Sie sind auf Seite 1von 70

WILKES-BARRE, PA $1.

00 Sunday, February 26, 2012


Jerry Granahan
never stopped
making music.
>> PAGE 3
PA, WA hockey
teams ready for
Blue n Gold Skate.
>> PAGE 39
Dickie Doo
still does
Facing off
this Friday
COUPON SAVINGS INSIDE WORTH $206.79
PHOTO BY BILL TARUTIS
P
A
G
E
2
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
7
1
6
6
5
7
2
5
9
1
3
3
Call Karen Fiscus at 970-7291
Advertising deadline is Thursday at 3 P.M.
Impressions Media
Fax: 602-0184
My friend the scientist,
whose comment sometimes I
think the earth is spinning fas-
ter I referred to last week,
responded thusly:
Great column. I, the scientist,
do have a couple of comments,
though.
First, the earths rotation is
actually slowing down. This is
due to a transfer of earths
rotational energy to the moon
because of tidal friction. The
result is a slowing earth and an
increase in the earth-to-moon
distance.
(I told you he was a scientist,
and one with a PhD at that, but
let him continue )
Second, Einstein discovered
the concept of time dilation,
which means that as an object
moves faster, time slows down.
This effect is most dramatic as
one approaches the speed of
light.
So, it stands to reason that
the converse of this would mean
that time speeds up as you slow
down.
So, putting the two together, it
is actually the earth spinning
more slowly that makes time
pass faster.
I guess my tongue-in-cheek
comment was wrong, then. I am
definitely no physicist.
On many occasions in my
classes (my friend is a college
professor) I mention a poster I
have that says Everything you
need to know in life I learned
from Star Trek and reference
the space-time continuum as
the ultimate answer to every-
thing.
I admit it I am a geek.
One more thing. My son is
actually 15 (not 12, as I wrote
last week), already. He will be
16 by the time you get this...
(not really, his birthday is Sep-
tember 23). (Thats a scientists
joke.)
Live long and prosper!
That last comment is, of
course, a Star Trek reference.
The subject of time, whether
Einsteins theories or my own
musings, has always fascinated
me. Close to 20 years ago I
read I never realized how
much time I had until I threw
my watch away and immedi-
ately took off my Timex and
tossed it in a trash can. Except
for a few months when I ran in
circles where having an expen-
sive Movado on my wrist meant
something, I havent worn a
watch since.
Sometimes people ask how,
without the benefit of a time-
piece, I am not late for appoint-
ments. The answer, I tell them,
is simple: because I have no
watch, I cant afford to be late.
When I first met my wife and
she found out about the no-
watch thing, she couldnt help
but ask how I know what time
it is. I told her I always know
what time it is: its always now.
Then I added: it was now a
thousand years before I was
born and it will be now a
thousand years after Im gone.
And she still married me.
Science aside, one of the
things thats bugged me about
time is that, Einstein pun in-
tended, its so relative. For ex-
ample, according to the clock,
it takes roughly two hours to
drive from here to Philadelphia.
But, depending upon the com-
pany, that two hours can either
seem an eternity or go by in an
instant. The lyrics of the Gor-
don Lightfoot song The Wreck
of the Edmund Fitzgerald ex-
press the idea beautifully, albeit
sadly: Does anyone know where
the love of God goes when the
waves turn the minutes to
hours?
Few of us have been aboard a
ship about to sink in a storm,
but if youve ever had a tooth-
ache in the middle of the night,
you can relate to minutes turn-
ing to hours.
Then theres the opposite.
Where does time go when we
are experiencing sheer joy? We
lose ourselves in a book, a
movie, the embrace of our be-
loved, or with a baby in our
arms, and time disappears. The
magic wand making this hap-
pen is love. Listen to Henry van
Dyke:
Time is too slow for those
who wait; too swift for those
who fear; too long for those
who grieve; too short for those
who rejoice. But for those who
love, time is not.
All of which brings me to
this coming Wednesday
February 29.
The best evidence I can think
of that time is not God, but man
made is that every four years
we have an entire day left over.
I suspect that those who created
the calendar stuck this day in
the middle of winter hoping no
one would notice. What bothers
me is their strategy seems to
have worked. We tend to take
this extra day right in stride.
How can that be? An extra
day, a full 24 hours, once every
four years and its no big deal?
If you ask me, it should be
national holiday?
At the very least, a no-watch
day.
Ed Ackerman, optimist
eackerman@psdispatch.com
Time, time, time
Dickie Doo today ..............................................3
Biking all the way.............................................4
Local on TV.......................................................5
Important WP meeting....................................7
Local Chatter ....................................................8
Matters of Faith ...............................................10
Editorial /Letters.............................................14
Jack Smiles ......................................................15
Nutrition............................................................15
Peeking into the Past .....................................16
Town News ......................................................33
Sports...............................................................39
Obituaries .......................................31, 32, 51-55
School menus .......................................Social 2
Birthdays................................................Social 3
I
N
S
I
D
E
VOL. 66, NO. 3
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
G
rowing up in Brown-
town in the1940s, Gerry
Granahan had a little
niece named Patsy Ann. She
had spina bifida, Granahan said
in a phone interviewfromRhode
Island where he now lives. She
sat all day in pain. She loved the
Irish lullaby Tura Lura Lura. Id
hold her in the rocking chair and
sing it for hours until she fell
asleep.
It might be said singing Patsy
Ann to sleep was the genesis of
wildly successful 60-plus year
career in music for Granahan as
a performer, composer, pro-
ducer, A & R (artist and reper-
toire, or talent scout) man and re-
cord label president. Over the
course of that career, Granahan
met with pop and rock music
icons like Les Paul, Roy Orbi-
son, Bobby Darin, Dick Clark,
Jerry Lee Lewis, Buddy Holly,
Chuck Berry, Bo Diddley, Jay
and the Americans, Manfred
Mann and legions more.
Tonight Granahan, 78, will be
honored by the Rhode Island
Music Hall of Fame in Providen-
ce. He is already a member of the
Hall and tonight he will be rein-
troduced as an honoree at the
opening of the Halls physical
museum space.
Though Granahan hasnt lived
in the Pittston area since he went
to NewYork City to start a music
career in the 1950s, he has fond
memories of the area andloves to
talk about growing up here. Pat-
sy Ann is never out of his
thoughts. She is the name and lo-
go of his company Patsy Ann
Music.
My niece Mary Ellen Don-
nelly lives in Philadelphia.
Whenever we talk, we talk about
the area. We both miss it a lot,
he said.
Granahans father, Patrick,
was a railroad engineer. His
mother, Helen, who was known
as Aunt Helen to the neighbor-
hood kids, had 10 children, two
which died in infancy. Gerry is
the second youngest.
When Granahan was nine or
10 his father died. He was in his
early 40s. He was a very reli-
gious guy, Granahan said. A
pillar of St. Johns church. He
was a terrific father and super
guy.
Granahans fathers death left
the family without a steady in-
come, but Gerry didnt see it as a
hardship. I didnt realize until
later what a great life we had
growing up. Maybe we were
poor, but if so I didnt realize it.
Mother was a genius. With a 20
dollar bill she could do anything.
Everybody pitched in, did odd
jobs and whatever it took. Moth-
er had a couple brothers. They
were very decent guys and they
helped out.
Granahan went to Pittston
Township high school and trans-
ferred to St. Johns for his junior
and senior years. He was on the
football team, but didnt gradu-
ate. He dropped out to work in a
shoe factory, a hardware store
and Harry Corcorans clothing
store.
John Bozo Connors was
Granahans St. Johns teammate.
He was quite a character, Con-
nors said. He was a ladies
man.
At age11Granahan played bu-
gle in a local drum and bugle
corps. Incrementally he taught
himself trumpet, accordion, gui-
tar, and piano. Though there was
a piano in the Granahan house
and his mother played a little, the
Granahans werent reallya musi-
cal family, except for Gerry. I
wouldsit at pianoandtrytowrite
songs as kid, he said. When I
sang to my niece, my brothers
would tell me I sounded good.
WhenGranahanwas inhis late
teens, he and the gang he ran
with went to the VFWin Wilkes-
Barre. Wed get served beer
there, he said. They had a
house band and Id get up and
sing.
Bill Phillips, a disc jockey at
radio station WBRE, heard me,
Im not sure how. He introduced
me to somebody and the next
thing I knew I was singing in a
place called Jimmys Glass Bar,
in Nanticoke, I think. He hired
me for weekends. They had a
singer, a comic and then a strip-
per. I think I was paid maybe five
bucks. ThenI hookedupwiththe
Frankie Reynolds Orchestra
from the Pittston area. Wed play
Dupont dances, the Poconos, the
Catskills.
Phillips said youve got tal-
ent go to New York City. He
gave me the address of a guy
named Eddie Geiger. He was
married to one of the De Castro
Sisters.
(The De Castro Sisters were a
singing trio from Cuba who had
a #2 Billboard Hit with Teach
Me Tonight in 1954.)
Granahan picks up the story:
I had $50 on me when I got to
New York. Geiger took me to an
apartment with three airline
stewardesses. They were flying
all the time. I slept on their
couch. I was like a fishout of wa-
ter. Absolute culture shock. It
tookme a while toget usedtoit. I
went to Hansons Drugstore on
Times Square. I met kids like
myself there, struggling singers.
I met Bobby Darin there and we
became friends.
Granahan and Darin both got
signed by ATCO, later Atlantic
Records.
Early in his career Granahan
met Bo Diddley who taught him
a guitar technique called open
tuning which Granahan used on
some of his recordings. They re-
main friends to this day
Granahan released a couple
songs on ATCO, but got no chart
action. Enter Dick Clark, who
was doing American Bandstand
from Philadelphia. Though
Bandstand was a national show
on ABC, the first half hour of it
was a local show, seen only in the
Philly area. Gerry was a guest on
the local show and he played a
demo for Clark of a song he had
written and produced with friend
Dave Alldred called Click-
Clack, inspired by the sound of
subway tracks.
Granahan described how he
produced and arranged Click,
Clack. He may have been a stu-
dio novice, but he was a quick
study.
I used my last $180 to finance
the demo. I had no idea what I
was doing. The studio had two
tracks. I laid down the music.
Then I put the lead voice on. I
asked questions. Can I do this?
Or this? I learnedhowtooverdub
What ever happened to Dickie Doo?
Gerry Granahan, of 60s pop music fame, is in Rhode Island Music Hall of Fame
By Jack Smiles
Associate Editor
Gerry Granahan, center, with Bo Diddley and guitarist Charie Tona, in Bo Diddley's home studio in
Florida.
I had $50 on me when I got to New York. Geiger took me to an apart-
ment with three airline stewardesses. They were flying all the time. I
slept on their couch. I was like a fish out of water. Absolute culture
shock. It took me a while to get used to it. I went to Hansons Drugstore
on Times Square. I met kids like myself there, struggling singers. I met
Bobby Darin there and we became friends.
See GRANAHAN, Page 27
P
A
G
E
4
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
When Nicole Waxmonsky Tu
was a student at Pittston Area
High School a decade ago, she
was one of the top youth bowlers
in the area. She regularly rolled
200 games and 600 series in the
youth league at Modern Lanes.
These days, shes a candidate
for a PhD in cell biology and a
cancer researcher at the Univer-
sity of Minnesota. She lives in
Minneapolis, where she has trad-
ed in her bowling balls for bicy-
cles.
Living in one of the most bike-
friendly areas in the country
the Twin Cities area of Minnea-
polis and St. Paul Waxmonsky
Tu and her husband, Haink Tu,
bike everywhere and in all kinds
of weather, including ice and
snow.
We ride all the time, Wax-
monsky Tu said in a phone inter-
view. We use bikes for transpor-
tation. Its pretty easy to ride out
here; its part of the culture in
Minnesota. When it snows, they
sometimes plow the bike path
before the road.
The bike path is the Midtown
Greenway, a 5.5-mile former
railroad bed in Minneapolis with
easy access to most of the down-
town.
Though Waxmonsky Tu ini-
tially started biking as a form of
exercise, pedaling is now a life-
style. We save so much money,
she said. We own a car but we
dont have to use it. Everything
we need is within five miles. We
save on gas and car insurance.
Life is easier and more fun. I see
things like bald eagles over the
river. If I was in a car, I wouldnt
be able to do that.
Waxmonsky Tus love of bik-
ing transcends transportation.
Shes a member of the University
of Minnesota cycling team
which competes on tracks and
dirt in the largest conference in
the country, traveling to Kansas,
Nebraska and other Midwest ar-
eas. The spring season consists
of a series of 30 to 40 mile road
races.
She is also is a certified winter
biking instructor for the League
of American Bicyclists where
she teaches prospective bikers
about road rules, how to feel
comfortable in vehicle traffic
and safe riding in the winter. She
was featured in the January issue
of Bicycling Magazine, provid-
ing tips for safe and warmwinter
biking.
Not coincidentally to the Twin
Cities bicycle culture, St. Paul is
home to Quality Bike Products
(QBP), the largest importer and
distributor of bicycle parts and
accessories in the industry. QBP
distributes winter bikes and ac-
cessories like 4-inch and studded
tires for manufacturer 45NRTH.
She graduated from Pittston
Area in 2001 where she was a
science brainiac andcompeted
in the Brain Bee, a bi-county
competition, in the field of neu-
roscience, Waxmonsky Tu cred-
its her parents, Donald and Syl-
via, for fostering her love of sci-
ence.
In high school, she attended
the Governors School for sci-
ence where she met Tu, a Taiwa-
nese-American student from
Philadelphia. They married in
2005 after graduating from
Rochester Institute of Technolo-
gy. Tu is also a doctoral candi-
date at the University of Minne-
sota.
Waxmonsky Tu and her hus-
band own six bikes. She de-
scribed them in an email:
We each have a mountain bike
for dirt trail riding (by the way,
the mountain biking in NEPA is
one of the nations best kept se-
crets).
We each have a road bike for
faster riding (15-20mph) and
longer distances (30 miles or
more).
We each have a commuter bike
for errands and transportation
(racks for holding items, lights
for riding at night and very com-
fortable riding positions).
We are currently building a
cargo bike to make it easier to
haul bigger and heavier items
(like groceries, oil pans from the
auto store or camping chairs to
the lakes).
The style we are building is re-
ferred to as a long tail bikes
with very large bags for carrying
items and an extended wheel-
base for stability.
You can modify these to carry
people andmany people here use
them to carry their children with
them. You can buy these off the
shelf, say from Trek, or you can
modify your existing bicycle that
you already own with a kit called
Xtracycle.
For PA grad it really is all about the bike
Nicole Vaxmonsky Tu pedaling her way toward doctorate in Minnesota
By Jack Smiles
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
COURTESY OF AARON THOMAS SMITH
Nicole Waxmonsky Tu competing in a Halloween mountain bike race.
COURTESY OF KEN HUM
Nicole Waxmonsky Tu ready
for a University of Minnesota
cycling teamcompetition.
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
The Villa Foglia
ITS SOUP AND
HEARTY MEAL
TIME!
Restaurant and Catering
Call for Bereavement Luncheon info.
Proudly Serving The Wyoming Valley For Over 44 Years
Hours: Monday-Saturday from4:30 p.m. til ?
1133WyomingAvenue, Exeter 654-1206
Hoagies Pizza
Sandwiches Always Available
FULL DINNER MENU
Pasta Chicken Veal
Seafood Steaks &More!
Catering any Event:
Parties Weddings
Christening
Family Reunions
Featuring The Best in Italian/American Cuisine
nt:
gs
ns
FACTS OF
LAW
Brought to you as a paid public service by
the Law Ofces of Dominick P. Pannunzio,
294 Main Street, Dupont, 655-5541
By
Dominick P.
Pannunzio, Esq.
The Kentucky Court of Appeals has upheld
two Kentucky laws that reference God: a 2002
legislative fnding that says the safety and
security of the commonwealth cannot be achieved
apart from reliance upon Almighty God and a
2006 act that requires Kentuckys homeland
security agency to publicize this dependence
on Almighty God in training and educational
materials, and on a plaque at the entrance to its
emergency operations center. In a split decision,
the Court of Appeals overturned a 2009 ruling
by a state circuit judge who found the legislation
requiring the Almighty created an offcial
government position on God, in violation of the
Kentucky and U.S. constitutions bans on state-
sponsored religion.
***
A new state law allows freworks in Maine for the
frst time in decades.
***
A recent Iowa Supreme Court ruling has signaled
the Courts view that traffc stops on the side of
public highways are inherently coercive and
therefore can give rise to improper pressure on
motorists to agree to vehicle searches. When
it comes to highway traffc stops, justices said,
police plainly have the upper hand and are
exerting authority in a fashion that makes it likely
that a citizen would not feel free to decline to give
consent for a search even though the search is
Chris Semon of Pittston, a
union carpenter, was working
out at Browns Gymin Chinchil-
la four years ago when a trainer
gave him the phone number of a
man looking for a part-time car-
penter to help him restore an old
home.
Thats how Semon met actor
BronsonPinchot andgot a jobon
Pinchots DIY (Do It Yourself)
Network TV show The Bron-
son Pinchot Project. The eight-
part series chronicles Pinchots
restoration of an 1839 mansion
in Harford, Susquehanna Coun-
ty. The showairs at 10:30 p.m. on
Saturdays 10:30 on DIY which
can be found on DirectTV.
Pinchot, who had roles in the
movies Risky Business, Be-
verly Hills Cop and The First
Wives Club, is best known for
playing the character Balki Bar-
tokomoushis on the ABC family
sitcom, Perfect Strangers.
When hes not acting, Pinchot
collects architectural salvage
from remodeled or demolished
1800s homes and uses it to re-
store the Harford mansion.
Semon described some exam-
ples of the work he and the other
carpenters do on the Pinchot
Project show, which was filmed
last fall. In one room, we took
old shutters from 1830s and
made pocket doors so shutters
can slide in and disappear, Sem-
on said. We installed fancy
moldings. I took out relatively
modern windows and put in win-
dows from the 1820s. People
laugh when I tell them that be-
cause there is no insulation in the
windows and you can feel the
cold coming through.
Semon commuted the 45
miles to Harford, which is off
Route 81 north of Scranton,
nights and weekends putting in
about 20 hours a week for three
months.
Semon and Pinchot have be-
come friends to the point where
Pinchot went to Browns Gym
and watched Semon set a state
record in a power lifting compe-
tition.
Hes a little eccentric to say
the least, Semon said about his
new friend. His ideas for what
he wants to do are constantly
changing, but he has a good
heart andtakes care of the people
who work for him. Hes one of
the best bosses anyone could
have.
Though filming is now com-
plete for the series and three of
the eight episodes have already
aired, Semon still occasionally
travels to Harford to work with
Pinchot.
Its not known if DIYwill pick
upthe showagain, but as Pinchot
owns several other buildings in
Harford, includinghouses, store-
fronts, the former post office and
the Oddfellows Hall, its possi-
ble. Harford, a rural town of only
1,300, was previously known for
its annual summer agricultural
fair. Now Pinchot is now putting
the town on the map as he tries to
remake it as an early1800s archi-
tectural show case.
Pittston carpenter on Bronson Pinchot Project
TV show chronicles restoration of 1839 mansion in Harford
By Jack Smiles
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
SUBMITTED PHOTO
Actor Bronson Pinchot, left, and Chris Semon, of Pittston, at Brown's gym. Semon has a role on the
TV show, ' `The Bronson Pinchot Project.'
The Pittston Memorial Li-
brary is hosting A Blind Date
with a Book.
From now until April 10, pa-
trons can head to the Pittston
Memorial Library and have a
mysterious date, or as many as
they like, with a book. Blind date
books are wrapped in newspaper
and those checking out the mys-
tery books wont know the iden-
tity of their blind date until they
get home. Patrons can then
spend time getting to know their
date. There will be no uncom-
fortable questions to answer, no
awkward lulls in conversation,
no need to put on nice shoes or
even get out of your pajamas.
Sure, youmight be disappoint-
ed but, then again, you may end
up having a great time with
something you would otherwise
never have ventured to read.
Inside each book is a Rate
Your Date slip for readers to of-
fer comments on the book they
choose. All returned slips will be
entered into a raffle for a Barnes
& Nobles gift certificate.
Library offering blind dates
Pittston Library is hosting 'A Blind Date with a Book.' Blind date
books are wrapped in newspaper and those checking out the
books won't know the identity of their date until they get home.
P
A
G
E
6
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
T
PRICES EFFECTIVE
FEBRUARY 26
TH
THRU
FEBRUARY 28
TH
PRICES EFFECTIVE WITH GOLD CARD ONLY
TO ASSURE SUFFICIENT SUPPLY OF SALE ITEMS, WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO LIMIT THE PURCHASE OF SALE ITEMS. EXCEPT WHERE
OTHERWISE NOTED. NONE SOLD TO DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS, NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR TYPOGRAPHICAL ERRORS. ARTWORK FOR
DISPLAY PURPOSES ONLY. THANK YOU FOR YOUR COOPERATION. *PURCHASE REQUIREMENTS ON GOLD CARD ITEMS DO NOT INCLUDE
MILK, CIGARETTES OR PRICE OF THE GOLD CARD ITEM.
401 Kennedy Blvd., Pittston, PA 570-655-8000
www.quinnsmarkets.com
SAVING YOU MORE EVERYDAY!!
SUPERMARKETS
head
SUNDAY ONLY
2/26/12
MONDAY ONLY
2/27/12
TUESDAY ONLY
2/28/12
with Gold Card with Gold Card
$
12
EYE ROUND
ROAST
PEPSI CUBES
24 PACK/12 OZ CANS
ALL VARITIES
LARGE GREEN
PEPPERS
HADDOCK
FILLETS
PSI C
SANDERSON FARMS
GRADEA
SPLIT CHICKEN BREAST
NARDONES
PIZZA
with Gold Card
with Gold Card with Gold Card
REDORWHITE
SEEDLESS
GRAPES
with Gold Card
EXCLUDINGITEM
WITH$10.00 PURCHASE
with Gold Card with Gold Card
lb. lb. 99

99

with Gold Card


BUY 1, GET 1
FREE
ICEBURG
LETTUCE
EXCLUDINGITEM
WITH$10.00 PURCHASE
lb.
2
88
EXCLUDINGITEM
WITH$10.00 PURCHASE
STROEHMANNS OR
SUNBEAMBREAD
ANY
SIZE
PACK
lb.
3
99
49

FAMILY SIZE
12
CUT
4
99
2/ lb. 99

20-24 OZ
FROZEN
If you are vacationing in or
passing through Savannah, Ge-
orgia, you might want to seek out
some of the best chocolate can-
dies in town at Paula Deens re-
tail store/restaurant.
As soon as you walk into the
shop, youll see a display of
chocolates by Adam Turoni, a
chocolatier and friend of Paula
Deen. Turoni is the son of Chris-
tine and the late Sam Turoni and
grandson of Frank and Theresa
Colella and Sonny Turoni, all of
Greater Pittston.
He sells his chocolates under
the name Chocolat by Adam
Turoni and is headquartered in
Savannah. But thats not where
he got his start.
Turoni has always had a pas-
sionfor baking, goingall the way
backtohis youthat his grandpar-
ents home in West Pittston. He
remembers holidays at the Colel-
la house filled with baked de-
lights and, in his high school
years, Turoni worked at Isabel-
las on Route 315 as the head
pastry chef.
After graduation, he entered
the Culinary Institute of Amer-
ica, learning from some of the
worlds best chefs. He honed his
trade in Berkeley, California, at
Chez Panisse but really learned
his craft with chocolate under
Chef Peter Greweling, known as
a chocolate guru.
Turoni found his way to Sa-
vannah where he worked at the
Wright Square Cafe as its choco-
latier and hasnt looked back
since.
He met Deen a few years ago
and, through their connection,
has appeared on her cooking
show on the Food Network. His
chocolate masterpieces are dis-
played in the gift shop of Pauls
Deens restaurant.
For more information go to
www.chocolatat.comor Turonis
facebook page: Chocolat by
Adam Turoni.
For Adam Turoni, chocolate is his life
Local native has gained fame for his chocolate in Savannah, Georgia
SUBMITTED PHOTO
AdamTuroni has worked with Paula Deen on her show on the
Food Network.
SUBMITTED PHOTO
While traveling through Savannah, local resident Allison Vozniak
met up with Chocolatier AdamTuroni. Turoni's momChristine and
his grandmother Theresa Colella were in town to help himmove
into a new residence. Shown here in front of Turoni's display at
Paula Deen's gift shop are, fromleft, Theresa Colella, Christine
and AdamTuroni and Allison Vozniak.
By Tony Callaio
Dispatch Correspondent
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
7
Standing:Tammy Strellish,Dr.Jeff Walker,Bridget DeGerolamo
Seated:Kerry Girman,Susan Smith
113 New Street Pittston 654-5551
Dr. Je Walker, DMD
Authorized Supplier of
PERFORMANCE MOUTHGUARDS
We Accept CareCredit
Conveniently located across from the Martin L.Mattei Middle School
COMPLETE COMPREHENSIVE DENTISTRY FORTHE ENTIRE FAMILY.
Participating With Most Insurances.
We Proudly Use The
Flood recovery in West Pittston, where
hundreds of homes are still uninhabitable
and many businesses are gone for good,
has to be about much more than FEMA
handing out checks, concerned citizens
say.
FEMA cannot provide enough money
to put West Pittston back together again,
but through a series of meetings the agen-
cy is providing guidance and ideas for re-
covery that will come from within the
community. The group of residents who
attended the last meeting agreed to take
on the name West Pittston Tomorrow
for the project.
The next of these meetings is next Sun-
day, March 5, at Wyoming Area high
school. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. and the
meeting begins at 7. Its open to the public
and West Pittston residents are especially
encouraged to attend.
Approximately100 people attended the
last meeting earlier this month. The FE-
MA representative, SheaBrianna Chris-
tlaw, who is a West Pittston native and
Wyoming Area graduate, suggested that
the attendees breakdown into smaller
groups or committees.
Ideas for committees were proffered
and housing, public safety, community
outreach, infrastructure/mitigation, natu-
ral and cultural resources and business ec-
onomics were agreed on.
These committees have been meeting
in advance of next Sundays meeting.
Joe Valenti addressed the last meeting
and agreed to develop a West Pittston To-
morrow website with links to the various
committees and other appropriate sites.
FEMA also suggested steps toward re-
covery such as:
Get a vision - bring the public togeth-
er to generate ideas
Work it out create subject-area
working groups or committees to identify
the project to accomplish the vision
Find partners secure the partners
that can bring the projects to reality
Create a plan develop a strategy to
bring it all together
Make it happen achieve goals with
partners.
While in a way these steps may sound
kind of vague, FEMAexplained that with
each meeting the steps become clearer.
Shickshinny is cited as an example of a
flooded community where the plans are
working.
WP residents called to meeting on flood recovery
West Pittston Tomorrow seeking input from residents at large
By Jack Smiles
The Sunday Dispatch named
Our Flooded Neighbors as
Persons of the Year for 2011.
Now we want to recognize each
of them by name.
The Dispatch will publish the
names of Greater Pittston resi-
dents who incurred flood dam-
age to their homes during the
September, 2011 flood in a spe-
cial tribute in the March18 issue.
We ask those who were flood-
ed and wish to be included in the
list to send your names to the
Dispatch, so that we can give you
proper recognition. The deadline
to submit names has been ex-
tended to Feb. 28.
Names can be emailed to the
Sunday Dispatch to jminsav-
age@psdispatch.com or mailed
or dropped off to the newspaper
at 109 New St., Pittston, PA
19840. If it is more convenient,
feel free to call Judy Minsavage
at 602-0168.
Send names exactly how you
wish them to appear. Feel free to
mention everyone in a family if
you desire.
Lithuanian Women
The LithuanianWomens Club
of WyomingValleywill meet at 1
p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28 at Bos-
covs, Wilkes-Barre. Lunch will
be at noon followed by a busi-
ness meeting chaired by Presi-
dent Martha Warnagiris.
Softball teams
Hughestown Girls League
softball teams will hold registra-
tion at 6:30 p.m. on Wednesday,
Feb. 29 in the borough building,
42 Center St. Girls between the
ages of 7 and 14 from Hughes-
townandoutlyingareas are eligi-
ble to sign up.
For information, call Dave
709-5727 or Joanne 313-0321.
Roast beef dinner
A roast beef dinner will be
held from5 to 7 p.m. on Wednes-
day, Feb. 29 at the Northmore-
land Twp. Vol. Fire Co. Center-
E V E N T S , M E E T I N G S , B R I E F S
Flooded? Send in your names; beef dinner Wednesday
See BRIEFS, Page 17
LOCALCHATTER
P
A
G
E
8
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
What are you chattin about? Call 602-0177 or email sd@psdispatch.com and let us know.
Impressions Media recog-
nized one of its own Friday, nam-
ing Stephen Morris as 2012
Salesperson of the Year.
Morris reached the most sales
goals among his peers to secure
the award and use of a 2011 Ford
Escape.
As a media consultant, Mor-
ris job is to persuade business
owners that the resources he can
bring to the advertising task are
an ideal fit for the customers
needs.
Often the link between the
newspaper and the community,
Morris builds, maintains and
manages a customer sales list, as
well as prospecting and develop-
ing new business.
The end result for advertisers
is results, Morris said.
His results speak for them-
selves.
The parent company of The
Times Leader, Impressions
Media includes such publica-
tions as the Sunday Dispatch,
The Dallas Post, Go Lackawan-
na and the Abington Journal.
Morris sells advertising space
throughout those publications as
well as for the web-based ver-
sions that appear online.
Across that wide array of ad-
vertising space, Morris reached
128 percent of his goal.
Vice President of Advertising
Denise Sellers noted Morris was
able to produce those numbers in
what currently is not an ideal
economy.
Despite economic challeng-
es, people realize they still need
to advertise, she said.
Stephen was able to pitch
that.
Even though Morris and his
fellow advertising representa-
tives work towards a common
goal, he acknowledged there is a
good-natured rivalry between
him and the other reps.
Amongst my peers there is a
competition, he said.
Morris won Salesperson of the
Month on more than one occa-
sion during the year but wasnt
certain the yearly award was
coming his way until being told
so in person.
It was no sure thing until it
was announced, he said. But I
was hopeful.
Morris lives in Plains Town-
ship with his wife, Colleen, and
11-year-old daughter, Danielle.
Its trulyanhonor tobe recog-
nized, he said.
Its great to be working with a
company that recognizes great
effort.
Theyre brand new
Wyoming Valley Medical
Center announced newborns.
A girl was born to Jenna and
Edward Yanchulis of Dupont
on Feb. 4.
A girl was born to Janee
Brown and Dwight Woods of
Exeter on Feb. 8.
A boy was born to Danielle
and William Moran of Wyom-
ing on Feb. 9.
A girl was born to Corinna
Gagliardi and Michael Dixon
of Exeter on Feb. 15.
Deans List
Felicia Featherby, daughter
of Annamarie Selecky, of West
WyomingandRussell Featherby,
of Moscow, has been named to
the deans list for 2011 fall se-
mester at Kutztown University.
A 2008 graduate of Wyoming
Area High School, she is major-
ing in Elementary Education
with concentrations in Reading
and Psychology.
She is the granddaughter of
Anthony C. Tavella, of Florida
andthe late Angeline Tavella and
Mary Featherby.
Molly Feeney, of West
Wyoming, and Andrew Jacko-
witz, of Moosic, have both been
named to the deans list at Fair-
field University for the fall 2011
semester.
Rachel Lombardo, of Pitt-
ston, has been named to the
deans list at Bloomsburg Uni-
versity. Lombardo is a sopho-
more at the university, pursuinga
degree in Education.
William Balasavage Jr., of
Inkerman, has been named to the
deans list for the Fall 2011 se-
mester.
A 2011 graduate of Pittston
Area High School, he is a fresh-
manat the JayS. SidhuSchool of
Business and Leadership at
Wilkes University, currentlypur-
suing his degree in Business Ad-
ministration. He travels to New
York City weekly to study acting
under the direction of Matt New-
ton.
Jillian Layaou, of Wyoming,
has been named to the deans list
at Slippery Rock State Universi-
ty for the 2011 fall semester. She
has been accepted to the College
International de Cannes in
France for the spring semester.
A 2009 graduate of Wyoming
Area High School, she is major-
ing in French secondary educa-
tion and minoring in Russian.
Birthday notes
Happy birthday wishes go to
Kim Dydish Davidson, of Flor-
ida, celebrating on March 3, Leo
Azaravich, AnnAmes andMa-
ry Ann Frank, all of Pittston,
and Anita Lizza, of Exeter, all
celebrating on March 7.
Brian Talipan, son of Debbie
and Pat Talipan, of Pittston
Township, will celebrate his 16th
birthday on Feb. 28.
Steve Morris named Salesperson of the Year
By Joe Dolinski
Times Leader intern
CLARK VAN ORDEN/THE TIMES LEADER
Denise Sellers (right) Vice-President of Advertising The Times Leader hands the keys to a 2011 Ford to Stephen Morris, Media Con-
sultant who was named Sales Person of the Year Friday.
Felicia Featherby
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
9
Former Luzerne County District Attorney
is now
Available at her
LawOfces
at
126 S. Main Street
Pittston, PA
(Across from the Gramercy
Ballroom and Restaurant)
655-1500
Call For An
Appointment
Areas of Practice:
PERSONAL INJURY
Auto Accidents Trucking Accidents
Wrongful Death Slip and Fall
Dog Bites Personal Liability
FAMILYLAW
Divorce Support
Custody Alimony
REAL ESTATE TRANSACTIONS
AProven Record of Fighting for You
WILLS &ESTATES
Jackie Musto Carroll
PREMIUMHEATINGOIL
Call Today
For The Best Price!
Avoca, Dupont, Duryea, Jenkins Twp., Pittston,
West Pittston, Wyoming, West Wyoming, and Exeter
Call Today 570-654-3441
100 gallon minimum
(prices subject to change)
Wholesale Distributor Of Gulf Gasoline
SABATELLES
An Authentic Italian
MEAT MARKET &
FINE FOOD STORE
114-116 S. MAIN ST., PITTSTON 654-4616 - 654-4617
We Deliver WE ACCEPT FOOD STAMPS HOME OF BELLA BASKETS
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 27TH THRU SUNDAY, MARCH 4TH
RE-OPENING ON MONDAY, MARCH 5TH at 8:00AM
WE WILL BE ON A
WINTER VACATION
Greater Pittston Friendly Sons
of St. Patrick President Patrick
Gilligan announced that Charles
J. Grimes, of Jenkins Township,
will receive the Greater Pittston
Friendly Sons of St. Patrick
Achievement Award when the
organization gathers on March
17 for the 98th annual St. Pa-
tricks Day Banquet and that
James Red OBrien will serve
as toastmaster.
It was announced previously
that Joe Long will serve as Gen-
eral Chairman for banquet that
will be held at 5:30 p.m. on Sat-
urday, March 17, at the Wood-
lands Inn and Resort, Route 315,
Plains.
James (Jim) R. Wills, Jr., Dep-
uty Chief of the consolidated
Kingston-Forty Fort Fire De-
partment and a Pittston native,
has been named grand marshal.
Avoca native, Richard (Dick)
Callahan, the voice of the Oak-
land As baseball team, will re-
turn to the Greater Pittston Area
as principal speaker.
Banquet tickets are available
from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. any
Wednesday night at the Pittston
Knights of Columbus or by con-
tacting any active member of the
Greater Pittston Friendly Sons of
St. Patrick. The event is usually a
sell-out.
Grimes was born in Plymouth
on Nov. 9, 1946, the son of Jo-
seph and Helen Grimes. He re-
ceived his early education at St.
Vincents Catholic School and
later at Plymouth High School.
He began his career in 1970 as a
driver/sales representative with
Freedman Express and retired
after 15 years with Conway
Freight.
He is a sustaining Fourth De-
gree member and past Grand
Knight of the President John F.
Kennedy Council #372 Knights
of Columbus. He is a member
and past president of the Friend-
ly Sons of St. Patrick.
Grimes currently volunteers
his time with his wife, Rose Fe-
rentino Grimes, for Meals on
Wheels of Greater Pittston and
the Salvation Army.
They are parents of six chil-
dren, Jacqueline Robbins and
her husband, Thomas, of Mur-
rieta, CA; Joseph Grimes and his
wife, Dawn, of Drums; Maurice
Ferentino and his wife, Ann, of
Pittston; Jude Ferentino and his
wife, Lori, of Jenkins Twp; Jason
Ferentino and his wife, Tiffany,
of Duryea; and Jarrett Ferentino,
Esq. and his wife, Dr. Nicole Fe-
rentino, of Laflin. Theyalsohave
13 grandchildren.
James Red OBrien is the
son of Jack OBrien and Marie
McGlynn OBrien both resi-
9 8 T H A N N U A L S T. PAT R I C K S D AY B A N Q U E T
Grimes to receive Friendly Sons Achievement Award
Red OBrien toastmaster for annual Friendly Sons of St. Patrick event
Charles J. Grimes James Red O'Brien
See FRIENDLY SONS, Page 24
P
A
G
E
1
0
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
MATTERS OF FAITH
email items for this page to sd@psdispatch.com; fax to 602-0183
St. Josephs Senior Social
Club will set The St. Josephs
Table inhonor of St. Joseph, pa-
tron saint, at their regular sched-
uled meeting on Thursday,
March15, at 2:00p.m. inOur La-
dy of Mt. Carmels Church Hall.
La Tavola di San Guiseppe,
an ancient Sicilian tradition dat-
ingbacktothe Middle Ages, was
brought to New Orleans by Sici-
lian immigrants in gratitude to
St. Joseph for answering prayers
for deliverance from a severe
draught that resulted in countless
number of deaths due to famine.
A three tier altar representing
the Holy Trinity and Holy Fam-
ily will be assembled with vari-
ous foods such as breads, pasta,
fruits, vegetables, pastry and the
fava bean. In Sicily, the fava bean
was grown for fodder for cattle
but because of its resilience it be-
came the sustaining food during
the famine.
Rev. Joseph Sibliano, pastor of
St. Joseph Marello Church, hon-
oredguest, will bless the altar, ta-
bles and bread that will be dis-
tributed to the attendees.
Peter, Alicia and Joseph Ado-
nizio will represent the Holy
Family. Members of the club and
attendees named Joseph or Jose-
phine will be recognized in hon-
or of their feast day.
The food for the altar and lun-
cheon is being prepared by
members and guests. Attendees
are askedtobringcannedfoodor
dry staples to be placed at the
foot of the altar. According to
custom the food will be used to
feed the hungry. The collected
items will be donated to St. John
the Evangelist Church, Greater
Pittston Food Pantry.
Danny Argo and Friend Fran-
kie will provide music.
The public is invited to attend.
Reservations must be made by
calling Maria Capolarella Mon-
tante at 655-2398 or Theresa Or-
mando at 654-2967.
Members of the St. Josephs
Senior Social Club will attend
Mass on Monday, March 19, the
feast day of St. Joseph, at the Ob-
lates of St. Joseph Seminary in
Laflinat 10:30a.m. Rev. Paul Mc
Donnell will offer the mass. A
luncheon at Perkins will follow.
HAM AND CABBAGE
A ham and cabbage dinner
will be served on Saturday,
March 10, at Wyoming United
Methodist Church, 376 Wyom-
ing Avenue.
Serving is 4-6:30p.m. Cost:
Adults $9.00 and Children (5-
12) $5.00. Take-outs will be
available.
LENTEN RETREAT
The Josephite-Marellian Laity
Association will host a Lenten
Retreat, next Sunday, March4, at
the Oblates of St. Joseph Semi-
nary, Route 315, Laflin. The re-
treat begins at 2:00 p.m. with a
talk by Sr. Redempta Sweeney,
IHM, followed by adoration of
the Blessed Sacrament, confes-
sions, Stations of the Cross and
the celebration of Holy Mass
(suffices the Sunday Mass obli-
gation).
The retreat is free and open to
the public. For more informa-
tion, call the seminary office at
654-7542.
LENTEN CONCERTS
In a 63-year tradition of inspir-
ing prayer and meditation
through music, the Catholic
Choral Society will present Len-
ten Concerts on March 4 in
Wilkes-Barre and on March11in
Pittston.
The first concert on March 4
will be held at St. Andrew Par-
ish, 316 Parrish St., Wilkes-
Barre, on Sunday afternoon, at 3
p.m. The pastor of St. Andrews
Church is Rev. James E. McGa-
hagan while the Permanent Dea-
con is Francis J. Bradigan Jr.
The second concert will be
presentedat St. Johnthe Evange-
list Parish ,35 William Street,
Pittston on Sunday, March 11 at
2:30p.m. The pastor of St. Johns
Church is Msgr. John J. Bendik
while the assistant pastor is Rev.
Richard J. Cirba. The senior
priest is Rev. Hugh H. McGroar-
ty and the deacons are James G.
Cortegerone and David E. Marx.
Both concerts are open to the
public free of charge.
Dr. Thomas Rittenhouse and
Brenda Grunza are co-presi-
dents of the Catholic Choral So-
ciety. Ann Manganiello is music
director of this group while Jean
Shields is accompanist.
Further information may be
obtained by calling 570-587-
2753 and also atwww.catholi-
cchoralsociety.org.
PEDIATRIC CLINIC
The Care and Concern Pediat-
ric Health Clinic, located in the
former Seton Catholic School
building on William Street in
Pittston, will be open the first
and third Thursday of each
month.
Free healthcare is providedfor
infants through age 11. Registra-
tion is from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m.
Participants should bring your
childs immunization records
with them. Parents or guardians
must be present to have their
child examined. All services are
free and confidential.
The clinic is sponsored by the
Care and Concern ministries of
the Parish Community of St.
John the Evangelist, Msgr. John
Bendik, Pastor. For more infor-
mation call 855-6035.
PORK AND SAUERKRAUT
Saint Andrew Parish, 316 Par-
rish St., Wilkes-Barre, will hold
its annual Kaffee Klatsch Pork
and Sauerkraut Dinner today,
Sunday, Feb. 19, serving from
11:30 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Both take
outs and served dinners will be
available throughout that time
period. The tradition of the Pre-
Lenten Pork and Sauerkraut
Dinner began as a coffee and
dessert social before Lent at
Saint Boniface Parish in Wilkes-
Barre in 1901 and in the 1940s
became a pork and sauerkraut
dinner. The menu includes slow
roasted pork roast, mashed pota-
toes, sauerkraut, green beans
with bacon, coffee or tea, and
dessert. The event will also in-
clude a Bake Sale and a Theme
Basket Raffle.
The tradition is being main-
tained at Saint Andrew parish
which is a consolidation of the
former parishes of Saint Boni-
face, Saint Patrick and Holy
Rosary. Tickets, which are $9.00
for adults and $4.50 for children
under 12, will be available at the
door.
REFORMED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
OF WYOMING VALLEY
1700 Wyoming Avenue, Forty-
Fort
Pastor Rev. R.F. Dymond
Morning Worship: 10:30 a.m.
Bible School: 11:45 a.m.
Wednesday evening prayer
service: 6:30 p.m. every other
Wednesday
Visitors are welcome. For ad-
ditional information call 570-
693-1918
BENNETT PRESBYTERIAN
501 Bennett Street, Luzerne
Everyone is welcome. The
church is handicap accessible.
BETHEL UNITED
METHODIST
Main St., Avoca
11:15 a.m. Worship
BRICK UNITED
METHODIST
905 Foote Ave., Duryea
Pastor Michael Shambora
Service: Sunday 9:45 a.m.
CHRISTIAN AND
MISSIONARY ALLIANCE
CHURCH
Luzerne Ave. and Parke Street
West Pittston
Origins The Foundation of
Creation and Man Part will be
held from 7 to 8:15 p.m. Mar. 4
through May 13. The study is
open to Bible students and well
as interested individuals. Pre-
registration is recommended by
calling the church office 654-
2500.
The 9th Annual Sportsmans
Beast Feast will be held at 6 p.m.
on Saturday, Mar. 24, at the
church. A buffet of wild game
and domestic offerings are fea-
tured. Event is open to the public
and free of charge. For reserva-
tions call the church office at
654-2500 by Monday, Mar. 19.
Christs Community Clothes
Closet will be open from 6 to 8
p.m. on Wednesday and Thurs-
days. The closet will be closed
on days that Pittston and Wyom-
ing Area School Districts are
closed due to weather or holi-
days. There are clothes for men,
women and children.
This community ministry is
open to the public free of charge.
For more information, call 654-
2500.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Water Street, Pittston
Sunday 9:30 a.m. Worship and
Praise Service/Childrens Sun-
day School, Adult/Teen Sunday
School immediately following
service.
Rev. James H. Breese, pastor,
Traditional table will honor St. Joseph
The First United Methodist Church of West
Pittston will hold a pizza sale Friday, March 2.
Pizza can be ordered baked or unbaked with or
without onions. Cost of a tray is $11. Toppings
of sweet red peppers, pepperoni or sausage can
be added for $2 each.
Broccoli, tomato and garlic pizzas are $14 per
tray. Vegetable pizza is $13 and includes, toma-
toes, onions, broccoli, red peppers and mush-
room, no cheese.
To order called the church office at 655-1083,
or just walk in.
UM Church pizza sale Friday
See FAITH, Page 11
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
1
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
HIC# PA-005521 655-6710
Flat Roofs Shingles Siding
Replacement Windows
Free Estimates
Licensed & Insured
Owens Corning Shingles Now Come With A
Limited Lifetime Warranty. Call For Details!
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
457 North Main Street, Suite 101
Pittston, PA 18640
655-0300
Skibitsky & Molino is a full service, general
practice law rm that handles a broad range
of legal matters including:
Personal Injury
Workers Compensation
Social Security Disability
Family Law
(Divorce/Custody/Support)
Bankruptcy
Real Estate Transactions
and Closings
Wills,Trusts, Living Wills,
Powers of Attorney
Estate Administration
Corporations/Business Law
Landlord-Tenant
Collections
Municipal Law
Please call us for a free consultation.
ATTY. GREGORY S. SKIBITSKY, JR.
GSkibitsky@skibitskyandmolino.com
ATTY. GENE M. MOLINO
GMolino@skibitskyandmolino.com
655-0300
will conduct a series of Commu-
nity Lenten Services every
Wednesday during Lent at 7:15
p.m. The message will be The
Suffering Servant. Everyone is
welcome and invited to attend.
For more information, please
contact the church at 654-0283.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
UCC
500 Luzerne Avenue
West Pittston
Rev. Joan Mitchell, Pastor
Sanctuary is handicapped ac-
cessible.
Sunday Worship Service 11
a.m.
Tuesday, 7 p.m. Diaconate
Meeting; 7:30 p.m. Church
Council Meeting
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
14 Broad Street Pittston
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
with Rev. William N. Lukesh.
FIRST UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
West Pittston
Rev. James Thyren
654-8121
Feb. 26 10 a.m. Sunday
School, 11 a.m. Worship, 12:05
p.m. choir rehearsal; 12:05 p.m.
Deacons sponsored Soup-off.
Services are being held at St.
Cecilias Roman Catholic
Church, Wyoming Ave., Exeter,
as the church recovers from the
flood of September 2011. There
is parking on Wyoming Avenue
and in the lot behind the church.
FULL GOSPEL CHAPEL
Avoca
Weekly church schedule is:
Adult Sunday School, 9:30;
Sunday morning worship at
10:30 a.m.; Wednesday evening
Bible study and prayer service at
7:00.
The churchalsohosts the Rose
of Sharon Church with Rev. Vin-
cente Torres on Sunday after-
noon at 3:00 p.m. for the Hispan-
ic community.
FIRST UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
West Pittston
Feb. 26 - 10 a.m. Worship,
Sunday school during Worship
Feb. 27 - 7 p.m. Boy Scouts,
Class 18 making Welsh Cookies
Feb. 28. 6 p.m. Lenten Bible
study, 7 p.m. trustees
Feb. 29. 10 a.m. Mommy &
me, 5 p.m. Strings &wings, 6:30
TOPS, 7 p.m. Choir
Mar. 1 5 p.m. Holistic Moms
group, 6 p.m. Girl Scouts, 7 p.m.
Weight Watchers
Mar. 2 Pizza Sale.
GLENDALE GOSPEL
CHURCH
105 Church Drive
Glendale/Pittston Township
Sunday Service 10:45 a.m.
HARDING CHURCH OF
CHRIST
RR 1 Box 187A, Falls
Sunday services: 10:00 a.m.
Sunday School and 11:00 a.m.
Church Service.
Call 388-6534 www.harding-
churchofchrist.org
HOLY MOTHER OF
SORROWS PNCC
212 Wyoming Avenue, Dupont
Rev. Zbigniew Dawid, Pastor
Sunday Mass schedule: 8:00
a.m. Traditional Mass; 9:15 a.m.
School of Christian Living
(SOCL) and Confirmation
Class; 10:30 a.m. Traditional
High Mass
Daily Mass 9:00 a.m. Monday
through Saturday.
Lenten Devotions, Stations of
the Cross will be held at 7:00
p.m. every Wednesday.
Bitter Lamentations will be
celebrated every Friday at 7:00
p.m.
Lenten Potato Pancake and
Clam Chowder Dinner will be
held on Friday, March 23. Serv-
ing will be 2:00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Takeouts are available from1:00
p.m. Donation is $7.00 which in-
cludes pancakes, soup, dessert
and beverage. For dinner tickets
you can contact Arnold Borc at
654-8175.
Potato cheese pierogie are still
available and can be purchased
after Masses on Sunday at the
church hall.
INDEPENDENT BIBLE
CHURCH
328 Main Street
Duryea, PA18642
(570) 451-0346 Home/Office
JLaCava@TheBible-
Church.org
INKERMAN
PRESBYTERIAN
Main St., Inkerman
Services: Sundays, 9 a.m.
LANGCLIFFE
PRESBYTERIAN
1001 Main St Avoca
Sunday worship 11:15 a.m.
The Langcliffe Church is
handicapped accessible. Nurs-
ery is provided for children dur-
ing worship.
The Care for Soldiers program
continues. To date, over 50 care
packages have been sent to ser-
vicemen and women overseas.
MOOSIC ALLIANCE
CHURCH
608 Rocky Glen Road, Moosic
Pastor: DougJensen457-6020
maccma2@verizon.net
Sunday morning Sunday
School for all ages at 9:30 a.m.
Sunday morning Worship at
10:45 a.m.
Prayer meeting, Wednesdays
at 7:00 p.m.
Celebrate Recovery Ministry,
Thursdays at 7:30 p.m.
Faith
Continued from Page 10
See FAITH, Page 12
P
A
G
E
1
2
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Dancing with
the Stars
Edyta
SPOTLIGHT SPOTLIGH SPOTLIGH
Dance Studio 570-540-5910
405 Main St. Duryea
Church of St. Maria Goretti
Lain Road, Lain
Monsignor Neil J. Van Loon
and the Parish Community
Cordially Invite All
SUNDAY, MARCH 4, 2012
Noon to 5:00 P.M.
Dinner includes: Salad, Bread/Butter,
Beverage, Dessert
Take Outs: Noon to 4 P.M.
(containers will be provided)
Tickets At the door $9:00
Children 5 years old and under are FREE for Eat-in only
Church of St Ma
Homemade
Pasta &
Sausage
Dinner
Facilities are Handicapped Accessible
Ample and Free Parking
OBLATES OF ST. JOSEPH
Highway 315, Pittston
Masses are held daily in the
seminary chapel at 7:00 a.m.
(Monday Friday) and on Sat-
urday mornings at 8:00 a.m.
There are no weekend Masses.
Confessions are heard daily
from 9:00 a.m. noon and from
3:00 6:00 p.m.
Office hours are Monday
Friday: 9:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m.,
evenings and weekends by ap-
pointment. Office phone num-
ber is 654-7542.
Mass is celebrated at 7 p.m.
every Wednesday in conjunction
with the Novena to St. Joseph &
St. Joseph Marello. Novena
prayers and the blessing of the
first-class relic of St. Joseph Ma-
rello, Founder of the Oblates of
Saint Joseph Congregation, im-
mediately follow the Mass. All
are welcome.
Living the Eucharist for Teens
is set for 6 to 7:30 p.m. on Febru-
ary 27, March 5, 12, 19, and 26,
(Mondays) at the seminary.
Kathy Yaklic, theology teacher
at HolyCross HighSchool, Dun-
more, will be the presenter. The
$20 fee includes cost of the
workbook. Five or more students
fromone parish or school can at-
tend for a total of $75. To register
for the above program, call 207-
2213, ext. 1107.
The province and seminary
website will soon be undergoing
a complete revamping in the
weeks and months ahead. You
can follow the changes just by
clicking on towww.oblates-stjo-
seph.com
Tune into Catholic Radio 750
AM. The radio studio is located
in the seminary building and is
broadcast daily from dawn to
dusk. For more information
about this station, contact Ed
Niewinski at 287-4670.
There will be an organization-
al meeting for FUN FEST 12on
Wednesday evening, Feb. 29, af-
ter the 7:00pm Mass & Novena
toSt. Joseph&St. JosephMarel-
lo. Plans will be discussedfor the
event that is scheduled for the
weekend of August 25-26 on the
seminary grounds. All are wel-
come to be a part of the plan-
ning!
Monthly Vocation Holy Hour
will be held on Thursday, March
1, at 7:00pm. The Holy Hour in-
cludes adoration of the Blessed
Sacrament, recitation of the ros-
ary with vocation-theme myster-
ies, Scriptural reflection, ser-
mon, general intercessions and
benediction. All are invited to
come and pray for an increase of
priestly and religious vocations
in the Church, particularly in the
Oblates of St. Joseph and in our
local diocese.
Blue Army First Friday Prayer
Vigil will be held on Friday,
March 2, beginning with rosary
and confessions at 8:00pm, fol-
lowed by Mass to the Sacred
Heart of Jesus, exposition of the
Blessed Sacrament with private
adoration and public prayers, de-
votions to the Immaculate Heart
of Mary and scapular enroll-
ment. The evening of prayer is
open to everyone.
Annual Saint Joseph Novena
will begin on Saturday, March
10th, and conclude on the Feast
of St. Joseph, March19th. Mass-
es will be held daily at 10:30am
& 7:00pm with novena prayers
to St. Joseph following. Preach-
ing this years novena will be Fa-
ther Robert D. Dwyer, a priest
from the Diocese of Syracuse,
who served in various parish &
diocesan assignments, along
with missionary activity in Ke-
nya and with the Glenmary mis-
sionaries in Mississippi. Mark
your calendars and plan to at-
tend!
For more news and informa-
tion about the Oblates of Saint
Joseph locally and around the
world, turn towww.oblates-stjo-
seph.com.
ST. JOSEPH MARELLO
PARISH
OUR LADY OF
MT. CARMEL
ST. ROCCOS
Pittston
Weekday Masses: Monday
through Friday at 7:30 & 11:30
a.m. at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
Church.
Every Tuesday after the 7:30
& 11:30 a.m. Mass, Novena
prayers to the Miraculous Medal
and Mother Cabrini.
Every Tuesday at 7:00 p.m.
Holy Hour at our Lady of Mr.
Carmel Church.
Every Wednesday after the
7:30 &11:30 a.m. Mass, Novena
prayers to Saint Joseph and St.
Joseph Marello.
Weekend Masses: At Our La-
dy of Mt. Carmel Church, on
Saturday at 4:00 &7:00 p.m. and
on Sunday at 8:00 & 11:00 a.m.
At St. Rocco Church, on Satur-
day at 5:30 p.m. and on Sunday
at 9:30 a.m.
Any homebound parishioner
who would like to receive Holy
Communion, should call the
Rectory at 654-6902.
Public and parochial school
students in sixth, seventh and
eighth grades who belong to St.
Joseph Marello Parish will re-
ceive the sacrament of Confir-
mation at 5 p.m. on Friday, April
13, in Our Lady of Mt. Carmel
Church. If they have not done so,
Confirmation candidates should
write a brief letter to Fr. Sibiliano
expressing their desire to receive
the sacrament and should be
working on their report explain-
ing their choice of Saint and
name for Confirmation. The re-
port is due February 19. Parents
of parochial school students who
have not contacted the church
and who have not received infor-
mation regarding Confirmation
requirements should call the
CCD director, Terrie Audi, at
654-3326 as soon as possible.
Mt. Carmel Senior Choir will
hold rehearsal from 7 to 8:30
p.m. on Mondays. St. Rocco Se-
nior Choir will resume weekly
rehearsals at 7:30 p.m. on Tues-
days in the choir loft of St. Rocco
Church.
St. Joseph Marello Parish Raf-
fle is now underway. Buy your
tickets now for a chance to win
2012 Chevrolet Cruz or $20,000
Tickets are $20 each and only
2,000 tickets will be sold. Seller
of the winning ticket receives
$500. Call Connie Toole-655-
3681, Frank Sciabacucchi 655-
6125, Pena Hansen-332-5989, or
the rectory office-654-6902.
A special thank you to all who
participated in the Italian Festiv-
al this past weekend. It began
with beautiful and special music
and singing at the Italian Mass
with the senior choir and con-
cluded with wonderful foods
prepared by our volunteers for
the seating of our large crowds.
Some students of the Confirma-
Faith
Continued from Page 11
See FAITH, Page 13
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
3
Unique Cake Creations
Tired of the same old cake?
Let us create a Truly Incredible Cake
That will excite all your senses!
Let the
CAKE FAIRY
work her magic
for you!
Plus...
Candy Platters,
Baskets and a
wide variety of
Gourmet Apples
also available
Call Samantha at 655-3238
Saporito, Saporito & Falcone
Attorneys At Law
William J. Watt, III, Esquire; Samuel A. Falcone, Jr., Esquire;
Joseph F. Saporito, Jr., Esquire; Carlo J. Saporito
Representing the Seriously Injured
-Since 1946
Auto Accidents
Personal Injury
Social Security Disability
Workers Compensation
654-4643
490 N. Main Street
Suite 202, Pittston
tion class did a great job with
helping to keep the area clean
and ready to go all weekend.
Raffle winners:
1st Prize: Joe and Carol Blan-
cato; 2nd Prize:Francis X. Sola-
no; 3rd Prize: Mary Alt; 4th
Prize: Joseph Latona; 5th Prize:
Tina LoBrutto; 6th Prize: Janet
Rizzo; 7th Prize: Vincenta Zar-
ra; 8thPrize: Baccinari; 9thPrize
Mary Ann Musto.
The Italian basket donated by
Graziano Funeral Home was
won by Frances Fasciana.
To rent the Parish Banquet
Hall or meeting roomcall Chris-
tine Silinskie, Hall Manager, at
704-8861 for details and/or a
tour of the facility.
Stations of the Cross every
Friday during Lent at. Mt. Car-
mel Church after the 11:30 Mass
andat 5:00p.m. withthe Euchar-
istic Benediction.
At St. Roccos Church, Sta-
tions of the Cross follow every
Friday 11:30 a.m. Mass.
The Fridays of Lent are meat-
less days. Ash Wednesday and
Good Friday are meatless and
fasting days from 18th birthday
up to 60.
Operation Rice Bowl: A Len-
ten programof sacrifice, eat a re-
ducedmeal eachweek, andplace
the savings in a family Rice
Bowl. Participate in this pro-
gramto help people and children
who have no food. Containers
are at the entrances of the
Church.
Practice for the new Altar
Servers will be held on Saturday
at 11:00 a.m. at Mt. Carmel
Church. Any child from third
grade up may be an Altar Server.
To serve at the Altar of God is a
special privilege that you receive
from God.
The First Communion Class
members will receive the Sacra-
ment of Reconciliation this af-
ternoon, Sunday, at 1 p.m. in
preparation for the solemn day
when they will receive Jesus for
the first time in the Holy Euchar-
ist, Sunday, May 5.
Class members: Joshua Ada-
metz, Jack Albert, Charles Ba-
liatico, Isabella Bartalotta, An-
gelo (AJ) Borino, Ben Bowen,
Elizabeth Casey, Tyler Cegelka,
Alexsander Chilson, Zachary
Chilson, Frank DAiello, Aman-
da Fath, Seth Gale, Luke Galli,
Gabrielle Gattuso, Nicholas
Giardina, David Girman, Da-
niella Granahan, Marissa Gubi-
toso, Kevin Herron, Matthew
Kellogg, Olivia Kiwak, Katie
Koss, Jack Locker, Lauren Lo-
Presto, Mariah Mahasky, Con-
nor Manganiello, Hannah Merli-
no, Lidia Janel Marranca, Rob-
ert Louis Miller, Jiana Moran,
Kyle Norton, John Ozark, Aria-
na Pisano, Alexander Prete, Ka-
rissa Renfer, Olivia Sennettoc-
chiato, Robert Sedlak, Ava Seri-
no, Kyleigh Shupp, Ryan Smith,
Bethany Sromoski, Kevin Tali-
pan, Abigal Tirva, Salvatore Tu-
ronis, Christian Wasko, Sage
Weidlich and Alexis Wesnak.
OUR LADY OF THE
EUCHARIST PARISH
535 N Main Street, Pittston
Mass Schedule
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. and 10:30
a.m.
Daily Mass: 8:00 a.m.
Sacrament of Reconciliation
(Confessions)
Saturday from 3:30 p.m. to
3:45 p.m. and by appointment
All Religious Education class-
es are held for Grades 1 thru 7
from 9:15 a.m. to 10:15 a.m. in
the Religious Education Center.
Stations of the Cross will be
celebrated every Friday in Lent
at 7:00 p.m. On Friday, March 9,
all are invited to meet in the par-
ish hall before Stations to share
soup, bread and fellowship.
Sign-up sheets can be found in
the back of the Church.
Rehearsals for the Adult Choir
will be held on Wednesdays
from 7:00-8:00 p.m. Michael
Sowa, Director of Music Minis-
try, invites all current members
as well as those who are interest-
ed in joining for the first time.
The Adult Choir will sing for the
Road to the Resurrection
Mass on Wednesday, March 7 at
7:00 p.m., as well as the Masses
and services during the Easter
Triduum. Rehearsals for the
Childrens Choir will be held on
Thursdays from 6:00-7:00 p.m.
The Childrens Choir will sing
for Family Masses throughout
the rest of the school year and al-
so for the 10:30 a.m. Mass on
Easter Sunday. If you have ques-
tions about either the Adult
Choir or Childrens Choir, please
see Michael after any Mass or
call him at 881-2301.
The next meeting for the Pitt-
ston Catholic Youth Group will
be on Sunday, March 11, 2012
from5:00 to 6:30 p.m. in the Re-
ligious Education Center. All
youth of the Greater Pittston Ar-
ea are invited to participate in the
youth group.
The dates, sites and speakers
are nowin place for Road to Res-
urrection. The first step on our
journey will be this Wednesday,
Feb. 29, at St. Maria Goretti, La-
flin. Fr. Gerard Shantillo from
St. Judes, Mountaintop will be
the speaker. Wednesday, March
7, will be at Our Lady of the Eu-
charist with Fr. Joseph Elston,
Chaplain, Holy Redeemer High
School; Wednesday March 14,
will be at Queen of the Apostles,
Avoca with Fr. Edward Buch-
heit, CPfromSt. Anns Monaste-
ry; Wednesday, March21, will be
at St. Joseph Marello Parish, Our
Lady of Mount Carmel worship
site with Fr. Louis Grippe, Most
Precious Blood, Hazelton; and
the final will be on Wednesday,
March 28, at St John the Evange-
list with Fr. Philip Altavilla, St.
Peters Cathedral. All Masses be-
gin at 7:00 p.m. and all are invit-
ed to walk this journey together.
Introductory yoga classes will
be offered free of charge to de-
termine if there is interest. Call
the parish office at 654-0263 for
more information.
YOGA for Absolute Begin-
ners: This class is a must for
those interested in learning more
about yoga and its benefits.
Learn the fundamental poses,
the power of deep breathing and
how to deeply relax. Dress com-
fortably. Bring a yoga mat and
blanket. Open to all ages. No pri-
or experience needed. Class
date: March 1, 7-8:30 p.m.
TOTALYOGAfor Strength &
Relaxation: this class offers a
comprehensive yoga experi-
ence and is ideal for those with
some yoga background. Come
experience all the ways that yoga
strengthens and tones the body
as well as its capacity to deeply
relax. Class ends with a deep re-
laxation process that is not to be
missed. Dress comfortably.
Bring a yoga mat and blanket.
Open to all ages. Class date:
March 15, 7-8:30 p.m.
Gentle Yoga for Seniors:
breathe, move, strengthen, re-
new, relax. Join us for this gentle
yoga practice designed to in-
crease awareness, flexibility,
strength & relaxation. Bring a
Faith
Continued from Page 12
See FAITH, Page 18
P
A
G
E
1
4
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
In a letter on this page, parents of stu-
dents who attend the Sarah J. Dymond
Elementary School in Harding ask for fel-
lowtaxpayer support at Tuesdays Wyom-
ing Area School Board meeting to help
deter proposed plans to close the school.
At first blush, the motives of this group
may seem self-serving, but regardless,
whocanblame themfor tryingtopreserve
a gem that has served them well?
Wyoming Area is one of the fewschool
districts to still have neighborhood
schools for its youngest students and,
weve always believed this is part of the
districts charm. While the trend in educa-
tion as been toward kindergarten and ele-
mentarycenters fewcanargue that such
centers are driven by anything other than
economics. The small, neighborhood
school provides an atmosphere conducive
to learning for young students that simply
cannot be matched by larger, less personal
schools requiring lengthy bus rides to and
fro.
That said, the economics of running a
school district in todays day and age can-
not be ignored. The Wyoming Area dis-
trict has always suffered from a tax base
devoid of large industry and, while its
early to say, the September flood is sure to
further erode that tax base.
The WA school directors have a lot to
deal with, but were hopingtheycanfinda
creative way to manage the districts fi-
nancial shortfalls without drastic mea-
sures that may not best serve the students.
Dymond
a real gem
We, the parents of Sarah J. Dymond (SJD) Elementary School
students have been told by the School Board that they are seri-
ously considering closing SJD and raising taxes to reduce their
budget shortfalls. As concerned parents, we are asking for your
support by joining us at the next school board meeting scheduled
for 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28.
The boards current plan involves two major changes to the
Wyoming Area School District. The first is to move all of the
elementary schools from the current neighborhood school for-
mat to their proposed Learning Center format. The Learning
Center format involves not only closing a school, but also send-
ing all of the children from grade groups - such as K, primary
middle - to a designated building.
Second, the school board is calling for raising school taxes.
The maximumincrease allowed is for an adjusted index of 2.3%.
Thats 0.2977 mills for Luzerne County district residents and
1.1672 mills for Wyoming County school district residents.
According to the school boards early budget figures, these
proposals will not cover their budget deficit.
As concerned taxpayers, we believe now is the time to thor-
oughlyexamine the financial impact directlyrelatedtoall school
district costs moving forward.
We encourage all of the taxpayers and especially the parents
who have a son or daughter attending any of the Wyoming Area
Elementary Schools to show your support.
Ask your questions about what impact these proposals will
have on your children for the coming years.
John and Tara Bonin
Jami and Mike Brown
Sherry and Dan Darby
Nicole and James Gashi
Craig and Jodi Weiskerger
Proud parents of Sarah J. Dymond students
Taxpayers, parents urged to attend WA board meeting
OUROPINION
Whats at stake at the meeting planned
for Monday, March 5, at 7 p.m. at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Center (see
story, page 7)? Only the future of West
Pittston. Wish we could say we are being
melodramatic, but the fact is West Pittston
finds itself at a crossroads only exacerbat-
ed by the flooding in September. Known
as The Garden Village, and for good
reason, the borough seems to have be-
come less of a garden in recent years and
even less of a village.
Maybe its a sign of the times and may-
be no town is what it once was. But West
Pittston has a proud heritage with a num-
ber of residents who take that seriously.
Mondays meeting is designed to put in
place plans to ensure West Pittstons fu-
ture is as rich as its past. Anyone who
agrees should clear their calendars and be
sure to attend.
West Pittston
YOUROPINION
In an article appearing on page 4 today, Nicole Waxmonsky Tu, a Greater Pittston native who nowlives in the Twin Cities area of
Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota, says she and her husband, Haink Tu, bike everywhere and in all kinds of weather, including ice
and snow. We ride all the time, Waxmonsky Tu is quoted. We use bikes for transportation. Its pretty easy to ride out here; its part
of the culture in Minnesota. When it snows, they sometimes plowthe bike path before the road. This photo she provided of herself
proves riding in snow is the Minnesota way.
The Dispatchwelcomes photos for Your Space. Dropoff or mail tothe Sunday Dispatch, 109NewSt., Pittston, PA18640or email to
sd@psdispatch.com
YO U R S PA C E
Neither rain, nor snow, nor sleet
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
5
Time was when the sight of a black or brown face in traffic or
on a sidewalk around here would turn a few heads. Thats chang-
ing. Our population, while still vastly Caucasian, is diversifying.
Historically, though, our area has little to offer up for Black
History month in February with one very notable exception
Edgar Patience. And, heck, come to think of it the whole Patience
family was, and is, pretty darn interesting.
Edgar, a West Pittston native, was a significant 20th century
artist, a sculptor whose medium was anthracite coal.
Edgar was one of six sons of Harry Brazier Patience. Harrys
father, Edgars grandfather, was Crowder Patience a North Car-
olina runaway slave who was freed by the Union Armys 103rd
Pennsylvania Infantry Brigade in January of 1864. He enlisted into
the 103rd on the spot, saw some action and when the war ended
went back to Harrisburg with the 103rd. He mustered out there in
July of 1865, married a local girl named Elsie Vedan and got a job
as a teamster.
On a job Crowder drove a team up to Pittston. He liked the area
and settled in West Pittston, where he worked as a stableman for
the Carpenter Greenhouses family and lived in a home the Carpen-
ters provided. He and Elsie had eight children. The youngest son
was Harry Brazier Patience.
Harry B. left school after eighth grade to work as a breaker boy
in the Exeter Colliery. When he was 17, after injuring his arm in
the breaker conveyor, Harry left the breaker and started his own
business carving coal souvenirs with nothing but a penknife and a
chalk-covered cloth for polishing the coal.
He made hearts, charms, crosses, bibles, letter openers, ashtrays
and paperweights. He married Elsie Miller. They had six sons and
they all they worked for him. The business took off and they sup-
plied retailers all over the state with coal souvenirs eventually
made on electric carving machines and polishers.
Harry died at age 48. Eventually all his sons, except Harry Lee
and Charles Edgar, got out of the coal carving business. Son Ken-
neth worked for John Kehoe, the coal baron who founded this
newspaper in 1947.
Harry L. fought in WWII and lost a couple fingers in the Anzio
battle in Italy. After the war Harry L. came back to West Pittston
where he and Edgar continued making souvenirs in a shop behind
34 Washington Street.
In 1948 Edgar married his second wife, Alice Patterson, ceded
the souvenir business to Harry and moved to Wilkes-Barre.
Harry continued to make souvenirs in that shop behind 34
Washington into the 1960s. I know because I was there every other
Saturday morning for a couple years when I was in high school.
The Patience home was on my Wilkes-Barre Record route and I
went there to collect payment for the paper.
I always knocked on the front door and Harrys daughter , or his
son, Robert who was my classmate, would send me around back to
the shop. Harry L. would come to the door. Id try not to look at
his mangled hand as he reached in his pocket for change to pay for
the paper.
Im not sure that I got exactly what he was doing in that shop,
but I know he always paid in full on time, something I cant say
about a lot of my other customers.
Meanwhile as Harry slugged away making ashtrays, his brother
opened a shop in Wilkes-Barre and tried to make it as an artist.
He succeeded wildly. Before his death in 1970, his coal sculp-
tures would grace the collections of queens, prime ministers, presi-
dents, industrial giants and Hollywood celebrities
To learn more and see photos get the book Anthracite Coal Art
by Charles Edgar Patience by his daughter Juanita Patience Moss.
Search for it on amazon.com.
SMILES ANDFROWNS
by JACK SMILES -
jsmiles@psdispatch.com
Black as coal History Month
Its not spring yet; however, some days it feels
like it. To get ready for spring cleaning, remember
the kitchencabinets because theyare one thingthat
may be overlooked.
Keep in mind that canned foods, whether in tins
or glass jars, dont keep forever so take time to
check them while cleaning. Commercial canners
work under tightly-controlled conditions but there
are still limits to howlong food quality can be pre-
served. Home-canned foods, processed under less
carefully controlled conditions, may have even
shorter storage lives.
There are several factors that limit the shelf-life
of canned foods. First, cans or metal lids on glass
jars can rust. When rust is deep enough, tiny holes
open in the can or lid that may allow spoilage to
occur. Shipping accidents that dent or crush cans
also cause container problems.
Then there is can corrosion. In all foods, espe-
cially high-acid foods like canned tomatoes and
fruit juices, the food continually reacts chemically
with the metal container. Over several years, this
can cause taste and texture changes and eventually
lower the nutritional value of the food.
High temperatures over 100 degrees F. are harm-
ful tocannedfoods, too. The riskof spoilage jumps
sharply as storage temperatures rise. In fact,
canned goods designed for use in the tropics are
specially processed. Even at prolonged storage
temperatures above 75 degrees F, the rate of nutri-
ent loss in canned foods increases. Light can cause
color changes and nutrient losses in foods canned
in glass jars.
Never use foods from containers with these
spoilage warning signs - loose or bulging lids on
jars, bulging, leaking or badly dented cans, or
foods with a foul odor.
To store canned food wisely, followthese guide-
lines:
Store themin a cool, clean dry place. Arange
of 60-70 degrees is good for long shelf life.
Check the best before dates on cans. Tis will
give you an idea of howlong foods will last before
they lose quality. Most products will last beyond
their best before date if they are stored properly.
Practice FIFO (First-In-First-Out). Place re-
cently purchased items behind the existing food
items, ensuring that you are consuming food prior
to expiration date/spoilage and saving you money
by reducing the amount of food to discard.
Remember, when in doubt, throw it out.
Keeping food safe to eat can sometimes be a
chore. As the warmer days come upon us, spring
clean your kitchen as well as your windows. If you
have some canned fruits and pudding that need to
be used, try this recipe. We have used it for years
and have found it to be a favorite!
Magical Fruit Salad
1 can (20 oz.) pineapple chunks
1 can fruit cocktail
2 bananas
1 3/4 cups nonfat or lowfat milk
1 package (3 1/2 ounce) instant pudding mix
lemon or vanilla
Rinse and drain the pineapple and fruit cocktail.
Add the bananas to the bowl.
Pour the milk over the fruit. While slowly stir-
ring the fruit mixture, sprinkle in the pudding mix.
Let the mixture stand for 5 minutes and serve.
Refrigerate leftovers within 2 hours.
NUTRITION
CORNER
Dont forget to spring clean your pantry
Mary R. Ehret, M.S., R.D., L.D.N., is with Penn State Cooperative Extension, Luzerne County, 16 Luzerne
Ave., West Pittston, Pa., 18643. (570) 825-1701/602-0600. Fax (570) 825-1709. mre2@psu.edu.
White and pure,
It will come thats for sure
This year snow is rare
And right now the ground is bare
Do we miss it?
Maybe a little bit
Sometimes snow comes by way of Noreaster
Then one has to be careful not to fall on his kees-
ter.
Once in awhile we get a break in the weather
So enjoy it like birds do and they flock together
If you are an afficionado of snow
The resorts have enough to ski and show
Our towns get a chance to save on salt
And maybe Mother Nature will smile on us, its
her fault
This year the temps are warmer, too
So we can turn down the thermostat, thats cool
Another month of winter to go
So enjoy each day as we travel to and fro.
Ronald Voveris
Yatesville
YO U R O P I N I O N
Snow
P
A
G
E
1
6
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Lifes more enjoyable when
you can hear whats
happening around you, and
todays hearing instruments
are more eective & descreet
than ever. Let our hearing
professionals help you nd
a solution thats perfect for
your needs...your lifestyle...
and your budget.
Denise Prislupski, Au. D. David A. Wadas, Au. D.
Doctors of Audiology
If you cant see, you get your eyes checked.
Ears are no dierent.
Find us online!
34 South Main St.
Wilkes-Barre
822-6122
1339 Main St.
Peckville
383-0500
321 Spruce St.
Scranton
343-7710
Call today to schedule a hearing screening:
Wide Selection of Hearing Aids
Licensed Professionals
State-of-the-Art Technology
Warranty on All Hearing Aids
Hearing Education Classes
Attractive Financing Options
www.audiologyhearing.com
Question 1
What did Betty
Carey, Clair Call-
ahan and Mrs.
James Padden, of
Pittston, and Marilyn
Ohl, of Inkerman, have
in common as mentioned in a Dispatch
article in 1948?
1948 64 Years Ago
Teachers in the Pittston Township
School District were owed three months
wages and the debt forced the school
directors to seek state aid.
Directors and teachers alike feared the
aid would come with a mandate to sus-
pend more teachers.
Eight teachers had left the employ of
the school district, but with skyrocketing
expenditures the vacancies in teaching
staff did not facilitate relief on expand-
ing school budgets.
Joe Boley, of the Philadelphia Athlet-
ics, offered to send scouts from the Ma-
jor League team to watch teenagers in
Pittston City league play.
Teams were fielded from each section
of the city, creating inter-community
rivalries and generating more interest.
The 1947 season operated six clubs
with Hughestown Panthers taking top
honors. The team was awarded a trip to
New York City.
The Philadelphia Athletics existed
from1901 until 1954 when the team
moved to Kansas City after being sold in
1954. Pennants were won in 1902, 1905,
1910, 1911, 1913, 1914, 1929, 193 and
1931.
The teams of 1910, 1911, 1913, 192 and
1930, won the World Series. The Athlet-
ics have been named Philadelphias
Most Successful Sports Franchise.
Pittston Post 838, American Legion
sponsored a radio program titled Veter-
ans Counselors.
Guests included Carl Adonizio,
Commander of the post and James
Hopkins of the Office of Veterans Ad-
ministration, Albert Loquasto, and
Frank Novakowski.
Residents were asked to send any
questions regarding veterans benefits or
educational and employment opportuni-
ties to the show.
1958 54 Years Ago
Sidney Chessic, illustrator for the
Post Engineers Office at Fort Myer,
Virginia, had one person to thank for his
artistic success and that was Pittston art
teacher, Mary E. Barrett.
It was Sidneys job to paint the Presi-
dential Seal adorning the helicopter
transporting President Dwight D. Eisen-
hower on short trips.
Eisenhower suggested the idea of a
helicopter to the Secret Service, who
then approved of the new mode of trans-
portation, seeing it as safer and more
efficient than the traditional limousine
motorcade.
Admitting to having only the benefit
of Miss Barretts art instruction, Sidney
meticulously painted the aluminum
plates that would adorn the craft.
Dwight D.
Eisenhower became the first president
to employ a helicopter while in office.
Tony Giordano, of Wyoming and a
member of the Jenkins Hardware team
in the Industrial Bowling League, posted
a high series of 723.
Logging a high game of 268, Giorda-
no set a new league mark for the season.
The Industrial, City, Merchants, Pro,
Consolidated, Pit-Exe, Knights of Co-
lumbus and Business were popular
bowling leagues in the Greater Pittston
Area in 1958.
Mrs. Otto English asked local resi-
dents to Greet the solicitors with a
welcome smile and a generous contribu-
tion to the Heart Fund.
Fund volunteers Shirley Strubeck,
Mrs. Donald Kudoling, Mrs. William
Landmesser, Mrs. Lee Dean, Jean
Lemongelli, Diane Adams, Mae Willi-
nen, Mary Ellen English, Mary Ellen
Bauman and Mrs. John Adonizio were
scheduled to visit borough homes on a
Sunday afternoon in 1958 to collect
donations.
Six young women of the Mercy Hos-
pital School of Nursing received their
nurses caps during a candlelight service
at St. Aloysius Auditorium.
Shelia McTigue and Eileen Hoban
both of West Pittston; Jackie Kearney,
Wyoming; Mary McGuire, Inkerman;
Lorraine Sadonick and Mary Marcav-
age both of Exeter recited the pledge of
fidelity at the conclusion of the ceremo-
nies.
In the 19th century, Florence Night-
ingale designed the nurses uniform
which included the nurses cap. In the
United States the use of caps in medical
facilities had all but disappeared by the
late 1980s and a more unisex uniform
Urbanski killed in Vietnam 44 years ago
Peeking
into the past
With Judy Minsavage
See PEEKING, Page 26
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
7
1137 Wyoming Avenue, Exeter 654-5152
www.marrancachiropractic.com
D r.M a ry Ellen M a rra nca
Fa stGentleReliefFrom :
Au to/ W ork/ S ports In ju ries
D is c P a in / S cia tica
Neck& Ba ckP a in
Hea d a ches
S tres s / Fa tigu e
M u s cle S pa s m s
Arm & Leg P a in
Ca rpa l Tu n n el S yn d rom e
New Patients Welcome Most Insurances Accepted
Office Hours By Appointment
Sta teOfTheA rtTechniqu es& Equ ipm ent,
Inclu ding A Rela xing H ydrom a ssa geTa ble
Massage Therapy Services Available
FLEXIBLE MOBILITY Inc.
1325 River Road, Plains Tuft Tex Complex
824-6620 1-800-214-9566
DURABLE MEDICAL EQUIPMENT
PERSONAL CARE PRODUCTS
WHEEL CHAIRS POWER CHAIRS LIFT CHAIRS SCOOTERS
STAIR GLIDES HOSPITAL BEDS RAMPS
DONT
CLIMB
STAIRS INSTALLATION
AVAILABLE
Grab Bars
NOW
SELLING
DIABETIC
SHOES
7
4
1
0
9
5
moreland. Cost is $8 for adults
and $4 for children under 12
years of age. Tickets will be
available at the door. Takeouts
will be available.
Third District Democrat
The Third District Democrat
Committee will meet at 7 p.m.
on Thursday, March 1 at Roo-
neys IrishPub, MainStreet, Pitt-
ston. There will be a brief social
after the meeting. Pizza and bev-
erages will be served.
Post 477 Ladies Auxiliary
The Ladies Auxiliary of
American Legion Post 477, Pitt-
ston will hold a meeting at 5 p.m.
March 3 at the post home, Vine
Street.
Night at the Races
Sitaras Karate School, Pitt-
ston, will hold a Night at the
Races 6 p.m. on March 3 at Co-
lumbia Hose Company No. 3,
149 Jackson St., Edwardsville.
Donation of $10 per horse in-
cludes admission, food and re-
freshments. Winning horses will
win $50.
Polish Womens Alliance
The Polish Womens Alliance
will hold its quarterly meeting at
noon on Saturday, March 3 at
Grotto Pizza, Wyoming Valley
Mall. Immediately following,
the council will conduct a Bal
Polonaise Committee meeting
The annual Bal Polonaise on
Saturday, April 14. Any young
woman interested should contact
Bernadine Regis at 693-2293 or
Bernadine Borinski 779-4337.
Slovak Heritage Dinner
An Ethnic Dinner sponsored
by the Slovak Heritage Society
of Northeastern PA will be held
from 2 to 5 p.m. on Sunday,
March 4 at St. Ignatius of Loyola
Parish, Kingston. Takeouts will
be available at 1:30 p.m.
Volunteer Villages
The Presbytery of Lackawan-
na will open two Volunteer Vil-
lages in March to coordinate
flood recovery and to host visit-
ing and local volunteers. The
volunteer centers, sponsored by
churches across the presbyterys
seven counties and by Presbyter-
ian Disaster Assistance, will
open at First Presbyterian
Church of Towanda and at the
Wyoming Institute at Wyoming
Presbyterian Church on March
4. For more information, contact
Administrative Coordinator
Marge Zeigler at the Presbytery
of Lackawanna at 348-0643.
Pasta dinner
The Wyoming Area Drama
Parents Association will hold a
pasta dinner fromnoon to 5 p.m.
on Sunday, March 4 in the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter Cafeteria. Takeouts will also
be available. Tickets are $8 and
available through any drama par-
ent or at the door. Tickets can al-
so be obtained by contacting
Donna at 357-3303.
Baton twirling class
Lynnettes Twirlerettes is of-
fering a complimentary baton
twirling class 6 to 6:45 p.m. on
Monday, March 5 at the Pittston
YMCA. This class is open to any
child 4 years of age and older. To
register, call 281-9797.
Valley Lodge
Valley Lodge No. 499, West
Pittston, will have an Interna-
tional buffet dinner from 4 to 7
p.m. on Saturday, March 10, at
Wyoming Lodge, 821 Wyoming
Ave., Wyoming. Ethnic dishes
and desserts will be served. Price
is $7 for adults and $3.50 for
children under 12.
Seniors Have Talent
Hospice Community Care, in
conjunction with Celtic Health-
care and Mohegan Sun, will host
Seniors Have Talent from 6 to
10 p.m. on Thursday, April 12 at
the Grand Ball Roomof the Mo-
hegan Sun Casino.
Auditions will be held March
13 with the finals on April 12. All
proceeds benefit PA Vent Camp
for Kids. Contestants must be 60
years or older to enter. The inner
will earn a $1,000 cash prize.
There is noentrance fee for au-
ditions. Tickets for the Finals
event are $15 per non-contestant.
Night at the Races
The Pittston Kiwanis and
Friends of the Pittston Library
are holding a Night at the Races
at 7 p.m. on Saturday, March 24
at the Jenkins Twp. Hose Com-
pany, 2 Second St. Doors open at
6:30 p.m. Admission is free with
the purchase of a horse for $10 or
$5 without horse purchase. The
owners of winning horse receive
$50. Food and refreshments will
be served. For more information,
contact Sal Bernardi at 820-
8459, Don Shearer at 654-5063,
Frank Thomas at 654-3438 or
Ron Faust 655-4088.
St. Nicholas Ham Bingo
Rev. Gary Mensinger and the
parishioners of St. Nicholas
Byzantine Catholic Church are
sponsoring their second annual
Ham Bingo at 1 p.m. on Sunday,
March 25 in the church hall at
320 Vine St, Old Forge.
A basket raffle, cash raffle,
door prizes and various Bingo
specials will be available
throughout the afternoon.
Kitchen opens at 11a.m. Ava-
riety of food items and refresh-
ments will be available. The
church will also sponsor a bake
sale during the Bingo.
Admission is $3.
Music festival
The Wyoming Seminary Mu-
sic Department will present a
Shostakovich Chamber Music
Festival, featuring the music of
Russian composer Dmitri Shos-
takovich, at 8 p.m. on Saturday,
March 31 and at 3 p.m. on Sun-
day, April 1 in the Great Hall of
Wyoming Seminary, 228
Wyoming Ave., Kingston, just
north of Kingston Corners. The
concerts will include instrumen-
tal and vocal works and will fea-
ture professional and student
performers. For more informa-
tion, call 270-2192.
Pittston Hospital Nurses
The 1982 class of the Pittston
Hospital School of Nursing is
planning a 30th class reunion for
the fall of 2012.
Members of this graduating
class are asked to contact either
Ted Kross or Janet Kelly
(Endres) to gather contact infor-
mation and help plan event.
Kross can be reached through
e-mail at tedandgina9@com-
cast.net or 655-4952.
Kelly can be contacted
through e-mail at janetakel-
ly@aol.com or 693-4165.
Briefs
Continued from Page 7
P
A
G
E
1
8
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
COMPLETE WEDDING PACKAGES STARTING AT $39 PER PERSON!
HILTON SCRANTON & CONFERENCE CENTER
100 ADAMS AVENUE, SCRANTON, PA 18503
570-558-7315 WWW.SCRANTON.HILTON.COM
yoga mat and blanket. No prior
experience needed. Class date:
Monday, March 19, 9:30-10:30
a.m.
Instructor Dr. Christine E.
Kiesinger has been teaching yo-
ga since the early nineties. She
has taught in Florida, Texas,
WashingtonDCandnowteaches
here in northeastern Pennsylva-
nia.
All children of the parish are
invited to meet the Easter Bunny
and participate in an Easter egg
hunt on Saturday, March 31, at
10:00 a.m. Carolyn Moscatelli
has volunteered to chair this
event. Registration forms will be
distributed at Religious Educa-
tion Classes this weekend as well
as being available in the back of
the Church for those children not
yet in school or who are enrolled
in parochial or private school.
The address for the parish
webpage is:www.eucharist-pitt-
ston.org. You will find links to
the Schedule for Liturgical Min-
isters, our weekly bulletins,
monthly calendars, upcoming
events and additional informa-
tion. We hope that you will find
the information useful and easily
accessible.
Check out our parish Face-
book page for all the latest infor-
mation. The address
iswww.facebook.com/OLE-
PARISH.
On the first Friday of each
month Communion is brought to
those who are unable to partici-
pate in Sunday Mass because of
age or health. The Sacrament of
the Anointing of the Sick is cele-
brated with anyone seriously ill,
anticipating a serious operation,
or quite elderly. Notify the parish
office of anyone desiring these
Sacraments, as well as anyone in
the hospital or a nursing home.
PRINCE OF PEACE PARISH
Old Forge
St. Marys Church, Lawrence
Street, Saturday Vigil 4 p.m.
Sunday, Mass 8 and 10 a.m.
St. Lawrence Church, Main
Street, Saturday Vigil 5:30 p.m.
Sunday Mass 11:15 a.m.
SACRED HEART OF JESUS
Lackawanna Ave., Dupont
The mass schedule for the
week is Monday through Friday
at 7:00 a.m., Saturday at 7:30
a.m. and 4:00 p.m. and Sunday at
8:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. The
Stations of the Cross will be
prayed at 7:30 p.m. on Friday.
CCD classes will be held on
Feb. 27, March 5, 12 and 10. In
case of school closing or early
dismissal due to severe weather,
the CCD program will be closed
for that night. If there is a late
start to school classes, CCD
classes will take place as sched-
uled.
Girl Scouts will meet on Feb.
27from6:30p.m. to8p.m. inthe
lower level of the rectory. Bible
Study will be held on Feb. 29 at 7
p.m. in the lower level of the rec-
tory. All are welcome.
The Senior Outreach Commit-
tee will meet on Monday, Feb. 27
at 6 p.m. in the lower level of the
rectory. Plans for the Annual
Health Fair will be discussed.
The Choir will meet on Thurs-
day, March 1 from 6:30 p.m. to
7:30 p.m. in the choir loft. Any-
one wishing to join the choir is
asked to come to the practice.
The Holy Name Societys
Spring 300 Club will start on
March 4. Five weekly prizes will
be awarded. Tickets are $10 each
and are available fromany mem-
ber or by calling the rectory. The
Holy Name Society will meet on
Thursday, March 1 at 7 p.m. All
outstanding 300 Club returns are
to be made at this time.
ST. BARBARA PARISH
28 Memorial Avenue, Exeter
Office Hours: Monday Fri-
day 9:00 a.m. 3:00 p.m.
Evenings, by appointment.
Phone: 654-2103
Stations of the Cross are every
Friday at 4:00 p.m. and 6:30 p.m.
after Mass.
A Biblical Walk Through the
Mass is a series designedtobring
Catholics closer to God thru a
more profound experience of
this central mystery of our faith
will be held at St. Anthonys Hall
of St Barbaras Parish hosted by
Fr. Phil, Fr. Leo, Rocco Yanora,
Barbara Russo & Ray Pasavage
during Lent on Wed. evenings at
7:00 p.m. in the Parish Center
beginning this Wednesday, Feb.
29 thru March 28. Those attend-
ing are asked to bring a bible.
The follow up meeting for the
Parish Council and Picnic Plan-
ning Meeting will be held on
Thursday, March 1 at 7:00 p.m.
in the Parish Center. It was origi-
nally scheduled for February 23.
The monthly Mass honoring
all married couples celebrating
their wedding anniversary dur-
ing the month of February will
be held on Tuesday night, Febru-
ary 28 at 7:00 p.m. Everyone is
welcome.
The Diocesan Wedding Anni-
versary Mass will be celebrated
on Sunday, June 3. Bishop Jo-
seph Bambera will preside at a
2:30PM Mass in the Cathedral,
followed by a reception. Please
note the event is designed for
25th and 50th anniversary cele-
brants, but we can include cou-
ples who missed their special
year. Cathedral seating will be
reserved for the anniversary cou-
ples. Please call the Rectory at
654-2103 to make your reserva-
tion.
ST. JOHN THE
EVANGELIST PARISH
COMMUNITY
35 William Street
Phone: 654-0053
Pittston
Baptismal Instruction will be-
gin 7:30 to 8:30 p.m. April 10 in
the parish center.
Bereavement Support Group
will meet every Tuesday evening
in the parish center dining room.
For more information call the
parish office at 654-0053.
Applications for Holy Name
Scholarship are in the parish
center.
The Ethnic Heritage Dinner
will be held on Sunday, March18
Holy Name Society will meet
Sunday, March 4 at 11 a.m. in
Seton Catholic auditorium.
Altar and Rosary Society
meeting will meet at 2 p.m. on
Monday March 5. Refreshments
will be provided.
The Greater Pittston Food
Pantry is sponsored by the Care
and Concern Committee of St.
John the Evangelist Parish. Any-
one in need of food is asked to
call 654-9923. Distribution of
food is by appointment only.
The Free Health Clinic is open
at 5:30 p.m. every Wednesday in
the former Seton Catholic High
School, and on first come first
serve basis.
Pediatric Health Clinic is open
on the first and third Thursday of
the month. Registrationis heldin
the Seton building from 4:30 to
5:30 p.m. Bring your childs im-
munizations records.
Greater Pittston Kids Closet is
open Wednesday from9 to11:30
a.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. The Closet
accepts donations new and gent-
ly used. For information call the
parish office.
ST JOHNS LUTHERAN
9 Wood St., Pittston
Pastor John Castellani
Organist Marcia Colleran
Lay Reader - Doris Mersin-
cavage
Acolyte - Emily Goyne
Meet the newest Acolytes: Ri-
chardDrummond, Trisha Renna,
JustinLazanowicz, SarahCiesla,
Emily Goyne, Brett Rooney
along with the veterans Brooke
Cherney, Justin Peterson, Maris-
sa Faccipointi, Shelby Rinaldi
and Katie Colleran.
March Acolyte schedule is as
follows. 4 Brett Rooney;
11Brooke Cherney; 18 Justin Pe-
terson; 25 Marissa Faccipointi.
Tuesday, Feb. 28, Small Group
Bible Study 7 p.m.
Wednesday, Feb. 29, Mid
Week Lent Service 7 p.m.
Thursday, March 1, Week Day
School 5:30 p.m.
Sunday, March 4, Worship
Service (with Communion) 9:30
a.m.
Wednesday, March 7, Mid
Week Lent Service 7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 14, Pot
Luck Dinner 6 p.m.
Wednesday, March 14, Mid
Week Lent Service 7 p.m.
Wednesday, March 21, Mid
Week Lent Service 7 p.m.
Sunday, March 25, Soup Sale
II 10 a.m.
February is mite month.
Please bring whatever mites you
have collected. The LWML dis-
trict is short in its funds of the
2010-2011 approved projects. So
a special prayer is asked to col-
lect the mites that have been sit-
ting on the Kitchen Counter. Ex-
change your old box if needed or
pick up a new one to start saving
for LWML needs
If you would like to join this
Church Family call 655-2505 or
e-mail address isstjohnspitt-
ston@verizon.com
ST. JOHNS P.M. CHURCH
316 Main St., Avoca
Sunday Service 10:00 a.m.
Tuesday Bible Study 6:00-
7:30 p.m.
ST. MARIA GORETTI
Laflin Road, Laflin, PA. 18702
42redwood@comcast.net
www.stmariagoretti-laflin.org
The road to resurrection will
start at St. Maria Gorettis
Church on Feb. 29 at 7 p.m.
The speaker is Father Jerry
Shantillo from St. Judes Moun-
taintop. A small reception will
follow.
A homemade pasta and sau-
sage dinner will be offered on
Sunday, March 4, noon to 5 p.m.,
with takeouts noon to 4 p.m.
(Take-out containers will be pro-
Faith
Continued from Page 13
See FAITH, Page 19
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
1
9 7
2
9
7
8
5
Ph. 570-347-7580 PA019285
www.moldspecialist.net
Has your home been fooded?
Call us, we can help.
We are certied in Mold Remediation,
Testing & Inspection
Structure Drying & General Construction
7
4
0
5
8
9
SCRANTON
1919 Pittston Ave.
342-8884
Daily: 8:00 To 5:30 Mon. & Turs. 8:00 To 7:00 Sat. 8:00 To 4:00
Sun. 12:00 To 4:00(Pittston Only)
PITTSTON
701 Pittston By-Pass
655-6284
BENJAMIN MOORE PAINTS
Custom Color Mixing
Painters Supplies
EVERYTHING FORYOUR HOME
Carpet Tile Laminate Hardwood Vinyl
Paint Wallcovering & More!
$
1
59
sq. ft.
LAMINATE
FLOORING
starting at
99

sq. ft.
VINYL
FLOORING
IN STOCK
BLINDS
CUSTOM
2 WOOD
99

sq. ft.
CERAMIC
FLOOR TILE
12 x 12
$
3
59
sq. ft.
HARDWOOD
FLOORING
starting
at
3 ROOMS
CARPET
INSTALLED WITH PAD
$
699
BENJAMIN MOORE
Interior Flat
Eggshell
Semigloss
$
16
99
Gallon
$
18
99
Gallon
*
*Based on 360 sq. ft. Extra charges may apply.
PAINT
vided). Children 5 yrs. and under
eat free - Eat-In Only. Price for
all others is $9.00.
The first meeting of the partic-
ipants in the Saint Maria Goretti
Talent Show to be performed on
April 22 is on Sunday, Feb. 26, at
7:00 p.m. in the Parish Center.
This is a popular parish event
which will be directed by Peggy
Sosnak assisted by Frank Mag-
dalinski and Jennifer Johnson.
Contact the rectory if you would
like to be in the show. There will
be live and lip sync performanc-
es. The performance is free and
refreshments will be served by
the Social Committee.
The St. Maria Goretti Adult
Choir has resumed rehearsals.
They are Wednesday evenings at
7 p.m. in the Church. For more
information on either choir, or if
you are interested in becoming a
cantor, please contact Jennifer
Johnson at JMSJohn-
son7@gmail.com or 283-0362.
Mass schedule: Saturday 4:30
p.m. Sunday 8:30 a.m. and 11:00
a.m. Weekdays 8:00 a.m.
The Banquet Hall is available
for special events. To schedule
your event, call 655-8956.
ST. MARYS POLISH
NATIONAL CATHOLIC
CHURCH
200 Stephenson St.
Duryea
Rev. Fr. Carmen G. Bolock,
Pastor
Sunday Masses
SAINT MONICAS CHURCH
363 West 8th Street, West
Wyoming, PA 18644
Office Hours - 9:00 a.m. to
4:30 p.m., Mon. Fri.
Phone: 570-693-1991
Email: olos363@verizon.net
website: www.stmonicanepa-
.com.
Father Leo J. McKernan, Pas-
tor
Mr. William Jenkins, Deacon
Mass Schedule:
Saturday Vigil: 4:00 p.m.
OLOS
Sunday: 8:30 a.m. STJ; 11:00
a.m. OLOS
Daily Mass at OLOS
Mon-Tues-Fri: 7:00 a.m.
(Please note: no Wed. a.m.
Mass); Thurs: 7:00 p.m.
Stations of the Cross: Friday,
7:00 p.m. at OLOS site on the
following dates: March 2, 9, 16,
& 23
Living Stations of the Cross:
March 29 & 30 at 7:30 p.m.
(OLOS)
Lenten Penance Service:
March 26 (Monday), 7:00 p.m.
(OLOS)
Biblical Walk Through the
Mass: During Lent on Wednes-
day Evenings sponsored by St.
Barbaras and St. Monicas Par-
ishes, there will be a series of
talks designed to bring Catholics
closer to God thru a more pro-
found experience of this central
mystery of the Faith. Father Phil
Massetti, O.S.J. Rocco Yanora,
Barbara Russo and Ray Pasav-
age will host it. The series begin
Wednesday, Feb. 29 thru March
28 at 7:00 p.m.
Life in the Spirit Seminar: Be-
ginning the week after Easter on
Thursday, April 12, and contin-
uing thru the Thursday before
Pentecost, May 24, St. Monicas
Parish will be teaching a seminar
entitled, Life in the Spirit.
Each Thursday after the 7:00
p.m. Mass, there will be a teach-
ing on the Gospel of Jesus Christ
and the Holy Spirit. For more in-
formation call Fr. McKernan at
693-1991 or email at moni-
caww@verizon.net. Registra-
tion is necessary in order to
know how to prepare for the
seminar.
St. Monica Parish Mens
Group Retreat: This weekend re-
treat will be held on the weekend
of June 1-3, at Mount Saviour
Monastery located between El-
mira and Corning, NewYork. To
learn more about the Monks and
the Monastery, go to www.msa-
viour.org. For information about
the retreat or to make reserva-
tions contact Father McKernan
at 693-1991 or email at moni-
ca.ww@verizon.net. You may
contact Joe Lisewski at 693-
3366 (home) or his cell at 466-
6099. His email is joelisew-
ski@aol.com. Group size is lim-
ited and reservations will be on a
first-come basis.
Pre-K & Kindergarten CCD
Class being formed: Children 5
years and over will be accepted
for the class. Registration forms
may be obtained from the CCD
Office, Parish Office or on the
table in the Hall or at the back of
the Church at St. Josephs site.
For more information, call
Elaine Kelley at 693-1521.
Adult CCDClass: This beauti-
ful class is for an Adult that may
be mentally challenged but so
capable of loving the Lord. Dur-
ing the Lenten Season classes
will be held under the direction
of Debbie Koss. If you wish to
register a family member, call
Debbie at 693-2958 or Mrs. Kel-
ly, CCDCoordinator at 693-1521
for more information and to reg-
ister. Anyone wishing to volun-
teer with these classes is wel-
come to do so. .
H.S. Theology Group will
meet in the Rectory with Father
McKernan at 9:45 a.m. every
Sunday. This newprogramoffers
Teens the opportunity to learn
more about the Catholic Faith as
it relates to important issues of
today. The focus is on Jesus and
the Scriptures. Registration is on
going so if you want to attend,
Faith
Continued from Page 18
See FAITH, Page 21
P
A
G
E
2
0
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Tis Weeks Dining Guide Feature:
JANUARY
DINING GUIDE
WINNER
MARY ANN RATAJCZAK
of Exeter
To Advertise In Te Dining Guide Call:
Karen Fiscus 829-7291 Steve Morris 829-7290
ENTER TOWIN
THIS MONTHS
GIFT CERTIFICATE:
Fill out and deliver
or mail entry to:
Te Sunday Dispatch
Dining Guide
109 New Street
Pittston, PA 18640
Name:____________________
Address:___________________
__________________________
City:______________________
State:______________________
Zip:_______________________
Phone:____________________
CASTLE INN
COOPERS WATERFRONT
DENTES CATERING
ERNIE GS
FIRE & ICE
IPANEMA GRILLE
JUNIORS PASTA HOUSE
NARDONES RESTAURANT
SAVOS PIZZA & RESTAURANT
TIPSY TURTLE
Look On Te Following Pages For
Tese Advertisers Weekly Ads
34 Delicious Beers
Between Both Locations
With Seasonal &
Microbrews Arriving Daily!
visit us at: www.tipsyturtlepub.com
TONS OF APPETIZERS TO GET THE NIGHT STARTED SOUPS & SALADS HUGE BURGERS
SPECIALTY SUBS & SANDWICHES OVEN FRESH PIZZA CHEF CREATIONS DINNERS KIDS MENU HOUSE DESSERTS
245 Owen Street, Swoyersville, PA 18704
570-287-6074 570-287-6075(fax)
29 Market Street, Jenkins Twp., PA 18640
570-655-8091
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
1
M ORREALES M ID CITY SERVICE
40 Years E xperien ce
ProfessionalAuto B od y & Painting
U nibod y F ram e & Paint Sp ecialists
F oreign & D om estic
State ofthe A rt C olorM atching S ystem
E xp ert B od y W ork A llC ars
G uaranteed W ork
220 EastEighth Street,W yom ing
693-3716 OR 693-3717
H ours: M on.-F ri. 8 a.m . -5 p .m .
7
3
1
0
7
6
W e A re StillO peratin g an d H ere To Serve You...
In su ran ce C laim s F ree E stim ates In su ran ce C laim s F ree E stim ates
Dont just watch a movie, experience it!
All Stadium Seating and Dolby Surround Sound
ALL FEATURES NOW PRESENTED IN DIGITAL FORMAT
825.4444 rctheatres.com
3 Hrs. Free Parking At Participating Park & Locks with Theatre Validation
Free Parking at Midtown Lot Leaving After 8pm and All Day Saturday & Sunday.
(Parenthesis Denotes Bargain Matinees)
All Showtimes Include Pre-Feature Content
Avoid the lines: Advance tickets available from Fandango.com
Rating Policy Parents and/or Guardians (Age 21 and older) must
accompany all children under 17 to an R Rated feature
*No passes accepted to these features.
**No restricted discount tickets or passes accepted to these features.
***3D features are the regular admission price plus a surcharge of $2.50
D-Box Motion Seats are the admission price plus an $8.00 surcharge
First Matinee $5.25 for all features (plus surcharge for 3D features).
SPECIAL EVENTS
The Metropolitan Opera: Ernani LIVE
Saturday, February 25 at 12:55pm only
National Theater Live: The Comedy Of Errors
Thursday, March 1 at 7:00pm only
The Metropolitan Opera: Manon LIVE
Saturday, April 7 at 12:00pm only
*Tyler Perrys Good Deeds - PG13 -
115 min
(1:55), (4:55), 7:25, 9:55
*Gone - PG13 - 105 min
(2:10), (5:00), 7:30, 9:50
Act of Valor in DBox Motion Seating
- R - 110 min
(1:50), (4:15), 7:35, 10:00
*Act of Valor - R - 110 min
(1:50), (4:15), 7:35, 10:00
*Wanderlust R - 105 min.
(2:05), (4:20), 7:25, 9:50
This Means War - PG13 - 110 min
(1:50), (4:20), 7:15, 9:45
The Secret World of Arrietty - G -
105 min (1:55), (4:10), 7:00, 9:15
***Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance in
3D PG-13 - 105 min
(1:55), (4:35), 7:20, 9:40
**Ghost Rider: Spirit of Vengeance
PG13 - 105 min
(1:45), (4:10), 7:00, 9:20
***Journey 2: The Mysterious Island
in 3D PG - 105 min.
(1:40), (4:25), 7:00, 9:15
Safe House - R - 125 min.
(1:50), (4:40), 7:15, 10:05
***Star Wars: The Phantom Menace in
3D - 140 min.
(1:40), (4:20), 7:05, 9:55
**The Vow - PG13 - 115 min.
(2:05), (4:30), 7:30, 10:10
Chronicle - PG13 - 95 min.
(2:15), (4:40), 7:20, 9:40 (no 2:15, 4:40 on
2/25 & NO 7:20, 9:40 ON 3/1)
The Woman In Black - PG13 - 105 min.
(2:00), (4:25), 7:10, 9:30
DEAD OR ALIVE
All Junk Cars & Trucks
Route 11, Edwardsville 570-288-3112
VALENTIS SCRAPYARD
HIGHE$T PRICE$ PAID
$350.00 & Up - Call The Scrapyard Direct
Dont Lose $$$ to the middle man!
p
G
r
e
a
t
e
r
P
i
t
t
s
t
o
n
F
u
e
l
6
5
4
-
4
6
5
7
CALL FOR BEST PRICE
ONHEATING OIL
24 Hour
Burner Service
Plumbing & Heating
SPECIAL
FURNACE
CLEANING
$
96
95
call Father McKernan at 693-
1991.
R.C.I.A. The Rite of Chris-
tian Initiation (Education) for
Adults:
This programis for anyone in-
terested in learning more about
their Catholic Faith as well as
anyone interested in preparing to
become a Catholic and receive
the Sacraments.
Call the Rectory (693-1991)
and speak to Father McKernan.
These classes are held on
Wednesday evenings at 7:00
p.m. on the back porch of the
Rectory.
SAINT PETERS
EVANGELICAL LUTHERAN
CHURCH
100 Rock Street, Hughestown
Stpeters_elc@yahoo.com
654-1009
Confirmation Class - 9:00
a.m.
Sunday School 9:00 a.m.
Worship Service 10:00 a.m.
Communion
Wed. Feb. 26, 7:00 p.m. Ash
Wednesday Service
QUEEN OF THE APOSTLES
PARISH
715 Hawthorne St.
(570) 457-3412
stmarysavoca@verizon.net
www.stmaryavoca.4lpi.com
Atty. Biagio Musto, II, will
present a free informational
seminar on elder and estate law
today at 2 p.m. in St. Marys
School Auditorium, 742 Spring
St. One of the most important
topics be will discuss is protect-
ing your assets from nursing
home costs. The public is invited
to attend.
The parish extends a special
thank you to Todd Shimko of
Todd Shimko Insurance Agency
LLC, for supporting their parish
fundraiser.
With this fundraiser, advertis-
ers are invited to place their busi-
nesses flyer in the parish bulle-
tin for a nominal fee. For more
information, please call the par-
ish office at 457-3412.
The parish youth group will
meet today at 6:30 p.m. in St.
Marys School auditorium, 742
Spring St.
This meeting will include the
January and February birthday
celebrations. New members are
always welcome. For more infor-
mation, please call Lori Ostrow-
ski at 457-8840.
The parish finance council
will meet Tuesday, Feb. 28 at 7
p.m. in St. Marys Rectory, 715
Hawthorne St.
Several Protestant and Cathol-
ic churches in Avoca, Duryea,
Old Forge, and Moosic will cele-
brate ecumenical services Tues-
days at 7 p.m. throughout Lent.
The first service is Tuesday,
Feb. 28 at the Full Gospel
Church, 1113 Main St., Avoca,
where the Rev. RichRock, pastor
of St. Johns Primitive Methodist
Church, Avoca, will be the
speaker.
The public is invited to attend.
Due to the Pittston Deanerys
Road to Resurrection Lenten
Masses each Wednesday eve-
ning during Lent, the parish will
not have their normally sched-
uled Wednesday evening parish
liturgy.
They will have one at 8 a.m.
instead.
The parish will have its First
Friday Healing Mass March 2 at
7 p.m. at St. Marys Church. The
Stations of the Cross will be
prayed at 6:30 p.m.
Stations will return to their
normally scheduled time of 7
p.m. on March 9.
The parish will have a Lenten
food sale Friday, March 9.
The sale includes tuna hoa-
gies, with or without onions;
homemade Manhattan clam
chowder; and haluski.
Hoagies are a $1.50 for a small
and $3 for a large; the clam
chowder is $1.50 per cup and $6
per quart; and, the haluski is $3.
To place an order, please call
Arlene at 346-8060, Jeanette at
457-7804, Kay at 457-8470, or
the rectory at 457-3412 by
March 7.
Orders over $20 will be deliv-
ered.
Orders under $20 can be
picked up at SS. Peter and Pauls
Church, 1000 Main St., between
11 a.m. and 6 p.m. on the sale
date.
The parishs pastoral council
will meet Monday, March12 at 7
p.m. in the rectory.
The parishs womens guild
will meet Tuesday, March13 at 7
p.m. in the rectory.
Queen of the Apostles Parish
will have its annual spring chick-
endinner Sunday, March18from
12-4 p.m. in SS. Peter and Pauls
Church auditorium, which is lo-
cated in the lower level of the
church, 1000 Main St.
The dinner includes a 1/2
chicken, mashed potatoes and
gravy, vegetable, homemade
cole slaw, rolls and butter, home-
made dessert, and beverages.
Takeouts will be available too
beginning at 11 a.m.
In addition to the dinner, there
will also be a raffle with great
prizes from area businesses.
Tickets are $9 for adults and $4
for children 12 and younger.
Topurchase tickets, please call
the rectory at 457-3412.
The parishs worship commit-
tee will meet Monday, March 19
at 7 p.m. in the rectory.
The parishs social concerns
committee will meet Monday,
March 19 at 8:30 p.m. in the rec-
tory.
The parish has gone green!
Any person who would like to
drop off aluminum cans may
place them in a container in the
empty bay of St. Marys Rectory
garage which will be open on the
weekend during Mass times:
Saturday at 4 p.m. and Sunday at
8, 10, and 11 a.m.
To have your cans picked up,
please call Jason at 351-5062.
Become a fan of the parish
Facebook page today!
You can join it by typing in
Queen of the Apostles Parish,
Avoca, PA in the search bar at
www.facebook.com.
And then clicking on the
Faith
Continued from Page 19
See FAITH, Page 24
P
A
G
E
2
2
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
www.omarscastleinn.net 675-0804
Murder Mystery
March 4th
Audience Participation
VOTED #1 SHOW IN
LUZERNE COUNTY
Enjoy a cozy
dinner in front
of our
2 freplaces
SUNDAY
BRUNCH
$10.95
over 24
Homemade Items
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
eeeee
dn
es
days
BI B AN G D
LUE
Catering Packages Available
245 Owen Street, Swoyersville 287-6074
5 to 10 pm
Any Burger off the
menu only $6.95
Tipsy 5-0 MARGARITAS $9.00
(Market St. Only)
Wednesday Special Available
at our Jenkins Twp. location:
29 Market Street, Jenkins Twp. 655-8091
23OZLABBATTBLUE$3.00ALLDAY
ALLOFOURAWESOMESALADS
ARE$2.00OFF
ddnnn
eeess
d
ss
ddaaayyys yss
A il bl
00
809
eeee
d
eeeee
AY
S
ddnnn
eeess
d
s
ddaaaaayyyyyyyyyys yyss
A iil bl
91 1
Y
Stop by our other location:
2 Large
Family Dining
Rooms
SUN., MON., TUES.
7 A.M.-3 P.M.
WED., THUR., FRI., SAT.
7 A.M.-8 P.M.
509 Exeter Ave., West Pittston
The Best Breakfast Around
Overstuffed Omelets Huge Frittatas
Fluffy Buttermilk Pancakes Hand Dipped FrenchToast
Voted Best Value...Most Affordable... and Favorite Restaurant by our loyal customers
Serving Affordable Home-Cooked Meals Eat-In or Take-Out
Call For Our Daily Specials, 654-2536
EVERY FRIDAY DURING LENT
Biagio A. Dente, CEC,AAC, HOF
Blaise Alan Dente, CCC, HAAC
655-0801 www.dentescatering.com
DENTES
Catering & Tent Rental
TABLE TALK
50th Anniversary
in the Pittston Commons, Pittston By-Pass, Pittston
& Family Restaurant
Since
1964
655-0001
OPEN WEEKDAYS 11 TO 9;
FRI. & SAT. 11 TO 10;
SUN. 12-8
NEW MENU ITEMS
COUPON SPECIAL
When you buy 12 cuts at the regular price. Price
does not include sales tax. Cannot be used with
other specials. Good for our Red Pizza only.
EXPIRES 3/31/12
12 CUTS OF PIZZA
ONLY
$
4.99
DELIVERY, PICK-UP OR EAT-IN COUPON
These pizza specials do not include White Pizza, Broccoli Pizza or Fresh Tomato & Garlic Pizza.
Buffalo Bites Garlic Parm Wings
Cheesesteak Pizza Cobb Salad
MONEY SAVING SPECIALS
7 DAYS A WEEK
All First Responders
And Service Connected
Personnel In Uniform
Will Receive A
15
%
Discount
Cannot be used with other specials or discounts
Eat-In Only
www.savospizza.com
Deviled eggs are the perfect two bite hor
doeuvre for any gathering. They are easy
to prepare ahead of time, highly portable,
and endlessly customizable. Try nishing
your eggs with chopped bacon or add
a simple sprinkle of paprika. No matter
how you decorate it, the deviled eggs will
always be the toast of the party.
SCRANTON 346-6883 PITTSTON 654-6883
www.coopers-seafood.com
OWNED & OPERATED BYTHE
COOPER FAMILY SINCE 1948
Voted best restaurant in
NEPA byWhere the
locals eat
Consistently rated in the
top 100 restaurants in
the USA
Our crab bisque recipe
appeared in
Bon Appetitmagazine
DINNER FEATURES
LENTEN LUNCH SPECIALS ALSO AVAILABLE
Fishermans Platter Fish & Chips Dinner
Stuffed Flounder
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
3
SUNDAY
DISPATCH
1022 Main St. Avoca, PA 18641 570-457-1600
Monday & Wednesday - 40 Wings
(Sold in Quantities of 10) Eat in only
Tuesday - 40 Rhode Island Clams
Eat in only (Sold in Quantities of 10)
$6 LUNCH SPECIALS from 11AM-2PM
Monday - Hot Ham & Cheese Sandwich
Tuesday - Chili Dog
Wednesday - Porketta Sandwich
Thursday - Chicken Tenders
Friday - 3 Slices of Pizza
MARCH ENTERTAINMENT
PAUL MARTIN - Friday, March 2 6-10pm
MILLENIUM - Friday, March 9 8pm
All Specials Include Soup of the Day
JUNIORS
Pasta House & Rustic Cuisine
HOURS: Serving Tuesday thru Saturday, 4:30 til close
Homemade Pastas Fresh Seafood
Veal Steaks Chops
Appetizers Salads and More!
204 Broad Street, Pittston
299-7814
Check out Juniors Bar on Facebook
Check Out Our
RUSTIC MENU
Tuesday thru Thursday - ALL NIGHT
3 Courses...Only $15.95
A UTO
V EN UE
S A L ES & S ERV ICE
1270W YOM IN G A V E .
E XE TE R, P A
655-5021
Sa le Pric es Plu s Ta x & Ta gs . Artw o rk Is Fo rIllu s tra tio n Pu rpo s es O nly. Ac tu a l V ehic les M a yV a ry. N o tR es po ns ib le Fo rTypo gra phic a l Erro rs . See D ea lerFo rD eta ils .
A V EN U E A U T O S A L ES
A V EN U E A U T O S A L ES A V EN U E A U T O S A L ES
U NB EATAB L E P R ICES O N AL L VEH ICL ES!
U NB EATAB L E P R ICES O N AL L VEH ICL ES! U NB EATAB L E P R ICES O N AL L VEH ICL ES!
O F
O F O F
EX ET ER
EX ET ER EX ET ER
A ll Ca rs Com e W ith A N A DA E xte n d e d A ll Ca rs Com e W ith A N A DA E xte n d e d A ll Ca rs Com e W ith A N A DA E xte n d e d
W a rra n ty, S e rvic e d , I n s pe c te d , De ta ile d . W a rra n ty, S e rvic e d , I n s pe c te d , De ta ile d . W a rra n ty, S e rvic e d , I n s pe c te d , De ta ile d .
Itis ve ry ha rd to b e a tthe pric e s a n d s e rvic e a tAve n u e Au to .
Als o w e s e rvic e a ll c a rs a n d tru c ks a tthe lo w e s tpric e
G UARANTEED!
OI L CHA N GE FOR M OS T CA RS $26.90 OI L CHA N GE FOR M OS T CA RS $26.90 OI L CHA N GE FOR M OS T CA RS $26.90
W E DO A L L S E RV I CE S ON A L L CA RS W E DO A L L S E RV I CE S ON A L L CA RS W E DO A L L S E RV I CE S ON A L L CA RS
FROM AIR C ONDITIONING TO TRANS M IS S ION FLUS H.
0 5 Che vy Im p a la L T
3 0 M PG , G a ra ge K ept, 8 3 K M iles ,
All Servic e R ec o rd s
$
6,995
0 2 M its u b is hi M on te ro X L S
V ery R elia b le, 3 .0 L
V 6 , 75 K M iles , 4 W D ,
X LS, Aw es o m e,
Equ ipped to
the M a x !
0 2 Toyota Ca m ry
8 5 K M iles ,
Lo a d ed To The M a x !
$
8 ,995
0 6 VW Je tta GL S
Lim ited Ed itio n,
8 6 K M iles , B la c k
w / B la c k Lea ther
8 1K M iles , Tra d e In Spec ia l,
N ea rM intCo nd itio n, Lo a d ed
$
6,995
$
3,395
$
9,350
A ll Tra d e s W e lc om e A ll
Cre d itW e lc om e W e M a ke
Buyin gA Ca rE a s y
0 4 GM C En voy X U V P ic k u p
79 K M iles , SLT,
V 6 , V ery R a re
SUV Tha t
Tu rns Into A
Pic k u p Tru c k
$
10 ,495
0 4 Je e p L ib e rty S p ort 4W D
Lo w M iles , G o tta SeeThis O ne, V 6 ,
Am a zing Co nd itio n
$
8 ,495
Stu ffed , 70 K M iles , Lea ther,
Up To 3 0 M PG Hw y,
98 L e xu s S C30 0 Cou p e
Lo w M iles , 3 4 M PG ,
Lik e N ew , Aw es o m e Ca r
$
6,995
0 5 M its u b is hi En d e a vor X L S 4W D
2 4 M PG , 74 K M iles ,
To ns o f O ptio ns ,
G a ra ge K ept
0 7 Ford F150 4W D
4 .6 Liter, 4 D o o r,
Im pec c a b le, In a nd O u t,
Unb ea ta b le B u y, 8 9 k M iles
$
11,495
$
8 ,995
0 3 Che vy Tra ilb la ze r L TZ
Lo a d ed w / 2 Yea r
W a rra nty, Lea ther,
Su nro o f, Pea rl
W hite, Am a zing
Co nd itio n
$
6,995
97 Chrys le r L H S
0 3 H yu n d a i S a n ta Fe GL S
$
CAL L
P
A
G
E
2
4
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
7
3
9
2
9
1
like button once you arrive at
the page.
Anyone who is interested in
renting St. Marys School for
child care, parties, or other use-
ful activities is invited to call the
rectory at 457-3412 to learn
more about this opportunity.
Daily Masses:
8 a.m. (Wednesday at 7 p.m.)
Eucharistic Adoration: Tuesdays
from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m.
Miraculous Medal Novena:
Wednesday following the 7 p.m.
Mass
Weekends Masses: Saturday
at 4 p.m.; Sunday at 8, 9:30, 11
a.m.
Confession: Saturdays 3-3:45
p.m.; anytime upon request by
calling 457-3412.
Prayer Chain: 457-5867
SECOND PRESBYTERIAN
143 Parsonage St., Pittston
Feb 26 - 9:30 a.m. Sunday
School, 11 a.m. Worship; 5 P.M.
Agape meal
Feb. 27 6 p.m. Fellowship
committee
Feb. 28 7 p.m. AA meeting
Feb 29 6:30 p.m. choir re-
hearsal
Mar 111a.m. Scripture, soup
and sandwich
TRINITY EPISCOPAL
CHURCH
Spring Street and Montgom-
ery Avenue, West Pittston
Parish Mission: To live and
build holy community.
All welcome: Worldwide An-
glican Communion: We believe
in one holy, Catholic apostolic
church.
Web of information and links
atwww.trinityepiscopalchurch-
westpittston.organdwww.dio-
beth.org.
SundayHolyEucharist:11a.m.
every Sunday.
Ash Wednesday Holy Euchar-
ist with distribution of ashes be-
gins at 5:15 p.m.
Food Pantry: February items
needed are Gerritys gift cards,
cash donations and pasta and
sauce
Prayernetwork: Open To Pub-
lic.
Daily prayer for those with
needs requesting prayerful sup-
port.
Start Prayernetwork at parish
office 654-3261.
Youth Program:10:45 a.m. ev-
ery Sunday. Weekday special
events andservice projects as an-
nounced.
Faith Forum for Adults: En-
richment for adults seeking spir-
itual renewal and opportunities
for ministry and volunteerism.
Parish Life Events Team: Bi-
monthly first Sundays.
Parish Council: Every second
Sunday.
Women of Trinity: Every third
Sunday.
WOT Ministry Invitation. The
Women of Trinity have under-
taken a ministry to help support
Good Shepherd Episcopal
Church of Scranton in their ou-
treach to the homeless of the re-
gion.
Each month after enjoying a
home cooked meal at Good
Shepherd all who have needs
may shop for necessities like
clothing, shoes, toiletries in a
store-like setting in the churchs
refurbished basement of donated
items.
The Woman of Trinity has
supported this ministry by deliv-
ering donations of clothing, new
undergarments and socks and
toiletries to the Scranton church.
WOT will continue to collect
trial size and hotel toiletries and
invites the parish community to
join with themin helping the less
fortunate.
Donations of trial size and
sample size toiletries are wel-
come.
Party and Banquet Space.
Newly renovated banquet room
and kitchen. All Day Rental
$100.
Reservations at 654-3261.
Music Together Classes: Fun
and music for infants and chil-
dren through age five accompa-
nied by a parent or caregiver.
Next semester starts in late
March.
Visit www.musictogether.com
for details or call 654-3261.
Seating and takeouts availa-
ble.
Dinners include pancakes,
eggs, sausage, beverage and
dessert. tickets are $6 for adults
and $4 for children10 and under.
For tickets or information call
654-3261.
Tickets available at the door
while supplies last.
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
Corner of Broad & Church
Sts.
Pittston
Rev. Dr. Michael Turner
Wednesday, Feb. 22 - Ash
Wednesday service at 7 p.m.
Sunday Worship Service: 9:30
a.m. Childrens Sunday School:
9:30 a.m.
Holy Communion: 1st Sunday
each month
Choir Rehearsal: Thursdays at
7 p.m. unless told otherwise
United Methodist Women:
2nd Monday unless told other-
wise
Websitewww.umcpittston.org
Phone 655-4340
Easter Candy orders are now
being taken for homemade East-
er Eggs, Migees and Lollipops.
Deadline for orders is Sunday,
March 18.
For additional information or
to place an order call 655-4340
leave a message and someone
will return your call.
Hoagie Sale will be on Tues-
day, March 13.
Choices are ham, salami and
cheese or turkey and cheese with
or without onion. Price of a hoa-
gie is $4.
Orders must be received by
Sunday, March 11.
To place an order call 654-
3936 or 693-1572.
Faith
Continued fromPage 21
dents of Duryea and was raised
in West Avoca along with his
nine other siblings.
He attended Saint Marys
Grade School Avoca and gradu-
ated from Pittston Area High
School in 1986. He went on to
Luzerne County Community
College and Marywood Univer-
sity where he studied Business
Administration and Computer
Information Systems.
OBrien has been elected to
numerous public offices by the
citizens of the Greater Pittston
area and Luzerne County. He
served as Mayor of Avoca for
three years. He was also elected
to the Pittston Area School
Board three times and served for
ten years and became president
of the board in 2007. In 2007 he
was elected Recorder of Deeds
of Luzerne County to serve a
four year term.
During OBriens tenure as
Recorder of Deeds the office
added over 1 million real estate
images onto the county comput-
er systemdating back to the year
of 1925. He also spearheaded
and instituted, along with Veter-
ans Affairs, the Return the F.A-
.V.O.R. program to assist veter-
ans with discounts in the county.
Luzerne County was the first in
the Commonwealth of Pennsyl-
vania to adopt such a program.
Over the years, OBrien has
served on numerous boards and
been involved with many civic
organizations.
In 2010 he was recognized for
his outstanding service to his
community by being selected as
the Avoca Ancient Order of Hi-
bernians Man of the Year. He has
previously been active with the
Friendly Sons Banquet having
served as Grand Marshall. He
was the former owner of
OBriens Irish Pub & Grill in
Avoca for seven years.
He is married to the former
Ann Snopkowski of Dupont and
the couple has a daughter Ella;
he also has a son Seamus. He is a
member of the Ancient Order of
Hibernians, Avoca, Greater Pitt-
ston Friendly Sons Saint of Saint
Patrick, Pittston Knights of Co-
lumbus and Our Lady of Euchar-
ist Parish in Pittston.
Friendly Sons
Continued fromPage 9
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
5 7
4
0
6
6
6
140 MAIN ST. DUPONT 570.299.5296
OPENING SOON!
NOW BOOKING:
Graduation parties, Rehearsal Dinners, Funeral
Luncheons, Business events, Of site catering, etc.
Award Winning
Tuscan Deep Dish Pizza
by Chef Doyle Lewis
PLENTY OF PARKING WITH SECURITY (30 CAMERAS)
NOW HIRING PROFESSIONAL STAFF
FINE ITALIAN
DINING
CREEK SIDE PATIO
MARTINI BAR
BANQUET
ROOM
LIVE
ENTERTAINMENT
CIGAR LOUNGE
LARGE DANCE FLOOR
CONCERT STYLE
SOUND&LIGHTING
The Luzerne County Slovak
League of America Branch #474
named Bernard J. Novabilski
Man of the Year and installed of-
ficers at a meeting last Sunday at
the Wyoming Hose Company.
Novabilski was born August 1,
1935, in Port Griffith to Joseph
and Zofia and was one of nine
children, five girls andfour boys.
He graduated from St. John the
Baptist Slovak Grade School in
Pittston, then preceded to Jen-
kins Township High School.
During those years, he served in
the Naval Reserve for one year.
After graduating high school in
1953, he enlisted in the United
State Air Force. He served four
years of active duty being honor-
ably discharged in1957. He then
proceeded to be an active reserv-
ist for four more years from
1957-1961.
He enrolled in Wilkes-Barre
Business College in the Ad-
AT I N S TA L L AT I O N D I N N E R
Novabilski named Slovak League Man of the Year
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Officers and trustees of Slovak League of America, Kingston Branch #474, are sworn in last Sunday afternoon at Wyoming Hose Co. No. 2 by Luzerne County Judge Fred
Pierantoni. Fromleft: David Ciotola, trustee; Eugene McKeweon, trustee; George Nisky, secretary; Robert Chmarney, president; David Barilla, district justice; Bernie Nov-
abilski, trustee; Mark Manganaro, chaplain; Andrew Barilla, vice president; Joseph Severnak, sergeant of arms; Christopher Nawalajko, treasurer; Fred Pierantoni, resi-
dent judge. Absent fromphoto: Msgr. John Bendik, moderator.
Slovak League of America, Kingston Branch #474 President Rob-
ert Chmarney, left, presents Bernard Novabilski the Man of the
Year Award at Wyoming Hose Co. No. 2 last Sunday afternoon.
See SLOVAK, Page 26
P
A
G
E
2
6
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
7
3
2
4
0
5
www.VisitingAngels.com
Locally Owned
Free In Home Consultation
Hygiene Assistance
Over 30 Full Kitchen & Bath Displays
Thousands of Choices
Does Your
Kitchen
Need An
Update?
COMPLETE KITCHEN
$
1299
COMPLETE KITCHEN
$
1699
COMPLETE KITCHEN
$
2069
COMPLETE KITCHEN
$
2549
Great Value for the
Budget Minded
1 color to choose
*A Traditional
Style
2 colors to choose
*The Clean Look of
a Shaker door
3 colors to choose
*The Ultimate
in Classic Cabinetry
3 colors to choose
(Prices Based on a 19 foot kitchen)
Louis Industrial Drive, Old Forge
344-0443 457-6774 www.mariottibp.com
Showroom hours: 8 til 4:30 Wed & Thurs; 8 til 8 Sat: 8 til Noon Warehouse closed: 4:30 daily - noon on Sat.
Features and Benets of Classic Cabinetry

:
100% Amish Made in the USA
Fully assembled and cartoned
Painted cabinets at stained cabinet price
Free delivery in 5 days or less
All wood (no particle board)*
Features and Benets of DuraSupreme:
100% All wood construction (no particle board)
Soft close doors & drawers
Maple, cherry, oak, lyptus & rustic cherry
Dovetail all wood drawers
Lifetime Warranty
300+ styles and nish combinations
We will come out and measure your kitchen!
GRANITE COUNTERTOP SALE
No Hidden Fees
*Template, install, sink cut out and
FREE stainless steel sink. All included. *With this ad.
30 S/F
MINIMUM
$
5
7
00*
Pa HIC#045635
vanced Curriculumin January of
1959 and graduated with a de-
gree in Business Administration
in June of 1960.
He married JoAnn Ezzo and
together they had two sons. One
of the boys became a police offi-
cer and was killed in the line of
duty in 1995. His other son is a
medical doctor and has a prac-
tice in Collegeville. His wifes
passing of 22 years will be noted
in June.
Novabilski has worked for six
years as a Railway Postal Clerk
in the Transportation Depart-
ment and 40 years for the U.S.
Postal Service. In 1995, he re-
ceived a $200 award and a
plaque from his superiors for re-
porting for duty in Scranton Post
Office during the state of emer-
gency.
He is a member of St. John the
Evangelist Church, Pittston and
actively supports the church and
Holy Name Society. In his spare
time, he enjoys golfing, garden-
ing, ballroomdancing and pock-
et watch and coin collecting. He
is also a 20 and 1/2 gallon blood
donor.
Slovak
Continued fromPage 25
was adopted with the increased
influx of men entering the field.
1968 44 Years Ago
Specialist Fourth Class Ro-
nald M. Urbanski, of Pittston,
lost his life in a battle at a base
camp in South Vietnam. Urban-
ski was serving with the Bat-
tery B, Second Battalion, 40th
Artillery, 199th Light Infantry
Brigade. The 199th was a major
combat unit of the United
States Army. The brigade
formed at Fort Benning, Ge-
orgia, in 1966. Nicknamed the
Redcatchers, the 199th LIB
moved to Song Be, Vietnam in
December, 1966 to provide
increased U.S. presence and
remained there until its return
to Fort Benning in October,
1970, where it was inactivated.
Clint Eastwood starred in
The Good, The Bad and The
Ugly, screened at the Amer-
ican Theatre, while Doris Day
played in The Ballad of Josie
at the Comerford Drive-in.
Popular Sunday Night televi-
sion shows were Ed Sullivan,
FBI, Smothers Brothers, Bo-
nanza, Mission Impossible and
High Chaparral.
Diskay Discount Store of-
fered ladies canvas shoes for $1
and spring skirts for $2.57.
Sperrazzas Meat Market
advertised a head of lettuce for
10 cents, beef liver at 4 lbs. for
$1, veal chops for 69 cents per
pound. Luchetti Sales in Exe-
ter promised no waiting and
immediate delivery on the 68
Rambler just $1,995.
Question #2
In 1968 it was called some-
thing to see and deemed a
place youd hate to leave. To
what location was the writer
referring?
1978 34 Years Ago
The Seton Catholic girls
basketball team coached by
Sister Sandra Grieco finished
the 1977-78 season with an 11-4
record. The team was led in
scoring by Mary Kay Boos and
Ellen Gilhooley, who also led
in rebounding. Team members
who headed to the district play-
offs were Mary Kay Boos,
Kathy Healey, Linda Skurla,
Patty DeGuglielmo, Juliann
Ristagno, Chris Hizny, Mary
Helen Plisko, Ellen Gilhooley,
Monica Tomaszewski, Joyce
Baker and Diane Insalaco.
Pittston Area Patriots won
their first AAA Division
Wyoming Valley Conference
title in 1978. The team, coached
by Gene Guarilia, battled
Wyoming Valley West to a
60-59 nail-biting finish. Mem-
bers of the team that contrib-
uted to the championship sea-
son were Mike Ardoline, Joe
Maurizi, Charlie Dominick,
Harry Ardoline, Bob Dono-
van, Ralph Clapps, Joe Gua-
rilia, Steve Haluschak, Ed
Ward, George Aldrich and
Rich Para.
1988 24 Years Ago
Cindy Czerniakowski made
history at Pittston Area by be-
ing the first junior basketball
player in the schools history to
reach 1,000 career points. Cin-
dy turned in a 30-point game
high performance in a game
against Wyoming Area.
Wyoming Area Lady War-
riors Swim Team Theresa
Shimko, Rhea Piccirilli, Lau-
ra Dennis and Cindy Butcof-
ski brought home gold medals
in two events in the District II
Swimming Championships.
The team, coached by Susan
Cavanaugh, came in third
overall.
Answer #1
Local residents Betty Carey,
Clair Callahan, Mrs. James
Padden and Marilyn Ohl were
born on February 29. February
29 is a date that occurs every
four years and is called Leap
Day. This day is added to the
calendar in leap years as a cor-
rective measure, because the
earth does not orbit around the
sun in precisely 365 days.
William A. Watson, Sr.,
founding editor of the Sunday
Dispatch, was also born on Feb.
29. When he reached 64 years
old, he remarked that it was his
Sweet 16 birthday party.
Answer #2
An article in the February 25,
1968, Sunday Dispatch de-
scribed the Pittston Area High
School as 80 percent complete.
The writer further stated, ac-
cording to the old song lyrics, I
dont want to get well, Im in
love with a beautiful nurse,
would be paraphrased by the
1968 graduating class when
they had the opportunity to
view the building in Yatesville.
I Dont Want to Get Well
was a popular World War I
song, released in 1918.
I think, at a childs birth, if a
mother could ask a fairy god-
mother to endow it with the
most useful gift, that gift should
be curiosity.
Eleanor Roosevelt
Peeking into the Past
Continued fromPage 16
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
7
Something for
both of you
Erectile
Dysfunction
Hair Replacement
Laser Hair Removal
Eye Lash Extensions
Non Surgical, Semi Permanent
(As seen on Good Morning America)
Botox and Fillers
Testosterone
evaluation for men
(800) 424-HAIR (4247) (570) 489-2222 www.medhaircenter.com
The Anti Aging Clinic
at the
six layers of my own voice on the
two tracks. Its called bouncing.
The instrumental sounded bor-
ing, so we cut that part out with
razor blade and sped it up a full
octave so guitar sounded like
banjo. It seemed innate to me. It
was love at first sight in studio.
Granahan wasnt going for it,
but the sound he produced was
rockabilly.
As Granahan was technically
still signed by ATCO, to avoid le-
gal trouble he released Click
Clack under the name Dickie
Doo and the Donts. The name
was an inside joke referring to
Clark and the legal entangle-
ments.
The record took off and reac-
hed number #28 on Billboards
Top 100. It was the first of three
Gold Records he earned along
with You Were Mine recorded
under The Fireflies, and No
Chemise, Please, under his own
name.
The success of Click, Clack
landed Granahan on a tour as
Dickie Doo. He put a band to-
gether and went on the road with
Alan Freeds Big Beat Tour with,
among other acts, Jerry Lee Le-
wis, Buddy Holly and the Crick-
ets, Chuck Berry, and Screaming
Jay Hawkins.
Another tour brought him to
San Souci Park in Hanover
Township with Frankie Avalon,
Connie Francis and Danny and
the Juniors.
Worn out from juggling three
bands at the same time The
Donts, the Fireflies and his Ger-
ry Granahan band in the early
1960s Granahan became a pro-
ducer and at age 28 one of the
youngest record executives in
history, first at his own Caprice
Records and then at two major
labels, United Artists and Dot.
Granahan produced early pre-
fame recordings for bands in-
volving Joe Walsh of the Eagles,
Gram Parsons, a founder of the
Byrds, and Ginger Baker, of the
band Cream, to name three of
many.
The biggest single song Gra-
nahan is associated with is Cara
Mia which he produced and ar-
ranged for Jay & The Ameri-
cans. As Granahan put it, It
made my career and it made
theirs.
Cara Mia was released right
inthe middle of Beatlemania and
the subsequent British Invasion.
With its big production with
strings and horns and Jay Blacks
soaring vocals Cara Mia
bucked that trend.
People asked me if I was nuts
to go against the British Inva-
sion, Granahan said. Id like to
get nuts like that a couple more
times.
Cara Mia went to #4 on Bill-
board.
Bucking the British Invasion
wasnt a plan by Granahan. By
his own admission nothing that
happened in his career was by
plan. I didnt visualize the fu-
ture. Whatever made me happy,
whatever sounded good, I did.
Fortunately, I wasnt a one trick
pony. I produced every kind of
record. I was loose cannon.
While Cara Mia was a big hit
for Granahan, the legendary
song Wild Thing was a big
miss. Granahan produced the
obscure original recording of
Wild Thing by the Wild Ones
in 1965, six months before the
Troggs made a world wide
smash out of it.
It happened this way. Richard
Burtons ex, Sybil Burton, own-
ed a restaurant in Manhattan
called Arthurs that was popular
with music and show business
types and where the house band
was Jordan Christopher and the
Wild Ones. Burton was about to
marryChristopher andshe asked
Granahan to produce a song for
him. Granahan called Chip Tay-
lor, a friend and songwriter who
was the brother of actor Jon
Voight, and asked himif he had a
song.
Taylor said he did, but actually
wrote half the song in a cab on
the way to Granahans office.
I was going to finish the song
with him, but I was too busy and
asked him to finish it or I could
have had writing credits on it,
Granahan said.
Granahans version of Wild
Thing was, by his own admis-
sion, over-produced with har-
monica and a horn section. I
like a big sound, but it didnt be-
long on that song.
The Troggs hit version is a
stripped down guitar song.
One of Granahans most sig-
nificant discoveries was the
singer and songwriter tandem of
James Ray and Rudy Clark.
Rays recording of If You Gotta
Make A Fool Of Somebody hit
#22 on Billboards Hot 100 and
#10 on its R&B chart in 1962.
Songs from the album, which
Granahan produced, were influ-
ential for decades. Freddie and
the Dreamers made a hit out of
If You Gotta Make AFool and
George Harrison made a #1 hit
out of Ive Got My Mind Set On
You in 1988.
Granahan believes big things
could have happened for him,
Ray and Clark. Ray died of a
drugoverdose, but Clarkwent on
to songwriting success writing
Good Lovin for the Young
Rascals and Everybody Plays
The Fool for The Main Ingre-
dient
Granahans connections with
iconic rockstars are toomanyfor
this story, but one has to be told.
Granahan was producing the girl
group, The Angels, before they
made the hit My Boy Friends
Back.
Granahanwas lookingfor a re-
placement for one of the girls
when Sid Bernstein, the promo-
ter who brought the Beatles to
America, suggested he audition
MaryLouKiernan, a first runner
up in the Miss Rhode Island pag-
eant. Granahan was knocked out
in more ways than one. She
joined the Angels under the
name Kerri Downs and became
Mrs. Granahan in 1963.
They have two daughters, Ta-
ra, a radio personality on WPRO
in Providence, and Gerriann, a
dance choreographer.
In the 1970s, Granahan put to-
gether a band and toured the ho-
tel/resort/casino circuit rotating
with former heavyweight boxing
champ Joe Frazier and his group,
The Knockouts, and Dennis Yost
& The Classics IV.
Granahan, 78, still keeps busy
in music. Hes still recording and
compiling and even occasionally
performing in upscale Oldies re-
vues in New England. In 2005,
he released an album of Christ-
mas music.
Right nowhe is putting a com-
pilation of his old releases and
Granahan
Continued fromPage 3
Gerry Granahan, front row, no helmet, with members of the St.
John's High school football team in 1948. The photo belongs to
John 'Bozo' Connors, back row no helmet.
See GRANAHAN, Page 30
P
A
G
E
2
8
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Charlie Adonizio won two
gold medals in the same catego-
ry to lead a parade of local medal
winners at the 13th Annual Cor-
rados Amateur Winemaking
Competition at The Venetian in
Garfield, NewJersey, on Jan. 27.
Leo Sperrazza also won a gold
medal as did the teamof Richard
Gumbravich, Pat Flynn, Wally
Songalia and Allister McNee.
Sperrazza also won three bronze
medals.
Paul Savakinas won three sil-
ver medals, one with partner Jer-
ry Kufta, and a bronze.
Dave and Fran Drozda won a
silver and a bronze; Michael Pu-
gliese Sr. won a silver; and Tom
Zabresky won a bronze.
Adonizios golds were for his
Barbera/Old Vine Zinfadel
blend and for his Malbec.
Sperrazza was awarded a gold
medal for his Zinfandel.
Team Grumbravich won gold
for their Merlot.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF LEO SPERRAZZA
Greater Pittston winemaking enthusiasts and perennial medal
winners at the Corrado's competition, Charlie Adonizio, left, and
Leo Sperrazza.
Winemaking medal winners TomZabreskie and Paul Savakinas. LuAnn Sperrazza with husband Leo and
Grape performance
Locals bring home medals from Corrados Amateur Winemaking Competition
The Grumbravich crew are perennial winners at the Corrado's competition.
Fran and Dave Drozda with their winem
Tony Martorana and his family attend th
Competition at The Venetian in Garfield
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
2
9
d his latest medals.
Charlie, left, and Karen Adonizio pose at the Corrado's event with winemaking guru Sandy Gubbiotti.
making medals.
he Corrado's Amateur Winemaking
d, N.J.
Paul Savakinas and Leo Sperrazza with their 2012 amateur wine-
making competition medals.
Regular attendees at the Corrado's winemaking competition, Dave
and Joanna Fusco, pose for a photo.
Kristy and Jerry Mecadon pose for a photo while attending the
winemaking competition.
Joe Carmody and Dave Barilla visit during the winemaking com-
petition event.
P
A
G
E
3
0
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
2
7
6
3
5
5
Almost 30% of the youth in the
United States, or more than 5.7
million children, are estimated to
be a bully, a target of bullying or
both.
There also appears to be a strong
relationship between childhood
bullying and adult legal and crimi-
nal problems.
Studies show that bullies are
generally physically aggressive,
hot tempered, easily angered and
impulsive.
Children and youth that are bullied
are typically anxious, insecure,
and cautious. They suffer from
low self-esteem and rarely defend
themselves.
Many times children are embar-
rassed to tell their parents or other
adults. They end up being very shy
and afraid to be out-spoken and
stick up for themselves...especially
later in life.
Bullying can cause a problem with
grades and school work. Worse
yet they might want to t in and
become a member of a gang, try
drugs or other illegal activity.
Sometimes parents dont realize it
until the child reaches their teens
and they start to see who they
hang around with or a change in
their attitudes and school work.
Is Your Child Being Bullied?
See Our Website at:
WWW.ROTHROCKSKUNGFU.COM
417 Main St., Duryea, PA (570) 457-2591
Stop the Bullying Before It Starts
Little
Dragons:
Concentration
Leadership
Discipline
Persistence
Patience
Respect
Goals
Safe & Fun
2 FREE
Lessons
1350 N. River Street
Plains, PA 18705
570-270-0777
INSPECTION/EMISSIONS
TIRES
TUNE-UPS
BRAKES
GENERAL MAINTENANCE
We gladly welcome back our old clients
and warmly welcome new ones!!
The Auto Lodge provides all automotive needs for
all types of vehicles.
The Auto Lodge is a local family run business
based on quality workmanship and
honest business practices.
OWNER:
Frank Gubbiotti
HEAD MECHANIC:
Howard Balbach
songs never released for an al-
bum for Sony called The Quiet
Legend.
Granahan said as much as he
appreciates singers and players
they are nothing without materi-
al. Im impressed with song-
writers, he said. They are the
root of everything.
His favorites are Jim Webb
and Hal Davis, who he calls the
greatest American lyricist, and
Burt Bacharach, because hes
so diversified. Thats a songwrit-
er.
His favorite singers are Tom
Jones, Dusty Springfield and an
obscure Christian music singer,
David Phelps.
Granahan said he was never
star struck by the musicians he
crossed paths with. But, he
said, I would be if I met Tom
Brady or Wes Welker. Ima foot-
ball freak.
Granahan still has nieces and
nephews in the area among them
Tom, Danny and Kenneth Gra-
nahan, Kathleen Jones and Jim-
my Rocco Guliano. He hopes to
visit Pittston in the spring or
summer.
To learn more search the Wild
Ones Wild Thing and Dickie
Doo and the Donts on youtube.
Or go to http://www.ripopmu-
sic.org/musical-artists/musi-
cians/gerry/
Granahan
Continued from Page 27
Senior Citizens Centers, sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging
for Luzerne and Wyoming counties, offer hot noon meals Monday
through Friday to people 60 years of age or older. Donations from
participants are gratefully accepted and needed in order to expand
this program.
MENU FOR WEEKOF FEBRUARY 27
Monday - Sliced turkey breast, gravy (low sodium) glazed baby
carrots, mashed potatoes, whole-wheat dinner roll, apple pie, marga-
rine milk and coffee.
Tuesday - Meatball sandwich, Caesar salad, split pea soup, whole-
wheat hoagie roll, crackers, cheesecake, margarine, milk, coffee.
Wednesday- Apple cranberryporkchop, sweet potatoes, Brussels
sprouts, whole wheat dinner roll, spice cake, margarine, milk, coffee
Thursday - Chicken and biscuits, mixed vegetables, mashed pota-
toes, fruit cocktail, margarine, milk, coffee.
Friday - Stuffed shells, garden salad, salad dressing, minestrone
soup, garlic bread, Parmesan cheese, banana, margarine, milk coffee.
Senior centers menu
Early Tikes Gymnastics
Just 2s
Parent participation required.
Toddlers and parents will love
this energetic class, learning and
building gymnastics skills.
Wednesdays: 9 to 9:30 a.m.
Cost: $30
Just 3s
This class introduces your
child to an independent gymnas-
tics class.
Wednesdays: 9:44 to 10:15
a.m. Cost: $30
Twinkie Fitness (age 4)
This class utilizes equipment
to teach basic skills and aids in
coordination development.
Thursdays: 5:15 to 6 p.m.
Cost: $40
Beginner Gymnastics
Young Beginner (ages 5-7)
Gymnasts will learn skill on
mats. Beams, vaults and bars.
Saturdays: 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Beginner (ages 7 & up)
Class starts with basics on
mats, vault, beam and bars and
progresses to intermediate skills.
Saturdays: 10 to 10:45 a.m.
Intermediate (ages 10 & up)
Gymnasts will continue to ad-
vance their skills on mats, vault,
beamand bars while learning the
basics of tumbling as well.
Saturdays: 11 a.m. to noon
Member: $40
Family member: $30
Non-members: $55
Basketball
Beginner (kindergarten,
first and second grades)
Learn howto dribble, pass and
shoot the ball inthis introductory
basketball program.
Tuesdays: 5:30 to 6:15 p.m.
Basketball Basics (third,
fourth and fifth grades)
Learn the basic skills of bas-
ketball, improving skills with
dribbling, passing, shooting and
playing together as a team
Tuesdays: 6:30 to 7:30 p.m.
Member: $50
Family member: $40
Non-members: $65
Baseball and softball
Tee Ball (ages 5 and 6)
Boys and girls will learn run-
ning, catching, throwing, batting
and basic game play.
Saturdays: 9 to 9:45 a.m.
Pre-Minors Baseball (ages 7-
10)
This program is meant for
those almost ready to start play-
ing Little League.
Saturdays: 10 to 11 a.m.
Pre-Minors Softball (ages 7-
10)
This program is meant for
those almost ready to start play-
ing Little League.
Saturdays: 11:15 to 12:15 p.m.
Member: $50
Family member: $40
Non-members: $65
For more information or to
register, call Mike Labagh ,
Wellness and Sports Director, at
655-2255 ext 104 or email himat
mlabagh@greaterpittstonym-
ca.org.
Several programs offered at Greater Pittston YMCA
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
1
GREATER PITTSTON CHAMBER 2012
MEMBERSHIP DRIVE CONTINUES
Call Us At 655-1424
Or Email Us At
info@pittstonchamber.org
Joining Is Easy!
Seated left to right:
Janet Rosenbaum; Blaise Alan Dente,CCC; Joseph J. Prociak, Esq.; Richard Kazmerick; Joseph F. Saporito, Jr. Esq. Coun-
sel; Charles A. Adonizio III, President; Patricia F. Stella, 3rd Vice-President; Joseph D. Burke, Esq., 1st Vice-President and
Joseph Durkin, P.E., Immediate Past President.
Second row, standing left to right:
Wayne Dotter; Edward Yencha; Phyllis Brandwene; Judy M. Martinelli; Mark Nobile, Treasurer; James Powers; Rosemary
Dessoye, Executive Vice-President; Representative Michael Carroll; Michael Butera, Esq.; Brandi Bartush, Ofce Manager
and Shirley Bartos, Administrative Assistant.
Brand New Businesses Will Receive
A FREE 1st Year Membership
Existing Businesses Joining For the First
Time Receive 10% OFF Their 1st Years Dues
FEBRUARY IS MEMBERSHIP
MONTH FOR THE CHAMBER
Ofcers and Board Members encourage all businesses old
and new to join the Chamber and discover the many benets
we have to offer.
Like us on
Facebook!
OBITUARIES
Robert Gaspar Leginus Sr.
died Feb. 20, 2012 in Columbia,
Md., at the age of 98.
He was born on Sept. 22, 1913,
in Wyoming. He attended grade
school and high school in the
Wyoming Valley and attended
Beckley College in Harrisburg
for one year studying Aeronaut-
ics. After Beckley College
closed, he attended Penn State
extension school at night for four
years, where he received his Cer-
tificate in Aeronautical Engi-
neering. At an early age he
learned to fly at the Wyoming
Valley Airport. He flew for a
banner towing service in Wyom-
ing and as a copilot for early
commercial airlines. He even
tried to buy one of Amelia Ear-
harts aircraft to start his own
banner towing service. Always
one to experiment with aircraft,
he was one of the first persons to
fly the auto gyro, the predecessor
to the helicopter.
One of his un-obtaineddreams
was to become an Astronaut, but
he said he was born too early. He
enlisted in the Army Air Force in
April 1942 as a private and after
receiving his certificate as an
airplane and engine mechanic
was promoted to Staff Sergeant
one year later. On Dec. 29, 1943,
he was honorably discharged to
accept a commission as a glider
pilot on Dec. 31, 1943. As a glid-
er pilot he was part of the D-Day
Operations and successfully
completed 50 combat mission
hours flying CG 4A Glider sup-
plymissions behindenemylines.
His missions primarily support-
ed Gen Pattons advancing U.S.
tank divisions. He was captured
twice by the German Army (es-
caping once and liberated the
other) and once by the Allied
forces (the adjoiningcamps U.S.
general vouched for his release)
as he made his waybackfromhis
glider controlled "crash" land-
ings.
He also flew C-47 aircraft as a
co-pilot ontroopandsupplymis-
sions within Europe, Africa and
the Middle East. He received the
World War II Victory Medal, the
European African Middle East-
ern Theater Campaign Ribbon,
two Presidential Unit Citations
and two Air Medals. After Hon-
orable Discharge fromthe Army
Air Force on July 26, 1945, he
moved to the Washington area
and joined the U.S. Army Quar-
termaster General Intelligence
Agency as a Military Intelli-
gence Analyst. He served as an
Aide to the Armys senior mili-
tary leadership and was present
in the Pentagon war roomduring
the Bay of Pigs invasion. Be-
cause of his drafting back-
ground, he received a U.S. Army
citation for designing the new
(1957) Austrian Army Insignia.
He retired fromGovernment ser-
vice as a Cartographer with the
Department of Agriculture in
1979. He is survived by his lov-
ing wife of 63 years, Adele Legi-
nus, children, Robert Leginus
Jr., Roberta Graves, Susan Mill-
er and Joseph Leginus, and five
grandchildren and four great-
grandchildren.
Robert G. Leginus, Sr.
February 20, 2012
P
A
G
E
3
2
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
7
3
7
6
9
7
OBITUARIES
Michael
Vacula, 65,
died February
23, 2012 in the
Hospice Care
unit at the
Dept. of Veter-
ans Affairs Medical Center,
Plains Twp., with his loving fam-
ily at his side.
Michael was born and raised
in Exeter, son of the late Michael
Adam and Doris Curtis Vacula.
He was a1965graduate of Exeter
High School. A U.S. Marine
Corps veteran, Michael honor-
ably served his country during
the Vietnam War. Upon his dis-
charge in April 1971, Michael
had attained meritoriously the
rank of Sergeant.
A proud veteran, Michael was
the former commander of the
V.F.W. Exeter Post # 6518. He
was also a member of the Amer-
ican Legion Post 0833. Through
his lifetime being always civic-
minded, Michael served his
community as a member of the
Wyoming Area School Board
and was appointed as representa-
tive to West Side Vocational-
Technical School. He was elect-
ed as Exeter Borough Council-
man serving as representative to
the WVSA Board. Michael vol-
unteered as coach for the Exeter
Panthers mini football league
during its early years. He had
been employed by Maiers Bak-
ery until his retirement in 2006.
An avid Penn State fan he at-
tended many games along with
the busloads of family and
friends he usually brought along.
He also enjoyed his hunting ex-
peditions to Maine and South
Carolina and returned home to
his loving family and friends to
share his exciting and usually ve-
ry entertaining stories.
Michael cherished the time
with his children and grandchil-
dren, his greatest joy. They were
his sweethearts and his buddies.
They shared so many happy
times and they will remember
himalways for his caring, loving
heart.
Michael was also preceded in
death by his brother-in-law and
good friend, Ronnie Rome.
He is survived by his children,
Jennifer Vacula, Wyoming;
Heather Vacula Gallo and her
husband, Aaron, Darien, Ct. and
Michael Vacula and his wife Sa-
mantha, Exeter; his grandchil-
dren, Elizabeth Hannon, Mia
and Wes Gallo, and Ava and
Alex Vacula; former wife and
friend, Gloria Vacula; his sisters,
Margaret Giordano and her hus-
band Ross, Exeter, and Suzanne
Vacula, Plains; Godmother and
Aunt Valya Vacula, Exeter and
best friend, Pat Perugino, Plains,;
sistersin-law, Mary Ann Rome,
Exeter, Marguerite Pallchak and
her husband Robert, Spring, Tx.
and Jo-Ann Pellegrini and her
husband Thomas, Exeter; and
many nieces, nephews, breakfast
partners and good friends. He
will be very deeply missed by all
who knew and loved him.
The family would like to thank
everyone at Manor Care, King-
ston and the VA Hospice Care
Unit for their loving attention,
compassion and care.
Militaryfuneral honors will be
conducted Monday at 9 a.m.
from the Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, 1030 Wyoming Ave.,
Exeter with the Am Vets Honor
Guard, with a Mass of Christian
Burial at 9:30 a.m. at St. Antho-
ny of Padua Church, St. Barbara
Parish, Exeter. Interment Mt. Ol-
ivet Cemetery, Carverton. Vis-
itation will be held today from
5-8 p.m. at the funeral home.
Visit www.gubbiottifh.com to
send an online condolence.
Michael Vacula
February 23, 2012
Grace Gaughan, 88 of West
Wyoming died February 24,
2012 in the Highland Manor
Nursing and Convalescent Cen-
ter, Exeter.
Born in West Wyoming she
was the daughter of the late Tho-
mas and Gertrude Gordon
Gaughan. She was a graduate of
the West Wyoming High School
class of 1944. Prior to her retire-
ment she was employed at Sing-
er. Grace was a member of St.
Anthony of Padua Church of St.
Barbara Parish, Exeter.
Also preceding her in death
were several brothers and sisters.
Surviving is her brother Tho-
mas Gaughan of Wyoming; sev-
eral nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held
Monday at 9 a.m. from the Met-
calfe and Shaver Funeral Home,
504 Wyoming Ave., Wyoming
with a Mass of Christian Burial
at 9:30 a.m. in St. Cecilias
Church of St. Barbara Parish,
Exeter. Interment St. Cecilias
Cemetery, Exeter.
Friends may call Monday
morning 8:30 to 9 a.m. in the fu-
neral home.
Grace Gaughan
February 24, 2012
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
3
In the towns
Atty. Biagio Musto, II, will
present a free informational
seminar on elder and estate law
today at 2 p.m. today, Feb. 26 in
St. Marys School Auditorium,
742 Spring St. One of the most
important topics he will discuss
is how to protect assets from
nursing home costs.
Happy birthday
Happy birthday to Nancy Mat-
tioli who celebrated her special
day on February 17 and to Laura
Krafjack who will celebrate her
special day Monday, Feb. 27.
Get well
Get well wishes are extended
to Otto Mattioli who is recuper-
ating at home from a broken toe
and bruised arm. Otto thanks ev-
eryone for all of the well wishes
he received and assures all of his
buddies at the American Legion
he will be back on his feet soon.
Thank you note
Queen of the Apostles Parish
extends a special thank you to
Todd Shimko of Todd Shimko
Insurance Agency LLC, for sup-
porting the parish fundraiser.
With this fundraiser, advertisers
are invited to place their busi-
nesses flyer in the parish bulletin
for a nominal fee. For more in-
formation, call the parish office
at 457-3412.
Youth group
Queen of the Apostles Parish
youth group will meet today,
Feb. 26 at 6:30 p.m. in St. Marys
School auditorium, 742 Spring
St. This meeting will include the
January and February birthday
celebrations. New members are
always welcome. For more infor-
mation, call Lori Ostrowski at
457-8840.
Finance council
The Queen of the Apostles
Parish finance council will meet
at 7 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28 in
St. Marys Rectory, 715 Haw-
thorne St.
Archives Club
The Old Forge Coal Mine and
Anthracite Archives Club will
have its first 2012 meeting at
6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28 in
the Eagle McClure Hose Com-
pany Hall, 375 Milwaukee Ave.,
Old Forge. The meeting is open
to all persons interested in
miningandlocal history. Attend-
ees are encouraged to bring their
old photos to share with the
group. Mining equipment and
books will also be on display.
New members are welcome. For
directions, e-mail info@oldfor-
gecoalmine.com.
Ecumenical services
Several Protestant and Cathol-
ic churches in Avoca, Duryea,
Old Forge and Moosic will cele-
brate ecumenical services at 7
p.m. Tuesdays throughout Lent.
The first service is Tuesday, Feb.
28 at the Full Gospel Church,
1113 Main St., Avoca, where the
Rev. Rich Rock, pastor of St.
Johns Primitive Methodist
Church, Avoca, will be the
speaker.
Liturgy rescheduled
Due to the Pittston Deanerys
Road to Resurrection Lenten
Masses each Wednesday eve-
ning during Lent, Queen of the
Apostles Parish will not have
their normally scheduled
Wednesday evening parish litur-
gy. There will be one at 8 a.m.
instead.
Borough taxes
2012 Luzerne County/Avoca
Borough taxes will be mailed
this week. Beginning March 1,
Avoca Tax Collector Therese
Wrubel will accept payments
from9:30 to11:30 and from1:30
to 3:30 p.m. on Thursdays at the
Avoca Municipal Building, 752
Main St. She will also have of-
fice hours from 6 to 7 p.m. on
Fridays. Garbage stickers will al-
so be available at these times.
Tge rebate period for the taxes
ends April 30, and the garbage
fee will increase after March 21.
The fee schedule for purchasing
the garbage window sticker in
order to have up to three bags
collected weekly is as follows:
$160 if purchased by March 21;
$170 if purchased between
March 22 and April 21; $180 if
purchased between April 22 and
May 21; and $190 if purchased
between May 22 and June 21.
Delinquent accounts will be re-
ferred to district court after June
21.
Residents unable tostopbythe
municipal building to pay their
taxes or purchase a garbage
sticker can submit their pay-
ments via mail to Avoca Bor-
ough c/o Therese Wrubel, 129
Factory St., Avoca, PA18641.
Residents paying taxes via
mail who need a receipt should
send both copies of the tax bill
and a self addressed/stamped en-
velope. Residents purchasing a
garbage sticker should include a
check made payable to Avoca
Borough and a self-addressed
stamped envelope.
For additional information,
call Wrubel at 457-4891.
Healing Mass
Queen of the Apostles Parish
will have its First Friday Healing
Mass at 7 p.m. on March 2 at St.
Marys Church, 715 Hawthorne
St. Stations of the Cross will be
prayed at 6:30 p.m. Stations will
return to their normally sched-
uled time of 7 p.m. on March 9.
Covered dish dinner
In lieu of the regular March
business meeting, the Ladies
Auxiliary to V.F.W. Post 8335
will have a covered dish dinner at
6 p.m. on Saturday, March at the
post home, 915 Main St. The la-
dies will conduct the nomination
and election of auxiliary officers
for the 2012-2013 term at 7 p.m.
on Monday, April 2 at the post
home. The officers installation
ceremony will be held in May.
President June Fitzgerald will
preside over the meeting and
Mary Starinsky and Mary Orluk
will host it.
Lenten food sale
Queen of the Apostles Parish
will have a Lenten food sale on
Friday, March 9. The sale in-
cludes tuna hoagies, with or
without onions; homemade
Manhattan clam chowder; and
haluski. Hoagies are a $1.50 for a
small and $3 for a large; the clam
chowder is $1.50 per cup and $6
per quart and, the haluski is $3.
To place an order, call Arlene at
346-8060, Jeanette at 457-7804,
Kay at 457-8470 or the rectory at
457-3412 by March 7. Orders
over $20 will be delivered. Or-
ders under $20 can be picked up
at SS. Peter and Pauls Church,
1000 Main St., between 11 a.m.
and 6 p.m. on the sale date.
Pastoral council
Queen of the Apostles Parishs
pastoral council will meet at 7
p.m. on Monday, March12 in the
rectory, 715 Hawthorne St.
Womens guild
Queen of the Apostles Parishs
womens guild will meet at 7
p.m. on Tuesday, March13 in the
rectory, 715 Hawthorne St.
Callahan returns home
Former St. Marys parishioner
and Avoca resident Richard
Dick Callahan will return
home fromCalifornia to serve as
the principal speaker at the Grea-
ter Pittston Friendly Sons of St.
Patrick 98th Annual Banquet on
Saturday, March 17.
Dick, who grew up on Spring
Street and was a member of St.
Marys Schools class of 1954, is
currently the public address an-
nouncer for Major League Base-
balls Oakland As.
Tickets, which are $65 for
adults and$50for childrenunder
21 years of age, are available by
calling Avoca A.O.H. Officer/
Avoca Ticket Chairman Gene
Philbin at 457-0776. The menu
includes a prime ribdinner for all
attendees anda cocktail hour and
open bar for guests over 21.
Chicken dinner
Queen of the Apostles Parish
will have its annual spring chick-
en dinner fromnoon to 4 p.m. on
Sunday, March 18 in SS. Peter
and Pauls Church auditorium,
located in the lower level of the
church, 1000 Main St.
The dinner includes a half
chicken, mashed potatoes and
gravy, vegetable, homemade
cole slaw, rolls and butter, home-
made dessert and beverages.
Takeouts will be available at 11
a.m. In addition to the dinner,
there will also be a raffle with
great prizes from area business-
es.
Tickets are $9 for adults and
$4 for children12 year of age and
younger. To purchase tickets,
call the rectory at 457-3412.
Training class
Traceys Hope Hospice Care
Programand Rescue for Domes-
tic Animals, Inc., Duryea, will
have a pet hospice volunteer
training class from2 to 5 p.m. on
Sunday, March 22 in St. Bene-
dicts Church basement, 155
Austin Ave., Wilkes-Barre. To
register, call Denise at 457-1625.
Night at the Races
The Fourth Annual Night at
the Races to benefit the 1st. Lt.
Jeffrey DePrimo Memorial Fund
will take place Saturday, March
31 at St. Anthonys Parish Cen-
ter, Exeter. Doors will open at 6
p.m. and races will begin at 7
p.m. Admission, which includes
food and beverage, is free with
the purchase of a $10 horse and
$5 without the purchase of a
horse. Patrons must be 21 years
of age or older to attend.
To submit items for publica-
tion in Avoca news, call 457-
3351 or e-mail avocahappen-
ings@verizon.net.
Seminar on estate law today at St. Marys auditorium
AVOCA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
avocahappenings@verizon.net
P
A
G
E
3
4
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
The Dupont Volunteer Hose
Company No.1will hold its 47th
all-you-can-eat breakfast from 7
a.m. to noon on Sunday March 4
at the Dupont Fire Hall.
The breakfast includes pan-
cakes, scrambled eggs, sausage,
coffee and juice. The price is $8
for adults and $4 for children 12
years of age and under. Tickets
will be available at the door, but
can also be purchased in advance
from any member. All proceeds
from the breakfast will benefit
the Hose Company.
Leos Club
The Pittston Area Leos Club
and Fibers of the Earth, a recy-
cling company, have combined
forces to help the environment.
The Leos Club invites you to
clean out your closets and join in
their clothingandshoe drive fun-
draiser. The collection will start
on March1and continue through
March 16.
Items to be collected are adult
and children clothing and sleep-
wear, sneakers and shoes, sheets
and linens, curtains, purses,
belts, bags, hats, socks and stuff-
ed or soft cloth toys and animals.
There are two drop off loca-
tions: PittstonArea HighSchool,
5 Stout St., Yatesville or the Du-
pont Municipal Office, 600
Chestnut St., Dupont. Funds will
be used for the Leos Club spring
tree planting project.
Dupont Borough will directly
benefit from this as the Leos
Club will plant trees on Garden
Drive located off Wyoming Ave
between Sacred Heart Cemetery
and Interstate 81. The tree-plant-
ing project is part of the Lions
Club International Million Tree
Planting Campaign, a global
campaign taking place fromJuly
2011to June 2012 that focuses on
caring for the environment and
communities through tree plant-
ing.
Any questions about the drive
can be directed to Claire Ellen
Hopple at 654-2415 ext.2101 or
about Fibers of the Earth call 86-
5242 or emailfibersofth-
eearth@gmail.com.
Traffic problems
The railroad intersection lo-
cated on Main Street between
Curtain and Coolidge Streets has
had traffic problems for some
time and Dupont Borough has
been addressing the many issues
with the Reading and Northern
Railroad Company.
Residents have registered nu-
merous concerns to borough
council about the wooden planks
between the rails coming loose,
causing a traffic hazard. The
Reading and Northern Railroad
Company has done repairs to the
site but residents feel more needs
to done.
Borough residents can register
their concerns to the railroad
company by contacting Wesley
P. Westenhoefer, Vice-President
of Maintenance of Way, at 610-
562-2100 or e-mail readingnor-
thern.com
Crime Watch
The Dupont Crime Watch will
meet at 6:30 p.m. in the James
Cocco Council Chambers at the
Dupont Municipal Building. A
monthly police report will be
given by Officer in Charge Sgt.
John Saranchuk.
Public meeting
A public meeting will be held
at 6 p.m. on Monday, March19 at
the Dupont Municipal Building
for comments and input on the
possible elimination of the Turn-
pike Bridge on Garden Road.
State Rep. Michael Carroll and
State Senator John Blake will at-
tend to discuss options.
Softball/teeball signups
Softball/teeball signups will
be held from6 to 9 p.m. on Mon-
day, Feb. 27, Tuesday, Feb. 28
and Wednesday, Feb. 29 at the
field house, 200 Elm St.
Call Bob at 881-8744 for more
information or log onto http://
dupontsoftball.clubspaces.co-
m.Opening day is scheduled for
1 p.m. on Sunday, April 15.
Softball league
The newly-formed County
Line Girls Softball League is an
ASA recreation league looking
for girls, teams or towns/organi-
zations to join the league which
is comprised of girls organiza-
tions from Dupont, Taylor and
Minooka. Girls ages 7 to 17 are
invited to join the league with
minimal travel involved. Call
Bob at 881-8744 for information
or log onto http://dupontsoft-
ball.clubspaces.com
Joeys eco-tip
Instead of buying a book at a
book store, go to your local li-
brary. This saves trees!
Sacred Heart Church
Girl Scouts will meet from
6:30 to 8 p.m. on Monday, Feb.
27 in the lower level of the Rec-
tory.
Bible Study will meet at 7 p.m.
on Wednesday, Feb. 29 in the
lower level of the rectory.
Senior Outreach Committee
will meet at 6 p.m. on Monday,
Feb. 27 in the lower level of the
rectory. Plans for the Annual
Health Fair will be discussed.
Choir will meet from 6:30 to
7:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 1
in the choir loft.
All outstanding 300 club tick-
ets returns are to be made at this
time.
Pet hospice training
Traceys Hope Hospice Care
Program&Rescue for Domestic
Animals, Inc. will hold a class to
train anyone who wishes to be-
come a pet hospice volunteer
from 2 to 5 p.m. on Sunday,
March 22 in the basement at St.
Benedicts Church, 155 Austin
Ave., Wilkes-Barre.
All who plan to attend must
RSVP by calling Denise at 457-
1625.
Sympathy
Our condolences go out to
Rev. Joseph Verespy, pastor of
Sacred Heart of Jesus Church,
and his family on the loss of his
beloved mother, Ruth.
Rally
There will be a Cartwright for
Congress Rally at 7 p.m. on
March 7 at the Polish American
Citizens Club, Elm Street,. Re-
freshments will be served.
VFW Post 4909
The Dupont VFW Post 4909
Home Association will hold its
annual St. Patricks Day Dinner
Dance on Saturday, March 17 at
the post home, 401-402MainSt..
A dinner buffet will be served
from 7:30 to 8:45 p.m., Gary
Dee and Company will play
from 9 p.m. to 1 a.m. and the bar
will be open from 7:30 p.m. to
12:30 a.m. Door prizes will be
awarded.
For tickets and reservations,
call Bob Lopata at 654-9104 or
see him any evening at the post
home. Tickets are $25 per per-
son. Deadline for reservations is
Friday, Mary 16.
Lenten sale
Holy Mother of Sorrows
Church will host a Lenten Potato
Pancake & Clam Chowder Din-
ner from 2 to 7 p.m. on Friday,
March 23 at the parish hall on
Wyoming Avenue.
Takeouts will be available
starting at 1 p.m. Donation is $7.
The menu includes pancakes,
soup, dessert and beverage.
Tickets can be obtained by call-
ing Arnold Borc, dinner ticket
chairperson, at 654-8175.
Lions Club sale
Moosic Lions Club Annual
Lenten Tuna and Homemade
Clam Chowder sale will be held
from11 a.m. to 1 p.m. every Fri-
day during Lent at the Moosic
Youth Center. Hoagies are $4
and clamchowder is $3 for pints
and $6 for quarts. Pre-order
pickup or business delivery can
be arranged by calling Tim at
457-1299 at any time and walk-
ins are welcome.
Dupont Lanes
Universal
High Scratch Series scores:
Jerry Coggins, 683; Mark Preb-
ish, 659; David titton, 638; Ri-
chard Arditi, 607; Nicholas Ber-
linski, 594; Jim Lavelle III, 568;
William Elko, 558; Tom titton,
554; Lowell Stoss, 553; Dale
Reese, 549.
National
High Scratch Series scores:
John Kulick, 722; Mark Kulick,
705; Lisa Menichini, 680; Rich
Gorzkowski, 679; Dale Reese,
668; Jerry Coggins, 655; Allyn
Jr. Ferretti, 648; Chris Yonki,
629; John Pisano, 618; Allyn Sr.
Ferretti, 599.
Junior/Senior
High Scratch Series scores
Mens division: Michael Len-
chak, 677; Peter Kulick, 606; Za-
chary McKitish, 604; Billy Jr.
Elko, 585; Michael Szumski,
569.
Womens division: Katie
Wynn, 532; Michelle Gross-
bauer, 302.
Warehouse Mixed League
High Scratch Series Scores
Mens division: Rich Eipper,
799; John Borgia, 643; Matt
Charney, 633; Chris DeHaas,
620; John Doran, 609.
Womens division: Melony
Yurek, 438.
Magic Circle
High Scratch Series scores:
Mens division: John Colarus-
so, 725; Paul Chmiel, 707; Jo-
seph Chmiel, 673; Don Whiting,
673; Vito Buzzetta, 666; Matt
Charney, 647; Greg Renfer, 646;
Chris Rnefer, 634; Jeff Bogdan-
ski, 585; Russ Stevens, 584.
Womens division: Denise
Gordon, 553; Mima Brunges,
425; Ashley Fuller, 358.
Pittston Twp VFW
High Scratch Series scores:
Wally Moore, 717; Joe Jr. Walsh,
656; Jack Casper, 623; Frank So-
lano, 592; Russ Stevens, 579;
Joe Argenio, 578; Larry Jr.
OBrien, 576; Joe Jr. walsh, 572;
Ray Wasko, 569; Rich Russian,
567.
American
High Scratch Series scores:
Gerry Reilly, 789; Scott Kowalc-
zyk, 718; John Grohowski, 710;
Neal Elko, 696; Pete Latona,
649; Dave Kern, 639; Mike Mor-
rissey, 626; Al Jr. Cannarella,
623; Mark Kulick, 618; Edward
Collins, 613.
Dupont Bowlerettes
High Scratch Series scores:
MaryAnn Shugdinis, 560; Kim
Kishel, 558; Marytheresa Pupa,
452; Trisha Chmiel, 447; Debbie
Stevens, 435; Helen Zapotoski,
388; Rose McDade, 384; Ann
Alfano, 378; Mima Brunges,
366.
To submit items for publica-
tion in Dupont news, call 407-
0231 or e-mail du-
pont.news@comcast.net.
47th annual all-you-can-eat breakfast next Sunday
DUPONT
ANN MARIE PADDOCK
654-0897
dupont.news@comcast.net
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
5
201 Foote Avenue, Duryea
FREE DELIVERY! CALL 457-8881
OPEN DAILY: 6 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday & Sunday til 5 p.m.
REHOSKIS MARKET
FRESH & SMOKED KIELBASI
Boneless Chuck Roast ......................$2.99 lb.
Rump Roast .....................................$3.29 lb.
Eye Round Roast ..............................$3.99 lb.
Lean Stewing Beef ...........................$3.59 lb.
Fresh Cut Minute Steaks...................$4.59 lb.
Smoked Bacon.................................$4.99 lb.
Turkey Breast ...................................$5.99 lb.
Cooked Salami.................................$2.99 lb.
Muenster Cheese.............................$4.99 lb.
Now that Lent has arrived,
many local residents will avoid
eating meat on Fridays. While
that is easy for some, its not al-
ways easy for others. Lucky for
us, two of Duryeas finest orga-
nizations are having fundraisers
that will not only satisfy our taste
buds but also our goal of meat-
less meals this Lenten season.
Nativity of Our Lord Parish
will have its annual Lenten food
sales from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. on
March 2 and 30 at Sacred Heart
of Jesus Hall, 529 Stephenson
St. The sale will feature Manhat-
tan (red) clam chowder, home-
made pierogi, haluski, pizza and
baked goods.
The Germania Hose Company
Scuba Team will have its Lenten
pizza sale from4:30 to 7:30 p.m.
every Friday during Lent at the
hose company, 430 Foote Ave.
Trays are $11 each and available
in red or white. Orders can be
placed in advance on sale days
by calling 451-3750 or by stop-
ping at the hose company.
Get well wishes
Get well wishes are extended
to Otto Mattioli who is recuper-
ating at home from a broken toe
and bruised arm. Otto thanks ev-
eryone for all the well wishes he
received and assures all of his
buddies at the American Legion
he will be back on his feet soon.
Ambulance meeting
The Duryea Ambulance and
Rescue Association will meet at
7:30 p.m. on Monday, Feb. 27 at
the ambulance building, 261
Marcy St.
Cub Scouts
Duryea Cub Scout Pack 375
will have Pack Night at 7 p.m. on
Monday, Feb. 27 at Sacred Heart
of Jesus Hall, 529 Stephenson
St. Four Webelos II Scouts will
receive their Arrow of Light
Awards, the highest rank a Cub
Scout can earn.
Crime Watch
The Duryea Neighborhood
Crime Watch will meet at 6:30
p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28 at the
Duryea Municipal Building, 315
Main St.
Archives Club
The Old Forge Coal Mine and
Anthracite Archives Club will
have its first 2012 meeting at
6:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 28 in
the Eagle McClure Hose Com-
pany Hall, 375 Milwaukee Ave.,
Old Forge. The meeting is open
to all persons interested in
miningandlocal history. Attend-
ees are encouraged to bring their
old photos to share with the
group. Mining equipment and
books will also be on display.
New members are welcome. For
directions, e-mail info@oldfor-
gecoalmine.com.
Excelsior Hose Co.
The Excelsior Hose Co. No. 2
will meet at 7 p.m. on Thursday,
March 1 at the hose company,
798 Foote Ave.
Stations of the Cross
The parishioners of Nativityof
our Lord Parish invite the com-
munity to pray the Stations of the
Cross with them at 7 p.m. every
Friday during Lent at Holy Ros-
ary Church, 127 Stephenson St.
There will also be Exposition
and Benediction of the Most
Blessed Sacrament.
Lenten devotions
The parishioners of St. Marys
Polish National Catholic Church
invite the community to their
Lenten devotions at 7 p.m. every
Friday during Lent at the church,
200 Stephenson St.
Pet hospice training
Traceys Hope Hospice Care
Programand Rescue for Domes-
tic Animals, Inc., Duryea, will
have a pet hospice volunteer
trainingclass fromwto5p.m. on
Sunday, March 22 in St. Bene-
dicts Church basement, 155
Austin Ave., Wilkes-Barre. To
register, call Denise at (570)
457-1625.
Night at the Races
The Excelsior Hose Co. No. 2
will have its sixth annual Night
at the Races onSaturday, March
24. The cost of a horse is $10plus
a $2 admission fee at the door.
Horses can be purchased from
any member.
Races benefit DePrimo Fund
The Fourth Annual Night at
the Races to benefit the 1st. Lt.
Jeffrey DePrimo Memorial Fund
will take place Saturday, March
31at St. Anthonys Parish Center
in Exeter. Doors will open at 6
p.m. and races will begin at 7
p.m. Admission, which includes
food and beverage, is free with
the purchase of a $10 horse and
$5 without the purchase of a
horse. Patrons must be 21 years
of age or older to attend.
Garbage stickers
The 2012 garbage stickers
were due February 1, however
they are still on sale. Stickers can
be purchased from 7 a.m. to
noon and from1 to 3 p.m. Mon-
day through Friday at the Duryea
Municipal Building, 315 Main
St. Stickers can also be pur-
chased from5 to 8 p.m. on Tues-
days, Wednesdays and Thurs-
days evenings at the municipal
building. Prices of the garbage
stickers, including the $10 late
fee, are $90 for one bag, $145 for
twobags, $185for three bags and
$225 for four bags. Garbage will
not be collected fromhomes that
do not have the 2012 garbage
sticker displayed.
Guns N Hoses
The Sixth Annual Guns N
Hoses Charity Basketball Game
will take place Saturday, April
21at the Pittston Area High
School gymnasium, 5 Stout St.,
Yatesville. Doors will open at
4:30 p.m. and tip-off time is 5
p.m. During this game, the areas
police officers and firefighters
will hit the hardwood to raise
money for St. Jude Childrens
ResearchHospital. There will al-
so be door prizes, entertainment
anda foodandrefreshment stand
catered by My Sisters Kitchen.
Tickets, which can be pur-
chased at the door, are $5 for
adults and $3 for students ages 5
to 18. Children under 4 years of
age will be admitted free.
Businesses and individuals
cansenddonations toChief Nick
Lohman, c/o Duryea Police De-
partment, 315 Main St., Duryea,
PA18642. Make checks payable
to St. Jude Childrens Research
Hospital and in the memo area
list Guns N Hoses 2012 Be
sure to include your name with
your gift in order to have it in-
cluded on the acknowledgement
poster which will be displayed at
the game. Businesses that would
like to supply door prizes can
mail or drop them off at the Du-
ryea Police Department.
To send items for Duryea
news, call 457-3351 or e-mail
duryeahappenings@veri-
zon.net.
Local organizations offering Lenten foods on Fridays
DURYEA
JACKIE BORTHWICK-GALVIN
457-3351
duryeahappenings@verizon.net
Duryea Cub Scout Pack 375 held its annual Frog Race competition at the Sacred Heart Hall in Du-
ryea. Tiger and Lion Cub Scouts made frogs fromplywood and raced themon a string. Shown here
are the winners. Fromleft, second alternate Bobby Davidson, first alternate Anthony Ranieli, who
also won for best looking frog; first-place winner Kyle Skutack with a time of :49 seconds; second-
place winner Chase Krawchuk and third-place winner Zachary Semon. The Scouts received certif-
icates and ribbons and will receive their trophies at the Blue and Gold Banquet in April. The scouts
will compete in the Pinewood Derby and Rain Gutter Regatta at 1 p.m. on February 19 at 1 p.m. at the
church hall.
P
A
G
E
3
6
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
The Fourth Annual 1st. Lt. Jef-
frey DePrimo Memorial Fund
Night at the Races will be held
March 31at St. Anthonys Parish
Center in Exeter. Admission is
free admission with a $10 pur-
chase of a horse and $5 without.
Admission includes food, drink
and lots of fun. Doors open at 6
p.m. and post time is set for 7
p.m.
Hose Co. #1
Exeter Borough Hose Co. #1,
13405 Susquehanna Ave., will
hold a potato pancake through
Good Friday, April 6. Pierogies
and haluski, along with weekly
specials, will also be sold. Hours
are 4 to 8 p.m. and noon to 8 p.m.
on Good Friday will be open
noon until 8 p.m. Phone orders
can be made by calling 602-
0739.
Refuse stickers
Refuse stickers are available at
the municipal building from 9
a.m. to 3 p.m. on Monday, Tues-
day, Thursday and Friday and
from9 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Wednes-
day.
Until February 28, the price is
$150 for anyone under the age of
65. Senior citizens pay $110 if
they are 65 years or older by
March 31. From March 1 to
March 31, the price is $180 for
anyone under 65years of age and
$130 for senior citizens 65 years
or older. From April 1 to April
30, the sticker is in penalty and
the charge will be $250 for ev-
eryone. OnMay1, the delinquent
list will be turned over to the
chief of police and citations will
be issued. The cost will be a fine
plus the $250 refuse bill.
Payments can be mailed Re-
fuse Office, 1101Wyoming Ave.,
Exeter, 18643. If a self-ad-
dressed/stamped envelope is in-
cluded, the sticker and a calendar
will be mailed. Payments can be
made with cash, check, money
order or credit card but not
American Express. For more in-
formation, call Lynda at 654-
3001 Ext. 2.
Cosmopolitan seniors
The Cosmopolitan Seniors
will meet at 1 p.m. on Tuesday,
March 6 in St. Anthonys Center.
Vic Malinowski will preside and
dues will be collected. Hosts/
hostesses are Olga Costello,
Share Dailey, Sophie Hudock,
Marion Kratzer and Ann Mattei.
Travel coordinator Johanna is
accepting reservations for a trip
to Mount Airy Casino on
Wednesday, March 15 and a trip
to Woodloch Pines Resort on
Tuesday, May 1. This trip in-
cludes a seafood buffet along
with American and Italian cui-
sine, as well as entertainment.
There will be pickups in Exeter
and Pittston. Details can be ob-
tained from Johanna at 655-
2720.
St. Barbara parish
The follow-up meeting for the
Parish Council and Picnic Plan-
ning Meeting will be held at 7
p.m. on Thursday, March1in the
Parish Center.
The monthly Mass honoring
all married couples celebrating
their wedding anniversary dur-
ing the month of February will
be heldat 7p.m. onTuesday, Feb.
28.
Lenten Program: A Biblical
Walk Through the Mass:, a se-
ries designed to bring Catholics
closer to God will be held from
February29throughMarch28at
St. Anthonys Hall of St Barba-
ras Parish. It will be hosted by
Fr. Phil, Rocco Yanora, Barbara
Russo and Ray Pasavage.
The Diocesan Wedding Anni-
versary Mass will be celebrated
at 2:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 3 in
the Cathedral. Bishop Joseph
Bambera will preside and the
Mass will be followed by a re-
ception. The event is designed
for 25th and 50th anniversary
celebrants. Cathedral seating
will be reserved for the anniver-
sary couples. Call the rectory at
654-2103 to make your reserva-
tion.
Website
The newExeter Borough web-
site is up and running. Visit it
atwww.exeterborough.com
To submit items to be publish-
ed in Exeter news, call 287-3349
or e-mail ecipriani@com-
cast.net.
DePrimo Memorial Fund Night at Races March 31
EXETER
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
The Hughestown Borough
Council work session has been
changed to 7 p.m. on Thursday,
March 1. The regular council
meeting will be held at 7:30 p.m.
on Monday, March 12, with
Wayne Quick presiding.
Councilwoman Marie Gri-
glock attended the Pittston Area
School Board meeting. To date,
the sewer problems on Rock
Street have not been resolved. A
suggestion was made to use a
better dissolving paper towels.
Parks meeting
Hughestown Park and Recre-
ationwill meet at 7p.m. onMon-
day, Feb.27, in the borough
building with Carmen Ambrosi-
no presiding. Plans for the open-
ing of the stand will be finalized
as well as plans for Picnic in the
Park.
Anyone interested in helping
should attend the meeting or call
654-2061 and leave a message.
Girls League
Girls League sign -ups will be
held from 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Feb 29, on the sec-
ond floor of the borough build-
ing for girls ages 6 to 14 from
surrounding towns. Sign-ups
will be held from 6:30 to 7:30
p.m. ever Wednesday until the
end of March at the borough
building. For more information,
call Dave at 709-5727 or Joann
at 313 -0321.
Business owners interested in
sponsoring a team are asked to
call either of the above phone
numbers.
Council work
session Thursday
HUGHESTOWN
Members and friends of the Falls Senior Center
sponsored by the Area Agency on Aging for Lu-
zerne/Wyoming Counties recently enjoyed a piano
concert by April Roskos. From left, first row, are
Nancy McKinney, Violet Treat, Art Haefner, Ron
Jackson, Herb Watkins, Twila Watkins, April Ros-
kos, Jeanette Martin and Eugene Smith. Second
row, Warren Keller Stanley Kaiser.
The center invites anyone 60+ to Health at Ev-
ery Size by Lisa MacDonald, registered dietitian,
11a.m. to noon with a salad bar 1p.m., Wednesday,
Feb. 29.
FA L L S
Piano concert presented
to Falls Senior Citizens
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
7
Another good sign West Pitt-
ston is coming back after the
devastating flood in September
that affected 40%of the borough
is Miss Kims Coffee 2 Go is up
and running.
As you may recall, Miss Kims
coffee trailer was hanging on by
the electric wiring tethered from
Colella Chiropractics office
building during the flooding.
That wiring saved the trailer
from being destroyed.
Kim worked many long hours
scraping and cleaning every last
corner of the trailer andall shelv-
ing has been built brand new.
New glass windows have been
installed and the only item recy-
cled was the refrigerator which
was broken down, steam-
cleaned and had a brand new
compressor installed.
Welcome back, Kim!
Hockey charity event
The 13th Annual Blue-n-Gold
Skate game will be held Friday,
March 2 at the Revolution Ice
Center in Pittston.
The WA/PA JV game will be
played for the Stick trophy at
7:10 p.m. The WA/PA varsity
game will be played for the
Skate trophy at 8:50 p.m.
Wyoming Area Ice Hockey
will host this years charity event
whichwill benefit FaithStoshak,
a 5-year old twin from West
Wyoming, who is battling leuke-
mia.
There will be a bake sale, bas-
ket raffle and admission of $2 for
students and $3 for adult with all
proceeds to be donated to the
Stochak family.
Pasta dinner
The Wyoming Area Drama
Parents Association will hold a
pasta dinner fromnoon to 5 p.m.
on Sunday, March 4 in the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter cafeteria. Take-outs will be
available. Tickets are $8 and will
be available through any drama
parent or at the door. Tickets may
also be obtained by contacting
Donna at 357-3303.
Night at the Races
A Night at the Races will be
held on Saturday, March 31at St.
Anthonys Parish Center, Exeter.
The event is sponsored by family
and friends of 1st Lt. Jeffrey De-
Primo with all proceeds benefit-
ing the 1st Lt. Jeffrey DePrimo
Memorial Fund of the Luzerne
Foundation.
Admission to this adults-only
event is $5.Admission is free
with purchase of a horse. Doors
open at 6 p.m. with post time set
for 7 p.m.
Support group
The First United Methodist
Church will present Take Off
Pounds Sensibly (TOPS) from
6:45 to 8 p.m. every Wednesday
at the church library. For more
information, call Susan Lee at
763-9730.
Golf tournament
The West Pittston Rams Par-
ents Association will conduct its
first-ever golf tournament on
Saturday, April 28 at Four Sea-
sons Golf Course. Registrationis
at 8 a.m. and the Captain and
Crew format set to tee off at 9
a.m. Cost of $75 includes lunch,
beverages and golf. Reserva-
tions are required. For further in-
formation, contact Chrissy Fer-
nandes at 954-0329.
Salvation Army
The West Pittston Chapter of
The Salvation Army has begun
preparation for the upcoming
100th anniversary of its presence
in the borough. Contact Major
Sheryl Hersheyfor additional in-
formation at 655-5947 or e-mail
her atSheryl.hershey@use.sal-
vationarmy.org.
Library programs
Beginner Yoga -8:30 to 9:30
a.m., Tuesdays and Thursdays
Vinyasa Yoga (all levels)
6:15 to 7:15 p.m. Mondays
RestorativeYoga (all levels)
6 to 7 p.m. Wednesdays
Classes are held in the former
American Legion Building at
316 Linden St. by the Montgom-
ery Ave. Elementary School.
Cost is $7 for drop-in and $5
with a punch pass.
Birthday notes
Celebrating this week are The
Piano Man Lee Strubeck, Jason
Speece and Matt Skesavage,
February 26; Caroline Kudasik,
March1; Frank Colella and Amy
Argenio, March 2
Thought for the week
Patience is one of the hardest
virtues to master.
Quote of the week
If your actions inspire others
to dream more, learn more, do
more and become more, you are
a leader. - John Quincy Adams,
sixth American president
Bumper sticker
Good things happen to those
who hustle.
PHOTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
Kimberly Burnham, owner of Miss Kim's Coffee 2 Go, serves cof-
fee to Kim Thomas, a huge supporter of Miss Kim.
Miss Kim's Coffee 2 Go sustained major damage during the September 2011 flooding.
Another WP business bounces back after flood
WESTPITTSTON
Tony Callaio
654-5358
tonyc150@verizon.net
P
A
G
E
3
8
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
The Wyoming/West Wyoming
Little League will hold registra-
tion from6:30 to 8 p.m. on Mon-
day, Feb. 27 from at the Stites
Street Fire Hall.
The registration fee for tee ball
through major baseball and soft-
ball is $70 per player or $95 per
family. The fee for junior/senior
baseball and softball is $100 per
player with no family rate. Fun-
draisers will be distributed at
registration.
All players must provide proof
of residency and new players
must provide a copy of his or her
birth certificate. Any child who
will be 4 years old prior to May1
is eligible to play tee ball this
coming season.
The league will also conduct
major baseball and softball
tryouts on Saturday, March 3 at
the Wyoming Area High School
in Exeter. Major boy tryouts will
begin at 9 a.m. and major girl
tryouts will begin at 11a.m.
Registrations will also be held
at tryouts
Recreation Board
The Wyoming Recreation
Board(WRB) will meet at 7p.m.
on Thursday, March 1 in the sec-
ond floor Community Room at
the borough building.
Discussion will include Easter
holiday, Cinco de Mayo fun-
draiser and summer events.
There has been interest in having
Octoberfest this year as it was
cancelled last year due to the
flooding. There is also interest in
bringing back the haunted hay-
rides.
Anyone interested in partici-
pating in Octoberfest/Haunted
Hayride is asked to attend this
meeting. Interested parties who
cannot attend the meeting are
askedtocontact Jeanne Wisnew-
ski at 905-1946 or by e-mail at
wyomingrecreation-
board@gmail.com.
Blue-n-Gold Skate
The 13th Annual Blue -n-
Gold Skate game will take place
on Friday, March 2, at the Revo-
lution Ice Center in Pittston. The
Wyoming Area / Pittston Area
JV game will be played for the
Stick trophy at 7:10 p.m. and the
Wyoming Area / Pittston Area
varsity game will be played for
the Skate trophy at 8:50 p.m.
Wyoming Area Ice Hockey
will host this years charityevent.
WyomingArea Ice Hockeychar-
ityrecipient is FaithStoshak, a 5-
year-old twin from West Wyom-
ing, who is battling leukemia.
There will be a bake sale, bas-
ket raffle and admission of $2 for
students and $3 for adults with
all proceeds to be donated to the
Stochak family.
Zoning and planning
Wyoming Borough has trans-
ferred zoning and planning mat-
ters to Luzerne County. The
county planning and zoning of-
fice is located at the Penn Place
Office Building, 20 N. Pennsyl-
vania Ave., Wilkes-Barre, and
can be reached at 825-1560.
Building projects cannot begin
until a zoning permit has been is-
sued.
Masonic Lodge #468
Wyoming Masonic Lodge
#468, Wyoming Ave, Wyoming
will holdits annual Lentenmeals
from 3 to 7 p.m. every Friday in
Lent, including Good Friday.
Meals consist off potato pan-
cakes, haluski, pierogies, red and
white clam chowder. Eat in or
take out. For more information,
call 885-1441 or 693-2608.
St. Monicas Parish
St. Monica Mens Group will
hold a St. Patricks Day Party
from 7 to 11 p.m. at Our Lady of
Sorrows Church Hall, West
Wyoming. Food will be provided
by KLs Distinctive Impressions
and music will be provided by
Chic Colarusso.
Tickets are $20 per person and
may be purchased from any
member of the Mens Group or
by calling Rocco Yanora at 693-
2999. Tickets will also be avail-
able after weekend Liturgies at
Our Lady of Sorrows Worship
Site. Reserved tables of eight are
encouraged. Doors open at 6:30
p.m. This is a non-smoking
event.
Feb. 22 to April 1 - Join others
as we pray the Rosary for Life at
9 a.m. Monday thru Friday at
Planned Parenthood in Wilkes-
Barre
To help defray the cost of
printing the Sunday church bul-
letin, businesses and services in
the community can place an ad
on the back of the bulletin. Con-
sider helping your parish by hav-
ing you name going to hundreds
of homes each week. If interest-
ed, call the Parish Office at 693-
1991.
Bible Study: There will be no
Bible Study during Lent. A very
special programwill replace it at
7 p.m. on Wednesday evenings
from Feb. 29 through March 28
at St. Anthonys Hall of St. Bar-
baras Parish. The Lenten Pro-
gram is entitled, A Biblical
Walk Through the Mass.
Fr. Phil Massetti, Rocco Yan-
ora, Barbara Russo and Ray Pa-
savage host the program.
Ronan Tynan, Irish Tenor, will
present a concert with pianist
Bill Lewis at 2 p.m. on Sunday,
April at Pottsville Area High
School Auditorium. For tickets,
call St. Patricks Rectory at 622-
1802.
Check out our Web site
atwww.stmonicanepa.com. Up-
dates are posted and listed on the
Home Page. Photos of various
events are in a special folder un-
der Happenings.
The Pro-Life Center in
Wilkes-Barre is in need of baby
wipes, diapers, sizes 1 and 2,
towels, wash clothes, boys sleep-
ers, size med., girls sleepers, size
12 months, blankets, etc. CCD
students were asked to donate at
least one itemand the center was
amazed at the amount of items
collected for the Moms and Ba-
bies.
Library news
The Wyoming Library has the
following classes scheduled:
How to Meditate - Death,
Dying and Lucid Dreaming: A
Glimpse of Things to Come, 11
a.m. to 4 p.m., March 24. No
charge, registration encouraged.
How to Write and Publish
Your Non-Fiction Book,11a.m.
to 4 p.m., April 14. No charge,
registration encouraged
The classes will be conducted
by Mark Stavish. Mark Stavish,
M.A., author of five non-fiction
books that have been published
in seven languages.
Pre-school story time is start-
ing up again! The program will
run from 11 a.m. to noon every
Friday until March 30. All chil-
dren ages 3-5 are welcomed to
come and listen to stories, do a
craft and have a tasty snack after-
wards. Call the library at 693-
1364 to register.
Anewservice offered at the li-
brary is the Coupon Clippers
Corner. Bring in your unexpired
clipped coupons and place them
in the designated box by catego-
ry. Then browse through the
available coupons and take the
ones you need.
The library has announced the
schedule for the Saturday Family
Movie Day. Lion King 2 - Sim-
bas Pride will be shownat noon
on March 10. Popcorn and soda
will be provided. Call the library
to register.
Hours 10a.m. to6p.m. Mon-
day, 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesday
through Thursday, 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. Friday, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat-
urday.
To submit items for publica-
tion in Wyoming News, call or
fax 287-3349 or e-mail ecipria-
ni@comcast.net.
Little League sign-ups Monday at fire hall
WYOMINGNEWS
EILEEN CIPRIANI
287-3349
ecipriani@comcast.net
Scouts fromBoy Scout Troop 36 and the Webelos II group of Cub Scout Pack 366 spent a day at
Goose Pond where they hiked and did geocaching. Fromleft, first row, are Webelos II WilliamFaun-
tleroy, Mike Remley, RJ Salvo, Nick Perry, Ray Drivinghawk, Josh Carlson. Second row, Boy Scouts
Matthew Minnelli, Gianni Massa, Paul Minnelli, Matthew Carlson, Matthew Dovidas, Aaron Herra,
David Corby and Mike Sanflippo.
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
3
9
Sports
Pittston Area and Wyoming Area may
have battled it out on the wrestling mat
and the hardwoods in recent weeks, but
there is one more rivalry game left to play
this winter sports season.
The Cross River Rivalry takes to the ice
this Friday at 8:50 p.m. at the Revolution
Ice Centre for the 13th annual Blue n
GoldSkate. The JVteams will playat 7:10
p.m. for The Stick.
Wyoming Area leads the series, 7-5,
and has won the past three Skate games.
With both teams near the bottom of the
standings in the NEPA Scholastic Ice
Hockey League, both the Patriots and the
Warriors will be looking for some posi-
tive momentumheading into the playoffs.
The Patriots seem to play better when
there is something on the line. They al-
ready beat the Warriors once this year en-
route to a second place finish at the An-
nual Casey Classic, which is held at the
Revolution Ice Centre in Wilkes-Barre
during Christmas break.
We havent been doing as well as we
would have liked. Its been kind of a rough
year, our record isnt where we want it to
be. We only have one win, but if you look
back at the Casey, we played really well,
Pittston Area head coach Rich Benedetto
said. We tied Crestwood, which shocked
a lot of people, maybe even myself. Then
we tied Paupack and beat Wyoming Area
there, but after that we have been strug-
gling a little bit. We had a couple of in-
juries and a couple of kids were sickfor an
extended period, but I think what we have
been trying to do is stay focused and look
ahead.
The Patriots havent enjoyed much suc-
cess since the Casey Classic as they have
just one win in the league. However, for
coach Rich Benedetto, this is the most ex-
citing time of the year.
We have Blue and Gold and we have
playoffs left, Benedetto said. We played
well in the Casey and we are hoping we
can work on things in practice, get better
and make a good showing. This is kind of
the fun part of the season coming up.
The Patriots will relyonheavilyontheir
few veterans in this years Skate. Tyler
Loftus, Shawn Simmons and Richard
Weinstock will all play huge roles for the
Patriots.
Simmons has established himself as
one of the best goaltenders in the league
andshouldbe keytoanysuccess the Patri-
ots may enjoy.
Shawn Simmons is probably one of
the best, if not the best goalie in the league
and he has been skating out a lot too,
Benedetto said. Shawn is just so experi-
enced and is such a great goalie. Hopeful-
ly the whole team clicks at the right time
and we will see what we can do.
For Loftus and Weinstock their roles
will be their usual roles as offensive
craftsmen, in addition to their newly ac-
quired defensive skills. Due to injury,
Benedetto was forced to move two of his
best goal scorers to defense and they have
become do-it-all skaters.
Coming into the year we didnt know
what to do with our defense, so we kind of
asked him to play some defense for us,
Benedetto said. We had Ryan Flanagan
on defense, but he broke his wrist in the
Casey. RichandTyler have beenbouncing
around and its a new position for them.
Defense will also be a focus for the
Warriors, as they do not have any super-
star scorers.
For varsity, there really is no key play-
er. Everyone plays an important part,
Wyoming Area head coach Frank Hawk
said. We are such a young team and we
dont have any superstars. Everybody has
to play their part and if they dont play
their part, were not going to win.
Coach Hawk feels his team is prepared
andwill be successful as longas theykeep
their heads in the game and play strong
physical hockey.
Its not so much of doing too much in
the beginning, its about being able to sus-
tain a consistent amount of energy, Hawk
said. It has to start in the locker room,
you have to be in the mindset that you are
going to war for 48 minutes.
He does admit it is harder tokeepa team
mentally prepared for a rivalry game, es-
pecially a rivalry where there isnt a whole
lot of love.
We need to keep our heads in the game
and get them away from trying to kill
somebody and to just play good solid
hockey, Hawk said.
Coach Hawk will be relying on his top
players, Eric Smith, David Hawk and Dal-
ton Sheerer to bring the heat offensively.
However, he did stress they are a defen-
sive team first and all five guys will have
strong defensive skills.
He uses a four-man rotation for de-
fense, which consists of Billy Romanow-
ski, Evan Rider, Brian McNue, and Zack
Leyhart.
We need to be mentally prepared for
Skate last winter matchup of rivals
Patriots, Warriors battle on the ice Friday night
PHOTO BY TONY CALLAIO
Pictured fromleft to right, ice hockey players Michael Dolan (WA), Tyler Loftus (PA), Shawn Simons (PA), Brandon Pernot (PA,)
David Hawk (WA).
From Staff Reports
See SKATE, Page 50
P
A
G
E
4
0
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
It was an intense battle be-
tween Pittston Area and
Wyoming Valley West on
Monday night for the Wyom-
ing Valley Conference Divi-
sion I all-season champion-
ship. And with an energy
surging through the Holy Re-
deemer gymnasium right
from tip off, it would be the
little things that cost the La-
dy Patriots in a 57-50 loss to
the Lady Spartans.
The game was fast paced
and aggressive from the start
as both teams played with
their hearts fully in it. Pitt-
ston Area took charge in the
beginning of the game, by
showing their usual bril-
liance with their passing, tak-
ing a 14-10 lead after the first
quarter as Wyoming Valley
West seemed overwhelmed
with PAs defense and pass-
ing early.
We had our chances, said
Pittston Area Head Coach
Kathy Healey. When we had
the lead we panicked but we
took them down to the wire.
WVW turned the tables on
the Lady Patriots in the sec-
ond quarter, by opening up a
passing game of its own to
find open shots, while clamp-
ing down defensively during
a 12-4 run to take a 22-18 lead
at intermission. The Lady
Spartans limited Pittston Ar-
ea 1,000-point scorer Mia
Hopkins to just two points in
the first half.
But Hopkins found another
way to contribute.
Late in the first half, Hop-
kins jumped up in a crowd of
players to get a rebound by
her fingertips. She then
passed the ball down court to
a wide open Allie Barber who
put the layup in for two
points to keep the Lady Patri-
ots within range.
They are a great defensive
team and they played with a
lot of heart, said Hopkins.
We didnt come out and do
the little things.
One of the little things
Hopkins talked about was
Pittston Areas handling of
the basketball. The Lady Pa-
triots turned the ball over 25
times as both teams played
extremely aggressive and
physical, fighting for every
opportunity to get the ball to
the offensive side of its game.
They were active the
whole game and they were
driving to the basket well,
said PA freshman Liz Wales-
ki, of Valley Wests second
quarter spurt. It was a close
game. They were with us the
whole game. We got tired and
we turned the ball over.
The second half was much
of the same story. Both teams
played fast and aggressive
with the basketball changing
possessions more than there
were shots taken.
PA was starting to slip on
the score board when Hop-
kins stole the ball and drove
down court, through defend-
ers, and put in a shot for two
points plus an added point on
the foul. That play brought
the Pittston Area crowd and
team back to life as Hopkins
capped the third quarter with
an 18-11 Pittston run to regain
the lead at 36-33 heading into
the fourth quarter.
But the Lady Spartans an-
swered with a run of their
own as back-to-back three-
pointers spurred a 21-3
WVW run, resulting in a
league title for the second-
half champs.
We need to improve on
our confidence down the
stretch. If we improve on that
well be okay, said Healey.
No matter what, I have
[my teams] back. We have to
get ready for the playoffs Sat-
urday, added Hopkins.
Hopkins finished with 20
points and 20 rebounds for
Pittston Area. The junior also
added eight steals and four
assists.
Kelly Mitchell added a sea-
son-high 12 points and eight
rebounds for the Lady Patri-
ots, and Grace ONeill
chipped in with 10 points on
three triples and a free throw.
G I R L S VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L
Little things cost Lady Patriots in title loss
Pittston Area beaten by WVW, 57-50, for WVC Division I title
By Tommy Romanelli
Dispatch Intern
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Pittston Area's Mia Hopkins scored a team-high 20 points but it was not enough to help the Lady
Patriots get past Valley West for the WVC Division I title in a 57-50 loss on Monday night in Wilkes-
Barre. Below left, PA's Kelly Mitchell is seen scoring two of her season-high 12 points for the Lady
Patriots. Below right, Allie Barber dribbles through traffic against Valley West.
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
1
Two-time defending District 2
Class 3A champion Jamie Sca-
rantino continued his domination
of the lightest weight class by ad-
vancing to the title match of the
106-pound class yesterday at the
D2 Class 3A Wrestling Cham-
pionships at Hazleton Area High
School.
Scarantino (26-5) faced off
against Wallenpaupack freshman
Chase Gallik (29-4) for the title
last night after Dispatch dead-
lines. Win or lose, Scarantino will
advance to next weeks PIAA
Class 3A Northeast Regional at
Bethlehem Freedom High
School.
The Pittston Area senior ad-
vanced to the title bout with a 6-0
decision over Coughlins Bob
Hawkins on Saturday morning.
The top-seeded Scarantino won
his quarterfinal bout on Friday
night over West Scrantons Ste-
phen Caple in a 10-3 decision.
Check Sundays edition of the
Times Leader or online at
www.thepittstondispatch.com for
all updated results.
The Sunday Dispatch will pro-
vide a full report next week.
Lussi pulls upset
Fifth-seeded Angelo Lussi
pulled off the first major upset on
Saturday morning when he
earned a 10-4 decision over top-
seeded Pat Ingulli of Wallenpau-
pack at 145 pounds. Lussi (23-7)
deniedIngulli (31-7) anautomatic
berth to regionals, and in turn
picked up an invite to next week-
ends event.
A junior, Lussi pinned Cough-
lins Dominic Gulius in 4:53 dur-
ing Fridays first round action be-
fore earning a trip to Saturdays
semis with a 2-1 decision over
fourth-seeded freshman, Cody
Cordes (27-8) of WyomingValley
West.
Lussi grappled with third-seed-
ed Kyle Hankinson (24-2) of
D I S T R I C T 2 C L A S S 3 A W R E S T L I N G
Scarantino wrestled for three-peat
PA106-pounder fought for third straight crown last night
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
PHOTO BY AIMEE DILGER
Pittston Area's Dave DeLeo (bottom) checks the clock while wrestling Bob Gray of Crestwood during
District 2 AAA championship play at Hazleton Area High School. DeLeo lost to Gray but wrestled his
way back to medal contention.
See WESOLOWSKI, Page 44
Two-time champion Andrew
Schutz led three Wyoming Area
wrestlers into the District 2 Class
2A semifinals last night at Lake-
Lehman High School.
Schutz, along with Carmen
Mauriello and Carl Zielinski all
had a shot to claim a medal after
the triowas amongthe topsixfin-
ishers in their respective weight
classes.
The top-seeded Schutz (25-2)
pinned Chris Jones of Hanover
Area in 1:14 of the championship
quarterfinals at 132-pounds on
Friday night. The Warriors junior
was set to take on fifth-seeded
Josh Sayre of Lake-Lehman on
Saturday afternoon in the cham-
pionship semis.
Schutz won 125-pound gold as
a sophomore and119-pound gold
as a freshman.
Mauriello (15-13) came out of
nowhere to earn a spot in the120-
pound semis for Wyoming Area.
Theseventh-seededjunior pinned
Steven Bardo of Lake-Lehman in
55 seconds of the preliminary
roundonFridaynight before edg-
ing second-seeded Pat Creedon
(24-8) of Scranton Prep, 6-5, in
the quarterfinals.
Mauriello faced third-seeded
Justin Elick (31-4) of Meyers on
Saturday afternoon in the cham-
pionship semis.
Zielinski (7-3) earned a bye in
the 285-pound preliminaries be-
D I S T R I C T 2 C L A S S 2 A W R E S T L I N G
Wyoming Area trio advanced to semis
Heck not allowed to wrestle because of skin infection
By Rick Notari
Dispatch Staff
See TRIO, Page 48
PHOTO BY PETE G. WILCOX
Steven Barush of Wyoming Area and Matt Judge of Valley View battle in the 126-pound bout during
Friday's District Class 2A tournament at Lake Lehman High School. Judge won 6-3, but Barush wres-
tled back to get within a victory of medaling.
P
A
G
E
4
2
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
If you only caught the first
quarter of Friday nights District
2 Class 3A opening-round play-
off game between Pittston Area
and Crestwood, you would have
thought the Patriots were going
to run away with a victory.
But a 19-9 first-quarter lead
was not enough for the eighth-
seeded team as they only man-
aged to score only 18 points the
rest of the way in a 49-37 loss to
the top-seeded Comets at the
Wyoming Area Secondary Cen-
ter Gym in Exeter.
Pittston Areas fast start was
fueled by Wyoming Valley Con-
ference leading scorer Steve
Stravinski, who dropped 11
points in the first quarter. But the
63 swing man was held to only
five more points the rest of the
way - none in the final quarter.
Best player in the league,
said Pittston Area Head Coach
Alan Keisinger about Stravinski.
He does a tremendous job on
the offensive end and the defen-
sive end, and he doesnt get the
respect that he should.
Crestwood is a very tough
team. They get all the credit.
They did a phenomenal job de-
fensively.
After falling behind 5-1 early
in the contest, Steve Sklanka hit
a nice baseline up-and-under to
spark the Patriots. Stravinski hit
a three-pointer from straight
away off of a Michael Schwab
assist and the next trip down the
floor, Schwab hit Stravinski
again in the same spot to give PA
a 9-5 lead.
Stravinski then hit Jordan
Houseman on a backdoor cut for
the layup, before the senior went
to work in the post to bump the
lead to 13-5. Crestwood ended
the 12-0 Pittston Area run with a
free throwbut Sklanka hit a three
off of a Houseman assist to push
the lead to 16-6 with three min-
utes left in the opening stanza.
The Comets hit a three cutting
the lead to 16-9 but Stravinski
answered with a three of his own,
giving the Patriots a 19-9 lead at
the end of the first.
Sklanka scored the first points
of the second quarter when he hit
two free throws. Crestwood
dropped in two at the 3:28 mark
of the second to cut the PA lead
to 21-11 before Houseman came
back with a spin move into the
paint and a nifty underhand lay-
up to give the Patriots their big-
gest lead of the game at 23-11.
But the Comets clamped down
defensively from that point, and
scored five straight before Stra-
vinski scored two after sealing
his man off in the post. Crest-
wood hit the last bucket of the
half to cut the PAlead to 25-19 at
the intermission.
The thirdquarter startedwitha
nice out of bounds play that led
toa wide openlayupfor Sklanka.
However, Crestwood used the
three-ball to near perfection to
take control. The Comets fin-
ished the night with 10 of its 14
field goals from three-point
range.
With 4:19 left in the quarter,
the Comets drained a three.
Nearly 30 seconds later, they hit
another, this one cutting the PA
lead to 27-25.
Stravinski would fight back
hitting a reverse layup while get-
ting fouled, then hitting the free
throwfor anold-fashionedthree-
point play, giving the Patriots a
five-point lead with 3:40 left in
the third.
Crestwood would answer back
with a three-pointer to cut the
lead back down to two.
Housemanthenrattledoff four
straight, but the Comets hit the
last basket of the third when they
sank a three to cut the lead to 34-
31. CrestwoodoutscoredPA12-9
in the third, all of the 12 coming
from behind the arc.
The first points of the fourth
came at the 5:37 mark when the
Comets scored on a layup. A
Crestwood free throw 30 sec-
onds later tied the game at 34. A
Schwab free throwwith 4:47 left
gave the Patriots the lead once
again but it would be short-lived.
Fourteen seconds after PA re-
gained the lead, the Comets hit a
three and one minute later they
hit another giving them a 40-35
lead.
B OY S VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L
Fast start cannot overcome slow finish
Patriots season ended by Crestwood in D2 Class 3A quarterfinals
By Matt Page
Dispatch Correspondent
PHOTOS BY BILL TARUTIS
Above, Pittston Area's Steve Stravinski reverses a layup for two points against Crestwood. The se-
nior scored 16 in the Patriots loss to the Comets. Below left, Steve Sklanka (20) defends a Crestwood
player, and Michael Schwab looks to make a pass in traffic. Below right, Jordan Houseman wraps a
pass around a Crestwood defender.
See FINISH, Page 48
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
3
B OY S VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L
Sixth annual DeMinico Memorial Game played
Hughestown's finest, Athena, a 2-year old Doberman demon-
strates how she finds hidden contraband hidden in a electrical
outlet. Canine Officer Ed Sulima praises Athena after the find.
The Pittston Area (top) and Wyoming Area (above) cheering sections show their school spirit during
the sixth annual DeMinico Memorial Game played last week at Wyoming Area High School.
Officer Sulima holds Athena's leash while trainer Alan Finn of Old Forge displays Athena's attack
mode.
PHOTOS BY TONY CALLAIO
Dr. Eugene DeMinico with the game's two MVPs, Danny Newhart
of Wyoming Area, and Steve Stravinski of Pittston Area.
P
A
G
E
4
4
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Crestwood last night for district gold.
Wesolowski advances
PA Heavyweight Chris Wesolowski (18-
10) gavethePatriots threewrestlers inatitle
bout with his mild upset of second-seeded
Dylan Berardelli (24-9) of Abington
Heights.
Wesolowski, thethird-seed, tooka3-1de-
cision over the Comets senior in the cham-
pionshipsemifinals onSaturdayafternoon.
The senior Patriot won his quarterfinal
bout on Friday night with a pin of Wallen-
paupacks Michael Pajalich in1:50.
With the semifinal win, Wesolowski
earned Pittston Area its third berth in the
NE Regionals. He faced undefeated Brad
Emerick (35-0) of Coughlin last night for
the district title.
Wrestling Back to Regionals
Three Patriot wrestlers overcame losses
in the championship bracket to qualify for
the NERegionals and a chance at a District
2 bronze medal.
At120-pounds, PittstonAreasTylerLu-
tecki (20-10) advanced to the third-place
bout with a 9-4 overtime victory over Ber-
wicksPeteTalancaintheconsolationsemi-
finals.
Lutecki beganthetournament bypinning
Mike Pavlichko (16-15) of Tunkhannock in
3:31 during Fridays quarterfinal bout. But
the Patriots sophomore lost a 7-4 decision
to second-seeded Tom Hendry (28-5) of
West ScrantoninSaturdaymornings semi-
finals.
Lutecki was set to face Coughlins Eddie
Ciprich(24-14) inthethird-placebout early
Saturday evening.
SamFalcone lost his preliminary match
totop-seedMarkGranahanof Scrantonbut
that didnt stop him from winning his next
three matches to get to the third-place bout
at 160 pounds.
Falcone (13-10) was pinned by Granahan
(37-2) top open wrestling on Friday night
beforeearninga4-0decisionover Coughlin
senior Troy Vannucchi. The PAjunior then
edged Hazletons Tom Biesadesky in the
consolation quarterfinals with a 3-2 deci-
sion to set up his consolation semifinal
match 4-3 decision over Berwicks Will
Masteller (30-9).
Falcone wrestled third-seeded Delaware
Valleys Dan Favaro (18-16) for the bronze
medal Saturday night.
Pat Nallin became the third Patriot to
earn a shot at a bronze medal by way of a
forfeit winover CoughlinsJohnOlson. The
senior got to the consolation semis with a
2-0wininthe182-poundconsolationquar-
terfinals over Tunkhannocks Nate Carras-
co.
Nallin (12-17) lost his first bout on, a Fri-
WESOLOWSKI
Continued from Page 41
Dan Ritz of Crestwood tries to hold to Dan Gambini of Pittston Area during the
District 2 Class 3A tournament at Hazleton Area High School on Friday night..
PHOTOS BY AIMEE DILGER
Kevin Wesolowski of Pittston Area controls LiamCaplette of Wallenpaupack dur-
ing District 2 Class 3A tournament at Hazleton Area High School.
See FIFTH, Page 48
A teary eyed Kathy Healey
walked off the court on Saturday
afternoon at North Pocono High
School after her Pittston Area
Lady Patriots fell to Scranton
Prep 40-36 in the first round of
the PIAA District 2 Class 3A
playoffs.
The Lady Patriots had their
chances, led by a strong effort
fromMia Hopkins who poured
in 16 points but the ball
wouldnt fall the right way.
I thought we played hard, but
a couple of breaks didnt go our
way, said Healey. The kids
played until the buzzer. I think if
we made a couple more foul
shots it would have been a differ-
ent game but I am so proud of
them.
Hopkins started the scoring
with a free throw and offensive
rebound put back to give the La-
dy Patriots a quick 3-0 lead.
However, Scranton Prep answer-
ed back with five points before
Allie Barber hit a three and made
a fast break layup to give PA an
8-5 lead. The Classics ended the
quarter by hitting four foul shots
to regain the lead 9-8.
Barber scored on a slashing
layup but Prep answered with
one of their own. PA went on a
6-0 run when Hopkins hit a
jumper followed by a Jackie Ra-
bender layupandanother driving
layup by Barber. The Classics
scored four to cut the PA lead to
16-15 but Hopkins hit a short
jump shot from the paint to give
PA an 18-15 halftime lead.
Prep opened the third with a
bucket but Hopkins immediately
followed with a layup to keep a
three-point Pittston Area lead.
Prep hit another basket but Hop-
kins earned a trip to the line
where she knocked down both
free throws. But the Classics
would go on a 9-1 run over the
last 1:20 of the third quarter to
take a 28-23 lead into the final
quarter.
The fourth opened with a
strong effort by Grace ONeill
who grabbed two offensive
boards before dropping in the
layup. Then Kelly Mitchell
found Liz Waleski for a wide
openjumper tocut the leadto28-
27.
Prep hit a short jumper in the
lane but then Waleski found
Mitchell for a short baseline
jumper to keep the Pittston Area
deficit at one.
The Classics hit a shot but
ONeill made her way to the line
where she knocked down one of
two. Prep then banked in a three
from the left wing to push the
lead to 35-30 but Hopkins hit a
foul shot and ONeill made a
short jump shot to cut the deficit
to 35-33 with less than two min-
utes left.
Having to foul to get the ball
back, Pittston Area went down
37-33 after two Prep free throws.
AHopkins foul shot with13 sec-
onds left cut the lead to three but
Scranton Prep would hit three
more from the line to ice the
game and take home a 40-36 vic-
tory.
They played hard, said Hea-
ley. Prep is a good team and we
came to play today.
Hopkins added 12 rebounds,
three blocks and one assist for
the Lady Patriots.
Barber finished with nine
points and two rebounds for PA.
Class 1A opens Wednesday
Old Forge will look to regain
the District 2 Class 1Atitle it lost
last year when it opens this years
tournament with third-seeded
Northwest on Wednesday at a
site and time to be determined.
The Blue Devils (15-6) who
won three straight crowns before
being beat by Forest City last
year - finished third in the always
tough Lackawanna League Divi-
sion II while Northwest (14-8)
finished third in WVC Division
III. The Lady Rangers were led
by the divisions leading scorer
in Alivia Womelsdorf who
poured in 21.4 points per game.
The defending champion La-
dy Foresters will take on the
MMI Prep in the other semifinal.
The winners will meet Saturday,
March 3 for the title.
G I R L S VA R S I T Y B A S K E T B A L L
Lady Patriots on wrong end of Classic battle
Prep ousts Pittston Area from D2 playoffs with 40-36 win
By Matt Page
Dispatch Correspondent
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
5
VA R S I T Y F O O T B A L L
Pittston Area grid seniors, parents honored
Pittston Area football players and their parents, front row fromleft, Josh Blaker,
Dave Mawson, Jake Zalewski, Joe Stoss, captain; and Mike Baclasky; second row:,
Wayne & Denise Blaker, Kelly & Dave Mawson Sr., Lori & Jake Zalewski, Rosemary
& Bernie Cegelka, and Jolene & Michael Baclasky.
Pittston Area football players and their parents, front row fromleft, John Cum-
mings, Kevin O'Brien, Eddie Klein, Brad McKitish, and Tyler Roman, captain; sec-
ond row, John & Lisa Cummings, Kevin & Elaine O'Brien, Ed & Patty Klein, Eric &
Ann McKitish, and Romayne Roman.
Pittston Area football players and their parents, front row fromleft, Brian Delaney,
Evan Hahn, captain; Joe Harth, and Cody Stoss; second row, Carla & Brian Dela-
ney, Lori & Timmy Hahn, Debbie & Rick Harth, and Coleen & George Stoss.
Pittston Area football players and their parents, front row fromleft, Tyler Roman,
captain; Anthony Schwab, Mike Starkoski, captain; Dave Dragon, captain; and John
Ameen; second row:, Gerard & Alice Musto, Romayne Roman, Jolyne & Tony
Schwab, Sue Starkoski, Dave and Mary Jean Dragon, and Donna Ameen.
The PittstonArea soccer teamcelebratedSenior
Parents Night at its last home game of the season.
Pictured from left to right, kneeling, Pietro Co-
lella, Eric Fino, Quinn Tracy, Shawn Simons,
Chris Musto, Tom Allardyce and Jaret Monte-
forte; standing, Neva and Pietro Colella, Karen
and Tom Tracy, Gerard and Alice Musto, Denise
and TomAllardyce, and Deb and Lee Monteforte.
VA R S I T Y S O C C E R
Soccer seniors,
parents honored
at Pittston Area
P
A
G
E
4
6
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Free Parking Free Electronic Recycling (No Appliances) Fri. &Sat.
Register to Win a Free Vacation courtesy of Ken Pollock Nissan Commercial Vehicles
Builders Home Improvement Professionals Suppliers
Insurance & Financial Reps
Childrens area featuring McDonalds Characters (Sat. only)
and Games Outdoor Rae to benet Ronald McDonald House, Scranton
Wine tasting Event, Saturday only. $10 admission
(includes home expo and wine tasting)
Plus much more for and about the home.
and present the
HOME
Builders / Remodelers
MARCH 2, 3 & 4
Located at the
Kingston Armory
Friday 4-9
Saturday 10-7
Sunday 10-5
The Building Industry Association
Of Northeastern Penna.
287-3331
411 Main St., Kingston, Pa 18704
Support Your Local Businesses
For Event Schedules and Information Call
Regular Admission $3 or bring a non-perishable
canned good and pay only $2!
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
7
The Pittston Area Track Parents are
holding a mandatory meeting on Thurs-
day, March 1, at the Pittston Area High
School at 7 p.m.
Parents of a track and field athlete in
grades 7-12 are invited to attend. Among
items to be discussed will be the upcom-
ing JV and Varsity schedules, the Pittston
Relays, and the clothing sale.
Arm wrestling touney Sat. at Dianes
The 2012 Icebreaker IAF Arm Wres-
tling Championship Tournament is Satur-
day at Diane Deli, 206 S. Main St.
There are weight classes and novice and
masters categories for men and women.
The entry fee is $20. Winners receive cash
prizes and trophies. Spectators are wel-
come.
Call TomNitroSimkoat 570-388-8612.
Hughestown Softball signups set
The Hughestown Girls Softball League
will hold signups on Wednesday from
6:30-7:30 p.m. at the Borough Building,
second floor.
Girls ages 6-14 from Hughestown and
surrounding towns are welcome to join.
Signups will continue every Wednesday
until the end of March.
Anyone wishing to sponsor the league
or a team may contact Dave at 709-5727
or Joann at 313-0321.
MOF Softball Field to be dedicated
The Moosic-Old Forge Mens Softball
League and Old Forge Borough Council
invites all former players, coaches and
umpires to the dedication of the Robert V.
Semenza Softball Field at Pagnotti Park.
Ceremonies will be held April 21at 1p.m.
Any former players who would be in-
terested in participating in an "Alumni
Game" are asked to contact Tony DiMat-
tia at (570) 335-5596 or Pat Revello at
(570) 430-1113 for more information.
The day will include the dedication cer-
emony, the Alumni Game, and a tourna-
ment featuring all current teams in the
MOF Softball League.
Visit www.freewebs.com/mofsoftball
for more info.
WAFPA Night at the Races
The Wyoming Area Football Parents
Associations Night at the Races is March
3 at St. Barbaras Parish Center in Exeter.
Doors open at 6 p.m., with races begin-
ning at 7 p.m. Admission is $5 for the 21-
and-over only event. Food and drinks will
be provided. Horses cost $10 each.
The WAFPA is also seeking sponsors
for the event. For more information, call
Dan Resciniti at 814-5803 or visit the
group website at www.wyomingareafoot-
ball.org. All proceeds benefit the Wyom-
ing Area Football Program.
GP Sr. Legion reorganizing
The Greater Pittston Senior Legion is
reorganizing for the 2012 season.
All current and prospective players are
asked to call 655-1919 and leave a mess-
age, including name and phone number,
to begin the registration process.
A/D LL registrations this week
Avoca/Dupont Little League will hold
registrations at the upper Avoca Little
League field clubhouse today and Mon-
day from 6-8 p.m.
Registration fee is $60 per player and
$75 per family. Teener baseball sign-up
fee is $60 each player. Programs include:
tee-ball (ages 4-6), coach pitch (ages 7-8),
minor softball and baseball (ages 8-10),
major softball and baseball (ages 10-12),
junior baseball (ages 13 & 14), senior
baseball (ages 15 & 16), and big league
baseball (ages 17 &18).
GP Jr. Legion seeking players
Any baseball players interested in join-
ing the Greater Pittston Junior Legion
Baseball program must contact rmus-
to369@comcast.net.
Cedar BMX Banquet set for March 4
The 2011 Cedar BMX awards banquet
will be held March 4, from1-4 p.m. at the
Chinchilla Fire Hall on Shady Lane Road,
in Clarks Summit.
All riders and their families are encour-
aged to attend. Please RSVP to candyro-
sie@lycos.comby Feb. 27. The 2011track
champions will receive their awards, and
we will discuss plans for the upcoming
season, which is scheduled to begin
March 24.
JTLL registrations set
Jenkins Township Little League has
scheduled final registration period.
Registration will be held March 4 at
12:30 p.m. at the Jenkins Twp. Field
House at the Little League Field Com-
plex.
Fees due at sign up are $65 for Major/
Minor Baseball/Softball, $55 for Coach
Pitch, $50 for T-Ball and $75 for Teeners.
Additional childcost is $30withnorebate
for Teeners.
Parents should bring a copy of childs
Birth Certificate and three Proofs of Resi-
dency. Forms and information can be
found at www.jenkinstwplittleleague-
.com. Any player who wishes to sign up
after the third registration date will be as-
sessed a $20 late fee. If you can not sign
up by one of the registration dates, please
let the league knowso other arrangements
can be made.
JTLL monthly meeting
The Jenkins Twp. LL will hold its
monthly meeting on Sunday, March 4
from12-12:30 p.m. upstairs at the Jenkins
Twp. Fieldhouse at the Little League Field
Complex.
Items to be discussed are 2012 season
preparations and golf tournament. All in-
terested parents are welcome.
JTLL sets Field Prep Day
There will be a Field Preparation Day
on Saturday, March 10 from 8 a.m.-12
p.m.. All managers and coaches must be
present on this day for field preparations
for the upcoming season. If you can not
make it on this day, you must designate
someone to be there in your absence. An
alternate day will be scheduled in case of
inclement weather.
GP Stoners Youth Soccer signups set
Spring signups for Greater Pittston
Youth Soccer have been set for Wednes-
day, Feb. 29 from6:30-8 p.m. at the Exeter
Scout Home in the rear of the Exeter Boro
Building on the corner of Wyoming Ave-
nue and Lincoln Street, Exeter.
Cost is $25 if you do not need uniform
and $40 with a uniform. For more info,
visit http://stonersoccer.org/.
OFLL final signups today
The Old Forge Lions Little League will
hold final registration for all baseball,
softball and tee-ball players, ages 4-16, to-
day from 12-2 p.m. at Old Forge High
School.
Fees for the 2021season are $45 for one
player, $65 for two players from the same
family, and $75 for three or more players
from the same family. A birth certificate
is also required when signing up, and
players must also purchase two raffle tick-
ets at $10 each, not to exceed three tickets
per family.
Any questions, call John Belko at 457-
2188.
Inaugural Big Blue Devil
Golf Classic set
The inaugural Big Blue Devil Golf
Classic will take place May 20 at the Blue
Ridge Trail Golf Club.
Cost for the Captain and Crew event
will be $125 per golfer or $500 per four-
some. Cost includes cart and green fees,
tournament dinner, cash prizes to flight
winners and runners-up, scats, prizes and
tournament golf shirt.
To register your team, email BigBlue-
DevilClassic@gmail.com or 570-650-
9356. Spots in the tournament are expect-
ed to go fast, so reservations are required
as soon as possible.
Scholarship sponsorships are available
for $250; Hole sponsorships for $100; and
a $50 patron sponsorship is also available.
All sponsorships will be advertised at this
years tournament and other events to take
place this year. Donations are tax deduc-
tible.
If you cannot play and wish to make a
donation to the Richard P. Notari Sr.
Scholarship Fund, you can mail donations
care of Rick Notari, 13 Lincoln St., Old
Forge, PA 18518. Checks can be made
payable to the Richard P. Notari Sr. Schol-
arship Fund.
Dupont Softball signups
The Dupont Softball/Teeball League
will be holding final signups at the Du-
pont Fieldhouse, 200 Elm St, Dupont on
Monday, Feb. 27; Tuesday, Feb. 28; and
Wed., Feb. 29 from 6 to 9 p.m.
The league as no residential boundary
restrictions, and is open to all children
from the Greater Pittston area as well as
surrounding communities. Teeball is for
boys or girls ages 4 to 7; and softball for
girls ages 7to17. Cost is $25per player for
teeball, and $50 for 1 player, $85 for two
players or $110 for three players from the
same family for softball.
There is no league fundraiser required.
Opening Day is scheduled for April 15 at 1
p.m.
For more info, call Bob at 881-8744 or
visit http://dupontsoftball.clubspac-
es.com.
Softball league calls players, teams
The CountyLine Girls Softball League,
a newly formed ASARec League with no
boundary restrictions, open to all girls,
ages 7-17, is seeking players or teams to
participate in a fun and friendly league
with minimal travel.
Girls Softball towns already signed up
include Dupont, Taylor and Minooka
Call Bobat 881-8744for more informa-
tion or visit http://dupontsoftball.club-
spaces.com
Pace Setter 3-on-3
The Pace Setter Athletic Club of North-
eastern Pa. will conduct a 3 on 3 tourna-
ment and skills contest day on Sunday,
April 1 at the Greater Scranton YMCA in
Dunmore.
Action begins at noon with a one-hour
instructional clinic, followed by 3-on-3
competition and shooting and skills con-
tests for three-player teams of boys and
girls in grades 6-7-8. A Pizza Party,
NCAAFinal Four coverage and addition-
al YMCA activities are also included.
For further information contact; Pace
Setter A.C. at 347-7018 or 575-0941 or e-
mail pacesetterbasketball@verizon.net.
S P O R T S B R I E F S
PA track parents meeting Thursday
P
A
G
E
4
8
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
Houseman picked off a pass
and converted the layup for the
onlyPAbasket of the quarter cut-
ting the lead to 40-37. But Crest-
wood converted on nine free
throws down the stretch to seal
the 49-37 victory.
They played their hearts out.
They did a good job, they held a
very good team to 49 points,
said Keisinger. We had a good
start and we hit a drought, thats
the story of the game.
Stravinski finished with 16
points five below his season
average. He also added seven re-
bounds for the Patriots.
Sklanka and Houseman added
10 points each for Pittston Area
(13-10). Sklanka added five re-
bounds and Houseman chipped
in with two assists.
Class 1A opens Tuesday
Five-time District 2 Class 1A
champion Old Forge will open
defense of its titles on Tuesday
against Forest City at a site and
time yet to be determined.
The Blue Devils enter the tour-
nament as the No. 2 seed after
losing a flip of a coin with Sus-
quehanna for the top-spot in the
tournament. Both Old Forge (7-
14) and the Sabers (6-15) went 3-
11 in league play.
Old Forge has lost 10 of 12
coming into the tournament
which they have dominated the
past five years. But four of those
losses have come by a total of
just six points, and the Blue Dev-
ils play in the much tougher
Lackawanna League Division II.
The Foresters are 2-20 overall
with both victories coming in di-
vision play. But one of those vic-
tories was over Susquehanna to
open second-half play in late Ja-
nuary.
Seeded fourth, Forest City is
led by 510 freshman guard
Noah Fedak. Fedak averages 9.2
ppg and has 44 three-pointers on
the season.
Susquehanna is led by high-
scoring players Andrej Tomczyk
and Cole Mallery. Tomczyk, a
guard, is averaging over 20
points per game in Lackawanna
League Division III play, and
Mallery, a mid-season transfer,
has averaged18 ppg since his re-
turn in January.
The Sabers take on MMI Prep
(6-15) also on Tuesday. The
Preppers went 0-14 in WVC Di-
vision III play this season.
The winners will play Friday,
March 2 for the D2 Class 1A ti-
tle.
FINISH
Continued from Page 42
fore taking a 10-7 decision over
second-seeded Joe Ingaglio
(32-3) of Western Wayne on Fri-
day night.
Zielinski took on third-seeded
Ben Lehman of Lackawanna
Trail in the championship semis
for a shot at the heavyweight gold
medal.
Check Sundays edition of the
Times Leader or go online at
www.thepittstondispatch.comfor
all updated results.
The Sunday Dispatch will pro-
vide a full report next week.
Heck of a disappointment
Unfortunatelytheonlycasualty
of District 2s preventative mea-
sures to relieve concerns over the
spreading of skin infections at the
Class 2A Wrestling Champion-
ships at Lake-Lehman was
Wyoming Areas Nick Heck.
Heck, the top-seed in the 138-
poundweight class after postinga
21-7 mark this season, was not al-
lowed to wrestle after doctors de-
termined he had a, questionable
skin condition.
District 2 brought in extra doc-
tors andtrainers tocheckall wres-
tlers during the weekend after
wrestlers at Lake-Lehman suf-
feredanoutbreakof HerpesGlad-
iatorum also known as mat
herpes a fewweeks ago.
According to wikipedia.com,
Herpes Gladiatorum is one of
the most infectious of herpes-
caused diseases, and is transmis-
sible by skin-to-skin contact. It is
also known as Human Herpes
Simplex Virus type 1 (HSV-1),
which more commonly causes
cold sores. While the disease is
commonly passed through nor-
mal human contact, it is strongly
associated with contact sports.
Heck, a junior, won a D2 silver
medal as a freshman at 103
pounds and finished fifth at 119
pounds a year ago as a sopho-
more.
Wrestling Back
ThreeWyomingAreawrestlers
made there way back into medal
contention by advancing to the
consolation quarterfinals with
victories in the opening round of
consolationboutsonFridaynight.
Ryan Filipiak, Nick Mazzone
and Steve Barush all grabbed
wins to advance within one victo-
ry of earning a district medal.
Filipiak defeated Josh Winters
of Lake-Lehman, 9-7, in the 145-
pound preliminaries before he
lost a tough 2-1 decision to sec-
ond-seeded Derrick Smith (20-5)
of Elk Lake in the championship
quarterfinals.
But thesenior reboundedwitha
12-7 decision over Hanovers An-
thony Eck in the first round con-
solation bout. Filipiak was set to
take on Klayton Kasprzyk of
Nanticoke in the consolation
quarterfinals on Saturday after-
noon.
Mazzone followed the same
route, winninga 5-1decisionover
GARs RichSickler intheprelims
before losing 6-0 to second-seed-
ed Beau Fuller (28-8) of Western
Wayne inthe152-poundquarters.
The WA senior then defeated
Blue Ridge freshman Addison
Parker in a 3-1 sudden victory
bout to reach the consolation
quarters. Mazzone was set to face
Nanticokes Maurice Wood in
yesterdays consolation quarterfi-
nals.
Barush lost his opening bout, a
6-3 decision to Valley Views
Matt Judge, in Friday nights 126-
pound preliminaries before tak-
ing a 9-1 major decision victory
from Jordan Visneski of Dallas.
Barush was set to fight Gary
Parks of Montrose in the consola-
tion quarterfinals.
Still alive
Both Shawn Whiting and Nick
Hromek were still alive Saturday
morning despite each losing their
only match of the tournament.
Whiting lost to second-seeded
Ryan Monk of Dallas in the 195-
pound championship quarterfi-
nals andreceiveda bye tothe con-
solationquarters wherehewas set
to take on Curtis Barbacci of
Lake-Lehman.
Hromek was pinned by top-
seeded Dominic DeGraba (37-8)
of Dallas inthe106-poundopener
before receiving a bye into the
consolation quarterfinals where
he was set to take on Michael Ca-
naveri of Valley View.
Winless Warriors
Only two WAwrestlers left the
District 2 Class 2A champion-
ships without a victory. Mark
OMalley (113) and Jude Polit-
Moran (182) were both knocked
out after two matches.
OMalleylost a12-8decisionto
Western Waynes Josh Brown,
and a major decision to Mon-
troses Aaron Grochewski.
Polit-Moran lost to second-
seededTroyUhrinof ValleyView
in the preliminaries before falling
to Western Waynes Austin
Swoyer in the consolation round.
TRIO
Continued from Page 41
PHOTO BY PETE G. WILCOX
Josh Brown of Western Wayne (left) and Mark O'Malley of Wyoming
Area battle in the 113l-pound bout during Friday's District Class 2A
wrestling tournament at Lake Lehman.
day night championship quarter-
final, against Ethan Wehrmann
(27-10) of Wallenpaupack. The
two wrestled again for third-place
on Saturday evening.
Fifth Avenue Freeze Out
Pittston Area had two more
grapplers wrestle back into re-
gional and medal contention only
to fall in the consolation semifi-
nals with hopes of earning a fifth-
place medal.
Dave DeLeo was knocked into
the113-poundconsolationbracket
by top-seed Bobby Gray of Crest-
wood in Friday nights first round.
But that did not deter freshman.
DeLeo (7-10) won an 11-0 ma-
jor decision over Wallenpaupack
senior Nick Demchuck (16-19) in
a first-round consolation bout
then took a 7-5 decision from
sixth-seeded Shane Jennings (27-
14) Scranton in the consolation
quarterfinals.
In the consolation semifinals,
DeLeowas pinnedbyRichieKos-
lower of Delaware Valley. He was
set to take on James Fayocavitz of
Abington Heights on Saturday
night.
Pittston Area sophomore Ke-
vin Wesolowski (15-13) earned a
win in the preliminary round be-
fore being ousted by finalist Der-
rick Sims (22-8) of Valley West in
the championship quarterfinals.
But the 138-pounder wrestled
back through the consolation
bracket on Friday and Saturday to
get totheconsolationsemis where
he faced top-seeded Aaron Ken-
nedy (31-4) of Honesdale who
was upset by Simms in the cham-
pionship semis.
Wesolowski pinned Liam Ca-
plette of Wallenpaupackin5:51to
begin the tournament before fall-
ing to Simms in a major decision.
He then won a 9-0 major decision
over Chris Packer of Tunkhan-
nock in the first-round consola-
tion bout.
Wesolowski opened Saturdays
FIFTH
Continued from Page 44
See PA, Page 49
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
4
9 7
3
5
0
8
3
KINGSTON
COMMONS
FANELLI
TRUCKING &WAREHOUSING
timesleader.com
March 13, 2012 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The Woodlands Inn & Resort
SPRING
Explore New Opportunities
Sponsored by:
1st Battalion
109th Field Artillery
Meet these and other employers:
T.J. Maxx Distribution
Center
GoldenTechnologies Inc.
Gateway Energy A
Direct Energy Company
Greater Hazleton Health
Alliance
Kingston Commons
109th Field Artillery
First Quality Nonwovens
Regional Hospital of
Scranton an aliate of
Commonwealth Health
Motorworld Automotive
Mary Kay
Telerx
Fortis Institute
CareGivers America
Pennsylvania CareerLink
Luzerne County
Travelocity
Bayada Home Health Care
AEP Industries Inc.
MidAtlanticYouthServices
Lehigh Career &Technical
Institute
Northwestern Mutual
Allied Services
Aac
Mature Worker Program
of Luzerne/Wyoming
Counties
Express Employment
Professionals
Fanelli Brothers Trucking
TMGHealth
Coatesville native Michael
Matz, who trained the ill-fated
BarbarotoKentuckyDerbyglory
in 2006, is back on the Derby
Trail again this year with the
once-beaten Union Rags, who
has been pegged as the early
choicetowinthe2012Runfor the
Roses. The ultra-talented sopho-
more colt is expected to make his
seasonal debut in the $400,000
Fountain of Youth Stakes at Gulf-
stream Park on Sunday, and will
take the same road that Barbaro
did en route to giving Matz his
first Classic victory.
Michael Matz is no stranger to
the equine breed, as the long-time
horseman rode on the Olympic
Equestrian team in 1976, 1992
and 1996, and held the honor of
carrying the American flag into
Atlantas Centennial Olympic
Stadium during the closing cere-
monies of the 1996 Summer
Olympics. His wife, Dorothy, has
deep roots in Thoroughbred rac-
ing, as well. Sheis thedaughter of
breeder Helen Kleberg Groves
and the granddaughter of Robert
Kleberg, whoownedKingRanch
in Texas and raced 1946 Triple
Crown winner Assault.
The 61-year-old conditioner
has been a hero off the racetrack,
as well. On July 19, 1989, Matz
survived the crash landing of a
Unitedflight, remarkablycoming
out of it unscathed, and was the
rescuer of three children -- Jody,
Melissa and Travis Roth -- who
were traveling unaccompanied.
As for Union Rags, the
$390,000 juvenile purchase has
compiled three wins from four
starts to date, while accruing
$858,000 in earnings. The excit-
ingcolt was a desperate secondin
his two-year-old finale, the
Breeders Cup Juvenile, and was
the second leading vote getter for
Championtwo-year-oldat thean-
nual Eclipse Awards. Prior to
that, thedarkbayrompedhomein
the Hopeful Stakes and Saratoga
Special in the Empire State, serv-
ing notice across the country that
hewas arguablythetopyoungster
in the land.
Union Rags has been training
in South Florida since early Janu-
ary and seems poised for a big
race this weekend, even though
his major goal is for the first Sat-
urday in May. Chances are the
Keystone State, following the
successes of Barbaro and the un-
forgettable Smarty Jones in re-
cent years, will have a rooting in-
terest in the Greatest Two Min-
utesinSports onceagainin2012.
John Mucciolo is a resident of
Old Forge and writes for Brisnet-
.com, the Internets largest horse
racing information service.
H O R S E R A C I N G
Early Derby favorite
has Pennsylvania ties
By John Mucciolo
Special to the Dispatch
wrestlingwitha4-2decisionover
Crestwoods Jake Geroski to ad-
vance to the consolation semifi-
nals but lost a 6-3 decision to
James McNally of Scranton to
settle for a berth in the fifth-place
bout.
Wesolowski faced Anthony
Colletta of Delaware Valley, the
second-seed in the tournament
for the fifth-place medal late Sat-
urday afternoon.
Five heldwinless
FivePittstonAreawrestlers left
the district championships with-
out a victory on Friday night.
DanGambini (126), BradRush
(132), Frank Ardo (152), Troy
Platkus (170), and John Minich
(195) all went 0-2 in their match-
es.
Minich and Ardo were the only
seededwrestlersof thefivefor the
Patriots
Minich (15-12) was the fourth-
seedinthe195-poundbracket, but
lost to fifth-seeded Joe Baress of
West Scranton in the champion-
ship quarterfinal on Friday night.
Minich was then ousted in the
first round consolation bout by
Joe Quinn of Honesdale.
Ardo (14-13) was seeded sev-
enth in the152-pound bracket but
waspinnedbyunseededTimRus-
sell of Honesdale in his opening
bout on Friday night. The PA ju-
nior then dropped a 7-3 decision
to Hazleton Areas Adam Fred-
mund who was seeded eighth.
PA
Continued from Page 48
Send your sports news, scores and
photos to rnotari@psdispatch.com
P
A
G
E
5
0
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
it, Hawk said. We play defense
five spots around so we need
heavy back checking, strong
blue line defense, its a defensive
game all around.
The Warriors defeated the Pa-
triots 5-3 last season.
This years games proceeds
will benefit Faith Stoshak, a
five-year old twin from West
Wyoming who is battling Leuke-
mia.
The Wyoming Area Ice Hock-
ey Parents Club will be holding a
bake sale and basket raffle to add
to admissions donations of $2
per student and $3 per adults.
Those wishing to make addition-
al donations may do so by send-
ing to WAIH, P.O. Box 4341,
Wyoming, PA18644.
This year's Blue 'n' Gold Skate Game will benefit Faith Stoshak
who is battling leukemia. Pictured above are Faith, left, and her
twin sister Tiffany.
SKATE
Continued fromPage 39
The West Pittston Rams
held their year-end celebra-
tion at the Wyoming Area
Secondary Center Cafeteria.
The evening honored the hard
work and dedication of the
football players, cheerleaders
and coaching staff during this
years season. There were
basket raffles and music pro-
vided by Lesser Evil.
The evening ended with the
presentation of the Speece
Award. This years award
winner was J.J. Smallz Fer-
nandes for his unwavering
example of sportsmanship,
determination and commit-
ment to his fellow teammates
during the 2011 season. J.J.
received the award from last
years recipient J.P. Gashi.
J U N I O R F O O T B A L L
Fernandes earns
Speece Award
JJ Smallz Fermamdes
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
1
OBITUARIES
John M.
Krall, formerly
of Wyoming,
died February
14, 2012 in
Long Island,
NY in his 90th
year.
He was born in Port Blanchard
and was the son of the late Ge-
orge and Sidonia Krall. John
graduated from Jenkins Town-
ship High School and served in
the US Army for three years dur-
ing WWII in the South Pacific.
He was a fore-man for 31years at
United Foundries, West Wyom-
ing until his retirement. Thereaf-
ter he was a school crossing
guard in the Wyoming Area
School district for 12 years. John
was a life-long member of St.
John the Baptist Church, Pittston
where he served as an usher and
greeter and was a member of the
Holy Name Society. He also was
a lifetime member of the Amer-
ican Legion, West Wyoming.
When he moved to Long Island
he became a member of St.
Frances de Chantal Church,
Wantagh.
Surviving are his devoted wife
of 69 years,, the former Marga-
ret Yencha, daughter Margaret
Galantine and son-in-law Bill of
Long Island, grandsons Eugene
andEricandtheir wives Amyand
Jill, great grandchildren Tyler,
Samantha, Jessica and Alexan-
dra, brothers George of Luzerne
and David of Virginia and sister
Emily Loughney of Pittston.
John was also preceded in
death by brothers Stephen and
Michael and sister Ann Barker.
A funeral Mass of Christian
Burial was held on Feb. 18 at St.
John the Evangelist Church, Pitt-
ston. Interment St. John the Bap-
tist Cemetery, Exeter.
John M. Krall
February 14, 2012
Logi W. Krywokulski, 96, of
Altoona, died February 23, 2012
at the Golden Living Center,
Wilkes-Barre.
He was born in Altoona, on
November 18, 1915 and was the
son of the late Alex and Carrie
Krywokulski. Logi was a mem-
ber of the Ukrainian Church, Al-
toona, Pa. He attended Altoona
schools and was retired as an
electrician for the Pennsylvania
Railroad, Juniata.
He was also preceded in death
byhis sonStephenandhis daugh-
ter KayeWytiaz, andhis brothers,
Nick and Charles Krywokulski.
Logi is survived by his wife of
over 71 years, the former Anna-
belle (Garman) Krywokulski; his
daughters, Nancy Munski and
her husband, Thomas, of Avoca,
and Maryann McGill and hus-
band James, of Langhorne; son-
in-law, Charles Wytiaz, of Pitts-
burgh; 13 grandchildren; six
great-grandchildren, and several
nieces and nephews.
Funeral services will be held at
the convenience of the family.
Funeral arrangements have
been entrusted to Kiesinger
Funeral Services, Duryea. On-
line condolences may be made to
www.kiesingerfuneralservices-
.com.
Logi W. Krywokulski
February 23, 2012
Joseph C.
Dennis, Sr., of
Pittston, died
February 23,
2012 in Hos-
pice Commu-
nity Care at
Geisinger South Wilkes Barre,
surrounded by his loving family.
Born in Hughestown, Sep-
tember 7, 1934, a son of the late
John and Bertha Schuman Den-
nis. He attended Hughestown
Schools. Joe was a member of
St. Johns Lutheran Church,
Pittston, previously serving on
the church council and as an
usher. He was employed as a
foreman in the shipping depart-
ment at Bracket Steel, Old
Forge for several years. Joe
served as a constable and Part
Time Police Officer in Pittston
City. Prior to his retirement he
was employed by Bridon Amer-
ican, Hanover. He was an Army
Veteran and a member and
2ndVice Commander of Amer-
ican Legion Post 477, Pittston.
Joe enjoyed fishing and camp-
ing with his children and grand-
children. He was an avid New
York Giants fan.
He was also preceded in death
by brothers, Fred and John Den-
nis; and sisters, Inga Vanyo, El-
izabeth Talipski, Catherine Lis-
kosky, and Anna Koslosky.
He is survived by his wife, the
former Hazel Morgan with
whom he observed their 50th
wedding anniversary December
30, 2011; sons, Joseph Jr., and
wife Barbara, Hunlock Creek;
David and wife Nory, Pittston;
daughters: Cheryl Renna and
husband Peter, Old Forge; and
Jennifer Peterson and husband
John, Pittston; grandchildren
Megan Murphy, John and Justin
Peterson, Trisha Renna and Ni-
cole Dennis; numerous nieces
and nephews.
The family would like to
thank Hospice Community
Care Kingston for the compas-
sionate care given to Joseph
during his illness.
The funeral will be held Mon-
day at 10:30 a.m. from the Ho-
well-Lussi Funeral Home, 509
Wyoming Ave., West Pittston
with services at 11 a.m. in St.
Johns Lutheran Church, Wood
Street, Pittston. The Rev. John
Castellani will officiate. Amer-
ican Legion Post 477 Pittston
will conduct services Sunday
evening at the funeral home and
Monday at Marcy Cemetery.
Friends may call at the funeral
home today from 5 until 8 p.m.
Interment Marcy Cemetery,
Duryea
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donation may be sent to St.
Johns Lutheran Church 9 Wood
Street, Pittston, 18640
Joseph C. Dennis, Sr
February 23, 2012
Anthony S.
Barlik, of Du-
ryea, died
February 24,
2012 at Hos-
pice Commu-
nity Care,
Dunmore.
Born in Duryea, he was the
son of the late Joseph and Ber-
tha Kania Barlik. He was a
graduate of Duryea High
School, and served in the U. S.
Army during World War II. He
retired as an assistant director
of the Tax Assessors Office of
Luzerne County, Wilkes-
Barre. He was a very dedicated
and active member of Nativity
of Our Lord Parish, Duryea.
He was a member of the VFW
Post 1227 Duryea, the Amer-
ican Legion Post 585 Duryea,
Polish Falcons of America,
and former treasurer of the
Polish Roman Catholic Union
of America. He was a former
member of the Holy Name So-
ciety of the former Holy Ros-
ary Church, Duryea. He was a
loving father, grandfather, and
great-grandfather. He was an
extremely generous person.
He was also preceded in
death by his wife, the former
Helen Wargo, who died on
June 29, 1994; son-in-law Gre-
gory Pavlik; brothers Edmund,
Rev. Frank, and John Barlik;
and sisters Sophie Barlik, Stel-
la Zukiewicz, Agatha Galuska,
and Helen Burke.
Surviving are daughter can
caretaker, Paulette Ricketts,
and her husband Roy, Duryea;
daughter Loretta Dziak, and
her husband Richard, Warmin-
ster; granddaughter Tanya
Pavlik Osenkarski; grandson
Anthony Dziak; granddaught-
er Kelli Anne Papciak; great-
grandchildren Skylar and
Charlie Osenkarski; Gacin
Chase Dziak; nieces and neph-
ews.
Funeral will be held Monday
at 9 a.m. from the Bernard J.
Piontek Funeral Home, 204
Main St., Duryea, with a Mass
of Christian Burial at 9:30 a.m.
in Holy Rosary Church, Du-
ryea. Interment Holy Rosary
Cemetery. Friends may call to-
day from 5-8 p.m. The Amer-
ican Legion Post 585, Duryea
will conduct military services
tonight. The VFW Post 1227
Duryea will conduct military
services Monday morning.
The family would like to
thank nurses Patty and Lynn
from traditional Home Health
and Hospice for the excellent
care that was given to Anthony
over the last several months.
Memorial contributions may
be made to Holy Rosary
School, 127 Stephenson St.,
Duryea.
Anthony S. Barlik
February 24, 2012
Paul M. Kridlo, 86, of Traf-
ford, died February 14, 2012,
in Excella Health Westmore-
land Hospital, Greensburg.
He was born Dec. 16, 1926,
a son of the late John P. and
Elizabeth (Kosik) Kridlo. Pri-
or to retirement he was a ma-
terial handler at Westin-
ghouse Printing. He was a
veteran having served in the
Army in World War II, and a
member of Trafford Ameri-
can Legion Post 331, St. Re-
gis Church, Knights of Co-
lumbus No. 6299, Trafford
Senior Citizens and the Na-
tional Slovak Society.
He was preceded in death
by his wife, Mildred F. (Pil-
lar) Kridlo; brothers, Joseph,
Michael, Daniel, John, Wil-
liam and Aloysius Kridlo;
and sisters, Elizabeth Hera-
kovich, and Germaine Brown.
Paul is survived by his lov-
ing children, Paul M. Jr., John
P., Mark J. and Mary (John)
Wilson; and a brother, Leo-
nard Kridlo.
Funeral Mass was celebrat-
ed Feb. 17 in St. Regis
Church, Trafford. Interment
Braddock Catholic Cemetery,
North Braddock.
Memorial donations may be
made to the Paul M. Sr. and
Mildred F. Kridlo Fund,
Westmoreland County Com-
munity Foundation, 951 Old
Salem Road, Greensburg,
15601.
Paul M. Kridlo
February 14, 2012
P
A
G
E
5
2
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
F U N E R A L S E R V I C E S I N C .
255 MCALPINE STREET, DURYEA, PA 18641 (570) 457-4387
DANIEL HUGHES, SUPERVISOR
MARK KIESINGER, FUNERAL DIRECTOR
F
u
n
e
r
a
l
D
i
r
e
c
t
o
r
y
Ba lo ga Funera l Ho m e, Inc.
1201 Ma in Street,Pittston
655-7333
w w w.b a loga fu nera lhom e.com
Su sa n L . Ba loga - Su pervisor
Bed na rski Funera l Ho m e
168 W yom ing Avenu e,W yom ing
693-3851
Joseph Bed na rski,Fu nera l Director
Ja cqu eline Bed na rski,Fu nera l Director
G ub b io tti Funera l Ho m e
1030 W yom ing Avenu e,Exeter
654-8931
Ma rilyn Gu b b iotti,Fu nera l Director
CPC (Certified Pla nning Consu lta nt)
Pa ul F. Leo na rd Funera l Ho m e
575 N. Ma in Street,Pittston
654-0564
Pa u l F. L eona rd ,Jr.,Fu nera l Director
M etca lfe & Sha verFunera l Ho m e
504 W yom ing Avenu e,W yom ing
693-1130
Su pervisor: Joseph A. Kopcza III
Berna rd J. Pio ntek Funera l Ho m e, Inc.
204 Ma in Street,Du ryea
457-4301
Su pervisor: Berna rd J. Piontek
Fu nera l Director: Michelle R. Piontek
Recupero Funera l Ho m e
406 Su squ eha nna Avenu e,W estPittston
654-4801
OBITUARIES
Alma Rodo-
la Kearney, 84,
of Dupont,
died February
16, 2012 at
home.
She was a
daughter of the late Frank and
Caroline Adams Rodola and at-
tended Dupont area schools.
She worked with several local
companies, retiring after many
years from Rex Shoes in Exe-
ter. Alma was a life member of
St. John the Evangelist Church,
Pittston, often volunteering her
time to the church and school.
An avid bingo and card player,
she could be found playing al-
most every day at the Senior
Center in Pittston.
She was also preceded in
death by her brothers, August
and Joseph Rodola.
She is survived by a son, Ro-
nald Kearney, and a daughter,
Donna Breymeier, sister,
Frances E. Cipriano; four
grandchildren, great-grandchil-
dren and several nieces and ne-
phews.
Funeral services were held
Feb. 21 from the Peter J. Adoni-
zio Funeral Home, Pittston,
with a Mass of Christian Burial
in St. John the Evangelist
Church, Pittston. Interment De-
nison Cemetery, Swoyersville.
Alma R. Kearney
February 16, 2012
Joseph P. Schmieg, 79, for-
merly of Exeter and a resi-
dent of the Timber Ridge
Nursing facility, Plains
Township died February 22,
2012 at Geisinger Wyoming
Valley Medical Center after
a brief illness.
He was born in Exeter, on
December 8, 1932, and was
the son of the late Louis and
Margaret Kaiser Schmieg.
He was a member of Immac-
ulate Conception Church,
West Pittston, a graduate of
the former St. Marys High
School, Scranton and a 1959
graduate of Wilkes Universi-
ty. Joe was a Staff Sergeant
with the United States Air
Force serving during the Ko-
rean War. Prior to retirement,
he was employed as a case-
worker for the Department of
Public Welfare. Joe was a
member of the Plains Amer-
ican Legion Post 558, Plains.
He was also preceded in
death by a nephew, Sean J.
Pace, and brother-in-law,
Harry J. Pace Sr.
He is survived by his sis-
ter, Mary Margaret Pace of
Exeter; nieces, Cathy Mor-
gan and her husband, Chuck,
and their sons, Chucky and
Colby, of Moosic; Margie
Pace of Exeter; Patty Pace of
Exeter; nephew Harry J. Pace
of Exeter, also the family
pets, Happy, Charger and
Mulatto.
A blessing service was
held Feb. 25 at Kiesinger Fu-
neral Services, Duryea. On-
line condolences may be
made to www.kiesingerfun-
eralservices.com.
Joseph P. Schmieg
February 22, 2012
Henry R.
Manarski, 86,
of Hudson,
passed away
in peace with
his family at
his side on
February 22, 2012.
Henry was born in Plains on
February 27, 1925. He was the
son of the late Frank and Stel-
la (Senderovicz) Mlynarski.
He was a graduate of Plains
Memorial High School, class
of 1943. Henry was drafted by
the U.S. Army after high
school and fought in Europe
during World War II as a
member of the 127th A.A.A.
Gun Battalion. After the war
he settled in Plains and mar-
ried the former Leona Consid-
ine of Hudson in 1953. Henry
was active in local politics for
much of his life, having
served 22 years on the school
boards of both Plains and
Wilkes-Barre Area, and was
also active in many other po-
litical organizations in Plains
throughout his life. Henry
was a member of the Plains
American Legion Post 558 for
over 60 years. He was employ-
ed for many years in the As-
sessors Office of the Luzerne
County Courthouse. Henry
enjoyed a long retirement and
always cherished the time he
was able to spend with his five
grandchildren. He was a life-
long member of the former St.
Joseph Church, Hudson and a
current member of Ss. Peter
and Paul Church, Plains.
He was preceded in death by
a sister, Natalie Pliscott of
Exeter.
In addition to his wife, Leo-
na, Henry is survived by
daughters, Karen Caffrey and
her husband, Joseph, Hudson;
Debra Manarski, Hudson;
son, Mark Manarski, and his
wife, Virginia, Plains; and
grandchildren, Caitlin, Mat-
thew, Joseph, Erica and Ben-
jamin. Also surviving are
brothers, Albert Mlynarski of
Manville, N.J., and Edward
Manarski of Swoyersville.
Henrys funeral will be con-
ducted on Monday at 9 a.m.
from the Mark V. Yanaitis Fu-
neral Home, 55 Stark Street,
Plains, with a Mass of Chris-
tian Burial in Ss. Peter and
Paul Church, Plains. Inter-
ment will follow in St. Joseph
Cemetery, Hudson. Friends
may call Sunday from 3 to 6
p.m.
In lieu of flowers, memorial
donations may be given to
Alzheimers Association, 57
N. Franklin Street, Wilkes-
Barre, 18701.Condolences or
directions may be accessed at
www.yanaitisfuneralhome-
.com.
Henry R. Manarski
February 22, 2012
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
3 2
6
9
2
9
3
Funeral Home, Inc.
211 LUZERNE AVENUE
WEST PITTSTON, PA
Helena A. Morris, Supervisor
(570) 654-3471
451 N. MAIN STREET
WILKES-BARRE, PA
H. Merritt Hughes, Supervisor
Ryan M. Wagner, Licensed Associate
(570) 823-6511
7
4
0
8
3
3
In Loving M em oryOf
Joh n Va cenda k
4/06/13 -2/25/88
SadlyM issed and Lovingly
Rem em b ered b ySons,
Dau gh ters-in-law,Fam ily
and Friends.
7
4
0
9
1
3
Th eFam ilyof th elate
Ja m esW .OM a lley
wou ld lik eto th ank everyonewh o sent
sym path ycards,M asscards,flowers,
food and donationsto th e
A m erican H eartA ssociation
You rk indnesswill notb eforgotten
The O M a lley Fa m ily
OBITUARIES
Gladys
Rodda Par-
ente Kauf-
man, 94, of
Pittston, died
February 20,
2012, in Wes-
ley Village after a period of
declining health.
Born October 8, 1917, in
Perth Amboy, N.J., she was a
daughter of Charlotte
(Young) Rodda and George
Foster Rodda. She grew up in
Hazleton, and graduated
from Hazleton High School
in 1935. She married John J.
Parente in 1940. Together
they lived in Arizona, Maine,
and then returned to Hazle-
ton, where she worked for
Deisroths Department Store
while John was in Veterinary
School. They settled in
Wilkes-Barre, where she
lived most of her life, work-
ing as a loving wife, mother
and office manager for
Johns veterinary practice
until his death in 1976. In
1987, she married David J.
Kaufman, who survives, with
whom she shared a second
loving marriage for the past
25 years. Gladys loved noth-
ing more than being with her
girls, her six grandchildren,
step-granddaughter and
eight great-grandchildren.
Her hobbies included baking
and knitting. She knitted a
personalized Christmas
stocking for every member
of her immediate family,
even anticipated spouses-to-
be. Gladys was a life mem-
ber of the Wyoming Valley
Womans Club and an active
member of First Presbyterian
Church, Wilkes-Barre.
She was predeceased by
her sister, Effie (Rodda)
Hill; and her brother, Arthur
Rodda.
Also surviving are her
daughters, Mary Louise
(Parente) Labows and her
husband, John, Horsham,
and Barbara (Parente) Shue
and her husband, David,
Staunton, Va.; as well as
step-daughters Dawn (Kauf-
man) DeLong and her hus-
band, Gene, and Jill (Kauf-
man) Lichty and her hus-
band, Gary. She is also sur-
vived by her lifelong best
friend, Valma Krapf.
A funeral service was held
Feb. 25 in First Presbyterian
Church, Wilkes-Barre. Inter-
ment Mountain View Ceme-
tery, West Hazleton.
Memorial donations may
be made to First Presbyterian
Church, Wilkes-Barre, or
Wesley Village, 209 Roberts
Road, Pittston, 18640. Funer-
al arrangements have been
entrusted to Jacobs Funeral
Service, Wilkes-Barre. To
leave an online, condolence
visit www.jacobsfuneralser-
vice.com.
Gladys Kaufman
February 20, 2012
Clifford E.
Donahue, 77,
of Pittston,
died, February
21, 2012 in
Highland Ma-
nor, Exeter.
Born in Pittston on November
12, 1934, he was a son of the late
John and Helen Armitage Dona-
hue. He was a graduate of Pitt-
ston High School, class of 1952.
He was a U.S. Army veteran of
the Korean Conflict, serving
with the 7th Infantry Division.
He was a graduate of the Army
Finance School. He was a gradu-
ate of Georgetown University
and had been employed with the
Federal Bureau of Investigation,
Justice Department, the Wash-
ington Hospital Center, the
Washington Cancer Institute, re-
tiring in 1997 after 30 years of
service. He was a member of Our
Lady of the Eucharist Church
and its Holy Name Society.
He was also preceded in death
by brothers, John Donahue Jr.,
Thomas Donahue, Charles Do-
nahue; and niece Catherine Gal-
lagher.
Surviving are his nephews, Jo-
seph and his wife, Susan; John
and his wife, Joyce; Robert,
Mark and Kevin Donahue; niece
Colleen; several great-nieces
and great-nephews.
Funeral services were held
Feb. 25 from the Peter J. Adoni-
zio Funeral Home, Pittston, with
a Mass of ChristianBurial inOur
Lady of the Eucharist Parish,
Pittston. Interment St. John the
Evangelist Cemetery, Pittston.
Online condolences may be
made at www.peterjadonizio-
funeralhome.com.
Clifford E. Donahue
February 21, 2012
Cynthia M. Mattey, 40, of
Pittston, died February 22,
2012 at Geisinger South, Hos-
pice Community Care,
Wilkes-Barre, after a short ill-
ness and surrounded by her
loving family.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, she
was the daughter of Andrew
and Rose Shupshinsky Mattey.
She was a member of St. Ceci-
lias Church (St. Barbara Par-
ish) and was a graduate of Pitt-
ston Area High School.
Preceding her in death were
her sister, Sandra Jean Panus-
ki; maternal grandparents, Jo-
seph and Anna Shupshinsky;
and paternal grandparents,
Andrew and Mary Mattey.
Also surviving are sisters,
Lori and her husband Dr. Wil-
liam Chromey, Exeter; and
Sheri and her husband George
McCracken, Peabody, Ma.; ne-
phews, Kyle Chromey, Weston
McCracken and Michael Pa-
nuski; and nieces Lauryn
Chromey and Samantha Pa-
nuski.
Funeral services were held at
the convenience of the family
with a Mass of Christian Buri-
al concelebrated by Rev. Paul
McDonnell, O.S.J.; and by her
uncle, Rev. Joseph J. Mattey,
and also the Rev. Dwane Ga-
vitt. Interment St. John the
Baptist Cemetery, Exeter.
Funeral arrangements have
been entrusted to the Gubbiotti
Funeral Home, Exeter. To send
an online condolences please
www.gubbiottifh.com.
Cynthia M. Mattey
February 22, 2012
It is with
great sadness
that the family
of Robert A.
Smith, 58, for-
merly of
Wilkes-Barre,
wish to inform friends of his
death. Robert passed away on
Wednesday, October 27, 2010,
in Las Vegas, Nev., where he
had lived since the mid 1980s.
He was a graduate of Central
Catholic High School, King-
ston, now Bishop OReilly, in
1971 and a U.S. Navy veteran.
He was preceded in death by
his father, Robert, in 1987;
brother, Michael, in 2007; and
infant brother, Jimmy.
He is survived by his son,
Anthony, and former wife,
Marilyn Smith (Pointon). He
is also survived by his mother,
Angela Smith, Plymouth; sis-
ters, Karen Mitchell, Burkbur-
nette, Texas; Susan Smith,
Wyoming; brothers, David,
Bethlehem, N.H., and Paul,
Piedmont, S.C.
He was buried at the South-
ern Nevada Veterans Memo-
rial Cemetery, in Boulder City,
Nev. His brothers and sisters
can be contacted through
Facebook.
Robert A. Smith
October 27, 2010
Email obits to
sd@psdispatch.com
P
A
G
E
5
4
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
7
4
1
1
0
9
JOH N J.H AFFE RTY
M arch 2
W hispersFrom Hea ven
W h en Ileftth isworld with ou tyou
Ik now itm adeyou b lu e.
You rtearsfell so freely,
Iwatch ed;Ik now th isistru e.
W h ileyou wereweeping,
DaysafterIpassed away
W h ileall wassilentwith in m e,
Isaw you k neel to pray.
From th iswonderfu l place
Called H eaven
W h ereall m ypain isgone,
Isend agentleb reezeto wh isper
M yloved ones,pleasego on
Th epeaceth atIh avefou nd h ere
Goesfarb eyond com pare.
No rain,no clou ds,no su ffering
Ju stLOVE from everywh ere.
You need notb etrou b led
Ju ststaycloseto GOD in prayer
Som edaywell b ereu nited
M yLove,H IS love
Su rrou ndsyou always
EVERYW H ERE.
Ha ppy Birthda y in Hea ven
W ife Cla ra ,D a u g hterColleen
a nd fa m ily a nd S on John
a nd fa m ily.
OBITUARIES
Ruth Soley
"Mema" Veres-
py, 85, fought
the good fight,
lived a good,
faith-filled life
anddiedFebru-
ary 21, 2012, at home, firmin her
faith surrounded by her family.
She was a daughter of the late
Michael and Emily Zofcin Soley
of Larksville. She graduated as
salutatorian of the Class of 44
from Larksville High School.
She was employed at Old Fash-
ion Bottling Company for sever-
al years and then at various sew-
ing factories in the Plains Town-
ship area. She and her late hus-
band, District Justice Joseph P.
Verespy, celebrated 50 years of
marriage before his death in
1998. They were the parents of
three children, Nancy Verespy,
International Executive Director
of the Veterans of the Vietnam
War Inc. and the Veterans Coali-
tion, Pittston, married to Peter J.
Forbes; the Rev. JosephD. Veres-
py, pastor of Sacred Heart
Church, Dupont, and George C.
Verespy, belovedsonwhodiedin
1969. They also celebrated their
joy with their one and only
grandson, Jonathan R. Curley,
his wife, Trish; and the lights of
her life, great-granddaughters,
Aubrey and Irelyn Curley of Jen-
kins Township, filled her heart
with joy. In Australia, she is sur-
vived by Duncan and Kylie
Forbes, and their children,
Amanda, Dakota and Taylor;
Moire and David Binch and their
daughter, Fayth, and Katherine
and Beth Forbes. Her brothers
and sisters included, Rosalie
Robinson, who helped "Mema"
in her "Passing Over"; Dolores
Adkins; Robert, Joseph, Tho-
mas, Anne Marie Antol; Shirley
Fisher and Barbara Drust. Her
brother Michael Soley died in
2000.
She is survived by numerous
nieces, nephews, great nieces
and great nephews. One of her
numerous friends, Mary Drew,
became like a "sister" to Ruth
and helped her to remain at
home. She was anactive member
of her community. Her gardens
were her pride and joy. She con-
tinued to do all of her own gar-
dening with the help of her
neighbor, Tommy, until her pass-
ing. She was a 28-year RedCross
volunteer also having donated
seven gallons of blood over the
years. She also volunteered her
time at the Veterans of the Viet-
nam War Inc. and The Veterans
Coalition, always ready on short
notice, fast and capable. She also
volunteered at the St. Vincent de
Paul Kitchen. She enjoyed her
participation in her neighbor-
hood Breakfast Club. Family and
friends always told her that she
should own stock in Hallmark
since she rarely missed anyones
birthdayandsent cards for all oc-
casions. She was a faithful mem-
ber of Sacred Heart Church,
Plains Township, and progressed
to Ss. Peter and Paul Church in
Plains Township, after the clo-
sure. She was a 50-year member
of the Plains American Legion
Auxiliary, Post 558, member and
volunteer with the Ladies of
Charity; past officer of the Dio-
cesan Council of Catholic Wom-
en, and she held all of the various
offices of the Sacred Heart,
Plains Township, Altar and Ros-
ary Society. She was also a faith-
ful member of the Sacred Heart
"Tabernacle" Choir. She gave a
number of years to the Plains
Township Senior Citizens Asso-
ciation serving as their treasurer.
She was a proudPierogi maker at
Sacred Heart Church, Dupont.
Bus trips were an important part
of her life - her motto was "when
the bus goes, I go." Mema was
greatly loved by all.
Funeral services was held Feb.
24 at the Corcoran Funeral
Home, Plains Township. Funeral
Mass, in celebration of the life of
Ruth, was held at Ss. Peter &
Paul Church, Plains Township,
with the Rev. Joseph D. Verespy,
her son, officiating. Interment
Sacred Heart Cemetery, Plains
Township.
Memorial Donations may be
made to the St. Vincent de Paul
Kitchen, 39 E. Jackson St.,
Wilkes-Barre, 18702. Online
condolences may be made at
www.corcoranfuneralhome-
.com.
Ruth Verespy
February 21, 2012
Dolores (Dee Dee) Race, 58,
of Duryea, died February 15,
2012, at NE Pa. Hospice, Scran-
ton.
Born in Taylor, she was a
daughter of the late David and
Irene Johnson Race Sr.
Surviving are step-mother,
Dolores J. Minegar Race; sisters,
Patricia ODell and husband
James, Karen Ellis and husband
Greg, Deven Keiper and hus-
band Mark; brother, David Race
Jr., and wife Lyndsey; nieces and
nephews; and her dog, Riley.
Funeral services were held
Feb. 20 at the Bernard J. Piontek
Funeral Home, Duryea, with
Pastor Michelle Kaufman of St.
Peters Lutheran Church, Hugh-
estown. Interment Marcy Ceme-
tery, Duryea. The family wishes
to thank the ICU and Hospice
Staff of Regional Hospital,
Scranton, and Golden Living
Center, Scranton, for the care
that was given to Dolores.
Dolores Race
February 15, 2012
Helen Jane
McGroarty,
89, of West
Pittston, died
February 19,
2012, in Geis-
inger Wyom-
ing Valley Medical Center,
Plains Township.
Born May 13, 1922 in Bas-
kin, La., she was a daughter of
Willard and Minie Hudson.
Helen graduated from Nurs-
ing School from Monroe, La.,
where she became a Regis-
tered Nurse. She was a mem-
ber of St. Cecilias Church of
St. Barbaras Parish and the
Wyoming Womans Club.
She was also preceded in
death by her husband, Lt. Col.
Edward McGroarty, Pennsyl-
vania State Police Area II
Commander, (retired); son 1st
Lt. Michael Francis McGroar-
ty.
She is survived by her son
Kevin James McGroarty, West
Pittston; sister, Joy Parnell,
Farmsville, La.; care giver and
companion, Lamara Sterling.
Funeral services were held
Feb. 23 from the Metcalfe and
Shaver Funeral Home, Wyom-
ing, with a Mass of Christian
Burial in St. Cecilias Church
of St. Barbaras Parish, Exeter.
Interment Mt. Olivet Cemete-
ry, Carverton.
Memorial contributions
may be made to the Pennsyl-
vania State Police Troop "P"
Camp Cadet Program, PO
Box 4005, Wyoming, 18644.
Helen J. McGroarty
February 19, 2012
Thomas
John Cala-
brese, of Hilo,
Hawaii, died
February 8,
2012 after a
lengthy battle
with cancer.
Born in Pittston, on Octo-
ber 28, 1938, he was the son
of the late Michael and Pau-
line Falzone Calabrese, of
Kingston. He attended Pitt-
ston High School until his en-
listment in the Navy. He grad-
uated from Great Lakes Naval
Training Center in Illinois
and served aboard the USS
FORESTAL CVA59. He had
the honor of service next on
the naval cruiser, the USS
NORTHAMPTON CC1,
which was the flagship of the
entire Atlantic Fleet at the
time. He continued his career
in the Navy by attending
school at "the worlds first
and finest submarine base" in
Groton, Connecticut. On
completion of his studies, he
was stationed aboard the USS
PIPER SS409. His next as-
signment was aboard the nu-
clear powered submarine the
USS GRANT SSBN631 as a
plank owner. He concluded
his naval career as an interior
communications specialist
aboard the destroyer the USS
MADDOX DD731. Upon his
honorable discharge from the
Navy, he continued his educa-
tion at Cerritos College in
California, obtaining a de-
gree in business administra-
tion. He went on to California
State College in Long Beach,
where he was awarded a BA in
Political Science. Throughout
his civilian career in Califor-
nia, he held many positions in
local government as city man-
ager in Arista, Willits City,
Patterson and Colton City.
Besides being a member of
the Western Government Re-
search Association, he was al-
so employed by the General
Telephone Company of Po-
mona. Tom spent his retire-
ment near the ocean in Hawaii
with his wife, the former Sha-
ron Nishimoto.
He is survived by his sons,
Thomas, Michael and Nicho-
las; his nine grandchildren;
his one great-grandchild and
stepchildren, Stephen, Harry
and Jan. He is also survived
by his brothers, Charles, who
resides in Arizona; John Mi-
chael, of Swoyersville; and
Anthony, of Hughestown.
A memorial service was
held in Hilo and at his re-
quest, he was cremated and
his ashes were returned to the
sea he loved so much.
Thomas J. Calabrese
February 8, 2012
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
P
A
G
E
5
5
OBITUARIES
Joseph F.
"Homer" Zi-
mak, 84, of
Old Forge,
died February
17, 2012 in the
Geisinger
Community Medical Center,
Scranton. His wife, the former
Margaret Kendall, died August
6, 1992.
Born and raised in Old Forge,
son of the late Anthony and An-
na Przywara Zimak, he was
educated in the Old Forge
School District. Prior to retire-
ment, he was employed by Su-
perior Door and Sash Co. Earli-
er in life, Homer also worked at
the Dutchess Co. of Old Forge.
Following his education, he
served in the U.S. Navy during
World War II and later be-
longed to the American Legion
Post 513 and the VFW Post
4954, both of Old Forge, and
the Dupont AmVets Post 189.
He was a parishioner of St. Ni-
cholas of Myra Byzantine Ca-
tholic Church, Old Forge. He
was a loving father and grand-
father who enjoyed spending
time with his family. He espe-
cially loved hosting holidays at
his home. In his spare time, he
enjoyed gardening and sharing
the fruits of his labor with fam-
ily, friends, and neighbors. His
family wishes to acknowledge
both Dr. Kenneth Sebastianelli
and the doctors and nurses of
NCHS for their wonderful care
and professionalism.
He was also preceded in
death by two brothers, Adam
"Casey" Zimak and Gene Zi-
mak; a sister, Sophie Kwiat-
kowski; and two great-grand-
children, Haylie Alexa and
Raymond Michael Wascavage
and companion Yvonne "Bon-
nie" Rink.
Surviving are two daughters,
Sandra Wascavage, and hus-
band, Raymond, of Old Forge
and Deborah Bryk, and hus-
band, Frank, of the Old Boston
section of Jenkins Township; a
son, Joseph Zimak, of Duryea;
four sisters, Josephine Gawel,
Mary Sohara, Lucy Davis and
Jean Grimes, all of Old Forge; a
sister-in-law, Margie Zimak, of
Taylor; eight grandchildren, Dr.
Raymond Wascavage and wife,
Kim; Tracie Krasulski and hus-
band, Matthew; Jennifer Carr
and husband, Brian; Amy Was-
cavage; Justin Bryk and wife
Melissa; Jessica and Sarah
Bryk, and Breanna Zimak; two
great-grandchildren, Justin
Bryk and Kendall Krasulski;
nieces and nephews.
The funeral with military
honors was held Feb. 21 from
the Ferri Funeral Home, Old
Forge, to be followed by Office
of Christian Burial in St. Ni-
cholas Byzantine Catholic
Church, Old Forge. Interment
parish cemetery, Old Forge. To
leave an online condolence, vis-
it www.ferrifuneralhome.com.
Joseph F. Zimak
February 17, 2012
Francis J. Swanberry, 65, of
Wilkes-Barre, died February 22,
2012, at his residence, surround-
ed by his family.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
a son of the late Francis P. and
Margaret (Boyle) Swanberry. He
was educated in Wilkes-Barre
schools, and was a graduate of
Meyers High School, class of
1965. He was a member of the
Sons of the American Legion
Dallas Post 672, a former long-
time member of the Wilkes-
Barre Jaycees, and a former
coach of the Wilkes-Barre Mini
Mohawks football team. He en-
joyed spending time with family
and friends going to the Outer
Banks, and was an avid football
fanof the PittsburghSteelers and
Penn State.
Survivors in addition to his
loving wife of 17 years, the for-
mer Patti Bond, are sons, Mi-
chael and wife Sara, Falls
Church, Va.; Jeffrey and wife
Lauren, Pittston; sister, Margaret
Moffett, and husband John,
Cranford, N.J.; brothers, Jerry
and wife Linda Swanberry,
Memphis, Tenn.; Joe Swanberry,
Wilkes-Barre; brother-in-law,
Jack Bond, Dallas; grandchil-
dren, Ryan and Alyssa Swanber-
ry.
A viewing was held Feb. 24 in
the Desiderio Funeral Home,
Hanover Township. Interment at
the convenience of the family.
The family requests donations
may be made to Medical Oncol-
ogy Associates of Wyoming Val-
ley, Prescription Fund,. 382
Pierce St., Kingston, 18704. On-
line condolences may be ex-
pressed at www.desideriofh-
.com.
Francis J. Swanberry
February 22, 2012
Fernando
(Freddie) Spi-
nosi, 62, of
Wilkes-Barre,
died February
21, 2012 at the
Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital.
Born in Plains Township, he
was a son of the late Fernando
and Mary (Siena) Spinosi. Fred-
die was a graduate of Plains
Township Memorial High
School, class of 1967, and at-
tended Wilkes College. He was
employed for Sapa of Mt. Top,
formerly Mid East Aluminum,
for 38 years and was a member
of Ss. Peter & Paul Church,
Plains Township. He and his
wife, the former Connie Pizzel-
la, celebrated their 40th wedding
anniversary on June 19, 2011.
Freddie was also preceded in
death by his sister Nicolina
(Nicki) Cinti.
Also surviving are his daugh-
ter, Tammy Corwin, and her hus-
band, David, Jenkins Township;
granddaughter, Rachel, whom
he loved so much and was his
helper in his garden; sister Marie
Spinosi, Plains Township; nu-
merous nephews and nieces.
A funeral was held Feb. 25
from the Corcoran Funeral
Home, Plains, with a Mass of
Christian Burial in SS. Peter &
Paul Church, Plains. Interment
Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carver-
ton.
Memorial donations may be
made to the American Heart As-
sociation, 71 North Franklin
Street, Wilkes-Barre, 18702.
Online condolences may be
made at www.corcoranfuneral-
home.com.
Fernando Spinosi
February 21, 2012
Julie Stark, 82, of Pittston, died
February18, 2012at Wilkes-Barre
General Hospital. She was the
wife of John Stark, who died in
2009.
Born October 25, 1929, in Pitt-
ston, she was the daughter of An-
thony and Anna Bolin OMalley.
She graduated fromPittston High
School and worked at home. She
was a member of Our Lady of the
Eucharist Parish, Pittston.
She was preceded in death by a
daughter, Ann Clisham; three
brothers, William, Thomas and
Joseph; andasister, AnnSpangler.
Surviving are two brothers, Ed-
ward and wife Silvia, Nanticoke,
and Jack and wife Thelma, Syra-
cuse; a daughter, SusanStark; and
a granddaughter, Karen Clisham,
Pittston. The family would like to
thankDrs. JamesBrunoandChar-
les Manganiello, the nurses on the
fourth and fifth floors of the Gen-
eral Hospital and Brian Morgan.
The funeral was held Feb. 23
from the Paul F. Leonard Funeral
Home, Pittston, with a Mass of
Christian Burial in Our Lady of
the Eucharist Parish. Interment
Mount Olivet Cemetery, Carver-
ton.
Julie Stark
February 18, 2012
Louis D. Ri-
gle, 86, of Exe-
ter, died Feb-
ruary 22, 2012
at the Regional
Hospital,
Scranton.
Born in Wilkes-Barre, he was
the son of the late Benjamin
and Mabel Weiss Rigle. Lou
was a graduate of Exeter High
School Class of 1943 and he at-
tended Bucknell University. He
along with his wife Fedora,
were proprietors of Lou Rigles
Market in Exeter for 17 years.
He also worked as a manager of
National Accounts with Blue
Cross of Northeastern Pa. Lou
also worked as a congressional
aide for the former Rep. Paul
Kanjorski. He was a charter
member of the Exeter Lions
Club holding various offices.
He was instrumental for orga-
nizing the Exeter Little League
and the Exeter Tax Payers As-
sociation. And the Recreation
club of St. Anthonys Church.
He served as president of the
Holy Name Society of St. An-
thonys Church and was chair-
man of the Red Cross Drive in
Exeter, along with being an ac-
tive blood donor.
He was preceded in death by
his sisters, Doris Talamelli, An-
na Richey, Margaret Carpenter,
and brothers, Nathan and Rob-
ert Rigle.
Surviving are his wife of 65
years, the former Fedora Paci,
and daughters, Janice and her
husband Joseph Zekoski, Kent,
Ohio; Lois Wilson, Philadel-
phia; Lynn and her husband
John Pfeil, Lancaster; a brother,
Irving and his wife Agnes Ri-
gle, Forty Fort; grandchildren,
Joy and her husband Ryan
Snyder; Joseph and his wife
Maria Zekoski; Josiah, Esther,
Micah, Caleb and Elijah Wil-
son, and Jameson and Geoffrey
Pfeil; great-granddaughter,
Taylor Zekoski; great-grand-
sons, Leo Zekoski, A.J. Snyder,
and J.P. Snyder.
A visitation was held Febru-
ary 25 at the Gubbiotti Funeral
Home, Exeter with funeral ser-
vices with interment following
at the Denison Cemetery,
Swoyersville.
Donations may be made to
Bancroft Development Office,
800 N. Kings Hwy., Suite 201
Cherry Hill, NJ 08034, in
memory of Elijah Wilsons
grandfather, Louis Rigle. To
send on online condolence, vis-
it www.gubbiottifh.com.
Louis D. Rigle
February 22, 2012
P
A
G
E
5
6
S
U
N
D
A
Y
D
I
S
P
A
T
C
H
,
S
U
N
D
A
Y
,
F
E
B
R
U
A
R
Y
2
6
,
2
0
1
2
GREAT 4 BR BRICK HOME IN PITT. TWP. SPACIOUS AND INVITING WITH SUN
PORCH, GARAGE AND NICE YARD. LOTS OF OFF STREET PARKING. MLS# 11-2887
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: PITTSTON BY PASS TO NORMAN ST. HOUSE ON LEFT.
THI S HOUSE HAS I T ALL!
FOUR BEDROOMS, 1 3/4
BATH, I NGROUND POOL,
H O T T U B , S U N R O O M,
HARDWOOD FLOORS IN LR
& D R , L A R G E F A MI L Y
ROOM WI T H V AUL T E D
CEILI NG, REPLACEMENT
WINDOWS, GAS FIREPLACE,
CARPORT. MLS# 12-232
CALL LUANN 602-9280
DIR: NORTH ON WYOMING
A V E , L E F T O N
TUNKHANNOCK, TURNS
INTO EXETER AVE, LEFT ON
BENNETT. HOME ON LEFT.
EVERYTHING YOU NEED IS
IN THIS 4 BEDROOM, 2 1/2
BATH 8 YEAR OL D FI NE
LINE HOME. MASTER BR
WITH WALK IN CLOSET, 2ND
FLOOR LAUNDRY, 2 CAR
GARAGE, 2 DRI VEWAYS,
FENCED IN YARD, DECK &
ABOVE GROUND POOL. FULL
BASEMENT. MLS# 11-3162
CALL LUANN 602-9280
DIR: NORTH ON MAIN ST,
RIGHT ON CHURCH, RIGHT
ON COSTELLO DR, HME ON
RIGHT. NO SIGN.
NICELY LANDSCAPED CORNER LOT SURROUNDS THIS BRICK FRONT COLONIAL IN DESIRABLE
NEIGHBORHOOD. THIS HOUSE FEATURES 4 BEDROOMS, SPACIOUS MODERN EAT IN KITCHEN, 1ST FLR
LAUNDRY, 4 BATHS & FINISHED LOWER LEVEL. ENJOY ENTERTAINING UNDER THE COVERED PATIO WITH
HOT TUB, REAR DECK AND ABOVE GROUND POOL. MLS# 12-157
CALL MICHELE 905-2336
DIR: NORTH ON WYOMINGA VE, LEFT ON 8TH ST, LEFT ON SHOWMAKER, RIGHT ON JOHNSON.
FANTASTIC KITCHEN WITH HICKORY CABINETS, GRANITE COUNTERS, STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES
AND TILE FLOOR. KILLER MASTER BEDROOM WITH CHAMPAGNE TUB & GLASS HOWER, WALK IN
CLOSET, 4 CAR GARAGE IS PARTIALLY FINISHED. THE LIST GOES ON... MLS# 12-210
CALL CHARLIE 829-6200
DIR: N. MAIN ST PLAINS TO RIGHT ON SAYLOR AVE, LEFT ONTO LOMBARDO DR, LEFT ONTO WYNDETREE
DR, HOME STRAIGHT AHEAD.
BEAUTI FUL 5 BEDROOM 2
FULL, ONE 3/4 AND ONE 1/2
BATH, 2 YEAR OLD HEALEY
CONSTRUCTI ON, FAMI LY
R O O M W I T H G A S F P ,
KITCHEN WITH TILE FLOOR,
GRANITE COUNTERTOPS AND
CENTER ISALDN, PARTIALLY
FINISHED BASEMENT WITH
WAL K OUT , OVERSI ZE D
DECK. ETC. MLS# 11-4084
CALL LUANN 602-9280
D I R : P H O E N X I S T T O
BLUEBERRY DR, LEFT ON
HUCKLEBERRY, HOME ON
RIGHT.
TRADITIONAL 4 BEDROOM
H O M E W I T H L A R G E
MASTER BR & BATH WITH
WALK- IN CLOSET, STONE
F I REPL ACE I N F AMI L Y
ROOM, MODERN KITCHEN
& BATHS, LIGHTED DECK IN
GREAT LOCATI ON. MLS#
11-3071
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
D I R : P H O E N I X S T T O
BL UEBERRY RI GHT ON
RASPBE RRY, L E F T ON
HUCKLEBERRY HOME ON
RIGHT.
NEWER CONSTRUCTION, 3 BR, 2
1/2 BATHS, FAMILY ROOM W/GAS
FIREPLACE, FORMAL DINING ROOM
& LIVNG ROOM, GAS HEAT, 2 CAR
GARAGE, LARGE FRONT PORCH
AND REAR DECK. MLS# 11-3858
CALL LUANN 602-9280
DIR: PHOENIX ST TO BLUEBERRY,
RIGHT ON BLACKBERRY, HOME ON
RIGHT.
PRICED TO SELL! THIS 4
BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOME
HAS A 2 CAR GARAGE,
E X T R A D R I V E WA Y ,
CENTRAL AIR, VERANDA
OV E R GA RA GE , RE C
ROOM WITH FIREPLACE
A N D W E T B A R ,
SUNROOM. MLS# 12-296
CALL TOM 262-7716
D I R : R I V E R R O D T O
THOMPSON ST, LEFT ON
SUNRISE DR, BEAR LEFT,
LAST HOME ON LEFT.
VERY NICE, PRACTICALLY NEW BI LEVEL HOME ON
A NICE QUIET DEAD END STREET. LARGE FENCED IN
YARD, 4 BEDROOMS, GARAGEAND LOWER LEVEL
FAMILY ROOM. MLS# 11-3422
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: RT 309 TO BLACKMAN ST, LEFT ON HAZLE,
RIGHT ON W. LIBERTY, LEFT ON RAYMOND.
W O N D E R F U L
NEI GHBORHOOD, THI S 4
BR, 10 YEAR OLD HOME
HAS IT ALL! EXTRA ROOM
ON 1ST FLOOR GREAT FOR
MOTHER IN-LAW SUITE OR
REC ROOM. MODERN OAK
KITCHEN, LR, CENTRAL AIR,
IN GROUND HEATED POOL,
F E NCE D Y A RD, 2 CA R
GARAGE. MLS# 11-3732
CALL NANCY 237-0752 OR
MELISSA 237-6384
DIR: MAIN ST DURYEA TO
STEPHENSON ST, TURN ON
BROWN, TO EDWARD.
RELAX AND ENJOY THE COMFORTS OF HAVING EVERYTHING DONE! GREAT 3 BR HOME WITH 1 1/2
BATHS, 1ST FLOOR LAUNDRY, LARGE KITCHEN WITH OPEN FLOOR PLAN, SEMI PRIVATE DECK TO
ENJOY AN EARLY SPRING, FENCED IN YARD. NEW FURNACE AND GAS FIREPLACE! MLS# 12-328
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: KENNEDY BLVD TO EAST ST, LEADS TO JOHNSON, HOME ON LEFT.
THREE STORY TOWNHOUSE WITH
PLENTY OF STORAGE AND 2 CAR
B U I L T I N G A R A G E . MO D E R N
KI TCHEN & BATHS, LARGE ROOM
SIZES AND DECK. TWO BEDROOMS.
MLS# 11-4567
CALL CHARLIE 829-6200
DIR: NORTH ON MAIN ST. PLAINS
JUST PAST BIRCHWOOD HILLS TO
RIGHT ON CLARKS LANE, PROPERTY
ON RIGHT.
FABULOUS 3 BEDROOM, 2 BATH HOME WITH ULTRA MODERN KITCHEN WITH GRANITE COUNTERS,
HEATED TILE FLOOR & STAINLESS STEEL APPLIANCES. DINING ROOM HAS BRAZILIAN CHERRY FLOORS,
HUG YARD, GARAGE, PARTIALLY FINISHED LOWER LEVEL. MLS# 11-4079
CALL CHARLIE 829-6200
DIR: MAIN ST AVOCA, TURN WEST ONTO MCALPINE, RIGHT ON FOOTE AVE, JUST PAST STEPHENSON ST
HOME ON LEFT.
WITH FOUR BEDROOMS, 2 BATHS, 2 CAR GARAGE,
GREAT DRI VEWAY, CENTRAL AI R, HARDOOWD
FLOORS, GREAT YARD A MUST SEE HOME. MLS# 12-
477
CALL TOM 262-7716
DIR: MAIN ST. PITTSTON HEADING NORTH HOME IS
ON RIGHT.
JUST LIKE NEW INTERIOR UNIT TOWNHOME WITH OPEN
FLOOR PLAN, FIRST FLOOR MASTER BEDROOM & BATH,
1ST FLOOR LAUNDRY, ROOM DARKENING WINDOW
TREATMENTS. READY TO MOVE IN. MLS# 11-3711
CALL LUANN 602-9280
DIR: WEST ON E. MAIN ST, LEFT ON MAYOCK, HOUSE
ON RIGHT.
LARGE 3 BEDROOM HOME IN NEED OF UPDATING.
HOME WAS NOT EFFECTED BY RECENT FLOODING JUST
IN NEED OF TLC. OLD FASHIONED BATH ON 2ND FLOOR,
LARGE ROOMS ON A CORNER LOT. MLS# 12-456
CALL COLLEEN 237-0415
DIR: EXETER AVE TO LEFT ON FREMONT ST, HOME ON
RIGHT.
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 1B
Social Section
Inside
School menus ....................2
Birthdays............................3
Schools ..........................2, 4
Classified......................7-14
S E C T I O N B
S O C I A L
Mr. and Mrs. James M. Blandina, Wyoming, are proud to an-
nounce the engagement and upcoming marriage of their daugh-
ter, Jaime, to Mr. Jay Weinschenk, son of Attorney and Mrs.
Alfred Weinschenk, of Clarks Green.
The bride-to-be is the granddaughter of Mrs. Helen C. Adoni-
zio, Pittston, andthe late Mr. Charles A. Adonizio, Jr. andMr. and
Mrs. Michael Blandina, Wyoming.
The prospective groomis the grandson of the late Mr. and Mrs.
Alfred Weinschenk, Dunmore, and Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Houlli-
han, Clarks Summit.
Ms. Blandina is a graduate of Scranton Preparatory High
School and a graduate of the University of Delaware where she
earned a Bachelor of Science degree in Business Administration
with a minor in International Marketing. She is employed with
Geisinger Health System as an Operations Manager in Commu-
nity Practice in the Scranton Department.
Mr. Weinschenk is a graduate of Scranton Preparatory High
School and a graduate of Catholic University, Washington, DC,
where he earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in Financial Manage-
ment. He also earned a Masters of Business Administration from
The University of Scranton. He is employed with Net Driven as a
Client Relations Executive.
The couple plans to exchange vows on May 26, 2012.
Jaime Blandina and Jay Weinschenk
May wedding planned
AshleyAnnFernandes andJeffreyJames Waters, together with
their families, announce their engagement and upcoming mar-
riage.
The bride-to-be is the daughter of Mendel Fernandes, West
Pittston, and Bernadette Fernandes, Duryea. She is the grand-
daughter of Mae Noss, Wilkes-Barre; Catherine Prendis, Wilkes-
Barre; Dennis Fernandes of Boston, MA; and the late William
Noss.
The prospective groom is the son of William and Lois Waters
of Duryea. He is the grandson of Lois Balchune of Duryea; Rob-
ert Schumaker of Pittston; the late Chas Balchune and the late
Dolores Schumaker.
Ms. Fernandes is a 2004 graduate of Pittston Area High School
and is currently employed as the kitchen manager at the Town
Tavern in Duryea.
Mr. Waters is a 2000 graduate of Seton Catholic High School
and a 2005 graduate of Kings College where he earned a Bache-
lor degree in Criminal Justice. He is currently employed by Bran-
don Balchune Construction, Duryea.
The couple will exchange vows on May 19 at Nativity of Our
Lord Parish, Duryea. Following a honeymoon to Cancun, Mex-
ico, they will reside in Duryea.
Jeffrey Waters and Ashley Ann Fernandes
To wed in May
St. Mary Magdalen Church in Media was the setting Oct. 29,
2011, for the wedding of Kaitlyn Beraldi, Philadelphia and Joel
Piazza, formerly of Pittston.
The bride is the daughter of Dr. and Mrs. Raymond Beraldi,
Newton Square. The bridegroom is the son of Larry and Nancy
Piazza, Pittston.
The Reverends Francis E. Kelly and Ralph Chiefo were co-
celebrants of the ceremony.
Mrs. Piazzas sisters, Lauren Baraldi and Jennifer DiMarino,
were matrons of honor. Bridesmaids were Samantha Piazza, Pitt-
ston; Allison Seitchik, Boston, MA; Kate Gallagher, New York
City; Nicole Rantz and Andrea Young, both of Philadelphia.
Jesse Piazza, Pittston, was best man. Ushers were Brian Bech-
told and Michael Pedley, both of Avoca; John DAiello, Swoyers-
ville; Kevin Hanley, Philadelphia; Matt Chisdock, Moosic; and
Jon Beaumont, Philadelphia.
Areception was held at the Overbrook Country Club, Villano-
va.
Mrs. Piazza is a graduate of Villa Maria Academy and earned
bachelors degree in History and Anthropology from the George
Washington University. She earned her masters degree in An-
thropology and Higher Education Management fromthe Univer-
sity of Pennsylvania. She is currently the Associate Director for
the Institute for Immunology at the University of Pennsylvania.
Mr. Piazza is a graduate of Seton Catholic High School, earned
a bachelors degree in Computer Science fromDrexel University
and is currently employed by Lockheed Martin, Morristown, NJ.
Following a wedding trip to St. Lucia, the couple resides in
Philadelphia.
Mr. and Mrs. Joel Piazza
Exchange vows
Genevieve (Jean) Yurek, of the Laurels, Wyoming celebrated
her 92nd birthday on Feb. 12. Jean has four children, Joanne De-
pascale, West Wyoming; Irene Pizzano, Exeter; Annette Kelly,
Indianapolis, IN; and John Yurek, Exeter. She has also been
blessed with 10 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.
Family parties were held in her honor.
Genevieve (Jean) Yurek
Notes 92nd birthday
Emerson Louise Bomber, daughter of Lee and Brittany (Bal-
chune) Bomber, of Henryville, formerly of Duryea, was baptized
on Sunday, Jan. 22 at Holy Rosary Church in Duryea.
A celebration was held at Memorable Occasions in her honor.
Emersons parents chose Jeremy Ambrosavage and Bridgette
Balchune as godparents.
Maternal grandparents are Williamand Charlotte Balchune, of
Duryea. Paternal grandmother is Deborah Bomber, of Duryea.
Emerson Louise Bomber
Baptism celebrated
Kira Jacqueline McCoy, daughter of Brian and Jill McCoy, of
Duryea, was baptized on Feb. 19 at Nativity of Our Lord Parish in
Duryea by Reverend Andrew Sinnott.
She is the granddaughter of Guy and Jacqueline Fasciana, of
West Pittston, Ann and Gordon Webb, of Middletown, and Mark
McCoy, of Mechanicsburg. She is the great-granddaughter of
Ralph and Betty Lininger, of Shippensburg.
Her godparents are Christine Turoni, of Scranton, and Chris-
topher McCoy, of Shippensburg.
Kira has two brothers, Aiden and Evan. She was honored at a
baptismal luncheon with her family following the ceremony.
Kira Jacqueline McCoy
Baptized last Sunday
The 1982 class of the Pittston
Hospital School of Nursing is
planning a 30th class reunion for
the fall of 2012. Members of this
graduating class are asked to
contact either Ted Kross or Janet
Kelly (Endres) to gather contact
information and help plan event.
Kross can be reached through e-
mail at tedandgina9@com-
cast.net or 655-4952. Kelly can
be contacted through e-mail at
janetakelly@aol.com or 693-
4165.
Pittston Hospital
nurses set reunion
C M Y K
PAGE 2B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
S C H O O L S
Pittston Area School District
High School and Middle School
Menu for week of Feb. 27
Monday: Grilled chicken parmesan hoagie,
corn, fruit, low fat milk
Tuesday: Hot turkey sandwich, mashed po-
tatoes and gravy, fruit, low fat milk
Wednesday: Pork chop with gravy, rice,
peas, fruit, low fat milk
Thursday: Steak and cheese Panini with
marinara sauce, green beans, fruit, low fat milk
Friday: Pierogie pizza, mixed vegetables,
fruit, low fat milk
High school breakfast
Grab & go at cafeteria store has hot break-
fast sandwiches, breakfast pizza, bagels and
cream cheese, cereal with toast, breakfast bars,
fresh fruit, juice and low fat milk.
Middle School breakfast
Monday: Egg and cheese on bagel or French
toast sticks with syrup
Tuesday: Sausage and cheese on English
muffin or scrambled eggs with toast
Wednesday: Pancakes with syrup or egg,
bacon and cheese on bagel
Thursday: Breakfast pizza or egg and
cheese on bagel
Friday: waffles with syrup or ham and
cheese on bagel
Available daily: Plain and specialty pizza,
whole grain chicken patty, buffalo chicken
hoagie, salads, assorted hoagies and wraps
Intermediate, Primary, Kindergarten
Monday: Chicken fajita with lettuce, cheese
and salsa or ham and cheese on bun, corn,
pears, low fat milk
Tuesday: Hot turkey sandwich with gravy or
cheeseburger on bun, mashed potatoes, cher-
ries, low fat milk
Wednesday: Macaroni and cheese, break
slice or meatball hoagie, carrots, peaches,
peaches, low fat milk
Thursday: Corn dog nuggets or Sloppy Joe
on bun, baked fries, apple slices, low fat milk
Friday: Pierogie pizza or taco salad with let-
tuce, cheese, & salsa, mixed vegetables, mixed
fruit, low fat milk
Alternates: Turkey wrap, chef salad, Italian
hoagie, chicken tenders with bread
Breakfast
Monday: Hot pockets
Tuesday: Pancake sausage wrap
Wednesday: Sausage, egg and cheese on ba-
gel
Thursday: Scrambled eggs with toast
Friday: Waffles with syrup
Available daily: Breakfast pizza, assorted
cereals with buttered toast, juice and low fat
milk
Wyoming Area School District
Wyoming Area Secondary Center
Menu for week of Feb. 27
Monday
A. Mozzarella breadsticks w/ marinara sauce
B. Tyson Hot n Spicy Chicken sandwich on
a bun
C. Chicken fajita w/ lettuce, tomato, salsa,
sour cream
D. Rib-a-Que, cheeseburger or chicken patty
on bun
Sides: Baked colossal fries, tossed salad
/dressing, mixed fruit
Tuesday
A. Pierogies, bread
B. Pizza bagel
C. Philly double-cheese steak hoagie
D. Rib-a-Que, cheeseburger or chicken patty
on bun
Sides: Fresh veggies/ranch dip, tortilla chips
/salsa, peaches
Wednesday
A. Popcorn chicken, bread
B. New! Chicken risotto
C. Nachos grande w/ beef taco, double-
cheese, lettuce, tomato, salsa and sour cream
D. Rib-a-Que, cheeseburger or chicken patty
on bun
Sides: A, C & D Mashed potatoes/gravy,
sweet peas, pears
Thursday
A. Hot dog w/chili sauce and/or cheese sauce
B. Macaroni n cheese
C. Meatball hoagie w/mozzarella cheese
D. Rib-a-Que, cheeseburger or chicken patty
on bun
Sides: Baked potato wedges, brown sugared
carrots, applesauce
Friday
A. Bosco sticks w/marinara sauce
B. Grilled cheese sandwich, tomato soup
C. Turkey & cheese hoagie w/lettuce
D. Rib-a-Que, cheeseburger or chicken patty
on bun
Sides: Fresh veggies/ranch dip, seasoned po-
tato spirals, juicy sliced peaches
Elementary School Menu
Monday
Monzerella breadsticks w/marinara sauce or
chicken nuggets, bread, tossed salad w/dress-
ing, mixed fruit cup
Alternate - Cheese sandwich, or PBJ, or 4oz.
yogurt and animal crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds
Breakfast - Waffle w/syrup, fruit juice, milk
Tuesday
Cheeseburger on bun, or chicken patty on
bun, side of pierogies, pickle slices, peaches
Alternate - Cheese sandwich, or PBJ, or 4oz.
yogurt and animal crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds
Breakfast - Whole wheat English muffin w/
jelly, fruit juice, milk
Wednesday
Baked popcorn chicken, bread, mashed pota-
toes/gravy, sweet peas, pears
Alternate - Cheese sandwich, or PBJ, or 4oz.
yogurt and animal crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds
Breakfast - Warm pizza slice, cereal, juice,
milk
Thursday
Hot dog on a bun, macaroni n cheese, brown
sugared carrots, applesauce
Alternate - Cheese sandwich, or PBJ, or 4oz.
yogurt and animal crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds
Breakfast - Scrambled eggs w/sausage, toast,
juice, milk
Friday
Grilled cheese sandwich or turkey and
cheese on a bun, carrots, celery, broccoli/dip,
tomato soup, crackers, juicy sliced peaches
Alternate - Cheese sandwich, or PBJ, or 4oz.
yogurt and animal crackers all w/choice of
string cheese or sunflower seeds
Breakfast - French toast w/syrup, fruit juice,
milk
S C H O O L M E N U S
Meet the seniors
Paul Gestl, of Pittston, is the
son of Joe and Sandy and was
born August 29, 1993. He enjoys
the movie Pulp Fiction and his
favorite celebrity is Liam Nee-
son. Paul loves to play video
games and sketch and his favor-
ite high school moment was
making his first friend of his
high school career in geometry
class in ninth grade. Pauls favor-
ite teachers are Ms. Conlon, Mr.
Mills, Mrs. Distasio and Mrs.
Greenwald and he considers his
father to be his idol. If he could
teach any class, it would be art.
After graduation, Paul plans to
attend an engineering college.
Krys Summerton, of Pitt-
ston, was born on December 27,
1993. His favorite teacher is Mrs.
Vincelli. His best friends are Sa-
rah, Lizzy, Ariel and Caci. If he
couldteachanyclass, it wouldbe
math and after graduation Krys
plans to live on his own and
work.
Alexa McCann, of Pittston
Township, is the daughter of
Sheryl and Ron McCann and
was born on March 5, 1994.
Alexas favorite high school
teacher is Mr. Caprari. She does
dance, tap, jazz and ballet and af-
ter graduation plans to major in
International Relations.
Bill Carey, of Suscon, is the
son of Bill and Denise and was
born on January 15, 1994. He
will eat any food except sushi,
his favorite song is Bonfire
and his favorite movie is
Rocky. Bill has a part time job
and is looking forward to col-
lege.
Caroline Manganiello, a Pitt-
ston native, was born on June13,
1994. She plans to attend college
and enjoy her newfound free-
dom. The daughter of Geor-
geann Hudak and Michael Man-
ganiello, she is best friends with
Karen Graaf and Mary Hoover.
Born September 2, 1994,
Christopher Santana is the son
of Khrista Lyon. His favorite
teachers are Mrs. Saunders, Mrs.
Koss, Mr. Burns and Mr. Devlin.
His favorite food is pizza and he
loves the movie Pineapple Ex-
press. He is usually seen hang-
ing out with friends Jared Sea-
mon, Bryan Winters, Tom Wol-
cott and Kyle Whipple.
Colleen McLane, daughter of
Jennifer Masulis and Shawn
McLane, was born on Septem-
ber 9, 1993. Colleen loves sushi
and the David Matthews Band.
Colleens friends include Da-
nielle Fereck, Josh Reynolds,
Katie McGinty, Kelly Keener,
Grace ONeill and Lizz Raffa.
She works part-time at Tonys
Pizzeria in Pittston and one word
she uses to describe her high
school experience is memorable.
Born on April 24, 1994, Shel-
by Smith lives in Dupont and is
the daughter of Amy and Kevin
Smith. Shelbyhas participatedin
many extracurricular activities
such as volleyball, student coun-
cil, Key Club, ICE Club, Art
Club, and the Journalism Club.
The class she would teach if giv-
en the chance is English. Shelby
is usually seen with Jess Oliveri,
Afton Fonzo and Kim Chesniak
and plans to attend college after
graduation.
Middle School
Science Olympiad
Members of the Science
Olympiad will meet from 3 to
4:30 p.m. on Thursday, March 1
in room 145. Drivers picking up
students should be in front of the
Middle School no later than 4:15
p.m. The Science Olympiad will
be held on Wednesday, March 7.
8th grade field trip
Eighth-grade students will see
the movie, Hunger Games on
April 4.
MATHCOUNTS
Congratulations to the follow-
ing students who traveled with
Dr. Keska to the Luzerne County
MATHCOUNTS Competition
last Saturday, Feb. 11 at Luzerne
County Community College,
placingfourth: Kate Musto, Abi-
gail Sheerer, Steven Shamnoski,
Patrick Mitchell, Austin Smith-
onic, Marley OBrien, Taylor
Baloga, Molly Walsh, Haley
Norwillo and Abigail Norwillo.
PSSA Assessments
The PSSA Reading and Math
Assessments will be held from
Monday, March 12 through
Monday, March 19.They will be
given to all students in the sixth,
seventh and eighth grades.It is of
extreme importance that all stu-
dents attend school on the days
of the test unless excused due to
serious illness.
Tips
Here are tips from each of the
reporting categories in reading
and math to enhance your childs
understanding of some of the tar-
get skills on the PSSA Test.
Reading
Comprehension and reading
skills - After reading a story, ask
your child what the main idea of
the selection is and to support it
with two details from the story.
Underline five words in the pas-
sage. Ask your child the mean-
ing of each word as used in the
text. Your child should use con-
text clues to figure this out. Take
the five underlined words again
and ask your child to give an an-
tonym or synonym for each.
Interpretation and Analysis
After reading a story, ask your
child the authors purpose for
writing the selection. Ask your
child to describe the characters,
setting, plot, theme, mood and
tone of the passage. Ask your
child to find a fact and an opin-
ion in the passage. Ask your
child to identify from which
point of viewthe passage is writ-
ten.
Math
While shopping, compare and
order prices of items. Ask your
child to figure out howmuch tax
will be added on to the item.
Have your child provide a rea-
sonable estimate for the total
amount of items purchased.
Measurement
Calculate the area of your
childs bedroom. Using a recipe,
convert measurements from
cups to pints, gallons to quarts,
etc. Using a map, interpret and
apply the scale shown to calcu-
late distances between cities.
Geometry
Identify basic geometric
shapes that appear in buildings
or homes (rectangles, circles,
cubes, etc.) While walking out-
side, have your child find exam-
ples of perpendicular and paral-
lel lines. Take apart a cereal box
to illustrate nets of figures.
Algebraic Concepts
Play a number game using
questions such as, What num-
ber added to 4 equals 19? Make
flashcards using index cards
with an equation on one side and
the correct answer on the other.
Use magazines or newspapers to
find tables or graphs for which a
variable expression or pattern
can be determined.
Data Analysis
Use a dice or a spinner to find
probabilities of certain events.
Ask questions such as, What is
the chance that the next number
rolled will be odd? Use maga-
zines or newspapers to analyze
and interpret graphs and charts.
Have your child conduct a sur-
vey of friends and family on a
topic of interest and then create
an appropriate graph with the re-
sults.
Look for patterns that emerge
and make predictions based on
the results.
For more information, call
Mrs. Rebovich or Dr. Keska,
PSSA Coordinators, at 655-
2927.
Scholarship program
The Greater Pittston Friendly
Sons of Saint Patrick, along with
the McDonalds on Route 315,
are sponsoring a scholarship
fundraiser benefiting Pittston
Area High School students.
McDonalds will donate 20 per-
cent of its sales from 5 to 8 p.m.
on Tuesday, March 6 to the
scholarship program. Ronald
McDonald will be available be-
tween 5:30 and 6:30 p.m. that
day.
PSSA Writing Assessments
The PSSA Writing Assess-
ments will be administered to all
eighth- grade students Monday,
April 16 through Wednesday,
April 18.
PSSA Science Assessments
The PSSA Science Assess-
ments will be administered to all
eighth-grade students Monday,
April 23throughThursday, April
26.
Sports and activities
Any student who participated
in a winter sport is reminded to
return their uniformand any oth-
er equipment to their coach or to
Mr. Lopresto in room 231 as
soon as possible. Uniforms must
be washed prior to being return-
ed and any player failing to re-
turn their uniform or equipment
will not be allowed to participate
in a spring sport until they do so.
Athletes are asked mark the
bag they return uniforms and
equipment in with their name
and the name of their sport.
Spring sports news
Any student planning to par-
ticipate in baseball, softball or
track and field should see Mr.
Lopresto in room231 as soon as
possible in order to complete the
necessary paper work. Students
are reminded that if they partici-
pated in a fall or winter sport,
they will not need another phys-
ical, but must see Mr. Lopresto
to complete spring sport paper-
work in order to be eligible for
participation.
P I T T S T O N A R E A S C H O O L D I S T R I C T
Middle School students prepare for Science Olympiad
December Students of the Month at Old Forge High School have been named. Fromleft, are Mrs. Regina Krieger, vice principal; David
Chromey, grade 11; Christian Mozeleski, grade 10; Casey Greenfield, grade 7; J.J. Roberts, grade 8. Absent at the time of the photo were
Bailey Matsko, grade 9; and Miguel Rosa, grade 12.
O L D F O R G E H I G H S C H O O L
December Students of Month at OFHS
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 3B
B I R T H D A Y S
Nina, Luciano and Lorenzo Ginocchietti, children of Aubrey and Michelangelo Ginocchietti, Pitt-
ston, will celebrate their second birthday on March 1.
Grandparents are Vita Blasi, Old Forge, Pat Ginocchietti, Pittston, and John and Catherine Morris,
Trucksville. Great-grandparents are Vivian Morris, Cinnaminson, NJ; and Nando and Marion Ginoc-
chietti, Pittston.
Nina, Luciano and Lorenzo have a sister Solana, 9 months old.
Ginocchietti triplets
Giuliana Celia Domin-
ick, daughter of Joseph
and Maria (Gubitose) Do-
minick, of Tampa, Flor-
ida, celebrated her fourth
birthday on Feb. 6. Her
grandparents are Freddy
and Patty Gubitose, Pitt-
ston; Paul and Helen Do-
minick, Dunellen, NJ; and
Robert and Marlene Ko-
senak, Swoyersville. Her
godparents are Heather
Koss, Pittston; and the late
Sam Nardone. Giuliana
has a little brother, Paulie,
16 months and attends
Carrollwood Day School.
A party at Gymboree
Play & Music was held in
her honor as well as a par-
ty at school and another
one at home. Giuliana en-
joys singing and dancing.
Atrip to Cinderellas Cas-
tle at Walt Disney World
Resort will also mark the
occasion.
Giuliana Dominick
Stop by or mail your birth-
day photo to:
The Sunday Dispatch
109 New Street
Pittston, PA18640
Pictures can run in back and
white for $2 or color for $10.
Deadline is Wednesday at 5
p.m., but space is limited, so
pictures will be publishedona
first-come, first-served basis.
Any questions, please call
602-0168.
Happy
Birthday!
Checks can be made payable
to The Sunday Dispatch.
Louis Joseph Ide, son
of Randy and Lisa Ide of
Shavertown, celebrated
his first birthday on Feb.
2.
He is the grandson of
Louis and Andrea Bocci,
Wyoming; Helen Otley,
Archbald; and the late
Randy Ide.
He is the great-grand-
son of Frances Poluske,
Wyoming; and the late
Joseph Poluske, the late
Donald and Alberta Ide,
the late Fernando and
Jean Bocci and the late
Frank and Ann Zelonis.
Louis Ide
Mia Joy Adelstein,
daughter of Mark Adel-
stein and Joy Tetlak-
Adelstein, Dupont, will
celebrate her first birth-
day on February 28.
Mia is the grand-
daughter of Jack and Ma-
rion Tetlak, Dupont;
Sheldon and Sue Adel-
stein, Valrico, FL; and
Peg Hodin, Clarks Sum-
mit.
Her great-grandmother
is Ann Tetlak, Dupont.
Mia Adelstein
Mario Joseph Belza,
son of Rob and Jay Belza,
Exeter, celebrated his
fifth birthday on Friday,
Feb. 24.
He is the grandson of
Richard and Arlene Bel-
za, of West Wyoming and
Paul and Josephine Ha-
trak, of Exeter.
Mario has a sister, Ni-
na, who is 2 years old.
Mario Belza
Cassondra Chesniak,
daughter of Frank and Ta-
mi Chesniak, Duryea is
celebratating her fourth
birthday today, Feb. 26.
Cassondra is the grand-
daughter of Sylvia and
Bernard Vilchock, Old
Forge; Gloria Chesniak,
Dupont; and the late
Frank Chesniak.
Cassondra
Chesniak
Haley Karboski,
daughter of Ken and Dr.
Nicole Balchune Karbos-
ki, Pittston, celebrated
her first birthday on Feb-
ruary 18.
Haleys grandparents
are Joe and Eileen Bal-
chune, Duryea; and Leo-
nard and the late Anita
Karboski, Pittston.
Haley Karboski
Dylan Robert
Klush, son of Dale
and Stephanie
Klush, of Pittston, is
celebrating his third
birthday today, Feb.
26.
Dylan is the grand-
son of Robert and
Lynn Fritz, Orange-
ville; Susan Lazev-
nick, Duryea; and
Dale C. Klush, Pitt-
ston.
Dylan Klush
Riley Michael Knaub
celebrated his seventh
birthday on Tuesday, Feb.
21. He is the son of Mar-
lene and Ray Knaub Jr.,
of West Wyoming.
He is the grandson of
Bernadine A. Podskoch,
Swoyersville; and the late
Raymond A. Podskoch
and the late Carolyn and
Ray Knaub of Redlion.
Riley is a first-grade
student at Tenth Street
Elementary, Wyoming.
He has a sister, Elizabeth,
and a brother, Ray.
Riley Knaub
Kierra Montemayor,
daughter of SSGT Mark
and SrA Amanda (Bush)
Montemayor of Malm-
strom Air Force Base, MT,
will celebrate her second
birthday on Monday, Feb.
27. She is the granddaught-
er of Katie Bush, Harding;
and the late Christopher
Bush and Kelly and Gilbert
Greene, TX. She is the
great-granddaughter of Re-
gina Krostag, Harding; and
the late WilliamKrostag. A
Hello Kitty party will be
held in Kierras honor.
Kierra Montemayor
The Cookie Corner recently celebrated its 31st anniversary with a
dinner held at the Atrium restaurant in Kingston.
Teachers and assistants who work with toddlers, pre-school day
care andnurseryschool childrenattendedthe event sponsoredbythe
school to honor its staff.
From left, first row, are Krista Artim, Toni Tabone, JoAnn Woj-
tash, Donna B. Brenner, Ruth Tielle and Theresa Guzik. Standing,
Katie Lampman, Laura Gover, Joan Urban, Anne Schwartz, Sue
Lanning, Doris Conant, Ellen Campbell, Nicole Friscia and Doreen
Gay. Absent at the time of the photo were Diane Dileo and Kelsey
Muldoon.
Cookie Corner staff honored
at 31st anniversary dinner
C M Y K
PAGE 4B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
S C H O O L S
The Pittston Area Primary
Center held an assembly entitled
Whats Special About Janu-
ary? on Friday, Jan. 27 and fea-
tured special happenings that
take place during the month of
January. Mrs. Zaffutos first-
grade class and Mr. Zaffutos
second-grade class highlighted
special happenings by perform-
ing poems, songs and move-
ments about January. All pri-
mary students will have the op-
portunity to perform in one as-
sembly during the school year.
PA Primary Center learns Whats Special about January
Students in Mrs. Zaffuto's first-grade class at the Primary Center who enjoyed an assembly recently are, fromleft, first row, Saige Price, Paakeo Phommachanh, Collin
Granagan, Emily Dessoye, Cassandra Hintze, Andy Mendez, Tyler Savage, Makayla Mancini, Raymond Ortiz. Second row, Ashton Tyrell, Nicholas Franchetti, Corbin
Wright, Ethan Lazowski, Ryan Crawford, Alyda Sands, Kai Hubert, Josiah Smith, Antonio Santiago. Third row: Mrs. Zaffuto, Rebecca Ratchford, Karma Gambardella,
Jamez Snow, Gavin Caprio, Nicholas Pugliese, Natalya Soto, Kacie Ralston, Kyleigh Hutchins and Hayden Drass.
Students in Mr. Paul Zaffuto's second-grade class at the Primary Center who enjoyed an assembly recently are, fromleft, first row, Victoria Cavello, James Dunston,
Paul Westawski, Joseph Moore, Lauren Earley, Joseph O'Malley, Jayla Morris. Second row, Sydney Chrobak, Emily Dering, Brandon Reedy, Natasha Story, Unidenti-
fied, Eric Paxon, Gabrielle Gattuso, Third row: Mr. Ron Moran, James Rifflard, Stephen Schott, Alexander Tomlinson, Madison Hector, Kiana Sharif, Jesse Fuller, Cara-
lynn Walsh, Lee Andrew Poling and Mr. Paul Zaffuto.
The Holy Rosary School His-
tory Day Fair will be held on
Monday, Feb. 27.
Sixth and eighth-grade stu-
dents have been engaged in a re-
search process over the past sev-
eral months, based on the 2012
National History Day Theme
Revolution, Reaction, Reformin
History.
Students chose to work indi-
vidually or in groups to explore
local, state, national or historical
world events.
They researched the cause of
the event and its impact, as well
as what factors contributedtothe
subsequent revolution and re-
form.
Project formats include a re-
search paper, display boards,
group skits and webpage de-
signs. HistoryFair is the first lev-
el in this nationwide competi-
tion.
The top projects in each cate-
gory will move onto the NHD
Regional Competition held at
Penn State, Wilkes-Barre in
March with the possibility of
participating in the statewide
competition in May.
Congratulations to all students
for their hard work on this pro-
ject, and special thanks to NHD
moderators Mrs. Doris Brady
and Mrs. Jennifer Snyder for all
the extra time and effort they
gave!
Registrations due
Registrations for the 2012-
2013 school year are due March
2. Families are asked to return
registrations as soon as possible,
as there are limited openings in
some classes.
For information on new regis-
trations, call the school office at
457-2553.
Stations of the Cross
Stations of the Cross will be
prayed on Wednesday of this
week due to the First Friday
Mass.
First Friday Mass
First Friday Mass will be cele-
brated at 9 a.m. on Friday, March
2 in St. Marys Church, Avoca.
Thanks to volunteers
Thanks to all our PTO volun-
teers for the terrific Night at the
Races and Family Fun Night at
Ruby Tuesdays this past week.
Our special thanks toNight at the
Races chairpersons Anne
McDonnell and Lisa Allardyce
and to Family Fun Night chair-
person Ruth Nawrocki for all
their planning and hard work.
Basketball
We wish luck to our basketball
teams who beginn their tourna-
ments this week and to our varsi-
ty cheerleaders who will partici-
pate in the All Saints Academy
competition this afternoon.
Gift certificates
Vouchers sales will continue
to be held from 89 to 10 a.m. ev-
ery Thursday in Sacred Heart
Church Hall in Duryea. School
families may send orders in on
Wednesday to be filled on
Thursday
Recycling
In addition to cartridge recy-
cling, we also have cell phone re-
cycling. Select cell phones can
be dropped off in the same loca-
tion and recycled for credit. For
more information or for a list of
qualifying cartridges, visit
www.fundingfactory.com or
contact Mrs. Skutack at 457-
2553.
Labels and box tops
Campbells Soup labels and
Box Tops for Education are be-
ing collected at Holy Rosary
School.
H O LY R O S A R Y
History
Day is
Monday
The Members of the Rolling Thunder Chapter PA3 presented the
Old Forge High School and Old Forge Elementary School with flags
from POW/MIA to represent all those who have not been forgotten
in our world wars.
High School Seniors Anthony Trotta, David Argust and Colin Ca-
rey were on hand for this event.
Shown in the top photo from the high school presentation are,
fromleft, Chris Thomas, high school principal; Anthony Trotta, Da-
vid Argust, Colin Carey, Tony Valunas, Rolling Thunder chapter
president; Rolling Thunder members John Golden and Stan Matys
and Augie Barhight, Rolling Thunder chapter vice president.
Shown in the photo at right formthe elementary presentation are,
fromleft, Nicole VanLuvender, elementaryprincipal; TonyValunas,
John Golden, Augie Barhight and Stanley Matys.
O L D F O R G E S C H O O L D I S T R I C T
Rolling Thunder
presents flags
C M Y K
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 5B
S C H O O L S
Feb. 29 - Lenten Liturgy, 1
p.m. Fr. Thomas Maloney will
be the celebrant. Fourth-grade
students will lead prayers.
Schedule for Stations of the
Cross
Fridays
March 2 - 12:30 p.m., Grade 7
March 9 - 10:15 a.m., Grade 6
March 16 - 8:15 a.m., Grade 5
March 23 - 1 p.m., Grade 4
March 30 - 8:15 p.m., Grade 3
Lenten Mass Schedule
Wednesdays
Feb. 29 1 p.m., Grade 4
March 7 1 p.m., Grade 8
March 14 1 p.m., Grade 7
March 21 1 p.m., Grade 6
March 28 1 p.m., Grade 5
April 4 - 8:15 a.m., Grade 4
Read Across America
Read Across America will be
celebrated the week of Feb. 27
March 2The following are
scheduled activities for the
week:
Monday, Feb 27
ReadingNight Grades Pre-K
and K.
A night of reading with Mrs.
Barney, kindergarten teacher,
begins at 6 p.m. All preschoolers
and kindergarten students are
welcome and they may bring a
friend. Joins us for a night of
reading and a special craft.
Tuesday, Feb. 28
Guest readers
Each teacher will invite a spe-
cial guest to their classrooms to
read to their students.
Wednesday, Feb. 29
Drop everything and read.
We will read together for 10 to
15 minutes. Mr. Tigue, principal,
will announce the time.
Thursday, March 1
Breakfast for everyone
Pre-K Grade 3, 9 to 9:20
a.m.; grades 4-8, 9:50 to 9:50
a.m.
Grades Pre-K Grade 2:
Dress as your favorite book char-
acter and make a character pup-
pet.
Friday, March 2
Reading Buddies
Grade 8 will read to the lower
grade students in the gym. They
will bring in blankets and books
and read to grades Pre- K to
grade 3. Pre-Kto Grade 3will al-
so color a Dr. Suess picture.
Schedule:
Grade 2 8 to 8:30 a.m.
Grade 3 8:35 to 9:05 a.m.
Grade 1 9:10 to 9:45 a.m.
Pre-K 9:50 to 10:20 a.m.
K 10:25 to 10:55 a.m.
Grades 4-8 Read the most
from coast to coast. Succeed in
reading by taking an accelerated
reading test on March 2. All stu-
dents throughout the United
States will take the Accelerated
Reading Test on the same day.
Forensics news
Practice for Forensics the
weekof Feb. 27will be heldfrom
2:45 to 4 p.m. Monday, Tuesday
and Wednesday.
Labels
Parents are asked to keep
sending in Campbell Soup La-
bels and Box Tops for Educa-
tion.
WYO M I N G A R E A C AT H O L I C S C H O O L
Students conduct food drive for Catholic Schools Week
Students who earned top points in the Accelerated Reader Programat Wyoming Area Catholic are, fromleft, first row, Carissa Benderavich, second grade; Hayden
Foland, first grade; Christopher Maciejczyk, second grade; Matthew Maciejczyk, second grade; Samantha Casey, second grade; Stephen Renfer, kindergarten; Vincent
Contardi, kindergarten. Second row, Mrs. Theresa Sabetta, librarian; Jayden Hastead, second grade; Nicole Yencha, kindergarten; MaKaylee Crake, third grade; Ga-
brielle Morgam, third grade; Molly Blaskiewicz, third grade; and Mr. Chris Tigue, principal.
As a continuation of the Catholic Schools' Week theme of Faith, Academics and Service, the Wyoming Area Catholic Student Council conducted a food drive for the
Greater Pittston Food Pantry located at the former Seton Catholic High School in Pittston. Fromleft, first row, are Walker Cherry, fourth grade; Danielle Morris, fifth
grade; Adiya Golden, fifth grade; Aiden Barney, sixth grade; Rebecca Lalko, fifth grade; Molly Poray, sixth grade. Second row, Mrs. Theresa Sabetta, librarian; Noah
Heck, eighth grade; Matthew Clemow, eighth grade; Bianca Mazzarella, fifth grade; Danielle Franklin, eighth grade; Sarah Cragle, seventh grade; Marissa Moran, sev-
enth grade; Samanth Yencha, fourth grade; Vanessa Musto, seventh grade; Charles Kulick, sixth grade; Mr. Chris Tigue, principal; Mrs. Josephine Toomey, reading
teacher, grades 4-8.
Wyoming Area Catholic Student Council officers who helped with a recent food collection at the
school are, fromleft, Alexia Mazzarella, Danielle Morris and Erika Serafin. Absent at the time of the
photo was Sarah Satkowski.
The Wyoming Area Guidance Department, in conjunction with the Luzerne County Domestic Vio-
lence Service Center recently presented a bullying and cyber bullying programto Wyoming Area Mid-
dle School students. Tammy Rogers, a volunteer/outreach coordinator with the Domestic Violence
Service Center, is shown here speaking to students on Internet safety, the dos and donts of Facebook,
and the mistakes of posting photos on Facebook, pointing out that colleges and employers look at
perspective students and employees Facebook sites.
WYO M I N G A R E A
Domestic Violence rep speaks to WA students
Wyoming Area School Dis-
trict is offering two Drivers Ed.
Theory classes for sophomores.
Session one will consist of 20
11/2-hour classes meeting two or
three times per week.
Session two will consist of 10
3-hour classes meeting once per
week on Saturdays.
Each student will pay $90 for
the class.
Checks may be payable to the
Wyoming Area School District.
Seats are on a first come/first
served basis with15 students per
class. Classes will be held at the
Secondary Center with Session
one in room 164 from 2:30 to 4
p.m.
Session two will also meet in
room164 from 9 a.m. to noon.
Session one will be held on:
February 27, 29; March 5, 6, 8,
12, 13, 15, 19, 20.
Session two will be held on:
February 25; Mar. 3, 10, 17, 24,
31 and April 14, 21, 28.
These classes will meet the
30-hour theory aspect of Drivers
Education.
Driver-ed classes at Wyoming Area
C M Y K
PAGE 6B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
C O M M U N I T Y
Our Lady of the Eucharist Parish held its first-ever Night at the Races on Feb. 11 in the parish hall.
Dinner was catered by LaFrattes with over 170 people were in attendance. Audra Casper and Cindy
Vough served as chairpersons and were assisted by Jeannie and Tony Bantell, Mark Casper, Joe Corri-
doni, LarryCorridoni, NormFrederick, Michelle Gorey, Barbara andDennis Grimes, MaryB. Leonard,
Jon McHale, and Red OBrien. Luzerne County Judge Michael Vough served as emcee for the evening.
The races were sponsored by: State Rep Mike Carroll, the Corridoni Family, Father Maloney in honor of
Clare and Eddie Kanes 65th wedding anniversary, Chase Duffy, the Vough Family, Stell Enterprises
Inc., Tomand Diane Tigue, Tracey Ashby, the Cicon Family, Medico Industries, Gerard Musto Hiscox
& Musto, attorneys at law, and Quality Beverage.
Our Lady of Eucharist Parish holds Night at the Races
Father TomMaloney, pastor, prays God's blessings on those in attendance and on the meal they
are about to share.
Fromleft, are Joanne and Lenny Yashinski, Barbara and Marty Quinn and Rosemary Dessoye.
Fromleft, are Deanne and Joel Tomaszewski, Genevieve Tomaszewski and Marita Tomaszewski. Preparing to open the betting windows are, fromleft, Eve Corridoni, Tony Bantell, Mike Skutack
and Joe Corridoni.
Fromleft, are Barbara Grimes, Bea and Bill Ellis with Carl Boos in the background.
Preparing to call the next race are, fromleft, Joe Corridoni, Emcee Mike Vough, Larry Corridoni and
Mark Casper.
Thirty-seven Wilkes University education ma-
jors are completing student teaching for the spring
2012 semester. The students met for an orientation
session at Wilkes prior to starting their student
teaching. From left, seated, are Stephen Martin,
Pittston; Nicole Clarke, Wilkes-Barre; Lindsey
Davenport, Dallas; MeganClementson, Frederick,
MD; Casey Naumann, Bloomsburg; William
Gouger, Saylorsburg; Alicia Lewis, Wilkes-Barre;
Mark Senchak, Larksville; Mary Siejak, Ashley.
Second row, Lindsay Rowland, Wallingford; Cait-
lin Sobota, Pompton Plains, NJ; Justina Van Allen,
Mahanoy City; Jillian Blair, Wantage, NJ; Lea
Kunkle, West Pittston; Julia Keefer, Hershey; Be-
thany Guarilia, Forty Fort; Michelle Paserp, May-
field; Melissa Kirwan, Larksville; Jessica Solt,
Kunkletown; BrittanySheluga, Scranton; Rebecca
Gallaher, Hershey; Kaitlyn McGurk, Ridley; Fel-
icia LeClair, Glasser, NJ; Kathleen Shedden, Can-
ton; Sarah Frable, Weatherly; Christine Fleming,
Shamokin; Lisa Lombardo, Port Jervis, NY; Alana
Donnelly, Laflin. Third row, Marrissa Fedor, Ha-
nover Township; Amy Daniel, Mountain Top;
Frank Kopyta, Gouldsboro; Jordon DEmilio,
Stowe; Thomas Goldberg, Freehold, NJ; Jared La-
cefield, Spokane Valley, WA; Patrick Ritter, Se-
linsgrove; Shane Everett, Saylorsburg; and Miles
Humenansky, Edwardsville.
Wilkes University students to complete student teaching
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 7
100 Announcements
200 Auctions
300 Personal Services
400 Automotive
500 Employment
600 Financial
700 Merchandise
800 Pets & Animals
900 Real Estate
1000 Service Directory
MARKETPLACE
To place a Classied ad: Call 570-829-7130 or 1-800-273-7130 Email: classieds@thepittstondispatch.com
thepittstondispatch.com
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
518 Customer
Support/Client Care
548 Medical/Health 548 Medical/Health
United One Resources is seeking candidates for a
full-time Title Insurance Settlement Agent. The
successful candidate must be able to work in a
fast paced environment, work independently,
have excellent organizational and communication
skills and an eagerness to excel. Prior settlement
experience is required. We offer a competitive
salary, mileage reimbursement, and a
comprehensive benefit package.
Please forward your resume to:
iwanttowork@unitedoneresources.com
SETTLEMENT AGENT
United One Resources, Inc.
270 North Sherman Street
Wilkes-Barre, Pa 18702
EOE M/F/D/V
Assistant Clinical Director
Job Purpose: Exciting opportunity for a skilled
clinical professional to work as a key member of
our Autism leadership team. Works closely with
Clinical Director regarding the provision of
treatment strategies for children on the autism
spectrum who are receiving services in our
center based or community programs.
Qualifications: Board Certified Behavior
Analyst required. Professional License a plus.
Previous supervisory experience required.
BHRS /Autism experience preferred.
Please reply to:
recruiter@friendshiphousePA.Org
Or mail resume to: Friendship House
c/o Human Resources
1509 Maple Street, Scranton, PA 18505
Direct Care and Clinical positions are available
Please visit us at www.friendshiphousepa.org
E.O.E/L.E.P
100
ANNOUNCEMENTS
110 Lost
ALL JUNK CARS
WANTED!!
CALL ANYTIME
HONEST PRICES
FREE REMOVAL
CA$H PAID
ON THE SPOT
570.301.3602
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS &
TRUCKS
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest Prices
Paid!!!
FREE
REMOVAL
Call
Vito & Ginos
Anytime
288-8995
135 Legals/
Public Notices
ESTATE NOTICE
NOTICE is here-
by given that Let-
ters Testamentary
have been granted
in the Estate of
EMILIO D.
CASAGRANDE,
a/k/a EMILIO
CASAGRANDE,
late of the City of
Pittston, who died
January 10, 2012.
All persons indebt-
ed to said Estate
are requested to
make payment and
those having claims
to present the
same, without
delay, to the Execu-
tors, EMILIO J.
CASAGRANDE
and ELIZABETH
ANN
DOMARASKY and
their Attorneys
SAPORITO,
SAPORITO &
FALCONE
490 NORTH
MAIN STREET
PITTSTON, PA
18640
150 Special Notices
ADOPT
Active couple
longs to be
blessed with your
newborn to cher-
ish and educate in
our loving home.
EXPENSES PAID
Please call
Kim & Chris
888-942-9899
ADOPTING YOUR NEWBORN
is our dream.
Joyfilled home,
endless love,
security awaits.
Randi & Chuck
1-888-223-7941
Expenses Paid
P PA AYING $500 YING $500
MINIMUM
DRIVEN IN
Full size 4 wheel
drive trucks
ALSO PAYING TOP $$$
for heavy equip-
ment, backhoes,
dump trucks,
bull dozers
HAPPY TRAILS
TRUCK SALES
570-760-2035
542-2277
6am to 8pm
310 Attorney
Services
Free Bankruptcy
Consultation
Payment plans.
Carol Baltimore
570-822-1959
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
SOCIAL SECURITY
DISABILITY
Free Consultation.
Contact Atty. Sherry
Dalessandro
570-823-9006
412 Autos for Sale
09ESCAPE XLT $11,495
10Suzuki sx4 $11,995
09JourneySE $12,495
07RANGER4CYL$6,995
04 XL7 4X4 $8,995
10 FUSION SEL $13,995
Full Notary Service
Tags & Title Transfers
BENS AUTO SALES
RT 309 W-BTwp.
Near Wegmans
570-822-7359
BMW `01 X5
4.4i. Silver, fully
loaded, tan leather
interior. 1 owner.
103k miles. $8,999
or best offer. Call
570-814-3666
BMW `04 325i
Automatic. Dark
blue with black inte-
rior. Showroom con-
dition. 20,000 origi-
nal miles. Garage
kept.
$14,900
(570) 814-8106
BMW `99 M3
Convertible with
Hard Top. AM/FM. 6
disc CD. 117 K miles.
Stage 2 Dinan sus-
pension. Cross
drilled rotors. Cold
air intake. All main-
tenance records
available. $11,500
OBO. 570-466-2630
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
CHEVROLET `04
CORVETTE COUPE
Torch red with
black and red
interior. 9,700
miles, auto, HUD,
removable glass
roof, polished
wheels, memory
package, Bose
stereo and twilight
lighting, factory
body moldings,
traction control,
ABS, Garage kept
- Like New.
$25,900
(570) 609-5282
CHRYSLER `04
SEBRING
LXI CONVERTIBLE
Low miles - 54,000.
V6. FWD. Leather
interior. Great
shape. A/C. CD.
All power.
$7,200. Negotiable
(570) 760-1005
EAGLE `95 TALON
Only 97,000 Miles.
Full custom body kit,
dark green metallic
with gray interior.
Dual exhaust, 4 coil
over adjustable
struts. All new
brakes, air intake
kit, strut brakes,
custom seats, cus-
tom white gauges, 2
pillar gauges, new
stereo, alarm, cus-
tom side view mir-
rors. 4 cylinder
automatic, runs
excellent. $8,500.
Call 570-876-1355
or 570-504-8540
(evenings)
FORD 02 MUSTANG
GT CONVERTIBLE
Red with black
top. 6,500 miles.
One Owner.
Excellent Condi-
tion. $17,500
570-760-5833
HONDA `07 ACCORD
V6 EXL. 77K miles. 1
owner with mainte-
nance records.
Slate blue with
leather interior. Sun-
roof. Asking $12,500.
Call 570-239-2556
HONDA `09 CIVIC LX-S
Excellent condition
inside & out. Garage
kept. Regularly
serviced by dealer,
records available.
Option include alloy
wheels, decklid
spoiler, sport seats,
interior accent light-
ing (blue), Nose
mask and custom
cut floor mats. Dark
grey with black inte-
rior. 56K highway
miles. REDUCED!
$13,300. Call
570-709-4695
JAGUAR `00 S TYPE
4 door sedan. Like
new condition. Bril-
liant blue exterior
with beige hides.
Car is fully equipped
with navigation sys-
tem, V-8, automatic,
climate control AC,
alarm system,
AM/FM 6 disc CD,
garage door open-
er. 42,000 original
miles. $9,000
Call (570) 288-6009
412 Autos for Sale
LEXUS `98 LS 400
Excellent condition,
garage kept, 1
owner. Must see.
Low mileage, 90K.
Leather interior. All
power. GPS naviga-
tion, moon roof, cd
changer. Loaded.
$9,000 or best
offer. 570-706-6156
WANTED!
ALL
JUNK
CARS!
CA$H
PAID
570-301-3602
MAZDA 02 626LX
Sedan, auto, power
windows & locks,
CD, 4 cylinder.
122,000 miles. Good
on gas. $3,000.
570-472-2634
TOYOTA 04 CELICA
GT
112K miles. Blue, 5
speed. Air, power
windows/locks,
CD/cassette, Key-
less entry, sunroof,
new battery. Car
drives and has
current PA inspec-
tion. Slight rust on
corner of
passenger door.
Clutch slips on
hard acceleration.
This is why its
thousands less
than Blue Book
value. $6,500
OBO. Make an
offer! Call
570-592-1629
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
VOLKSWAGEN `04
Beetle - Convertible
GREAT ON GAS!
Blue. AM/FM cas-
sette. Air. Automat-
ic. Power roof, win-
dows, locks &
doors. Boot cover
for top. 22k. Excel-
lent condition.
Garage kept.
Newly Reduced
$14,000
570-479-7664
Leave Message
VOLVO 850 95
WAGON
Runs good, air,
automatic, fair
shape. $1,800.
347-693-4156
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
CHEVY 30 HOTROD COUPE
$49,000
FORD 76 THUNDERBIRD
All original $12,000
MERCEDES 76 450 SL
$24,000
MERCEDES 29
Kit Car $9,000
(570) 655-4884
hell-of-adeal.com
CHEVY 77 CORVETTE
Red & red, all
original. No hits,
restoration. Rides
and looks new.
Exceptionally clean.
A/c, pb, ps, pw, 51K
$13,900 OBO
570-563-5056
DESOTO CUSTOM
49 4 DOOR SEDAN
3 on the tree with
fluid drive. This All
American Classic
Icon runs like a top
at 55MPH. Kin to
Chrysler, Dodge,
Plymouth, Imperial
Desoto, built in the
American Midwest,
after WWII, in a
plant that once
produced B29
Bombers. In its
original antiquity
condition, with
original shop &
parts manuals,
shes beautifully
detailed and ready
for auction in Sin
City. Spent her
entire life in Ari-
zona and New
Mexico, never saw
a day of rain or
rust. Only $19,995.
To test drive, by
appointment only,
Contact Tony at
570-899-2121 or
penntech84th@
gmail.com
FORD SALEEN 04
281 SC Coupe
1,000 miles
documented #380
Highly collectable.
$28,500
570-472-1854
415 Autos-Antique
& Classic
FORD `52
COUNTRY SEDAN
CUSTOM LINE
STATION WAGON
V8, automatic,
8 passenger,
3rd seat, good
condition, 2nd
owner. REDUCED TO
$6,500.
570-579-3517
570-455-6589
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MAZDA `88 RX-7
CONVERTIBLE
1 owner, garage
kept, 65k original
miles, black with
grey leather interior,
all original & never
seen snow. $7,995.
Call 570-237-5119
MERCEDES 1975
Good interior &
exterior. Runs
great! New tires.
Many new parts.
Moving, Must Sell.
$1,300 or
best offer
570-362-3626
Ask for Lee
MERCEDES-BENZ `73
450SL
Convertible with
removable hard top,
power windows, AM
/FM radio with cas-
sette player, CD
player, automatic, 4
new tires. Cham-
pagne exterior; Ital-
ian red leather inte-
rior inside. Garage
kept, excellent con-
dition. $28,000. Call
825-6272
MERCURY `79
ZEPHYR
6 cylinder
automatic.
52k original miles.
Florida car. $1500.
570-899-1896
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
427 Commercial
Trucks &
Equipment
CHEVY 08 3500
HD DUMP TRUCK
2WD, automatic.
Only 12,000 miles.
Vehicle in like
new condition.
$19,000.
570-288-4322
439 Motorcycles
BMW 2010 K1300S
Only 460 miles! Has
all bells & whistles.
Heated grips, 12 volt
outlet, traction con-
trol, ride adjustment
on the fly. Black with
lite gray and red
trim. comes with
BMW cover, battery
tender, black blue
tooth helmet with
FM stereo and black
leather riding gloves
(like new). paid
$20,500. Sell for
$15,000 FIRM.
Call 570-262-0914
Leave message.
DAELIM 2006
150 CCs. 4,700
miles. 70 MPG.
New battery & tires.
$1,500; negotiable.
Call 570-288-1246
or 570-328-6897
HARLEY 2011
HERITAGE SOFTTAIL
Black. 1,800 miles.
ABS brakes. Securi-
ty System Package.
$16,000 firm.
SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY
570-704-6023
HARLEY DAVIDSON `03
100th Anniversary
Edition Deuce.
Garage kept. 1
owner. 1900 miles.
Tons of chrome.
$38,000 invested. A
must see. Asking
$18,000. OBO
570-706-6156
HARLEY DAVIDSON 80
Soft riding FLH.
King of the High-
way! Mint origi-
nal antique show
winner. Factory
spot lights, wide
white tires,
biggest Harley
built. Only
28,000 original
miles! Never
needs inspec-
tion, permanent
registration.
$7,995 OBO
570-905-9348
439 Motorcycles
YAMAHA 97
ROYALSTAR 1300
12,000 miles. With
windshield. Runs
excellent. Many
extras including
gunfighter seat,
leather bags, extra
pipes. New tires &
battery. Asking
$4,000 firm.
(570) 814-1548
442 RVs & Campers
FLAGSTAFF `08
CLASSIC
NOW BACK IN PA.
Super Lite Fifth
Wheel. LCD/DVD
flat screen TV, fire-
place, heated mat-
tress, ceiling fan,
Hide-a-Bed sofa,
outside speakers &
grill, 2 sliders,
aluminum wheels, ,
awning, microwave
oven, tinted safety
glass windows,
fridge & many
accessories &
options. Excellent
condition, $22,500.
570-868-6986
Let the Community
Know!
Place your Classified
Ad TODAY!
570-829-7130
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
BUICK `05
RENDEZVOUS
BARGAIN!!
AWD, Fully
loaded, 1 owner,
22,000 miles.
Small 6 cylinder.
New inspection.
Like new, inside
& out. $13,000.
(570) 540-0975
CADILLAC `99
ESCALADE
97k miles. Black
with beige leather
interior. 22 rims.
Runs great. $8,500
Call 570-861-0202
CHEVY `99 SILVERADO
Auto. V6 Vortec.
Standard cab. 8
bed with liner. Dark
Blue. 98,400 miles.
$4,999 or best offer
570-823-8196
CHRYSLER `02
TOWN & COUNTRY
Luxury people
mover! 87,300 well
maintained miles.
This like-new van
has third row seat-
ing, power side &
rear doors. Eco-
nomical V6 drive-
train and all avail-
able options. Priced
for quick sale
$6,295. Generous
trade-in allowances
will be given on this
top-of-the-line vehi-
cle. Call Fran
570-466-2771
Scranton
FORD `04 EXPLORER
Eddie Bauer Edition
59,000 miles,
4 door, 3 row
seats, V6, all power
options, moon roof,
video screen
$12,999.
570-690-3995 or
570-287-0031
FORD 02 ESCAPE
4WD V6
Automatic
Sunroof
Leather
Excellent
condition!.
116,000 Miles
$7200.
570-814-8793
FORD 02 EXPLORER
Red, XLT, Original
non-smoking owner,
garaged, synthetic
oil since new, excel-
lent in and out. New
tires and battery.
90,000 miles.
$7,500
(570) 403-3016
GMC `05 SAVANA
1500 Cargo Van.
AWD. V8 automatic.
A/C. New brakes &
tires. Very clean.
$10,750. Call
570-474-6028
JEEP 97 GRAND
CHEROKEE LAREDO
4.0-ATM, 4WD,
128,000 miles, full
power, minor body
& mechanical work
needed for state
inspection. Recent
radiator & battery.
$2,500. OBO.
570-239-8376
451 Trucks/
SUVs/Vans
JEEP `03 LIBERTY
SPORT. Rare. 5
speed. 23 MPG.
102K highway miles.
Silver with black
interior. Immaculate
condition, inside and
out. Garage kept.
No rust, mainte-
nance records
included. 4wd, all
power. $6,900 or
best offer, trades
will be considered.
Call 570-575-0518
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
MERCURY `03
MOUNTAINEER
AWD. Third row
seating. Economical
6 cylinder automat-
ic. Fully loaded with
all available options.
93k pampered miles.
Garage kept. Safety /
emissions inspected
and ready to go. Sale
priced at $8,995.
Trade-ins accepted.
Tag & title process-
ing available with
purchase. Call Fran
for an appointment
to see this out-
standing SUV.
570-466-2771
Scranton
RANGE ROVER
07 SPORT
Supercharged
59,000 miles, fully
loaded. Impeccable
service record.
$36,000
570-283-1130
460
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
468 Auto Parts
All Junk
Cars &
Trucks
Wanted
Highest
Prices
Paid In
CA$H
FREE
PICKUP
570-574-1275
BEST PRICES
IN THE AREA
CA$H ON THE $POT,
Free Anytime
Pickup
570-301-3602
570-301-3602
CALL US!
TO JUNK
YOUR CAR
503 Accounting/
Finance
LOCAL FINANCIAL
INSTITUTION SEEKS
ADMINISTRATIVE
ASSISTANT TO
HUMAN RESOURCES
Candidate must be
detail oriented, able
to multi-task in a
fast paced environ-
ment, and perform
duties while main-
taining a high level
of confidentiality.
Experience in pro-
viding administrative
support to Sr. Man-
agement and
Human Resources
preferred. Proficien-
cy in Microsoft
Office Suite
required. Responsi-
bilities include, but
are not limited to: on
boarding new hires,
managing employee
files, ordering sup-
plies, preparation of
bi-weekly payroll,
administering bene-
fit submissions, han-
dling mail, assisting
with Board and
Committee meeting
setup. Potential for
advancement within
Human Resource
area.
Competitive salary
and benefit pack-
age. Send resume
to: Landmark Com-
munity Bank,
2 South Main St.,
Pittston, PA 18640
Fax: 570 891-0001
Attn: M. Lewis
E-mail to mlewis@
lcbbank.com
EOE
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
509 Building/
Construction/
Skilled Trades
CONSTRUCTION
TRUCK DRIVERS
Seeking applica-
tions to fill CDL
Class A & B driver
positions. Valid PA
license and clean
driving record
required. Work with
us in the highway
construction and
Marcellus Shale
industries.
QUARRY
Seeking off-road
truck driver and
excavator/hammer
operator.
Successful candi-
dates must be will-
ing to work all shifts
and all days includ-
ing weekends.
Salary commensu-
rate with experi-
ence.
AMERICAN ASPHALT
PAVING CO.
500 Chase Rd
Shavertown, PA
18708
Fax: 570-696-3486
jobs@amer
asphalt.com
EOE
533 Installation/
Maintenance/
Repair
Growing HVAC
Firm Seeks
SERVICE
TECHNICIAN
Energy Technolo-
gies, Inc. is expand-
ing and has an
immediate opening
for an experienced
commercial service
technician. Become
part of the success
of this Linc franchise
where service is
central to our busi-
ness. Benefits
include top pay,
flexible health insur-
ance plan, retire-
ment plan, vacation,
company truck,
continuous training,
bonus incentives,
and a professional
atmosphere.
Stop in to fill out an
application or send
resume to:
Mr. Chad Davis
Service Manager
ENERGY
TECHNOLOGIES, INC.
591 North Hunter
Highway
Drums, PA
18222
(570) 788-3845
Ext. 23
www.energyt.com
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
536 IT/Software
Development
Programmer/Analyst
Experience with
Peachtree account-
ing a plus.
Send resume to:
CFM
PO BOX 236
CLARKS SUMMIT, PA
18411
538 Janitorial/
Cleaning
HOUSEKEEPER
Flexible schedule.
Experience required.
Please send
resume & 3 refer-
ences to:
275 Memorial Hwy
PO Box 301
Dallas, PA 18612
542 Logistics/
Transportation
DRIVER NEEDED
Independent
Contractor
Excellent pay with a
growing company.
Call 570-820-0414
DRIVERS
Due to our contin-
ued growth, Bolus
Freight Systems
is expanding its fleet
of company drivers.
Company drivers
will enjoy dedicated
runs or regional
runs. You can be
home every night or
every weekend, the
choice is yours.
You can earn in
excess of $1400 per
week, and you will
be driving a new or
late model truck.
Part time and week-
end work also avail-
able. This is a
career opportunity
for dependable driv-
ers to work for an
industry leader and
one of the highest
paying companies in
the business. We
offer a performance
bonus, paid vaca-
tions and holidays,
medical and life
insurance as well as
401K. For more
information call:
1-800-444-1497
ext 721
542 Logistics/
Transportation
Drivers, CDL-A:
Home every night!
Local Hazleton
Dedicated route!
Great Pay, Benefits!
1-866-336-9642
Lowboy Driver -
CDL Required
Opening for Lowboy
Driver-CDL
Required. Must
have good driving
record. We offer
Top Wages and
Benefits Package.
Apply in person &
ask for Paul or Mike.
FALZONE TOWING
SERVICE, INC.
271 N. SHERMAN
ST., WILKES-BARRE,
PA 18702
570-823-2100
DRIVERS: DayCab
Work. Dedicated!
Regional work.
Guaranteed mini-
mum plus opportu-
nity to earn more!
CDL-A. recruiting
@westmotor.com
800-456-7885
x:3289
548 Medical/Health
LITTLE FLOWER
MANOR AND ST.
LUKES VILLA
have the following
positions available.
RN Supervisor
part time & per
diem, 3-11P and
11P-7A
Certified Nurse
Aides full, part
time & per diem,
7A-3P and 11P-7A
Dietary
Aides/Porters
6A-2P & 4-7P
Resident
Assistant
(St. Therese Resi-
dence) part time
5-9PM
LPN - Personal
Care (St. Lukes
Villa) part time
3-11P
Activity Aides
(Little Flower
Manor) part time
8A-4PM, 12-8PM, 3-
8PM & every other
weekend
Apply:
Little Flower Manor
200 S. Meade St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
pmelski@lfmstr.com
fax: 570-408-9760
EOE
MASSAGE THERAPISTS
The Woodhouse
Day Spa is currently
hiring for Full Time
Massage Thera-
pists. Position
requires outstand-
ing customer serv-
ice skills and must
be available days,
evenings and Satur-
days. Please apply
in person at the spa.
Monday-Friday 9-6
387 Wyoming Ave.,
Kingston. EOE
BEAUTY
551 Other
FOSTER PARENTS NEEDED!
FCCY is looking for
people to help meet
the growing demand
for foster homes.
Those interested in
becoming foster
parents call 1-800-
747-3807. EOE.
PARTS PERSON
WANTED:
We are looking for
an experienced
parts person to join
our team. Responsi-
bilitys include: parts
ordering, inventory,
data entry, clerical
Day shift, great
working environ-
ment: Apply in per-
son ONLY. EOE
Calex
58 Pittston Ave
Pittston, PA
551 Other
PLASMA DONORS
NEEDED
INTERSTATE BLOOD
AND PLASMA
665 CAREY AVE
WILKES-BARRE
IMMEDIATE PAYMENT
CALL WITH QUESTIONS
823-4119
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
VAN DRIVER
Needed Monday
thru Friday.
6-6.5 hours/day.
No weekends,
No holidays.
Apply within
Keystone
Garden Estates
100 Narrows Rd
Route 11
Larksville, PA 18651
NO PHONE CALLS
PLEASE.
554 Production/
Operations
KMS FAB LLC
Has immediate
openings for the
positions listed
below.
- Laser Operators
- Turret Operators
- Press Brake
Operators
- Punch Press
Operators
- General Machine
Operators
Please email your
resume to:
kbrunges@
kmspa.com or fill
out an application
at KMS, FAB, LLC.
100 Parry Street
Luzerne, PA. 18709
E.O.E.
PRODUCTION WORK-
ERS
Local window man-
ufacturing company
is seeking
experienced line
operators.
Starting rate
depends on experi-
ence. Attendance
and Productivity
Bonus are potential.
Health, Dental,
Vision & 401K Plan
available upon full
time status. Dont
miss out on an
opportunity to join a
great team! Apply in
person to:
INTERSTATE BUILDING
MATERIALS, INC.
Attn: Director of HR
322 Laurel St.
Pittston 18640
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
ACCOUNT EXECUTIVE:
WNEP-TV has a
rare opportunity for
an experienced
Account Executive.
Candidate must
have excellent
organization, pres-
entation, and nego-
tiation skills. New
business is a must.
Minimum 3 yrs.
media sales
required.
See details on
our website:
www.wnep.com/
business
Garden Center
Work with plants &
garden supplies.
Must have knowl-
edge of Annuals,
Perennials and Fer-
tilizers. Hours will
vary seasonally.
Retail
Must have cash,
register and sales
experience. Excel-
lent communication
skills needed.
Apply in person, no
phone calls please.
Dundee Gardens
2407 San Souci Pkwy
Hanover Twp, PA.
Hours: 9:30am-5pm
Find
that
new
job.
The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an
employment ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNLLL NNNNLLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LE LE LLE LE LE LE E LLE LE EE DER.
timesleader.com
Find the
perfect
friend.
Call 829-7130
to place your ad.
The Classied
section at
timesleader.com
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNNL NL NNNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNN LEA LE LLLE LE LE LE LEE LE LE LEE DER DDD .
timesleader.com
PAGE 8 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
CALL NOW 823-8888 CALL NOW 823-8888
1-800-817-FORD 1-800-817-FORD
Overlooking Mohegan Sun Overlooking Mohegan Sun
577 East Main St., Plains 577 East Main St., Plains
Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B Just Minutes from Scranton or W-B
*Tax and tags extra. Security Deposit Waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at
delivery. See salesperson for details. All payments subject to credit approval by the primary lending source, Tier 0 rate. Special APR financing cannot be combined with Ford cash rebate. BUY FOR prices are based on 72 month at $18.30 per month per $1000
financed with $2,500 down (cash or trade). Photos of vehicles are for illustration purposes only. Coccia Ford is not responsible for any typographical errors. No Security Deposit Necessary. See dealer for details. Sale ends
Steve Mizenko
Service Manager
16 Yrs. at Coccia
Rudy Podest
Parts & Service
Director
28 Yrs. at Coccia
Pat McGinty
Parts Manager
21 Yrs. at Coccia
Barry Williams
Finance Manager
25 Yrs. at Coccia
George Geiges
Service Manager
25 Yrs. with Ford
Lenny Santarsiero
Body Shop Manage
1 Yr. at Coccia
Rob Kosco
Salesperson
26 Yrs. with Ford
Jim Bufalino
Salesperson
19 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Toni Grasso
Salesperson
9 Yrs. at Coccia
Joe Skrutski
Salesperson
12 Yrs. at Coccia
US MARINES
Marcus Ossowski
Salesperson
2 Yr. at Coccia
Frank Vieira
Salesperson
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Victor DeAnthony
Salesperson
5 Yrs. at Coccia
Kevin Uren
Salesperson
2 Yrs. at Coccia
Greg Martin
General Manager
22 Yrs. at Coccia
US MARINES
Joe Bobo Nocera
Used Car Manager
26 Yrs. at Coccia
US NAVY
Ginny Kutzer
Salesperson
21 Yrs. at Coccia
US AIR FORCE
Jason Kilduff
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Mike Hallock
Salesperson
1 Yr. at Coccia
Abdul Alsaigh
Sales Manager
5 Yrs. at Coccia
Terry Joyce
Sales Manager
35 Yrs. at Coccia
Tom Washington
Sales Manager
15 Yrs. with Ford
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied **Lease payments based on 24 month lease
21,000 allowable miles. First months payment, $595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
Auto., AC, Pwr. Mirrors, Advanced Trac with
Electronic Stability Control, Side Curtains,
AM/FM/CD, Pwr. Door Locks, Tilt Wheel,
,
Cruise Control, 15 Alum.
Wheels,
Keyless Entry w/Keypad
24
Mos.
Len Gierszal
Finance Manager
1 Yr. at Coccia
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
Auto., CD, Anti-Theft Sys., Side Curtain
Air Bags, 16 Steel Wheels, Tilt Wheel,
Air, Instrument Cluster, Message
Center, Side Mirrors,
Fog Lamps, MyKey
MPG
Auto., CD, Alum. Wheels, Tilt Wheel, Pwr. Seat,
Safety Pkg., 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Side Impact
Air Bags, Anti-Theft Sys., PL, PW, Siruis
Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry,
Message Center,
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
Patrick Plastow
Internet Specialist
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
MPG
MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
3.5L Engine, MyFord Display,
Auto. Climate Control, Pwr. Mirrors,
17 Steel Wheels, CD, Keyless
Entry, MyKey, Cruise
Control, PL, PW
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
, Safety Canopy, Air, Side Impact
Safety Pkg., Pwr. Drivers Seat, Fog Lamps, Rear
Cargo Convenience Pkg., Privacy Glass,16 Alum.
Wheels, Roof Rack, Auto., Sirius Satellite
Radio, CD, PW, PDL, Keyless Entry,
MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
Auto., 3.5L V6, SYNC, Reverse Sensing
Sys., Keyless Entry w/Keypad,18 Alum.
Wheels, Anti-Theft Perimeter Alarm, Sirius
Satellite Radio, PDL, CD, PW,
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
Pwr. Windows,
Pwr. Door Locks, Air, Advance Trac
with Roll Stability Control,
Remote Keyless Entry,
CD, MyFord
MPG
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
Safety Canopy, Air, Side Impact Safety Pkg.,
Fog Lamps, Rear Cargo Convenience Pkg.,
Privacy Glass,16 Alum. Wheels, Roof
Rack, Auto., Pwr. Drivers Seat, Sirius
Satellite Radio, PW, PDL, Keyless
Entry, CD,
MPG
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
Auto., CD, Alum Wheels, Tilt, PW, PDL, Pwr. Seat, Safety
Pkg., Side Impact Air Bags, 1st & 2nd Air Curtains, Anti-
Theft Sys., Sirius Satellite Radio, Keyless Entry w/Keypad,
Message Center,
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
24
Mos.
Remote Keyless Entry, Pwr.
Locks, Message Center,
Air, Anti-Theft Sys.,
Side Curtain Air
Bags, CD, Side
Impact Air
Bags, MyKey
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
STX, 3.7L V6, Auto.,
17 Alum. Wheels,
Air, Cloth Seat,
40/20/40 Split
Seat, Decor Pkg.,
Cruise, ABS, Pwr.
Equipment Group
*Tax and tags extra. Security deposit waived. All factory rebates applied
**Lease payments based on 24 month lease 21,000 allowable miles. First months payment,
$595 Bank Fee, and $2,500 down payment (cash or trade) due at delivery. Sale ends 2/29/12.
M
O
S.
APR
PLUS
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 9
The Kia 10-year/100,000-mile warranty program includes various warranties and roadside assistance. Warranties include power train and basic. All warranties and roadside assistance are limited. See retailer for details or go to kia.com.
*24-hour Roadside Assistance is a service plan provided by Kia Motors America, Inc. **Plus tax and tag. Picture may not represent exact trim level. Plus tax & tag, 12k miles per year with 1,500 down & fees due at signing. Payments based on a
39 month lease with approved credit. *** Must be a documented deal. Dealer reserves right to buy that vehicle.
WyomingValley Motors
560 Pierce Street
Kingston, PA 18704
570-714-9924
www.wyomingvalleykia.com
- l0-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted power traln warranty
- 5-year/60,000-mlle llmlted baslc warranty
- 5-year/l00,000-mlle llmlted antl-perforatlon
- 5-year/60,000-mlle 24-hour roadslde asslstance`
Our shelves are restocked! We have the cars and we have the deals! COME IN TODAY!
NO CREDIT APPLICATION WILL BE REFUSED.
UP TO$5,000 OFF ANEWKIA!
#K2180
35
MPG
/utomatic /ir /M/FM CD Plutooth
iPoc Racy Powr Vincows Powr Locks
2012 KIA Soul
$
or buy for $16,545**
Per
Month
1
THE ALL NEW
2012 KIARIO
LX Automatic
ONLY $14,990
*
*Plus tax and tag.
RATES AS
LOW AS
0.9%
#K2162
29
MPG
2012 KIA Sorento
/utomatic Kylss Entry Satllit Racio & Plutooth
/lloys Hatc Sats Traction Control 6 /irbags
$
Per
Month
1
or buy for $23,450**
# K1429
35
MPG
2011 KIA Optima LX
/lloys Satllit Racio Plutooth & iPoc Racy
Powr Vincows Traction Control /M/FM CD 6 /irbags
Kylss Entry /utomatic Cruis Control
Per
Month
1
or buy for $20,900**
$
#K2068
36
MPG 2012 KIA Forte LX
Satllit Racio Plutooth & iPoc Racy
5 Star Crash Rating 6 /irbags Kylss Entry
/utomatic Cruis Control
Per
Month
1
or buy for $16,900**
$
WE WILL BEAT ANY COMPETITORS PRICE ONANEW
KIAGUARANTEEDOR WE WILL PAY YOU$1,000
***
40
MPG
#K2196
PAGE 10 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
468 Auto Parts 468 Auto Parts
39 Prospect St Nanticoke
570-735-1487
WE PAY
THE MOST
INCASH
BUYING
11am
to 6pm
IN THE HEART OF WILKES-BARRE
Immediate Occupancy!!
Efficiencies available
@30% of income
MARTIN D. POPKY APARTMENTS
61 E. Northampton St.
Wilkes-Barre, PA 18701
Affordable Senior Apartments
Income Eligibility Required
Utilities Included! Low cable rates;
New appliances; Laundry on site;
Activities! Curbside Public Transportation
Please call 570-825-8594
D/TTY 800-654-5984
BUYING JUNK
VEHICLES
$300 AND UP
$125 EXTRA IF DRIVEN,
DRAGGED OR PUSHED IN!
NOBODY Pays More
570-760-2035
Monday thru Saturday 6am-9pm Happy Trails!
566 Sales/Retail/
Business
Development
RETAIL CLERK
HARROLDS PHARMACY,
A GREAT
PLACE TO WORK!
Part time (22 hours/
week), front end cus-
tomer service, expe-
rience required.
Send resume to:
Harrolds Pharmacy
179 Old River Road
Wilkes-Barre, PA
18702
Or Fax:
570-824-8730
Retail Sales Manager
SEEKING VERSATILE,
RESPONSIBLE
PERSON. TRAINING,
BENEFITS AVAILABLE.
RESPOND TO JOER@
EFOFURNITURE.COM
600
FINANCIAL
610 Business
Opportunities
TAX REFUND COMING?
INVEST IN
YOURSELF WITH
JAN PRO
Quote from current
Franchisee,
I started with a
small investment &
I have grown my
business over
600%. It definitely
changed my life and
I would recommend
Jan-Pro.
* Guaranteed Clients
* Steady Income
* Insurance &
Bonding
* Training &
Ongoing Support
* Low Start Up Costs
* Accounts available
throughout Wilkes-
Barre & Scranton
570-824-5774
Jan-Pro.com
630 Money To Loan
We can erase
your bad credit -
100% GUARAN-
TEED. Attorneys
for the Federal
Trade Commission
say theyve never
seen a legitimate
credit repair opera-
tion. No one can
legally remove
accurate and timely
information from
your credit report.
Its a process that
starts with you and
involves time and a
conscious effort to
pay your debts.
Learn about manag-
ing credit and debt
at ftc. gov/credit. A
message from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
700
MERCHANDISE
708 Antiques &
Collectibles
RETIRED DEPART-
MENT 56 Seasons
Bay Village 9 build-
ings, 28 acces-
sories. Purchased
price $1261. 70%
sale price $890.
570-868-5886
710 Appliances
FREEZER upright by
Frigidaire. Asking
$50. 696-4978
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
GENES
RECONDITIONED
APPLIANCES
60 Day Warranty
Monday-Friday
8:00PM-5:00PM
Saturday
8:00AM-11:00AM
Gateway
Shopping Center
Kingston, PA
(570) 819-1966
MICROWAVE GE
Profile over the
range $70. Ken-
more Elite dish-
washer $60. Brass
Tiffany Chandelier
$50. Hunter Ceiling
Fan $20. All very
good condition.
Manuals included.
570-814-5300
RANGE: Kenmore
electric
3036x26-black,
10 months old.
$270.
WASHER Kenmore,
white, $50. Side by
side refrigerator
with water ice dis-
penser, 28 cu ft.
Beige color $100.
Both very good con-
dition. 262-6283
712 Baby Items
GLIDER ROCKING
CHAIR, honey col-
ored wood with tan
cushions, $100.
Graco highchair,
Windsor pattern.
$45. Graco Car
Seat $45. Infant 5
piece bedding, light
green, yellow,& ivor,
comforter never
used $50.654-8042
SWING, Graco,
Graco infant car
seat with base,
Recaro convertible
car seat, entire neu-
tral farm themed
nursery set with
lamp & accessories
all $15 each. Fisher
Price baby monitor,
and changing table
mattress $5 each
All in great condi-
tion. 570-735-4876
716 Building
Materials
SINK, single bowl,
great condition, 1
white, 1 tan. $10.
570-262-7923
726 Clothing
COAT
KENNETH COLE
Beige, size 6,
hardly worn. $75.
570-855-5385
742 Furnaces &
Heaters
HEATERS 2, 1
kerosene radiant 10
with manual & pump
$75. 1 carbon fiber
electric, new in box,
never used, free
standing or wall
mountable $49.
570-636-3151
744 Furniture &
Accessories
BED - NEW PLUSH
set, still in original
plastic
Must sell.
$150. Can Deliver.
280-9628
BED, twin complete,
solid wood mission
style bed with . All in
excellent condition.
$200. 299-9628.
COUCH 2 loveseats,
1 reclining chair, 1
chair with ottoman.
All for $199. Very
good condition.
570-824-7314
FURNI SH FURNI SH
FOR LESS FOR LESS
* NELSON *
* FURNITURE *
* WAREHOUSE *
Recliners from $299
Lift Chairs from $699
New and Used
Living Room
Dinettes, Bedroom
210 Division St
Kingston
Call 570-288-3607
KITCHEN DINING
TABLE oak laminate
and chrome with 6
chrome & wicker
chairs and leaf.
$150. 457-3486
LOVESEAT blue,
clean, like new $25.
570-574-5690
MICROWAVE stand/
kitchen cart. White
with wood top, cab-
inet & shelf. Like
new. $40.
570-696-4494
BUYING/SELLING
ALL US &
FOREIGN COINS
CURRENCY
POSTCARDS
STAMPS
GOLD & SILVER
We Give
FREE
Appraisals
(No obligations,
no pressure)
Over 35 years as
a respected local
coin dealer.
HERITAGE
GALLERIES
52 Carr Ave.
DALLAS, PA
Across from
Dallas Agway
on Rt. 415
Look for blue
& white signs
TUES-SAT
10-6
or call for
appointments
674-2646
758 Miscellaneous
DVD PLAYER
Insignia $20. (2) 8
mm movie projec-
tors reg & super 8
GAF 138 $40. Ionic
pro air purifier $25.
3 fluorescent fix-
tures & 30 watt bulb
$24. 35 mm Cannon
sure shot $15.
Handyman Maga-
zines .15 cents
each. American
Standard shower
head $4. VHS tapes
$3. VHS tapes T120
$5. 570-825-5564
GENERATOR. Husky
portable, 5,000
watt. Like new,
used once. $450.
Harveys Lake
570-639-3178
758 Miscellaneous
IPOD Touch 16 G
Generation 1 or 2.
Screen is in excel-
lent condition, $100.
Jagermeister base-
call cap, never
worn, $10. Motor-
cycle helmet, black
with sharp royal
blue design on it,
Size XL, $30.
484-239-8507
Pizza stone bake-
ware, 14 1/2, from
Home & Garden
Party, never used
$20. Lasagna
stoneware, 8 x 12,
from House of
Lloyd, excellent
condition $10.
570-333-4325
POLAR-CARE 300-
cold-therapy-unit,
new, (breg) $60.
PREMIUM knife col-
lection 10 boxed
knives including
clever, new $30.
570-489-2675
SEWING machine
1949, Kenmore in
original desk type
cabinet comes with
original manual, has
not been run for
decades; needs
check-up. Pics
available via e-mail
$49. 570-696-1410
TIRES 2 215/70R15
snowtires on rims
from 2000 Chevy
Venture $80.
570-474-0935
WHEELS Ford
Escape 17 factory
chrome wheels with
tires p23565r17
$350. 696-2212
776 Sporting Goods
COBRA S-9 irons,
steel, reg 6-7-8-9-
W $100. firm. Vin-
tage Yonex woods
graphite head
shafts 1-3-5 $60.
Slazenger cart/bag
slotted $25.
570-829-4016
GOLF CLUB
NEW MUST SEE!
$30. 570-574-5690
PULL-CART for golf
bag, good condition
$15. 570-788-2388
after 5 pm.
778 Stereos/
Accessories
SUB WOOFER Pow-
ered car subwoofer.
Very powerful, 2
power acoustic
subwoofers, 2 Pyle
1800 watt amps.
Custom cabinet with
see through acrylic
front. $250. or best
offer. 328-6059.
780 Televisions/
Accessories
TV BRACKETS, wall
mount, 1 holds large
set $39. 1 for small-
er set $29.
570-636-3151
TV from 1950; beau-
tiful pecan all wood
cabinet with doors.
$49. 570-696-1410
TV R.C.A. 14 color
with remote $25.
570-696-1661
784 Tools
CIRCULAR SAW, 7
1/4 Craftsman $25.
570-825-5564
LINE UP
A GREAT DEAL...
IN CLASSIFIED!
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
SNOW THROWER
Ariens 7hp electric
start, tire chains,
24 cut just serv-
iced, runs well
$395. 570-636-3151
786 Toys & Games
BIKE boys 20,
needs part. Was
$80. Asking $25.
570-574-5690
ICE SKATES ladies
ice skates size 6 $5
TV Teddy with 6
interactive videos
$20. 570-696-3368
794 Video Game
Systems/Games
SONY PLAYSTATION
2 console. Every-
thing included.
Works 100%.
Includes 4 games,
all cables, & carry-
ing case. Best
offers accepted.
$60. 570-905-2985.
796 Wanted to Buy
Merchandise
VITOS
&
GINOS
Wanted:
WANTED
ALL JUNK
CARS,
TRUCKS &
HEAVY
EQUIPMENT
DUMPTRUCKS
BULLDOZERS
BACKHOES
Highest
Prices
Paid!!
FREE
PICKUP
288-8995
800
PETS & ANIMALS
815 Dogs
PAWS
TO CONSIDER....
ENHANCE
YOUR PET
CLASSIFIED
AD ONLINE
Call 829-7130
Place your pet ad
and provide us your
email address
This will create a
seller account
online and login
information will be
emailed to you from
gadzoo.com
The World of Pets
Unleashed
You can then use
your account to
enhance your online
ad. Post up to 6
captioned photos
of your pet
Expand your text to
include more
information, include
your contact
information such
as e-mail, address
phone number and
or website.
DACHSHUND PUPPIES!
AKC Regi st er ed.
Ready to go. Vet
checked. Please call
570-864-2207
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
900
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE
906 Homes for Sale
Having trouble
paying your mort-
gage? Falling
behind on your
payments? You
may get mail from
people who promise
to forestall your
foreclosure for a fee
in advance. Report
them to the Federal
Trade Commission,
the nations con-
sumer protection
agency. Call 1-877-
FTC-HELP or click
on ftc.gov. A mes-
sage from The
Times Leader and
the FTC.
BACK MOUNTAIN
Centermorland
529 SR 292 E
For sale by owner
Move-in ready. Well
maintained. 3 - 4
bedrooms. 1 bath.
Appliances includ-
ed. 2.87 acres with
mountain view. For
more info & photos
go to:
ForSaleByOwner.com
Search homes in
Tunkhannock.
$275,000. For
appointment, call:
570-310-1552
BEAR CREEK
10+ ACRES
with 2 homes.
Good for primary
home, vacation or
investment. Prop-
erty includes: 10.2
acres (3 separate
parcels) bordering
state game lands
House with master
bedroom suite,
large kitchen,
oversized living
room, family room,
guest bathroom,
oversized deck (24
x 32). Private
Guest House with
living room/kitchen
combo, large bed-
room, bathroom.
Outbuilding for
storage & covered
pavilion.
email:
csmith7433@
aol.com
570-472-3152
EXETER
Nice size four
bedroom home with
some hardwood
floors, large eat in
kitchen with break-
fast bar. 2 car
garage & partially
fenced yard. Close
to everything!
$92,900
MLS# 11-1977
Call Christine
Kutz
570-332-8832
906 Homes for Sale
EXETER
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
362 Susquehanna
Ave
Completely remod-
eled, spectacular,
2 story Victorian
home, with 3 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
new rear deck, full
front porch, tiled
baths and kitchen,
granite counter-
tops, all Cherry
hardwood floors
throughout, all new
stainless steel
appliances and
lighting, new oil fur-
nace, washer dryer
in first floor bath.
Great neighbor-
hood, nice yard.
$174,900 (30 year
loan, $8,750 down,
$887/month, 30
years @ 4.5%)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
Shopping for a
new apartment?
Classified lets
you compare costs -
without hassle
or worry!
Get moving
with classified!
JENKINS TWP
1252 Main St.
3 Bedrooms,
1 Bath, Finished
Walk-Out
Basement, Single
Car Garage
Nice corner lot
$59,500
Call Vince
570-332-8792
LAFLIN
210 Beechwood Dr
Rare brick & vinyl
tri-level featuring 8
rooms, 4 bed-
rooms, 1.5 baths,
family room with
fireplace, rear
patio, sprinkler
system, alarm sys-
tem & central air.
MLS#11-2819
$199,000
CALL DONNA
570-613-9080
PITTSTON TWP.
BY OWNER
459 Broad St.
3 bedroom 1 bath
attractive home in
great location,
hardwood floors
100x144 lot
asking $109,900
570.970.0650
jtdproperties.com
SUGARLOAF
REDUCED!!!!
2 houses. Must sell
together. Each has
its own utilities on
2.5 + acres. 3 car
garage with 3 large
attached rooms.
For Sale By Owner.
$239,900
Call (570) 788-5913
SWOYERSVILLE
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
52 Barber Street
Beautifully remod-
eled 3 bedroom, 1
bath home in the
heart of the town.
With new carpets,
paint, windows,
doors and a mod-
ern kitchen and
bath. Sale includes
all appliances:
refrigerator, stove,
dishwasher, washer
and dryer. Nice yard
and superb neigh-
borhood. Priced to
sell at $89,900 or
$433.00 per month
(bank rate; 30
years, 4.25%, 20%
down). Owner also
willing to finance
100% of transaction
with a qualified
cosigner
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
906 Homes for Sale
WEST WYOMING
438 Tripp St
OPEN HOUSE
Sunday
12pm-5pm
Completely remod-
eled home with
everything new.
New kitchen, baths,
bedrooms, tile
floors, hardwoods,
granite countertops,
all new stainless
steel appliances,
refrigerator, stove,
microwave, dish-
washer, free stand-
ing shower, tub for
two, huge deck,
large yard, excellent
neighborhood
$154,900 (30 year
loan @ 4.5% with 5%
down; $7,750 down,
$785/month)
100% OWNER
FINANCING
AVAILABLE
Call Bob at
570-654-1490
909 Income &
Commercial
Properties
WILKES-BARRE
Duplex, can convert
to single. Steel sid-
ing, new roof, new
furnace, garage
large lot. Reduced
$59,900
Castrignano Realty
570-824-9991
930 Wanted to Buy
Real Estate
WEST PITTSTON
House Wanted
Need Owner
finance. Flood house
OK. Will repair.
Please contact
570-212-8370
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
DUPONT
Totally renovated 5
room apartment
located on 1st floor.
Partially furnished,
brand new fridge/
electric range, elec-
tric washer & dryer.
Brand new custom
draperies, Roman
shades, carpeting/
flooring & energy
efficient windows. 1
bedroom with large
closet, living room,
laundry room, stor-
age room, base-
ment & large front
porch. Easy access
to I-81, airport &
casino, off street
parking.
No smoking.
$650 + utilities &
security.
570-762-8265
FORTY FORT
BEAUTY -
EFFICIENT
1 bedroom,
fireplace, court-
yard parking,
appliances,
professionally
managed.
LEASE/
EMPLOYMENT
APPLICATION/
NO PETS/
SMOKING
$465+ utilities
AMERICA
REALTY
288-1422
HANOVER TOWNSHIP
Great location, 1
bedroom apartment
in residential area,
all utilities included.
$600/month
+ security.
908-482-0335
Say it HERE
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
KINGSTON
72 E. 72 E. W Walnut alnut St. St.
3rd floor, located in
quiet neighborhood.
Kitchen, living room,
dining room, sun
room, bathroom. 2
large and 1 small
bedroom, lots of
closets, built in linen,
built in hutch, hard-
wood floors, fire-
place, storage room,
yard. New washer/
dryer, stove & fridge.
Heat and hot water
included. 1 year lease
+ security. $950
570-406-1411
KINGSTON
E. WALNUT ST.
Light, bright, 3rd
floor, 2 bedrooms,
carpeted, security
system. Garage.
Extra storage &
cable TV included.
Laundry facilities.
Heat & hot water
furnished. Fine
neighborhood.
Convenient to bus
& stores. No
pets. References.
Security. Lease.
No smokers
please. $715.
570-287-0900
941 Apartments/
Unfurnished
KINGSTON
Newly renovated. 3
bedroom. Wall to
wall carpet.
Screened in porch.
Off street parking.
Fridge, stove,
washer & dryer
included. Sewer,
lawn maintenance
& snow removal
also included. $750
+ utilities. Call
(570) 807-7204
LEAVE MESSAGE
LARKSVILLE
Very nice, clean, 2
bedroom. Hard-
wood floors, w/d
hookup, stove,
fridge, dishwasher.
Off street parking.
$600 + security &
utilities. No pets.
570-954-5903
NANTICOKE
Nice clean 1
bedroom. Heat, hot
water, garbage fee
included. Stove,
fridge, air-condition-
ing, washer/dryer
availability. Security.
$525 per month
Call (570) 736-3125
PITTSTON
2nd floor rear apart-
ment. 3 rooms +
bath. Wall to wall
carpet. Heat &
garbage paid by
landlord. $425 +
security. No pets.
Call 570-655-1713
PITTSTON
2nd floor. 1 bed-
room, private
entrance, newly
painted, w/w car-
peting, washer/
dryer hookup, off
street parking.
Water & sewer
included. No Pets
No Smoking!
$425 + security.
570-883-9384
WEST PITTSTON
Spacious, updated 1
bedroom apartment,
2nd floor. Recently
renovated. Sewer &
appliances included.
Off street parking.
Security. No pets.
$475 + utilities.
570-586-0417
Sell your own home!
Place an ad HERE
570-829-7130
WILKES-BARRE
Mayflower
Crossing
Apartments
570.822.3968
2, 3 & 4
Bedrooms
- Light & bright
open floor plans
- All major
appliances included
- Pets welcome*
- Close to everything
- 24 hour emergency
maintenance
- Short term
leases available
Call TODAY For
AVAILABILITY!!
www.mayflower
crossing.com
Certain Restrictions
Apply*
944 Commercial
Properties
Center City WB
FREE HIGH SPEED FREE HIGH SPEED
INTERNET! INTERNET!
Why pay extra for
internet? Our new
leases include a
FREE FREE high speed
connection!
Affordable mod-
ern office space
at the Luzerne
Bank Building on
Public Square.
Rents include
internet, heat,
central air, utili-
ties, trash
removal, and
nightly cleaning -
all without a
sneaky CAM
charge. Parking
available at the
intermodal garage
via our covered
bridge. 300SF to
5000SF available.
We can remodel
to suit. Brokers
protected. Call
Jeff Pyros at
570-822-8577
FORTY FORT
Fully built-out &
furnished Doctors
Office. Approxi-
mately 2,000
square feet.
Available in April.
Contact Colleen
570-283-0524
PITTSTON
COOPERS CO-OP
Lease Space
Available, Light
manufacturing,
warehouse,
office, includes
all utilities with
free parking.
I will save
you money!
944 Commercial
Properties
315 PLAZA
1750 sf former
Physician Office.
OFFICE/RETAIL
570-829-1206
947 Garages
NANTICOKE
Available heated
storage space.
Great for boat or
car storage. $65 /
month. Call
570-650-3358
950 Half Doubles
DURYEA
109 Chittenden St.
Two - 2 bedroom, 1
bath totally remod-
eled homes. Off
street parking,
$450 per unit
plus security.
Utilities by tenant.
Call Brian
570-299-0298
OLD FORGE
22 Connell St
2 bedroom, 1 bath.
New rugs, fridge
stove dishwasher.
Very large fenced
yard with utility
shed. $650/mo +
security Utilities
by tenant
Call Brian
570-299-0298
PLAINS
NEW LUXURY
DUPLEX
This beautiful, com-
pletely renovated 2
bedroom luxury
apartment could be
yours! All new high
end amenities
include: hardwood
floors, gorgeous
maple kitchen cabi-
nets with granite
countertops & stain-
less steel appli-
ances. Spacious
great room with gas
fireplace. Stacked
washer/dryer. All
new tile bath. Large
screened-in porch.
Many large, conven-
ient closets. Central
Air. New gas heat-
ing system. Huge
attic for storage.
Must See!
$850 + utilities,
lease & security.
NO PETS. Call for
appointment.
570-793-6294
PLYMOUTH
3 bedroom, 1 bath.
Located on
Academy St.
New paint, carpet &
windows. $700 +
utilities & security.
Small pet OK with
extra security. Off
street parking .
Call 570-760-6410
WEST PITTSTON
1/2 double, 7 rooms
& bath, hardwood
floors, natural wood
work, garage. Great
neighborhood. Non
smokers, No pets.
Call 570-655-2195
Looking for the right deal
on an automobile?
Turn to classified.
Its a showroom in print!
Classifieds got
the directions!
953Houses for Rent
BACK MOUNTAIN
JACKSON TWP.
3 bedroom home
on Hillside Road.
$695/mo + utilities.
Lake Lehman
School District.
No pets.
Call American
Asphalt Paving Co.,
at 570-696-1181,
ext. 243 between
7:00AM and 3PM
Monday -Friday
HARVEYS LAKE
3 bedrooms, 2 full
baths, large living
room, dining room
family room,
kitchen with appli-
ances, washer /
dryer hookup.
New w/w carpet &
freshly painted.
Large yard &
screened porch.
Water, sewer,
garbage & snow
plowing included.
No pets. Non
smoking. Security
deposit, refer-
ences & credit
check required.
$1,100/per month
+ utilities.
570-709-6678
PITTSTON
3 bedrooms, 2 bath-
rooms, gas heat,
stove, washer/dryer
hookup, off-street
parking, no pets
fenced yard. $825/
month, plus utilities
& security.
Call 570-430-7901
953Houses for Rent
SWOYERSVILLE
Completely remod-
eled Large 2 story, 3
bedrooms, 2 baths,
single family home
including refrigera-
tor, stove, dish-
washer & disposal.
Gas heat, nice yard,
good neighbor-
hood,. Off street
parking. Shed. No
pets. $995 / month.
570-479-6722
WEST PITTSTON
617 LUZERNE AVENUE
2 bedrooms, com-
pletely renovated,
1.5 baths washer/
dryer hookup, off-
street parking, no
pets, $600/month,
plus utilities, &
security deposit.
Call 570-655-9543
959 Mobile Homes
MOBILE HOME LOTS
For rent in the quiet
country setting of
Hunlock Creek.
$290/month. Water,
sewer & trash
included. Call Bud
570-477-2845
965 Roommate
Wanted
SEEKING PROFES-
SIONAL FEMALE TO
LIVE WITH SAME.
Private bedroom,
share bathroom and
kitchen. Quiet
neighborhood. $400
a month.No pets or
kids. References
required. Call
570-362-2572.
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
971 Vacation &
Resort Properties
HARVEYS LAKE
BOAT SLIPS for
rent at Pole 155.
Call 570-639-5041
HARVEYS LAKE
LAKEFRONT fully
furnished. Wifi,
cable. Weekly,
monthly. Season
2012 starting June
570-639-5041
1000
SERVICE
DIRECTORY
1024 Building &
Remodeling
1st. Quality
Construction Co.
Roofing, siding,
gutters, insulation,
decks, additions,
windows, doors,
masonry &
concrete.
Insured & Bonded.
Senior Citizens Discount!
State Lic. # PA057320
570-299-7241
570-606-8438
1024 Building &
Remodeling
All types of residen-
tial remodeling.
Kitchens & baths.
Specializing in Win-
dows & Vinyl Siding.
Solar light tunnels.
30 years experi-
ence. BBB. PA025042
Licensed & Insured
Free Estimates
570-287-1982
1141 Heating &
Cooling
HEATING, A/C &
REFRIGERATION REPAIR
Services. Commer-
cial / Residential.
Licensed & Insured.
24-7 Free Estimates.
Call 646-201-1765
mycohvac.com
Looking for that
special place
called home?
Classified will address
Your needs.
Open the door
with classified!
1156 Insurance
NEPA LONG TERM
CARE AGENCY
Long Term Care
Insurance
products/life insur-
ance/estate plan-
ning. Reputable
Companies.
570-580-0797
FREE CONSULT
www
nepalong
termcare.com
1213 Paving &
Excavating
EDWARDS ALL COUNTY
PAVING & SEAL COATING
Modified stone,
laid & compacted.
Hot tar and chips,
dust and erosion
control. Licensed
and
Insured.
Call Today
For Your
Free Estimate
570-474-6329
Lic.# PA021520
1297 Tree Care
ZOMERFELD TREE
SERVICE, INC.
Tree removal,
trimming, stump
grinding. Demolition
Hauling &
excavating.
570-574-5018
LINEUP
ASUCCESSFULSALE
INCLASSIFIED!
Doyouneedmorespace?
A yard or garage sale
in classified
is the best way
tocleanout your closets!
Youre in bussiness
with classified!
Motorcycle for sale?
Let them see it here
in the Classifieds!
570-829-7130
Find homes for
your kittens!
Place an ad here!
570-829-7130
746 Garage Sales/
Estate Sales/
Flea Markets
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 11
906 Homes for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
524 Engineering
563 R&D/Science
906 Homes for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
524 Engineering
563 R&D/Science
906 Homes for Sale
542 Logistics/
Transportation
524 Engineering
563 R&D/Science
906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale 906 Homes for Sale
Unique 2BR Ranch with HW throughout. Amenities
include: 24.9x34 recreation room, surround sounds, 24" above
ground heated pool, Trex deck, detached fully equipped building
can be additional 2 car garage or workshop. 12-354
MARIE 881-0103
315 to Main St, Avoca, L on McAlpine, cross over Foote
Ave, L into Blueberry Hills, L on Cranberry Terrace, house on L.
Terrific 4-5BR 6000SF home on 1.68acres; LR & DR;
eat-in cherry Kit w/all appls; 1st flr FR w/FP; MBR Ste; 1st flr
office; A/C; Rec rm; Pool; 3 garages. 11-3196
RAE 714-9234
Rt 315 to Laflin Road, R on Fordham, home on R.
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP. No upgrades
needed. Includes HW, tile baths, granite & stainless in kitchen.
All units have open floor plans. 11-1697
MARCIE 714-9267
Rte. 315 to Oak St. Oak St. to Pittston by-pass. L on by-
pass to end. L on Main. Insignia Courtyards is on the R.
Traditional meets modern! 4BR authentic
Tudor w/every amenity overlooking gorgeous private
grounds w/in-ground pool, mature trees & gardens. A
must see!
MARCIE 714-9267
11-3957
Complete remodel. Everthing new in this cute
Ranch. Modern kitchen w/granite counters, new roof,
siding, windows, electric & plumbing.
MARCIE 714-9267
12-323
Spacious Ranch w/5BRs & great private pool
area for summer relaxation.
AMIE 715-9333
11-1213
End-unit Townhome with finished lower level,
fresh paint, brand new carpet, fenced yard, security
system & home warranty!
LISA 715-9335
11-3723
WILDFLOWER VILLAGE - Treat yourself to
Townhouse living in this 3BR, 1.5 bath middle unit w/
finished lower level, C/A & fenced rear patio area.
KIM 585-0600
11-4491
Beautiful new 2story w/all the extras in
a wonderful community! Large lot & many great features.
Come & see!
LISA 715-9335
10-2209
Beautiful 2 story in West Pittston.
3BRs, 1.5 baths, office, spectacular kitchen! Awesome
huge garage. Not a drive-by. Must see!
CORINE 715-9331
11-3900
Perfect for Contractor/Handyman torn
down to studs. New 200amp service cleaned & ready for
you to finish or flip.
LESLIE 696-0841
12-396
3BR move-in condition Ranch. Sunken LR w/
HW floor, DR w/hardwood, eat-in oak kitchen w/Corian
countertops, 2 baths, 2 car garage.
MATT 714-9229
11-969
Need a 5 car gar? Beautiful 3BR, 2 bath home
w/gar in great neighborhood. 5 minutes to shopping, PA
Turnpike & 81. C/A on 1st flr, new electrical service,
plumbing, maybe HW under carpet.
SHIRLEY 714-9272
11-3597
Pristine gem! Totally renovated from studs up.
2BR, 1.5 bath, HW floors, 2 car garage, private patio, new
eat-in kitchen. Bonus room on 3rd floor!
LESLIE 696-0841
12-401
Lovely 3BR home with large kitchen in a nice
neighborhood. 1st floor laundry & bonus room on 2nd
floor!
MARY M. 714-9274
11-3825
3BR, 2 bath home w/large modern kitchen,
laundry room off kitchen, split heat-A/C unit, alley in rear
w/possibile OSP. Partially fenced yard.
ROSEMARIE 89,900
11-3933
Priced to sell 1/2 Double - 4BRs, 1 bath,
partial new roof, finished attic, recent enclosed porch.
Great view!
SUSAN K. 696-0872
11-3852
3BR, 1.5 bath 1/2 double needs some work.
Priced to sell "as-is". 2 porches, house is fully carpeted.
SUSAN K. 696-0872
11-4075
Well maintained double block-great location,
gas heat, large room sizes, 2 story, detached 1 car garage.
Make an appt today! 11-4165
DEBORAH K. 696-0886
Live on one side while the other helps pay the
mortgage! Remodeled double with many upgrades. Must see!
11-862
TINA 714-9277
Nice double block located at end of a quiet street.
Low taxes! Live-in one side & rent the other. 08-3258
JILL 696-0875
2nd floor move-in ready 1st floor needs
renovating. All expenses can be covered with only one unit
rented. 11-4499
TRACY Z. 696-0723
Large double with 3BRs, 1 bath on each side.
Needs work. "As-is" conditon. 11-4541
SHARON 970-1106
Prime location on former Convention Hall. Zoned
Highway Business. Wonderful opportunity for Professional
Offices, Bank or other development possibilities. Parking for
100+ cars. Great visibility. 11-3654
MARGY 696-0891
Variety of uses are applicable for this 15,000SF
building in this highly traveled location. Renovated within the
last 5 years it presents itself as a user ready facility. Situated
on 4.6acres. Ample parking is available! Priced to sell! 10-
1110
JUDY 714-9230
EVERY
THURSDAY
IN
MARCH
from Noon-4pm
at the
Tunkhannock
Public Library
Interested Applicants can Apply Online at www.XLCServices.com.
Interviews scheduled Monday thru Friday. Call 800-472-1013 or
walk-ins welcome at Job Fairs.
Hiring Experienced Forklift Operators $12.25 hourly.
***STRAIGHT DAY SHIFT OR NIGHT SHIFT
(12 hour shifts ave. 42 hours per week)
***75 cent night shift pay differential offered.
***Pay increase based on skill development.
Take charge...LEARNAND EARN!
XLC Services, LLC (Logistics) is seeking experienced
Forklift Operators - MUST HAVE 1 YEAR FULL
TIME EXPERIENCE - with great employment
history to work at their Mehoopany, PA location.
The following skills are necessary for
these positions.
High School Diploma/GED
Computer Skills
Valid Drivers License
Criminal Background Check
Pass Pre-Employment Drug Screen & Physical
All full-time positions come with the following benets:
medical, 8 paid holidays, 401k after 1 year, and paid
vacation. Pay increases based on skill development.
Jr. Industrial Engineer Trainee
Industry-leading manufacturer is accepting resumes for a Jr. Industrial Engi-
neer Trainee. This position is responsible for the collecting of incentive
(piece rate) data for production employees. Data collected includes, units pro-
duced, downtime, etc. Correct data is entered into a computer system and
calculated for submission to payroll.
The successful candidate is mathematically inclined; has the ability to multi-
task; work in a team environment; is highly organized; has excellent commu-
nication skills, data entry skills and is proficient in Microsoft Word, Excel,
and Outlook.
We offer competitive wages and benefits.
Send resume or apply in person between 9am-4:30pm Monday-Friday to:
jobs@goldentech.com
401 Bridge Street
Old Forge, PA 18518
An Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action/Drug Free Workplace Employer
Local manufacturer seeks a Technician for their Research and Development
Department. This position is responsible to assist in the implementation of
new product designs for the production floor. The candidate will also assist
in improving current product designs.
The successful candidate needs to lift 50 lbs alone; must be able to use hand
and power tools; is mechanically inclined and creative. Prior experience in
production and AutoCAD is helpful.
We offer a competitive salary and benefits. Send resume and salary history
to:
c/o The Times Leader
Box 3010
15 N. Main St., Wilkes-Barre, PA 18711-0250
Research and Development Technician
PAGE 12 SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH
412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale 412 Autos for Sale
The Dispatch
LOCAL PROS
To Place Your Ad
Call 1-800-273-7130
TTTTTTTTTTToooooooooooo PPPPPPPPPPPPlllllllllaaaaaaaaaaacccccccccceeeeeeeeeee YYYYYYYYYYYoooooooooooouuuuuuuuuurrrrrrrrrrr AAAAAAAAAAAddddddddddd
CCCCCCCCCCCCaaaaaaaaaallllllllllllllll 1111111111--------88888888888000000000000000000000000-------2222222222227777777777333333333333--------77777777771111111111333333333333000000000000
CONSTRUCTION
CHRIS LATONA
General Contractor
Ceramic Tile Work - Kitchens
- Bathrooms - Garages
- Replacement Windows
- New Homes - Additions - Doors -
Complete Remodeling
FREE Estimates - Insured
457-8145 or 655-0777
Quality Works at Aordable Prices
PA008322
Complete Home
Remodeling, Kitchens,
Baths, Drywall, Windows,
Siding & Roofs.
570-457-0087
PA# HIC EA 18685
JOHN
PREGMON
CONSTRUCTION
DUMPSTER
NEED A
DUMPSTER?
CALL 570-335-4755
MOVING
J. CAWLEY MOVING, LLC
JASON CAWLEY, PITTSTON
Local & long distance moves.
Residential, Offices & Institutional moves.
(570) 299-7852 jcawleymoving@yahoo.com
ROOFING
HIC#
PA-005521
655-6710
SMITH & MILLER
ROOFING, INC.
Flat Roofs Shingles Siding Replacement Windows
Free Estimates - Licensed & Insured
ROBERT SMITH, WEST PITTSTON
WORKMANSHIP GUARANTEED
member
Northeastern
& Central PA
PREFERRED CONTRACTOR
SINCE 1976
KITCHEN & BATHROOM CONTRACTOR
COUNTER TOPS
P
l
u
s
FULL SERVICE
570.693.4350
570.371.9917
Tile/Hardwood Floors
Kitchen Cabinets
Interior Woodwork
Closet Systems
Countertop
Replacements
Storage Unit
Custom Built In
PA CONTRACTOR
055641
KITCHEN AND BATHROOM
CONTRACTOR
For All Your Interior Home
Improvement Needs
HEATING
ATTENTION
FLOOD VICTIMS
Call Northeast Plumbing, Heating
& Air Conditioning
For all your needs. Licensed / Insured
570-499-3225
NORTHEAST
WINDOW, INC.
Locally Owned & Operated Since 1987
Exterior Home Improvements By
FREE ESTIMATES
570.654.4220
www.northeastwindow.com
Windows
Siding
Enclosures
Fiberglass Doors
Storm Doors
Vinyl Railings
Roong
And More
PA018418
HOME IMPROVEMENT
ELECTRICAL
Got Power?
C. Burti Electric Co.
Keeping the
Traditions of Great
Electricians.
RESIDENTIAL - COMMERCIAL
570-457-0431
FULLY INSURED MASTER ELECTRICIAN
Family Owned &
Operated For 35 Years
HEALTH/BEAUTY
HAIRAT HOME
If you are someone who is not able to
get to a Salon to have your hair cut,
colored, or permed. Call 570-655-8639
Shirley Berti Hair Designs
TAX SERVICES
TRAVEL
CALL: 570-655-4247
BROADWAY SHOW
BUSTRIPS
JERSEY BOYS
Wednesday, April 11,
$150 (Front Mezz)
WICKED
Wednesday, May 2,
$169 (Orchestra)
INCOME TAX
PREPARATION
PICK UP SERVICES AVAILABLE
Bruce Moluski 570-457-1840
Tuesday, March 6 & 7
Complementary room, transportation
& baggage handling. Food, Beverages
& Snacks served on bus.
$25 per person.
Al Lispi: 570-814-3137
or 570-823-9578
Overnight Junket to
Atlantic Citys
Taj Mahal!
Collect
Cash.
Not
Dust.
Sell it in The
Times Leader
Classied
section.
Call 829-7130
to place an ad.
ONLYONE LEADER. ONL NNL L NNL NNNLYONE NNNNNNNNNNN LEA LLE LE LE LE LE LE LE LLE LEEEE DER.
timesleader.com
SUNDAY DISPATCH SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 PAGE 13
C M Y K
PAGE 14B SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 2012 SUNDAY DISPATCH