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ALC314 Advertising: Designing Desires

Gallery 2
Lachlan Ross: 600108473

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

POST STRUCTURALISM EXERCISE 1 Follow your own star is a 40-second TV advert for Mercedes that was broadcast in early 2005.
http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/ContentPageServerServlet/as sessment/poststructuralism/movies/Mercedes_REF.html

This ad by Mercedes demonstrates a post-structuralist view through its use of both linguistic and aesthetic languages (images and text). Unlike modernists, post structuralist argues that we cant develop a coherent, consistent, unified, stable self (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011). The Mercedes ad centres of the theory that individuals are not consistent and coherent selves, and instead have different identities at different times and places (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011). These theories are evident throughout the ad by displaying everyday people that the ad aims to relate to by doing unorthodox or unusual actions. A clear example of this is when the man in the ad is strangely surprised to find the child writing on the wall when the caption signalling make rules appears. The man chooses not to enforce any discipline for the childs bad behaviour; instead the man frames the writing as the caption signalling break them appears. In doing this, the man becomes the rule maker and rule breaker at the same time by being the father and seemingly encouraging his sons bad behaviour. The constant contradictions of messages throughout the ad like be responsible/be carefree and be a teacher/be a student reinforces the main meaning behind the theory of post-structuralism that different languages create different worlds that cant represent the real world (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011). Finally, with the message being sent from the ad by Mercedes saying, follow your own star is trying to tell the receiver that buying this car will give you the freedom to the good guy and bad guy, and that no matter how inconsistent you are in the way you act wont really matter. This is evident from Big Ideas, we cant understand the world (including our own particular circumstances) as a coherent and consistent entity, because our different languages create different worlds (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011).

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2A This was an ad Guru Gomez and was published in Info Skate Magazine Jan-Feb 2004.
http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=guro+gomez+ska teboarding+is+a+crime+advertisement&um=1&hl=en& nord=1&biw=1920&bih=979&tbm=isch&tbnid=es2Jnvjx

This ad by Guru Gomez, a line of skateboarding related apparel demonstrates a post structuralist view through its use of both linguistic and aesthetic languages (images and text). The teenager with a gun in his hand has his head and hand cock to the side, a gesture often seen in gangster films and music videos. The quote on the right side states, Skateboarding is a crime, thats why Im G.. Is a poor portrayal of the skateboarding community to say you have to be a gangster to be a skateboarder. In other words, one has to break the law to fit in. The skateboarder hanging upside down is saying, Follow no one, its another message asking teenagers to be rebellious. The fact that the guy is upside down shows that it is following no one or the audience has to read it in a different norm. The guy is also talking to the public with his hand pointing at his own bubble. There are two counter forces; the first one is the gun and the second one is the capitalism force. Its a suggestion that everyone can replace the traditional system of authority and the capitalism itself with their own freedom of being counter hem genic and rebellious, to reject the dominant ways of seeing in favour of alternatives (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011). Visually, by seeing these clothes that could be considered stylish, the public can only buy the hippy ones worn by teenagers but not the uniforms. The comparison of these two forms of attires indirectly reinforces that uniforms are not as cool as teenagers apparel. The ad is saying two things; firstly to be part of this structure, you have to purchase the gear, which is part of a base. Secondly, in order to access the part of this structure, you have to participate in a counter hem genic way-participating in the system by fighting the system Each identity expresses the view of the world offered by a particular language, and each identity may contradict one or more others (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011). The ad is targeted towards young white teens, Where poststructuralists focus on individuals in a society. (Big Ideas, Poststructuralism, 2011) Whose attention is easily drawn to humorous comical style ads, not to mention their interests in violence and sports. The police officer is the representative of an authority figure and the empowerment of the teenager shows the message that it is time to take revenge to the authority system by being the cool skateboarder.

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2B With this ad, in attempting to remove the theory of Post Structuralism, I removed all the branding, the extra male from the top of screen, the gun being pointed at the police officer and changed the text from skateboarding is a crime to skateboarding is not a crime. To further emphasis that skateboarding is not a crime I included the caption of the police officer asking the male if he has got a spare board?

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

BRAND CREATES MARKETS EXERCISE 1 Tear here to match your personality is a full-page advert for Deltas Botanical Bath collection of taps that appeared in InStyle Home (Fall Winter 2003)
http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/ContentPageServerServlet/assessment/brand -creates/images/PH_Delta.html

Every person/household needs taps, they are essential to the design and function of any bathroom or kitchen. This ad by Delta attempts to make them particularly essential and exclusive to certain demographics and the segmented markets that lie within them. From analysing this ad, the conclusion can be made that these special taps are designed for woman and the wallpaper scrapbook signals they are for renovators too. The message being sent by Delta, Tear here to match your personality offers the receiver that Delta has a tap for any sort of person. Also the message of Tear here to match your personality reinforces the theory of brand creates markets by the way markets are segmented to the extent of replicating its efforts across different segments (Big Ideas, Brand Creates Markets, 2011). Big Theories states that, A company segments a market to personalise its communication (advertising, marketing) with each segment (i.e. to make its communication with each segment resonate with that segments defining characteristic/s) (Big Ideas, Brand Creates Markets, 2011). An example of this in the Delta ad is the message of Add a twist to your childs bathroom. So not only is this a tap that is to be desired by both woman and renovators alike but also children. Delta is acting to satisfy basic emotions, desires and needs. The DIY appeal promotes a behavioural change with the message announcing Get the spring look, Get the summer look. With the current popularity of home renovation shows being on television throughout this year, and with the ease in which these home are transformed occur by ordinary people over the space or either thirty/sixty minute episode. The Delta ad relates to this by offering the receiver a simple solution that can instantly transform ones bathroom. This relates very well with the view stated in Big Ideas that, The assumption underlying lifestyle segmentation is that the more demographic characteristics and attitudes that people share, the
4 Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

more likely it is that they will also share patterns of consumption. Companies position an existing product within a specific market segments particular lifestyle by promoting the features of the product that fit that lifestyle, and/or they design a new product to meet a specific need of the people who share that lifestyle (even if those people didnt know they had that need!) (Big Ideas, Brand Creates Markets, 2011). By the ad displaying a wide range of taps, it enables Delta to appeal to a wider range of segments within mass markets, when the reality is that at the end of the day every working tap achieves the same outcome, a source that dispenses water.

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2 Seiko print ad. Source: National Geographic, Vol. 165, No. 4, April 1994
http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-nPTRmPb3tQ4/TVVXMC5ZC3I/AAAAAAAAABk/Nz2gk1LV7w/s1600/SeiSpoKin2002.jpg

This ad by Seiko is aimed at a middle class professional male audience. The ad perpetuates the ideas behind the theory of a brand creating a market for a specific gender with the representation of masculinity, technology, relationships between man and machinery, power and the automobile which can be identified with, The assumption underlying lifestyle segmentation is that the more demographic characteristics and attitudes that people share, the more likely it is that they will also share patterns of consumption (Big Ideas, Brand Creates Markets, 2011). High performance time keeping implies that owning this watch will allow the receiver to buy at least part of the implied lifestyle of a successful male professional. The relationship between the watch and the car is both iconic and symbolic, but totally dependent on the traditional gender associations of the car, anchored by the male driver. Another traditionally masculine concept employed by this ad to connect it to a male audience is that man and machine symbiosis. The descriptive text in the bottom left hand corner contains several phrases which reinforce this sense of symbiosis and also seemingly give the watch a life of its own, At this heart, It uses your bodys energy, Going into deep sleep, and Only to reawaken. The latter two address the presumed global conscience of the modern professional man, in the energy saving features of the watch which can be related to, .promoting the features of the product that fit that lifestyle (Big Ideas, Brand Creates Markets, 2011).

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2B With this ad and attempting to remove the theory of brand creates market, I removed the watch, all the fine descriptive text down the left hand side of the page and the last two words time performance from the top of the ad and changing it with petrol. Instead of the image of the watch, I have replaced it with one displaying shell premium gasoline. The ad now resembles a fast moving car which is being fuelled by shell premium gasoline.

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

BRAND DIFFERENTIATES GENERIC PRODUCTS EXERCISE 1 What tobacco issue is important to you? is a full-page advert that appeared in The New Yorker (15 November 2004).
http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/ContentPageServerServlet/assessment/branddifferentiates/images/PH_PhilipMorris.html

This ad for Phillip Morris, one of the worlds largest producers of cigarettes, is a very confusing ad to initially understand. In this ad the generic product is smoking related information whilst the brand is Phillip Morris. The ad attempts Phillip Morris to disassociate itself from other smoking brands by proving the receiver with a wide range of information that is provided from a variety of different sources and channelling them into a single point of reference. Instead of selling its product (cigarettes), Phillip Morris has done what Klein describes as building an image (Big Ideas, Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products, 2011). They are attempting to be perceived as wanting to help people quit smoking with the aid of its brand (the website). The website promises links to public health authorities and expert resources, this is an attempt to give the receiver a false sense of security which hopefully increases their trust in Phillip Morris by providing empathy to them. Phillip Morris is not telling the receiver to quit smoking all together, rather to just do it responsibly. This reinforces the belief of Big Ideas as it states that products are made in the factory, brands are made in the mind (Big Ideas, Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products, 2011). This is Phillip Morris positioning to brand itself as being responsible but its purely symbolic (Big Ideas, Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products, 2011).

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2
http://theinspirationroom.com/daily/2008/windows-life-withoutwalls-in-print/

The print portion of Microsoft's new ad campaign characterizes the Mac vs. PC debate as an epic struggle between "Windows vs. Walls". This is an ad by Microsoft promoting their computer operating software. It features a high degree of symbolism, brands emerged to differentiate and add symbolic value (Big Ideas, Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products, 2011). The dark enclosed room represents Windows vista. Outside of the mans entrapment, another product is being sold, a new operating system. The argument that brands differentiate generic products can illuminate this puzzle, Windows do not produce computers, in order for this product to be used, and it must be on a PC. The power saw represents the Microsoft technology that can be used to free the user from his trap. Utilizing Microsoft tools, the user breaks out of Vista, finally seeing the light, he has escaped ...brands emerged to differentiate between products (Big Ideas, Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products, 2011). Microsoft is saying that a downgrade to XP is the best move a Vista user can make. The ads dont mention Vista, its not the Windows Microsoft is talking about. What they are doing is what Klein describes as building an image (Big Ideas, Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products, 2011).

Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2B With this ad and attempting the remove what defines it from the theories of Brand Differentiates Generic Products I removed all the text that was being displayed and changed the shape of the hole in the wall from the windows symbol to a simple square. There is now no brand or product being sold to the reader, just a simple question being asked that shows an alternate way of life asking Think outside the square you live in.

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

SIMULACRUM EXERCISE 1 'Quality is timeless' is a quarter page advert for The Sash Window workshop that appeared in British Homes & Gardens (November 2003)
http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/ContentPageServerServlet/assessment/simulacr um/images/PH_Sash_window.html

This ad and the theories behind simulacrum in my opinion draw on from what was learnt in Gallery 1 and its relationship with meaning by association. What makes simulacrum unique from it though is that not only does this ad illustrate the idea of meaning by association but also its value by association. It separates itself from the things they represent. The effect of this equates to each signifiers meaning to another signifier, where every meaning is differed to the next signifier. This is a continuous cycle where each meaning is deferred to the next and so on. The ads meaning is produced by its relationship to other things within the ad which is evident from, each commodity is an element of a self-referential system of meaning, where each element of the system means what it does because of its relationships with other elements of the system, not because it carries its meaning within itself (Big Ideas, Simulacrum, 2011). Each of the signifiers within this ad can function by themselves but their relationship to all the other signifiers creates simulacrum. When drawing on examples form the ad in question some clear elements can be identified and related to this theory. For example, the man who is constructing the window frame represents a degree of value, he is fairly old, and he seems to be paying a great amount of detail to his work. Essentially he is a master of his craft; he is not relying on some form of technology, rather his hands and experience/expertise. The value represents that it is handmade and that its being made by a person who instils the values of craftsmanship in ones own work. It is both these forms of value that make the meaning of simulacrum, not one exclusively; they all assist and provide meaning to each signifiers symbolic meaning.

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2 Campbell's Soup Advertisement - American Home Magazine - June 1939


http://www.google.com.au/imgres?q=campbells+adver tisement&um=1&hl=en&nord=1&biw=1920&bih=979&t bm=isch&tbnid=83UWpsOZXrR5_M:&imgrefurl=http://j ustamodernguy.com/%3Fp%3D159&docid=1PNHWR5H TnDCnM&w=500&h=313&ei=poyJTqOJG9DjmAWtxrQq &zoom=1&iact=hc&vpx=1488&vpy=425&dur=12&hovh=178&hovw=284&tx=162&ty=117&page=1&tbnh=107 &tbnw=171&start=0&ndsp=81&ved=1t:429,r:37,s:0

This ad for Campbells soup is a relation to the theory of simulacrum. The Campbell soup can is a simple composition of what was highly influential in its time, not just as an ad but also as a social statement on consumerism. The soup can is transformed into art, and the viewer examines the ad in ways and with a concentration never given to the everyday object. The original is forgotten, replaced by a two dimensional representation that has become more real than the original, hyper real in fact. The original soup can cease to exist for the viewer-or, at least, ceases to matter-and instead, the simulacrum replaces it. The soup cans are not necessarily a true simulacrum standing alone; however they become a simulacrum when viewed within consumerism, that we live in a consumer society, but also that our consumption is primarily symbolic (Big Ideas, Simulacrum, 2011). Every detail, faithfully reproduced by the designers hand becomes more important than the original object, and the completed whole becomes a fascinating, detailed observation of modern lifecelebratory, cynical, banal, and in the hyper reality the framed advertisement, more real than the original soup can could ever hope to be. The soup can becomes a simulacrum because of its direct appropriation of the real object. Taken further, the actual soup cans that can be purchased in store are simulacra. There is no original soup can. What are purchased are copies of the original model, of which there is no original. each commodity has no (real) meaning within itself that expresses its innate qualities or characteristics. (Big Ideas, Simulacrum, 2011). The terms of copy and model bind us to the world of representation and objective (re)production. A copy no matter how many times removed, authentic or fake, is defined by the presence or absence of internal, essential relations of a resemblance to a model.

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

The simulacrum, on the other hand, bears only an external and deceptive resemblance to a putative model. The process of its production, its inner dynamism, is entirely different from that of its supposed model; its resemblance to it is merely a surface effect, an illusion.

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2B With this ad and attempting to make it mean something different to one that is based on the theories of Simulacrum, I changed half the image from cans of soup to one which displays hardship and child poverty. I added the text saying each can of soup that you buy, we match it to help feed the world which is being promoted through world vision. This ad now resembles the ideas behind what was studied in Gallery 1 being structuralism.

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

IDENTITY IN/AS CONTROL EXERCISE 1 'Stay in control' is a full-page ad for Schwarzkopf that appeared in the Australian magazine, New Idea (10 April 2004, p. 27).
http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/ContentPageServerServlet/assessment/id entity/images/PH_StayinControl.html

Identity in/as control is a theory based on an ad being able to construct an identity with which the receiver can identify with. It attempts to convince the receiver that a certain product can fix ones problems, assist in controlling situations in order to attain a better quality of life. It is a tool that the media use in aiming to help construct and recognise ourselves within a mass audience through using a particular product. When relating this theory to the ad provided, it is clear to acknowledge that this is a shampoo ad aimed for a female audience on the basis of the female model in picture. The delivery of the message is being sent by an invisible narrator, proposing the question, can your hairstyle keep up with your hair. The intended purpose of this is an example of the media addressing the receiver as an isolated individual. The narrator does not give any indication about the social status of their intended audience (Big Ideas, Identity In/As Control, 2011). The use of this individualism allows the receiver to relate themselves as a free subject (Big Ideas, Identity In/As Control, 2011) and to then accept to want and buy the product. The desire of being in control creates this individualism. This shampoo product can bring ultimate control when used on the receivers hair. A persons individual hairstyle enables the creation of their own identity and how they can be seen different to others. By the user having their individual hairstyle, reinforces individualism and helps create isolation. With the creation of this individual isolation enables the receiver to believe they have nothing in common with another user of the product and not being able to identify the divisions of society (Big Ideas, Identity In/As Control, 2011).

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2
http://www.google.com.au/imgres?imgurl=http://4.bp.blogspot.com/SUFIgBu5Ywc/TcatrlKBu7I/AAAAAAAAAEo/etDgonPPLPI/s1600/ugly%2Blady.jpg&imgrefurl=http://sophieostro wskimusicmagazine.blogspot.com/&h=1011&w=734&sz=87&tbnid=O9kNlKGhHtyIMM&tbnh=264&tbnw=191 &prev=/search%3Fq%3Desprit%2Bad%2Banalysis%2B%26tbm%3Disch%26tbo%3Du&zoom=1&q=esprit+ad+a nalysis+&hl=en&sa=X&ei=dZGJTs7WFYHEmAWNp-H2Dw&ved=0CE4Q8g0&usg=__Eu1-FCyrGtGrNzPMpSHnh_C1RY=

This ad is selling an image, but the brand ESPRIT is selling something that is obviously trying to be different from the rest. At first glance the ads connotations do not fit the code we have for femininity, a code exploited by other ads. What is different about this advertisement is literally plain to see. She has no (or no noticeable) make-up on, has short "boyish" hair, and freckles. She is what advertisers may call normal, not a normal model but closer to the girl next door definition of normal. She is not sexualised; she is shown from her shoulders up, no legs and no breasts. This message is built upon a system of relationships that are less familiar and therefore eye catching. The ad declares that this woman is ESPRIT, I am ESPRIT. The words get their meaning from the picture, the image, the stare, and the confrontation. Through the vehicle of the image of a normal, empowered individual who stands out from the fashion norm, ESPRIT wants to create a schema in which their product represents the stare, I am what I am and I do what I want (Big Ideas, Identity In/As Control, 2011). The consumer is supposed to pair liberation, power, and the uniqueness of this female with the product. It is an oxymoron that ESPRIT fashion somehow is anti-fashion or anti all that is associated with fashion. The other words denoted are She believes words havent lost their meaning is a statement that supports the ideology that image dominates modern culture and supports the suggestion that this woman is different, independent and not confined to the norm. She believes further supports the superficiality of other ads by downplaying ESPRITS recognition of the importance of image. ESPRIT is trying to counter the previously set cultural code of femininity supported by the fashion industry which is evident when referring to Big Ideas, .that underlie and rely on individualism, and it constructs its readers/audiences as isolated individuals (Big Ideas, Identity In/As Control, 2011).
16 Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

EXERCISE 2B With this ad and attempting to make in mean something different to identity in/as control, I removed all text and branding from it and altered the image of the female to make it look like she had a black eye. I then included the text saying Stop, to violence against women. It now looks like an ad with a very innocent looking female that has been a victim of domestic abuse.

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University

October 2, 2011

[ALC314 ADVERTISING: DESIGNING DESIRES]

WORKS CITED
Big Ideas. (2011, Jube 1). Big Ideas: Poststructuralism. Retrieved September 25, 2011, from Deakin Studies Online: ALC314 Advertising: Designing Desires: http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_poststructuralism.html Big Ideas. (2011, June 1). Brand Creates Markets. Retrieved September 15, 2011, from Deakin Studies Online ALC314 Advertising:designing Desires: http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Brand_creates_markets.html Big Ideas. (2011, June 1). Brand Differentiates 'Generic' Products. Retrieved Septmber 10, 2011, from Deakin Studies Online - ALC314 Advetising: Designing Desires: http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Brand_different.html Big Ideas. (2011, June 1). Identity In/As Control. Retrieved October 2, 2011, from Deakin Studies Online ALC3214 Advertising: Designing Desires: http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Identity.html Big Ideas. (2011, June 1). Simulacrum. Retrieved September 29, 2011, from Deakin Studies Online - ALC314 Advertising: Designing Desires: http://vista.deakin.edu.au/webct/RelativeResourceManager/Template/bigideas/Big_Ideas_Simulacrum.html

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Assessment Two: Lachlan Ross-ID600108473| Deakin University