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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

HANDLING DANGEROUS GOODS IN PORTS

General Awareness Course

PARTICIPANTS’ MANUAL

in the ASEAN Region HANDLING DANGEROUS GOODS IN PORTS General Awareness Course PARTICIPANTS’ MANUAL July 2011

July 2011

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

FOREWORD

In recent years transportation of dangerous goods has undergone significant growth. With the increase of dangerous goods transported in the world, it became ever more important that all involved in the supply chain understand the basic concepts of transporting, storing and handling dangerous goods appropriately in order to reduce the risks related to these activities.

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code issued by the International Maritime Organization (IMO) was developed as a uniform international code for the transport of dangerous goods by sea. Since January 2010, with the adoption of Amendment 34-08, the IMDG Code extends its training requirements to include as well shore-based personnel involved in the handling and storage of dangerous goods for sea transport.

The ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation project: ‘Sustainable Port Development in the ASEAN Region’, implemented by the German International Cooperation (GIZ) and financed by the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development (BMZ) using recommendations from the two project progress meetings and the findings of the initial review conducted in each port recognized the needs of the ports in the ASEAN region for training in this field. As part of its training program on Safety, Health and Environment, the project has developed this General Awareness training on the Handling of Dangerous Goods in Ports.

This training is in line with the IMDG code requirements for a General Awareness course.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

LIST OF ABBREVIATIONS

ADR

European Agreement concerning the International Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Road

CSDS

Chemical Safety Data Sheet

DG

Dangerous Goods

DGL

Dangerous Goods List

EDI

Electronic Data Interchange

EDP

Electronic Data Processing

ERP

Emergency Response Plan

EmS

Emergency Schedule

IBC

Intermediate Bulk Containers

INF

Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces

IMDG

International Maritime Dangerous Goods

IMO

International Maritime Organization

MARPOL

International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships

MSC

Maritime Safety Committee

N.O.S

Not otherwise specified

PRI

Pesticide Risk Indicators

RID

Regulations Concerning International Transport of Dangerous Goods by Rail

SOLAS

International Convention for the Safety of Life at Sea

UN

United Nations

UNCOE

United Nations Committee of Experts

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Foreword

List of Abbreviations

Contents

CONTENTS

MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME DANGEROUS GOODS (IMDG CODE)

1

1.1 History of IMDG

2

1.2 Functions of IMO

2

1.3 What is the IMDG Code?

2

1.4 Who Uses the Code?

3

1.5 Information Contained in the IMDG Code

4

1.6 Principles Physics and Chemistry

4

MODULE 2: DANGEROUS GOODS CLASSIFICATION

7

2.1 Why Do We Need to Classify Dangerous Goods

8

2.2 Dangerous Goods Classification and its Related Risks

8

MODULE 3: MARKINGS, LABELS, PLACARDS

14

3.1 Introduction

15

3.2 Marking, Labeling and Placarding

16

3.3 Shapes and Colors of Labels and Placards

17

3.4 Dangerous Goods Packing and Packages

22

MODULE 4: DANGEROUS GOODS DOCUMENTATION

23

4.1 Introduction

24

4.2 Documents Required for Dispatching Dangerous Goods

24

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 5: SEGREGATION AND SEPARATION

28

5.1 Introduction

29

5.2 Principles of Segregation and Stowage

29

5.3 IMDG Code Segregation, Stowage and Dangerous Goods List

29

5.4 Stowage Categories

30

5.5 Segregation

31

MODULE 6: EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS

35

6.1 Introduction to Emergency Response Plans

36

6.2 Definition of Emergency Response Management

36

6.3 The Principles of ERP

36

6.4 What are the Elements in an ERP?

38

6.5 IMDG Supplement: Emergency Schedule (EmS) Guide

39

ANNEX 1: GROUP ACTIVITIES

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation

Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 1: INTRODUCTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL MARITIME DANGEROUS GOODS (IMDG) CODE

Objectives

1. Recognize the international framework under which the transport, storage and handling Dangerous Goods is operating and the specific regulations applying to the transport by sea.

2. Explain the basic chemistry and physical parameters of elements, compounds and solution mixtures.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

1.1 History of the IMDG Code

1894 – The first reference to dangerous goods appeared in the 1894 British Merchant

Shipping Act under headings ‘Dangerous Goods’ and ‘Dangerous Goods and the Carriage of Cattle’. The act states general rules and restrictions on how to deal with and handle dangerous goods onboard vessels. However, its main focus was on goods that could cause explosions.

1914 – The first version of the SOLAS (Safety of Life at Sea) Convention was adopted in

1914, following the infamous capsizing of the cruise-liner Titanic, which resulted in more than 1,500 deaths. The convention includes chapters on navigation, construction, lifesaving appliances, radiotelegraphy, etc. Since then, there have been four more versions. The present version was adopted in 1974 and entered into force in 1980. This convention is considered one of the most important international conventions related to maritime safety.

1956 – The Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods established by the United Nations (UN) Economic and Social Council completed a report which established the minimum requirements applicable for the transport of dangerous goods by all modes. The report offered a general framework within which existing regulations could be adopted. United Nation Committee of Experts (UNCOE) has continued to publish the UN Model Regulations “Recommendation on the Transport of Dangerous Goods” (Orange Book), which is updated every two years.

1.2 Functions of IMO

The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations. IMO’s main responsibility is to develop and maintain a comprehensive regulatory framework for shipping which include safety, environmental concerns, legal matters, technical cooperation, maritime security and the efficiency of ships.

The main objective of the IMO is to facilitate cooperation among governments on technical- related matters affecting shipping, particularly in the promotion of the Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS), efficiency of navigation, prevention and control of marine pollution from ships.

1.3 What is the IMDG Code?

The International Maritime Dangerous Goods (IMDG) Code is a detailed publication produced and updated every two years by the IMO Subcommittee on dangerous goods, solid cargoes and containers. The IMDG Code is supported by a variety of international conventions, codes and recommendations such as:

A Code of Safe Practice for Solid Bulk Cargoes

The International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Dangerous Chemicals in Bulk

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

The International Code for the Construction and Equipment of Ships Carrying Liquefied Gases in Bulk

Recommendation on the Safe Transport of Dangerous Cargoes and Related Activities in Port Areas

International Recommendations concerning the Carriage of Dangerous Goods by Rail (RID), Road (ADR) and by inland waterways (AND and ADNR)

Various specialized organizations, commissions and committees are responsible for the Code while the basic principles published in the IMDG code come from the ‘Recommendation on the Transport of Dangerous Goods, Model Regulation’, more commonly known as the Orange Book (United Nations Committee of Experts on the Transport of Dangerous Goods). The Orange Book harmonizes a system of classification and labeling recommendations for the transport of dangerous goods.

The Code became mandatory in international law from 1 January 2004 and is a set of norms, prescriptions regulations and information on dangerous cargo. The codes requirements need to be transposed by national governments in national law.

The first issue was published in 1965, and it amplifies the requirements of the IMDG code as well as the Orange Book and has become the standard guide to all aspects of handling dangerous goods and marine pollutants.

Since 1965, the Code has undergone many changes over the years both in format and content in order to keep up with the rapid expansion of the shipping industry. The 2000 edition, which incorporates Amendment 30-00, is the first set of the IMDG Code to be printed in a new format:

Amendment 30 includes revisions to various sections of the code and to transport requirements for specific substances

Amendment 35-10 is the latest version of the IMDG Code, and will be made compulsory as of January 2012

The IMDG Code is amended every two years as to be aligned with the ‘Orange Book’ amendments.

1.4 Who uses the code?

Although the information in the Code is directed primarily at maritime activities, its provisions may affect a wide range of industries and services:

Manufacturers

Packers

Shippers

Feeder service providers such as road, rail and water transport

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Reliable advice on terminology, packing, labeling, classification, stowage, segregation and emergency response can be found in the IMDG Code.

1.5 Information contained in the IMDG Code

Within the three volumes of the IMDG Code it is possible to find the following general information:

List of the classification of dangerous goods

Physical – chemical characteristics of these products

Dangers they present

Labeling and placarding system, which is easy to understand and allows identifying the possible dangers of the products

Characteristics required for the packaging and classification into categories I, II and

III

Recommendations for stowage on board

Segregation tables

Product or substance United Nations Identification Number (UN Number)

Documentation which must accompany the goods

Rules to prevent marine pollution

Volume 1

General provisions

Classification

Provisions regarding packing/containers and tanktainers (tanks built on a standard, generally 20 foot container frame for transportation of liquids)

Procedures regarding the consignment of dangerous goods, labeling, placarding and documents required for transport

Tests for the construction and testing of packaging/bottles/containers, intermediate bulk containers (IBC) and for tanks and road tank vehicles

Provisions regarding transport, stowage and segregation operations

Special provisions in case of accidents, fire precautions and transport of wastes

Others

Volume 2

Complete List of Dangerous Goods, including the UN number of the goods, proper shipping name, class/division, subsidiary risks, packing groups, etc

Provisions on limited and excluded quantities

List of definitions

Others

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Volume 3 (Supplement)

Emergency response, procedures for fires and spillage

Medical first aid guide

Notification procedure in the case of accidents with dangerous goods

Stowage in transport units

Use of pesticides without risk

INF Code (International Code for the Safe Carriage of Packaged Irradiated Nuclear Fuel, Plutonium and High-Level Radioactive Wastes on Board Ships)

Appendix

1.6 Principles Physics and Chemistry

All objects around you – pencils, books, rocks, plants and water constitute the matter of the universe. Each particular kind of matter is referred to as material. We define chemistry as the science of the composition and structure of materials and of the changes that material undergoes. Physics studies the basic law that governs our universe and the interrelationship between energy and matter.

The IMDG Code classifies chemicals into three groups – Solid, Liquid and Gas

Water (H 2 O) in normal state is liquid, but can exist as ice (solid) and steam (gas).

is liquid, but can exist as ice (solid) and steam (gas). Dangerous goods will change its
is liquid, but can exist as ice (solid) and steam (gas). Dangerous goods will change its
is liquid, but can exist as ice (solid) and steam (gas). Dangerous goods will change its

Dangerous goods will change its state significantly if there are changes to the following elements:

Temperature

Pressure

The rates of reaction for chemicals are defined as the changes under varying condition in a given time. The rate of chemical reaction depends on the following:

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Concentration of the chemical substance at a particular moment

Temperature/pressure exposure

Exposure time

Quantity (kilograms or liters)

The consequences of a chemical reaction due to the mishandling of dangerous goods may result in the following:

Fire

Explosion

Spillage

Injury

Fatality

Contamination

Marine life degradation

Radioactive

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation

Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 2: DANGEROUS GOODS CLASSIFCATION

Objectives

1. List the major types of dangerous goods encountered in ports and the risks associated with them and recognize their specificities compared to other goods handled in ports

2. Explain how dangerous goods are divided into nine classes and describe the hazards presented by each class

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

2.1 Why do we need to classify Dangerous Goods?

It is necessary to classify dangerous goods into different classes on the basis of the specific chemical characteristics producing the risk. The classification schedule is essential for the relevant authorities to plan their emergency response. The shipping lines will apply the classification of the dangerous goods from the IMDG Code to charge and invoice the customers/consignees accordingly.

2.2 Dangerous Goods classification and its related risks

Types of Dangerous Goods

Dangerous goods based on their origin and characteristics can be classified as follows:

Oil by-products – fire and explosion being their main risk (benzenes, liquefied petroleum gas and other fuels)

Chemical products – (Industrial, pharmaceutical and agricultural) manufactured and loaded either as final product for consumption or as by-products for industrial use. The latter are most of the dangerous goods transported, and if not properly handled, could cause great damage to people, transport units and the environment

Minerals – such as coal, sulfur, mineral concentrates and other metals or asbestos which can cause different illnesses, injuries, intoxication or fires

Products of animal or vegetable origin – as fishmeal, pressed cakes of oleaginous seeds and cotton, which can also cause spontaneous combustion, fire or explosions

Radioactive materials – used in a variety of industrial and medical processes, as well as for military applications, which, in high doses could cause immediate harm, or even in small doses could cause cancer and other illnesses if exposed to people for prolonged periods of time

Many of the substances from Class 1 to Class 9 are deemed marine pollutants. A marine pollutant is defined as “any substance that will degrade the aquatic organisms that live in the water

Prior to stowage, segregation, marking, labeling and storing dangerous goods safely, those handling dangerous goods must know exactly what hazards these dangerous goods pose to the user. The term ‘hazard’ in this text means a source or a situation with a potential harm with regard to People, Environment, Asset and Reputation (PEAR Concept).

All chemicals are subject to the code and are assigned to one of the classes 1 – 9 according to the hazard or the most predominant hazards they present.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Classification of Dangerous Goods

The classification is made by the consignor/shipper or by the appropriate competent authority. The IMDG Code classifies dangerous goods as follows (simplified form):

Class 1: Explosives

Class 2: Gases

Class 3: Flammable Liquids

Class 4: Flammable solids; substances liable to spontaneous combustion;

substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

Class 5: Oxidizing substances and organic peroxides

Class 6: Toxic and infectious substances

Class 7: Radioactive material

Class 8: Corrosive substances

Class 9: Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

The numerical order of the classes and divisions does not indicate the degree of danger.

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
 

Class 1

1 Explosive substances and articles used to produce explosions or pyrotechnic effects

1

Explosive substances and articles used to produce explosions or pyrotechnic effects

 

Sub-Classes

1.1 Explosives with a mass explosion hazard

1.1

Explosives with a mass explosion hazard

1.2 Explosives with a severe projection hazard

1.2

Explosives with a severe projection hazard

1.3 Explosives with a fire, blast or projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard

1.3

Explosives with a fire, blast or projection hazard but not a mass explosion hazard

1.4 Explosives with a minor fire or projection hazard

1.4

Explosives with a minor fire or projection hazard

1.5 An insensitive substance with a mass explosion hazard

1.5

An insensitive substance with a mass explosion hazard

1.6 Extremely insensitive articles

1.6

Extremely insensitive articles

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
 

Class 2

2.1 Flammable gas

2.1

Flammable gas

2.2 Non-Flammable, compressed gas

2.2

Non-Flammable, compressed gas

2.3 Toxic or poisonous gas

2.3

Toxic or poisonous gas

 

Class 3

3 Flammable liquids

3

Flammable liquids

 

Class 4

4.1 Flammable solids

4.1

Flammable solids

4.2 Spontaneously combustible solids

4.2

Spontaneously combustible solids

4.3 Combustible solids when in contact with water

4.3

Combustible solids when in contact with water

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
 

Class 5

5.1 Oxidizer

5.1

Oxidizer

5.2 Organic peroxide (5.2 new ADR 2007)

5.2

Organic peroxide (5.2 new ADR 2007)

 

Class 6

6.1 Toxic substances

6.1

Toxic substances

6.2 Infectious substances

6.2

Infectious substances

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
 

Class 6

I Category I – White (symbol 7A)

I

Category I – White (symbol 7A)

II Category II – Yellow (symbol 7B)

II

Category II – Yellow (symbol 7B)

III Category III – Yellow (symbol 7C)

III

Category III – Yellow (symbol 7C)

Fissile Criticality safety index label (symbol 7E)

Fissile

Criticality safety index label (symbol 7E)

 

Class 8

- Corrosive materials

-

Corrosive materials

 

Class 9

- Miscellaneous dangerous compounds

-

Miscellaneous dangerous compounds

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation

Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 3: MARKING, LABELS, PLACARDS

Objectives

1. Identify the importance of dangerous goods being properly marked, labeled and placarded

2. Recognize

the

requirements

general

and

specific

marking,

labeling

and

placarding

3. Explain the requirements for identifying dangerous goods packages and containment units by proper shipping name, UN number, class mark, class label and class placard

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

3.1

Introduction

Markings, labels and/or placards on products are all channels of communication to the user.

These communication channels will tell the user the characteristics of a consignment or product. The IMDG Code provides clear procedures related to authorization of consignments as well as advance notification, markings, labels and documentation (by manual, electronic data processing or electronic data interchange techniques and placarding).

The code specifies clearly that no person may offer to transport dangerous goods unless the goods are properly marked, labeled, placarded, described and certified on a document. Those who are transporting dangerous goods must indicate the UN Number and proper shipping name clearly on the consignment. In the case of marine pollutants, the word “marine pollutant” must be on the document accompanying the consignment. This requirement is particularly important in the case of an accident involving these goods, in order to determine what emergency procedures are necessary to deal properly with the situation. In the case of marine pollutants, the captain of the vessel needs to comply with the requirements of MARPOL 73/78.

needs to comply with the requirements of MARPOL 73/78. Participants’ Manual Handling Dangerous Goods in Ports
ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

3.2 Marking, labeling and placarding

The IMDG Code recommends a system based on labels and placards designed especially so that all who work close to this type of cargo will be able to recognize, preferably at first sight, the nature of the risks entailed by these substances, whatever their packaging might be.

Labels

The IMDG Code states that all packaging, packages and drums carrying dangerous goods must be labeled. The labels are in the shape of a rhombus in white, orange, blue, green or red, or a combination of these colors. Symbols illustrating the danger of the class are also required. In general, each label is divided into two parts, the bottom half and the top half. The top half is for the symbol of the class of the good(s), and the lower half is for the text, class or division number. The minimum dimensions of labels are 10 cm x 10 cm. Labels must be firmly adhered to and placed on the package so that it can easily be seen. The quality of the labels must be such so they do not deteriorate outdoors and remain unaltered during the complete transport period and at least three months in the sea.

Due to the fact that dangerous goods can pose more than one risk, it is also necessary to use “secondary risk labels”. These labels are the same as the ones showing the primary risk, regarding their color, shape and symbols. Even though the IMDG Code says nothing to this effect, in some countries the class number is only indicated in the primary risk label, and that the secondary risk label does not include the class number. This is an effective way to distinguish between both.

Placards

The IMDG Code determines that all “cargo transport units” containing dangerous goods must be placarded. In this context, cargo transport units are containers, containers for liquids, tank vehicles, vehicles transporting goods by land, railway wagons with water tanks, good tanks destined for intermodal transport. Placards have the same shape, colors and symbols as the labels, but their dimension is 25 x 25 cm. Containers carrying more than 4000 kilograms of dangerous goods, and all tanks for liquids and gases must have the “United Nations number”. The UN number has four digits and is the number assigned by the United Nations to all goods identified and classified as dangerous.

Containers carrying dangerous goods must display at least one placard on each side and one on each end of the unit (this is to say, on its four sides)

Rail wagons must be placarded on at least both sides

Freight containers, semi-trailers and portable tanks must be placarded on all four sides

Road vehicles must display appropriate placards on both sides as well as the rear

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

3.3 Shapes and Colors of Labels and Placards

Class 1 – Explosives

* * * 1
*
*
*
1

Division 1.1 / 1.2 / 1.3 Symbol – explosion in black color Background – orange color Text – Explosive (optional)

* * Location of division and/or Compatibility Group

* Location of Compatibility Group or text

Number 1 – in the bottom corner

1.4. * 1
1.4.
*
1

Division 1.4 / 1.5 / 1.6 Background – orange color Subclass numbers – in black color (approximately 30 mm x 5 mm in labels of 100 mm x 100 mm)

*

Location of Compatibility Group

Number 1 – in the bottom corner

Class 2 – Gases

2
2
2
2

Division 2.1 Flammable Gases Symbol – Flame in black or white Background – in red color Text – Flammable Gas (optional) Number 2 – in the bottom corner

22 2
22
2

Division 2.2 Non-flammable gases Symbol – Gas cylinder in black or white color Background – in green color Text – Non flammable compressed gas (optional) Number 2 – in the bottom corner

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
2
2

Division 2.3 Toxic Gases Symbol – skull and crossbones in black color Background – in white color Text – Toxic (optional) Number 2 – in the bottom corner

Class 3 – Flammable Liquids

3
3

3

3 3

Symbol – flame in black and white color Background – red color Text – Flammable Liquid (optional) Number 3 – in the bottom corner

Class 4 – Flammable Solids; Substances liable to spontaneous combustion; substances which, in contact with water emit flammable gases

4
4

Division 4.1 Flammable Solids Symbol – flame in black color Background – white with seven red vertical stripes Text – Flammable Solid Number 4 – In the bottom corner

4
4

Division 4.2 Substances liable to spontaneous combustion Symbol – flame in black color or white color Background – blue color Text – Spontaneous combustion substances (optional)

Number 4 – in the bottom corner

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
4
4
4
4

Division 4.3 Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases Symbol – flame in black or white color Background – blue color Text – Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases (optional) Number 4 – in the bottom corner

Class 5 – Oxidizing Substances or Organic Peroxides

5.1
5.1
5.1 Division 5.1 Oxidant Substances Symbol – flame with circle in black color Background – yellow

Division 5.1 Oxidant Substances Symbol – flame with circle in black color Background – yellow color Text – Oxidizing Substance (optional) Number 5.1 – in the bottom corner

Division 5.2 Organic Peroxides Symbol – flame in white color Top Half – red Bottom Half – yellow Text – Organic Peroxide (optional) Number 5.2 – in the bottom corner

Class 6 – Toxic Substances or Infectious Substances

6
6

Division 6.1 Toxic Substances Symbol – black skull and crossbones Background – white color Text – Toxic (optional) Number 6 – in the bottom corner

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
6
6

Division 6.2 Infectious Substances Symbol – three crescents superimposed on a circle and inscriptions in black Background – white color Text – Infectious substance, notify Public Health Authority (optional) Number 6 – In the bottom corner

Class 7 – Radioactive Materials

Category I – White Symbol – trefoil in black color Background – white color Text

Category I – White Symbol – trefoil in black color Background – white color Text (mandatory) in black – in the lower half of the label “Radioactive I”, “Contents…”, “Activity…” and “Transport Index” box Number 7 – in the bottom corner

Category II – Yellow Symbol – trefoil in black color Background – the upper half

Category II – Yellow Symbol – trefoil in black color Background – the upper half in yellow color with white borders, the lower half in white Text in black – in the lower half of the label “Radioactive II”, “Contents…”, “Activity…” and “Transport Index” box Number 7 – in the bottom corner

Category III – Yellow Symbol – trefoil in black color Background – the upper half

Category III – Yellow Symbol – trefoil in black color Background – the upper half in yellow color with white borders, the lower half in white Text in black – in the lower half of the label “Radioactive III”, “Contents…”, “Activity…” and “Transport Index” box Number 7 – in the bottom corner

Class 8 – Corrosive Substances

8
8

Symbol – Liquids falling from two test tubes onto a hand and a black piece of metal Background – Upper half in white color and lower half in black with white borders Text – Corrosive (optional) Number 8 – In the bottom corner

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ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Class 9 – Miscellaneous Dangerous Substances and Articles Potentially Damaging to the Environment

9
9

Symbol – seven vertical bars in black in the upper half Background – in white color Number 9 – In the bottom corner

Other labels

Indicating elevated temperature (liquid state at a temperature equal to or exceeding 100 o C,
Indicating elevated temperature (liquid state at a temperature equal to or exceeding 100 o C,
Indicating elevated temperature (liquid state at a temperature equal to or exceeding 100 o C,

Indicating elevated temperature (liquid state at a temperature equal to or exceeding 100 o C, in a solid state at a temperature equal to or exceeding 240 o C)

Orange-colored plates, with hazard-identification number and UN Number

Orientation arrows, black or red color

Placards for Marine Pollutants

Packages and cargo transport units containing dangerous substances which are classified by the IMDG Code

Packages and cargo transport units containing dangerous substances which are classified by the IMDG Code as “marine pollutants”, must have the markings shown here, which must be durable. They must be placed close to the risk labels or risk placards of the goods. The dimensions of the marine pollutant markings must be a minimum of 10 cm per side for packages and 25 cm per side for cargo transport units.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

3.4 Dangerous Goods Packing and Packages

Packing Groups, Classifying Criteria

The risks presented by dangerous goods in maritime transport are related to their packaging, therefore it must be safe, well designed and manufactured and in good condition. It is very unlikely you will suffer injuries due to this cargo, but if the cargo is damaged, it is possible for dangerous substances or vapors to be released.

The packages/containers must comply with the following requirements:

Must not be affected by the cargo it contains

Must be strong enough to endure the rough treatment and risks involved in maritime transport

Must be able to endure rain, wind and sea water

Must be practical and adequate for the cargo they carry

Must be in good condition

Must be correctly marked, label and signposted

For packing purposes, dangerous goods belonging to all classes, except for class 1, 2, 6.2 and 7 have been divided into three “packing groups” depending on the degree of danger they represent:

Packing Group I –

Packing Group II –

Packing Group III –

High level of danger

Medium level of danger

Low level of danger

UN Packaging and Approval Marking

Most packages also need to bear the UN packaging approval mark confirming that the packaging has been tested and approved in accordance with relevant United Nations performance standards. Example below:

United Nations performance standards. Example below: Participants’ Manual Handling Dangerous Goods in Ports –
ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation

Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 4: DANGEROUS GOODS DOCUMENTATION

Objectives

1. Name the shipping documents relating to dangerous goods and describe what information each document contains

2. Explain the use of the Multimodal Transport Dangerous Goods document and describe the information it contains

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

4.1 Introduction

There are many documents in the shipping industry and they are primarily used to convey the information between/among these parties:

Consignors (shippers)

Consignees

Shipping lines

Government agencies

Banking services

Insurance companies

These are legal documents and can be produced in courts to resolve potential disputes.

In the IMDG Code Volume 1 under the chapter on Documentation (Part 5 - Chapter 5.4) the process of dangerous goods transportation is clearly described. The code also includes the use of Electronic Data Processing (EDP) and Electronic Data Interchange transmission techniques.

The documentation for dangerous goods is to convey the fundamental information relative to hazards of the goods. The shipper shall provide all information and documentation as specified in the code.

4.2 Documents required for dispatching Dangerous Goods

One of the main requirements of a dangerous goods transportation document is to contain the basic information regarding the risks entailed by these dangerous goods. This dispatch document is normally the same for all transportation modes, and the information stipulated must be clear and legible. Nevertheless IMO recommends the use of the Multimodal Form, which will be mentioned later.

Dangerous Goods Transportation Document

Information which must be included in the Dangerous Goods Transportation Document:

The shipping name or correct technical name (no commercial names will be accepted)

The Class and Division when applicable. The Class or Division can be included in the risk class number. The compatibility group will also be indicated in goods from class 1; and in the case of gases involving secondary risks, information will be extended to indicate such risks

The United Nations number preceded by the letters UN

The packing group when assigned

The number and types of bundles, as well as the total quantity of dangerous goods per volume or mass

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

The flashpoint for materials having a flashpoint the same or lower than 61 o C

The subsidiary risks not indicated in the shipping name

When applicable, the goods shall be identified as “Marine Pollutant”

Empty means of containment, which contain the residue of dangerous goods shall be described as such, for example, by placing the words “Empty”, “Uncleaned” or “Residue Last Contained” before or after the proper shipping name

For dangerous goods in limited quantities, the phrase “Dangerous Goods in Limited Quantity” shall be included

For class 5.2 or self reactive substances of class 4.1, the regulation and emergency temperatures

A statement signed in the name of the consignor, saying that the goods are correctly described, classified, packed, marked and labeled and that its conditions are appropriate for transport

Additional information may also be required in certain cases for explosives, radioactive materials, dangerous goods transported in a molten state, etc.

Dangerous cargo secured incorrect inside containers, which then becomes loose and damaged during transport, has been the cause of the majority of accidents concerning dangerous goods. This is why it is very important to check that this has been carried out correctly.

Dangerous Goods Declaration Ordinance

The way in which information must be reported when dangerous goods are transported varies from one country to another. A basic requirement is the obligation to present a Declaration for Dangerous Goods.

If dangerous substances and other non dangerous substances are listed in the same document, the dangerous substances should be listed first or their dangerous nature should be emphasized. Regardless of the format of this declaration, always the same information must be provided. The following order of information must be respected, without inserting any other data in between: The shipping name, the Class, the UN number, and when applicable, the packing group.

The following are examples of dangerous goods descriptions:

ALLYL ALCOHOL 6.1, UN 1098 I

FORMIC ACID, 8, UN 1779, II

ACROLEIN STABILIZED, 6.1, UN 1902, G e/e I (3), MARINE POLLUTANT

Container/Vehicle Packing Certificate

When dangerous goods are packed or loaded into any container or vehicle, those responsible for packing or loading shall provide a “container/vehicle packing certificate”. Basically this document certifies the following:

The cargo transport unit was clean, dry and apparently fit to receive the goods

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Incompatible substances have not been placed into the cargo transport unit (unless this had been specifically authorized by the competent national authority)

All packages have been externally inspected for damage, and only sound packages have been loaded

All packages have been properly loaded and secured within the cargo transport unit

The cargo transport unit and the packages are properly marked, labeled and placarded

A dangerous goods transport document has been received for each dangerous goods consignment loaded in the container/vehicle

The certificate must be signed by the person responsible of stowing the goods in the cargo transport unit. It is possible to incorporate this certificate and the Dangerous Goods Declaration into a single document, the “Dangerous Goods Multimodal Transport”.

Multimodal Model of the Transport Document

There is no mandatory model for the dangerous goods declaration. The IMDG Code recommends the use of the following document for the multimodal transport of dangerous goods, where the dangerous goods declaration is combined with the vehicle/container packing certificate (Regulation 4, Chapter VII, Solas 74) or Declaration of Dangerous Goods.

Please find an example of a completed Multimodal Dangerous Goods Form in the next page.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region
Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region Participants’ Manual Handling Dangerous Goods in Ports –
ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation

Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 5: SEGREGATION AND SEPARATION

Objectives

1. Describe the stowage, segregation requirements for dangerous goods in ports and onboard vessels

2. Understand how to use the Dangerous Goods List

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

5.1 Introduction

One of the most important aspects of managing the transport of dangerous goods is the stowage, segregation and separation of these goods. Hazardous substances must not be carried with goods which are liable to interact and cause danger to P.E.A.R.

Incompatible hazardous substances must be adequately separated from each other during transport and storage. Improper stowage or segregation of dangerous goods may result in the release of toxic fumes, fire, spill and degradation of the product’s quality. For this reason the IMDG Code has provided provisions in Volume 1 Part 7 titled “Provisions Concerning Transport Operations”, which focuses on stowage and segregation.

5.2 Principles of segregation and stowage

The following issues may contribute towards major chemical accidents during stowage and segregation:

Failure to understand the nature of the substance handled

Failure of quality assurance – container inspection certificates

Insufficient recording of chemical register inventories at different terminal locations

Insufficient labeling and recording of chemicals

Poor housekeeping – firefighting equipment not available in work area

The IMDG Code requires dangerous goods to be stored and segregated according to the hazard, class and compatibility. The code also provides detailed information on these important factors in terms of where dangerous goods should be stowed and how they should be separated or segregated from other cargoes.

Although the IMDG Code provides detailed information on ship stowage, the requirements can also be applied to storage ashore and even to container packing. The requirement offers a framework for port authorities when preparing their regulations for the safe transport of handling and storage of dangerous goods in ports. Dangerous goods which have to be segregated from each other shall not be transported in the same cargo transport unit.

5.3 IMDG Code segregation, stowage and Dangerous Goods list

General segregation is applied to all cargo spaces on deck or under deck of all types of ships and cargo in transport units and incompatible goods shall be segregated from one another. For the purpose of segregation, the IMDG Code has grouped together similar chemical properties in the dangerous goods list. In the dangerous goods list, the group substances are referred as follows:

1. Acids

2. Ammonium Compound

3. Bromates

4. Chlorates

5. Chlorites

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

6. Cyanides

7. Heavy metals and their salts

8. Hypochlorite

9. Lead and its compounds

10. Liquid halogenated hydrocarbons

11. Mercury and mercury compounds

12. Nitrites and their mixtures

13. Perchlorates

14. Permanganates

15. Powdered metals

16. Peroxides

17. Azides

18. Alkalis

If substances are shipped under Not Otherwise Specified (N.O.S.) entries, the shipper will decide the appropriate segregation group.

In the IMDG code Volume 2 under column 16 of the numerical list of dangerous goods, the stowage conditions for each one of the dangerous goods listed can be found. Also, in this column, there is information on stowage related to sleeping, food, solutions and mixtures areas, etc. For example, the product “ALLYL BROMIDE UN N o 1099”, column 16 indicates “Category B, far from living quarters.”

In the following paragraph the five stowage categories stipulated by the IMDG Code are described.

5.4 Stowage Categories

Category

A

B

C

D

E

Cargo ship carrying no more than 25 passengers

On deck or below deck

On deck or below deck

On deck

On deck

On deck or below deck

only

only

Passenger ships carrying more than 25 passengers

On deck or below deck

On deck

On deck

   

only

only

Prohibited

Prohibited

Regarding Class 1 (Explosives) the code establishes the following 15 categories for stowage onboard:

Category

Cargo Ships

Passenger Ships

01

On deck or below deck

On deck or below deck

02

On deck or below deck

On deck in closed transport units or under deck in closed transport units

03

On deck or below deck

On deck only in closed cargo transport units

04

On deck or below deck

PROHIBITED

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

05

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck

On deck in close cargo transport units or under deck

06

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in closed cargo transport units

07

On deck in closed transport units or under deck

On deck only in closed transport units

08

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck

PROHIBITED

09

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in closed cargo transport units

On deck in close cargo transport units or under deck in closed cargo transport units

10

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in closed cargo transport units

On deck only in closed cargo transport units

11

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in magazine stowage type “C”

On deck only in closed cargo transport units

12

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in magazine stowage type “C”

PROHIBITED

13

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in magazine stowage type “A”

On deck only in closed cargo transport units

14

On deck only in closed cargo transport units

PROHIBITED

15

On deck in closed cargo transport units or under deck in closed cargo transport units

PROHIBITED

In brief, the IMDG Code establishes a system whereby dangerous goods can be stowed in a safe way, considering their compatibility with other types of cargo and therefore preventing further damage in case of accidents.

Mastering the techniques on how to stow dangerous goods correctly on board ships is fundamentally the responsibility of the Ship Planner. Port Terminals are not concerned with planning of the stowage of dangerous goods on board; they are only responsible of stowing the cargo in the positions indicated in the ships plan, which is provided by the Shipping Line through the respective agencies.

5.5

Segregation

The IMDG Code defines four segregation terms:

1. “Away from” (the minimum separation between two incompatible goods)

2. “Separated from”

3. “Separated by a complete compartment or hold from”

4. “Separated longitudinally by an intervening complete compartment or hold from” (this is the maximum separation between two incompatible goods)

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

The general provisions regarding segregation between different classes of dangerous goods can be found in the code in the following Segregation Table:

 

1.1

CLASS

1.2

1.5

1.3

1.6

1.4 2.1

2.2 2.3

3

4.1

4.2 4.3 5.1

5.2

6.1 6.2

7

8

9

Explosives

1.1, 1.2, 1.5 *

*

*

4

2

2

4

4

4

4

4

4

2

4

2

4

X

Explosives

1.3, 1.6

*

*

*

4

2

2

4

3

3

4

4

4

2

4

2

2

X

Explosives

1.4

*

*

*

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

X

4

2

2

X

Flammable gases

2.1

4

4

2

X

X

X

2

1

2

X

2

2

X

4

2

1

X

Non-toxic, non-flammable gases

2.2

2

2

1

X

X

X

1

X

1

X

X

1

X

2

1

X

X

Toxic gases

2.3

2

2

1

X

X

X

2

X

2

X

X

2

X

2

1

X

X

Flammable liquids

3

4

4

2

2

1

2

X

X

2

1

2

2

X

3

2

X

X

Flammable solids (including self-reactive substances and solid desensitized explosives)

4.1

4

3

2

1

X

X

X

X

1

X

1

2

X

3

2

1

X

Substances liable to

4.2

4

3

2

2

1

2

2

1

X

1

2

2

1

3

2

1

X

spontaneous

combustion

Substances which. in contact with water, emit flammable gases

4.3

4

4

2

X

X

X

1

X

1

X

2

2

X

2

2

1

X

Oxidizing substances (agents)

5.1

4

4

2

2

X

X

2

1

2

2

X

2

1

3

1

2

X

Organic peroxides

5.2

4

4

2

2

1

2

2

2

2

2

2

X

1

3

2

2

X

Toxic substances

6.1

2

2

X

X

X

X

X

X

1

X

1

1

X

1

X

X

X

Infectious substances

6.2

4

4

4

4

2

2

3

3

3

2

3

3

1

X

3

3

X

Radioactive material

7

2

2

2

2

1

1

2

2

2

2

1

2

X

3

X

2

X

Corrosive substances

8

4

2

2

1

X

X

X

1

1

1

2

2

X

3

2

X

X

Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

9

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

X

(This table is applied to unitized dangerous goods; this is to say, in pallets, drums, boxes and crates and other similar packaging. It is not applied to containers carrying dangerous goods)

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Numbers and symbols relate to the following terms as defined in this chapter:

1

Away from

3

meters

2

Separated from

6

meters

3

Separated by a complete compartment or hold from

12

meters

4

Separated longitudinally by an intervening complete compartment or hold from

24

meters

X

The segregation, if any, is shown in the Dangerous Goods List

 

-

Explosives require special segregation in accordance with the compatibility group. Explosives which have the same letter can be stowed together, whatever their class subdivision may be. Since the properties of the substances, materials or articles of a same Class can be very different to each other, in each and every case it will be necessary to consult the Dangerous Goods list previously, to determine the applicable specific segregation provisions.

Segregation within the Cargo Transport Units

Dangerous goods which need to be segregated from each other must not be stowed in the same cargo transport unit (container). Nevertheless, goods which require to be segregated “away from” may be transported in the same cargo transport unit upon authorization by the corresponding authority. In this case an equivalent safety degree must be kept.

Segregation in Port Areas

The IMO Maritime Safety Committee (MSC), by way of Circular 1/1216 of 26 February 2008 determined several revised recommendations regarding the risk free transport of dangerous goods and related activities within the port area.

Circular MSC 1216 of 2008 establishes that containers containing dangerous goods must not be stowed above each other. Containers carrying dangerous cargo of the same class are exempt from this rule. This exemption is not to be applied to Class 8 cargo (corrosives), if they are different from each other. This is to say, if the Class 8 corrosive cargo is exactly the same substance, they can be stored above each other. Containers must be stowed in such a way that there is always easy access to the doors and to the sides in order to carry out cooling or control work

Separation between the different classes must be taken into consideration when dangerous goods are stored in special areas or deposits. The chart indicated by IMDG Code will help in the stowage on board ships. IMO’s Port Recommendations establishes the following segregation chart for port storage.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Classes

 

2.1

2.2

2.3

3

4.1

4.2

4.3

5.1

5.2

6.1

8

9

Flammable gases

2.1

0

0

0

S

A

S

0

S

S

0

A

0

Non-toxic, non-

2.2

0

0

0

A

0

A

0

0

A

0

0

0

flammable gases

Toxic gases

2.3

0

0

0

S

0

S

0

0

S

0

0

0

Flammable liquids

3

S

A

S

0

0

S

A

S

S

0

0

0

Flammable solids, self- reactive substances and desensitized explosives

4.1

A

0

0

0

0

A

0

A

S

0

A

0

Spontaneously combustible substances

4.2

S

A

S

S

A

0

A

S

S

A

A

0

Substances which, in contact with water, emit flammable gases

4.3

0

0

0

A

0

A

0

S

S

0

A

0

Oxidizing substances

5.1

S

0

0

S

A

S

S

0

S

A

S

0

Organic peroxides

5.2

S

A

S

S

S

S

S

S

0

A

S

0

Toxic substances (liquids and solids)

6.1

0

0

0

0

0

A

0

A

A

0

0

0

Corrosives (liquids and solids)

8

A

0

0

0

A

A

A

S

S

0

0

0

Miscellaneous dangerous substances and articles

9

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

The chart identifies only three segregation categories for storage in ports.

“0” means pairs of dangerous goods which do not need to be segregated from each other (unless indicated by the individual entry in the numerical list of dangerous goods, which must always be checked, requires so)

“A” indicates segregation requirement “away from …” the other class in that pair (3 meters)

“S” requires the segregation category “separated from …” between the classes of that pair (6 meters)

Cargoes of classes 1 (except division 1.4 S), 6.2 and 7 should normally be allowed into the port area for direct shipment or delivery only. These classes have not been included in the table. However, if through unforeseen circumstances, these cargoes have to be temporarily kept, it should be in designated areas. Segregation requirements of the individual class as stipulated in the IMDG Code should be considered by the port authority when establishing specific requirements.

Cleaning of container and portable tanks which contained dangerous goods must be done in a special area, away from to those where dangerous goods are stored. Such areas shall be adequately designed and equipped to avoid contaminated washing water ending up in the soil, waterways or sewerage system.

After deconsolidating (un-stuffing/ stripping) a container with dangerous goods, all placards and goods risk identification shall be removed from the container.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation

Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

MODULE 6: EMERGENCY RESPONSE PLANS

Objectives

1. Recognize type of hazards, relevant authorities and equipment list related to Emergency Response Plans

2. Outline the procedures to be followed in preventing, planning, preparing for and dealing with accidents and other emergencies involving dangerous goods

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

6.1 Introduction to the Emergency Response Plan

For years the maritime industry has been the main transport provider for moving dangerous goods from A to B. Many government agencies realize that, if these goods are not managed safely and effectively it may pose hazards to the society and the environment.

In November 1997, the IMO assembly adopted resolution A 852 (20) on “Guidelines for a structure of an integrated system of contingency planning for shipboard emergencies”. In accordance with the International Safety Management Code (SOLAS Chapter IX, 1994) all ships and the companies responsible for their operations, are required to maintain a Safety Management System. Most countries will have additional national and local regulations which require organizations to develop and maintain an emergency response plan covering their operations.

To complement these emergency response requirements, the IMDG code Volume:

Supplement contains guidance on Emergency Response Procedures for Ships Carrying Dangerous Goods. The supplement includes directions for dealing with incidents involving dangerous substances, materials or harmful substances (marine pollution) regulated under the IMDG Code. This guide is intended as support and guidance to all concerned parties in handling dangerous goods to develop emergency procedures and integrate it with the ship contingency plan. The P.E.A.R. concept must also be applied to the planning and implementation of the emergency plan.

6.2 Definition of Emergency Response Management

Emergency response management:

“is the managerial function charged with creating the framework within which organizations reduce vulnerability to hazards and cope with disasters”

Source – Dr. Wayne Blancard, FEMA Principles of Emergency Management

6.3 The Principles of Emergency Response Planning

Managing the P’s in Emergency Response Plan – predict, problem, pertaining, people, process, plant, prepare, preventive plan, protect, public and profit

An emergency prevention and response strategy basically consists of the following six main steps:

1. Prevent accidents by identifying and mitigating potential hazards

2. Prepare resources and procedures to manage an emergency

3. Conduct scheduled training and drills

4. Inspect resources regularly and take corrective actions where necessary

5. In an emergency situation, all concerned parties must follow the plan.

6. Every incident must be reported and reviewed

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Why is an Emergency Response Plan (ERP) needed?

To avoid or minimize loss of life and property

To ensure any emergency can be effectively dealt with

To support a prompt response to any emergency

To direct key people to act on specific tasks and provide direction

To support coordination and communication

Collaboration with external parties (police, fire department, hospitals)

To minimize the effects of P.E.A.R. within the operations area

To recover from an emergency in the shortest amount of time possible

To have ready emergency equipment and resources within the area of operation

Three Stages in an Emergency Response Plan

1. PRE EMERGENCY – in this stage, relevant parties must be able to identify hazards that will lead to an incident

2. EMERGENCY – in this stage an incident is beyond control and requires urgent attention from relevant parties

3. POST EMERGENCY – in this stage the emergency is under control and it is necessary that the organization addresses relevant parties on initial steps to be taken to prevent future incidents

Who is Responsible to Develop the ERP

It is the duty of every employer to ensure adequate information is provided to every

stakeholder in the organization with regards to Emergency Planning. Everyone in the organization is responsible to ensure the ERP implementation is carried out as planned. In organizations there are many hazards and it is the employee’s responsibility to identify these

hazards to identify these hazards and report them. A management has to ensure that their employees are trained to identify hazards, assess them as well as to control them.

Hazard Identification

A hazard is defined as a source or situation with potential for harm in terms of human injury

or ill health, damage to property, damage to environment or a combination of these (P.E.A.R). Risk, meanwhile, is defined as a combination of the likelihood of an occurrence of

a hazardous event within a specific period or in specific circumstance and severity of injury or damage. Hazard identification is one of the systems used in many industries to prevent accidents. This system shall identify undesired evens that would be a hazard to human health, damage to property and/or degradation to the environment.

The types of hazards that may lead to an emergency are:

Health hazards – any agent that can cause illness to an individual (chemical release or biological, such as virus or bacteria

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

Safety hazards – any force powerful enough to cause injury or damage to property (fire, explosion)

Environmental hazards – the release of gaseous or liquid substances to the environment that may cause harm to society

6.4 What are the Elements in an ERP?

Step One: Prevent

Evaluate the risks and hazards which may occur in different emergency situations. Possible events should be identified, and their probability of occurrence and consequences must be addressed to set priorities for planning. This includes a reporting mechanism of hazards.

Step Two: Identify

Identify the required response tasks. This requires a thorough definition of the actions which must be taken in an emergency.

Step Three: Preparation

Identify roles, responsibilities, resources and communication channels, including drill schedules and training.

Step Four: Reporting Procedures

When to report

How to report

Whom to report

What to report

Step Five: Annexes

The ERP, plant layout and cargo storage information should always be communicated to those concerned; otherwise the plan is a potential failure. Effective methods of communication are established by conducting scheduled training and drill sessions. The training should focus on the following areas:

Possible scenarios for accidents involving dangerous goods

Evacuation procedures

Reporting procedures

Knowledge of alarm system

Knowledge of the chemical properties

Location and use of protective equipment

The ERP must be updated regularly to ensure it is relevant during an emergency.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

6.5 IMDG Supplement: Emergency Schedule (EmS) Guide

The contents of the EmS Schedule guide is as follows:

Emergency Response procedures for ships carrying dangerous goods

Medical First Aid Guide for use in incidents involving dangerous goods

Reporting procedures

IMO/ILO/UNECE guidelines for packing cargo transport units

Recommendations for the safe use of pesticides in ships – fumigation of cargo holds

Recommendations for the safe use of pesticides in ships – fumigation of cargo transport units

International code for the safe carriage of Packaged Irradiated Nuclear fuel

Resolutions and circulars

The guide provided by IMDG is intended for fire and/or spillage (leakage) emergencies on board a ship involving packaged dangerous goods transported in accordance with the provisions of the IMDG Code. The recommendations are based on provisions contained in the 1974 Safety of Life at Sea (SOLAS) Convention.

Preventive management is an important element in managing an emergency. It is essential to identify the UN Number of the dangerous good(s) involved in the fire/spillage in order to refer to specific Emergency Schedule for appropriate action. Column 15 of the Dangerous Goods List Volume 2 contains the EmS Schedule. Fire is denoted as “F” and spillage is denoted as “S”. “E” and “D” denotes the chemical classifications. The Code also provides the guide to manage the fire and spillage incident according to its chemical state.

Every consignor, consignee and carrier must have a checklist on how to manage when an incident involving dangerous goods occur.

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ASEAN – German Technical Cooperation Sustainable Port development in the ASEAN Region

ANNEX 1: Group Activities Modules 1 – 6