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Difference b/w narrowband and broadband isdn

1.The narrowband ISDN is based on the use of a 64 kbps channel as the basic

unit of switching and has a circuit switching orientation. The major technical contribution of the narrowband ISDN effort has been frame relay. The B-ISDN supports very high data rates (100s of Mbps) and has a packet switching orientation. The major technical contribution of the B-ISDN effort has been asynchronous transfer mode, also known as cell relay

2.Generally, narrowband describes telecommunication that carries voice


information in a narrow band of frequencies. More specifically, the term has been used to describe a specific frequency range set aside by the U.S. FCC for mobile or radio services, including paging systems, from 50 cps to 64 Kbps On the other hand, broadband refers to telecommunication in which a wide band of frequencies is available to transmit information. Because a wide band of frequencies is available, information can be multiplexed and sent on many different frequencies or channels within the band concurrently, allowing more information to be transmitted in a given amount of time (much as more lanes on a highway allow more cars to travel on it at the same time) The most important development in the computer communications industry in the 1990s is the evolution of the integrated services digital network (ISDN) and broadband ISDN (BISDN). The ISDN and B-ISDN have had a dramatic impact on the planning and deployment of intelligent digital networks providing integrated services for voice, data and video. Further, the work on the ISDN and B-ISDN standards has led to the development of two major new networking technologies; frame relay and asynchronous transfer mode (ATM). Frame relay and ATM have become the essential ingredients in developing highspeed networks for local, metropolitan and wider area applications. The ISDN is intended to be a worldwide public telecommunications network to replace existing public telecommunication networks and deliver a wide variety of services. The ISDN is defined by the standardization of user interfaces and implemented as a set of digital switches and paths supporting a broad range of traffic types and providing value added processing services. In practice, there are multiple networks, implemented within national boundaries but from the user's point of view, the eventual widespread deployment of ISDN will lead to a single, uniformly accessible, worldwide network. The narrowband ISDN is based on the use of a 64 kbps channel as the basic unit of switching and has a circuit switching orientation. The major technical contribution of the narrowband ISDN effort has been frame relay. The B-ISDN supports very high data rates (100s of Mbps) and has a packet switching orientation. The major technical contribution of the B-ISDN effort has been asynchronous transfer mode, also known as cell relay. CIRCUIT SWITCHING Read more:

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Broadband Versus Narrowband


We frequently regard a broadband network as a "high speed connection" to the Internet run over Ethernet network interface cards (NICs). This is not a correct point of view. We must differentiate between broadband and narrowband networks in that broadband networks can be used for many different traffic characteristics, while narrowband networks are used for one. Broadband and narrowband networks have nothing to do with the capacity of asymmetrical digital subscribe line (ADSL) or cable modems. These are access points to a broadband network. Narrowband technologies are Ethernet, Token Ring, FDDI, and certain types of WAN links. Narrowband technologies can be adapted to run over broadband technologies, but it is not possible to run broadband technologies over narrowband. Broadband technologies, on the other hand, are not limited to a single link protocol (like Ethernet) or to data communication only. Broadband networks use frame, or frame trains, and special methods to encapsulate and control the information sent through it. The information does not have to be computer related at all. For example, voice -over-IP is not a broadband technology because the audio is digitized and sent as IP packets, mostly over Ethernet, whereas on broadband, voice can be sent as a separate channel without encapsulating it into a computer communication protocol. The three major types of broadband communication are:

Constant bit rate (time critical)typically video streams Available bit rate (in-order packet delivery)typically phone systems Unspecified bit rate (error-free)typically data communications

Broadband networks can be adapted to form the physical layer for LAN technologies (broadband ISDN or ATM), or to run subsets of TCP/IP directly (such as PPP over SDH). The three major groups of broadband technologies are:

Synchronous optical network (SONET, North America) Synchronous digital hierarchy (SDH, Europe) Broadband ISDN (ATM)

ATM can function by itself or run over SONET or SDH. The latter is more common.