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Abstract

This research intends to investigate the relationships of employees development , empowerment, and leadership style, with employees trust in their managers in Union Capital in Bangladesh. It is a correlational study aimed to measure the correlationals among the study variables such as employees development, empowerment, ledership quality of employer, and employeestrust in their managers. There will be two different samples for this study. One of these samples will be the employess of Union Capital and another will be the services who are taking from it. In both the cases the resaerchers will distribute 25 questionarries among the respondents. The correlational study and step wise regression will be employed in this study for data analysis.

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

1.0 Introduction
Union Capital Limited (UCL) is one of the largest investment banks and fastest growing financial institutions in Bangladesh. Previously, it was known as Peregrine Bangladesh which had its origins and businesses rooted in Hong Kong. Out of the local office of the erstwhile Peregrine Capital Limited of Hong Kong, Union Capital Limited, Dhaka emerged in early 1998 as a Bangladesh-based company led by a group of the foremost entrepreneurs of the country. Union Capital, within a short span of time, has proved its worth as a most forward-working vigorous organization achieving success with its wide international network and strong local base. Accodring to the management of Union Capital Limited they earned handsome amount of profit in first phase of their operation. But, after 2005 they had a drop in proft earning and the situation became more worse when they started to incure losses in 2007 and 2008. Top-level management of UCL believes that low performance of the employees are the main reason behind this. But in previous study (Baruch, Dolan, Harel, and T zafrir, 2003) identified that the higher the level of employee development, the higher the level of employees trust in their managers as a result an organization can perform better day by day. To maintain high level of performance of employee it is essential for an organization to conduct research in the area of management developement, approaches of leaders, and empowerment.

1.1 Statement of the Problem

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

The proposal intends to investigate whether there are relationships among employees development , empowerment, and leadership style of employer with employees trust in their managers in Union Capital Limited in Bangladesh. In the earlier study (Baruch, Dolan, Harel, and T zafrir, 2003) conducted in Israel reveals that that employee development would be positively correlated to employees trust in their managers. In context of Bangladesh, no such studies were carried on this topic.

1.2 Purpose of the Study


The purpose of the study is to present and test a model that identifies the impact of the communication among the management, leadership style, and development of empolyees with the relationship between employees trust in managers. Employee development is crucial for the growth and prosperity of any business as employees are one of the determining factors for the success of the company. The more capable and qualified the employees the better the performance of the company. When they are well trained, they can easily handle situations, please customers ensuring customer retention as well as resolve any glitches easily without much ado. When the company and the manager shows interest in employee development, the employee naturally has a greater interest in the company's development and their trust on their manager increases (Rampel et al., 1985). Leadership is the most discussed but least understood aspect of management, an effective leadership style is essential to motivate and adapt a team when changes come along, providing inspiration in the face of high-pressure situations and adversity.

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

Previous study shows that managers have to have an effective leadership style to gain trust of employees. For some, there is little to distinguish between 'manager' and 'leader', but as Professor John Adair wrote: "Our position as a manager is confirmed by the organization, but our role as a leader is ratified in the hearts and minds of those whom we lead." Team members will look to their leader to see whether their behavior indicates that they will deliver on goals and promises. Employee empowerment helps employees own their work and take responsibility for their results. It is the state of feeling self-empowered to take control of one's own destiny. Empowerment rules as a development strategy, it affects the performance of employees and built their trust on their managers as managers shows their trust on employees by empowering them. Degeneration of trust in management is a problem for both employees and management. But for the betterment of organization employees trust on their manager is very vital. (Zand, 1972) Manager needs to show trust of employees. Eventually employees will learn to reciprocate. (Earley 1986) Managers need to listen to their employee and let them know that they've been heard. Employees become distrustful when they sense that their views are not being heard. Management needs to acknowledge employee suggestions by acting on them and letting all know that they did so.

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

2.0 Reveiw of Literature


2.1 Employee development Trust evolves out of prior positive interactions between actors and by the feelings of confidence and security, which those relationships create (Rampel et al., 1985). Thus employee development is expected to create a sense of certainty, enhance employability and faith in management. Among its positive outcomes, this investment increases employability for the individual employee (Waterman et al., 1994). As early as the 1960s, Tannenbaum and Davies (1969) associated development and employee development with the creation of trust. We would view investment in training and development as clear evidence of a trust creation mechanism. This will result in the emergence of a global belief concerning the extent to which managers and their organizations value and care for employees well-being (Eisenberger et al., 1986). Transactional exchange in

this case is manifested by high investment in human capital. It would be difficult or unsettling to betray your organization if it made such an investment. Moreover, this continuous process reinforces the generation of mutual trust. Therefore, we predict a positive relationship between managers trust and employees development.

2.2 Empowerment Empowerment in an organizational context can be viewed as a set of conditions necessary for intrinsic task motivation (Conger and Kanungo, 1988). It can also be seen as a set of motivational techniques, contrasting traditional paradigms such as Taylorism which is predominantly based on strong managerial control, first stated by Plato some 2,400 years ago (Clemense and Mayer, 1987).

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

The empowering leaders role is to show trust, provide vision, remove performance-blocking barriers, offer encouragement, motivate, and coach employees. More and more managers are being advised that effective leaders share power and responsibility with their employees. Empowerment is reflected in delegation of power to make decisions at lower organisational layers, though empowerment means more than merely delegation (Malone, 1997). Empowerment is concerned with trust, motivation, decision making, and basically, breaking the inner boundaries between management and employees as them and us (Liden and Tewksbury, 1995). Mishra and Spreitzer view empowerment as reflecting a personal sense of control in the workplace as manifested in four beliefs about the person-work environment relationship (Mishra and Spreitzer, 1998, p. 577): (1) Meaning refers to an individual experiencing his task as important, valuable, and worthwhile (Hackman, 1987). (2) Competence Thomas and Velthouse (1990) defined it as the process of enabling people to be confident in their capacity to make choices over work processes. (3) Self-determination reflects a sense of freedom about how individuals do their own work (Mishra and Spreitzer, 1998, p. 577). (4) Impact when an employee produces work that is significant and important for an organization. These four components are reflected in HRM practices such as delegation of decision-making to the rank and file, enriching the diversity of competencies, and creating opportunities for challenging jobs. Adam Smith (1982) argued in The Theory of Moral Sentiments, that the moral basis of individual existence is the need for recognition and consideration on the part of others. People need attention, sympathy and approbation (Sligman, 1997, p. 80). In part they will expect it

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

from their organization, as part of the set of mutual expectations developed to maintain ccommitment and its positive outcomes (Steers, 1977). The process of empowerment is an exchange process, where managers share power with their subordinates, and in return expect to gain increased performance. An added value of the empowerment process is the increase in employees trust in their managers (Jones and George, 1998).

2.3 Trust Building trust within organisations, in particular within the context of dyad relationship between employees and their managers, is crucial for effective operation of the firm. Jung and Avolio (2000) suggested that transformational leaders may build trust by demonstrating individualised concern and respect for followers. Moreover, scholars have shown that interpersonal trust bears significantly on such variables as problem-solving (Zand, 1972), performance (Earley, 1986), citizenship behavior (McAllister, 1995), co-operation (Axelrod, 1984), and communication (Roberts and OReilly, 1974). For example, Gould-Williams (2003) using data collected from UK local government employees found that systems trust is the most significant predictor for perceived organisational performance. There have been a number of attempts to define trust in the organisational literature (Mayer et al., 1995; Rousseau et al., 1998). Robinson (1996, p. 576) provides a working

2.4 Definition of trust Ones expectations, assumptions, or beliefs about the likelihood that anothers future actions will be beneficial, favorable, or at least not detrimental to ones interests. Several aspects of this definition call for elaboration. First, trust is a social phenomenon (Blau, 1964; Luhamann, 1988;

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

Sztompka, 1999; Zand, 1972). Second, trust is based on the expectation that another individual will act benevolently towards one (Mayer et al, 1995) based on history experiences (Judith, 1996). Third, this definition explicitly recognizes the relationship between trust and risk (Zand, 1972). An overwhelming body of literature has emphasized the importance of positive interaction between parties, which increases the level of trust (Butler, 1983; Kramer and Tyler, 1996; Lewicki et al., 1998; Mayer et al., 1995; Saunders and Thornhill, 2003; Whitney, 1994; Zand, 1972). The trust cycle reflects a self-strengthening mechanism, as Deutsch (1962) mentions, by establishing a primitive interdependence and co-operation. Common beliefs as well as research findings suggest that a climate of positive trust enhances business performance and that the greater the amount of trust, the more efficient and effective the performance of employees and organizations will be (Ouchi, 1981; Shaw, 1997). Trust has been identified as an important component that makes mutual gains and bargaining successful (Friedman, 1993), a prerequisite for the implementation of a successful organizational productivity method (Savage, 1982), increasing group performance (Klimoski and Karol, 1976) and reducing employee turnover (Mishra and Morrissey, 1990). While many recent books and scientific papers pay increased attention to the positive and significant influence of emerging HRM practices on organizational performance (Delaney and Huselid, 1996; Shaw et al., 1998), still very little is known about how these emerging HRM roles are associated with trusting behaviour. Some theoretical and empirical research related to trust attempts to take HRM practices into account (Morrison, 1996; Whitener et al., 1998) but they fail to develop a comprehensive model of the consequences of human resource practices on trust. In numerous recent publications, Schuler and his colleagues propose that one of the growing challenges for human resource practices is to build a positive cycle of trust in the organization (Schuler, 1992; Schuler et al., 2001). Effective use of

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

HRM practices, which leads to increased procedural justice, greater open communication, and empowerment, will increase employees trust in their managers (Barney and Hansen, 1994; Gould-Williams, 2003; Schuler, 1992; Zeffane and Connell, 2003). Armstrong-Stassen (2002) in a three-year longitudinal panel study found that the practice of designating employees redundant has an adverse effect on job satisfaction, organisational trust and commitment during the downsizing period. Mayer and Davis (1999) found that implementing a new performance-based recognition and rewards system leads to a significant increase in trust in top management. Guest and Conway (2000) explain how innovative HRM practices have contributed to perceptions of trust. Along similar lines, Dolan et al. (1998) report that an examination of the core HR values of some 75 leading US and European organisations as communicated via their respective Web pages, often included the concept of trust and open communication (for a typical Web-based HR, trust emerged as an emergent core value see the HRM department at Cornell University: www.ohr.cornell.edu/ohr/support/sup79_corevalprinc.html). To recapitulate, the social exchange theory complements the resource-based view by providing a dynamic perspective. Exchange theory looks at trust as an essential tool for achieving a stable social relationship (Blau, 1964). Parties to the organizational relationship expect some return on their contribution but the nature and timing of that return is unspecified (Konovsky and Pugh, 1994), and depends on the context in which they operate (Kollock, 1994). Social exchange theory suggests that there is an expectation of some unspecified future returns, which is based on the individual trusting that the other parties to the exchanges will discharge their obligations fairly in the long run (Holmes, 1981). This perspective helps us identify when, and under which conditions of successful social exchanges, an organization is likely to achieve all four criteria for sustained competitive advantage. 2.5 Leadership Style

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

10 Leadership style is the manner and approach of providing direction, implementing plans, and motivating people. Kurt Lewin (1939) led a group of researchers to identify different styles of leadership. This early study has been very influential and established three major leadership styles. The four major styles of leadership:

Authoritarian or autocratic Participative or democratic Delegative or Free Reign & Transformational.

There are so many approaches to lead a person but as a researcher we think that transformational leadership is the best way to improve the management quality and good way to go more close to the organization goal. This theory was developed by Burns (1978) and later enhanced by Bass (1985, 1998) and others (Avolio & Bass, 1988; Bass & Avolio, 1994; Bennis & Nanus, 1985; Tichy & Devanna, 1986). The major premise of the transformational leadership theory is the leaders ability to motivate the follower to accomplish more than what the follower planned to accomplish (Krishnan, 2005). Burns postulated that transformational leaders inspire followers to accomplish more by concentrating on the followers values and helping the follower align these values with the values of the organization. Furthermore, Burns identified transformational leadership as a relationship in which the leader and the follower motivated each other to higher levels which resulted in value system congruence between the leader and the follower (Krishnan, 2002). Transformational leadership has been associated with the personal outcomes (Hatter & Bass, 1988; Barling, Moutinho, & Kelloway, 1998; Kirkpatrick & Locke, 1996) of the follower as well

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as organizational outcomes (Boerner, Eisenbeiss, & Griesser, 2007; Zhu, Chew, & Spangler, 2005; Jorg & Schyns, 2004; Barling, Weber, & Kelloway, 1996; Howell & Avolio1993). Research has shown that transformational leadership impacts follower satisfaction (Hatter & Bass; Koh, Steers, & Terborg, 1995) and commitment to the organization (Barling et al., 1996; Koh et al.). Research has also shown that transformational leadership impacts employee commitment to organizational change (Yu, Leithwood, & Jantzi, 2002) and organizational conditions (Lam, Wei, Pan, & Chan, 2002). Due to its impact on personal and organizational outcomes, transformational leadership is needed in all organizations (Tucker & Russell, 2004).

3.0 Research Questions


This study proposes to investigate the following questions: 1. Is there any significant relationship between employeesdevelopment and employeestrust in managers in context of Union Capital in Bangladesh? 2. Is there any significant relationship between empowerment and employeestrust in managers in context of Union Capital in Bangladesh? 3. Is there any significant relationship between leadership style and employees trust in managers in context of Union Capital in Bangladesh?

4.0 Hyppothesis
The hypothesis which can be stablish from the research questions are:

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1. There is a significant relationship between employeesdevelopment and employeestrust in managers in context of Union Capital in Bangladesh. 2. There is a significant relationship between empowerment and employeestrust in managers in context of Union Capital in Bangladesh. 3. There is a significant relationship between leadership style and employees trust in managers in context of Union Capital in Bangladesh.

5.0 Development of Conceptual Framework

Employees Development Empowerment

Employeestrust in managers

Leadership Style

6.0 Operational Defination

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Measured Value EmployeesDevelopment Empowerment Leadership style Employeestrust in managers

Operational Defination Will be operationally defined by Sim et al. (1999) Will be operationally defined by Carr and pearson (2004) Will be operationally defined by Ven and ferry (2000) Will be operationally defined by Pearson (1996)

7.0 Methodology
7.1 Research design The graphical representation of the proposed framework depicted the pattern and structture of relationship among the set of the measured variables. The purpose of the study is to measure correlations among the variables. The present study will investigate the relationship between these following factors such as: employeesdevelpoment, empowerment, and leadership style with the employeestrust on managers within the context of Union Capital Limited in Bangaldesh. Here, employeesdevelopment, empowerment, and leadership style considered as the independent varibales and employeestrust on managers are being considered as dependent varibales. This research will use a correlational study to establish the existence of the relationships between the measured variables. In this research, the researchers only want to identify whether any relationships exists between these measured varibales or not. Correlational study provides a

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measure of degree between two more variables. Therefore, the present study will be characterized as a correlational study.

7.2 Sampling method

There will be two different types of population for this study. For this proposed study the first population will be the empoyeesof Union Capital Limited in Dhaka city. The sampling frame for the research would be offiicial register of the employees. The researchers will use the systematic sampling to collect the sample for this study. In most of the previous researhs conducted the researchers had used this type of sampling (Piercy, 1995; Calleya & Caruna, 1998). According to (Levin & Rubin, 1998) in systematic sampling, elements are selected from the population at a uniform interval that is measured in time, order or space. Copper and Schinder (1998) supports this by stating that the major advantage of systematic sampling is its simplicity and flexibilty.Becasue of the time limitation researcher is willing to use a sample size of 200 where the population size is 600. Hence, researchers will pick every 3rd name from the employee register to come up with the sample size of 200. The researher willuse convenience sampling to collect second sample. In Bangladesh it is very difficult to find out a sampling frame to collect sample from the customers. It is also very difficult to find out the customers of banks for face to face interview and most of them may be inconvenient for researchers. In most cases sample size 200-300 (Souchan, Thirkell & Too, 2000; Feick & Lee, 2001). In this research the researhcer will also use a sample size of 200 because of the time limitation.
7.3 Survey Instrument

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To gather data researcher will use structered questionarries. The questionarries survey is the most effective method for this study to collect data. The questionarrie will be divided into four sections. Employees development will be measured using 17 ( Section 1, Questions 1-17) items developed by Sim et al. (1999). Empowerment will be measured using 5 ( Section 2, Questions 17-22) items developed by Carr and pearson (2004). Leadership style will be measured using 3 ( Section 3, Questions 22-25) items developed by Ven and ferry (2000). Employeestrust on managers will be measured using 4 ( Section 4, Questions 25-30) items developed by by Pearson (1996).

7.4 Pilot test questionnaire

The researchers intend to conduct a pretest to evaluate the questionarries for clarity bias ambiguous questions and relevance to organizational setting of UCL. According to Copper and Schindler (2001), a group size of pilot testing may vary from 25-100 repondents. Therefore, the researchers will select 25 employees from UCL and 25 customers from convenient place to conduct the pilot survey. The researchers will use 50 respondents in pilot survey because of the time limitations.

7.5 Data Collection

The present research is a unque one for UCL. Altough it is a unique one , secondary sources of data will be avaibale for this study. However, researchers will also go for primary data to

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investigate the research questions. To collect data from the primary resources, the researchers will use questionarrie survey method.

7.6 Data Analysis The proposed study is a correlational study. As a result, after collecting the data the researchers will use correlational matrix to identify whether relationships exist between the measured variables or not. The researchers are interested to find out whether the conceptually newer measured variables add anything to the dependent variables compared to older variables. Stevens (1996) stated that if an investigator wishes to determine whether some conceptually newer measures add anything to the dependent variable compared to the older, it is appropriate to use step wise regression. Hence, stepwise regression will be the most effective tool to analyze the data to find out whether the conceptually newer measured variables add anything to the dependent variables compared to older variables. For this research to run regration SPSS version 17 will be used as the statistical data tool as it offers greater flexibilty in data analysis and visualization.

8.0 Limitations of the Study


This present study is limited by number of factor. The sample population is limited by interms of its size and compusition. For the customer survey, the researcher will have to select convenient

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sampling which is a non-probablty sampling rather than any probability sampling. There are many other factors which can influence the independent variables e.g. development of the employees, empowerment, and level of education but the researcher will not consider those beacuse of the simplicity of the research.

9.0 Signifcance of the Study


Management development, effective leadership style,and employee empowerment recognized as a corenerstone of business success and effective tool for the management to construct a better performance for an organization by increasing employees trust in thier managers. The study is the first emperical research in Bangladesh to test the relationship between employees development , empowerment, and leadership style, with employees trust in their managers using structural equation modeling, so it will contribute a lot to Union Capital Limited and also other companies in Bangladesh. More over this study will not only increase the understanding of the complexities surrounding employees trust in their managers but also it will explore and define the relationship between employees development , empowerment, and leadership style, with employees trust in their managers. Again this research may encourage futher study and useful guidelines for these types of research.

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Luhamann, N. (1988), Familiarity, confidence, trust: problems and alternatives, in Gambetta, D. (Ed.), Trust: Making and Breaking Cooperative Relations, Basil Blackwell, Oxford, pp. 94107. Mayer, R.C. and Davis, J.H. (1999), The effect of the performance appraisal system on trust for management: a field quasi-experiment, Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 84 No. 1, pp. 123-36. Mayer, R.C., Davis, J.H. and Schoorman, D.F. (1995), An integrative model of organizational trust, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 20 No. 3, pp. 709-34. McAllister, D.J. (1995), Affect and cognition-based trust as foundations for interpersonal cooperation in organizations, Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 38 No. 1, pp. 24-59. Mishra, A.K. and Spreitzer, G.M. (1998), Explaining hoe survivors respond to downsizing: the role of trust, empowerment, justice and work redesign, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 23 No. 3, pp. 567-88. Mishra, J. and Morrissey, M.A. (1990), Trust in employee/employer relationships: a survey of West Michigan managers, Public Personnel Management, Vol. 19 No. 4, pp. 443-63. Morrison, W.E. (1996), Organizational citizenship behavior as a critical link between HRM practices and service quality, Human Resource Management, Vol. 35 No. 4, pp. 493-512. Ouchi, W.G. (1981), Theory Z: How American Business Can Meet the Japanese Challenge, Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA. Rampel, J.K., Holmes, J.G. and Zanna, M. (1985), Trust in close relationships, Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, Vol. 49 No. 1, pp. 95-112. Roberts, K.H. and OReilly, C.A. III (1974), Measuring organizational communication, Journal of Applied Psychology, Vol. 59, pp. 321-6. Robinson, S.L. (1996), Trust and breach of the psychological contract, Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 41 No. 4, pp. 574-99.

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Saunders, M.N.K. and Thornhill, A. (2003), Organisational justice, trust and the management of change: an exploration, Personnel Review, Vol. 32 No. 3, pp. 360-75. Savage, D. (1982), Trust as a productivity management tool, Training and Development Journal, Vol. 36, pp. February, 54-7. Schuler, R.S., Dolan, S.L. and Jackson, S. (2001), Trends and emerging issues in human resource management: global and trans cultural perspectives introduction, International Journal of Manpower, Vol. 22 No. 3, pp. 195-7. Shaw, B.R. (1997), Trust in the Balance: Building Successful Organizations on Results, Integrity, and Concern, Jossey-Bass, San Francisco, CA. Shaw, J.D., Delery, J.E., Jenkins, J.D. Jr and Gupta, N. (1998), An organization-level analysis of voluntary and involuntary turnover, Academy of Management Journal, Vol. 41 No. 5, pp. 511-25. Sligman, A.B. (1997), The Problem of Trust, Princeton University Press, Princeton, NJ. Steers, R.M. (1977), Antecedents and outcomes of organizational commitment, Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 22 No. 1, pp. 46-56. Sztompka, P. (1999), Trust: A Sociological Theory, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge. Tannenbaum, R. and Davies, S.M. (1969), Values, man and organization, Industrial Management Review, Vol. 10 No. 2, pp. 67-86. Thomas, K.W. and Velthouse, B.A. (1990), Cognitive elements of empowerment: an interpretative model of intrinsic task motivation, Academy of Management Review, Vol. 15 No. 4, pp. 666-81. Tyler, T.R. and Bies, R.J. (1990), Interpersonal aspects of procedural justice, in Carroll, J.S. (Ed.), Applied Social Psychology in Business Settings, Lawrence Erlbaum, Hillsdale, NJ. Waterman, R.H. Jr, Waterman, J.A. and Collard, B.A. (1994), Toward a career-resilient workforce, Harvard Business Review, Vol. 72 No. 4, pp. 87-95.

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Whitney, J.D. (1994), The Trust Factor: Liberating Profits and Restoring Corporate Vitality, McGraw-Hill, New York, NY. Zand, D. (1972), Trust and managerial problem-solving, Administrative Science Quarterly, Vol. 17 No. 2, pp. 229-39. Zeffane, R. and Connell, J. (2003), Trust and HRM in the new millennium, International Journal of Human Resource Management, Vol. 14 No. 1, pp. 3-11.

Appendix Research Questionnair for Employees

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Following are some questions which will measure managers leadership style, employees trust on their managers, Employees empowerment, and employees development in context of Union Capital Limited. Circle one number per statement using the following scale. 1= Strongly Disagree 2= Disagree Leadership style 01. Manager always takes vote from employer whenever a major decision has to be made 1 2 3 4 5 3= Neither Disagree nor Agree 4= Agree 5 = Strongly Agree

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02.

When things go wrong and manager need to create a strategy to keep a project or process running on schedule, manager call a meeting to get employee's advice. When employees makes a mistake manager tell employees not to ever do that again and make a note of it. Manager always creates an environment where the employees take ownership of the project. Manager allow employees to participate in the decision making process.

03.

04.

05.

Manager asks employees for their vision of 1 where they see their jobs going and then use their vision where appropriate. Managers think employees can lead themselves just as well as they can. Manager asks for employee ideas and input on upcoming plans and projects. 1 1

06. 07. 08.

2 2 2

3 3 3

4 4 4

5 5 5

Manager always tells employees what has to 1 be done and how to do it.

Employees Trust 09. Senior management does a good job of explaining the reasons behind important business decisions. Senior management does a good job of confronting issues before they become major problems. I trust management to always communicate honestly. I believe my organization as a whole is well managed. 1 2 3 4 5

10.

11. 12.

1 1

2 2

3 3

4 4

5 5

Employees development , empowerment, leadership style, in a reationship with employees trust in their managers

25

13.

Senior management communicates a clear vision of the future direction of my organization. Senior management does a good job of establishing clear objectives.

14.

Employee empowerment 15. 16. 17. 18. 19. 20. If I have problem I can speak directly to management. I take initiatives at work Management is good example to employees Management tries to solve my work related problem. I am rewarded for work well done I know which work I should complete every day. 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 5 5

Employees development 21. 22. Supervisor's efforts to identify your strengths and weaknesses The quality of orientation and training received for your current position in the company Managers provide support for my efforts to improve my weaknesses. There is a consistent and equitable system of rewards There is a positive recognition by your immediate supervisor 1 1 2 2 3 3 4 4 5 5

23. 24. 25.

1 1 1

2 2 2

3 3 3

4 4 4

5 5 5