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Installation & Operation Manual for D2066 Quasar Receiver

For software version v0024

Dycon Ltd Tel: 01443 471060 Fax: 01443 479374

INDEX
Description Part Numbers What to Do: Site Survey Installation System Testing Help Desk & Web Site The Details: Operational features Channel Inputs Analogue PSTN Modem(s) Digital ISDN Terminal Adapter(s) GSM Radio Modem(s) GSM SIM Cards VDN Radio-PAD(s) Power Requirements & Battery Radio aerials Printers Outputs (serial, printer, DC, relay) Remote Receiver Display Serial Numbers and Software version Number Factory Defaults Programming & Engineering Access Security Testing Quasar using a GSM Dualcom The Quasar Fitting Kit D2065 Power Supply Software Update / Replacement PCB Update / Replacement Appendix 1 (LED & Fault Indications ) Appendix 2 (Text Entry Procedure) Appendix 3 (Output Protocol Descriptions) Appendix 4 (Data Format - Input Descriptions) Appendix 5 (Data Format and Output Protocol Associations) Appendix 6 (Setup Parameters Form) Appendix 7 (Using different Modems) Appendix 8 (Specification & Approvals) Appendix 9 (Glossary of Terms) 10 - 11 13 14 - 17 18 - 22 23 - 25 26 27 - 29 30 - 32 33 34 - 35 36 - 40 41 41 41 42 - 59 60 61 62 63 63 - 64 65 - 66 67 68 - 83 84 - 87 88 89 - 90 91 92 93 - 94 6 7-8 8 9 2 3

Part No.: AH 206601-007

30/9/2004

Installation & Operation Manual for D2066 Quasar Receiver For software version v0024
Description The D2066 Quasar Receiver is a 19 inch rack unit that will receive alarm and monitoring transmissions from security and other systems using digital transmission formats. Up to four network connections are available on Quasar allowing up to 4 simultaneous received calls. Transmissions may be received from the analogue PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network), the digital ISDN (Integrated System Digital Network), GSM (Global System for Mobile Communications) networks and the Vodafone VDN (Vodafone Data Network) X25 network. Any mix of these units may be used on the 4 inputs, one per input. Outputs are available for printers and for connection to other logging systems, e.g. an Alarm Management System. Received transmissions will be available on these outputs and may also be seen on the receivers LCD display. Relay outputs are also available for sounders and other indicators. An internal log of all calls will be maintained even in the event of power failure or output cable disruption. All log entries are time and date stamped, and printed reports are serial numbered. The unit includes self test routines that constantly monitor performance, power and the integrity of the telephone lines that are connected. Monitoring information may be displayed and printed. In addition, these reports are available in the same format as a received alarm transmission and may be output to an Alarm Management System. The unit will operate from any suitable source of DC voltage (12 to 15 volts). For professional monitoring applications it is recommended that the matching D2065 Power Supply is used. This is a 19 inch rack mounted UPS that includes power and battery condition monitoring.

The Quasar Receiver - Front View Fig 1 This Manual includes descriptions of features to be found in software version v2066 0023 issued 1/4/2003 and v2066 0024 issued 7/9/04. Note: This manual may refer to features and operation that are not available in your Quasar receiver software. If some or all of these features and/or operation are required, contact Dycon for software upgrade availability.

Part Numbers D2066 D2065 D2068 D2067 D2016 CS1016 CS2057 CS1057 D0640 D0641 D2064 D3651-00 D3651-01 D0300 D0402 Quasar Receiver Power Supply (UPS) 19 inch rack mounted Analog PSTN Modem Kit Digital ISDN Terminal Adaptor Kit GSM Radio Modem Kit VDN Radio-PAD Kit GSM aerial with 5m lead VDN aerial with 8m lead 40 column serial Printer Kit Spare paper rolls (2) and printer ribbon (1) for D0640 Remote Receiver Display Kit Demonstration / temporary plug-top PSU, UK Demonstration / temporary plug-top PSU, Europe Heavy Duty Lightning/Surge Suppressor for PSTN Dycon Products CD containing manuals for all products

The Quasar Receiver Front View

Keypad Fig 2 Display Data and Printer outputs LED Indicators DC power inputs

The Quasar Receiver Rear View

Network Inputs Relay outputs Fig 3 Chassis Earth Bolt

Radio VDN X25 Radio Packet Network Police Station

Radio

Portable Alarm systems

Radio GSM Radio Communications Network Radio Alarm Receiving Station

Portable Alarm systems

Fire Station

4
ISDN Digital Communications Network Wires 24 hour manned site with Quasar (and other) receivers and Alarm Management System PSTN Analogue Communications Network Wires Fig 4

Dualcom

Wires

Emergency Services

DigiCom

Wires

Alarm System with radio and line signalling

Customer Responce Facilities

Radio Remote Display Remote Display output DC output Serial lead VDN Radio-PAD DC supply Channel 2 DC output 4 Relay outputs Channel 2 data input 12V DC for sounders, lights and printers DC supply Channel 1 DC output

GSM Radio Communications Network

GSM Radio Serial lead Channel 1 data input GSM 900/1800 Radio Modem

SMA

VDN X25 Radio Packet Network

Radio

VDN Radio

TNC

Relay outputs for sounders & lights Alarms Management System

PTT Board

Quasar Receiver
Mains Serial lead Channel 3 data input Channel 3 DC output Parallel Printer output Serial lead DC supply Printer data lead DC supply Serial lead ISDN Serial Data output

5
Digital ISDN Terminal Adapter PSTN Channel 4 data input Channel 4 DC output Analogue PSTN Modem Power Supply 12 - 15 Volt supply Fig 5 Battery 12v 7Ah

Network Termination

ISDN Digital Communications Network

RJ45

Parallel Printer Mains

Network Termination

PSTN Analogue Communications Network

RJ10

Serial Printer output

Printer data lead

Display & Keyboard

Power Supply Serial Printer

Mains

Mains

Battery backed -up (UPS) Power Supply

Site Survey Dycon strongly recommend that a site survey is conducted prior to installation of a Quasar receiver to confirm that adequate communication and power facilities exist at the intended installation location. 1. Ensure that space is available within the 19 inch rack and that 4 suitable mounting screws and nuts are available. These are normally supplied as part of the 19 inch rack fitting kit. 2. When connecting to wired networks, check that the required network connections are available. Where Analog PSTN and/or digital ISDN network connection is required, these services should have a Network Termination close (less than 3m) to the Quasar receivers location. RJ45 and RJ10 connectors are provided on the Quasar rear panel. Ensure that the correct connectors are available. 3. When connecting to a GSM radio network check that the required network aerial(s) are available, e.g. aerials for GSM 900 or GSM 1800 or both. Ensure that the correct connectors are available. Where connection to a GSM Radio network is required, ensure that there is sufficient radio signal strength at the intended location of the aerial(s). Determine the signal strength available. For this you can use a mobile telephone or call a Help Desk and ask for a GSM signal strength prediction. See page 9. If there is no GSM radio coverage at the proposed site, then the Quasar will not be able to receive signals directly from a GSM network base station. A GSM aerial is available with a 5m cable. SMA connectors are provided on the Quasar rear panel. Due to high radio losses in coax at GSM frequencies, a GSM cable extention is not recommended. Call a Help Desk for further advice. 4. When connecting to the VDN radio network check that the required network aerial(s) are available. Ensure that the correct connectors are available. Where connection to the VDN network in UK is required, ensure that there is sufficient radio signal strength at the intended location of the aerial(s). Determine the signal strength available. For this you can use the CSL CS1066 Radio Test Set or call a Help Desk and ask for a VDN signal strength prediction. See page 9. This will tell you if there is VDN radio coverage at the proposed site. If there is no VDN radio coverage at the proposed site, then the Quasar will not be able to receive signals directly from a VDN network base station. A VDN aerial is available with an 8m cable. Cable extention up to 20m may be utilised. TNC connectors are provided on the Quasar rear panel. 5. Quasar requires a 12-15 volt DC supply at 2 amps maximum capability. See pages 30. This may be supplied by a DC supply system at the site or by a battery backed-up power supply (UPS) that derives its power from the mains supply. The D2065 matching rack-mounted power supply is recommended. See page 62. Ensure that the correct connectors are available. For temporary and demonstration purposes the D3651 plug-top power supply is recommended. 6. Ensure that suitable cables and connectors are available for the connection of printers and data outputs to other equipment, e.g. an AMS. 7. Ensure that suitable cables and connectors are available for connection of warning equipment, e.g. lights and sounders. 8. Refer to the Part Number list (page 3) and order as required: Quasar Receiver, PSTN Modem, ISDN Terminal Adapter, GSM Padio Modem, VDN Radio-PAD, Printer, Power Supply and aerials.

Installation 1. Conduct a site Survey. See Page 6. 2. Unpack the receiver and remove the internal bag of cables and fittings. See page 63.Ensure that the D3040 Memory card is fitted. Check that all cables and fittings are present. See Page 61. 3. Fit the internal battery and its lead. Do not connect the battery lead to the Quasar at this stage. See pages 31 and 32. 4. Set-up and fit the Modem(s) / Terminal adaptor(s) / Radio Module(s) as required into the Quasar case. See pages 14 to 29. 5. Fit a remote Receiver Display if required. See page 41.

Ribbon lead to Processor Board Display Board Front Panel open Fig 6

6. Install the Quasar into a 19 inch rack. 7. Connect an earth connection on the rear panel chassis bolt. See Fig 7. 8. Install the power supply into a 19 inch rack and connect to a source of mains power. Do not connect power to the Quasar at this stage. 9. Connect radio aerials and network (PSTN & ISDN) cables to the Quasar as required. Ensure that the radio network(s) provide a suitable signal at the aerial location. See pages 33. 10.Connect a printer if required. See pages 34 to 40. 11. Connect an output to an Alarm Management System (AMS) if required. See page 39 and 40. 12.Connect the output relays to sounders if required. See page 40. 13.Connect the Quasar internal battery. See page 31 and 32. 14.Connect the cable from the power supply to the Quasar. When power is applied, ensure POWER led is on solid and that the display shows the start-up screen. See Fig 2. 15.Program the Quasar with its operational settings. See pages 42 to 59. 16. Use a suitable transmission device, e.g. Dualcom, Oasis, PortAlarm. Send a transmission to the Quasar to confirm that reception on Channel 1 operates as required. See page 60. Ensure that the printer and AMS output operate as required. Correct any connections and programming as required. 17.Repeat step 16 to test each of the 4 channels.

Installation (continued)

Voltage inputs & relay outputs

Unscrew to open

Telecomms & radio inputs

Fig 7 Printer & serial outputs Part Number & Serial Number Chassis Earth Bolt

Processor Board Fig 8 Rear Panel open

18.Using the Setup Parameters Form at Appendix 4, record all setup parameters: The serial number of the Quasar. See page 41. The Quasar software version number. See page 41. The Type of each Modem / Terminal adaptor / Radio Module used The telephone numbers of any PSTN or ISDN line used. The serial number and data telephone number of any GSM SIM card used. Radio signal strengths. Keep a copy of the Setup Parameters Form with your documentation that relates to this installation. It is recommended that this Manual with the completed Setup Parameters Form is kept with the Quasar. 19.Allow a minimum of 1 hour for the system and printer batteries to charge before using the Quasar. 20.The Quasar is now ready for use.

Help Desk If you have installed the Quasar in accordance with these instructions, checked all the above points but are still experiencing problems you can contact your Quasar supplier, your Telecom Service Provider or your VDN Service Provider. When contacting a Help Desk it is essential that the information on the Setup Parameters Form at Appendix 4 is available. In UK, VDN network questions may be addressed to: The CSL Technical Support Desk: Tel: 01895 474 444 Email: support@csldual.com In UK, Quasar installation, programming, operation or other questions may be addressed to: The Dycon Technical Support Desk: Tel: 01443 471064 Email: technical@dyconsecurity.com The Dycon web site: www.dyconsecurity.com contains the latest copies of all manuals for all Dycon products. Please ensure that you are working from the latest version. You can also download associated information and software samplers. Sales, shipping and contact information is here too.

Operational Features Channels Quasar can receive data transmissions from up to four network connections.These are connected to 4 input channels (9way D socket, serial data as a PC COM port) by the relevant Network Terminating Equipment, e.g. a modem for the PSTN. This equipment may be housed inside the Quasar case. See Appendix 5. Network Types Network Termination Equipment is available from Dycon for 4 different networks. These are a modem for the analogue PSTN, a Terminal Adaptor for the digital ISDN, a GSM Radio module for a 900 Mhz or 1800 MHz GSM network and a VDN Radio-PAD for the Vodafone VDN X25 network in UK. Any mix of these networks may be used on the 4 Quasar input channels. These equipments may be housed inside the Quasar and can receive their power from the Quasar. See Appendix 5. The user may provide their own network termination equipment for these or other networks. Basic configuration information is given in this manual for that other equipment. Where this equipment is too large to house inside the Quasar case or requires different power supplies, it may be mounted outside the Quasar and connected by serial cables. Clock Quasar includes a time clock and calendar. This is available for time and date stamping on all log entries and printed reports. This clock will maintain the time and date even in the event of a total power failure to the Quasar and/or disconnection of the Quasar internal battery. Internal Log The Quasar internal NVM will contain the 2000 most recent transmissions that have been received, for up to 10 years. Each entry will be time and date stamped. Each entry will include a four digit sequential number to indicate any tampering. Each entry will show if it is to be printed or has been passed to a printer. Each entry will show if it is to be passed to an AMS or has been passed to an AMS. The log may be viewed on the display or printed. Log and Printer Tampering All log entries and printed reports include a four digit sequential number to indicate any tampering that may occur to the printed output. Resiliance of Outputs Disruption of the output cables to the printer or the AMS will not cause the loss of received alarm information. This information will be stored in the Quasar Internal Log. When those outputs are restored, the information will be printed and/or passed to the AMS as required by the operational presets. Alarm Protocols The Quasar is supplied with two alarm transmission protocols that may be received from any data network listed above. These protocols are Dualcom96 and High Speed Contact-ID. To meet customers operational requirements Quasar has been designed to include other alarm transmission protocols. Contact Dycon for transmission protocol options. Output protocols The Quasar is supplied with several output protocols for onward transmission of alarms to other systems, e.g. an Alarms Management System. These protocols are Radionics 6500, Radionics 6500-Extended, RadionicsIE, Ademco High Speed, Ademco $+1, Ademco 4+2 and Contact-ID. To meet customers operational requirements Quasar has been designed to include other output protocols. Contact Dycon for output protocol options. See Appendix 5. The output port can also carry regular integrity transmissions for AMS monitoring of the Quasar. Printers A serial or parallel printer may be connected. All alarm transmissions may be printed, or Quasar fault conditions only, or printing may be deferred in favour of the serial output to an AMS.

10

Operational Features (continued) Battery Operation Quasar includes a 7 amp/hour battery. This will enable full operation for 4 or more hours in the event of failure of all power supplies to the Quasar. The various network termination equipments, e.g. modems that are housed inside the Quasar and output devices, e.g. a printer, may be powered from the Quasar and so remain fully operational from the same battery. With the Quasar operating from an external DC supply, it is possible to disconnect and replace this battery without interrupting operation. Monitoring The unit includes self test routines that constantly monitor performance and power. Any analogue PSTN, digital ISDN lines or radio networks, GSM or VDN) that are connected to the Quasar are also tested regularly if no transmissions are received. Failure will be corrected by cycling power to that unit to perform a reset. All monitoring and fault warnings may be displayed and printed. To allow this monitoring information to be presented to an operator at an AMS, these reports are available in the same format as a received alarm transmission and may be output to an AMS in the same manner. This requires that the Quasar is programmed with an Account Number and the AMS is preset with this Account and the monitoring / channel association. Power Supply When the Quasar is used with its matching D2065 Power Supply the monitoring features within that power supply are output to the Quasar. These may be displayed, printed and output to the AMS as described above. Output Relays Four output relays are available for connection to lights or sounders to announce incomming alarm calls and/ or Quasar fault conditions. Software Upgrade The software that enables the Quasar to operate, is contained on a plug-in memory card. This may be removed and replaced to enable other features to be made available. In most cases, this action will not delete or change the contents of the Internal Log. Where features or operation contained in the new memory card will affect the Internal Log, a note to this effect will be supplied with the new memory card. Language Options Where a numeric alarm transmission protocol is used, an internal look-up table allows plain text to be added to the printer and display outputs. This can assist operators who are not using an AMS. These text outputs may be translated using the front panel keypad. Maintenance All power signal and data connections are made via removable connectors on the case of the Quasar allowing rapid removal and replacement of a whole receiver without access to internal connections. All internal power signal and data connections are made via removable connectors allowing rapid removal and replacement of any internal PCB or other item. Access to any internal item may be achieved via the hinge-down front and rear panels without having to remove the Quasar from the rack. Warranty The Quasar receiver and all of its associated modem and printer kits are covered by a 2 year no quibble guarantee. Additional warranty may be provided as part of a service/maintenance agreement.

11

Rear Panel - PTT Board

Channel 1 connectors Channel 2 connectors Channel 3 connectors Channel 4 connectors Radio GSM (SMA) Radio VDN (TNC) Analogue PSTN (RJ10) ISDN (RJ45)

Fig 11 Cut-out for external Modem serial lead(s)

Channel 1 DC power Channel 2 DC power Channel 3 DC power

Channel 4 DC power

DC Power Jumper Link DC 6 volt position DC 9 volt position DC 12 volt position

Channel 1 input Channel 2 input Channel 3 input Channel 4 input Fig 12

12

Channel Inputs Each of the four channel inputs may be connected to a communication network via Network Terminating Equipment. That equipment must have a serial output of the type that can be connected to a PC serial COM port input. The Quasar Serial Inputs are configured as a PC DTE serial COM ports. See Fig 12. The connection to the 9way D connector pins is shown. Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Signal n/c RD Data to Quasar TD Data from Quasar DTR From Quasar 0v n/c RTS From Quasar CTS To Quasar n/c

1 2

3 4 5

o o o o o o o o o
6 7 8 9

The data speed of each input is selected via the Programming Options. This may be 300, 600, 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600 baud. The communication requires 8 data bits, No parity and 1 stop bit (8N1). A jumper link and 2pin connector provides a DC supply for each channel that may be individually adjusted to 6, 9 or 12 volts. Note: When set to 12 volts, the output voltage is the battery voltage and may be up to 14 volts. Up to 500mA average may be drawn from each of these outputs. See Fig 12.

GSM Radio Module on inner shelf

PSTN Modem on inner base

Fig 13

13

Analogue PSTN Modems Dycon provides an Analogue PSTN Modem Kit suitable for connection to an analogue PSTN termination. This kit includes all necessary cables and connectors. Modems from other sources may be used. All modems must operate with a Hayes command set and be approved for connection to the PSTN in the country concerned. The data connection must conform to a conventional serial standard as used on a PC serial COM port. Operation at data speeds of 9600, 2400, 1200 and 300 baud will be required. Auto-answer must be disabled and speed negotiation at data rates above 9600 baud may be disabled. Extended result codes (ie, enable the "NO DIALTONE" message) are required. This is the default for most modems but if not, refer to the modem manual and add the Hayes command to enable extended result codes. Because of the vast range of types, connections, size, power and programming options for modems from other sources, Dycon can not advise on their suitability, configuration or connections. The Quasar can supply the modem with 6, 9 or 12 volts DC supply at 250mA. Modems requiring an AC supply can not receive power from the Quasar. See Appendix 5. To install a modem inside the Quasar case: 1. Unpack the Analogue PSTN Modem Kit and check parts for damage. Ensure that the parts and quantities are present. Refer to the leaflet contained in the kit. Leave this leaflet inside the receiver. See Fig 15. 2. Prepare the Modem connections. Connect the 0.6m PSTN network lead with RJ10 & RJ11connectors to the modems network socket. Connect the serial data lead to the modems data socket. If an adaptor is required it will be supplied in the Analogue PSTN Modem Kit. Connect the power lead to the modems power connector. See fig 14.

PSTN Modem Fig 14 Power, data & PSTN lead

3. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the rear panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 7 & 8. 4. Slide the modem into the case and locate on the base of the case or on the shelf. See Fig 13. 5. Use one of the serial data ribbon leads supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit. See page 50. Connect this to a spare channel input data socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Note its channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4). See fig 12. 6. Connect the modem serial data lead to this ribbon lead. Do not connect the modem serial lead directly to the channel data socket on the rear panel Processor Board because it will foul the case when the rear panel is closed and put undue strain on the Processor Board connector. 7. Connect the modem PSTN network lead to the relevant PSTN (RJ10) socket on the rear panel PTT Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 5 above. See fig 11.

14

Analogue PSTN Modems (continued) 8. Each Modem Kit includes a leaflet. This leaflet states the voltage that the modem requires and its current consumption. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the modem. On the rear panel Processor Board, adjust the voltage jumper link for that channel to suit the modem requirement. See Fig 12. This jumper link may be adjusted for 6 volts, 9 volts or 12 volts DC. Warning: Operating the modem on a higher than recommended voltage may cause permanent damage to the modem and/or Quasar. Lower than recommended voltages may inhibit operation. 9. Connect the modem power lead to to the relevant DC power socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 7 above. See fig 12. Note: Ensure that the switch on the modem side is ON. 10.Close the Quasar case ensuring that no leads become trapped or internal items cause damage to the components on the rear panel. 11. Connect the 3m PSTN network lead to the relevant PSTN (RJ10) socket on the outside of the rear panel. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 5 above. See fig 11. Connect to the PSTN telephone line termination. 12.Program the Quasar presets for this channel. Select type PSTN Modem. See pages 42 to 59. Type: PSTN Modem Data: Select transmission protocol as required Baud: 9600 Test: 10 mins Setup String: AT&F0E0S0=0&M0&K0&E0 Data bits: 8 Parity: None During installation it is convienent to have the PSTN Modem sounder on to indicate received call progress. When installation is complete this sounder may be turned off by adding M0 to the Setup String, e.g. AT&F0E0S0=0&M0&K0&E0M0. Modems may be mounted outside the Quasar. Where this is required, on the rear panel carefully remove the metal section next to the PTT Board Channel 1 Radio connector. See Fig 11. Fit the alligator grommet supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit to the edge of the hole. Feed the serial data lead through this hole when closing the rear panel. Each Modem Kit includes a leaflet. This leaflet states the voltage that the modem requires and its current consumption. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the modem. Modem LED Indications Refer to the Modem manual supplied in the Modem Kit.

15

Analogue PSTN Telephone Line The analogue PSTN is a communication network where the line from the exchange equipment and the service supplied to the subscriber is analogue, i.e. not digital. See 16. A telephone line is always terminated at the users premises by an NTP (Network Termination Point) which is provided by the Telecoms Service Provider. This is a socket or connection where the users equipment can be connected. Some NTPs provide a socket and terminals for connection. In many cases, the NTP operates using power supplied from the exchange equipment via the telephone line. An analogue PSTN telephone line may be provided by BT or any of the other 44 telecoms service providers in UK. The Control Panel can be connected here. See Fig 16.

Analogue PSTN Telephone Line Fig 16

Connecting other telecomms equipment IN PARALLEL to the analogue telephone line used by the Quasar can stop the unit receiving alarm calls. Parallel connection is NOT recommended for the Quasar. The recommended PSTN line for Quasar: A PSTN line is supplied as ex-directory, AND the PSTN line goes to a Quasar PSTN Modem input ONLY. (No other telephone, fax, modem etc. is connected to the same line)

Connecting other telecomms equipment IN PARALLEL to the PSTN telephone line used by the Quasar can stop the unit receiving alarm calls. See Fig 17. Parallel connection is NOT recommended for the Quasar

Fig 17

16

ADSL (Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line) or Broadband ADSL lines are sometimes called Broadband. Many ADSL lines are Hybrid lines, i.e. they carry ADSL digital data and analogue telephone signals simultaneously. Some ADSL line NTPs provide an analogue socket; the Quasar can be connected here. See Fig 18. At the ADSL line NTP, a splitter or filter is used to separate the low frequency analogue telephone signals from the high frequency ADSL data signals. The ADSL filters may be built into the NTP or they may be plug-in inline types. See Fig 19. The NTPs that include ADSL fliters are normally provided with a new installation. The plug-in inline filters are normally provided on an analogue PSTN line that has been converted to an ADSL hybrid line. Contact your ADSL Service Provider for more information on ADSL lines or filters.

ADSL Hybrid Line (Filters in NTP) Fig 18

ADSL Hybrid Line (Plug-in Filters) Fig 19

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Digital ISDN Terminal Adapters Dycon provides a Digital ISDN Terminal Adapter Kit suitable for connection to a digital ISDN termination. This kit includes all necessary cables and connectors. Note: Terminal Adapters from other sources may be used. All Terminal Adapters must operate with a Hayes command set and be approved for connection to the ISDN in the country concerned. The data connection must conform to a conventional serial standard as used on a PC serial COM port. Operation of a V110 bearer service will be required. Because of the vast range of types, connections, size, power and programming options for modems from other sources, Dycon can not advise on their suitability, configuration or connections. The Quasar can supply the modem with 6, 9 or 12 volts DC supply at 250mA. Modems requiring an AC supply can not receive power from the Quasar. See Appendix 5. To install a Terminal Adapter inside the Quasar case: 1. Unpack the Digital ISDN Terminal Adapter Kit and check parts for damage. Ensure that the parts and quantities are present. Refer to the leaflet contained in the kit. Leave this leaflet inside the receiver. See Fig 21. 2. The Terminal Adapter is preset with factory defaults. These will answer any incoming ringing on the ISDN line. Where it is required that the Terminal Adapter will only respond to one of the telephone numbers that may be applied to an ISDN line, it will be necessary to programme the Terminal Adapter using a PC prior to its installation in the Quasar. See page 20.

Reset Push-button ISDN Terminal Adaprer

Fig 20

Power, data & ISDN lead

3. Prepare the Terminal Adapter connections. Connect the 0.6m lead with RJ45 connectors to the Terminal Adaptors network socket. Connect the serial data lead to the Terminal Adaptors data socket. Connect the power lead to the modems power connector. See fig 20. 4. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the rear panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 7 & 8. 5. Slide the Terminal Adapter into the case and locate on the base of the case or on the shelf. See Fig 13. 6. Use one of the serial data ribbon leads supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit. See page 50. Connect this to a spare channel input data socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Note its channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4). See fig 12. 7. Connect the Terminal Adapter serial data lead to this ribbon lead. Do not connect the Terminal Adapter serial lead directly to the channel data socket on the rear panel Processor Board because it will foul the case when the rear panel is closed and put undue strain on the Processor Board. 8. Connect the Terminal Adapter network lead to the relevant ISDN (RJ45) socket on the rear panel PTT Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 6 above. See fig 11.

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Digital ISDN Terminal Adapters (continued) 9. Each Terminal Adapter Kit includes a leaflet. This leaflet states the voltage that the Terminal Adapter requires and its current consumption. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the modem. On the rear panel Processor Board, adjust the voltage jumper link for that channel to suit the Terminal Adapter requirement. See Fig 12. This jumper link may be adjusted for 6 volts, 9 volts or 12 volts DC. Warning: Operating the Terminal Adapter on a higher than recommended voltage may cause permanent damage to the modem and/or Quasar. Lower than recommended voltages may inhibit operation. 10.Connect the Terminal Adapter power lead to to the relevant DC power socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 6 above. See fig 12. 11. Ensure that the Terminal Adapter is set with the factory default programming. Ignore this step if special programming was completed at step 2 above. Using the switch on the rear of the Terminal Adapter case, switch the unit off. Press and hold the square push-button on the top of the Terminal Adapter case. With this button pushed, switch the Terminal Adapter on. Release the push button. See fig 16. 12.Close the Quasar case ensuring that no leads become trapped or internal items cause damage to the components on the front or rear panel. 13.Connect the 3m ISDN network lead to the relevant ISDN (RJ45) socket on the outside of the rear panel. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 6 above. See fig 11. Connect to the ISDN telephone line termination. 14.Program the Quasar presets for this channel. See page 42 to 59. Type: ISDN Data: Select transmission protocol as required Baud: 9600 Test: 10 mins Setup String: ATB15 Data Bits: 8 Parity: None

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Digital ISDN Terminal Adapters (continued) A Terminal Adapter may be mounted outside the Quasar. where this is required, on the rear panel carefully remove the metal section next to the PTT Board Channel 1 Radio connector. See Fig 11. Fit the alligator grommet supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit to the edge of the hole. Feed the serial data lead through this hole when closing the rear panel. An example of a Terminal Adapter Kit leaflet is shown at Fig 21. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the Terminal Adapter. Programming the Terminal Adapter Where it is required that the Terminal Adapter will only respond to one of the telephone numbers that may be applied to an ISDN line, it will be necessary to programme the Terminal Adapter using a PC prior to its installation in the Quasar. Connect the Terminal Adapter to a PC Serial COM port using the serial data lead provided. Connect the Terminal Adapter power lead. Using a suitable program, e.g. Hyperlink or Dynacomm, set the relevant Terminal Adapter parameters for use on the ISDN line as required. Refer to the Terminal Adapter Manual and leaflet (book or on CD) provided in the Terminal Adapter Kit. Note: This step is best undertaken by an experienced technician who understands ISDN digital communication equipment. Terminal Adapter programming instructions can not be provided via the phone from a Help Desk.

LED Indications Link LED Lights when the ISDN connection is made to the RJ45 connector on the Terminal Adapter This should be lit to indicate that calls can be received. Note: On some PABX equipment, this may only be lit when a call is being established or is in progress. Lit to indicate that a call is in progress on the B1 channel Lit to indicate that a call is in progress on the B2 channel Lit to indicate that communications between the Terminal Adapter and Quasar is OK Lit to indicate that communications between the Terminal Adapter and Quasar is OK Lit to indicate that communications between the Terminal Adapter and Quasar is OK Lit to indicate that communications between the Terminal Adapter and Quasar is OK

B1 LED B2 LED RTS LED DTS LED CTR LED CTS LED

20

ISDN (Integrated System Digital Network) The digital ISDN is a communication network where the line from the exchange equipment and the service supplied to the subscriber is digital, i.e. not analogue. An ISDN line is a digital telephone line that conforms to the international ISDN standard. It can carry several calls simultaneously. Two types are generally available. Type ISDN 2 ISDN 2e ISDN 30 Name Basic Rate Basic Rate Primary Rate Number of simultaneous calls Up to 2 simultaneous calls Up to 2 simultaneous calls Up to 30 simultaneous calls

An ISDN line is always terminated at the users premises by an NTP (Network Termination Point) which is provided by the Telecoms Service Provider. The NTP is a socket or connection where the users equipment can be connected. The service supplied to the user from the NTP may vary. The digital connection on the NTP is called the S-Bus. The S-Bus allows many different types of digital communication equipment to be connected, e.g. an ISDN interface card in a PC. In many cases, the ISDN NTP operates using power supplied from the exchange equipment via the ISDN telephone line, however some types of NTP may require a connection to the mains supply at the users premises. Some ISDN NTPs include a converter to provide analogue sockets (e.g. Home Highway); See below. ISDN2e (Integrated System Digital Network, 2 channel) A basic rate ISDN telephone line can carry the equivalent of two simultaneous calls. In UK, a basic rate ISDN line is called ISDN2 or ISDN2e. Some suppliers call an ISDN2 line Home Highway or Business Highway. See below. An ISDN2 line can be provided as point-to-point or point-to-multipoint. Where there is only one item connected to the S-bus then a point-to-point service is OK. Where two or more items are connected to the S-bus then a point-to-multipoint must be provided. Contact your telecom Service Provider for details of the ISDN services that they can provide. The ISDN Terminal Adapter can be connected to an ISDN2 or ISDN2e line.

Home Highway, Business Highway Home Highway and Business Highway is the marketing name for a basic rate ISDN2 line supplied by BT with an NTE9 NTP. The NTE9 NTP provides two S-Bus sockets, it includes an ISDN-Analogue converter and two analogue telephone sockets. This type of NTP can have an analogue phone, fax, modem etc.connected at either or both of the analogue telephone sockets. See Fig 22. Power for the NTE9 comes from the exchange equipment via the ISDN line and also from the mains supply at the users premises. In the event of mains failure, the right-hand analogue telephone socket on the NTE9 will cease to operate but all other functions are powered from the exchange equipment. A maximum of two calls on an NTE9 may be in progress at the same time. Use of one analogue telephone socket constitutes one call. Use of the S-Bus on either S-Bus socket constitutes one or two calls (64 or 128 K byte bandwidth). If two calls are in progress it is impossible to make or receive another call.

21

ISDN (Integrated System Digital Network) (continued)

ISDN2 Home & Business Highway Fig 22

ISDN30 (Integrated System Digital Network, 30 channel) A primary rate ISDN line can carry the equivalent of up to thirty simultaneous calls. In UK, a primary rate ISDN line is called ISDN30. This is a digital telephone line that conforms to the international ISDN standard. It can carry up to 30 simultaneous telephone calls. This type of digital teltephone line normally connects directly to a PABX telephone exchange inside one building or company. Note: Quasar can not be directly connected to an ISDN30 line.

22

GSM Radio Modems Dycon provides a GSM Radio Modem Kit suitable for connection to a GSM radio network on the 900 and 1800 MHz bands. This kit includes all necessary cables and connectors. A GSM SIM Card and aerial will also be required. For use in UK, Dycon can supply a suitable GSM SIM Card. In other countries contact your Quasar supplier or a GSM Network Provider for sources of suitable GSM SIM Cards. See page 26. Note: GSM Radio Modems from other sources may be used. All GSM Radio Modems must operate with a Hayes command set and be approved for connection to a GSM network. The data connection must conform to a conventional serial standard as used on a PC serial COM port. Operation at a 9600 baud data rate will be required. Because of the vast range of types, connections, size, power and programming options for modems from other sources, Dycon can not advise on their suitability, configuration or connections. The Quasar can supply the modem with 6, 9 or 12 volts DC supply at 250mA. Modems requiring an AC supply can not receive power from the Quasar. See Appendix 5. To install a GSM Radio Modem inside the Quasar case: 1. Unpack the GSM Radio Modem Kit and check parts for damage. Ensure that the parts and quantities are present. Refer to the leaflet in the kit. Leave this leaflet inside the Quasar case. See fig 25. 2. Acquire and fit a SIM card in the GSM Radio Modem. Note: The SIM Card must be enabled for Data transmission and reception. See page 23. Check if a GSM SIM Card has already been fitted to the GSM Radio Modem by your equipment supplier. Push the eject button on the GSM Radio Modem with a biro point. Slide open & remove the plastic SIM Card carrier. Fit the GSM SIM Card in the carrier with the gold connections away from the carrier. Slide the carrier back into its slot in the GSM Radio Modem. See Fig 23. SIM cards have a Serial Number printed on them and a data telephone number allocated to them. It is strongly recommended that these numbers are recorded on the Quasar Setup Parameters Form at Appendix 6 and in the installation records that will be stored at your office. Push button to eject SIM Card

SIM Card in carrier

Fig 23 3. Prepare the Modems connections. Connect the 0.6m aerial lead with SMA coax connectors to the GSM Radio Modem aerial socket. Note: This lead may have a 90 degree connector on one end. Connect the straight connector to the GSM Radio Modem. Connect the serial data lead to the GSM Radio Modem data socket. Connect the power lead to the GSM Radio Modem power connector. See fig 24. 4. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the rear panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 7 & 8. 5. Where a plastic bag is supplied in the GSM Radio Modem Kit, fit the Modem in this bag. Slide the GSM Radio Modem into the case and locate on the base of the case or on the shelf. See Fig 13. 6. Use a serial data ribbon lead supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit. See page 61. Connect this to a channel input data socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Note its channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4). See fig 12.

23

GSM Radio Modems (continued) 7. Connect the GSM Radio Modem serial data lead to this ribbon lead. Do not connect the GSM Radio Modem serial lead directly to the channel data socket on the rear panel Processor Board because it will foul the case when the rear panel is closed and put undue strain on the Processor Board connector. 8. Connect the GSM Radio Modem aerial lead to the relevant GSM (SMA) socket on the rear panel PTT Board. Where this lead may have a 90 degree connector on one end, connect the 90 degree connector to the PTT Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 7 above. See fig 11. 9. Each Modem Kit includes a leaflet. This leaflet states the voltage that the modem requires and its current consumption. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the modem. On the rear panel Processor Board, adjust the voltage jumper link for that channel to suit the modem requirement. See Fig 12. This jumper link may be adjusted for 6 volts, 9 volts or 12 volts DC. Warning: Operating the modem on a higher than recommended voltage may cause permanent damage to the modem and/or Quasar. Lower than recommended voltages may inhibit operation.

Power, data & Aerial lead Fig 24 GSM Radio Modem

10.Connect the GSM Radio Modem power lead to to the relevant DC power socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 7 above. See fig 12. 11. Close the Quasar case ensuring that no leads become trapped or internal items cause damage to the components on the front or rear panel. 12.Install the aerial in a suitable location. See pages 30. Connect the aerial lead to the relevant RADIO (SMA) socket on the outside of the rear panel. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 7 above. See fig 11. An adapter lead is provided in the GSM Radio Modem Kit to enable GSM aerials with FME connectors to be used. 13.Program the Quasar presets for this channel. See pages 42 to 59. Type: GSM Data: Select transmission protocol as required Test: 10 mins Baud: 9600 Test: 10 mins Setup String: AT&F0 Data Bits: 8 Parity: None A GSM Radio Modem may be mounted outside the Quasar. Where this is required, on the rear panel carefully remove the metal section next to the PTT Board Channel 1 Radio connector. See Fig 11. Fit the alligator grommet supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit to the edge of the hole. Feed the serial data lead through this hole when closing the rear panel.

24

GSM Radio Modems (continued) An example of a GSM Radio Modem Kit leaflet is shown at Fig 25. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the Radio Module.

D2016 GSM Radio Modem Kit for use with the D2066 Quasar Receiver
This kit includes all parts requires to connect the Quasar receiver to a 900 MHz or 1800MHz GSM network apart from a GSM SIM Card and aerial. A GSM SIM Card will be required for use with a GSM network. An aerial will be required for use with a GSM network. Ensure that the radio network provides a suitable signal at the aerial location. Refer to the Quasar Manual for GSM SIM Card requirements and installation instructions.

PICTURE OF KIT CONTENTS

This kit contains: 1 GSM Radio Modem 1 0.6m aerial lead with two SMA male connectors. 1 Serial data lead with one 15way D pins connector and one 9way D holes connector. 1 Power lead with a connector suitable for the GSM Radio Module and a 2way terminal-strip plug. When installing this GSM Radio Modem in the Quasar ensure that the voltage jumper link on the Quasar rear panel Processor Board is set to 12 volts before connection of the power lead. This unit requires 150mA when active, 20mA average. Fig 25

LED Indications Red LED On Solid within 20 seconds of power-up. = Unit reading SIM Card and registering Red LED On solid at any other time. = Red LED Short flash every 2 seconds. = Red LED Short flash every 0.5 seconds. = No GSM radio signal and/or no suitable SIM Card fitted. SIM Card OK, and Registered on GSM Network, and waiting for a call. SIM Card OK, and Registered on GSM Network, and a call is in progress.

25

GSM Radio Modems (continued) Sim Card Details Each GSM Radio Modem used with the Quasar will require a GSM SIM Card. Check if a GSM SIM Card has already been fitted to the GSM Radio Modem(s) by your equipment supplier. For use in UK, Dycon can supply a suitable GSM SIM Card. In other countries contact your Quasar supplier or a GSM Network Provider for sources of suitable GSM SIM Cards. Ensure that the SIM Card is enabled for Data Mode Transmission & Reception. The Quasar will not receive transmissions if enabled for Speech Mode only. Note: Most SIM Cards are supplied for portable telephones and are only enabled for Speech Mode and SMS Mode, as such, they will not allow Quasar to receive alarms. These SIM Cards may be enabled for Data Mode by your GSM Service Provider. SIM cards have a number printed on them. This is the SIM Card Serial Number. It is strongly recommended that this number is recorded on the Quasar Setup Parameters Form at Appendix 4 and in the installation records that will be stored at your office.

Connections

Serial Number

Fig 26

26

VDN Radio-PADs Dycon provides a VDN Radio-PAD fitting Kit suitable for connecting a VDN Radio-PAD to the Vodafone VDN X25 radio network in UK. This kit includes all necessary cables and connectors. Note: A VDN Radio-PAD (type = RP9) must be sourced via Vodafone in UK. Contact Dycon for details. A VDN aerial will be required. Note: VDN Radio-PADs from other sources should not be used. Dycon can not advise on the suitability, configuration or use of VDN Radio-PADs from other sources. See Appendix 5 for essential power connection requirements. To install a VDN Radio-PAD inside the Quasar case: 1. Unpack the VDN Radio-PAD Kit and check parts for damage. Ensure that the parts and quantities are present. Refer to the leaflet contained in the kit. Leave this leaflet inside the receiver. See Fig 32. VDN Radio-PADs have an ESN number printed on them. This is the Serial Number (sometimes it is behind a sliding access flap, see Fig 31). It is strongly recommended that this number is recorded on the Quasar Setup Parameters Form at Appendix 4 and in the installation records that will be stored at your office. 2. Prepare the VDN Radio-PAD connections. Connect the 0.6m aerial lead with FME coax connectors to the VDN Radio-PADs aerial socket. Connect the serial data lead to the VDN Radio-PADs data socket. Connect the power lead to the VDN Radio-PADs power connector. See fig 30.

VDN Radio-PAD

Power, data & Aerial lead

Fig 30 3. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the rear panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Fig 7 & 8. 4. Slide the VDN Radio-PAD into the case and locate on the base of the case or on the shelf. See Fig 13. 5. Use one of the serial data ribbon leads supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit. See page 50. Connect this to a spare channel input data socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Note its channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4). See fig 12. 6. Connect the VDN Radio-PAD serial data lead to this ribbon lead. Do not connect the VDN Radio-PAD serial lead directly to the channel data socket on the rear panel Processor Board because it will foul the case when the rear panel is closed and put undue strain on the Processor Board connector. 7. Connect the VDN Radio-PAD aerial lead to the relevant RADIO (TNC) socket on the rear panel PTT Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 5 above. See fig 11. 8. Each VDN Radio-PAD Kit includes a leaflet. This leaflet states the voltage that the VDN Radio-PAD requires and its current consumption. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the modem. On the rear panel Processor Board, adjust the voltage jumper link for that channel to suit the VDN Radio-PAD requirement. See Fig 12. This jumper link may be adjusted for 6 volts, 9 volts or 12 volts DC.

27

VDN Radio-PADs (continued) Warning: Operating the modem on a higher than recommended voltage may cause permanent damage to the modem and/or Quasar. Lower than recommended voltages may inhibit operation. 9. Connect the VDN Radio-PADs power lead to to the relevant DC power socket on the rear panel Processor Board. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 5 above. See fig 11. 10.Install the aerial in a suitable location. See pages 30. Connect the aerial lead to the relevant RADIO (TNC) socket on the outside of the rear panel. Ensure this has the same channel number (1, 2, 3 or 4) as step 5 above. See fig 11. 11. It will be necessary to register the VDN Radio-PAD when installation is complete and power has been applied. To register a VDN Radio-PAD, push and hold the black Test button on the Radio-PAD for 5 seconds or until the yellow Service LED on the Radio-PAD starts to flash slowly. After 40 seconds the LED should be on solid indicating that the Radio-PAD has found a suitable radio signal from a base station and is locked onto it. If the LED continues to flash after this period, then registration has not completed successfully. The problem must be resolved and registration completed successfully before any VDN radio signals can be received. 12.Close the Quasar case ensuring that no leads become trapped or internal items cause damage to the components on the front or rear panel. 13.Program the Quasar presets for this channel. See pages 42 to 59.; Type: VDN Baud: 4800 Data: Select transmission protocol as required Test: 10 mins Setup String: <leave blank> Data Bits: 7 Parity: Even A VDN Radio-PAD may be mounted outside the Quasar. Where this is required, on the rear panel carefully remove the metal section next to the PTT Board Channel 1 Radio connector. See Fig 11. Fit the alligator grommet supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit to the edge of the hole. Feed the serial data lead through this hole when closing the rear panel. Note: It is recommended that VDN Radio-PADs when used with the Quasar are J-masked (locked) onto one particular base station. Contact Dycon for details.

Slide open to read the ESN Number Black TEST button Push to Register Yellow Service LED

VDN RP9 Radio-PAD

ESN Number of this Radio-PAD Fig 31

28

VDN Radio-PADs (continued) An example of a VDN Radio-PAD Kit leaflet is shown at Fig 32. Ensure that this leaflet is left inside the Quasar with the Radio-PAD.

D1016 VDN Radio-PAD Kit for use with the D2066 Quasar Receiver
This kit includes all parts requires to connect the Quasar receiver to the Vodafone X25 data network (VDN) in UK apart from an aerial. An aerial will be required for use with the VDN network. Ensure that the VDN radio network provides a suitable signal at the aerial location. Refer to the Quasar Manual for installation instructions. This kit contains: 1 VDN Radio-PAD 1 0.6m aerial lead with FME connectors. 1 Serial data lead with one 25way D pins connector and one 9way D holes connector. 1 Power lead with a connector suitable for the VDN Radio-PAD and a 2way terminal-strip plug. When installing this GSM Radio Module in the Quasar ensure that the voltage jumper link on the Quasar rear panel Processor Board is set to 12 volts before connection of the power lead. This unit requires 1.2A when active, 230mA average.

Fig 32

LED Indications Yellow LED Slow flash within 50 seconds of power-up Yellow LED Slow flash at any other time Yellow LED on Solid = = = Unit searching for base stations and registering onto the VDN Network. Unit can not hear any base stations and is searching for a useable signal. No communications are possible Unit in contact with a base station and awaiting a call.

29

Quasar Power Requirements Quasar requires a supply of 12-15 volts DC and consumes 3.5 watts of power. The unit incorporates a switched mode voltage stabiliser . This will stabilise the Quasar power requirement, i.e. when the supply is 13.8 volts the current requirement will be 230mA. This will rise as the supply voltage falls. When the supply is 12.0 volts the current requirement will be 280mA. When network terminating equipment, e.g. modems, are installed and powered from the Quasar, these units will each draw current and increase the total current required by the Quasar. The leaflet supplied with each modem kit states the current requirements of that unit. See pages 14 to 29. When a printer is powered from the Quasar rear panel DC outputs, the current used will add to and increase the total current required by the Quasar. The leaflet supplied with the Printer Kit states the current requirements of that unit. See pages 34 and 35. When power is used from the Quasar rear panel DC outputs, the current used will add to and increase the total current required by the Quasar. See Fig 37. The Quasar incorporates a 7amp/hour battery. This will allow the Quasar to operate for two hours (or more) with all power supplies disconnected. See next page. Longer periods of operation must be supported by the external DC supply. When the Quasar battery is partially or fully discharged the Quasar operating current will increase while the battery is recharging. 20 hours should be allowed for a fully discharged battery to charge. The installer must ensure that the Quasar power supply is rated to provide adequate power for this apparatus and for any other auxiliary apparatus drawing power from the same power supply. The installer must ensure that the battery capacity of the Quasar power supply is sufficient to provide adequate power for this apparatus and for any other auxiliary apparatus that draws power from the same power supply when the mains supply has failed for the specified battery-only operating period. Operating time on batteries (hours) = Battery capacity (amp/hours) x 0.9 / Quasar operating current (amps) The use of the D2065 battery backed-up (UPS) Power Supply is recommended. The Quasar supply voltage and internal supplies are monitored constantly. See Appendix 1. Only power supplies conforming to EN60950, EN41003 or International Safety Standards should be used with this apparatus.

30

Quasar Internal Battery The Quasar incorporates a 7amp/hour battery. This will allow the Quasar to operate for two hours (or more) with all power supplies disconnected. This battery may be removed and replaced while the Quasar is operating from an external DC supply without loss of operation or internal settings. The Quasar battery voltage and capacity are tested regularly. If these tests fail then a Power Fault will be indicated. See Appendix 1. Access to the battery connections is via the hinge-down rear panel. Access to the battery is via the hinge-down front panel. To remove the battery: 1. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the rear panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 7 & 8. 2. Locate the battery wires and disconnect their connector from the Processor Board that is mounted on the inside of the rear panel. Leave the wires connected to the battery. See fig 33.

Battery Connector

Processor Board on Rear Panel Fig 33

3. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the front panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 2 & 6. 4. Locate the battery on the right-hand inside wall of the Quasar. Undo the single screw retaining clamp and slide the battery out of the case via the front. Ensure that the battery wires and connectors are withdrawn with the battery and not damaged. See fig 34. Ensure that the battery terminals or lead wires do not touch the metal case.

Battery

Retaining Screw Battery Clamp

Fig 34

31

Quasar Internal Battery (continued) To install or replace the battery: 1. Check the condition of the battery leads and connectors. Replace if damaged or worn. Check that the 2way plug-terminal is correctly fitted on the other ends of the lead. Refer to the polarity markings on the Processor Board. See fig 33. 2. Connect the battery leads to the battery terminals. 3. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the rear panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 7 & 8. 4. Loosen the three retaining screws on the top edge of the front panel of the Quasar and allow it to open on its lower-edge hinge. See Figs 2 & 6. 5. Locate the battery enclosure on the right-hand inside wall of the Quasar. Undo the single screw and remove the battery retaining clamp. Slide the battery into the case via the front with the battery terminals upwards and towards the front of the case. See fig 34. Ensure that the battery lead does not foul on the metal guides around the battery. Ensure that the battery terminals or lead wires do not touch the metal case. 6. Feed the battery lead towards the rear of the case through the battery enclosure. 7. Connect the battery lead plug-terminal to its socket on the Processor Board that is mounted on the inside of the rear panel. See fig 33. 8. Close the Quasar case ensuring that no leads become trapped or internal items cause damage to the components on the front or rear panel.

32

Connecting and Locating Radio Aerials The aerial(s) used with Quasar should be mounted vertically at the point of strongest signal within the building. This is usually the highest point in the building (often the loft area). ALWAYS do a site survey to find the area of strongest signal before aerial installation. Radio signals can not pass through metal sheeting. Large metal structures can affect radio signals therefore, wherever possible, avoid installing the aerial directly under metal roofs or within metal skinned buildings because this will reduce the signal strength and may inhibit operation completely. If this is unavoidable, the strongest signal will be found away from the metal roof or close to large external windows or skylights. Note that some plaster-board walls include a metal surface to one face. Wherever possible do not install the aerial close (1 metre) to cable runs, ducting, structural metalwork, metal pipes, water tank, electronic equipment, e.g. photocopiers, fax machines etc. These can have similar effects as metal roofs. Reliable operation is unlikely with a low signal strength. If reception is poor, you should improve the signal strength. This may be achieved by repositioning the aerial in an area of stronger signal. VDN Aerials A 10m aerial extension lead is available to aid repositioning of VDN aerials. For locating VDN aerials, the CS1066 Radio Test Set is ideal for surveying a proposed site for the point of strongest signal. See Fig 35. When you have identified the point of the strongest signal, make a note of this point and use it when installing VDN aerial(s). GSM Aerials For locating GSM aerials, a mobile GSM telephone is ideal to show the GSM signal strength. The signal strength indicator is normally a bar or line at the side of the display on the portable telephone. Note: The GSM mobile telephone MUST use the same GSM network as the Quasar Radio Module SIM Card uses. A portable GSM telephone that uses a different GSM network will NOT show the correct signal strength. There are often two or more separate GSM networks provided by different Service Providers. In UK, GSM networks on 900MHz and/or 1800MHz are operated by Vodafone, O2, Orange and T-Mobile. (O2 was called Celnet, T-Mobile ownes One-2-0ne, Virgin uses the T-Mobile network). Remember: It is always easier to find the point of strongest signal before the aerials are fitted to a wall. Moving aerials, cables, trunking etc. after installation is wasted time and effort.

33

Serial Printer Dycon can provide a 40 Column Serial Printer Kit suitable for connection to the Serial Printer port of the Quasar. This kit includes all necessary cables and connectors and a power supply. This printer may be powered from the mains using the supplied DC Power Supply (12 volts) or from the Quasar using the supplied lead. Note that when powered from the Quasar rear panel DC output, the current drawn by the printer will add to the total current required by the Quasar. Note: Serial Printers from other sources may be used. The data and handshake lines used by serial printers often vary from published standards. Because of the wide range of types, connections, size, power and programming options, Dycon can not advise on the suitability, configuration or use of Serial Printers from other sources. To connect the Serial Printer to the Quasar: 1. Unpack the Serial Printer Kit and check parts for damage. Ensure that the parts and quantities are present. Refer to the leaflet contained in the kit. See Fig 32. Ensure that the printer model number is: 1014.0100. Refer to the label on the printer. 2. The supplied 12 volt Power Supply is fitted with a mains plug suitable for use in UK on 230 volts AC +/10%. Where connection is required to a mains supply using a different style of plug, remove and replace with the required type. Consult a qualified electrician if in any doubt. 3. Connect the data and power supply leads to the printer. 4. Fit the paper roll. 5. Connect the power supply to the mains, or supply the printer from the Quasar DC outputs on the rear panel using the lead supplied. 6. Connect the data lead from the printer to the Serial Printer port on the rear of the Quasar. Ensure that the lead provided is used. 7. Set the position of the CTS jumper to CTS=DSR. See Fig 41.

Power Supply Data lead

Printer Fig 36

Power On LED

Blank Programme Button

Line Feed Button

1 Button

0 Button

34

Serial Printer (continued) Setting-up the Serial Printer 1. Connect the DC supply to the the printer. Press the 0 button. See Fig 36. 2. Enter Printer Programming Mode by pressing the Blank Programming button and the 1 button together. 3. The printer will start and print the PROGRAMMING MODE header. The Power On LED will flash to indicate Programming Mode. See Fig 36. Note that Programming Mode will terminate if no buttons are pushed within 14 seconds and no changes to parameters will be stored. The PROGRAMMING MODE header will be followed by the various parameters. Ensure that they are: Data: 8 Parity: None Baud: 9600 Country: UK Print mode: Text Auto-off: Disabled Emulation: Standard DTR: Normal Interface: Serial Mechanism: M192 Loopback: Not present When the full list is complete, Data: 8 will be printed. 4. If the Data value is incorrect then press the Blank Programming button once to print the next Data value. If this is incorrect, repeat until the correct value is displayed. Refer to the parameters above. See Fig 36. 5. Step onto the next parameter, i.e. Parity, by pressing the LINEFEED button once. See Fig 36. 6. Repeat 4. and 5. above until all parameters are at the correct value. 7. To permanently store the parameters, press the BLANK Programming button and the LINEFEED button together. Note that Programming Mode will terminate if no buttons are pushed within 14 seconds and no changes to parameters will be stored. 8. Switch off by pressing the 0 button.

D0640 Serial Printer Kit for use with the D2066 Quasar Receiver
This kit includes all parts required to connect the Quasar receiver to a Serial Printer for call logging and settings printing. This kit contains: 1 40 column serial printer 1 paper print roll 1 Power Supply with leads and mains plug. 1 Power lead with a printer connector and a 2way plug-terminal. 1 Null Modem data lead with one 25way D pins connector and one 9way D holes connector. 1 User Guide. Replacement packs of 2 paper rolls and one print ribbon cartridge are available. Order part number D0641.

Fig 37

35

Quasar Output Connections

Rear Panel

Serial Printer D connector

Monitored DC input supply 4way connector Parallel Printer D connector

Un-monitored DC input supply input jack

Remote Display 4way connector

Auxilliary Output D connector Serial Output D connector (to AMS PC or server) DC power output 4way connector Fig 40 4 relay outputs 3way connectors

12 Volt Power Outputs Two 12 volt outputs are available on the Quasar rear panel to power printers, sounders, lights etc. These outputs are supplied by the Quasar battery and will continue to operate when the supply fails to the Quasar. Any current drawn from these outputs will add to the total current required by the Quasar. See Fig 40.

36

Quasar Output Connections (continued) Serial Printer Output The Serial Printer output on the Quasar rear panel is for connection to a printer with a serial input. There are several makes of serial printer available and each of these may have a different connection arrangement. The Quasar Serial Printer output is configured as a DTE PC serial COM port. The connection to the 9way D connector holes is shown. Seee Fig 40 and 41. See Programming, page 42 to 59, to select the Serial or Parallel printer and for the list of possible printer settings, e.g. baud rate and parity. Holes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Signal n/c RD Data to Quasar TD Data from Quasar DTR From Quasar 0v DSR To Quasar (see note below) RTS From Quasar CTS To Quasar (see note below) n/c

5 4

3 2 1

o o o o o o o o o
9 8 7 6 Fig 41

The data speed of this output is fixed at 1200 baud. The communication requires 7 data bits, Even parity and 1 stop bit (7E1). Note: Between the rear panel and the Processor Board, next to the Serial Printer D connector is a jumper link and 3 pin connector. See Fig 42. This allows for non-standard connections that require a CTS handshake line on pin 6 or pin 8 of the Serial Printer D connector. Ensure that this link is in the correct position. Select the NORMAL position for the CTS signal on pin 8 (pin 6 = n/c). (The jumper on the 2 pins away from the corner of Connector Board) Select the CTS=DSR position for the CTS signal on pin 6 (pin 8 = n/c) (The jumper on the 2 pins nearest the corner of Connector Board) This is the correct position for the D0640 Serial Printer.

Fig 42

CTS Handshake Jumper between PCB and rear panel

37

Quasar Output Connections (continued) Parallel Printer Output The Parallel Printer output on the Quasar rear panel is for connection to a printer with a parallel or Centronics input. There are several makes and model of parallel printer available. These use one of two different connection arrangements, a single direction cable or a bi-direction cable. A parallel printer with a single-direction cable must be used. The Epson LX-300+ dot matrix, fan-fold printer is recommended by Dycon. Printers that require a bi-directional connection cable and require a PC to process some of their printing & control functions are unsuitable for use with Quasar. These are sometimes referred to as Windows Printers. The Parallel Printer connector operates exactly as a PC DOS parallel printer LPT port. See Fig 40 and 43. Connect a parallel printer to this port. See Programming, pages 42 to 59, to select the Serial or Parallel printer and for the list of possible parallel printer settings. The connection to the 25way D connector holes is shown. 13 12 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Fig 43

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 Pin 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Signal Strobe Data 0 Data 1 Data 2 Data 3 Data 4 Data 5 Data 6 Data 7 Pin 19 - 25 = 0v Pin 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

Signal Ack Busy n/c Select n/c Error Reset n/c 0v

Aux Output The Auxilliary connector operates exactly as a DTE PC serial COM port. See Fig 40 and 44. This connector is unused and provides for future expansion options. The connection to the 9way D connector pins is shown. Holes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Signal n/c RD Data to Quasar TD Data from Quasar DTR From Quasar 0v n/c RTS From Quasar CTS To Quasar n/c

1 2

3 4 5

o o o o o o o o o
6 7 8 9

Fig 44

38

Quasar Output Connections (continued) Serial Output The Quasar Serial Output port allows received and verified transmissions to be passed to other systems, e.g. an AMS. See Fig 40 and 45. This output is as a serial DCE port (Data Communication Equipment) that may be connected via a straight serial lead to a serial COM port on a PC or server. Note that Modems that allow PC connection to the telephone network are configured as DCE. Therefore a normal or straight or modem serial lead that works with a PC and Modem should be suitable for Quasar connection to a PC or Server serial COM port. Do not use Laplink, crossover or Null-modem cables. The following information is provided to assist connection to a PC. This will be sufficient in most cases. Where connection can not be made, consult a serial communications expert. The DSR output signal from the Quasar (pin 6) will be permanently asserted (+12 volts) to indicate connection to the PC. The RTS input signal to the Quasar (pin4) needs to be asserted (+12 volts) to enable the Quasar output. Where RTS is disabled ( -12volts) for longer than 1 second then the Quasar will display an AMS Fault message. Note that the RTS signal into the Quasar is called the CTS signal where it leaves the PC serial port. The CTS output signal from the Quasar (pin 5) will be asserted (+12 volts) to indicate that the Quasar will output data. Where the Quasar displays an AMS Fault message and where a printer is enabled for Deferred Printing then the data will be printed. For all other printer options, then the data will be held in a buffer until the output is enabled. See Programming, page 42 to 59, for the list of possible output settings, e.g. protocols, baud rate, parity. The Quasar is supplied with several output protocols, i.e. Radionics 6500, and Radionics-Extended. To meet customers operational requirements Quasar has been designed to allow the inclusion of other output protocols. Contact Dycon for output protocol options. The Quasar Serial Output is configured as DCE. The connection to the 25way D connector holes is shown.

13 12 11 10 9 8

7 6 5 4

3 2 1

o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o o
25 24 23 22 21 20 19 18 17 16 15 14 Fig 45

Pin 1 2 3 4

Signal 0v Data To Quasar Data From Quasar RTS To Quasar

Pin 5 6 7 8-25

Signal CTS From Quasar DSR From Quasar 0v n/c

39

Quasar Output Connections (continued) Serial Output Cable Refer to the cable wiring table below for both 25-to-25 serial cables and 25-to-9 serial cables. Note that 9 and 25 pin D connectors do not use the same pin numbers for similar signals. Quasar D-25 holes 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 D-25 pins - Serial Cable - D-9/25 holes - - - - - - - - - - - 0v - - - - - - - - - < < < < Data to Quasar <<<< > > > > Data from Quasar > > > > << RTS to Quasar << >> CTS from Quasar >> >> DSR from Quasar >> - - - - - - - - - - - 0v - - - - - - - - - PC D-9 pins shell 3 2 7 8 6 5 PC D-25 pins 1 2 3 4 5 6 7

Some PCs and/or AMS software do not provide a CTS signal on their serial port. In this case, to permanently tell the Quasar that it can send data from its serial output port, it will be necessary to provide a positive signal into the Quasar RTS pin from the positive signal that is output by the Quasar on its CTS pin. Use a serial lead as shown below. Quasar D-25 holes 1 2 3 4 to 5 6 7 Relay Outputs Quasar includes four output relays whose changeover contacts are available to trigger any sounder, light etc. These relays may be programmed to operate in several different ways. They can energise on receipt of a call, when a monitoring output is given, when Quasar detects an internal fault etc. See the Programming section for the list of possible output settings. See page 42 to 59. Connection to each set of contacts is made by a 3way terminal-plug on the rear of the Quasar case. Several connectors are supplied with the Quasar in the fitting kit. The terminals are marked with C, NO and NC (for Common, Normally Open and Normally Closed) and a relay contact symbol to aid correct wiring. See Fig 40 and 46 The relay contacts are rated at 24 volt 1 amp. The circuits connected to these relay contacts must not exceede these ratings. An example is shown below of a 12 volt (1 amp maximum) bell being connected to a relay output and being powered by the 12 volt output on the Quasar rear panel for annunciation of incomming alarm calls. One of the 4 output relay connections Quasar Receiver Rear Panel D-25 pins - Serial Cable - D-9/25 holes - - - - - - - - - - - 0v - - - - - - - - - < < < < Data to Quasar <<<< > > > > Data from Quasar > > > > >> DSR from Quasar >> - - - - - - - - - - - 0v - - - - - - - - - PC D-9 pins shell 3 2 6 5 PC D-25 pins 1 2 3 6 7

+12 volts

Fig 46

12 volt output

0 volts

40

Remote Receiver Display Some installations may require the Quasar front panel, display and keypad to be located away from the receiver. This may be enabled by removing the two screws that secure the Quasar front panel hinge to the case and then relocating it elsewhere. The ribbon lead and 10 way connector that is connected to the rear of the Display Board must be disconnected and left in the Quasar case. A long connecting lead (up to 20 metres) may be assembled from 4 core cable and two of the 4way plugterminals supplied in the Quasar Fitting Kit or the Remote Display Kit. 4way sockets are available on the rear panel of the Quasar and the rear of the Display Board. Connect these with the long connecting lead. See Figs 6 & 33. The blank 3U panel that is supplied in the Remote Display Kit may then fitted to the front of the Quasar case. Serial Number and Software Version Number The Serial Number of the Quasar hardware may be read on a label fixed to the outside of the rear panel. The Software Version Number may be read on the Access Code screen. To display, ensure that the ACTIVITY LED is off, then press the CLEAR key until the ACCESS CODE & ENTER display is seen. The Software Version Number may be seen on the bottom line of the display for 10 seconds, e.g. Ver 20660023. After 10 seconds, the ACCESS CODE & ENTER display will disappear, then the operation screen will be displayed and further calls may be received. Quasar receivers using software that was manufactured before v20660002, 20/8/2001 do not display the version number as described. Contact Dycon for a software upgrade. Factory Defaults To return ALL of the preset values in the Quasar to the Factory Default values including the Engineering Access Code to 999999 and to clear all buffers: 1. Unplug the internal battery 2. Remove the DC supply voltage to the Quasar. 3. Replace the DC supply voltage to the Quasar. 4. Within 5 seconds press these keys: 1, 3, 7, 9, ENTER 5. Re-connect the internal battery. To return ONLY the Engineering Access Code to 999999: 1. Follow the above sequence using code: 1, 2, 3, 4, ENTER

41

Operational Programming Quasar requires a 6 digit Security Access Code to be input before any programming presets are changed or any user features are activated. See page 43. Follow the Main Menu flow chart below for selection of programming options. Key pushes are shown in chevrons, e.g. <CLEAR key>.Refer to the lower line of the display for operation of the ARROW, CLEAR and ENTER keys. To leave the programming menu, return to the menu shown below, then press the DOWN ARROW key repeatedly until the QUIT display is seen, then press the ENTER key. Note: No incoming calls will be received during Programming mode, i.e. from the time that the CLEAR key is pushed (prior to entering an access code) to leaving programming mode via the QUIT display.

< CLEAR key > TYPE CODE & ENTER - - - - - < 6 Digit Access Code > < ENTER key > ACCESS CODE < DOWN ARROW key > TIME & DATE < DOWN ARROW key > PRINTER < DOWN ARROW key > RX INPUT 1 < DOWN ARROW key > RX INPUT 2 < DOWN ARROW key > RX INPUT 3 < DOWN ARROW key > RX INPUT 4 < DOWN ARROW key > Go to chart on next page

(may need several pushes) (This screen also shows the software version number on the lower line) (e.g. 999999. Enter code within 10 seconds. See page 44) (press ENTER to change the 6 digit access code. See page 44)

(press ENTER to change the time and/or date display. See page 44)

(press ENTER to select the Serial or Parallel Printer output. See page 45)

(press ENTER to set parameters of modem connected to Input 1. Not Used or IN Use will also be displayed. See page 46) (press ENTER to set parameters of modem connected to Input 2. Not Used or IN Use will also be displayed. See page 46) (press ENTER to set parameters of modem connected to Input 3. Not Used or IN Use will also be displayed. See page 46) (press ENTER to set parameters of modem connected to Input 4. Not Used or IN Use will also be displayed. See page 46)

42

Operational Programming (continued) From flow chart on previous page RECEIVER OUTPUT <DOWN ARROW key > CONTACT ID CONVERT <DOWN ARROW key > AMS FAULT REPORTING <DOWN ARROW key > DUALCOM-96 MODE <DOWN ARROW key > PORTALARM-2001 MODE <DOWN ARROW key > AUXILIARY RELAYS <DOWN ARROW key > SOUNDER MODES <DOWN ARROW key > SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS <DOWN ARROW key > QUIT ? <DOWN ARROW key> Go to the ACCESS CODE display on the previous page. (press ENTER to leave this menu and return to normal receiver operation) (press ENTER to set the display and printer options for this protocol. See page 54 and 55) (press ENTER to set the operation of the internal sounder. See page 53) (press ENTER to set the operation of the four output relays. See page 52) (press ENTER to set the display and printer options for this protocol. See page 51) (press ENTER to set the display and printer options for this protocol. See page 51) (press ENTER to set parameters of conversion between ContactID output and a different protocol input. See page 48) (press ENTER to set the display and printer options for this protocol. See page 49 and 50) (press ENTER to set parameters of the Serial Output Port (to the AMS) See page 47)

43

Operational Programming (continued)

Type Code & Enter (Engineering Access Security)


Quasar requires a 6 digit security access code to be input before any programming presets are changed or any user features are activated. Note: Entry to programming is inhibited when any calls are in progress or during input activity, i.e. the Activity LED is on. During programming, incomming calls are not answered or processed. To enter the access code: 1. Ensure that the ACTIVITY LED is off. 2. Press the CLEAR key until the TYPE CODE & ENTER display is seen. (The Quasar software version number may be seen on the bottom line of the display) 3. A 6 digit access code may then be entered. If no key is pressed within 10 seconds, the display will return to the normal operational screen. (The 6 digit access code is set to 999999 when the unit left the factory) 4. Press of the ENTER key.

Program Access Code


This menu allows the 6 digit Engineering Access Code to be changed. The Factory default number = 999999. To return to the factory default number see the Factory Default instructions on page 41. Select the ACCESS CODE display. See page 42. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. Enter the required new 6 digit security access code. 3. Press the ENTER key. 4. Enter the required new 6 digit security access code again. 5. Press the ENTER key to store the new 6 digit access code and to return to the PROGRAM ACCESS CODE display on the main menu. See page 42.

Time & Date


Set the time and date in the Quasar so that its printer can give an accurate time to the second of each received message. Select the TIME & DATE display. See page 42. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. (do not use the number keys): 2. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to position the ^ cursor under the first number in the time or date that requires changing. 3. Press the UP ARROW key and DOWN ARROW key to change the number to that required (do not use the number keys). 4. Repeat step 1 and 2 until the time and date are as required. 5. Press the ENTER key to return to the SET TIME & DATE display on the main menu. See page 42.

44

Operational Programming (continued)

Printer Options
A Serial or parallel printer may be connected to the Quasar for logging of received messages and Quasars internal fault detection. This menu allows the printer port(s) to be set to the required parameters. A Serial or a Parallel printer may be used. Select the PRINTER display. See page 42. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Printer parameter is displayed. This is TYPE and it may be SERIAL or PARALLEL. If this parameter is selected to the correct value then go to step 7. If this parameter requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The parameter shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the parameter options. 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm this parameter option. The <chevrons> will dissappear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Printer parameter. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the Printer parameter options are correct. Printer parameters are: TYPE Select from: SERIAL or PARALLEL. BAUD SPEED Select from: 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600 PARITY Select from: NONE, ODD or EVEN DATA BITS Select from: 7 or 8 MODE Select from: ALWAYS, DEFERRED or OFF. The Deferred selection will only enable the printer if the Serial Output can not pass a message to the AMS. It will not print faults. FILTER Select from: FAULTS ONLY, or ALL. COLUMN WIDTH Select from: 24, 40, 80 or 120 (The Serial Printer must be set to 40). 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the PRINTER display on the main menu. See page 42.

45

Operational Programming (continued)

Receiver Input Options


The Quasar has 4 input channels. Each input may be connected via a modem to a communication network. These are: A GSM Radio modem for connection to a digital GSM Network for SMS Text reception. A PSTN modem for connection to the analogue PSTN (Public Switched Telephone Network). A VDN Radio modem( Radio-PAD) for connection to the digital Vodafone Data Netwotk (Paknet) A GSM Radio modem for connection to a digital GSM Network for data reception. An ISDN Terminal Adapter for connection to the ISDN2 (Integrated Services Digital Network) The 4 inputs are 9 pin D connectors for RS-232 serial communication. They are configured exactly as a serial COM port on a PC computer and have similar setup options. Each input channel can receive one Data Format e.g. Contact ID. See Appendix 4 for a description of all Data Formats. Once the Data Format has been selected for each of the 4 channel inputs, then the Output Protocol may be selected. The Output Protocol will be on the serial output connector for alarm handling by an Alarm Management System (AMS) on a PC or server. See Appendix 3 for a description of all Output Protocols. Each of the 4 channels may receive different Data Formats and output different Output Formats. See Appendix 5, Networks, Data Format and Output Protocol Associations. Select the RX CHANNEL (1, 2, 3 or 4) display for channel 1 to 4 as required. Under the Channel number, the display will show if this channel is "Not-Used" or "In-Use". See page 42. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Receiver Channel parameter is displayed. This is INPUT TYPE and it may be None, SMS, GSM, VDN, PSTN or ISDN. If this parameter is selected to the correct value then go to step 7. If this parameter requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The parameter shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the parameter options. 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm this parameter option. The <chevrons> will dissapear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Receiver Channel parameter. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the Receiver Channel parameter options are correct. Receiver Channel parameters are: INPUT TYPE Select from: NONE, SMS, GSM, VDN, PSTN or ISDN. DATA FORMAT Select from: DUALCOM-96, PORTALARM-2001, SIA-2, SIA-3, CONTACT-ID OUTPUT FORMAT Select from: RADIONICS-STANDARD, RADIONICS-EXTENDED, RADIONICS-IE, CONTACT-ID1, CONTACT-ID2, ADEMCO4+2, ADEMCO4+1, ADEMCO-HIGHSPEED. BAUD RATE Select from: 300, 1200, 2400, 4800 or 9600. PARITY Select from: NONE, ODD or EVEN DATA BITS Select from: 7 or 8 LINE CHECK (hours) Select from: OFF, 3mins, 6mins....up to 99 mins. See Note below. INIT. STRING Enter the required characters. This is described in Appendix 2. See the data sheet that was supplied with the Modem/Radio modem/TA details See the relevant section in this manual for the correct Initialisation String. 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the RX CHANNEL display on the main menu. See page 42.

46

Operational Programming (continued)

Receiver Output
The Receiver serial output port is for connection to an Alarm Management System (AMS). It is a 25 pin D connector for RS-232 serial communication. It is configured exactly as a serial COM port on a PC computer and has similar setup options. This port sends any received data to an AMS. In addition, a regular (every 1 minute) integrity transmission may be sent from the Quasar to the AMS. These integrity transmissions may be monitored by the AMS to confirm correct Quasar connection and operation. See Appendix 3 for a description of all Output Protocols. This port can also send details of any situation or fault that is detected by the Quasar. See the AMS Fault Reporting settings on page 49 and 50. The Quasar also monitors the acknowledge that the AMS sends whenever it receives any message from the Quasar. If these are absent then the Quasar can provide a fault output. See the Output Relays on page 40. To disable this port select the RECEIVER MODE parameter to OFF. Select the RECEIVER (SERIAL) OUTPUT PORT parameters required. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Receiver Output parameter is displayed. This is BAUD RATE and it may be 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19.2K, 38.4K, 76.8K or 153.6K. If this parameter is selected to the correct value then go to step 7. If this parameter requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The parameter shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the parameter options. 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm this parameter option. The <chevrons> will dissapear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Receiver Output parameter. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the Receiver Output parameter options are correct. Receiver Output parameters are: BAUD RATE Select from: 1200, 2400, 4800, 9600, 19.2K, 38.4K, 76.8K or 153.6K. PARITY Select from: NONE, ODD or EVEN DATA BITS Select from: 7 or 8 RECEIVER MODE Select from: OFF, THRU, RADIONICS-STD POLL, RADIONICS-EXT POLL, RADIONICS-IE POLL, CONTACT-ID1 POLL, CONTACT-ID2 POLL, ADEMCO POLL. See Appendix 3. RECEIVER NUMBER Select from: 00 to 99. See Appendix 3. PROTOCOL NUMBERSelect from: 00 to 99. See Appendix 3. INTEGRITY TX ACC. Enter a 4, 5 or 6 digit account number. This will be used for the regular integrity message to the AMS. Leave blank to disable the regular integrity message. Many AMS use Account Number 0000 for Receiver integrity checks. AMS EVENT ACK To acknowledge reception of all messages (except Integrity messages), the AMS will reply with a single byte. Many AMS use 06 hex (an ACK character) for Receiver message acknowledge. AMS INTEG. ACK To acknowledge reception of Integrity messages, the AMS will reply with a single byte. This allows a different acknowledge to be recognised for Integrity messages. Many AMS use 06 hex (an ACK character) for Receiver Integrity message acknowledge. 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the RECEIVER OUTPUT display on the main menu. See page 43.

47

Operational Programming (continued)

Contact ID Conversion
This menu presets the conversion procedure when the Dualcom-96 protocol is being received (e.g. from a Dualcom) and the ContactID protocol is being output from the Quasar to an AMS. For each received channel (1-16, test & low battery) a 3 digit Contact ID Event Code is associated. E.g. Dualcom-96 Channel 1 = Fire, the associated 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 110. Select the CONTACT-ID CONVERT display. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Dualcom-96 channel is displayed. This is CHANNEL 1. If the 3 digit Contact ID Event Code displayed is correct then go to step 7. If this 3 digit Contact ID Event Code displayed requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The current 3 digit Contact ID Event Code shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Enter the required 3 digit Contact ID Event Code (this must be 3 digits). 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm the 3 numbers displayed. The <chevrons> will dissapear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Channel number. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the Channel Number/3 digit Contact ID Event Codes are correct. The Dualcom-96 channels are: CHANNEL 1 Fire The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 110 CHANNEL 2 PA, Panic The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 120 CHANNEL 3 Burglary The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 130 CHANNEL 4 Open/Close The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 400 CHANNEL 5 System trouble The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 300 CHANNEL 6 Line Fail, communications trouble The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 350 CHANNEL 7 Alarm confirm, intrusion verifier The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 139 CHANNEL 8 Alarm mis operation, User on premises The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 458 CHANNEL 9 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 10 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 11 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 12 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 13 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 14 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 15 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 CHANNEL 16 General alarm The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 140 LOW BATTERY Low system battery voltage The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 302 TEST CALL Periodic test call The default 3 digit Contact ID Event Code = 602 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the CONTACT-ID CONVERT display on the main menu. See page 43.

48

Operational Programming (continued)

Alarm Management System Fault Reporting


Receivers are often mounted in a rack away from the Alarm Management System (AMS) operator(s). It is important that any faults detected by the Quasar are reported to the operator(s). This may be done by connecting a light or sounder to an output relay (see page 40) and/or giving the Quasar an account on the AMS so that it can send alarms to the operator(s) screen exactly as a Dualcom or an intruder alarm Control Panel does. The Quasar will send these alarms on the Receiver Output Port. See page 47. To disable AMS Fault Reporting, select the AMS FAULT REPORTING parameter to OFF. The format of the Fault Report that is sent to the AMS may be selected from any of the Output Protocols that the Quasar uses, e.g. Contact-ID. Where the Output Protocol is Radionics or Ademco then the channel number for each fault may be selected (1 to 16). Where the Output Format is Contact-ID then the code number for each fault may be selected (000 to 999). The default values are given in the table on the next page. See Appendix 3 for a description of all Output Protocols, Select the AMS FAULT REPORTING parameters required. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first AMS FAULT REPORTING parameter is displayed. This is FAULT REPORTING and it may be: OFF, RADIONICS-STANDARD, RADIONICS-EXTENDED, RADIONICS-IE, CONTACT-ID1, CONTACT-ID2, ADEMCO-4+2, ADEMCO-4+1, ADEMCO-HIGHSPEED. (Each is described in Appendix 3) If this parameter is selected to the correct value then go to step 7. If this parameter requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The parameter shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the parameter options. 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm this parameter option. The <chevrons> will dissapear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next AMS FAULT REPORTING parameter. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the AMS FAULT REPORTING parameter options are correct. AMS FAULT REPORTING parameters are: FAULT REPORTING Select from: RADIONICS-STANDARD, RADIONICS-EXTENDED, RADIONICS-IE, CONTACT-ID1, CONTACT-ID2, ADEMCO4+2, ADEMCO4+1, ADEMCO-HIGHSPEED or OFF. ACCOUNT NUMBER Enter the required number. 0 to 999999. FAULT or SITUATION There are 22 different faults or situations that may be reported. Each is listed in the table on the next page. The table also shows the factory default value that will be sent to the AMS depending upon which Output Protocol is selected. 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the AMS FAULT REPORTING display on the main menu. See page 43.

49

Operational Programming (continued)

Alarm Management System Fault Reporting (continued)


Radionics all Ademco 4+1 & 4+2 Ademco High Speed Channel Number
Supply Voltage Low Battery Capacity Low Engineer Mode AMS Communications Fail Rx 1 Supply Fault Rx 2 Supply Fault Rx 3 Supply Fault Rx 4 Supply Fault Rx 1 Communications Fail Rx 2 Communications Fail Rx 3 Communications Fail Rx 4 Communications Fail Rx 1 Line Fault Rx 2 Line Fault Rx 3 Line Fault Rx 4 Line Fault Rx 1 Initialisation Error Rx 2 Initialisation Error Rx 3 Initialisation Error Rx 4 Initialisation Error External PSU Mains Fail External PSU Battery Fault 1 2 4 5 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 9 10 11 12 12 12 12 15 16

Fault or Situation

Contact ID1 Contact ID2 C ode


900 910 930 940 950 950 950 950 951 951 951 951 952 952 952 952 953 953 953 953 980 990

Note

Input should be 12.0 to 15.0 volts Not available in software v0023 or earlier Rx = off line. Eng Mode selected. Handshake from AMS failure Voltage = less than 4 volts. Voltage = less than 4 volts. Voltage = less than 4 volts. Voltage = less than 4 volts. Modem, cable or PSU fault Modem, cable or PSU fault Modem, cable or PSU fault Modem, cable or PSU fault Telephone line or radio path fault Telephone line or radio path fault Telephone line or radio path fault Telephone line or radio path fault Modem setup string error Modem setup string error Modem setup string error Modem setup string error Not available in software v0023 or earlier Not available in software v0023 or earlier

50

Operational Programming (continued)

Dualcom-96 Protocol Options


These options allow for text to be printed and displayed as well as channel numbers when a transmission is received in the Dualcom-96 protocol. Any text that is entered will be used in preference to the default text, e.g. Channel 1 text = Fire, Channel 2 text = PA, Channel 3 text = Intruder. Delete all text to return to the default text. Select the DUALCOM-96 MODE display. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Dualcom-96 channel is displayed. This is CHANNEL 1. If the text displayed is correct then go to step 6. If this text displayed requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. Enter the required characters. This is described in Appendix 2. 4. Press the ENTER key to confirm the text displayed. 5. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Channel number text. 6. Repeat step 1 to 5 until all the Channel number texts are correct. 7. Press the CLEAR key to return to the DUALCOM-96 MODE display on the main menu. See page 43.

PortAlarm-2001 Protocol Options


These options allow for text to be printed and displayed as well as channel numbers when a transmission is received in the portAlarm-2001 protocol. Any text that is entered will be used in preference to the default text, e.g. Channel 1 text = Fire, Channel 2 text = Tamper, Channel 3 text = Intruder. Delete all text to return to the default text. Select the PORTALARM-2001 MODE display. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Portalarm-2001 channel is displayed. This is CHANNEL 1. If the text displayed is correct then go to step 6. If this text displayed requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. Enter the required characters. This is described in Appendix 2. 4. Press the ENTER key to confirm the text displayed. 5. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Channel number text. 6. Repeat step 1 to 5 until all the Channel number texts are correct. 7. Press the CLEAR key to return to the PORTALARM-2001 MODE display on the main menu. See page 43.

51

Operational Programming (continued)

Auxiliary Relays
There are 4 relay outputs on the Quasar. These may be connected to lights, sounders, etc. to draw attention to received messages and Quasar faults. This menu sets which occurences will operate which relays. Select the AUXILIARY RELAY parameters required. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Auxilliary Relay parameter is displayed. This is RELAY 1 ACTIVATION and it may be NORMALLY OFF or NORMALLY ON. If this parameter is selected to the correct value then go to step 7. If this parameter requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The parameter shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the parameter options. 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm this parameter option. The <chevrons> will dissapear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Auxiliary Relay parameter. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the Auxilliary Relay parameter options are correct. Auxilliary Relay parameters are: RELAY 1 ACTIVATION Select from: NORMALLY OFF or NORMALLY ON. RELAY 2 ACTIVATION Select from: NORMALLY OFF or NORMALLY ON. RELAY 3 ACTIVATION Select from: NORMALLY OFF or NORMALLY ON. RELAY 4 ACTIVATION Select from: NORMALLY OFF or NORMALLY ON. ANY ACTIVE TRIGGER Select the relay(s) that will operate for 2 seconds by this occurrence. POWER FAIL Select the relay(s) that will operate for 2 seconds by this occurrence. SYSTEM FAILURE Select the relay(s) that will operate for 2 seconds by this occurrence. AMS FAILURE Select the relay(s) that will operate for 2 seconds by this occurrence. MODEM FAILURE Select the relay(s) that will operate for 2 seconds by this occurrence. 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the AUXILIARY RELAY display on the main menu. See page 43.

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Operational Programming (continued)

Sounder Modes
Following a fault, the internal sounder will beep to attract attention. Pressing the CLEAR button will silence the sounder. This menu presets the sounder operation when a subsequent transmission is received. With Fault Re-sound set to on, any incoming message will re-activate the sounder. With Fault Re-sound set to off, the sounder will remain silent until the fault is restored. Select the SOUNDER MODE parameters required. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first Sounder Mode parameter is displayed. This is FAULT RE-SOUND and it may be OFF or ON. If this parameter is selected to the correct value then go to step 7. If this parameter requires changing then go to step 3. 3. Press the ENTER key. The parameter shown will have <chevrons> indicating that it can be changed. 4. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to select the parameter options. 5. Press the ENTER key to confirm this parameter option. The <chevrons> will disappear. 6. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next Sounder Mode parameter. 7. Repeat step 1 to 6 until all the Sounder Mode parameter options are correct. Sounder Mode parameters are: FAULT RE-SOUND Select from: OFF or ON. 8. Press the CLEAR key to return to the SOUNDER MODE display on the main menu. See page 43.

53

Operational Programming (continued)

System Diagnostics
This menu option allows various measurements to be made within the Quasar. These are the supply and battery voltages, and the radio modem signal strength and interference readings. Select the SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS parameters required. See page 43. 1. Press the ENTER key. Follow the display instructions and options. 2. The first SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS parameter is displayed. This is POWER SUPPLY STATUS. 3. Press the ENTER key. The REMOTE KEYPAD VOLTAGE will be displayed. 4. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next POWER SUPPLY STATUS parameter. 5. Repeat step 4 until all the POWER SUPPLY STATUS parameter options have been displayed. POWER SUPPLY STATUS parameters are: REMOTE KEYPAD VOLTS, LOCAL BATTERY VOLTS, INTERNAL PSU VOLTS, QUASAR INPUT VOLTS, MODEM 1 SUPPLY VOLTS, MODEM 2 SUPPLY VOLTS, MODEM 3 SUPPLY VOLTS, MODEM 4 SUPPLY VOLTS. 6. Press the CLEAR key to return to the SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS display on the main menu. See page 43. 7. The first SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS parameter is displayed. This is POWER SUPPLY STATUS 8. Press the DOWN ARROW key to display the next SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS parameter. This is RADIO SIGNALS. 9. Press the ENTER key. The SELECT CHANNEL question will be displayed. 10.Press 1, 2, 3 or 4 to select an Input channel that has a POWER SUPPLY STATUS connected. 11. The Radio Modem will initialise, register and then measure its radio path parameters. These will then be displayed. 12.Press the CLEAR key to return to the SYSTEM DIAGNOSTICS display on the main menu. See page 43.

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Testing the Quasar Using a GSM Dualcom To ensure that the Quasar is correctly installed and programmed, test calls should be sent through each network from which the Quasar can receive transmissions. This may be done with any equipment that transmits using Dualcom96 protocol. It is recommended that this is done for each type of transmission in each protocol on each network that is used to ensure full operation of the networks, Quasar, programming, printers etc. GSM Dualcom will transmit using Dualcom96 protocol. This describes a GSM Dualcom test. Refer to the GSM Dualcom Installation Manual for full details. 1. Select Quasar to Dualcom96 protocol on the channels that are in use. 2. Setup a GSM Dualcom with GSM SIM Card enabled for Data Mode, a 12 volt 0.3 amp power supply and an NVM programmed to report to the telephone number of the channel on the Quasar that you wish to test. The NVM of the GSM Dualcom should be preset to transmit on the GSM path only thus reducing the testing time. 3. Power up the GSM Dualcom, the unit will initialise. This will take 20 seconds with the GSM LED On, the PSTN LED Off, and the Signal Strength LEDs Off. When complete the GSM LED will be off. 4. To test the reporting path to the Quasar, momentarily short the test pins on the GSM Dualcom or trigger one or more of the input terminals (1 to 8). This will cause Dualcom to send a transmission. Once the test pins are shorted the yellow communication LED will illuminate. During communication the LED will flash to indicate the progress of the call. When a path has successfully communicated with the Quasar its associated LED will go off. 5. Check the Quasar display and printer output(s) for data received.

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Quasar Fitting Kit When supplied, the Quasar contains a kit of connectors. See Fig 50. The kit contains: 4 off 0.6m serial data lead with 9way D connector, one male, one female. Use these for connection to each of the 4 input channel connectors. 4 off 4way plugable screw-terminal strip. These allow connection to the rear panel power and remote control panel connectors. 4 off 3way plugable screw-terminal strip. These allow connection to the rear panel relay contact outputs. 4 off 2way plugable screw-terminal strip. These allow connection to the internal power sockets to power network termination equipment, e.g. modems. 2 off 0.6m PSTN lead with one 4/4 way RJ10 connector and one 4/6way RJ11connector. This allows the rear panel PSTN network connector to be connected to an internal PSTN modem that has a 6way RJ11 socket. 1 off 0.6m ISDN lead with RJ45 connectors. These allow the rear panel ISDN network connector to be connected to internal ISDN Terminal Adapters. 1 off 80mm Alligator grommet. When external modem devices are used with serial leads that exit the Quasar rear panel, this grommet protects those cables from the edges of the rear panel knock-out.

Serial data leads Plug-terminals Fig 50 PSTN leads

ISDN leads

62

D2065 Power Supply The Quasar matching Power Supply is a mains powered, battery backed-up UPS in a 19 inch rack housing. It is designed specifically to accompany the D2066 Quasar Receiver but may be used as a general purpose PSU if required. See Fig 51. The unit incorporates a 6 amp switched-mode mains supply and 34 amp/hours batteries. Assuming that the Quasar and its Modems / Terminal Adaptors / Radio Modules consume no more than 1 amp then the D2065 Quasar Power Supply will allow the Quasar to operate for more than 30 hours without a mains supply. At any time up to 4.0 amps may be drawn from the unit. The output voltage is a nominal 13.8 volts when the mains supply is connected. When mains is absent, the output voltage will fall as the battery voltage falls. The equipment conforms to the requirements of EN60950, an International electrical safety standard. When the Quasar Power Supply battery is partially or fully discharged the mains supply current will recharge the batteries and provide power to the output. 20 hours should be allowed for a fully discharged battery to recharge. This Power Supply includes comprehensive monitoring circuits. These will provide an output to the Quasar Receiver so that faults may be indicated exactly as other Quasar monitoring outputs. Any detected fault will also illuminate the PSU front panel Fault LED and operate a relay that is available on the rear panel.

63

Software Replacement Quasar is designed to have its operational software specification updated easily. This may be to provide a greater range of receiving and output protocols or other operational features. Dycon can provide software preloaded into a D3040 Memory Card that may be plugged into Quasar. It is strongly recommended that a note of all programmable parameters is made before changing the version of software. After the software change, the Quasar should be returned to its factory defaults and reprogrammed with the same parameters. To change the D3040 Memory Card: 1. Enter Engineering Mode and make a note of every preset value. See page 41. 2. Remove the power from Quasar. 3. Open the rear panel and disconnect the battery connector from the Processor board. 4. The D3040 Memory Card may be unplugged and the replacement item fitted.See Fig 60. Note: Quasar will not operate without a D3040 Memory Card being fitted. A D3041 Updater Card can not be used with Quasar. 5. Return the Quasar to its factory Defaults by: Reconnect the power to the Quasar. Within 5 seconds, enter 1, 3, 7, 9, ENTER on the keypad. 6. Reconnect the battery. Close the rear panel. 7. Enter Engineering Mode. See page 41. 8. Reprogramme the Quasar using the preset values recorded at step 1 above.

Fig 60

D3040 Memory Card

Printed Circuit Board Replacement Quasar is designed to have any of its Printed Circuit Boards removed and replaced for servicing or repair. To aid removal and replacement, all PCB connections are by plug and socket. All PCBs are secured in the case by screws. Processor boards that are version 003 or later include components that provide data protection for the battery backed RAM memory. Boards with this feature will not operate with software that is version 0021 or earlier. Ensure that software version 0022 or later is used with version 003 or later Processor boards.

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APPENDIX 1 LED and Sounder indicators on the Quasar. See Fig 2. These indications are for situations requiring attention. Full details are given on the display, printer and passed to an AMS. Power LED Off = No DC power is supplied to the Quasar Receiver. Active Display = Quasar is operating on its internal battery only. Blank Display = Quasar unpowered. On = DC power is supplied to the Quasar. It is greater than 9 volts. Activity LED Off = No incoming calls and no input channel activity. On = An incoming call (1 or more) is in progress or the Quasar is polling the Modem / Terminal Adapter / Radio modem(s) connected to the channel inputs. Power Fault LED Off = No power faults. On = One or more power faults, e.g. the input voltage is below 11 volts and the internal battery is not charging. See the Display for fault description. System Fault LED Off = No system faults On = One or more system faults, e.g. failed polling of a modem on an input channel. See the Display for fault description. Sounder Single short beep = Keypad button pushed 2 tone rapid alternating = warning, see LEDs above and the display. To silence the sounder press the 0 key To clear the warning display, first correct the fault then press the 0 key.

Relay Outputs. See page 40 and 50. Relays may be programmed as Normally Energised or Normally De-energised. A 2 second operation will occur (as selected in programming) for: Any Active trigger = A successfully received call. Power Fault. = Any supply fault. System Failure = A fault detected by the continuous self-test routines. AMS Failure = Failure to send an output to an AMS (requires 1 or more successful outputs before a failure can be indicated. Modem Failure = Failure to communicate with a modem or other device connected to one of the Channel Inputs (1, 2, 3 or 4). The Self-test routines will attempt to recover the modem by removing power to the modem for 2 seconds before re-testing

65

APPENDIX 1 Display Warnings Modem x Not responding Communications between Channel X input and the Modem / Terminal Adapter / Radio module has stopped Check cables to Modem Check power to modem Check modem power is switch on If this channel unused then enter programming and turn it off. Incorrect Access Code The access code used is not recognised. Obtain the correct number and retry. Alternatively, return the codes to the factory default values and use this number

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APPENDIX 2 Text Entry on Keypad Where text requires changing (See pages 42 to 59), select the Text Entry procedure by pressing the ENTER key when the text that is to be changed is displayed. Text is entered using the same convention used on most mobile telephones, i.e. multiple presses of each of the keys enters text as defined below: Key 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 0 CLEAR A D G J M P S V Y B E H K N Q T W Z C F I L O R U X y Displayed a d g j m p s v z b e h k n q t w 9 c f i l o r u x ! # $ 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 % & , ( ) *

0 + - . / : ; < = > ? @ ^ [ \ ] _ { | } ! # $ % & , space (blank character)

1. Press the LEFT ARROW and RIGHT ARROW keys to position the ^ cursor under the next character that requires changing. 2. Press the Numbers keys repeatedly to select that number or the associated letters. Refer to the table above. Punctuation and similar characters are associated with the 9 and 0 keys. 3. Repeat steps 1 and 2 until the new text is entered as required. 4. Press the ENTER key to confirm this text. Note: The backslash character ( \ ) is displayed as

_ Y

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APPENDIX 3 Radionics-Standard Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is 8 data bits. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. AAAAAA B C <14> <06> The message is as follows : AAAAAA B Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Event Type. A single ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: A = Alarm R = Restore O = Open C = Close T = Test channel action Channel Number or Status Channel. A single ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-F. When the Network Transmission Protocol is DTMF Fast Format, Dualcom 96, PortAlarm2001or a similar structured protocol then that protocols Channel Number indicates the Event. Refer to the table below. Channel Number = 1 to 9 Channel Number = 10 Channel Number = 11 to 16 ASCII 1 to 9 ASCII 0 ASCII A to F

Where the Event Type = T = Test channel action, the channel number is significant. Channel Number = 0 = Low-battery or power failure Channel Number = 8 = A monitoring function. Channel Number = 9 = A test call. <14> <06> Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Radionics-Standard Protocol Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: 0000 T 8 <14> <06> The message is as follows : 0000 T 8 <14> <06> Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0 = 30 hex. Event Type. A single ASCII character = T = 54 hex. Channel Number, Monitoring Function. A single ASCII character = 8 = 38 hex. Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Radionics-Extended Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is 7 or 8 data bits. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not set but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. AAAAAA B C D <14> <06> The message is as follows : AAAAAA B Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Event Type. A single ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: A = Alarm R = Restore O = Open C = Close T = Test action When the Network Transmission Protocol is DTMF Fast Format, Dualcom 96, PortAlarm2001 or a similar structured protocol then the data in that protocols Channels indicates the Type of Event. Refer to the table below. C Channel Number or Status Channel. A single ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-G. When the Network Transmission Protocol is DTMF Fast Format, Dualcom 96, PortAlarm2001or a similar structured protocol then that protocols Channel Number indicates the Event. Refer to the table below. Channel Number = 1 to 9 Channel Number = 10 Channel Number = 11 to 16 Status Channel = 17 ASCII 1 to 9 ASCII 0 ASCII A to F ASCII G

Where the Event Type = T = Test channel action, the channel number is significant. Channel Number = 0 = Low-battery or power failure Channel Number = 8 = A monitoring function. Channel Number = 9 = A test call. D Zone Number. A single ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-F. Zone Number = 0 to 9 Zone Number = 10 to 15 <14> <06> ASCII 0 to 9 ASCII A to F

Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Radionics Extended Protocol (continued) Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: 0000 T 8 0 <14> <06> The message is as follows : 0000 T 8 0 <14> <06> Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0 = 30 hex. Event Type. A single ASCII character = T = 54 hex. Channel Number, Monitoring Function. A single ASCII character = 8 = 38 hex. Zone Number. A single ASCII character = 0 = 30 hex. Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

71

APPENDIX 3 Radionics-IE Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. N RR L <SP> AAAAAA B C D <14> <06> The message is as follows : N RR L <SP> AAAAAA B Protocol Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Receiver Number. Two ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9. 00 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. Line Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-4. 0 will be used where no Line Number is assigned. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters Event Type. One ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: A = Alarm R = Restore O = Open C = Close T = Test action When the Network Transmission Protocol is DTMF Fast Format, Dualcom 96, PortAlarm2001or a similar structured protocol then the data in that protocols Channels indicates the Type of Event. Refer to the table below. C Channel Number or Status Channel. A single ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-G. When the Network Transmission Protocol is DTMF Fast Format, Dualcom 96, PortAlarm2001or a similar structured protocol then that protocols Channel Number indicates the Event. Refer to the table below. Channel Number = 1 to 9 Channel Number = 10 Channel Number = 11 to 16 Status Channel = 17 ASCII 1 to 9 ASCII 0 ASCII A to F ASCII G

Where the Event Type = T = Test channel action, the channel number is significant. Channel Number = 0 = Low-battery or power failure Channel Number = 8 = A monitoring function. Channel Number = 9 = A test call.

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APPENDIX 3 Radionics I E Protocol (continued) D Zone Number. A single ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-F. Zone Number = 0 to 9 Zone Number = 10 to 15 <14> <06> ASCII 0 to 9 ASCII A to F

Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: N RR 0 <SP> AAAAAA T 8 0 <14> <06> The message is as follows : N RR 0 <SP> AAAAAA T 8 0 <14> <06> Protocol Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Receiver Number. Two ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9. 00 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. Line number. One ASCII character = 0 = 30 hex. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Event Type. A single ASCII character = T = 54 hex. Channel Number, Monitoring Function. A single ASCII character = 8 = 38 hex. Zone Number. A single ASCII character = 0 = 30 hex. Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Contact-ID 1 Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. N RR L <SP> 18 AAAAAA Q EEE GG CCC <14> <06> The message is as follows : N RR L <SP> 18 AAAAAA Q Protocol Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. Normally set to 5. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Receiver Number. Two ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9. 00 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. Line Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-4. 0 will be used where no Line Number is assigned. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Message Type = Contact-ID. Two ASCII characters = 18 = 31 hex, 38 hex. Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Qualifier. One ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: E = New event or opening R = New restore or closing P = Previous event Event Code. Three ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Group Number. Two ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading 0s will be used. 00 will be used where no group number is assigned Zone or User Number. Three ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading 0s will be used. 000 will be used where no Zone Number is assigned. Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

EEE GG CCC <14> <06>

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APPENDIX 3 Contact-ID 1 Protocol (continued) Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: N RR 0 <SP> 18 AAAAAA E 602 00 000 <14> <06> The message is as follows : N RR 0 <SP> 18 AAAAAA E 602 00 000 <14> <06> Protocol Number. 1 character, range 1 - 9. Normally set to 5. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Receiver number. 2 characters, range 00 99, 00 will be used where no line number is assigned Line Number. A single ASCII character = 0 = 30 hex. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Message Type = Contact-ID. Two ASCII characters = 18 = 31 hex, 38 hex. Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Qualifier. One ASCII character = E = 45 hex. Event Code. Three ASCII characters = 602 = 36 hex, 30 hex, 32 hex. Group Number. Two ASCII characters = 00 = 30 hex, 30 hex. Zone or User Number. Three ASCII characters = 000 = 30 hex, 30 hex, 30 hex. Termination Byte. A single byte = Control Character DC4 = 14 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Contact-ID 2 Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. <LF> R L <SP> AAAA <SP> 18 <SP> Q EEE <SP> GG <SP> I CCC <SP> <CR> <06> The message is as follows : <LF> R A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Receiver Number. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9. 0 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Line Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. 0 will be used where no Line Number is assigned. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Message Type = Contact-ID. Two ASCII characters = 18 = 31 hex, 38 hex. Qualifier. One ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: E = New event or opening R = New restore or closing P = Previous event Event Code. Three ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Group Number. Two ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading 0s will be used. 00 will be used where no Group Number is assigned Contact Type. Zone = Z = 5A hex, or User = U = 55 hex. The Contact Type is derived within the Quasar and is Event Code dependent. Contact Type = 'Z' unless the Event Code is one of the following, in which case it will be 'U'. "121" "442" "464" "431" CCC <CR> <06> "313" "450" "466" "574" "400" "451" "411" "604" "401" "452" "412" "607" "402" "453" "413" "625" "403" "404" "405" "406" "407" "408" "409" "441" "454" "455" "456" "457" "458" "459" "462" "463" "414" "415" "421" "422" "424" "425" "429" "430" "642" .

L <SP> AAAA 18 Q

EEE GG I

Zone or User Number. Three ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading 0s will be used. 000 will be used where no Zone Number is assigned. A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Contact-ID 2 Protocol (continued) Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: <LF> R 0 <SP> AAAA <SP> 18 <SP> E 602 <SP> 00 <SP> Z 000 <SP> <CR> <06> The message is as follows : <LF> R A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Receiver Number. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9. 0 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Line Number. A single ASCII character = 0 = 30 hex. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Message Type = Contact-ID. Two ASCII characters = 18 = 31 hex, 38 hex. Qualifier. One ASCII character = E = 45 hex. Event Code. Three ASCII characters = 602 = 36 hex, 30 hex, 32 hex. Group Number. Two ASCII characters = 00 = 30 hex, 30 hex. Contact Type. One ASCII character = Z = 5A hex. Zone or User Number. Three ASCII characters = 000 = 30 hex, 30 hex, 30 hex. A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

0 <SP> AAAA 18 E 602 00 Z 000 <CR> <06>

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APPENDIX 3 Ademco 4+2 Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. <LF> R L <SP> AAAA <SP> B C <CR> <06> The message is as follows : <LF> R A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Receiver Number. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9. 0 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Line Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. 0 will be used where no Line Number is assigned. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Event Type. A single ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: A = Alarm R = Restore O = Open C = Close T = Test channel action Channel Number. A single ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-F. When the Network Transmission Protocol is DTMF Fast Format, Dualcom 96, PortAlarm2001or a similar structured protocol then that protocols Channel Number indicates the Event. Refer to the table below. Channel Number = 1 to 9 Channel Number = 10 Channel Number = 11 to 16 ASCII 1 to 9 ASCII 0 ASCII A to F

L <SP> AAAA B

Where the Event Type = T = Test channel action, the channel number is significant. Channel Number = 0 = Low-battery or power failure Channel Number = 8 = A monitoring function. Channel Number = 9 = A test call. <CR> <06> A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Ademco 4+2 Protocol (continued) Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: <LF> 00 OKAY @ <06> The message is as follows : <LF> 00 OKAY @ <06> A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Two ASCII characters = 00 = 30 hex, 30 hex. Four ASCII characters = OKAY = 4F hex, 4B hex, 41 hex, 59 hex. An AT character. A single byte = 40 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Ademco 4+1 Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. <LF> R L <SP> AAAA <SP> B <CR> <06> The message is as follows : <LF> R A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Receiver Number. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9. 0 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Line Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. 0 will be used where no Line Number is assigned. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Event Type. A single ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: A = Alarm R = Restore O = Open C = Close T = Test channel action A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

L <SP> AAAA B

<CR> <06>

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APPENDIX 3 Ademco 4+1 Protocol (continued) Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: <LF> 00 OKAY @ <06> The message is as follows : <LF> 00 OKAY @ <06> A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Two ASCII characters = 00 = 30 hex, 30 hex. Four ASCII characters = OKAY = 4F hex, 4B hex, 41 hex, 59 hex. An AT character. A single byte = 40 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 3 Ademco High Speed Protocol This protocol may be selected as an Output Protocol on the Quasar receiver Serial Output port. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Receiver sends the following string to the AMS whenever it receives a message. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. <LF> R L <SP> AAAA <SP> 1234 <SP> 5678 <SP> S <CR> <06> The message is as follows : <LF> R A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Receiver Number. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9. 0 will be used where no Receiver Number is assigned. This will be the L.S.Digit of the 2 digit number used in Quasar. Line Number. One ASCII character. The character = 1-9. 0 will be used where no Line Number is assigned. A Space character. A single byte = 20 hex. Account Number. 4 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Channels 1, 2, 3 and 4. Four ASCII characters. Each character may be 0-9. Channels 5, 6, 7 and 8. Four ASCII characters. Each character may be 0-9. Status Channel. One ASCII character. The character may be 0-9 or A-F. A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

L <SP> AAAA 1234 5678 S <CR> <06>

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APPENDIX 3 Ademco High Speed Protocol (continued) Integrity Poll Message It is important that the Alarms Management System is quickly aware of any breach in the integrity of the serial data cable to each Receiver, and that the receiver itself is operating correctly. This is achieved by the Receiver sending an integrity message if it has not sent any data for a period, typically one minute. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. The integrity message is: <LF> 00 OKAY @ <06> The message is as follows : <LF> 00 OKAY @ <06> A Line Feed character. A single byte = 0A hex. Two ASCII characters = 00 = 30 hex, 30 hex. Four ASCII characters = OKAY = 4F hex, 4B hex, 41 hex, 59 hex. An AT character. A single byte = 40 hex. Reception Acknowledgement. The Alarms Management System will reply with a single byte of 06 hex. The Quasar expects the acknowledgement within 1 second.

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APPENDIX 4 Input Data Format Descriptions Fast Format (Dualcom-96) This protocol may be selected as the received Data Format on any of the 4 Quasar input channels. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Quasar receives the following string. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 12345678 T <CR> <06> <CR> OR HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 12345678 9ABCDEFG T <CR> <06> <CR> The message is as follows : HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 12345678 Handshake. Three ASCII characters = HS1 = 48 hex, 53 hex, 31 hex. A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. A Start of Header character. A single byte = 01 hex. Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Channels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8. Eight ASCII characters. Each character may be 1-6. Channel 1 = Fire (Smoke Alarm) Channel 2 = Tamper Channel 3 = Intruder Alarm Channel 4 = Panel status - SET / UNSET Channel 5 to 8 = spare, undefined. 1 = New alarm event 2 = Opening event 3 = New alarm restoral 4 = Closing event 5 = No event, input is in the quiescent state. Alarm channel = no alarm, Open/close channel = Closed 6 = No event, input is in the active state. Alarm channel = Alarm, Open/close channel = Open 9ABCDEFG Channels 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16. Eight ASCII characters. Each character may be 1-6. Channel 9 to 16 = spare, undefined. As described for channels 1-8 above. T Test Channel. One ASCII character. The character will be one of the following numbers: 7 = Quiescent state 8 = Low battery 9 = Test transmission and Lo Battery restore Acknowledge character. A single byte = 06 hex. from Quasar to Quasar, 16 channel format from Quasar from Quasar to Quasar, 8 channel format from Quasar

<06>

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APPENDIX 4 Input Data Format Descriptions PortAlarm 2001 This protocol may be selected as the received Data Format on any of the 4 Quasar input channels. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Quasar receives the following string. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 12345678 9ABCDEFG Z <CR> <06> <CR> The message is as follows : HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 12345678 Handshake. Three ASCII characters = HS1 = 48 hex, 53 hex, 31 hex. A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. A Start of Header character. A single byte = 01 hex. Account Number. Six ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading zeroes will be inserted to make a total of 6 characters. Channels 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 and 8. Eight ASCII characters. Each character may be 1-6. Channel 1 = Fire (Smoke Alarm) Channel 2 = Tamper Channel 3 = Intruder Alarm Channel 4 = Panel status - SET / UNSET Channel 5 = Mains Fail Channel 6 = Test Channel 7 = Battery Low Channel 8 = Battery Fail 1 = Alarm event 2 = UNSET event (Standby) 3 = Restore event 4 = SET event (Armed) 5 = restore condition (normal) 6 = alarm condition 9ABCDEFG Channels 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15 and 16. Eight ASCII characters. Each character may be 1-6. Channel 9 = PA Channel 10 = Supervisory Channel 11 = Jamming Channel 12 to 16 = spare, undefined As described for channels 1-8 above. Z Zone Channel. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-F. 0 = Panel 1 = Zone 1 2 = Zone 2 etc. Up to a maximum of 15 zones, (F hex). Acknowledge character. A single byte = 06 hex. from Quasar to Quasar from Quasar

<06>

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APPENDIX 4 Input Data Format Descriptions Contact-ID This protocol may be selected as the received Data Format on any of the 4 Quasar input channels. Refer to the CSL protocol document for full information about this protocol. The protocol data format is represented by ASCII characters and control codes as shown. The baud rate, the use of parity and the number of stop bit is not defined but needs to be compatible at each end of the link. The Quasar receives the following string. Spaces shown in the sequences below are for printing clarity and do not form part of the message. HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 18 Q EEE GG CCC S <CR> <06> <CR> The message is as follows : HS1 <CR> <01> AAAAAA 18 Q Handshake. Three ASCII characters = HS1 = 48 hex, 53 hex, 31 hex. A Carriage Return character. A single byte = 0D hex. A Start of Header character. A single byte = 01 hex. Account Number. 4, 5 or 6 ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. For values less than 1000 leading zeroes will be inserted to make a minimum of 4 characters. Message Type = Contact-ID. Two ASCII characters = 18 = 31 hex, 38 hex. Qualifier. One ASCII character. The character will be one of the following capital letters: E = New event or opening R = New restore or closing P = Previous event Event Code. Three ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Group Number. Two ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading 0s will be used. 00 will be used where no group number is assigned Zone or User Number. Three ASCII characters. Each character = 0-9 or A-F. Leading 0s will be used. 000 will be used where no Zone Number is assigned. Checksum. Modulo 15. One ASCII character. The character = 0-9 or A-F. Acknowledge character. A single byte = 06 hex. from Quasar to Quasar from Quasar

EEE GG CCC S <06>

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APPENDIX 4 Input Data Format Descriptions SMS The Fast Format and the Contact-ID alarm reporting protocols can be received by Quasar from any GSM radio network when encoded as data or as SMS Text. The Fast Format alarm reporting protocol is also known as Dualcom-96. These alarm reporting protocols are described on the preceding pages. When SMS Text is received, 1. A GSM Radio modem must be connected to a Quasar input channel. 2. The Input Type for that channel must be selected to SMS. 3. The SMS Text must conform to the following standard. In an SMS Text message, Fast Format and the Contact-ID alarm reporting messages can be embedded within text. In an SMS Text message, Fast Format and the Contact-ID alarm reporting messages must be preceeded by a non-ASCII-hex character ie <SP>. In an SMS Text message, there is no limit to the number of alarm reporting messages or the amount of text. As the Quasar receives each character in the SMS Text message, each non-ASCII-hex character is ignored. Each ASCII-hex character is shifted into a buffer. The Buffer is checked after each received character and if all checks are ok then the data is actioned.
Number of characters in Buffer
13 to 15 16 to 18 21 to 23

Action
Check for an 8 channel Fast Format message Check for a Contact-ID message Check for a 16 channel Fast Format message

Example of a 16 channel Fast Format alarm & a follow-on message that is embedded in SMS Text: "Here comes an alarm on channel 1 123456155555557 oh no! the channel seems to have restored 123456355555557"

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APPENDIX 5 Data Format and Output Protocol Associations Each of Quasars 4 channels receives alarm messages from the one network to which it is connected. The networks are:
Quasar Input Type PSTN GSM VD N ISDN SMS

Communications Netw ork The Analogue PSTN Telephone Network A GSM Radio Network The Vodafone Packet Data Network (Paknet) The Digital ISDN Telephone Network A GSM Radio Network

Netw ork Terminating Equipment D2068 Analogue PSTN Modem Kit D2016 GSM Modem Kit CS1016 VDN Radio-PAD Kit D2067 Digital ISDN Terminal Adapter D2016 GSM Modem Kit

Each of Quasars 4 channels can receive alarm messages in one Data Format, and can output that message to an Alarm Management System (AMS) using one Output Protocol. There are several Output Protocols available depending upon the received Data Format. Not all Output Protocols are available for every received Data Format. The received Data Formats and Output Protocols are:
Received Data Format Output Protocol Radionics-Standard Radionics-Extenced Radionics-IE Ademco 4+1 Ademco 4+2 Ademco High Speed Contact-ID1 (via converter) Radionics-Standard Radionics-Extenced Radionics-IE Ademco 4+1 Ademco 4+2 Ademco High Speed Contact-ID1 (via converter) Contact-ID1 Contact-ID2

Fast Format / Dualcom 96

PortAlarm 2001

Contact ID

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APPENDIX 6 Quasar Setup Parameters Form It is recommended that this Manual with the completed Setup Parameters Form is kept with the Quasar and that a copy of this Setup Parameters Form is kept with your documentation that relates to this installation.

Quasar information Quasar Receiver Serial Number Software version number (see page 41)

Channel 1 information Network Termination Equipment PSTN Modem ISDN Terminal adaptor (tick one) GSM Radio Module VDN Radio-PAD Type of Network Termination Equipment (model name / number) Network connection number (telephone number of PSTN / ISDN line) (data telephone no. of GSM SIM Card) (ESN number of VDN Radio-PAD) (NUA number of VDN Radio-PAD) VDN or GSM Radio Signal strength Serial number of GSM SIM Card Initialisation string Channel 2 information Network Termination Equipment PSTN Modem ISDN Terminal adaptor (tick one) GSM Radio Module VDN Radio-PAD Type of Network Termination Equipment (model name / number) Network connection number (telephone number of PSTN / ISDN line) (data telephone no. of GSM SIM Card) (ESN number of VDN Radio-PAD) (NUA number of VDN Radio-PAD) VDN or GSM Radio Signal strength Serial number of GSM SIM Card Initialisation string

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APPENDIX 6 (continued) Channel 3 information Network Termination Equipment PSTN Modem ISDN Terminal adaptor (tick one) GSM Radio Module VDN Radio-PAD Type of Network Termination Equipment (model name / number) Network connection number (telephone number of PSTN / ISDN line) (data telephone no. of GSM SIM Card) (ESN number of VDN Radio-PAD) (NUA number of VDN Radio-PAD) VDN or GSM Radio Signal strength Serial number of GSM SIM Card Initialisation string

Channel 4 information Network Termination Equipment PSTN Modem ISDN Terminal adaptor (tick one) GSM Radio Module VDN Radio-PAD Type of Network Termination Equipment (model name / number) Network connection number (telephone number of PSTN / ISDN line) (data telephone no. of GSM SIM Card) (ESN number of VDN Radio-PAD) (NUA number of VDN Radio-PAD) VDN or GSM Radio Signal strength Serial number of GSM SIM Card Initialisation string

Installation Notes

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APPENDIX 7 Using other Modems Other modems than those supplied with the Quasar may be used. The installer must ensure suitability of the modem selected. Some modems must be used with their own power supply because they can not use the DC 6, 9 or 12 volt supply inside the Quasar. In these cases, the Quasar must still be able to switch the modem off and on. Use a small 12 volt relay connected as shown. This example shows a modem connected to the Quasar Channel 1 input.

Modem

Modem Power supply

12 volt Relay

+
Channel 1 DC power

Channel 1 DC Power Jumper Link DC 12 volt position

Serial Data Cable

Quasar Channel Connectors

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APPENDIX 8 Specification Model Dimensions Weight Power Requirement Current Consumption Battery Low Battery Inputs Outputs Alarm Protocols Output Protocol Display Monitoring Temperature Humidity Mounting Warranty D2066 Quasar Receiver (h x w x d) 135 x 432 x 370 mm 12Kg (including battery) 12.0 - 15.0 volts DC, 0.1volt max ripple 230mA min quiescent, 1 Amp max. Discharged battery = 2 Amp max. 13.8 volt 7 amp/hour lead-acid gel 10.8-11.0 volts falling, 11.8-12.0v recovery 4 serial inputs for modems etc. 4 changeover relays (24v 1A contacts) Serial and Parallel printers Serial for Alarm Management System Dualcom96 and Portalarm2001 Radionics 6500 4 line 80 character back-lit LCD DC voltage, current and temperature Input, printer and output data connections -20C to +60C transit, -4C to +40C operating 0 - 80% non-condensing Any orientation 2 years

European Approval The D2066 meets the requirements of the European Directives governing EMC and safety for electronic equipment operating on SELV voltages. The equipment carries the CE mark. Other equipment that may be used with the Quasar is not included as part of the Quasar approval.

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APPENDIX 9 Glossary of Terms ADSL Asynchronous Digital Subscriber Line A wideband digital communication service from a network provider to a subscriber that carries a high volume of digital data, most commonly for internet access. Sometimes called Broadband. An ADSL service is often provided with a simultaneous analogue PSTN service on a Hybrid line. AMS Alarms Management System Equipment (normally a Server & terminals) and documentation system to display received transmissions to operators (normally alarm information) for despatching to other services, e.g. fire, police, to record those received transmissions and to store details of the actions taken by the operators. The equipment and documentation system is normally contained within an ARC. Analogue PSTN Analogue Public Switched Telephone Network. The analogue national telephone system. Often just called the PSTN. Service is available to customers on twisted-pair wires that carries a DC supply provided from the network telephone exchange. ARC Alarm Receiving Centre See ARS ARS Alarm Receiving Station A 24 hour manned centre (often privately owned & operated) capable of receiving & logging calls of alarm and forwarding them to security authorities and other relevant services. Often called a Central Station. Broadband See ADSL Digital PSTN Digital Public Switched Telephone Network. The digital national telephone system. Service is available to customers on twisted-pair wires that carries a DC supply provided from the network telephone exchange, on optical fibre or other digital transmission medium. The digital service may be in ISDN format or another digital format. DTMF Dual Tone Multi Frequency The series of tones used by telephones to send dialling information to an analogue PSTN exchange. These tones are also used by the DTMF Fast Format Alarms Reporting Protocol. DTMF Fast Format Alarms Reporting Protocol A protocol that is a sequence of analogue tones (push-button telephone tones) used to send via telephone lines a transmission to receiving equipment at an ARC, and to receive checking and acknowledgement replies from that receiving equipment. 8 or 16 channel DTMF Fast Format protocol is commonly used in burglar or intrusion alarm equipment. Dualcom96 Alarms Reporting Protocol A digital protocol that is a sequence of ASCII characters used to send via telephone, radio or other data network a transmission to receiving equipment at an ARC, and to receive checking and acknowledgement replies from that receiving equipment. 8 or 16 channel Dualcom96 protocol is commonly used in burglar or intrusion alarm equipment. GSM Global System for Mobile Communications. Digital telephone service particularly (but not exclusively) for users that may be mobile for carrying digital data, speech or fax, where the path from the user is by a radio link to one (or more) fixed sites. Hybrid Line A line that carries digital data and analogue signals simultaneously. Most commonly this is an ADSL digital service and an analogue telephone service on one line from a Service Provider to a subscriber. ISDN Integrated Services Digital Network A digital communication network where services are provided via electrical or optical cables. This may also be a digital PSTN. The network is usually provided as a 2 channel or 30 channel ISDN service.

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APPENDIX 9 Glossary of Terms (continued) ISDN 2 2 Channel ISDN An ISDN communication service where two simultaneous channels may be used. Each channel is normally a 64 KiloBit/sec serial data path. Each path may typically carry one speech telephone call, or an internet connection or a fax call. ISDN 30 30 Channel ISDN An ISDN communication service where thirty simultaneous channels may be used. Each channel is normally a 64 KiloBit/sec serial data path. Each path may typically carry one speech telephone call, or an internet connection or a fax call. NTP Network Termination Point A telephone line is terminated at the users premises by a Network Termination Point which is provided by the Telecomms Service Provider. This is a socket or connection where the users equipment can be connected. NVM Non Volatile Memory. An integrated circuit memory device that does not need any power to remember data. PABX Private Automatic Branch Exchange A small telephone exchange for use within one building or group of buildings. Commonly used in businesses where each phone in that business is an extention on that PABX. Ususlly connects to one or more analogue PSTN or ISDN telephone lines. PAKNET Packet data Network. See VDN PortAlarm 2001 A digital protocol that is a sequence of ASCII characters used to send via telephone, radio or other data networks a transmission to receiving equipment at an ARC, and to receive checking and acknowledgement replies from that receiving equipment. 16 channel PortAlarm2001 protocol is used in burglar or intrusion alarm equipment. PSTN Public Switched Telephone Network. A national telephone system. This may be analogue and/or digital. See Analog PSTN. Radionics 6500 A digital protocol that is a sequence of ASCII characters used to send data via a serial lead between equipment (typically a Quasar receiver and an AMS PC or server). The protocol is structured specifically to carry alarm data and equipment identity. SIM Card Subcriber Identification Module Card A card or chip that contains data for use by a unit that communicates via the GSM network, e.g. a portable telephone. The data contained identifies the subscriber to that network allowing billing and other user related services to be associated with an indivudual or company. Terminal Adapter A Device that connects to the S-bus connection of an ISDN Network Termination Point and adapts the digital S-bus data, i.e.protocol, data speed, structure, to that required. In this document it describes a device that provides a serial port for cable connection to a PC serial COM port. VDN Vodafone Data Network (Paknet) An X25 communication system operated by Vodafone in UK for users that are not mobile, for carrying digital data (not speech) where the path from the user is by a radio link to one (or more) fixed sites. WEB SITE The Dycon Internet Web Site The Dycon web site: www.dyconsecurity.com contains the latest copies of all manuals for all Dycon products. Please ensure that you are working from the latest version. You can also download associated information and software samplers. Dycon sales, shipping and contact information is here too.

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