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Soccer Drills Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1)

Site:Soccer Drills & Football Drills - Professional Soccer Coaching http://www.professionalsoccercoaching.com Title:Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1) - Created: 28 September 2011
Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1)
Drill Objective(s) 1) Developing understanding of how to defend wide areas in a 4-3-3 formation. 2) Developing the roles of the outside defender and forward in a 4-3-3 formation. * * * * * Drill No: FOR2 Age: 14-Adlt No Players: 8vs8 (+GK) Difficulty: Advanced Area/Time: 60x45yrds (adjust as necessry) (20mins)

Diagram 1 - Left back Stepping Up

ORGANISATION: * 60x45yrd grid and a 'No Press Zone' approximately 15yrds deep marked with cones. * Red (Defending) vs. Yellow (Attacking) team. * Attacking team = 3-4-1 * Defending team = 4-3-1 * Starting Position: Back of the centre circle. INSTRUCTIONS: * The yellow team attempt to score on goal. * When in the 'No Press Zone' the yellow players cannot be challenged. * Starting Position: The yellows are allowed to play an unpressured pass wide to a wing player (wide midfielder). * Play resumes normally from this point. * If the ball is played negatively back into the 'No Press Zone' the defending team again cannot press and challenge for the ball. * If the defending team wins the ball they attempt to make 5 passes or make a successful pass into the 'No Press Zone'. * Changes team roles every 10 mins to keep players engaged.

Page 1 of 3 - Print date: 12 October 2011

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Soccer Drills Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1)

Site:Soccer Drills & Football Drills - Professional Soccer Coaching http://www.professionalsoccercoaching.com Title:Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1) - Created: 28 September 2011
SCORING: 1 goal = Attacking team scores a goal. 1 goal = Defending team makes 5 consecutive passes or makes a successful pass to team mate in the 'No Press Zone'. KEY COACHING POINTS: 1) Outside backs step up to pressure the wide players. The remaining defenders slide across to support the strong side of the field and provide cover and balance. 2) Central midfield unit recovers and slides to the strong side slightly and gets behind the ball and screens the central area of the field. 3) Refer to Diagram 2/Progression 2. After adding the wing forwards (i.e. LWF and RWF) these players look to pressure the attacking teams outside backs and force them centrally. They should curve their pressing runs making the outside back only have the option to pass inside or turn and go back. 4) When forced inside the the central midfield players perform anticipation marking and are very tight to the opponents in anticipation of a pass centrally they can cut out. 5) It is important in a 4-3-3 to not let the outside backs pass the ball wide. They should be channeled into the centre of the field where the 4-3-3 has strength in numbers. 6) Refer to Diagram 3/Progression 2. If the Wing Forward (LWF) fails to channel the pass inside and the opponents hihg outside midfielder has possession we attempt to create a trapping pocket on the wide midfielder. Essentially this involves double teaming the outside midfielder and pintching the forward and outside back on this player, trapping them. PROGRESSIONS 1) Perform the initial starting point on both sides of the field. 2) Add a LWF and a RWF (Diagram 2 & 3). The starting point should then change to direct pass to an outside back instead 3) Allow the defending team to press in the 'No Press Area'. First pass is free (i.e. cannot be intercepted). Diagram 2 - Addition of LWF and RWF to the defending team.

Diagram 3- Trapping Pocket

Page 2 of 3 - Print date: 12 October 2011

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Soccer Drills Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1)

Site:Soccer Drills & Football Drills - Professional Soccer Coaching http://www.professionalsoccercoaching.com Title:Defending Wide Areas 4-3-3 (4-2-3-1) - Created: 28 September 2011

VARIATIONS: 1) Add another forward to the Attacking team (Yellow). NOTES AND OBSERVATIONS: Make sure the players have a clear understanding of their role in how to defend in t wide areas. Use a whiteboard to check understanding after the session and have players draw out their understanding of their roles. Modify starting positions and allow free touches by the attackers if pplayers struggle at the beginning.

Page 3 of 3 - Print date: 12 October 2011

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