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Celebrating 176 Years of Texas Freedom

Sports Region History Lady Cards, Bobkittens head to state tourney Section C Judge: ‘no wrongdoing’
Sports
Region
History
Lady Cards, Bobkittens
head to state tourney
Section C
Judge: ‘no wrongdoing’ by
DA in 2007 drowning case
Page B1
Signers of Texas declaration
risked certain death
Page A11

The Gonzales

Cannon

risked certain death Page A11 T he G onzales Cannon Reporting on Gonzales and Surrounding Counties

Reporting on Gonzales and Surrounding Counties with Honesty, Integrity and Fairness

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• Luling • Flatonia • • Hallettsville •

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Flatonia • • Hallettsville • • Cuero and More • Vol. 3- Issue 23 Gonzales’ only
Vol. 3- Issue 23 Gonzales’ only locally-owned newspaper • w w w.gonzalescannon.com Thursday, March 1,
Vol. 3-
Issue 23
Gonzales’ only locally-owned newspaper • w w w.gonzalescannon.com
Thursday, March 1, 2012
• w w w.gonzalescannon.com Thursday, March 1, 2012 Man faces charge for sex assault of children

Man faces charge for sex assault of children

By CEDRIC IGLEHART

State -Bound!

Council gives green light to truck park

region@gonzalescannon.com

By DAVE MUNDY

A man is in custody at the

Gonzales County Jail after

he was arrested Tuesday in

regards to a report of sexual

abuse

child.

g

u

e

a

in regards to a report of sexual abuse child. g u e a Alberto M. Perez

Alberto M. Perez

of

A l b e r t o

l

M i

Perez, 30 of

G onza les,

was arrested

by the Gon-

zales Police

Department after two girls

- ages 10 and 13 - made an

outcry of being sexually abused Tuesday afternoon. Authorities responded to the residence on College Street and took Perez into custody about 5:30 p.m., charging him with one count of sexual assault and

one count of indecency with

a child by sexual contact.

When he arrived at the jail,

he was also charged with

one count of possession of

a prohibitive substance in a correctional facility. Perez was arraigned Tues- day morning on those three charges and his bond was

set at $160,000. As of press

time, he is in custody. Gonzales Police Capt. Al-

ASSAULT, Page A3

Energy Watch

Wednesday’s Prices

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Inside This Week:

Agribusiness

Arts/Entertainment

Oil &

Classifieds B4 Comics D4

Crime Beat Faith & Family In Our View In Your View

Obituaries B7

Puzzle Page

Regional

A2

B3

A4

A5

Gas A8

A7

D1

D3

B1

Sports C1

Page Regional A2 B3 A4 A5 Gas A8 A7 D1 D3 B1 Sports C1 “Come and

“Come and Hear It!” Tune in to radio station KCTI 1450 AM at 8 a.m. Fri- day and 8 a.m. Tuesday for weekly updates from Gon- zales Cannon news editor Cedric Iglehart and General manager Dave Mundy with KCTI personality Egon Bar- thels.

manager Dave Mundy with KCTI personality Egon Bar- thels. manager@gonzalescannon.com Gonzales City Council on Tuesday

manager@gonzalescannon.com

Gonzales City Council on Tuesday gave thumbs-up to a rezoning request which will enable a local property owner to build a parking lot for tractor-trailer rigs, and the Council also heard the city government is working actively to provide better communcation between the city and its constituency. Council approved a reso- lution re-zoning a property adjacent to the Tuch Tire Co. store from C-2 (Com- mercial) to M-1 (Industri- al) to enable owner Michael Tuch to pave the area for big-rig parking. The city has

Tuch to pave the area for big-rig parking. The city has Headed for Austin The Moulton

Headed for Austin

The Moulton Bobkittens earned a trip to the state tournament and will play Neches at 7 p.m. Friday at the University of Texas Frank

Erwin Center in the Class 1A Division II semifinal. Also in a state tournament are the St. Paul Lady Cardinals, who are set to play in the TAPPS Division IV tourney Friday against Sherman Texoma Christian at 6 p.m. in Mansfield. For full coverage of area basketball playoff action, see Section C. (Photo by Mark Lube)

seen greatly increased truck traffic during the past two years as development of the Eagle Ford Shale oil fields has progressed, and parked trucks have become an is- sue in the city, especially in the area near the county courthouse annex on Sarah DeWitt Dr. near the Tuch Tire facility. “This is something that is certainly needed,” noted Councilman Bobby Logan. During Tuesday’s meet- ing, Council received com- ments from a couple of citizens about the openness with which some city com- mittees conduct their meet- ings and how the city’s web- CITY, Page A3

Counties seek fuel thief

Authorities in two counties are asking for the public’s help in identifying a man seen by security cameras steal- ing diesel fuel from county facilities. Fayette County Sheriff Keith Korenek and Gonzales Co. Precinct 3 Constable Raleigh Measom are asking for as- sistance from the public in identifying the individual in the photo at right. Additional photos are available on our website at gonzalescannon.com. Investigators advise that the subject could be from Fay- ette, Bastrop, Gonzales, Caldwell, or Travis County This individual has been involved in several thefts in Fayette and Gonzales counties. The Sheriff’s Office is wanting to question this individual in reference to a felo- ny case. If anyone can identify this individual you can con- tact the Fayette County Sheriff’s Office at (979) 968-5856 and ask for Investigator Chris McClurg or Lt. David Beyer, or contact Measom at at 830-857-3380 or 830-788-7166. If anyone is able to identify this subject Fayette County Crime Stoppers is willing to pay up to $2,500.

or 830-788-7166. If anyone is able to identify this subject Fayette County Crime Stoppers is willing

Is stardom part of her Destiny?

Local woman earns Vegas trip for ‘America’s Got Talent’

By CEDRIC IGLEHART

newseditor@gonzalescannon.com

The talents of a local woman are taking her to places where most peo- ple can only dream about being. Destiny Tealer, 23 of Gonzales, is a contestant on the popular TV show “America’s Got Talent,” a televised competition pitting hopefuls against each other for a shot a fame and for- tune. Tealer was a reluctant entrant into the contest since it was her cousin, Tabitha Eldridge, that enrolled her into the competition without her knowledge. “She was the one who actually en- tered me in it,” Tealer said. “I would

have never done it if she hadn’t gone behind my back because I get stage fright, so I usually don’t like to sing in front of a lot of people.” The two cousins traveled to Austin on Jan. 14 for the initial audition,where they waited for sev- eral hours with other hopefuls. “We were there from 7:30 in the morning to 3 p.m.,” recalled Tealer. “I waited in line for a long time before I got to audition, but it was worth it. It was very exciting.” Tealer entered the audition room along with three other contestants and they took turns performing be- fore a single judge. Tealer performed a rendition of “Blessed” by Rachel DESTINY, Page A3

a rendition of “Blessed” by Rachel DESTINY, Page A3 Destiny Tealer Weather Watch Thursday’s Forecast:

Destiny Tealer

Weather Watch Thursday’s Forecast: Partly Cloudy. High-79, Low-65. 20% chance of rain. Winds from the

Weather Watch

Thursday’s Forecast: Partly Cloudy. High-79, Low-65. 20% chance of rain. Winds from the south at 12 mph, 82% relative humidity. UV index: 5 (moderate)

Friday:

Saturday:

Sunday:

Monday:

Tuesday:

Wednesday:

High-79, Low-52

High-66, Low-42

High-69, Low-44

High-70, Low-55

High-71, Low-61,

High-74, Low-58

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Page A2

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

For The Record

Today in Texas History March 2, 1836 On this day in 1836, Texas became a

Today in

Texas

History

March 2, 1836 On this day in 1836, Texas became a republic. On March 1 delegates from the seventeen Mexican mu-

nicipalities of Texas and the settlement of Pecan Point met at Washington-on-the-Brazos to consider inde- pendence from Mexico. George C. Childress presented

a resolution calling for independence, and the chair-

man of the convention appointed Childress to head

a committee of five to draft a declaration of indepen-

dence. In the early morning hours of March 2, the con- vention voted unanimously to accept the resolution. After fifty-eight members signed the document, Texas became the Republic of Texas.

Thought for the Day

“These, and other grievances, were pa- tiently borne by the people of Texas, untill they reached that point at which forbearance ceases to be a virtue. We then took up arms in defence of the na- tional constitution. We appealed to our Mexi- can brethren for assis- tance. Our appeal has been made in vain.”

—From the Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836

—From the Texas Declaration of Independence, 1836 Gonzales Co. Sheriff’s Office Report Gonzales County

Gonzales Co. Sheriff’s Office Report

Gonzales County Sheriff’s Of- fice Sheriff’s Report for Feb. 19-25:

Dodds, Ladonna Nacole, 02/1986, Seguin. Local Warrant –

Gonzales. Violate Bond/Protec- tive Order with 2+ previous Con-

 

02/19/12

Criminal Mischief >$500 <$1,500.

vicitons. Requires $7,500 Bond.

West, Anna Louise, 08/1978, Cuero. Aggravated Assault with

Local Warrant – Resist Arrest Search or Transport. Requires

Transferred to another Facility. Total Arrest, Court Commit-

a

Deadly Weapon. Released on

$5,000 Bond. Remains in Custody.

ments, other agency arrest and

$3,000 Bond.

02/24/12

processing’s:

 

02/20/12

Ramirez, Adam, 03/1972,

GCSO

07

Chavez, Pedro, 12/1953, Taft.

Waelder. Lavaca County War-

DPS

04

Commitment/Sentence – Driving

rant – Theft by Check. Released

GPD

06

while Intoxicated 3rd or More. Re-

on $1,000 Bond. Local Warrant –

WPD

02

leased – Time Served.

Theft of Property >$20 <$500 by

NPD

03

 

02/22/12

Check. Released on $500 Bond.

Constable

00

Jones, Frederick O’Neal,

Palacios, Librado Jr., 01/1989,

DWCSO

00

12/1982, Victoria. Victoria County

Gonzales. Commitment/Sen-

DEA

00

Warrant – Unauthorized Use of

tence – Burglary of a Building.

TPW

00

Vehicle. Transferred to Victoria

Released – Weekender – Work

GCAI

00

County.

Release.

Total

22

 

02/23/12

Ivey, Darrell Leon, 10/1968,

DeWitt Co. Sheriff’s Office Report

DeWitt County Sheriff’s Office Report from Feb. 17-23 February 17 Arrested Roland Diaz, 35, of Cu- ero. Criminal Nonsupport Court Or- dered Payment of $3,500.00. DeWitt County SO Arrested Cassondea Dawn Scott,

33, of Cuero. Failure to Appear/Theft

by Check Bond of $1,000.00. DeWitt

County SO. Arrested Maxie Tumlinson Jr, 48, of Yorktown, Capias Pro Fine/Public Intoxication. Fine of $364.00 York- town PD. Arrested George Abe Brown II, 26, of Cuero, No Driver License Fine of $319.80: 30 days to pay, Failure to Appear Fine of 509.60: 30 days to pay. Cuero PD. Arrested Tommy Goode, 52, of

Austin. Capias Pro Fine/Public Intoxi- cation fine of $129.00. Yorktown PD. Arrested Michael Lee Jasso, 41, of Cuero, Failure to Appear/Court Fine of $362.00: 30 Days to pay, Cuero PD. Arrested Dina Hoffman, 40, of Cuero. Failure to Appear/Court Fine of $392.00: 30 days to pay, Cuero PD. February 18 Arrested William Mark Dean, 52, of Yoakum, Capias Pro Fine/Speed-

ing Fine of $291.00, Capias Pro Fine/

Speeding fine of $231.00, Capias Pro Fine/Failure to Appear Fine of $442.00. DPS February 19 Arrested a subject on an out- standing warrant on FM 951 Arrested James Ray Gonzales, 51, of Yorktown, Possession Marijuana < 2oz Bond of $1,200.00, Driving While License Invaild W/ Previous Conviction Bond of $1,200.00. York- town PD. Arrested Santana Fonseca, 25, of Yorktown. Capias Pro Fine/Public

Intoxication fine of $415.00, Public Intoxation/ 30 Days to Pay. Yorktown PD. Arrested Darwin Jamal Powell, 32, of San Antonio. Endangering A Child bond of $15,000.00, Endan- gering A Child bond of $15,000.00, Endangering A Child bond of $15,000.00, Evading Arrest Deten-

tion W/ Vehicle bond of $12,000.00, Reckless Driving bond of $1,000.00, Disregard Red Light/ 30 Days to Pay, Disregard Red Light/ 30 Days to Pay. DeWitt County SO Arrested Jason Lee Carter Sr, 29, of Cuero, Burglary of Building bond of $7,500.00. Cuero PD. Arrested Wendy Migl, 26, of Yoa- kum, VP/Poss CS PG 1 1G<4G (Victo- ria Co.), Bond of $30,000.00, DeWitt County SO February 20 Arrested Daniel Morales-Gutier- rez,26, of Temple, Illegal Entry, No Bond, Cuero PD Arrested Noe Camacho-Alonso,

42, of Temple, Illegal Entry, No Bond, Cuero PD Arrested Timothy Hays, 50, of Victoria, Manufacture Delivery of Controlled Substance PG 1 > 1G <

4 G, Bond of $50,000, Manufacture

Delivery of Controlled Substance PG

1 >= 4 G < 200 G, Bond of $50,000, Yorktown PD

February 21 Arrested Roger Gonzales, 40, of Cuero, Public Intoxication, Fine of $364 (30 Days to Pay), Cuero PD Arrested Dina Molina, 37, of Yoakum, Theft of Property by Check, Bond of $1,000, Class C / Speeding 11-15 Above Limit, Fine of $216 (30 Days to Pay), Class C/ Failure to Ap- pear on Speeding, Fine of $367 (30 Days to Pay), DeWitt County SO

February 22 Arrested Winkler Thomas Allen, 49, of Austin, Motion To Revoke - Theft (Nueces Co.), No Bond. DeWitt County SO February 23 Arrested Kyle Henry, 30, of Cuero, Disorderly Conduct (Fighting), 30 Days To Pay. Yorktown PD Arrested Marcus Olivarez, 39, of Smiley, Disorderly Conduct (Fight- ing), 30 Days To Pay. Yorktown PD Arrested Solis Matthew Santiago, 26, of Cuero, No License Plate/ 30 Days To Pay, Failure To Appear/30 days To Pay, Capias Pro Fine/No Li- ability Ins.- 1st Offense Fine of $591.50, Capias Pro Fine/Disregard Stop Sign Fine of $273.00. DeWitt County SO. Arrested Celinda Ramirez, 43, of Smiley, Disorderly Conduct (Fight- ing), 30 Days To Pay. Yorktown PD, Criminal Mischief > = $500.00 < $1,500.00, Bond Of $1,200.00, Resist- ing Arrest, Bond of $1,200.00. DeWitt County SO. Arrested Christy Cessor, 30, of Cuero, Violation Of Probation - Bur- glary of Habitation, Bond Of $20,000.00.

DeWitt County SO. Arrested Casey Rene Jackson,

34, of Cuero, Capias Pro Fine/ Driv- ing While License Invalid Fine of $458.20, Capias Pro Fine No Liabil- ity Ins.- 1st Offense Fine of $657.80, Capias Pro Fine/ Child 5 & Over Ride Unsecured Fine of $406.90, Theft Of Property > = $20.00 < $500.00, Bond Of $500.00. DeWitt County SO. Arrested Jose Meneses Vega, 60, of Dennison, Revocation of Proba- tion/Driving While Intoxicated, No Bond, DeWitt County SO

Yoakum Police Report

Yoakum Police Department Weekly Incident Report for Feb. 20- Feb. 26:

02/20/12

Case #12-062, Att. Burglary- Residence, 401 S. South; Disposi- tion, Investigation.

02/22/12

Case #172158, Traffic Arrest, 100 Burt; Disposition, Cleared by Arrest. Case #172156, Lopez, Manaen, 35, Yoakum, 100 Burt; Offense, No Drivers License; Disposition,

Fine/$214/Rel.

02/23/12

Case #12-064, Forgery, 101 E. Gonzales; Disposition, Investiga- tion.

02/24/12

Case #172087, Thwarting, Jones, Kristie, 37, Yoakum, 900 Ir- vine; Offense, Thwarting; Dispo- sition, Fine/$579/YPD Custody. Case #172191, Warrant Ar- rest, Jones, Kristie, 37, Yoakum, 900 Irvine; Offense, CPF#10-490- Assault; Disposition, Fine/$533/ YPD Custody. Case #12-065, Assault-C, 100 Hutchinson; Disposition, Court Citation.

02/26/12

Case #172215, Illegal entry, Reyes-Riojas, Jose, 22, Yoakum, 805 Davis; Offense, Illegal Entry; Disposition, Rel. A.C.E, Corpus Christi.

Illegal Entry; Disposition, Rel. A.C.E, Corpus Christi. Relay For Life Donation The Gonzales Elks Ladies recently

Relay For Life Donation

The Gonzales Elks Ladies recently made a $4,000 donation to Relay For Life at Robert’s Deli in Gonzales. Pictured are (from left): Relay For Life sponsorship chair Jo Ann Low, Carolyn Barthels, Mary Lou Holub, Relay For Life event chair Arline Rinehart, Wilma Ducho, cancer survivor and 2012 Relay For Life honoree Barbara Blanchard, and Lisa Brown. The Gonzales Elks Ladies’ donation, which designates them as a Relay For Life Diamond level sponsor, put the total amount of sponsorship monies raised at over $40,000. (Photo by Cedric Iglehart)

Deputies catch would-be robber

On Sunday, Feb. 19, at

residence. The victim stated

about 12:35 a.m., Caldwell County deputies responded to an aggravated robbery in the 200 block of Witter Road, near Dale. Sheriff Daniel C. Law stated the deputy found the victim had been stabbed four times during an aggravated robbery. The victim stated he was alone in his bedroom when someone opened the front door and entered the resi- dence. When the victim con- fronted the intruder, he was attacked and stabbed twice

the attacker fled the scene in a gray Jeep Cherokee. The vic- tim went back inside the resi- dence and called 911. Shortly thereafter, he was treated by EMS and transported to Brackenridge Hospital in Austin. Lockhart Police Depart- ment units and a DPS Troop- er assisted Caldwell County Sheriff’s units in locating and identifying the driver of the suspect vehicle. David McClendon, 32 of San Marcos, was taken into custody by Sheriff’s deputies.

in the back and twice in the

A

number of pieces of jewel-

chest as he fought the at-

ry

were found in the suspect’s

tacker. The victim was able to es- cape from the attacker and flee out the back door of the

pocket and held as evidence. McClendon was taken to Seton Medical Center for in- juries from an unknown inci-

dent and then transported to the Caldwell County Sheriff’s Office and placed in jail. McClendon was charged with aggravated robbery, possession of a controlled substance, and evading ar- rest/detention with a vehicle. Bond was set at $600,000.

ar- rest/detention with a vehicle. Bond was set at $600,000. David McClendon Gonzales Municipal Court FTA

David McClendon

Gonzales Municipal Court FTA List

Gonzales Municipal Court No- tice for Feb. 22: Defendants who receive a citation(s) must appear on or before the date indicated on the citation(s). Their appear- ance must be in writing, in per- son or by an attorney, and any change of address must be given to the court. Defendants listed below have recently missed their scheduled court date and their failure to respond will result in a warrant(s) being issued for their arrest. An additional charge of violate promise to appear being added to their fine. In addition to the original charge, there will be a warrant fee for violate promise to appear. In addition, you may be denied the renewal of your driver license from the Department of Public Safety and collection of debt fees by attorneys at law. Justin Michael Fonseca Luis Carlos Garcia Robyn Garci Tyler B. Tucker Samuel Chopp Lannon D. Elkins John Broussard Ricardo Gonzales Alvarado Angel Isidro Hernandez Jaime Zamora Carmona Nelson Rafael Lagos Castro Elizabeth Castillo Rosas Phil Prado Maldonado Tray Dejuan Larkin Juan Gonzalez

Veronia Rodriguez Marsha Ann Hernandez Helen Agnes Ivey John Paul Casares Jessie Taylor Mikeshs Greta Kay Peterson Dennis Lee Garza Carlos Navarro Dusty Barta James Robert Mayes Ashley Nicole Smith Marcus W. Miller

Luis Alberto Hernandez Brittanie Bailey Victoria Furnace Marty Lee Vega Ernesto Izaguirre William Craig Wilson The above listed defendants

need to contact the court as soon as possible at 830-672-

2815. If you have any outstand-

ing fines your name may make the next list.

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Thursday, March 1, 2012

The Cannon

Page A3

South Texas Poison Center shares facts on household chemicals

Cannon News Services

newseditor@gonzalescannon.com

SAN ANTONIO — After a recent inci- dent in which children at a Gonzales day- care facility were mistakenly given diluted bleach to drink, the South Texas Poison Center wants to share the facts about the hazards of this and other household chem- icals. At least one child last Wednesday re- portedly drank a bleach solution that con-

sisted of a quarter cup of bleach per gallon

of water.

“It’s nowhere near the dose that would cause a serious adverse health effect,” said Miguel Fernández, M.D., a medical toxi- cologist and the director of the South Tex-

as Poison Center. “It’s the dose that makes the poison.” Reports of children swallowing bleach are among the most common calls to the poison center, Dr. Fernández said. But it’s rare that someone swallows enough house- hold bleach to need to go to the hospital or emergency room, and that’s especially true with a diluted bleach solution. “We nearly always recommend that those children stay under observation at home unless there is some other factor in- volved,” said Dr. Fernández, who is also an emergency room physician and professor of surgery with UT Medicine San Antonio, the clinical practice of the School of Medi- cine at The University of Texas Health Sci- ence Center at San Antonio.

Unless someone has ingested very large amounts of household bleach, which rarely occurs accidentally, the most likely adverse effects would be stomach upset and throat irritation, Dr. Fernández said. He made the distinction between household and industrial bleach; ingest- ing the latter can be far more serious. Smaller amounts of industrial bleach can cause nausea, vomiting, inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract and oral cavity, corrosion of tissues and gastrointestinal bleeding. Still, Dr. Fernández says, parents should not take chances. If they suspect a child has consumed household bleach, their first call should be to the South Texas Poi- son Center at 800-222-1222. The center is

available to the public 24 hours a day, 365 days a year, and service is free, confidential and bilingual in English and Spanish. Dr. Fernández cautions parents and childcare providers to store household chemicals securely, preferably in a high, locked cabinet or other place that is in- accessible to children. He made special mention of chemicals associated with cars, including antifreeze and windshield wiper fluid, which are far more hazardous than household bleach. Finally, he recommends against mixing chemicals and storing them in anything other than their original containers: “Kids will drink out of something because they think the container tells them what’s in- side.”

GEDC approves grant for warehouse project

By DAVE MUNDY

manager@gonzalescannon.com

The Gonzales Economic Development Corp. gave the go-ahead Monday to a new

business to locate in the city, and also authorized grants to help another local business get a facelift. The GEDC board of di- rectors gave its approval to

a grant application by Wise

Products Inc. Wise presi- dent Gary Beavers told the board he plans to locate a

12,000-square-foot ware- house in Gonzales as part of his company’s expanding casket-making business. The company is based in Honey Grove, north of the Dallas-Fort Worth Me- troplex, and has facilities already in Waco and Sweet- water. Honey Grove was found- ed, legend has it, by Davy

Crockett, who came through the area on his way to fight at The Alamo. Beavers said he is a big fan of Texas history,

“So Gonzales was just natu- rally fascinating to me.” The grant application will require the company to add two new full-time positions

a year for five years. The board also gave ap- proval to a $10,000 Small Business Incentive Grant to Tammy Hillman, owner of The China Basket. SBIG grants are typically used to remodel or renovate busi- nesses located in the old downtown area of Gonzales. The board also received a

CITY: Gonzales website undergoing full re-design

Continued from page A1

site needs an update. Roger Eberle said his wife had presented a proj- ect to the Beautification Committee at considerable personal expense, but had seen the committee reject the idea without providing any justification. Dennis Nesser said he would like to see more of the city’s vari- ous committees reporting to council and the public, and also pointed out that many documents on the city’s website are outdated. City Manager Allen Barnes said the city was already moving on both is- sues. “Beginning with the

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672-7100.

March 6 meeting, we will have at least one report from a committee at each council meeting, rotating them so you get at least two per year,” he said. “We are also in the process of com- pletely re-designing the city’s website, and we have some forms in the back of the room for the public’s suggestions.” Those forms are avail- able at City Hall, and the website redesign will be brought before the Coun- cil for final approval. In other business Tues- day, the Council held pub- lic hearings on the 2012-13 city budget and Gonzales

Economic Development Corp. budget. Council also welcomed new city finance direc- tor Pam Larison, and ap- proved authorization for her to be a signatory for the city’s TexPool assets; approved a resolution au- thorizing Barnes to enter into a contract with a le- gal firm representing six other cities to negotiate a rate increase with Texas Gas Services; and passed a resolution authorizing the re-zoning of several par- cels on the the east side of Seydler St. from R-1 (Resi- dential) to C-2 (Commer- cial).

DESTINY: Local woman advances

Continued from page A1

Lampa. All of the performers left the room without an in- kling of how they did and it wasn’t until Tuesday when Tealer received the call telling her she had indeed qualified for a second au- dition on March 23 in Las Vegas. “I couldn’t believe it,” she said. “But having that expe- rience did push me toward wanting to do it more.” The upcoming auditions will be among the ones that will air nationally when AGT returns this summer. Las Vegas Week has been an intermediary round be- tween the auditions and live shows that take place in a notable venue on the Las Vegas Strip. Names for this round in previous seasons have included “Las Vegas Callbacks” and “Vegas Ver- dicts”. The Las Vegas round generally consists of acts performing a second time for the judges, who then pick select acts to move on the live shows. An act elim- inated in Las Vegas Week is not completely excluded from the live show com- petition, as several seasons have featured contestants being brought back from

this round as “wild card” acts. Tealer plans to sing “I Hope You Dance” by Lee- ann Womack for the judges that will include Howie Mandel, Sharon Osborne and the iconic Howard Stern. If she passes through to the next round, then she will be on to Hollywood and on her way to the grand prize of a performing con- tract with a Las Vegas ca- sino and $1 million in cash. “I’ve thought about what it would be like to win,” Tealer admitted. “When I

make it my plans are to get a house and move my grand- mother (Emilia Zuniga) in because she’s my heart. She’s the one that raised me and I plan on being able to give her the world.” Tealer, who has been singing since she was six years old, wanted to extend

a special message to all of her backers. “I just want to thank all of my family and friends

for their support,” she said.

“I feel like I have all of Gon-

zales behind me on this all

of the way.”

“America’s Got Talent” will return for its seventh season this summer. No premiere has been set, but national auditions began on Feb. 3 in Charlotte.

ASSAULT: Man in custody

Continued from page A1

len Taylor said the two girls were taken to the hospi- tal for evaluation and later taken to Norma’s House (Gonzales County Regional

Child Advocacy Center) for interviewing. Although Perez gave a Gonzales address, officials believe that he may be illegal alien from Guatemala. The investigation is still ongoing.

grant application from Con- nie Dolezal of Shear Designs for future consideration. During the staff reports section of the meeting,

GEDC director Carolyn Gibson gave the board some welcome facts and figures. Figures from the Texas Comptroller’s office show that statewide, Texas has an unemployment rate of 7.4 percent -- but Gonzales County, as well as Lavaca County, have unemploy- ment rates considerably lower: just 4.9 percent. Gibson also reported the City of Gonzales had also seen a substantial increase over the last year in the amount of monies collect- ed by the city’s hotel/mo- tel tax. During Fiscal Year 2010, the city collected some $155,874, but during FY 2011, she said, the city collected $243,292 -- an in- crease of nearly $100,000. Gibson also reported that the Tourism Commit- tee is nearing completion of its smart-phone app project. “Videotaping is finished, and once they’re done you can take a picture of the QR (Quick Response) code

with your cell phone and it will come up with the video and commentary,” about the city’s various museums, historic houses and other destination sites. “Very, very few cities in Texas have anything like this, it will help attract visitors.” Board member Clint Hille noted the city was already receiving visitors as a result of having several structures

featured in a recent edition of “This Old House” maga- zine. “I heard the other day from a doctor from Shreve- port who said he was com- ing here after seeing that,” Hille noted. You can see the online edition of that magazine’s feature on Gonzales at:

ht t p : / / w w w. t h i s o l -

dhouse.com/toh/pho-

at: ht t p : / / w w w. t h i s o l

Horse rescued

Animal Care and Control responded to a possible dead horse at the HEB parking lot Feb. 22. Officer Larry Valis and a good Samaritan were able to get the horse breathing and on its feet. (Photo courtesy Gonzales PD)

Bob Burchard for MAYOR

It Is Time For A Change

Bob Burchard for MAYOR It Is Time For A Change I promise you: • Transparency •

I promise you:

• Transparency

• Accountability

• Responsibility

in our city government.

I Appreciate Your Vote and your Support.

General Information:

• Born in Gonzales at Holmes Hospital

• Graduate - Gonzales High School

• Graduate - University of Texas, Bachelor of Science in Civil Engineering

• Graduate - South Texas College of Law, Juris Doctor Degree

• Graduate - Southwestern Baptist Theological Seminary,

Master of Divinity Degree

• Registered Professional Land Surveyor

• Licensed Attorney At Law

• Owner and Manager - Burchard Abstract Corporation for 42 Years

• Member - First Baptist Church

• Chairman - City of Gonzales Beautification Committee

• Chairman - Gonzales County Historical Commission

• Member - Advisory Board, Gonzales Campus, Victoria Campus

• Member - Victoria College Foundation Board

• Member - Crystal Theatre Board

Call 830-672-2822, office or 830-672-6167, residence

Pol. Adv. paid for by Bob Burchard, 403 St. George St., Gonzales, TX 78629

Page A4

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

In Our View

Don’t fly off the handle over kids’ safety

Our erstwhile friend over at the Seguin Gazette, managing editor Chris Lykins, left a note on his Facebook page the other day after delivering his kid to Koen- necke Elementary school, and it riled up some folks. “I’m not sure why people sit in their cars and wait until their children are inside the school doors before moving an inch,” he wrote. “What do you think is go- ing to happen those six feet? Sur- prise velociraptor attack? Cleverly disguised pit trap? An invisible dreadlocked alien on a hunting expedition as part of Predator:

Koennecke?” What’s interesting wasn’t that a few folks chimed in who agreed with his sentiment. What’s inter- esting is that a whole lot of folks who vehemently disagreed with the outrageous idea that he might actually be making light of over- protective mommies chimed in. We’ve seen a number of other folks getting very vocally righ- teous on the subject of child

Dances with

Chihuahuas

Dave

Mundy

General

Manager

of child Dances with Chihuahuas Dave Mundy General Manager safety with a couple of recent sto-

safety with a couple of recent sto- ries here in Gonzales. It doesn’t matter to them that not a single child’s health was ever in any real danger — the point, to them, is that the remote possibility of danger even existed. Our society is already overrun with rules and regulations about child safety — and seemingly ev- ery time a child suffers an acci- dent, we fly off the handle in our haste to implement new rules and new regulations. The bleach-water incident at the Christian Kids Day Care center is a case in point. The water in ques- tion had about the same amount

of chlorine as your average swim- ming pool — and name me a kid who hasn’t swallowed pool water. There was no one “poisoned.” Witness the expert observation of Dr. Miguel Fernandez with the South Texas Poison Control Cen- ter: “It’s nowhere near the dose that would cause a serious adverse health effect.” The moment the accident was detected, the day-care center did the right thing: its first call was to the poison center, and upon being told that there was no danger, fol- lowed directions. They reported the incident to their regulatory agency and informed the affected parents. Likewise what was reported Monday at Gonzales Elementary, where some of the kids showing up for the free government break- fast were served egg biscuits, some of which showed evidence of mold on them. As with the day-care incident, the minute the mold was detected, school personnel took the proper

action to address the issue. Par- ents were notified, the affected food was removed, children were monitored. But we’re not talking about vast green forests of mold, just a spot. If you want green forests of the stuff, come by and look in my re- frigerator sometime. The point is that each incident was regrettable and shouldn’t have happened — but accidents hap- pen. That’s why they’re called “ac- cidents.” No one’s health was adversely affected. Measures were imme- diately implemented to prevent this from happening again — and some people lost their jobs. Kids are amazingly durable. I know there are some parents out there who just can’t see it, but that skinned knee is neither a sign of improper guidance nor cause for a lawsuit. As a thirsty 5-year-old one day years ago, I wandered into the kitchen in search of something wet. I found, to my surprise, a sink

full of nice cold water. I dipped in my cup and drank away. My mother, returning to the room, saw what I’d done and im- mediately forced me to chug milk while she called the doctor at the clinic at Aurora AFB, Colo., to find out if I was going to die. After being reassured that the mild-concentration bleach water I’d drunk wasn’t going to perma- nently harm me, she explained patiently to me why she was fran- tic — and I learned a lesson. We can mandate various forms of child-safety regulation, from requiring this kind of paperwork to requiring safety seats and oth- er equipment. In the end, though, all those rules and safety equip- ment can’t guarantee that a kid is “safe.” Kids are going to suffer their share of bumps and bruises, whether you’re holding their hands or not. You can’t keep them from stubbing their toes. The trick is to teach the lesson when they do it.

When our civil rights become civil wrongs

The state of Texas is cur- rently involved in two court cases that raise ques- tions about the theory and practice of civil rights laws. Since 1968, the Civil Rights laws have claimed to protect Hispanics, other minorities, and women from discrimination while helping them enter the mainstream of society. However, these laws have not promoted equal opportunity; rather, they have created a sense of en- titlement among groups, and encouraged reverse discrimination. They have also had a detrimental ef- fect on the integration of American society. Affirmative action and Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act are two exam- ples of how promoting civil rights turned upside down. In the recent case of Fisher vs. University of Texas, two students who were denied admission in 2008, hope to overturn the 2003 Supreme Court ruling that allows race to be considered in college admissions. These two white students are vic- tims — yes, victims — of reverse discrimination, otherwise known as affir- mative action. Affirmative action refers to policies that take race and other physical features into consideration in order to benefit an underrepre- sented group or “protected class.” The justification for affirmative action is that

El Conservador

George

Rodriguez

affirmative action is that El Conservador George Rodriguez George Rodriguez is a San Anto- nio resident

George Rodriguez is a San Anto- nio resident and the first Hispanic in the nation to lead a Tea Party or- ganization. He is a former official in the U.S. Justice Dept. during the Reagan Administration.

it helps to compensate for past discrimination, per- secution, or exploitation by

the ruling class of a culture, and to address existing discrimination. So is it good to discrimi- nate against one group to make up for discrimination against another group? And how long does this policy have to exist? How do we determine when equality is reached? The other example of civil rights becoming civil wrongs is Section 5 of the Voting Rights Act. This Act forces Texas and certain other states with a “history of discrimination” to pre- clear their election laws with the Justice Depart- ment. It covers any attempt by these specific states to change “any voting quali- fication or prerequisite to voting, or standard, prac- tice, or procedure with ”

respect to voting

in any

covered jurisdiction. Texas has to demonstrate that a proposed voting change does not have the purpose

and will not have the effect of discriminating based on race or color. The problem is that these other states are pre- sumed guilty without any trial or specific allegation. Liberal Hispanic groups have challenged the redis- tricting of Texas based on the assumption that all His- panics vote for Democrats, and therefore districts with Democrats should be pro- tected. Since when have Democrats become a pro- tected class or synonymous with Hispanics? When will Democrats al- low Hispanics be integrated into society politically and socially? Also, why pick on certain states and not ap- ply this law to all states? Isn’t that discriminatory and selective enforcement? Considerations of race, ethnicity, color, national origin, gender, and sexual orientation have no place in a constitutional repub- lic. There should be equal opportunity for all with in- dividual responsibility for growth and achievement. We have been drifting to- ward a system where the government determines who participates and to what degree for 45 years, and it’s time to stop and reverse the trend. No one should get special privi- leges or protections.

The Gonzales Cannon

BOARD OF DIRECTORS Billy Bob Low • Chairman

Randy Robinson, Vice Chairman

Myrna McLeroy

Mary Lou Philippus, Secretary

Alice Hermann

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Letters to the Editor letters@gonzalescannon.com Kulturkampf as public health About a month ago, people who

Kulturkampf as public health

About a month ago, people who thought religious institutions shouldn’t be forced to pay for things they mor- ally oppose were unre- markable, boring even. Now, they are waging a heinous War on Women. Through the twisted logic of statism run amok, opposition to a new Health and Hu- man Services mandate forcing employers to buy insurance covering contraceptives becomes opposition to access to contraceptives altogeth- er. White House spokes- man Jay Carney calls a Senate bill to allow em- ployers to forgo buying coverage for services they oppose -- as they have throughout the na- tion’s entire history up to this point -- “danger- ous and wrong.” Three Democratic women senators, Jeanne Shaheen (New Hamp- shire), Barbara Boxer (California) and Patty Murray (Washington), wrote in The Wall Street Journal that critics of the mandate “are trying to force their politics on women’s personal health-care decisions.” How are they proposing to do that exactly? The Catholic bishops are merely fighting to keep institutions affiliated with their church from getting coerced into par- ticipating in what they consider a moral wrong. They are the agents of a status quo that the day before yesterday wasn’t considered objection- able, let alone an assault

Rich Lowry
Rich
Lowry

Rich Lowry is editor of the Na- tional Review and a syndicated columnist for King Features Syndicate.

on women’s health. Supporters of the mandate like the three senators cite the statis- tic from the Guttmacher Institute that 99 percent of women who have been sexually active in the U.S. have used birth control. This doesn’t sound like a country facing a crisis of contra- ception. But prescrip- tion contraceptives are expensive, the senators argue, costing as much as $600 a year. (Or, looked at another way, less than $60 a month.) Never mind that a vast government apparatus exists to provide poor women access to contra- ceptives, from Medicaid and community health centers to Title X. There are roughly 4,500 Title X-funded clinics around the country. They are required to provide free birth control to the poor and subsidized birth control to people with incomes between 100 percent and 250 percent of poverty. They serve about 5 million people a year. Of all the causes of the explosion in illegitimate births, limited access to contraception can’t be high on the list. At the same time that we have

seen a profusion of con- traceptives that are daz- zling in their variety, impressive in their effi- cacy and democratic in their widespread acces- sibility, out-of-wedlock births have gone from 10 percent in 1970 to 42 percent today (largely among poor women with access to govern- ment-provided contra- ceptives). In its extension to religious institutions, the HHS mandate can only reach a very nar- row slice of the popula- tion. Women who aren’t poor enough to get gov- ernment assistance, yet aren’t well off enough to afford their own con- traception, can’t get any other help, and have no alternative but to work for an objecting reli- gious institution. On behalf of this vanish- ingly small number of women, the Obama ad- ministration is willing to risk a political back- lash and a rebuke in the courts. If the mandate were only about extending contraception coverage, exempting religious in- stitutions would be ob- vious. But it’s more than that. It is about bringing institutions thought to be retrograde to heel, and discrediting their morality. It is kultur- kampf disguised as pub- lic health.

Rich

Lowry

is

editor

of the National Review.

(c) 2012 by King Fea- tures Synd., Inc.

Thursday, March 1, 2012

The Cannon

Page A5

“Dispatch from Downrange”

When the mundane becomes all too real

It’s all over the news. News you at home get bombarded with but we here in Afghan- istan, here where it is hap- pening, have to search for. Today I heard about the Afghan Army soldier that was supposed to be pro- tecting the U.S. base who turned his weapon on the U.S. soldiers, killing two and wounding four more. These are the very same sol- diers that provide security for me and my fellow dog handlers as we search and try to secure the entry con- trol points and bases over here. When this sort of thing happens it brings home just how easy it is to have the situation go downhill in a hurry. The location I am sta- tioned at hasn’t erupted in protests other than a peace- ful demonstration of several hundred people, but the anger and hatred is just un-

Dispatches from Downrange

Jon

Harris

and hatred is just un- Dispatches from Downrange Jon Harris Jon Harris is an Army retiree,

Jon Harris is an Army retiree, re- serve City of Gonzales policeman and former deputy constable who is currently serving as a civilian mili- tary dog handler in Afghanistan.

der the surface. We know it could go south at any time. Now this may not be too politically correct but I and the folks I work with are not at ease with our secu- rity. We constantly keep a close eye on the surround- ings. It is what the Army calls S.A. or Situational Awareness. Without it you are simply a news item wait- ing to happen. To counter this, we have

a news item wait- ing to happen. To counter this, we have Drug Discovery This is

Drug Discovery

This is Naswar, the drug most commonly found in Afghanistan. It is dipped like snuff and its contents usually consist of tree bark, fine ground tobacco, and lime. It is then mixed with any of the following: hash- ish, marijuana, heroin, or methamphetamine. They sometimes use goat droppings as a binder.

found we work very close- ly together regardless of what service the handler is in. The old days of one ser- vice not associating with the other are long gone. I’m glad those days are dead and gone. In today’s world there is just no place (or time) for it. Yes, still some good natured ribbing but we are all work- ing for the same goal. That goal is twofold. Accomplish the mission; come home when it’s done. Where I am located, I work with Army MP ca- nine handlers and one Navy handler. What the Navy is doing in the middle of Af- ghanistan is anyone’s guess but he and I are friends and colleagues. It is a plus that he is also a narcotics dog handler. We work together as a team pretty much all the time. Recently we have been searching the local national barracks and third coun- try worker housing. These are laborers from all over the world, but not the U.S. and not Afghanistan, hence third country. Those days go pretty much like this. He and I get ready at about 04:00, that’s 4 a.m. for you non-military people. That means getting the dogs up and ready. They get a break of course, so we don’t have an “incident” in somebody’s room, then we head out to the search area. We meet with the mili- tary authorities in charge of the search and show up at the search area unan- nounced about 05:00. The military with us spread out

Letters to the editor

Thanks to donators!

Dear Editor:

It is my great pleasure to report that with the additional financial gifts of Jerry Ja- cobs, Vicki and Paul Frenzel, Bobby Logan and Natalie Fric added to those of Dennis Nesser, Bill Sheppard, Lorenzo Hernandez, Allen Barnes, a single mother,and Don and me, we now have the $900 needed to repair the vandalized tombstones. I can only imagine how pleased the fami- lies are whose loved ones’ tombstones were vandalized because they will now know that, yes, there are people in our world who seek to destroy, but there are people in this world who seek to build, and so with the help of those who seek to build, Mr. Joe Solansky will rebuild those tombstones

Letters to the Editor Policy:

The Gonzales Cannon welcomes and encour- ages letters to the editor. Views expressed in let- ters are those of the writers and do not reflect the views and opinions of the publisher, editor, or staff of The Gonzales Cannon. Submission of a letter does not guarantee publication. All letters are subject to editing for grammar, style, length (250 words), and legal standards. Letter-writters may criticize sitting office-holders for specific policies, but active electioneering is prohibited. The Gonzales Cannon does not publish unsigned letters. All letters must be signed and include the address and telephone number of the author for verifi- cation purposes. Addresses and phone numbers are not published. Our online edition at gonzalescannon.com also welcomes reader comments on stories ap- pearing in the paper, but posts by anonymous users or users registered under an alias will not be published.

that were vandalized. I hope to publish pictures in this newspaper of the vandal- ized stones and the repaired stones, when he has completed his repairs. If additional monies are received, I will call the donors and ask for their permission to use their financial gifts to clean these tombstones and other tombstones, as long as the money holds out. If someone wishes to discuss this with me by phone, my Cell # is 678-232-9258 and my email address is

dorisjoann1@yahoo.com.

Thanks to both newspapers for helping us reach this goal. We couldn’t have done it without you.

JoAnn Liefeste

Gonzales

Mundy’s column was right on the mark

Dear Editor, As a citizen, I really liked Dave Mundy’s column regarding funeral for a celebrity. I totally agree that American’s put WAY too much emphasis on celebrities. Why we now have it included in the daily T.V. news broadcasts along with the Weather and Sports? It is so ridiculous. If war were to come on U.S. shores, you can bet the rich celebrities will flee the country that made them rich. I also find

it appalling to fly the flag at half staff for Whitney Houston; it is a mockery of what

our nation stands for

or does it?

Candice Witzkoske

Gonzales

our nation stands for or does it? Candice Witzkoske Gonzales Dog Team Members Members of the
our nation stands for or does it? Candice Witzkoske Gonzales Dog Team Members Members of the

Dog Team Members

Members of the dog team include (from left): MA S. Spaltro, US Navy Narcotics Dog Handler; SGT L. Washburn, US Army Explosive Dog Handler; SSG J. Sos- nowski, US Army Explosive Dog Handler; Civ. J. Harris, US Army (Ret) Narcotics Dog handler (ME); and SGT R. McNulty, US Army Explosive Dog Handler.

and man each entry and exit door on the building or tent. There is the sound of doors being banged on and the laser-like beams of light from dozens of flashlights shining in all directions. All the occupants are ordered out of the building and pat- ted down as they exit. Then it’s our turn. In go the dogs. Room by room, door by door, bed by bed, everything is searched. Now our job is to search for drugs, but we are not blind and contraband that we see gets confiscated by the mili- tary. Cell phones, wireless devices, computers, all are contraband. All can be used to trigger devices or to com- municate Intel to the very people we are trying to stop. Also remember it is 05:00 in the morning in Afghani- stan. There are now maybe 75 people standing outside after being waken and hur- ried outside. It is also 18 de- grees and snowing.

a real long and bad day for

room. If we make a find, it is like Christmas (for us) and

My Navy partner and I go systematically through each

snarling dogs controlled by U.S. personnel (us). They are afraid of the dogs and to tell the truth we do nothing

to dispel that fear. It doesn’t bother me a bit that they think we might let loose the dogs of war on them. The search completed we return to the kennel area to, if the search was successful, log in and photograph the finds we made. If we strike out that day we will spend several hours training in de- tection or patrol (attack and bite) work. At the end of the day, we all meet back up at our camp and go over the day’s activities and resume the inter-service ribbing. There is always an unspoken sense of relaxation knowing we survived another day. Oh, and for my partner, if he reads this. Go Army— Beat Navy! From somewhere in the frigid hills of Afghanistan, this has been another Dis- patch From Downrange.

someone else. After the morning search, we head out to the ECP or Entry Control Point. This is the farthest forward point of protection and although we always have a U.S. secu- rity team with us, our main protection is Afghan sol- diers and police. We again are searching for drugs hidden by the workers that are walking onto the FOB (Forward Operating Base). They stash it in the wire, they hide it under rocks to retrieve later, and they attempt to bring it in the base either for personal use or to sell and trade to the workers. By The Way, we see very, very little soldier involvement in the drug problem over here. The Afghan workers do not like dogs, especially big

Don’t let life’s distractions limit your focus on God

“Quick! Catch all the little foxes before they ruin the vineyard” - Song of Songs 2:15 (NLT)

The word for fox in He- brew is Shual. It was the word used for any wild ca- nine and was probably re-

ferring to the jackal. Jackals were abundant and ran in large packs throughout Pal- estine during Old Testament times attacking livestock or destroying crops. This scripture was brought to our attention when our son noticed how the numer- ous tasks we had undertaken were keeping us away from our original purpose. We purchased our property with a mental picture of what we believed God wanted us to accomplish here. These are the short- and long-term goals we’ve set:

1. Get debt-free and stay

debt-free by paying cash for whatever we need.

2. Design and build an

unconventional, low-budget home ourselves without go- ing into debt.

3. Teach others how to do

what we have done through the mediums of art, music, writing and videos. Our goals have not changed. Although, I must admit, maintaining country property on a limited budget has proven to be both chal- lenging and exhausting. Be- sides the numerous routine chores that must be done to maintain property, farm animals add a whole new dimension to those already demanding responsibilities. Owning living creatures requires that we provide proper fencing, housing and rations. In addition, animals need special attention when they labor in birth, become entangled or trapped, are in- jured, get sick, lost, or die. Because life’s tasks require so much of our time, money and energy we have had to

Love, Eloise

Eloise Estes
Eloise
Estes

learn to set priorities. There are many activities that serve very good purposes; even so, good purposes can get us off the right track. Chasing after little foxes will keep us from getting to God’s greater pur- pose---that is, the thing we were meant to do in this life. Accomplishing a god-given vision necessitates a plan of action and learning to recog- nize priorities; putting main concerns on top of the list. So, how are we to know our purpose? I’ve noticed that God deposits a seed in each of us which sprouts into an idea that will not go away. Slowly it develops into a

vision to do something that will honor God and help others in some way. With

proper attention and nur- turing this vision can bloom into an undertaking that be- comes a labor of love.

Your mission in life is your vineyard; it is the vine- yard you must guard care- fully. Begin to recognize and separate distractions from what really needs to be done. The little foxes

will distract us away from our real purpose so that we will bear little or no fruit for God. The little foxes cause us to neglect what God has put in our charge. And, in time, the dream will die. Distractions come in many forms. They can be physical or emotional af- flictions that sap away our desire to do anything. They can be emotions and thoughts that torment us, filling us with anxiety or fear; which are destructive emotions that kill our joy for life. Paul warns us in the book

of Corinthians that we can’t

be fully devoted to God when our devotions are di- vided. He says “I want you to do whatever will help you serve the Lord best, with as few distractions as possible.” (NLT) Keep your eyes focused on what God has given you; guard your vision well. Rid yourself of anything that distracts you away from your real purpose. The devil wants to destroy your chances to flourish and suc- ceed; he is out to ruin any- thing that starts to bloom into an idea for God and will do anything to distract you away from your pur- pose. He uses the jackals of this world to ruin your vineyard before it has time to bear fruit. There are a million activi- ties and projects that serve good purposes; but this does not mean we have to become personally involved in every one of them. Some people see a problem and have the know-how and gumption to do something to fix it. These self-motivat- ed, action people don’t wait for others to jump in and help, they just take off run- ning. It becomes a temptation for these personalities to do what needs to be done and put their own projects – their own God-given pur- poses – on hold for the sake of others. I am one of these people and this is my advice from years of trial and error. You and I can’t save the world on our own. We are all on bor- rowed time and we have just so much energy to find and to complete our real pur- pose in this life. Time waits for no one. Focus on doing what you love and do it with excel- lence.

love, eloise

Page A6

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Staples, coalition laud court decision on water rights

Cannon News Services

newseditor@gonzalescannon.com

AUSTIN — Texas Agriculture Com- missioner Todd Staples this week joined a broad coalition of private property own- ers’ rights advocates in applauding the decision of the Texas Supreme Court in the Edwards Aquifer Authority v. Day and McDaniel water rights case. The following are statements from Commissioner Staples and leaders of the coalition.

“The Supreme Court of Texas has again affirmed private property rights are the foundation of our liberties in the Lone Star State,” Texas Agriculture Commissioner Todd Staples said. “The private ownership of water and land has been protected by generations of Texans and now it is our duty to continue this proud heritage.” “For over 100 years, landowners have believed that the law gave them a vested private property right in the groundwater beneath their land and I am pleased that

the current court upheld that today,” said State Senator Troy Fraser, author of SB 332, which clarified groundwater owner- ship in Texas. “This is another in a long line of re- cent successes defending private property rights, including key eminent domain re- forms,” Kenneth Dierschke, Texas Farm Bureau President said. “The ruling recog- nized the passage of SB 332—Texas Farm Bureau’s priority legislation on groundwa- ter ownership passed in the last legislative

session—that says a landowner’s interest in groundwater in place cannot be taken for public use without adequate compen- sation.” “This opinion is a victory for Texas landowners and will be important for gen- erations to come,” said Joe Parker Jr., Presi- dent of the Texas and Southwestern Cattle Raisers Association. “It also recognizes the important legislation, SB 332, that was passed by the Legislature in 2011.” “The Texas Wildlife Association ap-

plauds the Texas Supreme Court rul- ing in this very important case, and it re-affirms the principle that the land- owner owns the groundwater below the landowner’s land as real property,” said Glen Webb, President of the Texas Wildlife Association. “This is a criti- cal principle going forward as private land stewards conserve the natural re- sources of our state for all Texans. The ruling is a victory for all Texas property owners.”

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NixoN Livestock commissioN

N ixoN L ivestock c ommissioN Hwy. 87 E., Nixon 830-582-1561 or 830-582-1562 Sale Every Monday

Hwy. 87 E., Nixon

830-582-1561 or

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c ommissioN Hwy. 87 E., Nixon 830-582-1561 or 830-582-1562 Sale Every Monday 10:30 a.m. All Livestock

Sale Every Monday 10:30 a.m. All Livestock Bonded and Insured

W.E. “Buck” BUTLER Nixon, Texas

830-582-1052

MANAGER

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Texas 830-582-1052 MANAGER GARY BUTLER 830-582-1944 L arry O ndrusek d Ozer s ervice Root Plowing

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Hallettsville Livestock

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AUCTION SALE EVERY TUESDAY

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We appreciate your business!

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Thursday, March 1, 2012

The Cannon

Page A7

Business

Historical Commission to recognize Gonzales’ unique Eggleston House

On March 7 at 1:15 p.m., at the Eggleston House, the Texas Historical Commis- sion will celebrate 50 years of placing official markers in historically significant locations in Texas. The first official Record- ed Texas Historic Land- mark (RTHL) medallion was placed at the Eggleston House in March of 1982. This circa-1840 log cabin home was the first rebuilt in Gonzales after the Runaway Scrape. This was when all citizens of Gonzales were forced to evacuate the town because it was thought that Santa Anna’s Army would come through here after the Alamo fell. General Sam Houston ordered the burning of the town and all fled, following the Texas Army east until the victory at the Battle of San Jacinto. THC staff, his- torians, individuals present at the first RTHL designa- tion in Gonzales, and lo- cal history students will all be present at the ceremony and the public is urged to attend. The chamber board met on Wednesday, hearing a report from Jackie Mikesh from Victoria College – Gonzales on the enlarg- ing of the campus on the property just east that was an auto dealership. She said that they will have two ex- tra classrooms there, along with welding, heating and air conditioning and elec- trical classes. There will also be a five-year anniversary celebration for the Gon- zales Campus on April 18 with a ribbon-cutting and luncheon that the public is invited to attend. Don’t forget the March 1 celebration on Texas Heroes Square starting at 1 p.m., with fourth-grade classes and the band assisting in the program, which will be lead by Bob Burchard. Breakfast at the Old Jail will be held the next day, March 2, Texas In- dependence Day, from 6:30- 9:30 a.m. Tickets are $5 each and can be purchased at the door that morning. Wayne Spahn and crew will again be cooking scrambled eggs, sausage and hashbrowns, with coffee and juice. Come celebrate with us! The First Friday Coffee will also be held at the Old Jail that morning from 8:30

Around the Chamber Office

Barbara

Hand

morning from 8:30 Around the Chamber Office Barbara Hand Barbara Hand is the Execu- tive Director

Barbara Hand is the Execu- tive Director of the Gonzales Chamber of Commerce.

to 9:30, so come for breakfast and stay for the coffee. The Gonzales Livestock Show & Sale will be held that weekend at the J. B. Wells Park. Those who wish to do- nate to the sale may mail or bring them to the chamber office at 414 St. Lawrence Street. The Gonzales Livestock Show will be at the J. B. Wells Park Thursday, Friday and Saturday.

be at the J. B. Wells Park Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Luling Chamber awards banuqet The
be at the J. B. Wells Park Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Luling Chamber awards banuqet The
be at the J. B. Wells Park Thursday, Friday and Saturday. Luling Chamber awards banuqet The

Luling Chamber awards banuqet

The Luling Chamber of Commerce recently hon- ored several individuals and businesses at its an- nual awards banquet at Zedler Mill. Linda Moore was recognized as Volunteer of the Year (top left), while John Wells (above right) was named the Citizen of the Year. O.G.O Marketing (left) was named the Busi- ness of the Year. Not pictured is Albert Martinez, who was selected as Board Member of the Year. (Courtesy Photos)

was selected as Board Member of the Year. (Courtesy Photos) Farm Bureau Donation In recognition of

Farm Bureau Donation

In recognition of Farm Bureau Food Check-out Week, Gonzales County Farm Bu- reau president Allan Fink, and Barbara Koricanek, board member, donate funds to Betty Fussner, GCAM executive director, for use in acquiring food staples to distribute locally. Also present are volunteers Beatrice Navejar, Pauline Alvarez, and Fran DeChane. (Courtesy Photo)

Tax relief available for agricultural land

Farmers and ranchers can be granted property tax relief on their land. They may apply to the Gonzales County Appraisal District for agricultural productiv- ity appraisal, and for a lower appraisal of their land based on what it will produce, ver- sus what their land would sell for the open market. The Texas Constitu- tion authorizes two types of agricultural productiv- ity appraisal, 1-d-1 and 1-d, named after the sections of the Texas Constitution in which they were authorized. For 1-d-1 appraisal, prop- erty owners must use the land for agriculture or tim- ber but the lands must meet the degree of intensity gen- erally accepted in the area. Owners must also show that the land is being used for at least five of the proceeding seven years. 1-d-1 appraisal does not restrict ownership to individuals and does not require agriculture to be the owner’s primary business. Most land owners apply for the 1-d-1 appraisal. Under 1-d appraisal, the land needs to be in use for at least three years and the owner must be an individu- al versus corporation, part- nerships, agency or organi- zation. The land must be the owner’s primary source of income.

Penalties in the form of rollback tax, or the differ- ence between the taxes paid under the productivity ap- praisal and the taxes that would have been paid if the land has been put on the tax roll at market value, will be imposed if qualified land is taken out of agricultural or timber production. For more information about productivity appraisal and application forms, con- tact the Gonzales County Appraisal District at 928 St. Paul Street, P.O. Box 867, Gonzales, Texas 78629, Telephone 830-672-2879. Information is also available on the state Comptroller’s website at www.window. state.tx.us/taxinfo/proptax/ or by calling the Comptrol- ler’s Property Tax Assis- tance Division at 800-252- 9121 and press “2” to access the menu and then press “1” to contact the Information Services Team.

Area Livestock Reports

Gonzales Livestock Market Report

The Gonzales Livestock Market Report for Saturday, February 25, 2012 had on hand: 767 cattle. Compared to our last sale:

Calves and yearlings sold steady. Packer cows sold steady. Stocker-feeder steers: Medium and large frame No. 1: 150-300 lbs., $230-$255; 300-400 lbs, $215- $220; 400-500 lbs, $195-$220; 500-600 lbs, $175-$195; 600-700 lbs., $134-$166; 700-800 lbs.,

$136-$140.

Bull yearlings: 700-900 lbs,

$112-$138.

Stocker-feeder heifers: Medium and large frame No. 1: 150-300 lbs, $190-$225; 300-400 lbs, $180- $210; 400-500 lbs, $165-$180; 500-600 lbs., $147-$160; 600-700 lbs., $141-$147. Packers cows: Good lean utility and commercial, $67-$76; Cutters, $78-$92; Canners, $54-$60; Low yielding fat cows, $71-$77. Packer bulls: Yield grade 1 & 2, good heavy bulls; $97-$109; light weights and medium quality bulls,

$74-$94.

Stocker Cows: $850-$1,150. Pairs: $975-$1,800. Thank you for your business!! View our sale live at cattleusa. com!

Nixon Livestock Commission Report

The Nixon Livestock Com- mission Inc. report had on hand, February 27, 2012, Volume, 793; Sheep & Goats, 1. Steers: 200-300 lbs, $208 to $218 to $250; 300-400 lbs., $186 to $196 to $240; 400-500 lbs, $181 to $191 to $222; 500-600 lbs, $167 to $177 to $195; 600-700 lbs, $148 to $158 to $166; 700-800 lbs, $150 to $154 to $155. Heifers: 200-300 lbs, $192 to $202 to $238; 300-400 lbs, $168 to $178 to $224; 400-500 lbs, $164 to $174 to $195; 500-600 lbs, $154 to $164 to $190; 600-700 lbs, $139 to $149 to $159; 700-800 lbs, $148 to $158 to $170. Slaughter cows: $55 to $92; Slaughter bulls: $82 to $101; Stocker cows: $850 to $1,200.

Hallettsville Livestock Commission Report

The Hallettsville Livestock Commission Co., Inc. had on hand on February 21, 2012, 682; Week ago, 457; Year Ago, 1,358. The calves and yearlings were strong to higher again this week. Demand continues very good in all areas. Starting to see a few

continues very good in all areas. Starting to see a few fleshier new crop calves. Packers

fleshier new crop calves. Packers cows and bulls sold $1 to $2 high- er on 100 hd. Total. Packer Cows: higher dressing utility & cutter cows, $74-$95.50; lower dressing utility & cutter cows, $57-$74; light weight can- ner cows, $46-$57. Packer Bulls: heavyweight bulls, $88-$103.50; utility & cutter bulls, $78-$88; lightweight canner bulls, $68-$78. Stocker and Feeder Calves and Yearlings: Steer & Bull Calves: un- der 200 lbs, $195-$255; 200-300 lbs, $190-$255; 300-400 lbs, $184- $252; 400-500 lbs, $178-$220; 500- 600lbs, $158-$197.50; 600-700 lbs, $148-$168; 700-800 lbs, $138- $150. Heifer Calves: under 200 lbs, $185-$240; 200-300 lbs, $180- $230; 300-400 lbs, $172-$225; 400-500 lbs, $165-$200; 500-600 lbs, $145-$178; 600-700 lbs, $138- $155; 700-800 lbs, $120-$138. No. 2 & 3 Steer & Bull Calves: 200-300 lbs, $120-$188; 300-400 lbs, $120- $185; 400-500 lbs, $118-$176; 500-600 lbs, $115-$156; 600-700 lbs, $110-$147. No. 2 & 3 Heifer Calves: 200-300 lbs, $118-$178; 300-400 lbs, $118-$170; 400-500 lbs, $115-$162; 500-600 lbs, $112- $145; 600-700 lbs, $105-$135. If we can help with marketing your livestock, please call 361-

798-4336.

Cuero Livestock

Market Report

Cuero Livestock Market Report on February 24, 2012, had 719 head. Had 130 cows and 14 bulls. Bulls were higher. Cows sold to a strong demand. Calves were strong. Packer Bulls: Hvy. Wts., $90- $110; lower grades, $64-$76. Packer cows: boning cows, $86- $95; cutters mainly, $66-$94; low cutters, $60-$69; fat cows, $85-

$93.

Dry cows, $65-$92; young, $69-

$110.

Palpated cows: $80-$111. Pairs: 13 pairs at over $1,000,

$1,065-$1,360.

The calf market was very active. Higher on the choice. Steer Calves: under 200 lbs, $180-$265; 200-250 lbs, $200- $255; 250-300 lbs, $170-$255; 300-350 lbs, $200-$260; 350-400 lbs, $195-$235; 400-450 lbs, $185- $225; 450-500 lbs, $160-$215; 500-600 lbs, $160-$200; over 700 lbs, $105-$150. Heifer Calves: under 200 lbs, $190-$265; 200-250 lbs, $215- $225; 250-300 lbs, $150-$225; 300-350 lbs, $155-$230; 350-400 lbs, $165-$210; 400-450 lbs, $175- $225; 450-500 lbs, $160-$220; 500-600 lbs, $150-$195. Over 700 $95-$145.

Fehner & Son Grain Co.

•Grains •Custom Mix Feed •Liquid Feed •Cattle Cubes

•Liquid Fertilizer •Pellet Feed •Spraying

James Fehner -- Cell 830-857-3638 Jimmy Fehner -- Cell 830-857-3636

Fehner -- Cell 830-857-3638 Jimmy Fehner -- Cell 830-857-3636 1922 Co. Road 197 Gonzales, TX 78629

1922 Co. Road 197 Gonzales, TX 78629 Phone: 830-672-3710

THE TAX PLACE Tax Preparations, Bookkeeping Payroll and Sales Tax Ruth Guerra, Enrolled Agent 411A
THE TAX PLACE
Tax Preparations, Bookkeeping
Payroll and Sales Tax
Ruth Guerra, Enrolled Agent
411A St. George Street
3401 CR 239 (billing)
located on the square
830-672-2228
830-672-5298
Tax Season Hours
Mon.-Fri. 8-6 • Sat: 9-2
J B Wells Upcoming Events March 1, 2, 3 Gonzales Livestock Show with live @
J B Wells Upcoming Events
March 1, 2, 3
Gonzales Livestock
Show
with
live @
webcast
www.
cattleUSA.com
Sponsored by
Gonzales Livestock Market
Sale every at
Saturday
P.O. Box 565 • Gonzales, TX 78629
David Shelton Mobile 830-857-5394
10am
Mike Brzozowski Mobile 830-857-3900
Fax 830-672-6087
Office 830-672-2845

Page A8

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Oil & Gas

GEDC to be part of Eagle Ford forum

Cannon News Services

newseditor@gonzalescannon.com

LA VERNIA — The Gon- zales Economic Development Corporationhaspartneredwith regional economic developers to coordinate the Governor’s Small Business Forum: Oppor- tunities of the Eagle Ford Shale on March 20 from 8 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. at the La Vernia High School Auditorium, located at 221 FM 775 in La Vernia. The forum will provide an excellent opportunity for the business owners in Gonzales to benefit from information designed to assist them as they grow and expand their busi- nesses. The Governor’s Small Busi- ness Forums are designed to educate the Texas small busi- ness community on workforce development, employee skills training and growth opportu- nities. The Texas Workforce Commission (TWC) will pres- ent information on employee training grants and other pro- grams available through TWC. The event will also feature Dr. Tom Tunstall of the University

of Texas at San Antonio, speak-

ing about the Economic Impact

of the Eagle Ford Shale, and sev-

eral oil and gas industry leaders will be on hand share informa- tion on conducting business with the oil and gas industry. A representative from Rack- space Managed Hosting will present information on tech- nology for small businesses, and

a panel of experts from profit

and nonprofit lending institu- tions will provide information regarding small business loans. Texas Department of Agricul- ture and USDA experts will cover information for the agri- business community. After the informational ses- sions, several small businesses from Wilson, Karnes, DeWitt, Atascosa, Gonzales and Gua- dalupe counties will be honored with small business awards from the Governor’s Office. Business owners, prospec- tive entrepreneurs, elected of- ficials and community leaders are encouraged to attend. Con- tact Carolyn Gibson with any questions at (830) 672-2815 or cgibson@cityofgonzales.org. There is no charge to attend but in order to prepare handouts attendees are asked to RSVP to the La Vernia Municipal Devel- opment District office by email or phone to info@laverniamdd. org or (830) 779-2371. The event is a partnership of the Gonzales Economic Devel- opment Corporation, La Ver- nia Municipal Development District, Floresville Economic Development Corporation, Cu- ero Development Corporation, Pleasanton Economic Devel- opment Corporation, Karnes County Economic Develop- ment Corporation, Seguin Economic Development Corporation, and the Stock- dale Economic Development Corporation, along with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development and Tourism,

The Texas Workforce Com- mission, Texas Department of Agriculture, UTSA Institute for Economic Development, Wells Fargo Bank, BCL of Texas, Peo- ple Fund, and Rackspace Man- aged Hosting.

Oil & Gas Activity Report

Cannon News Services

API#: 055-34955

February 18

Well No.: 5H

API No.: 42-177-32481

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal

Approved Oil and Gas Completions for

Approved Drilling Permits by the Tex- as Railroad Commission for the period of Feb. 1-22

Location: Caldwell County, 1.3 miles NE from City of Luling Survey: A. Floyd Acreage: 95.46

Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 14,000 feet Direction and Miles: 8.83 miles west of Gonzales

Operator: Penn Virginia Oil and Gas LP Lease Name: Effenberger Unit Well No.: 1H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2)

February 1 Lease Name: Hiller Well Number: 1 Total Depth: 5,578 ft API#: 123-32146 Location: DeWitt County, 3.5 miles NW from City of Mission Valle

February 2

Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

Lease Name: Moses Baggett ‘A’ Well Number: 1H Total Depth: 3,000 ft API#: 055-34996

Survey Name: J. McCoy, A-46 Acres: 2,199.76

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Penn Virginia Oil and Gas LP Lease Name: Rock Creek Ranch Well No.: 6H

Total Depth: 14,000 feet Direction and Miles: 5.04 miles north of Moulton Survey Name: A. Ponton, A-35 Acres: 715.90

the period of Feb. 1-22

Survey: T.H. Bell Acreage: 140 Type: Gas Well Operator: B.P. Productions Inc.

Lease Name: A Wallis

Location: Caldwell County, 4.4 miles NE from City of Luling Survey: S. Shupe Acreage: 92.0 Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 14,000 feet Direction and Miles: 8.83 miles south- east of Gonzales Survey Name: J. McCoy, A-46 Acres: 2,199.76

DeWitt County

API No.: 42-123-32380 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Geosouthern Energy Corp. Lease Name: Warwas A

Well Number: 1H Total Depth: 14,000 ft API#: 123-32696 Location: DeWitt County, 6.54 miles SE from City of Westhoff Survey: I RR Co. Acreage: 331.25 Type: Gas Well Operator: Petrohawk Operating Com- pany

February 21 Lease Name: Northcutt Dye Well Number: 3H Total Depth: 3,000 ft API#: 055-34997 Location: Caldwell County, 5.9 miles NE from City of Luling Survey: J. Hinds Acreage: 129.53 Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

API No.: 42-177-32491 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Steen-Scruggs Unit Well No.: 4H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 11,800 feet Direction and Miles: 9.8 miles southeast of Cost Survey Name: J. Dillard, A-177 Acres: 1,226.68

Well No.: 1H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Survey Name: W. Quinn, A-394 Direction and Miles: 2.69 miles north- west of Nordheim Oil: 287 MCF: 1,732 Choke Size: 9/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 7,215 Total Depth: 18,860 feet

February 3 Lease Name: A Wallis

Recent Location reports

API No.: 42-177-32490

Plug Back Depth: 18,769 feet Perforations: 14,097-18,739 feet

Well Number: 1H Total Depth: 14,000 ft API#: 123-32697 Location: DeWitt County, 10.11 miles NW from City of Yorktown

DeWitt County API No.: 42-123-32701 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Petrohawk Operating Com-

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Steen-Scruggs Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1)

API No.: 42-123-32478 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Geosouthern Energy Corp. Lease Name: Lane B

Survey: T. Mancha

pany

Total Depth: 11,800 feet

Well No.: 1H

Acreage: 431.02 Type: Gas Well Operator: Petrohawk Operating Com-

Lease Name: P. Frisbie A Well No.: 1H Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale)

Direction and Miles: 9.8 miles southeast of Cost Survey Name: J. Dillard, A-177

Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale) Survey Name: T. Wentworth, A-49 Direction and Miles: 5.87 miles south-

pany

Total Depth: 14,000 feet Direction and Miles: 7.23 miles west of

Acres: 1,226.68

east from Westhoff Oil: 390

Lease Name: C Oliver

Nordheim

API No.: 42-177-32489

MCF: 4,428

Well Number: 1H

Survey Name: J. Keland, A-652

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal

Choke Size: 12/64 of an inch

Total Depth: 13,700 ft

Acres: 568.55

Operator: EOG Resources Inc.

Tubing Pressure: 8,215

API#: 123-32361 Location: DeWitt County, 5.27 miles NE from City of Westhoff Survey: MEP&P RR Co.

API No.: 42-123-32702 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Burlington Resources O and

Lease Name: Steen-Scruggs Unit Well No.: 2H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 11,800 feet

Shut In Well Pressure: 9,015 Total Depth: 19,165 feet Plug Back Depth: 19,108 feet Perforations: 13,626-19,088 feet

Acreage: 261.67

G

Co. LP

Direction and Miles: 9.8 miles southeast

Type: Oil or Gas Well Operator: Geosouthern Energy Coop- eration

Lease Name: Barrett Unit A Well No.: 1 Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2)

of Cost Survey Name: J. Dillard, A-177 Acres: 1,226.68

API No.: 42-123-32448 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Geosouthern Energy Corp.

Lease Name: Taylor Unit B

Total Depth: 13,300 feet Direction and Miles: 5.7 miles northwest

API No.: 42-177-32488

Lease Name: Byerly A Well No.: 1H

Well Number: 1 Total Depth: 12,500 ft API#: 123-32575 Location: DeWitt County, 10.4 miles NW from City of Yorktown Survey: F. Gonzales

of

Yorktown Survey Name: I RR Co, A-267 Acres: 360

API No.: 42-123-32703 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Burlington Resources O and

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Steen-Scruggs Unit Well No.: 1H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 11,800 feet Direction and Miles: 9.8 miles southeast

Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale) Survey Name: I RR Co, Section 34, A-578 Direction and Miles: 3.94 miles north- west of Nordheim Oil: 486 MCF: 3,867 Choke Size: 12/64 of an inch

Acreage: 388.07 Type: Oil or Gas Well Operator: Burlington Resources O & G Co. LP

G

Co. LP Lease Name: Motl Unit A Well No.: 1

of Cost Survey Name: J. Dillard, A-177 Acres: 1,226.68

Tubing Pressure: 7,215 Shut In Well Pressure: 7,215 Total Depth: 17,345 feet

February 6 Lease Name: Mary B. Johnson

Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale) Total Depth: 13,500 feet Direction and Miles: 8.4 miles northwest

API No.: 42-177-32482 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal

Plug Back Depth: 17,150 feet Perforations: 13,967-17,150 feet

Well Number: 3H

of

Cuero

API No.: 42-123-32705

Operator: EOG Resources Inc.

Gonzales County

Total Depth: 3,500 ft API#: 055-34940 Location: Caldwell County, 1.4 miles NE from City of Luling Survey: J. Hinds Acreage: 362.16

Survey Name: S. Pharrass, A-377 Acres: 517.94

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Petrohawk Operating Com-

Lease Name: Verlander Unit Well No.: 2H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 10,300 feet Direction and Miles: 8.6 miles southeast of Cost

API No.: 42-177-32322 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Zappe Unit Well No.: 5H

pany

Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1)

Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

Lease Name: H Mueller 18A Well Number: 1H Total Depth: 14,000 ft API#: 123-32698 Location: DeWitt County, 7.91 miles NW from City of Nordheim Survey: W H H Davis Acreage: 371.03 Type: Gas Well Operator: Petrohawk Operating Com-

Lease Name: P. Frisbie B Well No.: 1H Field Name: DeWitt (Eagle Ford Shale) Total Depth: 14,000 feet Direction and Miles: 7.23 miles north- west of Nordheim Survey Name: J Keland, A-652 Acres: 320

API No.: 42-123-32706 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Burlington Resources O and

Survey Name: S.H. Gates, A-228 Acres: 976.83

API No.: 42-177-32484 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Verlander Unit Well No.: 5H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 10,700 feet Direction and Miles: 8.5 miles southeast of Cost Survey Name: S.H. Gates, A-228

Survey Name: S. Bateman, A-1 Direction and Miles: 12.2 miles south- east of Gonzales Oil: 1,027 MCF: 960 Choke Size: 30/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 1,205 Total Depth: 18,400 feet Plug Back Depth: 11,231 feet Perforations: 12,046-18,234 feet

pany

G

Acres: 976.83

API No.: 42-177-32388

Lavaca County

February 7 Lease Name: Tiller Briscoe D Well Number: 9H Total Depth: 3,000 ft API#: 055-34995 Location: Caldwell County, 5.1 miles NE from City of Luling

Co. LP Lease Name: N Steinmann Unit B Well No.: 1 Field Name: Sugarkane (Eagle Ford) Total Depth: 13,000 feet Direction and Miles: 11.6 miles north-

west of Cuero Survey Name: H.P. Cook, A-120 Acres: 604.32

API No.: 42-177-32485 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Verlander Unit Well No.: 6H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 10,700 feet

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Kerner-Carson Unit Well No.: 9H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Survey Name: W. Simpson, A-426 Direction and Miles: 9.9 miles southeast from Cost

Survey: J. Hinds Acreage: 224.69 Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

API No.: 42-123-32707 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Burlington Resources O and

Direction and Miles: 8.5 miles southeast of Cost Survey Name: S.H. Gates, A-228 Acres: 976.83

Oil: 1,766 MCF: 1,655 Choke Size: 28/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes

 

G

Co. LP

Tubing Pressure: 1,691

Lease Name: J.B. Northcutt Well Number: 3H Total Depth: 3,000 ft API#: 055-34994 Location: Caldwell County, 7 miles NE

Lease Name: Lackey Land A 639 Unit B Well No.: 1 Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Total Depth: 12,800 feet Direction and Miles: 7.3 miles northwest

API No.: 42-177-32487 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Verlander Unit Well No.: 9H

Total Depth: 16,037 feet Plug Back Depth: 15,946 feet Perforations: 11,000-15,939 feet

of

Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1)

API No.: 42-177-32483

Lavaca County

from City of Luling Survey: J. Hinds

Acreage: 154 Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

Lease Name: Merriwether Well Number: 3H Total Depth: 3,000 ft API#: 055-34952 Location: Caldwell County, 1.3 miles NE from City of Luling Survey: A. Floyd Acreage: 95.46 Type: Oil Well Operator: Eagle Energy Acquistions LP

Yorktown Survey Name: I RR Co, Section 58, A-639 Acres: 320

Gonzales County API No.: 42-177-32479 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Southern Bay Operating LLC Lease Name: Newtonville Unit Well No.: 5H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 17,000 feet Direction and Miles: 19.78 miles north- east of Gonzales Survey Name: P. Hope, A-252 Acres: 971.57

Total Depth: 10,300 feet Direction and Miles: 8.6 miles southeast of Cost Survey Name: S.H. Gates, A-228 Acres: 976.83

Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: EOG Resources Inc. Lease Name: Verlander Unit Well No.: 3H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-1) Total Depth: 10,300 feet Direction and Miles: 8.6 miles southeast of Cost Survey Name: S.H. Gates, A-228

API No.: 42-285-33602 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Sharon Hunter Resources Inc. Lease Name: Furrh Well No.: 2H Field Name: Eagleville (Eagle Ford-2) Survey Name: P. Priestley, A-38 Direction and Miles: 2.3 miles northwest of Moulton Oil: 1,154 MCF: 724 Choke Size: 19/64 of an inch Flowing: Yes Tubing Pressure: 1,680

Total Depth: 15,969 feet Perforations: 10,755-15,722 feet

February 14 Lease Name: Merriwether Well Number: 4H Total Depth: 3,000 ft

API No.: 42-177-32480 Classification: Fld. Dev. and Horizontal Operator: Penn Virginia Oil and Gas LP Lease Name: Rock Creek Ranch

Acres: 976.83

API No.: 42-285-33625

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Thursday, March 1, 2012

The Cannon

Page A9

Education

Thursday, March 1, 2012 The Cannon Page A9 Education G/T students explore ‘Enigmas’ The students in

G/T students explore ‘Enigmas’

The students in the 4th grade Gifted and Talented class at Gonzales Elemen- tary recently completed the Texas Performance Standards Project, “Enigmas.” The students researched enigmas such as the Egyptian pyramids, the Bermuda Triangle, Stonehenge, the Lock Ness monster, and the Nazca Lines. Then, they created a board game or learning center to teach others about their enigma. The students are: (back row, left to right) Chris Holub, Tanner Blundell, Quinn Atkinson, Angel Sanchez, Sadie Thibodeaux, Bre Wolff, Wendy Vazquez, Sydney Clack, (middle row, left to right) Shelby Orme, Mason Ligues, Madison Blundell, Madison Stamport, Maraia Mathis, Ashlynn Stewart, Maggie Barnick, Sandra Pa- lacios, (bottom row, left to right) Krystalynn Buesing, Kiley Allen, Dylan Cantrell, Heath Henke, (not pictured) Nico Anzaldua, and Hunter Duke. (Courtesy Photo)

pictured) Nico Anzaldua, and Hunter Duke. (Courtesy Photo) A hands-on civics lesson A civics lesson: among

A hands-on civics lesson

A civics lesson: among the attendees at Thursday’s dinner were Nixon-Smiley teacher Laura Cook and students Jake Robinson and Heather Turner. (Photo by Dave Mundy)

Jake Robinson and Heather Turner. (Photo by Dave Mundy) One active swine Clay Orona attempts to

One active swine

Clay Orona attempts to convince his market swine to behave during the auction in Friday’s annual Waelder Livestock Show. The Cannon will feature photos of all the winners in the Waelder, Moulton, Luling, Shiner, Gonzales and Nixon-Smiley shows in our annual Livestock Show Salute in our March 22 edition. (Photo by Dave Mundy)

2012 Waelder Livestock Show Results

2012 Waelder Livestock Show

Market Swine:

Grand Champion: Cody Orona. Reserve Champion: Mal- orie Puente Showmanship: Cody Orona.

Light Weight - 1st - Cody Orona. Buyer:

Gonzales Building Center. Sale total: $2,080 2nd - Clay Orona. Buyer:

Zarimar Corp. Sale total:

$1,740.

3rd - Aaron Wilson

Heavy Weight - 1st - Malorie Puente. Buyer: Zarimar Corp. Sale total: $1,950.

2nd - Courtney Orona. Buyer: CATI. Sale total:

$1,480.

3rd - Caleb Ibarra. Buyer:

Caraway Ford. Sale total:

$1,415.

4th - Marissa Ramirez. Buyer: Caraway Ford. Sale total: $1,750.

Market Lambs:

Grand Champion: Zach Ramirez

Jd

Martinez

Zach

Ramirez

Reserve

Champion:

Showmanship:

Light Weight Class - 1st - Zach Ramirez. Buy- er: Gonzales Building Cen- ter. Sale total: $2,525

Heavy Weight Class -

1st - Jd Martinez. Buyer:

Zarimar Corp. Sale total:

$2,400.

Market Goat:

Grand Champion: Alex Benitez Reserve Champion: Pe- dro Hernandez Showmanship - Alex Benitez

Light Weight Class - 1st - Alex Benitez. Buyer:

Sage Capital bank. sale to- tal: $2,000. 2nd - Pedro Hernandez. Buyer: Bill Walker Plumb- ing. Sale total: $1,900.

Heavy Weight Class - 1st - Hailey Rincon. Buyer: Zarimar Corp. Sale total: $1,715.

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Several local students among HLSR scholarship winners

HOUSTON — The Hous- ton Livestock Show and Ro- deo began its 2012 scholar- ship season as 72 Texas high school seniors were each awarded a $16,000 scholar- ship to a Texas college or university. The 62 participating Area Go Texan counties are: An- derson, Angelina, Aransas, Austin, Bastrop, Bee, Bell, Bosque, Brazos, Burleson, Caldwell, Calhoun, Chero- kee, Colorado, DeWitt, Falls, Fayette, Freestone, Goliad, Gonzales, Gregg, Grimes, Hardin, Harrison, Hender- son, Hill, Houston, Jackson,

Jasper, Jefferson, Karnes, Lavaca, Lee, Leon, Lime- stone, Live Oak, Madison, Matagorda, McLennan, Mi- lam, Nacogdoches, Navarro, Newton, Nueces, Orange, Panola, Polk, Refugio, Rob- ertson, Rusk, Sabine, San Augustine, San Jacinto, San Patricio, Shelby, Trinity, Ty- ler, Victoria, Walker, Wash- ington, Wharton and Wil- liamson. The 72, four-year, $16,000 scholarships include an ad- ditional 10 awards given at large to eligible students within the 62 counties repre- sented in the Area Go Texan

Scholarship Program. Area scholarship recipi- ents include Brandi Mark- ert and Caitlin Markert, Caldwell County; Allyson Blakeney of DeWitt Coun- ty; Shelby Trlicek of Fayette County; Mary Menking of Gonzales County; and Bai- ley Steffek of Lavaca County. These scholarships are part of the Houston Live- stock Show and Rodeo’s an- nual commitment of more than $18.8 million to Texas students. Since its beginning in 1932, the Show has com- mitted approximately $283 million to the youth of Texas.

Congratulations to:

Congratulations to: Hannah Perez for Grand Champion Hog Nicholas Perez for Res. Champion Hog We are

Hannah Perez for Grand Champion Hog

Congratulations to: Hannah Perez for Grand Champion Hog Nicholas Perez for Res. Champion Hog We are

Nicholas Perez for Res. Champion Hog

We are very proud of you!

Perez Painting, Inc.

361-596-4988

Rabbits:

Grand Champion: Omar Garcia. Buyer: CATI. Sale total: $1,735. Reserve Champion: Ste- ven Puente. Buyer: GVTC. Sale total: $1,145. Showmanship - Carlos Mindieta 3rd - Andre Sustaita. Buyer: crystal Cedillo. Sale total: $1,065. 4th - Carlos Mindieta. Buyer: Sage Capital bank. Sale total: $1,065. 5th - Akiyah Reyes. Buy- er: Caraway Ford. Sale to- tal: $660. 6th - Felipe Martinez. Buyer: Zarimar Corp. Sale total: $1,065. 7th - Stacy Medina. Buy- er: GVTC. Sale total: $860. 8th - Katie Benitez. Buy- er: Bill walker Plumbing. Sale total: $1,070.

Broilers:

Grand Champion: Ash- lynn Noyola. Buyer: GVTC. Sale total: $2,325 Reserve Champion: Ash- lynn Noyola Showmanship - Ashlynn Noyola 3rd - Isabel Vela. Buyer:

GVEC. Sale total: $2,280. 4th - Randy Tovar. Buyer:

Lindemann Fertilizer. Sale total: $1,050.

Pictures of the winners in the Waelder Livestock Show will appear along with those from Moulton, Luling, Shiner, Gonzales and Nixon-Smiley as part of our annual Lvestock Show Salute on March 22

Page A10

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

GISD officials investigate origin of moldy biscuits By DAVE MUNDY said. “We contacted Poi- son
GISD officials investigate
origin of moldy biscuits
By DAVE MUNDY
said. “We contacted Poi-
son Control and learned
manager@gonzalescannon.com
that bread mold can cause
stomach aches, said it was
unknown if those com-
plaints were related to the
a
mild upper-GI infection
biscuits. The parents were
if
any student had in fact

Gonzales ISD Superin- tendent Dr. Kim Strozier said the school district is investigating how egg-bis- cuit sandwiches served to some students at the school Monday might have be- come contaminated with bread mold. “We received a call from the school administration and went into immediate response mode,” Strozier

Candidate

Filings

Reported office filings for the May 4 local elections. The last day to file is Monday, March 5:

City of Cuero For Mayor - incumbent Sara Post Meyer

City of Flatonia Non candidates have yet been an- nounced

City of Gonzales Mayor - Bob Burchard and Bob- by Logan. District 3 Council -- Incumbent Lorenzo Hernandez has filed for re-election. District 4 Council — Steve Hen- dershot and Clarence Opiela have filed.

Gonzales ISD District 4 — Josie Smith- Wright has filed for re-election. District 7 — Tom Lester Jr. has filed for re-election.

City of Luling There are three positions open- Council Member - Ward 4 & 5 and Mayor-at-large. Mayor Mike Hendrickshas filed for re-election.

eaten it.” Strozier said the tainted biscuits appear to have been confined to third- and fourth-grade students eat- ing breakfast at the school. The district’s automated phone system, Phone ocnnect, was used to con- tact parents of students in the affected classes Mon- day morning, and she said a second round of calls would be made Monday af- ternoon. Strozier said that two children complained of

notified, and the children were released to their par- ents, she said. “We’re investigating to see where it originated,” Strozier said. “Obviously student safety is our first priority. It’s just disturbing to receive any report like this. “We’re going to find out what caused this, how this happened, and take appro- priate action.” Strozier said the district would pass along further advisories as the investiga- tion continues.

along further advisories as the investiga- tion continues. Birthday Wishes from the Coach Douglas Forshagen (left)

Birthday Wishes from the Coach

Douglas Forshagen (left) had a special visitor come to Gonzales on Feb. 11 to help him celebrate his 99th birthday - former Texas A&M football coach Jackie Sherill. Forshagen, who graduated A&M in 1933, and Sherill have been friends for over 25 years. (Courtesy photo)

County considers offer for test-paving of road

By CEDRIC IGLEHART

region@gonzalescannon.com

The Gonzales County Commissioners Court held a relatively short meeting Monday morn- ing. Gonzales County Tax Assessor-Collector Nor- ma Jean DuBose gave her monthly report, which stated the county had collected $2,778,055.46 in taxes for January of 2012. She also stated that through Jan. 82.07% of the 2011 adjusted tax levy and

rollback had been collect- ed, compared to 79.98% in Jan. 2011. The court also heard

a presentation from Oil

& Gas Site Services, who

was touting their cement- treated base. The com- pany asked the court to consider providing a stretch of county road for paving with their product as a “trial run” to serve as a prelude to a county contract. No action was taken. In other business, the court:

• Received an order ap- pointing Becky Weston as the Gonzales County Au- ditor for a two-year term.

• Approved a loan

agreement with Holiday Inn Express & Suites un- der the Gonzales Revolv- ing Loan Fund Program and authorized payment to Holiday Inn in the amount of $160,000 under the Gonzales Revolving Loan Fund Program for purchase of equipment. • Approved a seismic work permit with Weems Geophysical, Inc. for Pct. 2.

City of Moulton No filings have been reported.

Shiner ISD Three candidates have filed for two places on the Shiner ISD Board of Trustees. Place 1 incumbent Julie Gamez has filed for re-election, while in Place 7, Max Moore and J.M. “Trey” Rankin III have filed for the seat currently held by Dr. Maurice Wilkinson.

City of Shiner City Council (Three at-large po- sitions) - incumbent Linda Rigby, Robert Randal (Randy) Boone.

City of Waelder City Council - incumbent Val- entino Hernandez has filed for re-election

City of Yoakum City Council - Place 4 incum- bent Elorine Sitka has filed for re- election

City of Nixon No filings reported.

Nixon-Smiley CISD Place 2 - Bud Box has filed for re-election. Place 3 - Richard Lott has filed for re-election.

Gonzales UWCD No filings reported.

City of Smiley No filings reported.

60-year membership

Receiving 60 year membership pin from Lee Vogel, Grand Vice President Fraternal was Shirley William- son. Presentation was made during the Gonzales Hermann Sons Christmas Party. (Courtesy Photo)

the Gonzales Hermann Sons Christmas Party. (Courtesy Photo) 60-year membership Receiving 60 year membership pin from

60-year membership

Receiving 60 year membership pin from Lee Vogel, Grand Vice President Fraternal was Leona Zella. Pre- sentation was made during the Gonzales Hermann Sons Christmas Party. (Courtesy Photo)

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J. Jordan, owner 3796 N. US Hwy 183 Gonzales, TX 78629 2011 Humanitarian Award Gonzales Lodge

2011 Humanitarian Award

Gonzales Lodge 175 presented the 2011 Humanitarian Award and a check to the Gonzales Memorial Hospital Auxiliaries. From left, Chuck Norris, CEO of Memori- al Hospital, Sally Brown, Pres. of Auxiliary, Raymond Zella, 2011 Pres. Presented award and Margaret Zella, 2012 Zella of Lodge 1975. (Courtesy Photo)

Margaret Zella, 2012 Zella of Lodge 1975. (Courtesy Photo) Blue Angels recognized Gonzales Lodge 175 presented

Blue Angels recognized

Gonzales Lodge 175 presented this group of Gonzales Memorial Hospital Aux- iliaries with the 2011 Humanitarian Award and a check for their general fund. Holding award, Sally Brown, President and her group of Blue Angels. They have a gift shop and do Volunteer work for the hospital. With money from Gift Shop and Vending Machine they buy needed equipment for the hospital. (Courtesy Photo)

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Thursday, March 1, 2012

The Cannon

Page A11

From a death sentence to a brand-new nation: Delegates who signed The Texas Declaration of
From a death sentence
to a brand-new nation:
Delegates who signed
The Texas Declaration
of Independence knew
they risked certain
death if they failed
Washington-on-the-Brazos on March 1, the
situation in Texas had already reached a danger-
ous stage. Those meeting were aware they were
under a death sentence, on the direct orders of
Santa Anna, who viewed the rebels as “pirates”
and attempted to use international maritime law
as justification for summary executions.
A total of 59 delegates signed the final Decla-

When a group of delegates from across Tex- as gathered at Washington-on-the-Brazos on March 1, 1836 with the express intent of declar- ing nationhood, they were not delusioned about their prospects. The army of Mexican dictator Santa Anna was sweeping across the land, and Texas’ ama- teur militiamen had proven thus far unable to stop him. As the delegates gathered, in fact, Santa Anna had surrounded the garrison at The Alamo in San Antonio de Bejar, was sending a second force south to intercept Col. James Fan- nin’s force trying to relieve the Alamo, and was hoping to lure Gen. Sam Houston’s rag-tag army of irregulars into a decisive pitched battle to end the rebellion. The famous Lt. Colonel William Barret Tra- vis Letter of February 24, 1836 from the Alamo dramatically presented the crisis underway only a few days away from the Town of Washington. The drive to establish a separate statehood for Texas had openly surfaced at the Convention of 1832. Settlers of the state, part of the state of Coa- huila y Tejas, submitted a petition to the central government under the Constitution of 1824. It was rejected. By 1835, the Constitution of 1824 has been completely abandoned by General Antonio Lo- pez de Santa Anna. Tensions rose throughout the year, culminating Oct. 1 with the Battle of Gonzales. The rebels enjoyed what they believed were spectacular successes — capturing Goliad on October 9, 1835 and San Antonio on December 10. Between these two events a Consultation was called at San Felipe de Austin. Delegates from the municipalities of Texas signed a document known as The Declaration of Causes on Novem- ber 7, 1835. The original of this document signed by 57 delegates has not survived. The Declaration of Causes stopped short of declaring independence from Mexico, but did state that they had the right to withdraw from the Union since Santa Anna had abandoned the Constitution of 1824. By the time the Convention of 1836 met at

ration of Independence with the additional sig- nature of H. S. Kimble as Secretary. In addition, on the back of the eleven page the document is signed by W. Wharton who had earlier been ap- pointed as a commissioner to the United States. Wharton wrote the notation that the document had been “Left at the Department of State May 28, 1836, by W. Wharton The original” The similarities of the Texas Declaration and the American Declaration of Independence are

dramatic, if only for the fact that both were writ- ten when the outcome of their respective rebel- lions were in doubt. As the Delegates gathered on March 1st time was pressing on Richard Ellis who was appoint- ed president of the convention. A resolution was introduced appointing a committee to draw up

a declaration of independence. Ellis appointed

George C. Childress, James Gaines, Edward Conrad, Collin McKinney, and Bailey Harde- man to this committee. The finished Declaration Document was ad- opted with little change by the committee and the Convention on March 2. The original docu- ment is scripted by Childress which is evident when a comparison is made with his signature on the document and with the style used on the

text. The text of the Texas Declaration is typed as per each page on the Texas Declaration of Inde- pendence Content Link. After the Declaration was completed, the Delegates continued working 17 straight days and nights to forge a new constitution and a new Republic of Texas Government. News of the fall of the Alamo reached the Convention and on March 17, and the delegates fled Santa Anna’s troops advanced to capture the new Govern- ment of Texas.

A little more than a month later, Houston’s

army stopped its headlong flight after Santa Anna split his forces in an attempt to cut off the Texians’ retreat. Houston turned to face the Mex- ican dictator at the San Jacinto River — and in a matter of minutes, routed the professional Mexi- can soldiers, later capturing the dictator himself and forcing Santa Anna to sign a treaty recogniz- ing Texas independence.

Anna to sign a treaty recogniz- ing Texas independence. Texas Historical Commission to salute the Eggleston

Texas Historical Commission to salute the Eggleston House

The Texas Historical Commission (THC) is celebrating 50 years of placing official Texas Historical Markers in histori- cally significant locations throughout the state, making the popular marker program itself eligible for historic recognition. In honor of that, THC officials, along with members of the Gonzales County Historical Commission (CHC), will revisit the placing of the first official Recorded Texas Historic Landmark (RTHL) at the Eggleston House, located at 1300 St. Louis Street, in Gonzales on Wednesday, March 7 at 1:15 p.m. Members of the Gonzales Chapter of the Daughter of the Republic of Texas and Gonzales Junior High School history stu- dents will also participate. The public is in-

vited. The Eggleston House was the first to be rebuilt after Gonzales was burned down after the Runaway Scrape. The first official RTHL medallion was placed at the Eggleston House in Gonza- les in March 1962. Fifty years later, officials with the Gonzales CHC and THC are rec- ognizing the historic event with a ceremo- ny at the historic location and in recogni- tion of Texas Independence from Mexico. The 1840 log cabin home was the first rebuilt in Gonzales after the Runaway Scrape, when thousands of Texans fled their homes when Antonio López de San- ta Anna began his attempted conquest of Texas in February 1836. The flight contin- ued until news came of the victory at the Battle of San Jacinto.

176 Years of Texas freedom

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Page A12

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Land Commissioner: feds suffering from ‘reptile dysfunction’

By DAVE MUNDY

manager@gonzalescannon.com

Texas Land Commission- er Jerry Patterson has a term for what over-zealous federal regulators are trying to do to the Texas economy. “We call it ‘reptile dysfunc- tion,’” Patterson quipped during Thursday’s Gonzales County Republican Party president’s Day Dinner. The state’s top land-man- agement official told county GOP faithful that Texas will sue if the Environmental Protection Agency moves ahead with plans to place several previously-unheard- of species — including a sal- amander —on the Endan- gered Species List, thereby limiting development of vast tracts of West Texas land for oil, gas and heavy-metals ex- ploitation and production. “Their efforts are not based on science, it’s based on litigation from radical

environmental groups,” Pat- terson said, calling those groups ‘environmental Na- zis.’ “The Obama Adminis- tration is trying to kill jobs in Texas.” The Texas General Land Office manages some 13 million acres and annually generates in excess of $300 million in revenues for the state. Prior to taking the Land Commissioner post, Pat- terson had served as a state senator from eastern Har- ris County, and is known as the author of the state’s Con- cealed Handgun law. The former Marine aviator and Vietnam vet said he’s used to hearing gloom and doom from the news media over Republican proposals. “If you recall, just about every major daily newspaper in Texas, when we pushed through the concealed-carry law, they were predicting shootouts at four-way stops,

gun battles in the streets,” he said. “They were saying, ‘Oh no, you have a gun, you might defend yourself! “Funny, that hasn’t hap- pened. The difference be- tween Republicans and Democrats is that we have the ability to have a little faith in our citizens, that they will do the right thing.” Patterson noted the big- gest challenge for Texas Republicans in the current election cycle — aside from the fracas over redistrict- ing — is re-connecting with Hispanic voters. “We have some very old books at the Land Office, some of them dating back hundreds of years,” Patterson said, noting among those books is an accounting from 1845 deeding land to mili- tary veterans and their sur- vivors. “In that book, hand- written, is Robert Crockett, Davy Crockett’s son. On the very next line is Juan Seguin.

“Among those lists is a list of who was an immigrant and who was a native. All the Tejanos were native, it was the Anglos who were the im- migrants then,” he said. “We have to stand firm on illegal immigration, but we cannot forget the contributions to our history made by Teja- nos.” While not involved in the current election cycle, Pat- terson does have plans. He announced Thursday he will be seeking the GOP nomi- nation for lieutenant gover- nor in 2014. Also among those attend- ing the event Thursday were a number of elected officials from the county and local level, as well as State Sen. Glenn Hegar, Congressional candidate Trey Roberts, 25th Judicial District Judge can- didates Steve Finch, Bill Old and Kevin Kolb, and 25th District District Attorney candidate Patricia Finch.

25th District District Attorney candidate Patricia Finch. Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson speaks

Texas Land Commissioner Jerry Patterson speaks duringThursday’s Presidents Day Dinner in Gonzales. (Photo by Dave Mundy)

Judges’ ruling leaves Gonzales Co. split in half

By DAVE MUNDY

manager@gonzalescannon.com

New interim redistricting maps released Tuesday by a federal court will leave Gonzales County split between two congressional dis- tricts, but raised hopes the state would be able to hold its party pri- mary elections on May 29. Texas Attorney General Greg Abbott applauded the changes the

court made to the maps when com- pared to the ones the U.S. Supreme Court struck down in January. “In light of the State’s legal argu- ments, the San Antonio court only modified the Legislatively enacted plan in response to alleged Voting Rights Act violations — while leav- ing virtually all other districts as they were drawn by the Legislature. In doing so, the court properly re- jected the demands by some plain-

tiffs to draw drastic and overreach- ing interim maps,” Abbott said in a prepared news release. The Texas House and congres- sional districts drawn by the San Antonio federal court mirrored an earlier plan approved by the Texas Legislature in dividing Gonzales County between Congressional District 27, currently represented by Republican Blake Farenthold of Corpus Christi, and the new Con-

gressional District 34, which was designated as a “Hispanic major- ity” district. The State House districts also appeared to be close to what was originally approved by the Leg- islature. Gonzales and Caldwell counties will become part of Dis- trict 17 (Rep. Tim Kleinschmidt), while DeWitt Co. will be in District 30 (Rep. Geannie Morrison), and Lavaca and Fayette Counties move

to District 13 (State Rep. Lois Kolk- horst) The court’s map would create two new majority-minority con- gressional districts and preserves the Republican-dominated Leg- islature’s decision to split Austin into five districts, forcing U.S. Rep Lloyd Doggett, D-Austin, to run in a new, heavily Hispanic district which stretches from San Antonio to Austin.

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Region

B

The Cannon Thursday, March 1, 2012

Region B The Cannon Thursday, March 1, 2012 Nixon-Smiley Little Ranch Hands Representing the

Nixon-Smiley Little Ranch Hands

Representing the Nixon-Smiley Ranch Rodeo at the San Antonio Ranch Rodeo Fi- nals Sunday in the Little Ranch Hands contest were Conley Boatright, Cason Tram- mell, and Santos Pompa. Conley is the daughter of Collie and Kristi Boatright; Ca- son is the son of Slade and Shelly Trammell; Santos is the son of Mark and Melissa Pompa. Coach Janna Wheat said, “Our kids did a great job. They were first to get to their goat, but unfortunately drew a very uncooperative goat, and were beaten by the team from Southwest Ranching Heritage Center in Uvalde.” (Courtesy Photo)

Judge: ‘no wrongdoing’ in 2007 drowning case

By RON MALONEY of the Seguin Gazette

Special to The Cannon

SEGUIN — A judge ruled Tuesday there was no evidence of wrongdoing or a cover-up on the part of 25th Judicial District At- torney Heather McMinn or Sheriff Arnold Zwicke in connection with Fran- cesca “Frankie” Casseb’s 2007 drowning death, add- ing there was insufficient probable cause to believe the man who put her in the Guadalupe River was reck- less or negligent. Senior State District Judge Doug Shaver issued the rulings at the close of two days of hearing evi- dence in a court of inquiry

that included emotional and tearful testimony by James “Dan” Rollins III and his daughter Kristin, who were the last people

to see Casseb, 12, alive as she struggled while pinned to a tree by fast current in the Guadalupe River below DROWNING, Page B3

fast current in the Guadalupe River below DROWNING, Page B3 District Attorney Heather McMinn testifies Monday

District Attorney Heather McMinn testifies Monday during a court of inquiry investigating a 2007 drown- ing death. (Photo by Ron Maloney/Seguin Gazette)

Deputies investigate after man struck, killed by big rig

By CEDRIC IGLEHART

region@gonzalescannon.com

A Nixon man was killed when he was struck by a tractor-trailer last weekend. On Sunday, Feb. 26 at approxi- mately 6:15 a.m., the Gonzales County Sheriff’s Office received a 911 call in reference to an auto

verses pedestrian accident near the intersection of Texas Highway 80 and 6th Street in Nixon. Chief Deputy Dennis Richter said the call came from Lonnie Trayton, who was driving a trac- tor trailer belonging to J and K Leasing of Buffalo. Trayton told authorities he was traveling north on Highway 80 when he report-

edly hit something. Deputies with the Gonzales County Sheriff’s Office, along with Nixon Fire Department and Gon- zales County Emergency Medical Services personnel, responded to the accident scene and found the deceased, Benito Araujo Gonza- les, 54 of Nixon, had been struck by the tractor trailer.

After he was struck, his body was caught up in the tractor trail- er and carried several feet before coming to rest. Pct. 4 Justice of the Peace Don Setliff was contacted and responded to the scene, where he pronounced Gonzales dead. Setliff ordered an autopsy be conducted and the body of the deceased was transported by

Finch Funeral Home to the Travis County Medical Examiner’s Office in Austin. Gonzales County depu- ties Cody Mikulencak and Steven Monsivais are heading up the in- vestigation. Richter said the Sheriff’s Office is continuing the investigation of this incident and is awaiting the results of laboratory analysis.

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Page B2

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

Places of Worship

Assemblies of God

Gonzales Family Church Assembly of God

320 St. Andrew

First Assembly of God

509 E. 3rd St. Nixon

New Life Assembly of God

Corner of Church St. & Jessie Smith St. Gonzales

Baha’i Faith

Baha’i Faith

621 St. George St. Gonzales

Baptist

Clark Baptist Church

F.M. 794, Gonzales

County Baptist Church

Hwy. 87 Smiley

Eastside Baptist Church

Seydler Street, Gonzales

Elm Grove Baptist Church 4337 FM 1115 Waelder, Texas 78959

First Baptist Church

422 St. Paul, Gonzales

First Baptist Church

403 N Texas Nixon

First Baptist Church

Hwy 108 N Smiley

First Baptist Church

406 N Ave E Waelder

Greater

Church

S of 90-A (sign on Hwy 80)

Palestine

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Greater Rising Star Baptist Church

3rd Ave S of Hwy 87 Nixon

Harwood Baptist Church

North of Post Office

Iglesia Bautista

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201 S Congress Nixon

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Iglesia Bautista Memorial

Hwy 97 Waelder

Leesville Baptist Church

E. of Hwy 80 on CR 121

Memorial Heights Baptist Church

1330 College Gonzales

Mount Pilgrim Baptist Church

100 Capes Gonzales

Oak Valley Baptist Church

Hwy. 97 Bebe

Old Moulton Baptist Church

2287

FM 1680, Moulton

Primitive Baptist Church

1121

N. College Gonzales

Providence Missionary Baptist Church

1020

St. Andrew Gonzales

San Marcos Primitive Baptist Church

4 Miles west of Luling on Hwy. 90 P.O. Box 186, Luling

830-875-5305

Stratton Primitive Baptist

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St. James Baptist Church

Hwy 80- North of Belmont

Saint Paul Baptist Church

SE 2nd St. Waelder

Shiner Baptist Church

Avenue F and 15th Street, Shiner

Union Lea Baptist Church

St. Andrew St. Gonzales

Union Valley Baptist Church

FM 1681 NW of Nixon

Catholic

St. James Catholic Church

417

N. College, Gonzales

Sacred Heart Catholic Church

St. John St. Gonzales

St. Joseph Catholic Church

207

S. Washington, Nixon

St Patrick Catholic Church in Waelder

613 Highway 90 East Waelder

St. Phillip Catholic Church

Hwy 87 Smiley

Christian

First Christian Church (Disciples of Christ)

712

Crockett, Luling

Churches of Christ

Church of Christ

1323 Seydler St. Gonzales

Church of Christ (Iglesia de Cristo)

201 E. Second St. Nixon

Church of Christ

E. 3rd & Texas, Nixon

Churches of God

Community Church of God

1020 St. Louis, Gonzales

Gonzales Memorial Church of God in Christ

1113 Hastings, Gonzales

New Way Church of God in Christ

514 St. Andrew, Gonzales

Episcopal

Episcopal Church of the Mes- siah

721 S. Louis, Gonzales (830) 672-3407

Evangelical

La Os del Evangelio Mission Capilla del Pueblo

W. Central at 87 Nixon

Full Gospel

Camp Valley Full Gospel

7 mi N of Nixon on Hwy 80

Full Gospel Church

1426 Fisher, Gonzales

Lutheran

First Evangelical Lutheran

1206 St. Joseph, Gonzales

Abiding Word Lutheran Church, LCMS

1310 St. Louis

Methodist

Belmont United Methodist Hwy. 90-A

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Dewville United Methodist

West of FM 1117 on CR 121

First United Methodist

426

St. Paul, Gonzales

First United Methodist

410 N. Franklin, Nixon

Flatonia United Methodist

403 E North Main, Flatonia

Harris Chapel United

Methodist

S. Liberty St. Nixon

Harwood Methodist Church

North 2nd and North Gonzales, Har- wood

Henson Chapel United Method-

ist

1113 St. Andrew, Gonzales

Monthalia United Methodist

CR 112 off 97

Smiley United Methodist

1 blk S. of Hwy 87

Waelder United Methodist

2 blks from Hwy 90 & 97

Webster Chapel A.M.E.

1027 Church St. Gonzales

Non-Denominational

Agape Ministries

512 St. James, Gonzales

Living

Waters

Fellowship

Church

605 Saint Joseph St. Gonzales

Bread of Life Ministries

613 St. Joseph, Gonzales

Cowboy Church of Gonzales County

J.B. Wells Showbarn

El Centro Cristiano “Agua Viva” of Waelder Sun. Worship 10:30 a.m., 6 p.m.

Emmanuel Fellowship

1817 St. Lawrence St. Gonzales

Encouraging

Fellowship

Hwy. 80 in Leesville

Word

Christian

Jesus Holy Ghost Temple

1906 Hickston, Gonzales

Lighthouse Church of Our Lord

1805 Weimar, Gonzales

Temple

Christ

Belmont, Corner of Hwy 466 & Hwy 80

Jesus

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River of Life Christian Fellow- ship

207 Steele St., Smiley 830-587-6500

Two Rivers Bible Church

1600

zales

Sarah DeWitt Dr., Ste 210, Gon-

Inter-Denominational

Faith Family Church

1812 Cartwheel Dr., Gonzales

Pentecostal

Faith Temple

Hwy 80 (N. Nixon Ave.) Nixon

Holy Temple of Jesus Christ No. 2

1515 Dallas, Gonzales

Temple Bethel Pentecostal

1104 S. Paul, Gonzales

Life Changing Church of Gon- zales

3.3 miles north on 183, Right on CR 235, Right on CR 236

Presbyterian

Pilgrim Presbyterian Church

CR 210 off FM 1116

Presbyterian Church of zales

414 St. Louis, Gonzales

Gon-

Messianic Judaism

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Gonzales, TX 78629

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P.O. Box 565 • Gonzales, TX 78629

Dave Shelton Mobile 830-857-5394

Mike Brzozowski Mobile 830-857-3900

Office 830-672-2845

Fax 830-672-6087

Reyna’s Taco Hut 1801 Sarah DeWitt Dr., Gonzales, TX 830-672-2551 Next to the Courthouse Annex
Reyna’s Taco Hut
1801 Sarah DeWitt Dr., Gonzales, TX
830-672-2551
Next to the Courthouse Annex
Open for Breakfast, Lunch & Dinner
Mon.-Sat. 5 a.m. - 9 p.m.; Sun. 5 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Home of the “Silverado”
Authentic Mexican Food Including Caldo & Menudo

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Cell

Office 830-672-1821

830-857-0488

Tony Fitzsimmons, Owner

Thursday, March 1, 2012

The Cannon

Page B3

We need to pray harder for our troops, families

Listen people, I know you/ we pray for our troops and their families. However, we need to start praying harder. This foolishness of killing our men and women in- side places that are secured areas, that are supposed to be the safe areas for them to stay is ridiculous. Whoever, however, let God surround them and let them learn to counteract this and find out how and why they are being

infiltrated this way. There is no worse thing than being betrayed by someone whom you thought was on your side and could trust and then have lives lost because

of that betrayal. You know I was a shel-

tered little girl when I start- ed school and had not been around lots of children in groups. I managed to make one friend that day and she

is still my friend to this day.

She is Janie Rhodes Parks

from Leesville. I can imag- ine how I would have felt

if she would have betrayed

me, especially in that first grade setting. I guess while I am on my “bandwagon” since March 2nd, is Texas Independence Day, I will say that we need to pray for anyone who is protecting other people in the line of duty. Texas is one of those unusual states that fought for their freedom and flew under a number of

different flags. It makes Tex- as different and Cost, and Gonzales different. Go out to Cost, TX and look at the monument declaring Texas’s freedom from Mexico. We boasted of the great Texas Rangers and still do. Think about our law enforcement officers who risk their lives each day. They have to re- ally trust each other, their weapons, their vehicles, and so many other things. And while I was looking this up

I ran across the fact that

March 2nd was the day that Afghanistan was invaded, by Operation Anaconda. I don’t know whether that has anything to do with those stepped up attacks but it is rather coincidental. Good luck to all the live- stock show exhibitors, buy- ers, etc. which is the same date mentioned above for those in Gonzales. Please lift the following people up in your prayers:

Joe Kotwig, Lisa Rodriguez, Terry Bowman, Mr. Baker,

Sandi’s Country Fried News

Sandi Gandre
Sandi
Gandre

William Hudgins, Sa- brina Flores, Bill and Ma- rie Lott, Doris and Alvin Hewell; Hester Behlen, Louise Jones, Aunt Geor- gie Gandre; Danny and Joyce Schellenberg, Pete Kallies, Mildred O’Neal, Doug Walshak, Selma Vick- ers, Gene Robinson, Susie

Dolezal, Teresa Wilke, San-

di Gandre, Carl and Vida

Tindle; Rev A. C. and Ev- elyn Newman, Ruby Ruth Gandre, Aunt Betty Gandre, Linda Nesloney, Larry Filip, Esther Lindemann, Jack Lott, Anna Lindemann, Ann and Bubba Bond; Case, Clint, and Lindsay Martin; Gloria Gass, Shirley Dozier,

Larry Washington, Laura, Bobby Steen, The family of Skee Williams, The family of Jerry Gorden, The family of James Brunkenhoefer, the family of Russell Riley, Jr. and please pray our troops and their families There is more good news about Case Martin. There are some WBC’S develop- ing which shows that the new stem cells are engraft- ing. If things keep going like this, he could possibly be on

the discharge list as early as Monday, but they have to find an apartment. The cost of an apartment is high, and they are evicting patients to make room for rodeo guests in the area where they need

to find an apartment. They

don’t understand this and neither do I. I know that they are just about over- whelmed by all of this, and definitely need your prayers. However, we have to think

about the positive in that the final outcome is a normal immune system for Case. The Belmont Ladies Club met for the last time under this name and had their year end dinner at the Ainsworth House in Luling. It was held

in a very nicely decorated

secluded side room with

four people to a table. We had a delightful choice of soup/salad and sandwiches

or a whole sandwich and a

wonderfully delightful pasta salad. There were so many

and a wonderfully delightful pasta salad. There were so many more things on the menu but

more things on the menu but these were mostly our choices. The desserts were scrumptious too. Then we drew names out of the jar for door prizes and most received beautiful stained glass wind chimes. Glenda Parker, our outgoing presi- dent received a big beauti- ful stained glass wind chime from Nancy Garnand, Vice- President. Elected President of the new formed Belmont Community Center is- Mar- cia Pinney; Vice-President, Mary Ann Day; Secretary, Glenda Parker; Treasurer, Shari Lee. Of course, we are welcoming new members. There will be no secret pals for the next year, and no bingo for the next meeting. Then the fun began when secret pals were revealed by those who had been buying these presents and hiding the fact for a full year. Per- sonally I think that Marcia better watch out. I may have to take that metal cat with the big blue belly away from her. That is just too cute. Shari Lee took her last class over at the Red Hen Pot- tery in downtown Belmont today. We reaped an extra benefit from her classes as she made each one of us a small container from her pottery class. I think that was a very nice thing to do for each of us while she was learning how to throw “mud” around. This Samson and Dililah are sprawled out on the bed like they think they own the place. They were wait- ing at the door for me when I came home. Itsy had to be different. He popped up from behind a box. Nicki

and Gracie were outside talking chatter because they wanted food. Gracie does more talking out there than ever did when she was inside. She claims domain to the roof and the ash tree. Come spring I just might let Itsy Bitsy out to talk up close and personal with Gracie and Nicki. It seems like to me that he is laying claim to the outside really well. He escaped the other day and the only place that Will could catch up with him was by his tail. It didn’t make Itsy very happy to be grabbed up by his tail but sometimes you have to re- sort to desperate measures. This was definitely turning into a desperate measure as the cat-chasing dogs were rounding the corner in a head on collision course straight for Itsy. Itsy is go- ing to have to learn at least one more thing before he is put outside and that is avoidance of the outside dogs.

Have a good week, and God Bless.

of the outside dogs. Have a good week, and God Bless. DROWNING: Court rules 2007 incident

DROWNING: Court rules 2007 incident was unfortunate accident

Continued from page B1

Lake Dunlap dam. “The court finds that there is absolutely no evi- dence of a cover-up or any criminal conduct on be-

half of the district attorney and/or the sheriff of Gua- dalupe County,” Shaver said. “The court further finds insufficient evidence of any criminal wrongdo- ing by Mr. Rollins. The court finds this event to be a tragic accident and offers its profound sympathies to the Casseb family.” The elder Rollins’s voice broke repeatedly as he re- called the tragedy under questioning by Wilson and his own attorney, Michael Hinton of Houston. Rollins testified he jumped from the Sea-Doo

to try to help the child.

He also described the sequence of events that

led to the authorities and McMinn being called to the scene. He’d seen Mc- Minn once, he believed at

a gathering at his home,

and perhaps a few times at the Baytown home of her former sister-in-law. She sent McMinn, then an attorney in private practice under her previ- ous married name, Hollub. He said he barely knew her, she’s never been his attorney and never gave him legal advice, although he acknowledged that he contributed $500 to her election campaign the next year out of gratitude for her role that night — and that he’d contributed three times as much to two schools and a church in Frankie Casseb’s memory. “I didn’t need a lawyer,” Rollins said. “Heather was an angel. She showed up on my doorstep when our families needed help and she helped us.” Rollins said he didn’t find out until the Seguin Gazette called him last December that a poten- tial criminal investigation had been opened, and expressed shock and sur- prise. “From all the informa-

tion I can gather, this is all politics,” Rollins said. “The emotions are raw. Anger comes to mind. When you have people such as Mrs. (Elizabeth Murray-) Kolb and Mrs. Finch using the tragic drowning of a 12-year-old girl for politi- cal purposes, it’s the lowest

of the low. It angers me so

much I can hardly stand it.” Rollins was referring to local attorney Patricia Finch, who sat with Mur- ray-Kolb through part of Monday’s testimony and who is a candidate to un- seat McMinn as 25th Judi- cial District Attorney.

Murray-Kolb, who left the courtroom early Tues- day to attend commis- sioner’s court, was ordered back by Shaver to testify about why she’d sought to have the case revisited. Under Wilson’s ques- tioning, Murray-Kolb, who is stepping out of her role as county attor- ney after 12 years and has announced no intention to seek another office, in- sisted politics had nothing to do with her decision to bring the documents to Peschel. “It would be easy to say it’s political,” Murray-Kolb acknowledged. “But that’s absolutely false. I felt like there was a terrible viola- tion of (the Casseb’s) trust. It’s a complicated case, and there were things (in the

record) that made it ap- pear the DA had lied to police.” She also had concerns from the depositions that perhaps charges should have been filed

against Rollins and that sheriff ’s deputies had not done enough to in- vestigate. Zwicke will never be- lieve it’s not about politics. “It’s politically motivat- ed,” Zwicke said. “To me, it’s a relief that it’s over. It’s disgusting to me that this has happened — that Gua-

dalupe County politics has resorted to this and I apologize to the citizens of Guadalupe County. He said he was disap- pointed in Murray-Kolb, who he once respected. “I’m upset because we wasted tax dollars here today, yesterday, and on this private investigator hoopla that she brought upon Guadalupe County,” Zwicke said. “I was up there yesterday, asking myself what a jury would think, did we make a mis- take along the way or not, and I’m absolutely certain the sheriff ’s office did not make a mistake.” Between his work as a volunteer firefighter and a sheriff ’s deputy before be- ing elected to the county’s top law enforcement office, Zwicke noted he’s often shared in the grief of the loss of a loved one, and it’s never been easy. “I apologize to the Casseb family and the Rol- lins family that they had to be drug through this once again after five years of trying to heal and now the wounds are open again,” Zwicke said. “I apologize on behalf of Guadalupe County for the actions of the county attorney. If she truly wanted justice, she should start in her own of- fice.”

Engaged

justice, she should start in her own of- fice.” Engaged Donalson-Such Mr. and Mrs. Paul L.

Donalson-Such

Mr. and Mrs. Paul L. Donalson of Weslaco, Texas are pleased to announce the engagement and forth- coming marriage of their daughter, Dana Marie Donalson, to Christopher Ryan Such, son of Mr. and Mrs. Jonathan Such of Gonzales, Texas. The bride-elect is a 2004 graduate of Weslaco High School. She graduated from the University of Texas

in 2007, with a Bachelor of Journalism degree. Dana

is employed as Audience Development Coordinator

at Texas Monthly in Austin, Texas. The groom-elect is a 2004 graduate of Gonzales High School. He graduated from the University of

Texas in 2008, with a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering. Chris is employed as Congestion Reve- nue Rights Engineer at ERCOT, the Electric Reliability Council of Texas, in Taylor, Texas. The couple will be married June 2, 2012 at Univer- sity United Methodist Church in Austin, Texas with

a reception following at the Austin Museum of Art – Laguna Gloria. (Courtesy Photo)

Austin Museum of Art – Laguna Gloria. ( Courtesy Photo) Getting Ready for The Stock Shows!
Getting Ready for The Stock Shows! Updo’s, Cuts, Hilites, Nails, Facials, Massages Gifts & More
Getting
Ready for
The Stock
Shows!
Updo’s, Cuts,
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Facials,
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Gifts & More
Hair It Is &
Co.
1402 St. Louis,
Gonzales, TX. 78629
830-672-3904

Page B4

The Cannon

Thursday, March 1, 2012

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