.
Dale Wolke said he decided
to open a model train store after
he retired from corporate life
and moved to the North Woods.
I was looking for some-
thing to do, he said. Having
been interested in trains for
over 30 years, and with my
knowledge of the retail busi-
ness, I thought that a train
store would be a perfect fit.
The couple opened the store
two years ago and Dale Wolke
said he never imagined the
business would need a larger
facility so soon.
But with a building lease
soon to expire and the growing
demand of customers wanting
more of an assortment of mer-
chandise, we knew this was
the time to move into a larger
store, he said.
The new 2,500-square-foot
Choo Choo Store features a
model train layout in its cen-
ter for enthusiasts young and
old to enjoy. The arrangement
consists of more than 300 feet
of track with five trains run-
ning simultaneously.
The hobby store specializes
in model trains and acces-
sories, offering an extensive
assortment of everything
needed for model railroading.
Thanks to all our cus-
tomers for their support, said
Dale Wolke. We appreciate all
of the help we were given dur-
ing the relocation.
For more information, call
(715) 546-8036.
Communitywide effort relocates
Choo Choo Store in Three Lakes
STUDENTS OF THE MONTH Three Lakes
Junior High and High School students of the
month for January included, from left, Hailey
Sankey, Michael Wanty, Lacey Tatro, Cassie Mil-
lard and Brooke Mathison. Presenting the stu-
dents was Principal Bill Greb. Missing from the
photo was Aaron Horack.
Contributed Photo
Three Lakes Center for the
Arts in the Northwoods will
host a dessert contest titled
Im Having What She Is Hav-
ing, Saturday, Feb. 11, at 6
p.m. in celebration of Valen-
tines Day.
There is no charge to enter
the contest and entry forms
are available at the gallery on
Superior Street and will be
available at the event.
Entrants should take
approximately 20 pieces of
their dessert for judging and
tasting, along with a copy of
the recipe.
Following the judging, the
theater will show the movie
When Harry Met Sally. The
movie is scheduled to start at
7 p.m.
Center for the Arts
sets dessert contest
Demmer Library will host
Fine Forgiveness for Food dur-
ing the week of Feb. 13-18.
Patrons are welcome to
take at least one nonperish-
able food item in exchange for
up to $5 off overdue fines.
Fines for lost or damaged
items are not eligible for fine
forgiveness. All food collected
will be donated to the Three
Lakes Christian Food Pantry.
For more information, con-
tact the library, located at
6961 W. School St. in Three
Lakes, at demmerlibrary.org
or (715) 546-3391.
Library to forgive
fines for food item
Three Lakes
Senior Citizen
Nutrition Menu
Reservations and cancella-
tions must be made 24 hours
in advance. Phone Angela
Kott witz, site manager, at
(715) 490-2798.
THURSDAY, FEB. 9
Beef chop suey
Brown rice
Stir-fry vegetables
Egg roll
Mandarin oranges
Fortune cookie
MONDAY, FEB. 13
Roast beef
Boiled potatoes and gravy
Cauliflower
Whole-grain roll
Dessert
TUESDAY, FEB. 14
Chili with macaroni
Cheese slice
Corn bread
Mandarin oranges
Strawberry-peach gelatin
dessert
The Three Lakes Womens
Club will hold its annual
Shack Happy Luncheon at
Oneida Village Inn Wednes-
day, Feb. 15, with a social at 11
a.m. and lunch at noon.
The cost for lunch will be
$13.50 with a choice of either
stuffed haddock or stuffed
chicken. Following tradition, a
steal-the-gift game will take
place after lunch. Game par-
ticipants should take a gift
valued at $10. The gift should
be wrapped with the givers
name enclosed.
All members and guests
along with any women inter-
ested in the womens club are
welcome to attend.
Paid reservations are due
by Friday, Feb. 10, and can be
made by calling Carolyn
Eaglesham at (715) 546-3104.
Womens club
plans luncheon
for Feb. 15
20 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
PUBLIC NOTICES
gifford112288@nnex.net
PHELPS
SHARON GIFFORD
(715) 545-4008
2462 ST. LOUIS RD.,
PHELPS, WI 54554
PHELPS SCHOOL POSITION OPEN
PART-TIME TEACHER AIDE
The School District of Phelps is now taking applications for the
position of Special Education Teacher Aide for the 2011-2012 school
year. The part-time opening is for morning hours, 25 hours a week. Send
rsum and letter of application by Wednesday, Feb. 8, 2012, to: Dr. Del-
nice Hill, School District of Phelps, 4451 Old School Road, Phelps, WI
54554. Position open until filled.
The School District of Phelps does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, nation-
al origin, age, ancestry, creed, pregnancy, marital or parental status, sexual orientation or physical,
mental, emotional or learning disability in employment or educational programs or activities. 1952
_____________
(One Week 2/8/12)
REGULAR BOARD MEETING
Monday, December 19, 2011
The regular meeting of the Northland
Pines Board of Education was called to
order by President Jim Mulleady at six
oclock p.m. (6:00 p.m.), on Monday, Decem-
ber 19, 2011, at the Northland Pines High
School in the Large Group Instruction
Room, Eagle River. The Pledge of Allegiance
was recited. Present were Board members:
Jim Mulleady; John Sarama; Mike Sealan-
der; Eric Neff; Holly McCormack; Mark Van-
der Bloomen and Mike Jovanovic. Quorum
was established. Also present were Mike
Richie, District Administrator; Margo Smith,
Business Manager; Scott Foster, Elementary
Principal/Director of Technology; Jim Brew-
er, High School Principal; Josh Tilley, Dean
of Students; Matt Spets, Elementary Princi-
pal; Jackie Coghlan, Middle School Princi-
pal; Maggie Peterson, Director of Pupil Ser-
vices/Instruction; Fritz Crall, Building &
Grounds Supervisor; and Susie Block,
Recording Secretary. There were 42 citizens
in attendance.
Open Meeting Verification Jim Mulleady
stated that the meeting had been duly called
with meeting notices posted at the following
locations:
1. The Northland Pines High School and
Middle School in Eagle River
2. The Northland Pines Elementary
Schools in Eagle River, Land OLakes and St.
Germain
3. The Vilas County Courthouse - Eagle
River
4. The Eagle River City Hall
5. Additional notice has been given:
I. The Vilas County News Review-Eagle
River
II. WERL/WRJO Radio Station-Eagle
River
III. The Rhinelander Daily News-
Rhinelander
IV. WHDG Radio Station-Rhinelander
Approval of Agenda - MOTION by Eric Neff
that the Board approves the agenda as pre-
sented and leaves the order to the discretion
of the Chair. Second by Mike Sealander.
Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Public Participation
Donna Hejtmanek expressed her opposi-
tion to not having a choice regarding the
automatic pay deduction from her paycheck
for Long Term Care.
Ann Hewitt expressed her support of keep-
ing Long Term Care and her opposition of
the new start time and bell schedule.
Mike Reimer expressed his support of
keeping Long Term Care.
Dave Niedfeldt expressed his support of
keeping Long Term Care.
Minutes of Past Meetings MOTION by
Eric Neff that the Board dispenses with the
reading of the Regular Meeting Minutes of
November 28, 2011, and the Board approves
the minutes and closed session minutes as
presented. Second by Mike Sealander. Voice
vote 5-0. Mark Vander Bloomen and Mike
Jovanovic abstained. Motion carried.
Board Committee Reports/Communica-
tions
Staff member of the month Tina
LaBeau. Tina works in food service at the K8
building. She is a very dedicated employee
who constantly goes above and beyond her
job duties. She has a very positive attitude
and is always willing to help her coworkers.
Tina does whatever is necessary to ensure
that things run smoothly and efficiently in
food service. She truly cares about the stu-
dents and wants to make sure they have a
good meal. Tina is a great asset to our dis-
trict and she truly deserves this award!
John Sarama reported the Finance Com-
mittee meeting minutes were distributed in
the board packet.
Jim Mulleady reported the Policy, Cur-
riculum & Education Committee meeting
minutes were distributed in the board pack-
et.
YMCA The Winter/Spring program guide
was included in the electronic board packet.
Mike Richie reported that Matt Schneringer
will attend the Northland Pines regular
board meetings on a quarterly basis to give
updates on the status of the Y.
Administrators Reports - Mike Richie
reported on the following topics:
1. Charter School meeting minutes and site
visits
2. School Board Election: Three candidates
are up for election; Holly McCormack, Town
of Land OLakes; Eric Neff, Town of St. Ger-
main and Town of Newbold; and John Sara-
ma, Member At Large.
3. Union recertification election results
The NPEA union is intact as they had 89 yes
votes.
4. There is a new law for referendum time
requirements which the Board will need to
consider in the future when deciding on ref-
erendum
5. Tuesday January 3rd is the next Vilas
Oneida Board Superintendent meeting at
Norwood Pines in Minocqua; they will be dis-
cussing the WASB resolutions.
6 Reminder January 9th the Board will
hold a Special Board Meeting to work on the
support staff handbook from 6:00 p.m. to 9:00
p.m.
Scott Foster reported on the growth of stu-
dents due to Power Hour.
Matt Spets reported on ERES Signature
Lessons where staff nominates staff for
teaching lessons out of the box. Spets indi-
cated he has already received nine nomina-
tions from staff regarding their peers.
Jim Brewer reported the NPSD Cares Toy
Drive collected gently used donated toys
and gifts and then on a designated day, fam-
ilies who were in need came in to the high
school and went shopping for their children.
We served 50 families and our students
wrapped the gifts, so nearly 150 children will
receive those donated Christmas gifts this
year under their trees.
Josh Tilley reported on the Blood drive
results indicating we may now be eligible for
another $500 Red Cross scholarship.
Jackie Coghlan reported on a new inter-
disciplinary project that Todd Wilfer is
working on which will entail our school for-
est and a logging project.
Maggie Peterson reported on a joint pro-
ject partnering with Nicolet College to devel-
op pre-employment skills in special needs
students that would help them be more suc-
cessful as they transition into the world of
work.
Discussion/Action Items:
Payment of Bills MOTION by John Sara-
ma that the Board approves the payment of
bills according to the summary check regis-
ter as presented in the amount of
$273,998.85. Second by Holly McCormack.
Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Long Term Care MOTION by Jim Mul-
leady that the Board makes Long Term Care
payments and payroll deductions for such a
condition of employment until October 1,
2012. Second by Mark Vander Bloomen. Roll
call vote: Mark Vander Bloomen, yes; Holly
McCormack, no; John Sarama, no; Mike
Sealander, yes; Eric Neff, yes; Mike
Jovanovic, no; Jim Mulleady, yes. Motion
carried.
Jim Mulleady indicated the Board will
have Long Term Care back on the July 2012
regular board meeting agenda and he
repeated that the deadline is October 1, 2012.
Neola legal policy updates - MOTION by
Mike Jovanovic that the Board approves the
Neola legal updates for policies. Second by
John Sarama. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Grievance procedure for support staff and
all other employees - MOTION by Eric Neff
that the Board approves the grievance pro-
cedures as presented for support staff and
all other employees. Second by Mike Sealan-
der. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
66:03 Agreements - MOTION by Mike
Jovanovic that the Board approves the 66:03
agreement with Three Lakes and the 66:03
agreement with Phelps. Second by Eric Neff.
Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Safe Routes to School permission to apply
for grant - MOTION by Holly McCormack
that the Board grants permission to apply
for the Safe Routes to School Grant. Second
by Mike Sealander. Voice vote 7-0. Motion
carried.
Staff Start Time for 2012-2013 and Student
Start Time for 2012-2013 MOTION by Hol-
ly McCormack that the Board approves the
Staff Start Time/Day for 2012-2013 to be 7:30
a.m. to 3:30 p.m. and the Board approves Stu-
dent Start Time/Day for 2012-2013 to be 8:25
a.m. to 3:25 p.m. Second by Mike Sealander.
Roll call vote: Mark Vander Bloomen, yes;
Holly McCormack, yes; John Sarama, yes;
Jim Mulleady, yes; Mike Sealander, yes; Eric
Neff, yes; Mike Jovanovic, yes. Motion car-
ried.
Bell Schedule for 2013-2014 - MOTION by
Holly McCormack that the Board approves
the new bell schedule for 2013-2014 to be the
modified block schedule. Second by Mike
Sealander. Roll call vote: Mark Vander
Bloomen, yes; Holly McCormack, yes; John
Sarama, yes; Jim Mulleady, yes; Mike Sealan-
der, yes; Eric Neff, yes; Mike Jovanovic, yes.
Motion carried.
Wisconsin Association of School Boards
(WASB) Resolutions MOTION by Eric Neff
that the Board grants permission to Mark
Vander Bloomen as the WASB Delegate to
vote on resolutions at the WASB Delegate
Assembly; the Board also grants permission
to John Sarama to act as the WASB Alternate
to vote on resolutions at the WASB Delegate
Assembly if necessary. Second by Mike
Sealander. Voice vote 7-0. Motion carried.
Long Range Planning/Visioning for NPSD
Jim Mulleady mentioned that several mem-
bers have asked that long range planning be
discussed; the Board noted they did some
long term planning tonight with the changes
in start time for staff for 2012-2013 and the
changes to the bell schedule for 2013-2014.
This item will remain on committee meeting
agendas as well.
Co-Curricular Coaching/Advisor positions
This month there were no recommenda-
tions; therefore, no action was needed.
Executive Session MOTION by Jim Mul-
leady that the Board adjourns to executive
session in accordance with Chapter 19, Sub-
Chapter IV, pursuant to s. 19.85(1)(c) of the
Wisconsin Statutes, to discuss administra-
tive contracts:
(c) Considering employment, promotion,
compensation or performance evaluation
data of any public employee over which the
governmental body has jurisdiction or exer-
cises responsibility.
Second by Mike Sealander. Roll call vote:
Mark Vander Bloomen, yes; Holly McCorma-
ck, yes; John Sarama, yes; Jim Mulleady, yes;
Mike Sealander, yes; Eric Neff, yes; Mike
Jovanovic, yes. Motion carried.
Reconvene to Open Session - MOTION by
Mark Vander Bloomen that the Board recon-
venes to open session to take such action as
the Board deems appropriate, following con-
sideration given in executive session. Sec-
ond by John Sarama. Voice vote 7-0. Motion
carried.
Adjournment
MOTION by Eric Neff that the Board
adjourns. Second by Mike Jovanovic. Voice
vote 7-0. Motion carried. The meeting
adjourned at 8:47 p.m.
SPECIAL BOARD MEETING
January 9, 2012
The special meeting of the Northland
Pines Board of Education of Monday, Jan-
uary 9, 2012, was called to order by President
Jim Mulleady at six-o-five p.m. (6:05 p.m.) in
the Large Group Instruction Room located
in the Northland Pines High School, Eagle
River, Wisconsin. The Pledge of Allegiance
was recited. Present were board members:
Mark Vander Bloomen; Holly McCormack;
John Sarama; Jim Mulleady; Mike Sealan-
der; Eric Neff; and Mike Jovanovic. Quorum
was established. Also present were Mike
Richie, District Administrator; Scott Foster,
Elementary Principal/Director of Technolo-
gy; Dave Bohnen & Fritz Crall, Building &
Grounds Supervisors; and Susie Block,
Recording Secretary. There were approxi-
mately 14 citizens in attendance.
Open Meeting Verification
Jim Mulleady stated that the meeting had
been duly called with meeting notices posted
at the following locations:
1. The Northland Pines High School and
Middle School in Eagle River
2. The Northland Pines Elementary
Schools in Eagle River, Land OLakes and St.
Germain
3. The Vilas County Courthouse - Eagle
River
4. The Eagle River City Hall
5. Additional notice has been given:
I. The Vilas County News Review-Eagle
River
II. WERL/WRJO Radio Station-Eagle
River
III. The Rhinelander Daily News-
Rhinelander
IV. WHDG Radio Station-Rhinelander
Approval of Agenda
MOTION by Mike Sealander that the
Board approves the agenda as presented.
Second by Mike Jovanovic. Voice vote 7-0.
Motion carried.
At this point, Jim Mulleady recused him-
self from the rest of the meeting and turned
the meeting over to Mike Sealander, Vice
President. Jim Mulleady left the meeting.
Discussion Item: Employment Handbook
for Support Staff
The Board went through page by page and
discussed the language of the first draft of
an employment handbook for support staff.
The Board listened to support staff input. No
action was taken.
Executive Session: MOTION by Mike
Sealander that the Board adjourns to execu-
tive session in accordance with Chapter 19,
Sub-Chapter IV, pursuant to s. 19.85(1)(c)(e)
of the Wisconsin Statutes, to discuss Total
Base Wages for staff:
(c) Considering employment, promotion,
compensation or performance evaluation
data of any public employee over which the
governmental body has jurisdiction or exer-
cises responsibility.
(e) Deliberating or negotiating the pur-
chasing of public properties, the investing of
public funds, or conducting other specified
public business, whenever competitive or
bargaining reasons require a closed session.
Second by Mike Jovanovic. Roll call vote:
Mark Vander Bloomen, yes; Holly McCorma-
ck, yes; John Sarama, yes; Mike Sealander,
yes; Eric Neff, yes; Mike Jovanovic, yes.
Motion carried.
Reconvene to Open Session: MOTION by
John Sarama that the Board reconvenes to
open session to take such action as the
Board deems appropriate, following consid-
eration given in executive session. Second by
Mike Jovanovic. Voice vote 6-0. Motion car-
ried.
NEST I and NEST II Total Base Wage
increase
MOTION by John Sarama that the District
increases pay to NEST I and NEST II by .8%
for the term of January 1, 2012 to June 30,
2012. Second by Mike Jovanovic. Roll call
vote: Mike Jovanovic, yes; Holly McCormack,
yes; Eric Neff, yes; Mike Sealander, yes; John
Sarama, yes; Mark Vander Bloomen, yes.
Motion carried.
Adjournment
MOTION by Eric Neff that the Board
adjourns. Second by Mike Jovanovic. Voice
vote 6-0. Motion carried. The meeting
adjourned at 9:36 p.m.
1961
_____________
(Three Weeks, 1/25-2/8/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
PROBATE
Order Setting Deadline
for Filing a Claim
(Formal Administration)
Case No. 12PR03
IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF
CARL J. OBERLANDER. A petition for for-
mal administration has been filed.
THE COURT FINDS:
1. The decedent, with date of birth June 27,
1924 and date of death December 25, 2011,
was domiciled in Vilas County, State of Wis-
consin, with a mailing address of 5243 High-
way 70 West, Eagle River, WI 54521.
2. All interested person(s) waived notice.
THE COURT ORDERS:
1. The deadline for filing a claim against
the decedents estate is May 4, 2012.
2. A claim must be filed at the Vilas County
Courthouse, 330 Court St., Eagle River, Wis-
consin, Room Probate Branch.
BY THE COURT:
/s/ Neal A. Nielsen III
Circuit Court Judge
January 18, 2012
Attorney Steven C. Garbowicz
P.O. Box 639
Eagle River, WI 54521
(715) 479-6444
Bar number 1018485
1947
WNAXLP
ELEANOR
ELLIS
PUBLIC
LIBRARY
PHELPS, WI 54554
Eleanor Ellis Public Library
will host a movie afternoon
Wednesday, Feb. 8, at 2 p.m.
featuring the movie Anony-
mous, rated PG-13 and star-
ring Vanessa Redgrave.
According to the movie syn-
opsis, Anonymous is a politi-
cal thriller advancing the theo-
ry that it was in fact Edward
De Vere, earl of Oxford, who
penned Shakespeares plays.
The showing will feature free
admission, popcorn and coffee.
New adult fiction releases
include: File M for Murder
by Miranda, Lucky Penny by
Anderson, Buried in a Book
by Arlington, Summer Gar-
den by Woods, Catch Me by
Gardner, Left for Dead by
Jance, Weird Sisters by
Brown, Breakdown by Paret-
sky, Copper Beach by
Krentz, Defending Jacob by
Landay, Fear Index by Har-
ris, Gun Games by Keller-
man, Home Front by Han-
nah, How It All Began by
Lively, Raylan by Leonard
and Getting Lucky by Brod.
New movie releases
include: Chateau Meroux,
Drive, Treasure Buddies,
Big Year, In Time, Double,
Novel Romance, Dream
House, Chalet Girl, Dog
Jack, Warriors Heart, Fire-
flies in the Garden, Anony-
mous and The Rebound.
Library hours are Mon-
days, Tuesdays, Thursdays
and Fridays 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.,
Wednesdays 2 to 6 p.m. and
Saturdays 10 a.m. to noon.
Call (715) 545-2887 or visit
phelps.wislib.org for more
information.
The Phelps School District
will host Child Development
Day for kindergarten and 4-
year-old kindergarten (4K)
registration Friday, Feb. 24.
Ki ndergarten students
must be 5 years old and 4K
students must be 4 years old
before Sept. 1 to register.
Parents should take a birth
certificate, immunization
record and Social Security
card for their children.
Those who havent received
a letter from the school dis-
trict with a screening date and
time can call the school at
(715) 545-2724.
Rennes Lillian Kerr
Healthcare Center in Phelps
recently announced it has
rooms available for committee
meetings and family events.
For more information, call
administrator Pete Leer at
(715) 545-3984 or pete@ren-
nesgroup.com.
Meeting rooms
ready at Rennes
SNOW SCULPTURES
Students of the Phelps
School District recently
participated in their annual
snow sculpture contest,
creating a wide variety of
snow-based figures. The
freshman class (above)
created a brightly colored
alien for their entry, while
girls from the junior class
(right) fabricated the rec-
ognizable Disney icon
Nemo, the clownfish pro-
tagonist from the 2003
movie Finding Nemo.
Photos By
Sharon Gifford
CHILI COOKOFF Lillian Kerr Healthcare Center by Rennes
employees recently sponsored a chili cookoff for residents. Res-
ident Dorie Sullivan, front, sampled the chili with her son, Bob
Mandyk, and daughter-in-law, Dorothy Mandyk. The winner of
the contest was employee Tamara Pluess.
Photo By Sharon Gifford
Phelps Senior
Citizen Nutrition
Center Menu
Lillian Kerr
Healthcare Center
by Rennes
Meals for seniors (60+) are
served Mondays and Fridays
at noon. Suggested donation is
$4. Make reservations 24
hours in advance to Sandy
Mutter at (715) 545-3983.
Home-delivered meals avail -
able, based on eligibility.
MONDAY, FEB. 13
Meatloaf
Mashed potatoes
with gravy
Corn
Chocolate cake
FRIDAY, FEB. 17
Baked chicken
Green beans
Rye bread
Brownies
PUBLIC NOTICES
Registration set
at Phelps school
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/18-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11 CV 232
(Civil 30404)
______________________________________________
HEADWATERS STATE BANK,
Plaintiff,
vs.
WILLIAM B. FASSBENDER
and
MARSHFIELD CLINIC,
Defendant.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a judgment of
foreclosure filed on September 1, 2011, I will
sell at public auction on the front steps of the
Vilas County Courthouse, 330 Court Street,
in the City of Eagle River, in said county, on:
DATE: March 8, 2012
TIME: 2:00 p.m.
all of the following described mortgaged
premises, to wit:
A parcel of land in the Southeast Quarter
of the Southwest Quarter (SE
1
/4 SW
1
/4), Sec-
tion Thirty-four (34), Township Forty-three
(43) North, Range Nine (9) East of the Fourth
Principal Meridian, Land 0' Lakes Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, previously
described in Volume 352 Micro Records, page
577, more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the one quarter corner
common to Sections 3 and 34, marked by a 2"
iron pipe, witnessed by a 6" Maple bearing S
20 E, 8.1 feet and a 6" Maple bearing S 53 W,
28.3 feet; thence S 88 52' 00" W, 428.95 feet
along the section line common to Sections 3
and 34 to a 1" iron pipe; thence N 4 16' 04" W,
400.00 feet to the PLACE OF BEGINNING,
marked by a 1" iron pipe; thence continuing
N 4 16' 04" W, 350.00 feet to a 1" iron pipe;
thence N 88 48' 36" E, 321.79 feet to a 1" iron
pipe on the arc of a curve of County Highway
"B"; thence 271.80 feet along the arc of a
curve of said right-of-way, concave North-
easterly having a radius of 1247.41 feet, the
chord of which bears S 37 52' 58.5" E, 271.26
feet to a 2" iron pipe on the East line of the
SE
1
/4 of the SW
1
/4; thence S 0 23' 18" W,
132.03 feet along said East line to a 1" iron
pipe; thence S 88 48' 35" W, 461.45 feet to the
place of beginning.
Subject to an easement, 20 feet in width,
over the existing road for the purpose of
ingress and egress to the parcel to the South
and to any restrictions or reservations of
record or of use and to a perpetual easement
for public utilities.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 6221 County Road
B, Land OLakes
TERMS OF SALE: Cash, with a minimum
deposit for down payment of not less than
$10,000, required at the time of Sheriffs sale
by, cash, money order, Cashiers Check or
certified check made payable to the Clerk of
Circuit Court, and the balance of the sale
price to be paid upon confirmation of sale by
the Court. This property to be sold AS IS
and subject to any and all delinquent real
estate taxes, plus accrued interest, and real
estate taxes for the year of sale, and any spe-
cial assessments, if any. Purchaser to pay
transfer return fee.
Frank Tomlanovich
Vilas County Sheriff
OBrien, Anderson, Burgy,
& Garbowicz, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
PO Box 639
Eagle River, WI 54521
Pursuant to the Fair Debt Collection Prac-
tice Act (15 U.S.C. Section 1692), we are
required to state that we are attempting to
collect a debt on our clients behalf and any
information we obtain will be used for that
purpose.
1938
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/18-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-243
______________________________________________
CitiMortgage, Inc., successor by merger to
ABN AMRO Mortgage Group, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
Merry Lee Lachance a/k/a Merry Lee John-
stone a/k/a Merry Lee La Chance, M & I Mar-
shall & Ilsley Bank a/k/a n/k/a BMO Harris
Bank, National Association, Eagle River
Memorial Hospital Inc., Gastrointestinal
Associates and US Bank NA ND,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on August
31, 2011 in the amount of $154,402.46 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: March 15, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashier's check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashier's check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the court's confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is
sold as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: Lot 39 of the recorded Plat
of Forest Lake, as the same appears of record
in Volume 5 of Plats, Page 28, being a part of
Government Lots 2 & 3, Section 3, Township
42 North, Range 9 East, Land OLakes Town-
ship, Vilas County, Wisconsin.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 6283 E Forest Lake
Rd Land O Lakes, WI 54540-9789
DATED: January 3, 2012
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain the
bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to col-
lect a debt and any information obtained will
be used for that purpose. If you have previ-
ously received a discharge in a chapter 7
bankruptcy case, this communication should
not be construed as an attempt to hold you
personally liable for the debt.
1931
_____________
(Six Weeks, 2/8-3/14/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11-CV-211
Classification (code: 30404)
______________________________________________
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY
NORTHWOODS WISCONSIN, INC.
P.O. Box 552
Minocqua, WI 54548,
Plaintiff,
v.
DANI MOREN
11383 Glyn Road
Arbor Vitae, WI 54568
-and-
ASSOCIATED BANK NA
1305 Main Street
Stevens Point, WI 54481,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
By virtue of and pursuant to a Judgment of
Foreclosure entered in the above-entitled
action on August 31, 2011, I will sell at public
auction on the front steps of the Vilas Coun-
ty Courthouse, 330 Court Street, in the City
of Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin, on:
THURSDAY, MARCH 22, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
the following described mortgaged premises,
to wit:
Lot Thirty-eight (38) in the IN-WOOD-TEE-
ESTATES, said Plat being in the Southeast
Quarter of Section Twenty-seven, Township
Forty North, Range Six East of the Fourth
Principal Meridian, Arbor Vitae Township,
Vilas County, Wisconsin, as the same appears
of record in Volume 9 Plats, page 8.
Address of property: 11383 Glyn Road
Arbor Vitae, WI
TERMS OF SALE: Cash DOWN PAYMENT:
10% of amount bid by Certified check.
Dated this 31st day of January, 2012.
/s/ Frank Tomlanovich, Sheriff
Vilas County, Wisconsin
John C. Houlihan
Houlihan Law Firm, S.C.
Attorney for Plaintiff, Habitat for Humanity,
Northwoods Wisconsin
P.O. Box 630
Minocqua, WI 54548
(715) 356-1422
1964
WNAXLP
Rivers to the
People

_____________
Remember not only to say
the right thing in the right
place, but far more difficult
still, to leave unsaid the
wrong thing at the tempting
moment.
Benjamin Franklin
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 21
PUBLIC NOTICES
jilliebabes@yahoo.com
LAND O LAKES
JILL JAMES
(715) 547-3930
4540 EVERGREEN DR.,
LAND O LAKES, WI 54540
Conover Lions Club 53
RD
Annual
Welnetz Chiropractic
Northern Carpets
Northern Waters Angling
& Archery
Derecks Carpentry Services
Vilas County News-Review
Headwaters State Bank
Land O Lakes, Presque Isle
Spence Heating
& Repair, LLC

WINTER FROLIC
Conover Town Park
(Take Hwy. K East
off Hwy. 45 North)
FUN FOR EVERYONE
Uphill towing by Sno-Buddies groomer.
Sunday, Feb. 12, 2012
11 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Downhill Sled, Toboggan, Tube & Saucer Races
begin at 1 p.m.
Raffles Prizes for Each Age Category
Food & Refreshments at Indoor Shelter
Everyone in the area is invited to attend.
THANKS TO THE FOLLOWING BUSINESSES WHICH PAID FOR THIS AD
_____________
(Six Weeks, 2/8-3/14/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 11 CV 148
______________________________________________
BAC HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
JAMES A. RUX, et al,
Defendant(s).
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on July 7,
2011, in the amount of $120,530.27 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: March 29, 2012 at 02:00 p.m.
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to
plaintiff. 2. Sold as is and subject to all
legal liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River,
Wisconsin 54521
DESCRIPTION: A PARCEL OF LAND IN
THE NORTHWEST QUARTER OF THE
SOUTHWEST QUARTER (NW 1/4 SW 1/4),
SECTION THIRTY-TWO (32), TOWNSHIP
FORTY-ONE (41) NORTH, RANGE EIGHT (8)
EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL MERID-
IAN, PLUM LAKE TOWNSHIP, VILAS COUN-
TY, WISCONSIN, MORE PARTICULARLY
DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: COMMENCING
AT THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF THE NW
1/4 OF THE SW 1/4 OF SAID SECTION 32,
TOWNSHIP 41 NORTH, RANGE 8 EAST,
MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE; THENCE N 89
30' 00" W ALONG THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4, FOR A DISTANCE OF
660.13 FEET; THENCE N 01 11' 00" E FOR A
DISTANCE OF 22.66 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE
ON THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE
OF COUNTY HIGHWAY N; THE PLACE OF
BEGINNING. THENCE CONTINUING N 01
11' 00" E FOR A DISTANCE OF 277.34 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE N 89 30' 00" W
PARALLEL WITH THE SOUTH LINE OF THE
NW 1/4 OF THE SW 1/4, FOR A DISTANCE OF
210.97 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE ON THE
EASTERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY LINE OF STATE
HIGHWAY 155; THENCE ALONG AN ARC
OF A CURVE TO THE LEFT WITH AN ARC
LENGTH OF 281.41 FEET AND THE CHORD
BEARING S 08 03' 06" E FOR A DISTANCE
OF 280.69 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE AT THE
INTERSECTION OF THE EASTERLY RIGHT-
OF-WAY LINE OF STATE HIGHWAY 155
AND THE NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF COUNTY HIGHWAY "N", THENCE
ALONG SAID NORTHERLY RIGHT-OF-WAY
LINE OF COUNTY HIGHWAY N, S 89 35'
19" E FOR A DISTANCE OF 165.93 FEET TO
THE PLACE OF BEGINNING.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 218 Main Street,
Sayner, WI 54560
TAX KEY NO.: 20-617
Dustin A McMahon
State Bar # 1086857
Blommer Peterman, S.C.
165 Bishops Way, Suite 100
Brookfield, WI 53005
262-790-5719
Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com
to obtain the bid for this sale.
Blommer Peterman, S.C. is the creditors
attorney and is attempting to collect a debt
on its behalf.
Any information obtained will be used for
the purpose.
283226
1963
(Six Weeks, 1/11-2/15/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 10-CV-3
______________________________________________
Bank of America, N.A., successor by merger
to BAC Home Loans Servicing, LP, FKA
Countrywide Home Servicing LP
Plaintiff,
vs.
Mark J. Vander-Bloomen, Kara M. Vander-
Bloomen and M&I Marshall & Ilsley Bank
Defendants.
______________________________________________
ADJOURNED NOTICE OF
FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on April 1,
2010 in the amount of $155,067.32 the Sheriff
will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
ORIGINAL TIME: December 29, 2011 at
2:00 p.m.
ADJOURNED TIME: March 1, 2012 at 2:00
p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashiers check or certi-
fied funds, payable to the clerk of courts
(personal checks cannot and will not be
accepted). The balance of the successful bid
must be paid to the clerk of courts in cash,
cashiers check or certified funds no later
than ten days after the courts confirmation
of the sale or else the 10% down payment is
forfeited to the plaintiff. The property is
sold as is and subject to all liens and encum-
brances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: A PARCEL OF LAND
BEING A PART OF THE NORTHWEST
QUARTER OF THE NORTHEAST QUARTER
(NW
1
4 NE
1
4), SECTION TWENTY-ONE (21),
TOWNSHIP FORTY-ONE (41), RANGE TEN
(10) EAST OF THE FOURTH PRINCIPAL
MERIDIAN, CONOVER TOWNSHIP, VILAS
COUNTY, WISCONSIN, DESCRIBED AS
FOLLOWS: COMMENCING AT THE NORTH-
WEST CORNER OF SAID NW
1
4 NB
1
4,
THENCE N 89 27' 19" E, A DISTANCE OF
700.0 FEET ALONG THE NORTH LINE OF
SAID SECTION 21, THENCE S 0 14' 27" W, A
DISTANCE OF 23.0 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE
AND THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. THENCE
S 0 14' 27" W, A DISTANCE OF 660.80 FEET
TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE N 89 36' 27" E,
A DISTANCE OF 300.0 FEET TO AN IRON
PIPE, THENCE N 0 14' 27" E, A DISTANCE
OF 661.59 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE, THENCE
S 89 27' 19" W, DISTANCE OF 300.0 FEET
AND THE PLACE OF BEGINNING. SUB-
JECT TO A 25 FOOT EASEMENT ROAD
PURPOSES OVER THE SOUTH BOUNDARY
OF PROPERTY HEREIN DESCRIBED FOR
INGRESS AND EGRESS TO ADJOINING
LOTS.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 4715 Church Rd
Conover, WI 54519-9202
DATED: December 23, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Please go to www.gray-law.com to obtain
the bid for this sale.
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to
collect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1923
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/11-2/15/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case Number 11 CV 214
______________________________________________
BANK OF AMERICA, N.A. AS
SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO BAC
HOME LOANS SERVICING, L.P.,
Plaintiff,
vs.
SANDRA L. BEHRIE-LIEBSCHER AKA
SANDRA L. BEHRLE-LIEBSCHER, et al.
Defendant(s).
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF SHERIFFS SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on Septem-
ber 1, 2011, in the amount of $51,028.98 the
Sheriff will sell the described premises at
public auction as follows:
TIME: March 1, 2012 at 02:00 PM
TERMS: 1. 10% down in cash or money
order at the time of sale; balance due within
10 days of confirmation of sale; failure to pay
balance due will result in forfeit of deposit to
plaintiff. 2. Sold as is and subject to all
legal liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: at 330 Court Street, Eagle River,
Wisconsin 54521
DESCRIPTION: Lot 9, Block 7 of the Plat
of Racine Community Beach, said plat being
located in the Northeast
1
4 of the Northwest
1
4, Section 8, Township 42 North, Range 11
East, Phelps Township, Vilas County, Wiscon-
sin.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 6084 Thompson
Road f/k/a 1906 Thompson Road, Phelps, WI
54554
TAX KEY NO.: 18-802
Dustin A McMahon
State Bar # 1086857
Blommer Peterman, S.C.
165 Bishops Way, Suite 100
Brookfield, WI 53005
262-790-5719
Please go to www.blommerpeterman.com
to obtain the bid for this sale. Blommer
Peterman, S.C. is the creditor's attorney and
is attempting to collect a debt on its behalf.
Any information obtained will be used for
the purpose.
281994
1927
_____________
(Six Weeks, 1/18-2/22/12)
STATE OF WISCONSIN
CIRCUIT COURT VILAS COUNTY
Case No. 2011-CV-139
Code: 30404 - Foreclosure
______________________________________________
SunTrust Mortgage, Inc.,
Plaintiff,
v.
Jay S. Cayo, Jane Doe Cayo and Eagle River
Memorial Hospital Inc.,
Defendants.
______________________________________________
NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE
______________________________________________
PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that by virtue of a
judgment of foreclosure entered on August
24, 2011 in the amount of $77,721.58 the Sher-
iff will sell the described premises at public
auction as follows:
TIME: March 8, 2012 at 2:00 p.m.
TERMS: Pursuant to said judgment, 10% of
the successful bid must be paid to the sheriff
at the sale in cash, cashier's check or certified
funds, payable to the clerk of courts (person-
al checks cannot and will not be accepted).
The balance of the successful bid must be
paid to the clerk of courts in cash, cashier's
check or certified funds no later than ten
days after the court's confirmation of the sale
or else the 10% down payment is forfeited to
the plaintiff. The property is sold as is and
subject to all liens and encumbrances.
PLACE: On the front steps of the Vilas
County Courthouse, Eagle River
DESCRIPTION: Lot Seven (7) Block One
(1) of Tamblings Addition to the Village (now
City) of Eagle River, said Addition being a
part of Government Lot Six (6), Section
Twenty-eight (28), Township Forty (40)
North, Range Ten (10) East, in the City of
Eagle River, Vilas County, Wisconsin, as the
same appears of record in Volume 1 of Plats,
page 8.
PROPERTY ADDRESS: 337A-337B River
St Eagle River, WI 54521-8111
DATED: December 28, 2011
Gray & Associates, L.L.P.
Attorneys for Plaintiff
16345 West Glendale Drive
New Berlin, WI 53151-2841
(414) 224-8404
Gray & Associates, L.L.P. is attempting to col-
lect a debt and any information obtained
will be used for that purpose. If you have
previously received a discharge in a chapter
7 bankruptcy case, this communication
should not be construed as an attempt to
hold you personally liable for the debt.
1932
WNAXLP
CANS FOR CANINES The Three Bear Sled
Dog Races and Games Committee will host
Cans for Canines at their event slated Saturday
and Sunday, Feb. 11-12 on the town hall grounds
in Land O Lakes. Donations of dry dog food,
rawhide toys, leashes and more will be accepted
to benefit the Humane Society of Vilas County in
a receptacle that will be located near the games
arena. The effort will be coordinated with the help
of Three Bear Chairman Pete Schindelholz, left,
Cans for Canines organizer Jack Sarama and
director of the Humane Society Jennifer Primich.
Contributed Photo
Land O Lakes Area Arti-
sans Inc. (LOLA) has
announced two upcoming
events at its LOLA Center for
the Arts, located at 4262 High-
way B in downtown Land O
Lakes.
A dramatization by Fred
Lippert, He Knew Lincoln,
will be performed Friday, Feb.
17, from 4 to 5 p.m.
Written in 1907 by Ida M.
Tarbell, it is the story of Billy
Brown, a mercantile propri-
etor who knew and befriended
Abraham Lincoln in Spring-
field, Ill., prior to Lincoln
becoming president.
Lippert, a retired United
Methodist pastor, lives in
Land O Lakes. This will be his
second time at the LOLA cen-
ter.
This event will be free of
charge and suitable for all
ages.
A DVD lecture on the
Impressionists given by
Richard Brettell, professor at
the University of Texas at Dal-
las will be presented Satur-
day, Feb. 18, from 11 a.m. to
noon.
A discussion on the artists
and a free chili lunch will fol-
low the lecture.
Artist Shirley Battin will
introduce these short lectures
given by Brettell.
The Great Courses DVD
series on art history is part of
LOLAs new art resource cen-
ter.
Hailed by the Wall Street
Journal as a serious force in
American education. Profes-
sor Brettell is the Margaret
McDermott Distinguished
Professor of Art and Aesthet-
ics at the University of Texas
at Dallas and the former
McDermott director of the
Dallas Museum of Art.
Participants should regis-
ter for this free event by Sat-
urday, Feb. 11, by calling
Wendy at (715) 547-3950.
LOLA has been given many
fine art books to share. The
books are available in LOLAs
new art resource center.
Selections on art history
and how-to books in many
forms of media are available.
The complete DVD set of The
Great Courses series on art
history also will be available.
Books and DVDs will be
available to check out for a
two-week period, or may be
viewed in the art room.
Current hours for LOLA
Center for the Arts are
Wednesdays through Satur-
days from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For more information, visit
lolaartswi.com or call Wendy
at (715) 547-3950.
Land O Lakes Area Artisans
announce events, add resources
Hope Lutheran Church will
sponsor Soup Sunday, Feb. 19,
following the 9:30 a.m. wor-
ship service at the church,
located on Highway 45 in
Land O Lakes.
Soup, bread, crackers, cof-
fee and dessert will be served
free of charge.
To make a reservation, con-
tact Cheryl at (715) 781-5794
or Arlene at (715) 479-5915.
_____________
Creative power, is that
receptive attitude of expectan-
cy which makes a mold into
which the plastic and as yet
undifferentiated substance
can flow and take the desired
form.
Thomas Troward
Church to host
Soup Sunday event
Land O Lakes
Senior Citizen
Nutrition Menu
Meals for seniors 60 and
older are available Thursdays
and Fridays at State Line
Restaurant, 4072 Highway B.
Meals are served at 11:30 a.m.
Home-delivered meals are
available based on eligibility.
While there is no set fee for a
meal, donations will be accept-
ed. No one will be denied ser-
vice because of inability to pay.
Suggested donation is $4.
For reservations, contact
Kathy Niesen, site manager,
24 hours in advance at (715)
547-6071.
THURSDAY, FEB. 16
Spaghetti and meatballs
Salad
Cheesecake
FRIDAY, FEB. 17
Chicken fingers
Oven fries
Coleslaw
Apple crisp
All meals served wit
fat-free milk, bread or rolls
and margarine.
Land O Lakes Public Library
P.O. Box 450 715-547-6006
The Land O Lakes Public
Library will feature the movie
Sarahs Key Friday, Feb. 10,
at 1 p.m. at the library, locat-
ed on Highway B in Land O
Lakes.
Free popcorn and coffee
will be available.
JANET GARLING
(715) 479-9265 janetgarling@yahoo.com
CONOVER
COOK-OFF WINNERS The Conover Sno-
Buddies snowmobile club recently held its annu-
al chili cook off at Buck Shots Saloon in Eagle
River. Winners included, from left, Sandie Hunt,
third place; Jeri Voltz, first place; Marilyn and Jeff
Hilliard, second place; and honorable mention
went to Bill Hunt. Proceeds from the event will be
used for trail maintenance.
Photo By Janet Garling
The 18th annual Great
Northern Jerk-off will be held
Saturday, Feb. 18, at Club 45 in
Conover. Registration will be
held from 5:30 to 6:30 p.m. with
judging beginning at 7 p.m.
Proceeds from the event
will be donated to Warm The
Children.
Participants must follow the
rules and regulations below.
All jerky must be prepared
by the participants. No com-
mercial brands or professional
entries will be allowed.
Jerky will be judged in two
categories: jerky made from
beef or venison, or jerky made
from fowl or miscellaneous
wild game.
Contestants will need to
take 20 to 30 small, bite-sized
pieces for judging.
Entrants will be assigned
entry numbers by way of lot-
tery drawing prior to the judg-
ing. Each entry will be
assigned a separate number.
Contestants may enter up to
two entries for a one-time fee of
$10. Each contestant is allowed
to win a single placement.
Judges will be local community
leaders, business- people and
sponsor representatives. Judges
will award 10 points for first
choices and five points for sec-
ond choices. Total points
received will determine the
winners.
For more information, con-
tact Club 45 at (715) 547-3571
or club45conover@yahoo.com.
Great Northern Jerk-off
slated Feb. 18 in Conover
The town of Conover has
issued a reminder to residents
and snowplow contractors that
snow is not to be pushed from a
driveway to or across a road.
According to Conover Town
Clerk/Treasurer James Hed-
berg, pushing snow from a
driveway to the opposite side
of a road or leaving a block of
snow on a road is a violation of
Wisconsin Statutes 86.01 and
346.94(5) which prohibit any-
one from leaving materials,
(including snow) in the travel
portion of any highway.
Hedberg noted that the
statutes state that it is further
unlawful to place or cause to
be placed upon a highway any
substance (including snow)
which is or may be injurious to
any vehicle.
Snow removal
reminder issued
Plenty of snow
for snowshoeing
While there is only a foot of snow on the ground in much of
Vilas and Oneida counties, there is still plenty of powder
for snowshoeing. Outdoor enthusiasts can break their own
trail on a logging road or try a marked trail, including the
new Tara Lila nature trail just south of Eagle River.
--Staff Photo By GARY RIDDERBUSCH
EDITORIALOPINION/COMMENTARY
22 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012
PRINTED
ON
RECYCLED
PAPER
SINCE 1985
Eagle River Vindicator Established 1886
Eagle River Review 1890 ~ Vilas County News 1892
VILAS
COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW
M
EMBER
Published weekly by Eagle River Publications, Inc., P.O. Box 1929, 425 W. Mill Street at
Eagle River, Wisconsin 54521 e-mail: erpub@nnex.net www.vcnewsreview.com
Member of the Wisconsin Newspaper Association and the National Newspaper Association
Publisher KURT KRUEGER
Editor GARY RIDDERBUSCH
Assistant Editor ANTHONY DREW
Lifestyle Editor MARIANNE ASHTON
Production Manager JEAN DREW
Assistant Production Manager ELIZABETH BLEICHER
Photo Technician SHARINAADAMS
Production Technician CARLY RATLIFF
Proofreader JEAN FITZPATRICK
Circulation Manager ELIZABETH SCHMIDT
Accounting Manager TERRY POSTO
Advertising Consultants MARY JO ADAMOVICH
DIANE GLEASON
MARCIA HEYER
MADELINE MATHISEN
JULIE SCHIDDEL
WHAT WOULD OUR lives
be like without challenges?
What we do when confront-
ed with these challenges has a
lot to do with how we perceive
our place in this world. We can
face the challenges or we can
give in to them without a fight.
Most challenges provide us
with opportunities. Opportuni-
ties can be disguised as hard
work and be fraught with
obstacles.
An old story tells about a
king who placed a heavy stone
in the middle of a much-trav-
eled road. Many who came by
berated the authorities for not
keeping the road clear, but no
one pushed the obstacle out of
the way.
After a time, a poor peasant
stopped and rolled the stone to
the side of the road. It only
took a few minutes and was
easily accomplished. Most any-
one could have done it.
To his surprise, he found a
bag of gold, a reward put there
by the king for anyone per-
forming this needed service.
A new look at our lives, our
jobs and our communities will
disclose many stones in the
road.
Their removal requires per-
sonal involvement by caring
people.
Many able people will avoid
getting involved. They will not
recognize the opportunity.
They will let others do the
work. And they will envy
those who reap the rewards
when the needed work is
accomplished.
Which stones can we put
our shoulders to in the days
ahead? Some stones (chal-
lenges) cant be moved by just
one person. Thats where team-
work comes into play.
* * *
SOME OF THE most inter-
esting and educational shows
on television can be found on
the Discovery Channel, the
History Channel and the Sci-
ence Channel. I find offerings
like Modern Marvels, Facto-
ry Made and How Its Made
absolutely fascinating.
Last weekend the Science
Channel, 284 on DirecTV, had
a marathon of How Its Made
shows that presented its entire
230 episodes of the documen-
tary-style programs. Each half-
hour episode has three or four
tightly edited segments.
The program bills itself as
the smartest damn show on
TV. They show everyday
items, popular food products,
industrial products, musical
instruments and sporting
goods are manufactured.
Products we all take for
granted often are the result of
very interesting manufactur-
ing techniques.
Watch a few episodes and
you may be amazed at how
manufacturers use computer-
operated robots, intricate con-
veyor systems, punch presses,
assembly lines, extruders,
laser-guided cutters and
welders, and other forms of
automation to produce prod-
ucts at high rates of speed. A
product might need to be sub-
jected to intense heat one
minute, extreme cold another
minute and a baking process
timed to the second.
The show also features
incredible artistic skills and
craftsmanship of our fellow
Americans. Id bet most of us
have no idea how common
everyday products are manu-
factured.
It can be a combination of
science, chemistry, engineering
brilliance, automation and
good old Yankee ingenuity.
Some product recipes have
been handed down for decades
and generations.
When you watch these
shows, youll wonder why peo-
ple can solve manufacturing
mysteries, but cant seem to
solve our economic, social and
financial problems.
* * *
LIFE IS FULL of mysteries
and questions that dont seem
to have a logical answer. What
are your thoughts about these
observations?
1. Why do people try to car-
ry 10 plastic grocery bags into
the house from the car instead
of making two trips?
2. What would happen if I
hired two private investigators
to follow each other?
3. I cant remember the last
time I wasnt at least kind of
tired.
4. I find it hard to believe
there are actually people who
get in the shower first and
then turn on the water!
5. In todays social media
world, I think part of a best
friends job should be to imme-
diately clear your computer
history if you die unexpectedly.
6. I think MapQuest really
needs to start their directions
on number five. Im pretty sure
I know how to get out of my
neighborhood.
7. I think obituaries would
be a lot more interesting if
they told you how the person
died.
8. Have you noticed bad
decisions make great stories?
9. We all need a
break can we all just agree
Some opportunities come cleverly disguised
People Make the Difference
By Byron McNutt
FOR THOSE OF us who
spend as much time as possi-
ble in the great outdoors,
there is always the knowl-
edge that there is risk in
what we do, however slight
that risk may be.
Last weekend an unfortu-
nate fall by a skier at Razor-
back Ridges resulted in a bro-
ken leg and a reminder that,
yes, it may not be great nor
something you give much
thought to, but risk nonethe-
less is a part of outdoor recre-
ation.
I got a call late Saturday
morning from Kevin Ras-
mussen, chief of the Plum
Lake Emergency Medical
Services, that they were on
their way and could I help
get them to the right place on
the trail? In minutes, I had
our groomer fired up and
with one emergency medical
technician (EMT) in the cab
and two more riding on the
drag behind, we were on our
way.
Before we got there, the St.
Germain rescue squad caught
up to us pulling their rescue
sled, which would be used for
transport.
I did a little double take
when we pulled up to where
the skier had fallen. It turned
out the skier was a woman
from Madison whom I had
bumped into a week ago,
along with her husband, at
which time we stopped and
enjoyed a lengthy chat.
Anyway, in short order, the
emergency response teams
had the leg immobilized and
had her on the way to a wait-
ing ambulance.
I describe all this mainly
because I was tremendously
impressed with the profes-
sionalism the crew displayed
in handling the patient, and
was reminded how much all
of us need to thank those vol-
unteer EMTs on a regular
basis for being there.
Its true that almost every-
thing we do in the outdoors is
quite safe, but whether it be
skiing, hunting, biking, fish-
ing or even a simple hike
through the woods, there is
always some small element of
risk involved.
In my 50 years of duck
hunting, I have managed to
tip a canoe over in a moment
of carelessness just once, and
Outdoors people always face a risk
Trails
& Tales
By
Will Maines
Free enterprise,
who bears risks?
AS NEWT GI NGRI CH
lashes out at liberal elites,
Mitt Romney is casting the
2012 campaign as free enter-
prise on trial and Romney
defines free enterprise as
achieving success through
risk taking. U.S. Chamber of
Commerce President Tom
Donahue, defending Romney,
explains, This economy is
about risk. If you dont take
risk, you cant have success.
But who do they think is
bearing the economic risks?
The higher you go in todays
economy, the easier it is to
make a pile of money without
taking any personal financial
risk at all. The lower you go,
the bigger the risks and the
smaller the rewards.
Partners in private-equity
firms like Romneys Bain
Capital dont risk their own
money. They invest other peo-
ples money and pocket 20% of
any upside gains. They then
pay taxes on only 15% of their
incomes a lower rate than
paid by many middle-class
Americans because of a
loophole that treats that
income as capital gains.
Wall Street as a whole
seeks to maximize personal
gains and minimize personal
risks. If youre high enough on
the economic ladder, you can
screw up royally and walk
away like royalty. And if the
bottom falls out, dont worry.
Taxpayers will bail you out.
Citigroups stock fell 44%
in 2011, but its CEO, Vikram
Pandit, got at least $5.45 mil-
lion on top of a retention
bonus of $16.7 million. (The
firm will reveal the rest of his
pay in March.) The stock of
JPMorgan Chase fell almost
22%, but its CEO, Jamie
Dimon, was awarded a pack-
age worth $17 million.
At the top of the American
economy, you can walk away
with a bundle even if youve
driven your company into the
ground. The swankiest golf
courses in America are fes-
tooned with former CEOs who
have almost sunk their com-
panies, but have been hand-
To McNUTT, Pg. 23
To MAINES, Pg. 23
Dont dismiss top snomo trails
as key to all-year economy
For the past two weeks, limited portions of
Vilas and Oneida counties have enjoyed snow
levels and trail conditions not experienced any-
where else in Wisconsin making this area a
snow oasis of sorts.
Trail conditions havent been ideal by any
means, yet the trails remained rideable through-
out a period of unseasonably warm weather,
thanks to volunteer-based snowmobile clubs and
grooming organizations. Grooming equipment
was seen on the trails nightly as operators
attempted to add snow and smooth out bumps.
Every time we drive by a restaurant or tav-
ern that has four cars and 40 snowmobiles in the
parking lot, we are reminded of the significant
financial impact the sport of snowmobiling has
always brought and continues to bring to this
seasonal economy.
The point being, dont take the sport of
snowmobiling for granted. The tens of thousands
of dollars it might bring to a motel, restaurant or
marina can be the difference between profit or
loss for the year. It usually takes more than three
seasons of revenue to cover the fixed overhead
costs of these small businesses.
Praise should go to the volunteers who care
so much about the future of their communities
that they have invested thousands of hours
building and maintaining one of the most scenic,
smoothest trail systems found anywhere in the
country.
The work has been going for months now, as
it started last summer with equipment mainte-
nance and work to obtain the private property
easements without which these highly
acclaimed trail systems could not exist. Private
property owners who have the good of their com-
munities in mind are true heroes when they gen-
erously allow trails to cross their lands.
Every community here has a small group of
hardworking people who give up their time and
sanity to maintain a viable trail network for sled-
ders. They construct trails, brush trails, sign
trails, groom trails and, when they can find the
time, ride the trails.
Fund-raising activities are a year-round
struggle, but every vintage race, poker run, drag
race and spaghetti dinner shows the commitment
of these snowmobile club members. Some of them
remember the years before snowmobiles and trail
networks when communities here were ghost
towns in winter.
Community-minded business owners support
the trail-grooming organizations because they
know the impact good winter business can have
on everything here. Money spent in this area cir-
culates here, its effects multiplying up to seven
times the initial expenditure. And, eventually,
that means a better economy and good news for
every business owner.
We tip our caps to the volunteers who lead
these snowmobile clubs and grooming organiza-
tions, for they are performing a vital yet thank-
less job that deserves applause. They help make
the colder, shorter days of winter bright. Now, we
just need Mother Nature to cooperate a little
more with winter-like weather.
Our View
Behind the editorial we
Members of the Vilas County News-Review
editorial board include Publisher Kurt Krueger,
Editor Gary Ridderbusch and Assistant Editor
Anthony Drew.
Robert
Reich
To REICH Pg. 23
VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 23
OP-ED/READER OPINION
that time I was lucky enough
to have a cousin just a short
distance away who helped me
get out of cold water that was
mostly covered with a half-
inch of skim ice that frosty
October morning.
Each year, duck hunters
find themselves in a similar
situation, a situation that,
without a little luck, could
turn into a tragedy. Trust me,
a duck hunter wearing heavy
waders and lots of bulky
clothes, hanging onto a shot-
gun at the same time, does
not swim very well, especially
in water cold enough to bring
on severe hypothermia in 15
minutes.
Mountain bikers the
hardcore ones anyway
thrive on riding like maniacs
over single-track goat trails
where a great deal of skill is
needed to avoid crashes capa-
ble of separating various body
parts in ways they are not
meant to be separated.
Every time they ride, they
risk to some degree or oth-
er bodily injury, but like
avid outdoor sportspeople of
all manner, no matter how
great or how small the risk,
they are not going to let a pos-
sibility of danger keep them
away from the sport they love.
My wife and I love to camp.
Weve tent camped just about
everywhere you can camp
throughout northern Wiscon-
sin and the Upper Peninsula,
and weve never had more
than a splinter of kindling
under a fingernail or briar-
scratched arms mar our out-
ings, but even participating in
such an innocuous adventure
as camping has a bit of risk to
it.
Quite a few years ago, we
camped at Imp Lake east of
Watersmeet for a weekend.
We enjoyed our time
immensely, my wife sitting in
a lawn chair with her feet in
the crystal-clear water while
reading a book for hours,
while I spent time leisurely
trying to catch a trout or nap-
ping in my chaise lounge
under a canopy of huge pine
trees.
Two weeks later, a camper
set up just two sites away
from where we had been was
killed when a severe thunder-
storm toppled one of those
huge pines on him.
Would such a risk have
kept my wife and I, or that
camper, from heading out on a
weekend camping trip? Not a
chance, and yet we do so
knowing that a one-in-a-bil-
lion chance could get us just
as well as the next guy.
While there is always the
chance of something going
wrong on any outdoor outing,
in todays world there is some-
thing that significantly
lessens the risk, at least in
terms of getting help when an
accident does happen.
That was the case with the
skiing accident Saturday. Cell -
phones are without question a
handy thing to have in your
pocket while enjoying the
great outdoors.
Last Saturday, the husband
had his and was able to
immediately call 911 when his
wife went down. Not only did
that speed up response time,
but it allowed him to stay
with his wife and help hold in
as much of her body heat as
possible until help arrived.
Otherwise, he would have
had a minimum 20-minute ski
to get back to a phone, during
which time his wife would
have been left by herself in
immense pain.
My wife, the worrier, is
always after me to carry my
cellphone whenever I head
out hunting, fishing, biking,
skiing or whatever. I always
have good intentions, but only
about one in 10 times do I
remember the phone.
Either I leave it on the
kitchen table or else set it on
the truck console when I
leave home, only to find it
still on the console when I fin-
ish my outing. Given that I
tend not to always wind up
going where I tell my wife Im
going, it probably would be a
good thing to have a phone in
my pocket.
Just call it a little extra
peace of mind, for her and for
me. And if a big black bear
decides to make a McSnack
out of me while Im on a back-
woods trek, the phone will
still come in handy, allowing
game wardens to make sure
theyre shooting the right
bear later. Dial my phone, lis-
ten for the ring tone in the
bears belly and, voil, job
completed.
Maines
FROM PAGE 22
somely rewarded nonetheless.
Thomas E. Freston lasted
just nine months as CEO of
Viacom before being terminat-
ed and walking away with an
exit package of $101 million.
William D. McGuire was
forced to resign as CEO of
UnitedHealth over a stock-
options scandal, but he left
with a pay package worth
$286 million.
Yet as economic risks are
vanishing at the top and the
rewards keep growing, the
risks are rising dramatically
on almost everyone below,
where the rewards keep
shrinking.
Full-time workers who put
in decades with a company
can now find themselves with-
out a job overnight with no
parachute, no help finding
another job, and no health
insurance. More than 20% of
the American workforce is
now contingent temporary
workers, contractors, indepen-
dent consultants with no
security at all.
Most families face the
mounting risk of receiving
giant hospital bills with no
way to pay them. Fewer and
fewer large- and medium-
sized companies offer their
workers full health-care cov-
erage 74% did in 1980, less
than 10% do today. As a
result, health insurance pre-
miums, co-payments and
deductibles are soaring.
Most people also face
increasing risk of not having
enough to retire on. Three
decades ago, more than 80% of
large and medium-sized firms
gave their workers defined-
benefit pensions that guaran-
teed a fixed amount of money
every month after they
retired. Now its under 10%.
Instead, they offer defined
contribution plans where the
risk is on the workers. When
the stock market tanks, as it
did in 2008, 401(k) plans tank
along with it.
Meanwhile, people at the
top are socking away tens of
millions for their retirements
while paying little or no taxes
in effect, enjoying a huge
government subsidy. Mitt
Romneys IRA is worth
between $20 million and $100
million, including Bain Capi-
tal holdings in offshore
havens like the Cayman
Islands.
Romney is right: Free
enterprise is on trial. But hes
wrong about the question at
issue. Its not whether Ameri-
ca will continue to reward risk
taking. Its whether an eco-
nomic system can survive
when the real risks are so dis-
connected from the rewards.
Americans are starting to
feel the game is rigged against
them, which may be why
Newt Gingrichs bombastic
attacks on elites are gaining
traction. Workers feel cynical
when those at the top get
giant rewards no matter how
badly they screw up, while the
rest of us get screwed no mat-
ter how hard we work.
Robert Reich, former U.S.
Secretary of Labor, is professor
of public policy at the Univer-
sity of California at Berkeley
and the author of Aftershock:
The Next Economy and Amer-
icas Future. He blogs at
www.robertreich.org.
Reich
FROM PAGE 22
Letter to the Editor:
Job creators . . . listen to
their seductive mantra with its
promises of prosperity! They
bring to mind the sirens of
Greek mythology, often
described as mermaids, some-
times as part bird/part virgin,
whose unimaginable beauty
and irresistible song and
music lured sailors to their
deaths as their ships ran
aground in the rocks off the
Sicilian coast.
In Republican mythology,
job creators are very sensitive
creatures, easily offended by
raising taxes which might
induce them to swim or fly
away (perhaps in their char-
tered jets), taking their jobs
with them. They are not play-
ing flute or lyre on an idyllic
coastline, unless, of course, its
a Cayman Island sanctuary.
No, they are hunkered down in
gated communities with
hoards of money safely stashed
away in Swiss bank accounts.
In reality, job creators are
average folk with money in
their pockets, making routine
purchases that support the
small businesses of their com-
munities. Those businesses, in
turn, hire more people to pro-
duce more goods or provide
more services to meet
demand a cycle that cannot
run efficiently with an impov-
erished middle class. The strat-
egy of tax cuts for the wealthy
has been proven not to create
jobs; it has spurred the type of
speculative investments that
shipwrecked our economy.
Captain Obama (with a less
mutinous crew by 2013) must
sail the Ship of State into safer
waters where a more equitable
tax code, along with govern-
ment investments in infras-
tructure, green energy, health
and education, will ensure that
the true job creators will have
the money, well-being and
security needed to regrow our
economy.
Terrance Moe
Three Lakes
Tax cuts for the wealthy
shipwrecked our economy
Letter to the Editor:
In his Jan. 31 letter to this
paper, Frank Gabl correctly
notes that a clash of ideology
defines our current political
turmoil. True enough.
But he then goes on to warn
your readers of the hidden dan-
gers of the U.N. Sustainable
Development Agenda 21 and
two of its offspring the
ICLEI-Local Governments for
Sustainability and the Wild-
lands Project. Apparently Mr.
Gabl believes that, in sum, the
three represent some sort of
U.N. world-government con-
spiracy that is intent on strip-
ping Americans of their proper-
ty rights and freedom in gener-
al.
Now, you may accept Gabls
premises and conclusions or
not. What interests me more
that his list of particulars is the
underlying idea of sustainable
development.
At the heart of this concept,
brilliantly outlined by Herman
E. Daly in his Beyond Growth:
The Economics of Sustainable
Development, is the fact that
no economy operates in a vacu-
um. Economics is but a subset
of the totality of the global
environment, the natural capi-
tal which is finite, irreplaceable
and supports all human eco-
nomic activity. The key words
here are finite and irreplace-
able, and the implications are
profound.
Beyond Growth dates
from the mid-1990s, but the
lessons it teaches are no less
valid today, perhaps even more
so. The most important of these
is the fact that, faced with an
exploding human population,
global warming, atmospheric
pollution and a world of finite
resources, the standard models
of economic growth (as mea-
sured by such yardsticks as
Gross Domestic Product)
should be viewed more in
terms of a not-so-slow-motion
global suicide.
Ultimately, we cannot grow
our way to economic security.
Humans cannot simply con-
sume their way to whatever it
is that constitutes the good life
without, at the same time,
destroying the very ecosystems
that form the basis of human
civilization indeed, of all life.
Cannibalizing the worlds nat-
ural capital at the levels of the
past 50 years is unsustainable.
If you take these lessons
seriously, you may begin to
understand that development,
not growth and consumption, is
a better philosophy of sustaini-
Humans cannot grow way to economic security
to ignore whatever comes after
DVDs? I dont want to have to
restart my collection.
10. Theres no worse feeling
than that millisecond youre
sure you are going to die after
leaning your chair back a little
too far.
11. I hate leaving the house
in the morning confident and
looking good and then not see-
ing anyone of importance the
entire day. What a wasted
opportunity.
12. Another waste: Even if I
knew your Social Security
number, I wouldnt know what
to do with it!
Letter to the Editor:
As a school district adminis-
trator, one of the most difficult
things that I have to deal with
is when there is a school emer-
gency or crisis.
On Tuesday, Jan. 31, a
school bus from the Northland
Pines School District was in an
accident; a pickup truck ran
into the back end of the school
bus as the bus was about to
drop students off after school
on Highway 70.
The good news here is that
there were only minor injuries,
none of which were life threat-
ening, although the pickup
truck was extensively damaged
in this accident. This situation
could have been much worse.
As a district, we have proce-
dures in place for crisis/emer-
gency situations. We followed
our procedures and those pro-
cedures worked well.
The purpose of this letter is
to highly commend all emer-
gency responders who attend-
ed the scene of the accident
including law enforcement, fire
departments, medical person-
nel, bus company owners,
administrators and other vol-
unteers at the scene or who
were at the hospital.
Although we live in rural
northern Wisconsin, we are
extremely fortunate to have
such highly trained emergency
teams both in Eagle River and
in our surrounding communi-
ties, and these teams were all
willing and prepared to help us
with this accident. Parents
need to know that the safety
and welfare of the students
were in very capable hands.
I would also like to applaud
the staff of Ministry Eagle Riv-
er Memorial Hospital for being
well prepared to deal with this
kind of situation. The profes-
sional treatment and medical
attention that our students
received was exceptional; the
caring attitude of the hospital
personnel who set up cookies
and juice for our students was
very much appreciated.
Again, I would just like to
thank and commend all the
groups mentioned in this letter
for doing a phenomenal job
helping us through this crisis.
Sincerely,
Mike Richie
District Administrator
Northland Pines
School District
Highly-trained emergency teams
responded to school bus accident
McNutt
FROM PAGE 22
Compiled by
Jean Fitzpatrick
VOICES
VOICES
Nola Payseur, 52
Food service preparer
Conover
I would be against it
because of the natural
resources in our area. I think
the potential for pollution out-
weighs the benefits.
Muskie Bob Jacobs, 65
Fishing guide
Eagle River
As long as it can create jobs
and the company can take
care of distribution of its
product and protect the envi-
ronment, Im all for it.
Tim Bogeman, 50
Respite service provider
Eagle River
If they do it in an environ-
mentally safe way and it
brings jobs to the North
Woods, Im all for it. Thats
one thing we need up here
is more jobs.
FROM ACROSS THE
HEADWATERS REGION
Question: How do you feel about mining
in northern Wisconsin?
To AGENDA 21, Pg. 24
24 WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8, 2012 VILAS COUNTY NEWS-REVIEW/THE THREE LAKES NEWS
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READER OPINION
Letter to the Editor:
The Feb. 1 Letter to the Edi-
tor by Ms. D. Goldschmidt is
interesting from a one-sided
and biased position. It is anoth-
er diatribe from the unyielding
Left. The following counter-
points are for the fairer mind-
ed.
1. The only people who
think that Right-minded folks
are mean spirited are those
who feel government is the one
and only great provider for all
of societys ills.
2. I concede that rich folks
dont provide jobs. Always go to
the Milwaukee Mission when I
need hiring.
3. Bush tax cuts benefited
all taxpayers. You would get
overwhelming support from the
so-called rich if their tax rate
was the same as the middle
class, especially those 50% of
wage earners who pay no feder-
al tax.
4. I wonder if Mitt, while at
Bain, saved any jobs. Or, when
GM and Chrysler were saved
by Obama, were any jobs lost?
Any bondholders or dealer-
ships getting the ax to trim the
company into solvency?
5. Concerning scandals,
when Bill Clinton was under
scrutiny, we were told its just
sex and, according to the lib-
erals, he was and remains the
best president ever. Whats dif-
ferent now?
6. Out-of-state money
affecting Wisconsin politics?
Its a complete belly laugh to
compare the Koch brothers to
no one. Any union money pour-
ing in to support the recall?
7. Ill go out on a limb and
assume you are against Scott
Walkers austerity measures.
Sometimes you just have to put
the burden on those backs that
carried us into a mess to get out
of the mess. As the facts unveil,
your arguments will not with-
stand the results.
The only satisfaction I got
after reading the opinions
expressed is the knowledge
that my vote will negate hers.
Bob Matson
Eagle River
Another diatribe from the Left
Letter to the Editor:
Rightly so, the proposed
Penokee Hills Iron Mine has
raised interest and concern
from many people and activist
groups. That sort of response
is now normal and can be
expected for just about any
sort of project.
Unfortunately, with the
slanted information that
comes from these biased
groups (pro and con), it
becomes difficult and is an
obstacle for open-minded peo-
ple who are just trying to bet-
ter understand the issues and
make informed judgments.
Most of us enjoy a decent
quality of life that depends on
the use of our Earths
resources. With our popula-
tion increase and even greater
increases among many more
less fortunate of Earths
inhabitants, who also want
and need a better life, there
will be continued and increas-
ing need to develop the worlds
natural resources. So, it is
important to understand as
much as possible for yourself
about a project and its
impacts (positive and nega-
tive) before you make a judg-
ment.
A project such as the Peno-
kee Hills Iron Mine (from
what Ive so far learned)
would take many years of
study and analysis before any-
one would have a reasonable
and defensible understanding
of the sorts of impacts the
mine and facilities would cre-
ate; and, of course, there
would be much more study to
determine how the negative
impacts could be mitigated or
eliminated.
This long process requires
thorough investigation and
definition (characterization) of
baseline conditions, mining
and facilities planning, study
and analysis with numerical
(computer) modeling to deter-
mine impacts, and much itera-
tive study to alter and opti-
mize mining and facilities
plans to minimize negative
impacts. Reclamation plan-
ning and waste disposal plan-
ning and much more is all
part of the permitting process.
Nothing about that has
changed with the new iron
mine permitting regulation.
I have no definite idea how
Gogebic Taconite would pro-
ceed through this process if
the project became a reality.
However, the most practical
and efficient way is to work
with the Wisconsin Depart-
ment of Natural Resources
(DNR) and inform the public
of plans and interim results
throughout the process. Find-
ing out later that an impor-
tant feature was not initially
characterized is not produc-
tive or efficient.
All of that project work is
not included in the 360-day
time frame (which seems to be
a major concern about the new
regulation); that 360-day peri-
od starts after the formal sub-
mittal of that mine-permit-
application-required-informa-
tion. At that time, the DNR
checks that all necessary
information has been submit-
ted and declares whether or
not the submittal is adminis-
tratively complete; if it is, the
360-day period starts; if not
the applicant takes more time
to make the application fully
complete.
In reality, though, through-
out all the work activities, if
the process has proceeded effi-
ciently, the DNR essentially
knows as much about the pro-
ject and its impacts as the
applicant does. At that point
in time (the beginning of the
360-day period), the main
responsibility of the DNR is to
reaffirm information and to
develop its own version of the
impacts and present them in
an environmental impact
statement.
Unfortunately, in the meet-
ings Ive attended, most of the
speakers and commenters
present their view of expected
impacts with no defensible
support. The best that can be
offered is that this sort of
impact happened before at
another mine; at the worst, it
could be a complete fabrica-
tion, as I saw in Hurley when
a commenter presented a
Mason jar full of a brown liq-
uid concocted in her kitchen
and she represented it as
being indicative of the
drainage expected from the
iron mine. Folks making pre-
sentations like that soon lose
all their credibility.
Ive started by trying to bet-
ter understand the Penokee
Hills environment from what I
could find with an Internet
google (Penokee Hills Geolo-
gy). Setting aside special
interest/activist websites/
links, there are some, but not
a lot, left. One interesting
source is a U.S. Geological
Survey report (from 1929, no
less) by Aldrich, Henry R.
(Henry Ray), b. 1891. The
geology of the Gogebic iron
range of Wisconsin, Bulletin
No. 71, Economic Series No.
24; The State, 1929. The URL
for this work: http://digit -
al.libr ary. wi sc.edu/1711.dl/
EcoNatRes.WGB71Econ24. It
is a good start to understand-
ing the area and is a very
interesting report to read.
If the project does move for-
ward, it will be many years
before any defensible impacts
could be determined, which,
depending upon what they
are, would lead to a decision
by the Wisconsin DNR on the
permit application.
Carlton Schroeder, PE
Eagle River
Its important to understand mining impacts


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ng economic survival for both
present and future generations.
Such are the lessons inherent
in Agenda 21 and similar proto-
cols. And as imperfect and
threatening as they may seem
to some, they call for a long-
term reordering of global and
national economic priorities
which will better serve the
world both today and into the
future.
If, like Frank Gabl, you dis-
miss all this as an elitist un-
American conspiracy, then I
suppose you will support the
status quo of strict property
rights, free markets, privatiza-
tion and growth as your ticket
to economic salvation. I prefer
to recognize and incorporate a
greater environmental reality
and the lesson of a sustainable
economic model.
Jeff Laadt
Eagle River
Agenda 21
FROM PAGE 23
Dear Editor:
I would like to commend the
Vilas County News-Review for
printing Letters to the Editor
such as the one written by Dar-
lene Goldschmidt dated
Wednesday, Feb. 1.
Its a reminder to the rest of
us that not everyone is
endowed with the gift of logic.
Her venting on conservative
issues in such negative fashion
tells us much of how the educa-
tion system evolved since 1946,
when progressives infiltrated
the school systems. The tools
for decision making in an
unselfish manner seem to have
been lost.
Just a side note: Mitt Rom-
ney gave about $6 million to
charity in the past two years
and a like amount to taxes. I
will bet the donation to charity
will be better used than his tax
money.
Regards,
Al Bybee
Land O Lakes
Tools of unselfish
decision making lost
ST. GERMAIN The board
of the Snowmobile Hall of
Fame (SHOF) will enshrine
four inductees Saturday, Feb.
18, at the annual induction
banquet.
Lifelong North Woods busi-
nessman and club volunteer
Larry Bosacki, of Minocqua,
will be among the four new
inductees. The others include
Joey Hallstrom of Thief River
Falls, Minn.; Toni Haikonen of
Finland; and Marcell Foun-
taine of Quebec, Canada.
The induction banquet will
follow the daylong celebrity
trail ride, now in its 29th year,
known as the Ride With the
Champs (RWTC), sponsored by
Modine HotDawg Garage
Heaters of Racine.
A $130 fee includes break-
fast, lunch, a souvenir bib, an
event cap, the 6 p.m. cocktail
and autograph session and the
induction banquet at 7 p.m.
For more information about
the SHOF, visit the website or
call (715) 542-4HOF (4463).
Snowmobile hall
to induct four