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MARCH 16, 2012

The Pioneer Log News

Bon Apptit drops cruel meat from menu


BY ASHLEY JOCZ
Staff Writer

Bon Apptit Management Company announced a recent policy shift to purchase primarily cruelty-free meat. Bon Apptit will attempt to no longer serve pork that was raised in gestation crates, cage-bred eggs or poultry, and will also completely eliminate foie gras and veal. The process, which will be complete by 2015, will ultimately lead to the creation of one of the industrys most comprehensive farm animal welfare policies. However, Bon Apptit will not be going completely cruelty-free. The company plans on having about 25 percent of its meat sourced from humane suppliers. Its important to clarify that the Bon is not selling only crueltyfree meat; much, probably most, of the meat will continue to come from factory farms, said Chloe Waterman (12), an active member of the Animal Club. Bon Apptit is not only the catering service for Lewis & Clark, but serves 400 cafes in 31 different states. Bon Apptit currently serves 3 million pounds of pork and 11 million eggs annually. By allowing a gradual shift from 2012 to 2015, the catering service will not only save money but will allow suppliers time to change their policies. Although LC students consider the issue of animal rights impor-

tant, they are also weary of rising prices. I definitely support the Bons attempt to use responsible meat, but not if it will be a noticeable price increase, said Christopher Hachisu (14). When asked, the Bon Apptit staff was not able to give a comprehensive answer on the exact price increase, but theorized that because of the policys gradual nature there would not be any noticeable difference. There will be no pricing changes this school year. Well have more information about any future price adjustments as we find suppliers that meet our policy, said Bonnie Powell, Director of Communications at Bon Appetit. The increase will be small, if any is needed at all. Although Bon Apptit claims thatthe price increase will be minimal, experts know that healthier meat is simply more expensive. Free range animal products do cost more because, simply, it is cheaper to confine animals in cages that are very small, said Josh Balk, Director of Corporate Policy for Humane Society of the United States. Gestation crates are 7ft x 2ft metal crates in which pigs live for extended periods of time and during pregnancy. I would support a very, very minimal increase in price because
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cruelty-free meat usually tastes better. When an animal is stressed and unhappy, they just dont taste as good, Hachisu said. There is a growing movement in the food industry to demand that food suppliers treat their animals better. Pigs can live up to four years in crates that are too small to even turn around in. Thats the same amount of time most students spend getting a college degree, said Balk, Bon Apptit has one of the most comprehensive

policies and is a true leader in attempting to stop cruelty on farms. Eight states in the country have already banned gestation crates, one of them being Oregon. However, Oregon is the only state to ban the crates through its state legislator. Waterman believes that although many students do not see vegatarianism and veganism as a viable solution to the cruelty animals face, responsible meat is the next best option.

Bon Apptit recognizes this and is responding by providing consumers with animal products raised under better conditions, said Waterman. LC has a proud tradition of showing passion and excitement over creating a more sustainable and humane world, which is why Bon Apptit is a perfect fit to run its welfare operations, Balk said. Most menu changes, if any, will be implemented in the next fall semester.

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Students sickened by virus


BY KEVIN RYAN
Staff Writer
A.M.P.A.S.

Over the weekend, at least 12 students came down with an illness, and the Health and Wellness center is saying that the most likely cause was a virus. At least three students were hospitalized for dehydration that was the result of symptoms caused by the illness such as violent vomiting and diarrhea, but many more people who were sick with much milder symptoms likely went largely unreported. Students sent to the hospital were diagnosed with gastroenteritis, a highly contagious stomach flu virus, and were given antinausea drugs. I was vomiting about once every hour, said Clay Alexander (15), one of the many students who had caught the illness Friday night. Mac Lary, the General Manager of the Bon, and Aaron Dionne, the Executive Chef in the cafeteria, both denied the possibility that the virus was transmitted via food poisoning. We work very hard to keep safety up and instances at a minimum, Lary said.

He explained that every employee has food safety training and that the Bon has four health and safety inspections per year, usually averaging in the 90s on a scale out of 100. Although food poisoning is not the likely culprit, the Bon acknowledges that transmission of any illness is much easier in the cafeteria because of the number of students that congregate there. Associate Dean of Students, Director of Wellness Services and Chief Psychologist John Hancock sent out an email on Monday stating that the illness was likely a virus, but was reluctant to share specific information about the outbreak in an interview with The Pioneer Log. He stated that nobody was sent to the hospital by health center staff. This is nothing out of the usual. Having a virus on campus is par for the course, said Hancock. According to the health center, the cases are fairly scattered and they only agreed to see a few people who exhibited symptoms. The health center and the Bon both confirm that it was likely an illness that someone carried into the Bon and was transmitted via the food.

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