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Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Release 5.2.2 March 07, 2012 04-603708 Issue 1

2011 Avaya Inc. All Rights Reserved. Notice While reasonable efforts were made to ensure that the information in this document was complete and accurate at the time of printing, Avaya Inc. can assume no liability for any errors. Changes and corrections to the information in this document might be incorporated in future releases. Documentation disclaimer Avaya Inc. is not responsible for any modifications, additions, or deletions to the original published version of this documentation unless such modifications, additions, or deletions were performed by Avaya. Customer and/or End User agree to indemnify and hold harmless Avaya, Avaya's agents, servants and employees against all claims, lawsuits, demands and judgments arising out of, or in connection with, subsequent modifications, additions or deletions to this documentation to the extent made by the Customer or End User. Link disclaimer Avaya Inc. is not responsible for the contents or reliability of any linked Web sites referenced elsewhere within this documentation, and Avaya does not necessarily endorse the products, services, or information described or offered within them. We cannot guarantee that these links will work all the time and we have no control over the availability of the linked pages. Warranty Avaya Inc. provides a limited warranty on this product. Refer to your sales agreement to establish the terms of the limited warranty. In addition, Avayas standard warranty language, as well as information regarding support for this product, while under warranty, is available through the Avaya Support Web site: http://www.avaya.com/support License USE OR INSTALLATION OF THE PRODUCT INDICATES THE END USER'S ACCEPTANCE OF THE TERMS SET FORTH HEREIN AND THE GENERAL LICENSE TERMS AVAILABLE ON THE AVAYA WEB SITE http://support.avaya.com/LicenseInfo/ ("GENERAL LICENSE TERMS"). IF YOU DO NOT WISH TO BE BOUND BY THESE TERMS, YOU MUST RETURN THE PRODUCT(S) TO THE POINT OF PURCHASE WITHIN TEN (10) DAYS OF DELIVERY FOR A REFUND OR CREDIT. Avaya grants End User a license within the scope of the license types described below. The applicable number of licenses and units of capacity for which the license is granted will be one (1), unless a different number of licenses or units of capacity is specified in the Documentation or other materials available to End User. "Designated Processor" means a single stand-alone computing device. "Server" means a Designated Processor that hosts a software application to be accessed by multiple users. "Software" means the computer programs in object code, originally licensed by Avaya and ultimately utilized by End User, whether as stand-alone Products or pre-installed on Hardware. "Hardware" means the standard hardware Products, originally sold by Avaya and ultimately utilized by End User. License type(s) Copyright Except where expressly stated otherwise, the Product is protected by copyright and other laws respecting proprietary rights. Unauthorized reproduction, transfer, and or use can be a criminal, as well as a civil, offense under the applicable law. Third-party components Certain software programs or portions thereof included in the Product may contain software distributed under third party agreements ("Third Party Components"), which may contain terms that expand or limit rights to use certain portions of the Product ("Third Party Terms"). Information identifying Third Party Components and the Third Party Terms that apply to them is available on the Avaya Support Web site: http://support.avaya.com/ThirdPartyLicense/ Preventing toll fraud "Toll fraud" is the unauthorized use of your telecommunications system by an unauthorized party (for example, a person who is not a corporate employee, agent, subcontractor, or is not working on your company's behalf). Be aware that there can be a risk of toll fraud associated with your system and that, if toll fraud occurs, it can result in substantial additional charges for your telecommunications services. Avaya fraud intervention If you suspect that you are being victimized by toll fraud and you need technical assistance or support, call Technical Service Center Toll Fraud Intervention Hotline at +1-800-643-2353 for the United States and Canada. For additional support telephone numbers, see the Avaya Support Web site: http://www.avaya.com/support

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Contents
Chapter 1: Introducing the New Features in Meeting Exchange 5.2 . . . . . . . . . New recording functionality. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New audio prompts . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New CDR fields . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New blast dial callflow. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New languages. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New codecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New signal to noise calculation. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New upgrade procedures . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New server support . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . New dial list functionality . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 2: Meeting Exchange checklist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 3: Working with an electronic preinstallation worksheet . . . . . . . . . . . Obtaining a copy of the EPW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the EPW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loading the EPW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verifying SNMP trap information using the EPW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 4: Installing Meeting Exchange software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing this chapter. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing the stages of the installation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring and testing the installation . . . . Customizing the server IP . . . . . . . . . . Checking if all process are up and running Configuring the system timezone . . . . . Configuring the number of licensed ports . Enabling features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring call branding . . . . . . . . . . Introducing call branding . . . . . . . . Defining the DNIS size . . . . . . . . . . Listing all the entries . . . . . . . . . . Listing a single entry . . . . . . . . . . Adding a DNIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Deleting a DNIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 13 13 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 16 17 21 21 22 24 24 27 27 28 28 29 32 32 33 37 38 39 39 40 41 45 46 47 47 47

Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

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Modifying a DNIS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Displaying help. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Making a call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing Bridge Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring server resources. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring server logins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring automatic backups . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing a list of the files that backup.sh supports Configuring backup.sh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Chapter 5: Configuring the Meeting Exchange application server . . . . . . . . . . . Tips for using this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Matching Meeting Exchange to the speed of the network . . . . . . . . . . . . . Customizing Meeting Exchange properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Customizing the scheduler utility . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating sign-ins to Meeting Exchange A short note about sign-ins . . . . . Creating sign-ins. . . . . . . . . . . Viewing and deleting sign-ins . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 6: Configuring the Meeting Exchange media server . . . . . . . . . . . . . Avaya Common Media Server features . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring codecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the system settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the media settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring automatic gain control . . . . . . . . . Configuring comfort noise generation . . . . . . . . Configuring transport settings . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring drive settings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the active speaker notification interval . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 7: Configuring external servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . File location . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mounting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Mounting the recording directory on the application server . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 8: Branding the customer experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A short note on the customer experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Obtaining conference telephone numbers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

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Configuring Meeting Exchange number collection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Meeting Exchange to handle a number it does not recognize . . . . Configuring partial matching . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the wildcard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the telephone number branding . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring reservation groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding reservation groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring call branding for reservation groups . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring dialing patterns . . . . . . A short note about syntax. . . . . . Configuring patterns for dialing out Configuring patterns for dialing in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Chapter 9: Configuring blast dial lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing blast dial lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring blast dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating blast dial lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Creating a new blast dial list . . . . . . . . . . . . Generating a blast dial list from the LDAP server . Viewing and printing blast dial lists . . . . . . . . Operators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bridge Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CRS Front End . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using blast dial lists . . Operators. . . . . . Bridge Talk . . . CRS Front End . Moderators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Dialing out to blast dial lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moderators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Viewing and printing blast dial lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System administrators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operators. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 10: Viewing Meeting Exchange information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call Detail Record (CDR) reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conference Detail Records (CODR) reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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CDR Loader application . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Accessing records using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu 105 Configuring the fields for viewing and printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Viewing and printing detail records . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 106 Accessing reports using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu 107 Working with conference report information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 107 Viewing and printing conference reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 108 Accessing records using a relational database . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing records using a remote host . . . . Introducing the transmission process . . . Configuring the Meeting Exchange server . Configuring the remote host . . . . . . . . Writing an application . . . . . . . . . . Defining a port . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 109 109 110 112 112 112 114 115 115 115 115 116 116 117 117 118 118 125 126 127 129 129 129 129 130 130 130 130 131 131 131

Accessing reports using the Client Registration Server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing reports using Bridge Talk. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing reports using Web Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing reports using the Reports Application. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing LAN statistics reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing logs. . . . . . . . . . Accessing general logs . . . Accessing modification logs Accessing operator logs . . Accessing participant logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Accessing port capacity reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Accessing polling reports. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 11: Configuring PINs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A short note on PIN functionality . Off. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conference . . . . . . . . . . . Conference types . . . . . . . . . Unattended conferences . . . Attended conferences . . . . . Flexflow conferences . . . . . Self Registration conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

PIN mode and the user experience . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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A short note on PIN lists Creating PIN lists . . PINs.txt . . . . . . PINlist.txt . . . . . Loading PIN lists. . .

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Chapter 12: Configuring recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling the recording feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring recording properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the playback call flow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Ensuring access for users . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supporting an older method of conference playback for Web Portal users. . . . Chapter 13: Configuring languages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction to localization . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A point of clarification regarding languages. System language . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conference language . . . . . . . . . . . Participant experience. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 14: Configuring audio messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . A short note about audio messages Prompt sets . . . . . . . . . . . Per-conference messages . . . System wide messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Recording new audio messages . . . . . . . . . . A short note about recording audio messages Configuring prompt set names . . . . . . . . . Recording new messages. . . . . . . . . . . . Maintaining a transcript of messages . . . . .

Enabling system wide messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 15: Connecting Meeting Exchange to your network. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting directly to Communication Manager . . . Adding Meeting Exchange to the node names list Adding a signaling group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a trunk group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a dialplan entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

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Adding a UDP entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding an AAR entry . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a route pattern . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Meeting Exchange for Communication Manager

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Connecting to an SES proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Meeting Exchange for an SES proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Communication Manager for an SES proxy . . . . . . . . . Adding Meeting Exchange to the node names list . . . . . . . . . . Adding the SES proxy to the node names list . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a signaling group for Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a signaling group for the SES proxy. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a trunk group for Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a trunk group for the SES proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a dialplan entry for Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a dialplan entry for the SES proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding an AAR entry for Meeting Exchange. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding an AAR entry for the SES proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a route pattern for Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding a route pattern for the SES proxy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Communication Manager and the SES proxy for SIP calls . Configuring the SES proxy for SIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Communication Manager for SIP . . . . . . . . . . . . . Connecting to AudioCodes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Meeting Exchange for AudioCodes Configuring AudioCodes for Meeting Exchange Configuring PSTN trunks . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring TDM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring direct connectivity . . . . . . . . Configuring call routing . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring transport type . . . . . . . . . . Configuring codecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring DTMF . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 16: Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP) . . . . . . . . . Configuring Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring Communication Manager . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Verifying SRTP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 17: Configuring security features. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring secure recordings . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Configuring additional PINs. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 18: Configuring electronic passcode validation (EPV) . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing EPV . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing the process . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring the XML code . . . . . . . . . Configuring the chdbased.reg file . . . Understanding the format of requests . Understanding the format of responses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

183 185 185 186 187 187 189 190 192 192 195 195 195 196 196 197 197 198 201 201 201 203 206 206 207 208 208 209 209 210 210 213 213 214 214 216 216

Configuring EPV for flexflow conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring leader PINs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring mandatory billing codes for flexflow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring billing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring settings relating to stranded participants . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing the configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . Testing your code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Using the keep alive response . . . . . . . . Using the xCalcli test program . . . . . . . . Using a Web browser to validate PIN codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 19: Configuring alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing the traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Adding and deleting traps. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring threshold values of trap receivers . . Configuring CPU and disk space usage traps . Configuring Port usage traps . . . . . . . . . . Verifying that SNMP is running . . . . . . . . . . . Debugging SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing core services . . . . . . . . . Running and verifying core services . Configuring core services. . . . . . . Viewing the logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 20: Introducing multisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introducing multisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . How multisite can be used to create global conferences . About hubs and linking servers . . . . . . . . . . . . Maximum number of sites and conferences . . . . . . Single dial-in number to access global conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Multisite required components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Multisite optional components . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Network architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System failover. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Link line architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Failover configuration and fault identification . Billing architecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

216 217 218 218 220 221 222 222 224

Multisite terminology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Chapter 21: Upgrading from Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 1 to Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 Installing the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM file . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Rolling back to a previous version . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 22: Configuring multisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Multisite environment requirements . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Opening ports between sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Installing multisite for Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up a CRS for multisite use . . . . . . . . . . SQL 2000 and SQL 2005 SP2 . . . . . . . . . . . Linking CRS servers. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Registering the server . . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up the stored procedure . . . . . . . Configuring SQL stored procedures . . . . . Configuring the MSDTC log file . . . . . . . . Creating a new server in the CRS Front End. Viewing servers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuring MultiSite.ini for multisite use . Configuring multisite for BSMon . . . . Stopping multisite . . . . . . . . . . . . Setting up the audio conference server Utilizing global conference resources . Overbooking settings . . . . . . . . Setting up global conference billing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 229 230 233 233 234 235 236 237 237 237 239 239 242 243 244 244 246 247 247 247 247 248 249 249 250 252

Chapter 23: Running multisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . About global conferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scheduling global conferences. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Managing global conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Conference features . . . . . . . . . Global level conference features Local conference features . . . Non-supported features . . . . .

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253 253 254 255 256 256 257 257 258 258 259 259 261 261 262 265 265 266 267 268 269 278 288 289 291 294 310 311 313 315 323 339 339 340

Tracking billing information for global conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Global conference resource monitoring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Chapter 24: Navigating multisite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CRS panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bridge panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Stats panel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Log Messages area . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix A: Configuration task list . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tips for using this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration tasks . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix B: Finding parameters by name. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tips for using this document . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Blast dial configuration properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CDR configuration properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Formatting considerations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CDR configuration properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CODR configuration properties. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Call Routing configuration properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Operator configuration properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supervision configuration properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System configuration properties . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Timed Assist configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Voice Message configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warning Tone configuration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix C: Supported management information bases (MIBs) . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix D: Audio messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix E: Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) commands. . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scan conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moderator commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

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Conferee commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Flexflow conferences . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moderator commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Conferee commands . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Commands for playing back a recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix F: Feature List . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix G: Configuration changes that require a reboot or a restart . . . . . . . . Rebooting or powering down Meeting Exchange . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Appendix H: List of softmediaserver.cfg parameters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

343 344 345 348 349 351 355 356 357

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Chapter 1: Introducing the New Features in Meeting Exchange 5.2


This chapter describes the new features in Meeting Exchange 5.2.
l l l l l l l l l l

New recording functionality New audio prompts New CDR fields New blast dial callflow New languages New codecs New signal to noise calculation New upgrade procedures New server support New dial list functionality

New recording functionality


Meeting Exchange 5.2 features new recording functionality. Customers can now record and play back conferences directly from the application server. The new recording and playback feature is also highly configurable to enable customers to exactly match their deployment requirements. Avaya has introduced a series of new parameters and a new cbutil function for this purpose. For more information, see Configuring recording on page 137.

New audio prompts


Meeting Exchange 5.2 contains a number of new audio prompts. In addition, Avaya has made changes to existing audio prompt scenarios, such as entering and exiting Q&A. Avaya has also configured different tones to be played when callers perform different actions. Avaya has also increased the number of available message slots to accomodate two new message features. These new features are per-conference messages and system-wide messages. For more information, see Configuring audio messages on page 147.

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Introducing the New Features in Meeting Exchange 5.2

New CDR fields


Meeting Exchange 5.2 outputs a number of new fields in the Call Detail Record (CDR) files. These new fields include the number of requests for operator assistance, the time of the last request for operator assistance, and the unique participant identifier. These fields are called Oper Help Reqs, Last Help Req, and Unique Participant Identifier, respectively. For moreinformation on these fields, see CDR configuration properties on page 269. For more information on the functionality relating to the unique participant identifier, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.

New blast dial callflow


In Meeting Exchange 5.2, the participants callflow when they receive a blast dial call is very similar to a regular conference entry participant callflow. For example, Meeting Exchange may request a rollcall name and announce their entry to the conference. For more information, see Dialing out to blast dial lists on page 101.

New languages
For Meeting Exchange 5.2, Avaya have re-recorded all audio messages for the following languages:
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English (United States) German French (France) French (Canada) Spanish (Spain) Spanish (Latin America) Russian

For more information, see Configuring languages on page 143.

14 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

New codecs

New codecs
Meeting Exchange 5.2 now ships with the Avaya Common Media Server. As a result, Meeting Exchange supports a number of new features, such as low rate bit codecs and video voice activated switching. For more information on these features, see Configuring the Meeting Exchange media server on page 71.

New signal to noise calculation


The Meeting Exchange application server now provides the Avaya Conferencing Provider application programming interface (ACP-API) with the signal to noise calculation on any given telephone line. The ACP API sends a request and the application server responds with the calculation.

New upgrade procedures


It is now easier to upgrade your edition of Meeting Exchange. For the 5.2 release, Avaya has automated many upgrade steps. In previous releases, these steps were manual and required specialist technical knowledge. For example, in the current release, the databases upgrade automatically. For more information, see Upgrading from Meeting Exchange 5.0.x, 5.1.x, or 5.2 to 5.2 Service Pack 1 on page 193.

New server support


For previous versions of Meeting Exchange, Avaya supported the Dell 1950 server. For Meeting Exchange 5.2, Avaya support the IBM X3550 M2 server for all components, with the exception of Avaya Web Conferencing recording functionality. For Avaya Web Conferencing recording functionality, customers require the IBM X3650 M2 server. For customers who are running Meeting Exchange 5.1 on a Dell 1950 server and who wish to upgrade to Meeting Exchange 5.2, Avaya will continue to support the Dell 1950 server. However, this support for the Dell 1950 server only extends to customers using the G.711 codec. If customers wish to add another codec, they must change to the IBM X3550 M2 server. If your deployment consists of a Dell 1950 running Meeting Exchange 5.0, Avaya recommend increasing the available memory to 4 GB as a minimum requirement.

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Introducing the New Features in Meeting Exchange 5.2

New dial list functionality


Meeting Exchange automatically saves the current conference participant list as the dial list using the conference reference number as the filename. Meeting Exchange makes this file available for transfer to a dial list directory on the Meeting Exchange server. To enable this feature, you must configure a directory on the CRS server and also configure a scheduled job to transfer the file to the Meeting Exchange server. For more information, see Configuring blast dial on page 96.

16 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Chapter 2: Meeting Exchange checklist


This chapter lists the tasks that you must perform in order to install, configure, and administer Avaya Meeting Exchange 5.2. This list is an overview of the processes involved in deploying Meeting Exchange in your customer network. Use it as a guide while you perform the tasks in the specified order. Table 1: Overview of Meeting Exchange Tasks Description Insert the Meeting Exchange CD and restart the application server. Connect a laptop to a dedicated services port or connect a screen and keyboard directly to the server. Install the Meeting Exchange 5.2 software. Obtain passwords from your Avaya Support Representative. Configure the customers network IP information. Check if all processes are up and running. Configure the system timezone. Configure the number of licensed ports. Enable Meeting Exchange features. Configure call branding for a test call. Make a test call. Install Avaya Bridge Talk 5.2. Configure server resources. Configure server logins. More Information Introducing the stages of the installation on page 28 Accessing the server on page 28 3

Installing Meeting Exchange on page 29 Accessing the software on page 32 Customizing the server IP on page 33 Checking if all process are up and running on page 37 Configuring the system timezone on page 38 Configuring the number of licensed ports on page 39 Enabling features on page 39 Configuring call branding on page 40 Making a call on page 48 Installing Bridge Talk on page 52 Configuring server resources on page 52
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Configuring server logins on page 53 Creating sign-ins on page 69 1 of 3

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Meeting Exchange checklist

Table 1: Overview of Meeting Exchange Tasks (continued) Description Configure SNMP. Configure automatic backups. Match Meeting Exchange to the speed of your network. Customize the Meeting Exchange properties to suit your requirements. More Information Configuring SNMP on page 54 Configuring automatic backups on page 54 Matching Meeting Exchange to the speed of the network on page 58
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Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59 Finding parameters by name on page 265

Customize the Scheduler Utility. Obtain the telephone numbers which the customer intends to use for conferencing. Configure how Meeting Exchange handles these telephone numbers.

Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62 Obtaining conference telephone numbers on page 86
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Configuring Meeting Exchange number collection on page 86 Configuring Meeting Exchange to handle a number it does not recognize on page 86 Configuring the telephone number branding on page 87

If you intend to use them in your deployment, configure reservation groups at this point. Configure how Meeting Exchange converts telephone numbers to Uniform Resource Identifiers (URIs). Connect Meeting Exchange to the customers network for in-service use.

Configuring reservation groups on page 88 Configuring dialing patterns on page 89

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Connecting directly to Communication Manager on page 157 Connecting to an SES proxy on page 163 Connecting to AudioCodes on page 172

If you intend to use them in your deployment, configure dial lists. If you intend to use them in your deployment, configure PIN lists.

Configuring blast dial lists on page 95 Configuring PINs on page 129 2 of 3

18 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Table 1: Overview of Meeting Exchange Tasks (continued) Description If you intend to use the conference recording feature in your deployment, configure record and playback. If you require any changes to the default audio messages, make these changes. If you have specific requirements for localization, configure your required languages. If your deployment requires enhanced security, configure these settings. More Information Configuring recording on page 137 3

Configuring audio messages on page 147 Configuring languages on page 143

Configuring security features on page 183 3 of 3

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Meeting Exchange checklist

20 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Chapter 3: Working with an electronic preinstallation worksheet


To facilitate configuration of settings for the conferencing server, an electronic preinstallation worksheet or EPW is included with the software installation. After you install the Linux and Meeting Exchange software on your server, use SCP to copy the EPW to your PC. Configure the settings for your conferencing server and download the completed EPW to the conferencing server. Tip:
Tip:

Use the EPW only for a new install, not for an upgrade. Obtaining a copy of the EPW Configuring the EPW Loading the EPW Verifying SNMP trap information using the EPW

This section contains the following sections:


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Obtaining a copy of the EPW


To obtain a copy of the EPW: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid craft password. 2. Go to /usr/dcb/bin/mx_epw 3. Open a WinSCP session on your PC. 4. Using SCP, copy the EPW_MX.xls file to /home/craft

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Working with an electronic preinstallation worksheet

Configuring the EPW


Open the worksheet on your PC and enter specifics about your conferencing server by paging through the tabs at the bottom of the page. You will need information for the following pages shown in Table 2. Table 2: EPW Settings EPW Page Intro Status Description Provides description of EPW Quick reference to determine completion status of each EPW page Overview of items needed for software install Enter server names and IP Addresses Information Cross Reference Read-only Read-only

Checklist Usage Platform Information NFS Config Server

Read-only Customizing the server IP on page 33 If the conferencing server does not use NTP, provide an IP address of 0.0.0.0 in this field.

Details for setting up an NFS server for audio files

Server Configuration Parameters SNMP Parameters

Configuring the system settings on page 75 The SNMP parameters are: Product ID Thresholds: - Reserved Port Pool Usage Lower Alarm - Reserved Port Pool Usage Upper Alarm - Unreserved Port Pool Usage Lower Alarm - Unreserved Port Pool Usage Upper Alarm All port pool usage thresholds are optional. For more information, see Introducing SNMP on page 201.

Media Server Runtime Parameters

Configuring the media settings on page 76 1 of 2

22 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Configuring the EPW

Table 2: EPW Settings (continued) EPW Page Description Media Server Interface Configuration Video Conferencing - System Parameters Process Configuration Parameters System Scheduler System Configuration Scheduler Settings Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59 For more information, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com. A short note about sign-ins on page 69 Save your changes. on page 80 Information Cross Reference

Sign-in

Maintenance, Operator and Scheduler sign-in configuration Application server failover utility

mxmonitor/ chdbased SIP

Connecting Meeting Exchange to your network on page 157

SIP Proxy Configuration URI to Telephone Number Configuration Telephone Number to URI Configuration SNMP Configure IP for SNMP trap receivers

Proxy Address with which to register Configuring dialing patterns on page 89 Configuring dialing patterns on page 89 The configurable settings are: IP Address Port Number (Optional) Community String (Optional) SNMP Device Type (Optional) For more information, see Verifying SNMP trap information using the EPW on page 24 2 of 2

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Working with an electronic preinstallation worksheet

Loading the EPW


Once you have configured all the settings in the EPW, download the spreadsheet to your conferencing server. 1. Follow steps 1 through 6 in Obtaining a copy of the EPW on page 21. 2. Copy the completed EPW from your PC to /home/craft on the conferencing server. 3. Close your WinSCP session. 4. Log in to the server as a superuser. 5. Copy the new file from dcbguest to /usr/dcb/bin/mx_epw. 6. Stop the server. service mx-bridge stop 7. Run the utility. ./run_mx_epw.sh <Excel_spreadsheet_name> 8. Verify the installation in the generated log file at: /var/disk/logs/run_mx_epw.log. 9. If you are using SNMP, run the commands shown in Verifying SNMP trap information using the EPW on page 24. 10. Reboot the server to install the new configurations.

Verifying SNMP trap information using the EPW


The EPW utility modifies a SQL script, /usr/ipcb/config/mxalarms.postgres.sql, which is then used to populate the trap destination information into the snmptrapreceiver table in the Core Services database. To verify that the SNMP trap information has been populated to postgres, execute the following commands after running the EPW utility: su postgres At the bash prompt, enter: psql coreservices -f /usr/ipcb/config/mxalarms.postgres.sql This command will execute the /usr/ipcb/config/mxalarms.postgres.sql command which will populate the snmptrapreceivers table. To see the configured SNMP trap services, at the bash prompt, enter: psql coreservices

24 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Verifying SNMP trap information using the EPW

At the coreservices # prompt, enter: select * from snmptrapreceiver; Tip:


Tip:

Verify that you have included the semicolon at the end of the command.

This will return the information for the SNMP trap server that has been set up for your system. For more information on SNMP, see Introducing SNMP on page 201.

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Working with an electronic preinstallation worksheet

26 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Chapter 4: Installing Meeting Exchange software


This chapter describes how to install the Meeting Exchange software. This chapter also describes how to install the Linux operating system, which is required by Meeting Exchange. The operating system is on the same CD as the Meeting Exchange software. Typically, Avaya installs the Meeting Exchange software on the IBM 3550 M2 before they ship it to the customer. However, Avaya recognizes that many customers re-install the Meeting Exchange software in order to configure it to suit their network environment. Avaya recommends that customers engage with their Avaya Support Representative for assistance if they choose to re-install. This chapter contains the following sections:
l l l l l l

Introducing this chapter Introducing the stages of the installation Accessing the server Installing Meeting Exchange Accessing the software Configuring and testing the installation Note: This chapter refers to the IBM X3550 M2 as "the server".

Note:

Introducing this chapter


There are two routes through this chapter.
l

The first route is for customers who decide to re-install the Meeting Exchange software when the server arrives on their site. During this re-installation, these customers configure the IP address of the server as it will be referenced on their LAN. If you choose this route, begin with the steps in Installing Meeting Exchange on page 29 and continue through the chapter. The second route is for customers who decide not to re-install the Meeting Exchange software when the server arrives on their site. These customers accept the Avaya default installation. These customers must run some scripts to configure the IP address of the server as it will be referenced on their LAN. If you choose this route, begin with the steps in Accessing the software on page 32 and continue through the chapter.

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Note:

Note: You can also use this chapter as a guide in the unlikely event that you have to re-install the Meeting Exchange software at any time.

Introducing the stages of the installation


There are a number of stages involved in the installation of Meeting Exchange. Once you insert the CD that contains the Meeting Exchange software and provide a number of configuration settings, the server automatically performs the installation and you can simply monitor the progress of the installation. The installation can take up to 40 minutes to complete.

!
Important:

Important: When you re-install Meeting Exchange, you delete all previous configurations, conferences, IP information, parameters, and billing information.

The stages below simply provide an overview of the installation phases. Do not follow the stages as if they were the only required steps. Here are the main stages:
l l l l l l

Insert the CD that contains the Meeting Exchange software Restart the server Connect a screen and keyboard directly to the server Configure IP connectivity between the screen/keyboard and the server Configure the date and time Configure the ethernet settings - The server copies the files from the CD - The server ejects the CD - The server automatically reboots - The server configures the Meeting Exchange software - The server outputs a verfication string to demonstrate that the installation has been successful

Accessing the server


During the installation, the server should not be connected to the customers corporate network. During this time, you can access the server by connecting a screen and keyboard directly to the server.

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Installing Meeting Exchange

Avaya shipped previous releases of Meeting Exchange on a Dell 1950 server. On the Dell 1950 server, there was a services port. The services port is not available on the IBM 3550 M2. It is important to note that on the IBM 3550 M2, eth1 is not available. In previous releases of Meeting Exchange on the Dell 1950 server, eth1 was the service port. On the IBM 3550 M2, eth3 defaults to the service port. As part of the installation process, you configure the server IP settings. After the installation, the server is connected to the corporate network. After the installation, you can access the server using your network LAN.

Installing Meeting Exchange


During this stage, you can access the server directly. Once you complete the installation, you must access the server using the secure shell (SSH) protocol. 1. Insert the CD that contains the Meeting Exchange software into the CD drive on the server. 2. Restart the server. This can take up to five minutes. When the server restarts, it displays the following message: Default is auto. Boot: Press enter 3. Press the Enter key. The software loads. When the software finishes loading, it displays the following message: Press enter to activate this console. 4. Press the Enter key. The server displays the first installation screen, called Warning - Format Disk Warning. For more information, see Figure 1. Figure 1: Warning - Format Disk - Warning Screen

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5. Select Yes on this screen. The server displays the Select Server Type screen. On the Select Server Type screen, the IBM 3550 M2 may not be listed. 6. If the IBM 3550 M2 is not listed, select the Unknown option. Tip:
Tip:

Use the Tab keys to navigate through the fields. Use the space bar to select a field. When you have made your selection, navigate to OK and press the Enter/ Return key. The server displays the What Do You Want To Do screen. For more information, see Figure 2.

Figure 2: What Do You Want To Do Screen

7. Select Install Meeting Exchange X.X.X.X and select OK. The server displays the Date/Time Initialization screen. For more information, see Figure 3. Figure 3: Date/Time Initialization Screen

8. Configure the date, year, time, and timezone.

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Installing Meeting Exchange

9. Enter the IP address of the NTP server that manages the time sychronization for your corporate network. 10. Select OK. The server displays the Configure Network Information screen. 11. Enter the configuration information. Table 3 describes each of the fields on the Configure Network Information screen. Table 3: Configure Network Information Screen Field Hostname DNS Domain DNS Server eth0 eth1 eth2 eth3 Description Enter the hostname of the server as it will be referenced on your LAN. Enter the fully qualified domain name of the server as it will be referenced on your LAN. Enter the IP address of the server as it will be referenced on your LAN. Enter the IP address and Subnet Mask for your LAN. Ensure that the Enable field has an X. Avaya provides these ethernet ports for network configurations with enhanced redundancy. At this point, you do not need to enter any information in these fields. This is the services port. It is pre-populated with the services IP address. It is enabled. Do not make any changes to this field.

When you complete this screen, the server formats the server drives. The server copies the files from the CD. These files include all the files that are necessary for Meeting Exchange operation, such as RPM files. This process can take up to 10 minutes. The server ejects the CD. The server reboots. The server runs a number of configuration scripts in order to unpackage the installation files that it copied from the CD. This process can take up to 30 minutes. Once this process is complete, you can no longer access the server using the Telnet protocol. You must access the server using the secure shell (SSH) protocol. 12. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user.

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Note:

Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid craft password. 13. Navigate to /var/disk/logs and validate that the install is complete by monitoring the S94mx-runOnce* file for the appearance of the string MeetingExchange Server configured successfully. For more information, see Figure 4.

Figure 4: S94mx-runOnce* File

Accessing the software


At this point, you can access the Meeting Exchange software. Avaya provides four levels of access to the software. For more information about the levels of access, see Creating sign-ins to Meeting Exchange on page 68. Alternatively, contact your Avaya Support Representative for more information about logins and passwords.

Configuring and testing the installation


Before you start using Meeting Exchange, you must perform a number of configuration and verification tasks, as follows:
l l l

Customizing the server IP Checking if all process are up and running Configuring the system timezone

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l l l l l l l l l

Configuring the number of licensed ports Enabling features Configuring call branding Making a call Installing Bridge Talk Configuring server resources Configuring server logins Configuring SNMP Configuring automatic backups If you have re-installed the software after the server arrived on site, you can proceed to Checking if all process are up and running on page 37. If you have not re-installed the software after the server arrived on site, you must run some scripts to configure the IP address of the server as it will be referenced on your LAN. You should proceed to Customizing the server IP on page 33 before Checking if all process are up and running on page 37.

As described in Introducing this chapter on page 27:


l

Customizing the server IP


When Avaya ships the server to the customer site, they configure it with a default IP address. This IP address is identical in all Meeting Exchange servers that they ship. You must configure a new server IP address so that you can reference the server on your LAN. You can also add the details of the NTP server that manages the time sychronization for your corporate network. If you have just re-installed all the Meeting Exchange software, in accordance with Installing Meeting Exchange on page 29, you will not need to customize the IP because you have already performed that step. However, you may want to use some of the scripts to customize other details. Avaya provide the mx-ipChange.sh script to manage the process of customizing Meeting Exchange server network information. This script can modify the IP address, host name, domain name, netmask, gateway NTP, and the DNS of the server. To run this script: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as sroot user or, if you cannot access it, you can connect directly to the server.

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Note:

Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid sroot password. The sroot login provides a higher level of access to the server than the craft login. 2. Navigate to /usr/dcb/bin and run the mx-ipChange.sh script. For more information, see Figure 5.

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Configuring and testing the installation

Figure 5: Syntax of mx-ipChange.sh mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: mx-ipChange.sh: Current customer LAN configuration is: Host name Domain name IP_address Netmask Gateway Network Time Server(s) Domain Name Server(s) Domain Search List NIC bonding state NIC device = aveoeight = usae.avaya.com = 135.35.93.118 = 255.255.255.0 = 135.35.93.1 = ntp.usae.avaya.com = 135.35.93.5 = usae.avaya.com = enabled = bond0 Type "Ctrl-C" within 10 seconds to terminate this procedure. =========================================== Additional warnings will be issued prior to applying changes and prior to rebooting. A system reboot is required to update the conferencing bridge IP configuration. ========================================== NOTICE: SYSTEM REBOOT REQUIRED

Host name (default="aveoeight"). Enter h for help, q to quit:

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----At this point, you can enter the new host name---Host name (default="aveoeight"). Enter h for help, q to quit: Domain name (default="usae.avaya.com"). Enter h for help, q to quit: usae.avaya.com Enter IP address 1 of 1 for New IP address : 135.35.93.119 Enter IP address 1 of 1 for New subnet mask : 255.255.255.0 Enter IP address 1 of 1 for New gateway address : 135.35.93.1 Multiple query. Type return if you have fewer addresses to enter Enter IP address 1 of 3 for Network Time Servers: ntp.1.net Enter IP address 2 of 3 for Network Time Servers: ntp.2.net Enter IP address 3 of 3 for Network Time Servers: netntp.3.net Multiple query. Type return if you have fewer addresses to enter Enter IP address 1 of 3 for DNS servers Enter IP address 2 of 3 for DNS servers DNS search domains (eg: yours.net mine.net) : 192.168.1.12 : : usae.avaya.com

/usr/dcb/bin/mx-ipChange.sh: 10 second delay before writing new configuration. /usr/dcb/bin/mx-ipChange.sh: quit: Return to continue or anything to

3. At the end, the script performs an automatic reboot to complete the changes. 4. Validate the changes by accessing the server using the LAN: a. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. b. Enter the command: su - sroot c. Run the following command to display the hostname: hostname

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Configuring and testing the installation

d. Run the following command to display the IP address: cat /etc/hosts | grep <hostname> e. Run the following command to view the default gateway and and subnet mask: netstat rn

Checking if all process are up and running


At this point, Avaya recommends running a command to check if all processes are up and running. You can do this using a command called Digital Conferencing Bridge Process Status. (DCBPS). 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Enter the command: su - sroot 3. Run this command: dcbps This server returns a list of the processes that are up and running. See Figure 6 for more information. Figure 6: DCBPS Command Results

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Configuring the system timezone


Although you have already configured an NTP server, you must also set the server timezone for the PostgreSQL database. PostgreSQL is the object-relational database management system (ORDBMS) that Avaya uses in Meeting Exchange. It is a free and open-source program. 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Enter the command: su - sroot 3. Navigate to /usr/dcb/bin and run the following command: tzset 4. Enter 0 for a list of all supported timezones. For more information, see Figure 7. Figure 7: Tzset Command

5. Enter the number of the timezone that you wish to configure. 6. Reboot the server using the following method, which Avaya recommends: a. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbmaint. b. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Re-initialization. c. Select Y at the confirmation. d. Press the Enter/Return key. The server reboots and implements the change. 7. Once the server has rebooted, open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user.

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8. Enter the command: su - sroot 9. Navigate to /usr/dcb/bin. 10. Verify the timezone by using the echo command to display the current timezone: echo $TZ :US/Eastern As an aside, if you want to view the current system time that the server is using: a. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin. b. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select System Date/Time and verify the time and date information.

Configuring the number of licensed ports


The number of licensed ports is the number of telephone lines that the server can support at any time. If a customer buys more ports, they can support a larger number of simultaneous conferences and conference participants. Note: Contact your Avaya Support Representative for more information on how to configure the number of licensed ports.

Note:

Enabling features
Meeting Exchange ships with a large number of features. You can enable certain features and disable others, depending on your requirements. You must restart the server if you make any changes to the feature list. For example, Avaya offers a feature called overbooking. The overbooking feature increases the available ports by providing a pool of additional virtual ports. These virtual ports are available for reserved conference bookings. This functionality ensures that customers can maximize the use of their conferencing system by allowing for the fact that in many cases, full conference attendance does not occur. You can enable or disable this feature and many other optional features. For more information on overbooking, see Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62. Tip:
Tip:

Feature List on page 351 describes the Meeting Exchange features.

You also have the option of enabling or disabling these features at a later date.

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To configure the feature lists: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an sroot user. 2. Navigate to /usr/dcb/bin and run the following command: featcfg The server lists the features and displayed their status as installed or not installed.
l

To display the disabled features: featcfg | grep "Not Installed" To display the enabled features: featcfg | grep -v "Not Installed" To enable a feature: featcfg +<feature name> To disable a feature: featcfg -<feature name>

3. Reboot the server using the following method, which Avaya recommends: a. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbmaint. b. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Re-initialization. c. Select Yes at the confirmation. d. Press the Enter/Return key. The server reboots and implements the change. e. Once the server reboots, log in to Meeting Exchange again as dcbmaint.

Configuring call branding


Call branding is a feature that enables you to configure the participants conference experience, based on the telephone number that they use to dial Meeting Exchange. This section describes how to configure this feature in order to enable you to make a very basic test call to the conferencing server. It contains the following sections:
l l l l l l

Introducing call branding Defining the DNIS size Listing all the entries Listing a single entry Adding a DNIS Deleting a DNIS

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l l

Modifying a DNIS Displaying help

For more detailed information on call branding, including instructions on how to configure this feature for your customer needs, see Branding the customer experience on page 85.

Introducing call branding


When conference participants dial the server to enter their conference, the server plays them a series of audio prompts. Avaya provides customers with the flexibiity to configure up to 30000 different telephone numbers that will all dial into the same server. Customers can link customized audio prompts with each of these different telephone numbers. For the customized audio prompts, Meeting Exchange supports up to 21 languages. Customers can also link different call flows with each of these different telephone numbers. These telephone numbers are called Direct Dial Inward (DDIs) or Dialed Number Identification Service (DNISs). A call flow refers to the sequential experience of the conference participant as they dial into a conference or listen back to a conference recording. Avaya also allows customers to limit the length of the DDI which Meeting Exchange processes. For example, if customers use the telephone numbers 1234001, 1234002, 1234003, 1234004, and so on, you can configure Meeting Exchange to read the only the digits that vary. Meeting Exchange does not need to process all digits. The number of digits that you configure to be processed by Meeting Exchange is called the DNIS size. The configuration of processing preferences such as limiting the DNIS size and linking various call flows is called call branding. Call branding occurs when Meeting Exchange collects the digits that the participant dials, matches them to an entry in a call branding table, then processes the call in accordance with with the instructions that you have configured in that call branding table. To configure call branding, Avaya provides a command line utility, called cbutil. cbutil enables you to assign a specific annunciator message, line name, company name, system function, reservation group, and audio prompt sets to a maximum of 5000 DNIS patterns. You must ensure that the final entry in the call branding table is the wild card entry, which is ????. If Meeting Exchange collects a DNIS that is not listed in the table, it processes the call based on the instructions that you have configured in this entry. When the a caller first uses a DNIS, Meeting Exchange checks the cbutil file. Meeting Exchange then routes the call in accordance with the configuration settings for that DNIS. After this initial check, Meeting Exchange caches the cbutil routing instructions in the shared memory database. Caching the instructions means that Meeting Exchange avoids having to check cbutil each time.

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Table 4 describes each of the variables in the call branding table. Table 4: Explanation of the DNIS variables Variable <dnis> Explanation Specifies the digit pattern of the DNIS. In certain regions, this is known as Direct Dial Inward (DDIs). You can specify the number of digits that Meeting Exchange collects using the Digit Parameters configuration option. For more information see Call Routing configuration properties on page 288. Specifies the Reservation Group. Meeting Exchange supports up to 999 Reservation Groups. The Reservation Groups feature allows operators to schedule multiple conferences with the same conference code at the same time. Each DDI is associated with a specific Reservation Group. For more information on Reservation Groups, see Configuring reservation groups on page 88. The annunciator message, listed by number, that Meeting Exchange plays to the participant before it processes the call in accordance with the instructions that you have configured for this entry. For more information on configuring messages, see Configuring audio messages on page 147. The number of the audio prompt set, from 0 to 20, that Meeting Exchange uses to play the annunciator messages. Meeting Exchange supports up to 21 languages. Specifies if Meeting Exchange plays the audio prompt set from the language that the moderator or operator has assigned to the conference or if it plays the audio prompt set from the language that you have configured, using cbutil, for this entry. The valid values are Y and N. 1 of 4

<rg>

<msg>

<ps>

<ucps>

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Table 4: Explanation of the DNIS variables (continued) Variable <func> Explanation Specifies how Meeting Exchange processes a call that matches the incoming digits. The valid values are: ENTER Meeting Exchange places the call in the Enter Queue. The Enter Queue is where participants await the attention of an operator. This is the most common choice for a conference in Attended Mode. DIRECT Meeting Exchange places the call directly in a conference. This a common choice for unattended calls. This function does not support flexflow conferences. If you require the DNIS to dial a flexflow conference, configure this value to FLEX. SCAN Meeting Exchange plays an annunciator message to prompt the participant to enter the passcode for the conference. This a common choice for unattended calls. HANGUP Meeting Exchange ends the call. AUTOVL This field is reserved for a multisite conference. MultiSite refers to a network of Conference Reservation Servers (CRSs) located in different geographical locations. FLEX Meeting Exchange identifies the call as a Flexflow call. A flexflow conference is a specific type of demand conference. In flexflow conferences, all call routing is based on the conferee passcode. In addition to the conferee passcode, moderators enter a moderator passcode, which grants access to a moderator-specific menu. PLAYBACK Meeting Exchange routes the call to the repository of conference recordings. Meeting Exchange prompts the User for a conference reference number and a passcode and plays the appropriate conference recording, if it is available. For more information, see Configuring the playback call flow on page 140. 2 of 4

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Table 4: Explanation of the DNIS variables (continued) Variable -o <of> Explanation Specifies how Meeting Exchange deals with failed actions that the participant makes, such as entering an incorrect passcode. Meeting Exchange places the participant in the Enter Queue (ENTER) or ends the call (HANGUP) or alternatively applies the Conference Scheduler ENTER or HANGUP values (DEFAULT). The default is HANGUP. This field is not valid if you set the function field to ENTER, HANGUP, or DIRECT. If you do not configure a value for this setting or configure DEFAULT, Meeting Exchange uses the failure instructions that you have configured using the Conference Scheduler application. The Conference Scheduler application is a command line utility that Avaya provides to enable you to configure a large number of settings for conferences, such as how long to retain conference records and the number of available lines for on-demand conferences. You can access the Conference Scheduler application by logging into Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin and navigating to System Administrator Main Menu > Configure Scheduler > Invalid Code. For more information on the Conference Scheduler application, see Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62. The values that you configure using the Conference Scheduler application are global values. Meeting Exchange applies Conference Scheduler values to all conferences unless you configure a value using cbutil. A cbutil value of ENTER or HANGUP will override the Conference Scheduler values. On the other hand, a cbutil value of DEFAULT will apply the Conference Scheduler values. Another value, outside of cbutil, also exerts an influence over the functionality of this variable. That value is called Security Code Error3 and you can configure it by logging into Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin and navigating to System Administrator Main Menu > Configurations > Voice Message Configuration. For this cbutil value to operate successfully, you must set Security Code Error3 to Tone. If you set it to any value other than Tone, Meeting Exchange uses the Invalid Code property that you have set in the Conference Scheduler command line utility. An optional line name that you can associate with the DNIS. The name can contain up to 20 characters. Meeting Exchange displays this name to the operator and also displays it in call and conference detail records (CDRs and CODRS). This optional line name is especially useful for calls destined for the Enter Queue because it helps operators to provide custom greetings. The default is blank. If you leave this field as blank and you have configured SCAN or FLEX in the func field, Meeting Exchange uses this field to display the last passcode that the participant enters. An optional company name to associate with the DNIS. The name can contain up to 20 characters. Meeting Exchange displays this name to the operator and also displays it in call and conference detail records (CDRs and CODRS). The default is blank. 3 of 4

-l <"ln">

-c <"cn">

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Table 4: Explanation of the DNIS variables (continued) Variable -crs <n> Explanation An optional starting Bridge Talk conference room assigned to this DNIS. This setting along with conference room end sets a range of rooms. When callers call the DNIS, Meeting Exchange places them into the conference room. Operators, using Bridge Talk, can see the callers in the conference room dialog. Customers can use this feature to assign responsibility for specific conference rooms to specific operators. Customers can also use this feature, along with -l <"ln"> and -c <"cn"> to ensure that operators customize the conferencing experience for callers. An optional ending Bridge Talk conference room assigned to this DNIS. This setting along with conference room start sets a range of rooms. An optional setting that is only used with the DIRECT function. When you configure the DIRECT call flow in the <func> column, Meeting Exchange places the call directly in a conference. Using the CC column, you can enter a conference code for use with a DIRECT call flow. For example, consider a deployment of cbutil with the following values: DNIS: 1234 Function: DIRECT Conference Code: 5678 When a caller dials in with DNIS 1234, Meeting Exchange places them in a conference with the passcode 5678. Using this feature, it is possible to have any number of DIRECT call branding entries putting callers into the same conference. If you do not configure the CC field, Meeting Exchange places a caller who dials in with DNIS 1234 into a conference that has the passcode 1234. This passcode can be a moderator passcode, a conferee passcode, or a co-chair passcode, so at most, Meeting Exchange can route three DIRECT call branding entries to a given conference. The CC column eliminates this restriction. This feature is sometimes called Unlimited DDIs. 4 of 4

-cre <n> -cc <n>

Defining the DNIS size


Avaya does not recommend defining the DNIS size on an operational conferencing system because the update could impact live conferences. To define the DNIS size, you must configure two separate files:
l l

You must define the DNIS size in the call branding table using cbutil. You must also define the DNIS size in a Call Routing Configuration parameter, called Digit Parameters.

The following steps describe these two configuration tasks:

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1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Define the DNIS size as follows To define the DNIS size as 4: cbutil dnissize 4 3. Log in as a dcbadmin User to access the System Administrator Main Menu. 4. Navigate to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Call Routing Configuration > Digit Parameters. 5. Define the value of Digit Parameters to ensure that it matches the value of dnissize in cbutil.

Listing all the entries


To list all the entries in the call routing table: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Count the entries, as follows: cbutil count Meeting Exchange displays the number of entries in the call routing table. If the count is less than 2000, proceed to step If the count is greater than 2000, set the ROW_SET_MAX environmental variable to the count value plus 1: If you are using the sh/ksh/bash shell, the command should be: export ROW_SET_MAX=<count value +1> In you are using the csh/tcsh shell, the command should be: setenv ROW_SET_MAX <count value +1> Note: There is no = in the setenv version. Note: By default, when Avaya ships Meeting Exchange, the shell for the sroot, craft, and dcbguest log-ins is the bash shell. 3. Run this command: cbutil list <number of entries to list per page> By default, Meeting Exchange displays 25 entries per page. 4. Press ENTER to view the next page of entries.

Note:

Note:

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Listing a single entry


To list a single call routing entry: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Run this command: cbutil lookup <dnis>

Adding a DNIS
To add a single call routing entry: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Run the following command: cbutil add <dnis> <rg> <msg> <ps> <ucps> <func> [-o <of> -l <ln> -c <cn> -crs <n> -cre <n>] See Table 4 for more information on the call routing variables.

Deleting a DNIS
To delete a single call routing entry: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Run the following command: cbutil remove <dnis>

Modifying a DNIS
To modify a single call routing entry: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Run the following command: cbutil update <dnis> <rg> <msg> <ps> <ucps> <func> [-o <of> -l <ln> -c <cn> -crs <n> -cre <n>] See Table 4 for more information on the call routing variables.

Displaying help
To display help: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user.

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2. Run this command to display a list of all supported commands, cbutil 3. Run the -help parameter with the command name to display help for a specific command. For example, to display help for the Add command: cbutil add -help Tip:
Tip:

For more information on configuring cbutil for an in-service deployment, see Configuring the telephone number branding on page 87.

Making a call
To make a call to the server, download a SIP softphone from the Avaya Website. If you already have a SIP softphone installed, it is important to uninstall it before you install the Avaya SIP softphone. The Avaya SIP softphone is called one-X Desktop Edition. For more information about Avaya one-X Desktop Edition, including software downloads and supporting documentation, see Avaya one-X Desktop Edition. At this stage of the installation, you can connect the Avaya one-X Desktop Edition directly to the Meeting Exchange server. Later in the installation, when you configure the Avaya Aura Telephony Server or other interoperability requirements, you will loose this direct connectivity between the Avaya one-X Desktop Edition and the Meeting Exchange server. It is important to note that this first call is simply a check to clarify that the server can receive calls. It is a basic test. The role of this test is to enable you to rule out basic connectivity as an issue if you run into problems later in the installation or configuration. The settings that you configure to enable this test call are not the settings that your deployment will use when the installation is complete. It is also important to note that if you are installing a S6800 or a Distributed S6200, this test call does not validate your installation. For S6800 and Distributed S6200 deployments, you must complete all configuration steps in order to place an effective test call. The reason that the test call does not validate installations of S6800 or Distributed S6200 is that when Avaya ships the Meeting Exchange solution, they configure it for an S6200 deployment, by default. To make a call: 1. Download and install the Avaya one-X Desktop. On the Installation Wizard, there is no need to select Enable Bluetooth Integration. 2. Once the installation completes, select the Desktop dashboard. Settings button on the Avaya one-X

3. At this stage, there is no need to configure most of the settings. You can accept the default values. However, the following settings are important:

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On the Account panel, enter a name and an e-mail address. At this stage, the server does not authenticate these details so you can enter any name and any e-mail address.

Figure 8: Avaya one-X Desktop Account Panel

On the Servers panel, select Use Peer-to-Peer Communication.

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Installing Meeting Exchange software

Figure 9: Avaya one-X Desktop Servers Panel

On the Profile panel, create a new profile. Regardless of your connection, ensure that you select Local Area Network from the Connection drop-down list. This selection ensures that the server uses the G.711 codec, which Meeting Exchange supports.

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Configuring and testing the installation

Figure 10: Avaya one-X Desktop Profile Panel

Advanced: On the Advanced panel, select Use UDP.

Figure 11: Avaya one-X Desktop Advanced Panel

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4. Save the profile settings. 5. Restart Avaya one-X Desktop. To properly exit Avaya one-X Desktop, you must right-click and select Exit on the Avaya one-X Desktop icon in the system tray at the bottom right of your screen. 6. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 7. Run the following command: cbutil list For more information see, Configuring call branding on page 40. 8. Select a DNIS and make a note of it. 9. On the Avaya one-X Desktop dashboard, enter the DDI and Meeting Exchange server IP address in the Enter Name or Number field. Use the following syntax to make the call: <DDI>@<Meeting Exchange server IP address> Avaya one-X Desktop sends a SIP Invite to the Meeting Exchange server. If the call is successful, you should hear the default Welcome message audio prompt.

Installing Bridge Talk


Avaya Bridge Talk is a software application which presents a global view of the Meeting Exchange system. Avaya Bridge Talk enables operators to schedule conferences, record messages, and manage live conferences. The Bridge Talk installation wizard should be on the Meeting Exchange installation CD or in the Meeting Exchange installation folder. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for more information on how to download Avaya Bridge Talk. To complete the Bridge Talk installation and configuration, you must also perform two further tasks:
l l

Configuring server resources Configuring server logins

Once you complete these two tasks, you can use Avaya Bridge Talk. For more information on Bridge Talk, see Using Meeting Exchange, which is available on support.avaya.com.

Configuring server resources


On the Meeting Exchange server, you must configure Flexible Digital Auxiliary Port Interface (FDAPI) resources. An FDAPI resource is a permanant link between the Meeting Exchange server and an operator or an API connection. You must configure an FDAPI resource for each operator in your

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Configuring and testing the installation

deployment. You need an FDAPI resource for each concurrent operator. You must also configure an FDAPI resource for each API connection in your deployment. Many components of Meeting Exchange, such as the Avaya Client Registration Server, the Avaya Web Portal, or Avaya Bridge Talk, connect to the Meeting Exchange server using an API connection. You need an FDAPI resource for every application which uses an API connection to communicate with the Meeting Exchange server. FDAPI resources are similar, in concept, to telephone lines. FDAPI resources enable operators to manage the Meeting Exchange server, record conferences, play music files, and so on. Each FDAPI resource reduces the number of available conference telephone lines (ports). For example, if a customer purchases 500 ports and requires 10 FDAPI resources, the number of ports available for conferencing is 490. In a Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) deployment, FDAPI resources are phyical lines. In a Voice over IP (VoIP) deployment, FDAPI resources are virtual lines. To configure an FDAPI resource: 1. Combine the number of concurrent operators and the number of API connections in your deployment to calculate the number of FDAPI resources that you require. 2. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbmaint. 3. From the System Maintenance Main Menu, select FDAPI Configuration. 4. On the Flex-DAPI Configuration screen, enter the number of FDAPI resources that you require in the Operators field. 5. Navigate to ESC. 6. Select Y to save changes. 7. Restart the server.

Configuring server logins


As described in Configuring server resources on page 52, FDAPI resources are operators and API connections. For each of these operators and API connections, you must configure a login account on the Meeting Exchange server. This login account enables operators and Meeting Exchange components, using API connections, to communicate with the Meeting Exchange server. These login accounts are not Linux accounts. They simply enable Meeting Exchange access for operators and other Meeting Exchange components, such as the Avaya Client Registration Server, the Avaya Web Portal, or Avaya Bridge Talk. There are four levels of accounts. For more information on these four levels, see Creating sign-ins to Meeting Exchange on page 68. For API connections and operator channels, you can choose between any of four levels of access. To configure a login account: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbmaint. 2. From the System Maintenance Main Menu, select Administrator Menu.

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3. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Sign-in Management. 4. On the System Sign-in Management screen, configure the login accounts as required. For each account, you must enter:
l l l

A sign-in name Password Telephone Number

5. Navigate to ESC. 6. Select Y to save changes. 7. Restart the server.

Configuring SNMP
Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) is a system of alarms which monitors the performance of the server. These alarms are called traps. For a number of Meeting Exchange processes, you can configure a performance threshold and when that process exceeds this performance threshold, the server emits an SNMP trap. To enable SNMP functionality, you must:
l

Configure an SNMP trap destination IP address. This is the IP address to which the server sends the trap. You can also configure SNMP to create an alert e-mail or to automatically raise a support request. Provide the customer with the Meeting Exchange Management Information Base (MIB). This file is contained in the /usr/ipcb/config folder. The MIB defines the database rules that Avaya has developed for Meeting Exchange. Tip:

Tip:

For more information about SNMP, see Configuring alarms on page 201.

Configuring automatic backups


Meeting Exchange is pre-configured with a number of back-up scripts which automatically create back-up files for the various databases. These scripts require no configuration. However, one back-up file, called backup.sh requires manual configuration. backup.sh creates a large number of back-up files, such as call detail record files, billing files, and configuration files. Avaya recommends running this file at least once before you leave a customer site following the installation of the audio conferencing server.

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Configuring and testing the installation

backup.sh is located in the following folder. You must run the script from this location: /usr/dcb/bin backup.sh stores back-up files for 30 days in the following folder: /usr3/BACKUPS/autobackups

You can perform the following tasks:


l l

Viewing a list of the files that backup.sh supports Configuring backup.sh

Viewing a list of the files that backup.sh supports


You can follow these steps to view a log of the files that backup.sh supports. These steps do not refer to viewing the actual backed-up files. 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an sroot user. 2. Navigate to /usr/dcb/backup.log. You can view some of the files that are backed-up. Alternatively, you can use a command to view more details: tar -z -tvf <filename> | more

Configuring backup.sh
To configure backup.sh. 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an sroot user. 2. Using the crontab -e command, run backup.sh using the following syntax. This command requires a vi Editor. 00 02 * * * /usr/dcb/bin/backup.sh > /usr/dcb/backup.log In this example, the server will create a back-up at 02:00, every day (*), every week (*), every month (*). In other words, on a daily basis, at 02:00, the server will create a back-up. In this example, the command redirects the back-up files to another folder. Figure 12 shows this example. If you run the script more than once in a 24 hour period, it overwrites the previous log.

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Figure 12: Backup.sh

56 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Chapter 5: Configuring the Meeting Exchange application server


This chapter describes how to configure Meeting Exchange to fit the requirements of your network. It contains the following sections:
l l l l l

Tips for using this document Matching Meeting Exchange to the speed of the network Customizing Meeting Exchange properties Customizing the scheduler utility Creating sign-ins to Meeting Exchange Note: To successfully perform the steps described in this chapter, you must first install Meeting Exchange. For more information on how to install Meeting Exchange, see Installing Meeting Exchange software on page 27.

Note:

Tips for using this document


If you are configuring Meeting Exchange and require information, there are a couple of ways of locating the information you require:
l

Finding parameters by name on page 265 contains a detailed list of all configuration settings which you can configure within each of these menus. If you know the name of the parameter that you want to configure, you can use the Adobe Reader search option to locate a detailed description of each parameter. For example, search for the parameter name Annunciator Delay to find the information you require to specify the pause before Meeting Exchange plays a message to an incoming telephone line. Configuration task list on page 261 contains a list of Meeting Exchange configuration tasks. If you do not know the name of the parameter that you want to configure, you can use the Adobe Reader search option to locate the information you require. For example, search for a term such as play a message to find the information you require to specify the pause before Meeting Exchange plays a message to an incoming telephone line.

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Matching Meeting Exchange to the speed of the network


A customers network can be a megabit network or a gigabit network. It is important to know which type of network the customer is running because the network type impacts the data transmission speeds. When Avaya ships Meeting Exchange to a customer site, Avaya configure it to fit to a 100 megabit, full duplex network. This is the default setting. If the customers network is a gigabit network, you must change this configuration setting. Also, if a customer has more than 700 telephone lines with a single connection to the switch, you must change this configuration setting. It is likely that the Meeting Exchange server will drop calls if you do not change the default megabit setting in a customer site with over 700 ports connected with a single connection to the switch. Note: Avaya recommends a gigabit network for optimum performance. 1. Open a PuTTY session and log to the Meeting Exchange server as a craft user. PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid craft password. 2. Enter the command: su - sroot This command allocates more permissions. It requires a password. To obtain the sroot password, please contact your Avaya Support Representative. 3. Navigate to the following directory: cd /etc/sysconfig/network-scripts ls -ls ifcfg* 4. Edit the ETHTOOL_OPTS field in each of the following three files, which correspond to three ethernet ports: ifcfg-eth0 idcfg-eth2 ifcfg-eth3 In each of these files, for a gigabit network, the ETHTOOL_OPTS field should have the following value: ETHTOOL_OPTS="speed 1000 duplex full autoneg on" Note: In your deployment, you may not be using each of these ethernet ports, but Avaya recommends updating each of the files for consistency.

Note:

To change the default megabit interface to a gigabit interface:

Note:

58 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Customizing Meeting Exchange properties

5. In the customer network, ensure that the ports on the switch are also configured to match the settings on the Meeting Exchange server. In other words, ensure that the ports on the customer switch are set to gigabit, full duplex, with autonegotiation (autoneg) set to on. These settings ensure that the customer network can establish a link to the Meeting Exchange server. 6. Verify that there are no customizations in the rc.local file. The rc.local file is in the etc/rc.d folder on the Meeting Exchange server. Customers often use the rc.local file to implement some additional network customizations. If customers have added configurations to the rc.local file, these settings may override the settings in the ifcfg-eth0, ifcfg-eth2, and ifcfg-eth3 files. An example customization from an rc.local file: ethtool -s eth0 autoneg on 7. Reboot the server.

Customizing Meeting Exchange properties


This section describes how to customize the Meeting Exchange properties to match the customers requirements. Before you customize the conferencing properties, it is a good idea to enable or disable the conferencing features using the featcfg command. Avaya recommend configuring the featcfg features first because if you disable certain feature using featcfg, their corresponding configuration properties do not display in the Meeting Exchange System Configuration screens. For more information on using the featcfg command, see Feature List on page 351 and Enabling features on page 39. 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin to display the System Administration Main Menu. Figure 13 displays the System Administration Main Menu.

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Figure 13: System Administration Main Menu Screen

2. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Configurations. Figure 14: Configurations Screen

The Configurations screen provides you with an entry point for the customization of all of the conferencing properties.

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Customizing Meeting Exchange properties

3. Use the Configurations screen to customize the conferencing properties to match the customers requirements. Table 5 describes how Avaya has divided the conferencing features into a number of sections. To access these sections, you must access a sub-menu item on the Configurations screen. Table 5: Configuration Sections Menu Item Blast Dial Configuration Description Use the Blast Dial Configuration option to specify how Meeting Exchange processes blast dial calls. In a blast dial, the Meeting Exchange simultaneously dials an entire list of phone numbers to establish a conference. When conferees answer the call, the Meeting Exchange prompts them to press specific digits on their telephones to join the conference without operator assistance. Table 51 describes each of the Blast Dial Configuration options. Use the CDR Configuration option to specify the content and format for call details in the CDR reports that Meeting Exchange produces. Table 52 describes each of the CDR Configuration options. Use the CODR Configuration option to specify the content and format for call details in the CODR reports that Meeting Exchange produces. Table 53 describes each of the CODR Configuration options. Use the Call Routing Configuration option to specify how Meeting Exchange processes incoming calls based on DNIS and DDI parameters. To successfully customize the call routing feature, you must also configure the cbutil file. For more information on the cbutil file, see Configuring the telephone number branding on page 87. In addition, Table 54 describes each of the Call Routing options. Use the Operator Configuration option to specify a number of details for the operator lines. To successfully customize the operator lines, you must configure the number of lines that you require, using the FDAPI Configuration Menu. For more information about the FDAPI Configuration Menu, see Configuring server resources on page 52. In addition, Table 56 describes each of the Operator Configuration options. 1 of 2

CDR Configuration

CODR Configuration

Call Routing Configuration

Operator Configuration

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Table 5: Configuration Sections (continued) Menu Item Supervision Configuration Description Use the Supervision Configuration option to specify a number of details in relation to how Meeting Exchange handles disconnected lines. Use this menu also to specify a number of timing delays, such as the delay before Meeting Exchange plays an audio prompt to an incoming line. Table 57 describes each of the Supervision Configuration options. Use the System Configuration option to specify a large number of diverse Meeting Exchange settings. This is the largest menu within the Configurations screen. You can use it to configure properties, such as whether the system is able to allocate additional telephone ports or time conferences while they are in progress or whether participants can enter conferences earlier. Table 58 describes each of the System Configuration options. Use the Timed Assist Configuration option to establish time-based rules for delivering operator help to participants. Table 59 describes each of the Timed Assist Configuration options. Use the Voice Message Configuration option to specify whether Meeting Exchange plays a tone, a voice message, or both to: l Notify participants of conference events l Provide instructions for conference functions l Announce how much time is left in a conference For more information on audio messages, see Configuring audio messages on page 147. In addition, Table 60 describes each of the Voice Message Configuration options. Use the Warning Tone Configuration to specify how often warning tones sound during the last 15 minutes of an unattended conference to notify participants that the conference is about to end. 2 of 2

System Configuration

Timed Assist Configuration

Voice Message Configuration

Warning Tone Configuration

Customizing the scheduler utility


The Conference Scheduler application is a command line utility that Avaya provides to enable you to configure a large number of settings for conferences, such as how long to retain conference records and the number of available lines for on-demand conferences. You can

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Customizing the scheduler utility

access the Conference Scheduler application by logging into Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin and navigating to System Administrator Main Menu > Configure Scheduler. The values that you configure using the Conference Scheduler application are global values. An optional External Passcode Validation (EPV) feature enables Meeting Exchange to validate passcodes and Personal Identification codes (PIN codes) on an external server. With EPV enabled, you can integrate Meeting Exchange into a distributed audio conference infrastructure where you can use external servers to schedule conferences. In this configuration, you can store conference parameters on external databases. If you decide to implement a Meeting Exchange solution that involves EPV, you must disable the Conference Scheduler application. To disable the Conference Scheduler application, configure the Status parameter, as described in Table 6. To customize conference parameters: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin to display the System Administration Main Menu. 2. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Configure Scheduler. 3. Use the Configure Conference Scheduler screen to customize the conferencing properties to match the customers requirements. Table 6 describes the configuration settings. Table 6: Conference Scheduler Configuration Parameters Menu Item Group Name Status Description This is a non-editable field with the value schedule. Specifies whether the Conference Scheduler is used. l Enabled Meeting Exchange uses the conference scheduler values. l Disabled (default) Meeting Exchange does not use the conference scheduler values. When using EPV, always disable the conference scheduler values to prevent local schedules from being used. If you disable the Scheduler and are not using EPV, Meeting Exchange routes all calls to the ENTER queue. The Meeting Exchange response to participants who enter an invalid passcode. The Scan Time parameter specifies the allowed time. There are two values: l ENTER (default) The participant is placed in the Enter Conference to wait for operator assistance. l Hang-up The system disconnects the caller. 1 of 6

Invalid Code

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Table 6: Conference Scheduler Configuration Parameters (continued) Menu Item Timeout Description The Meeting Exchange response to participants who do not enter the digits within the time allowed. The Scan Time parameter specifies the allowed time. l ENTER (default) The participant is placed in the Enter Conference to wait for operator assistance. l Hang-up The system disconnects the caller. Callers using rotary style telephones cannot enter digits and consequently always time out. The Meeting Exchange response to participants who enter invalid passcodes for conferences that have been secured by a moderator. l Enter (default) The participant is placed in the Enter Conference to wait for operator assistance. l Hang-up The system disconnects the caller. Moderators press *7 on their telephone keypad to secure a conference. The Meeting Exchange response to participants who enter valid passcodes for conferences that already contain the specified maximum number of lines. l Enter (default) The participant is placed in the Enter Conference to wait for operator assistance. l Hang-up The system disconnects the caller. Operators specify the maximum number of lines when they schedule a conference. The Meeting Exchange response to participants who enter a valid code at the wrong time, for example by attempting to enter a conference too early or too late. l Enter (default) The participant is placed in the Enter Conference to wait for operator assistance. l Hang-up The system disconnects the caller. The number of seconds that Meeting Exchange scans for code digits entered by callers. The default is 10 seconds. The valid time range is between 5 to 20 seconds. Be sure to allow an adequate scan time for lengthy codes. Callers can press the pound key (#) after entering their code to immediately enter the conference without waiting for the full scan time to elapse. Specifies the number of times that Meeting Exchange prompts for a passcode. The possible values are 1, 2, or 3 (default) times. 2 of 6

Conference Secured

Max. Lines Reached

Invalid Time of Day

Scan Time

Scan Attempts

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Customizing the scheduler utility

Table 6: Conference Scheduler Configuration Parameters (continued) Menu Item Auto Hang-up Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange disconnects all lines when the conference duration expires. l Enabled Meeting Exchange disconnects all lines when a conference duration expires. All lines become immediately available. This feature is especially important in a deployment in which there are no operators. Another parameter, the Auto Extend Duration parameter enables moderators to extend their conferences up to 100 minutes beyond the specified end time. l Disabled (default) The system does not automatically disconnect all lines. For more information on the Auto End Duration parameter, see System configuration properties on page 294. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange plays warning tones to remind participants that conference time is about to expire. l Enabled Meeting Exchange plays warning tones before disconnecting conference lines. To play warning tones, you must enable the Auto Hang-up parameter. l Disabled (default) Meeting Exchange does not play warning tones before disconnecting conference lines. The frequency with which tones are sounded is specified by the Warning Tone Configuration menu. For more information, see Warning Tone configuration on page 313. Defines whether moderators can use their telephones to access an open line for dial out and add participants to an active unattended conference. This is useful for contacting participants who cannot dial into the conference. l Disabled (default) Moderators cannot dial out of secured or unsecured conferences. l Unsecured Unattended moderators of unsecured conferences can access free lines for dial out, if sufficient channels are available based on the conference reservation. l AllModerators can dial out for both secured and unsecured conferences. Note: This setting only applies to flexflow conferences. A flexflow conference is a specific type of demand conference. In flexflow conferences, all call routing is based on the conferee passcode. In addition to the conferee passcode, moderators enter a moderator passcode, which grants access to a moderator-specific menu. 3 of 6

Warning Tones

Originator Dial Out

Note:

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Table 6: Conference Scheduler Configuration Parameters (continued) Menu Item Automatic Security Codes Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange automatically assigns security codes to conferences. The values for this parameter are: l The number of digits for the code, between 7 and 16 Meeting Exchange automatically assigns both conferee and moderator passcodes to a conference when it is created. For example, if you enter 7, Meeting Exchange assigns unique 7-digit passcodes to conferences. Operators and moderators can modify the passcodes that Meeting Exchange assigns. l Disabled (default) conferee and moderator passcode fields remain blank. Operators and moderators must specify codes for conferences. Sets the number of weeks that Meeting Exchange retains conference records. l 1 to 52 (default) The number of the most recent weeks for which you want to retain conference records. For example, if you want to retain conference records from the last ten weeks, enter 10 for this parameter. l 0 Do not retain any records expired as of midnight of the previous day. For more information on conference reports, see Accessing reports using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu on page 107. Specifies the percentage of Meeting Exchange lines that operators and moderators can overbook for scheduled conferences. This parameter does not impact on-demand conferences. l 1% to 100% With overbooking, operators and moderators can reserve a percentage from 1% to 100% more than the maximum number of lines available for a given time period. Lines configured for operators, music, record/playback, or link lines are not included in the line count. For example, if your deployment of Meeting Exchange has 1000 lines available for scheduled conferences and you set this parameter for 10%, you can schedule 1100 lines. l 0 (default) Meeting Exchange allows infinite conference overbooking. l To view this parameter on the Configure Conference Scheduler screen, you must enable it using the featcfg function. For more information on featcfg, see Enabling features on page 39 and Feature List on page 351. 4 of 6

Conference Retention

Overbooking (%)

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Customizing the scheduler utility

Table 6: Conference Scheduler Configuration Parameters (continued) Menu Item On-Demand Pct (%) Description Specifies the percentage of Meeting Exchange lines available for on-demand conferences, which are unattended conferences that can be convened on an ad hoc, first-come, first-served basis. The remaining percentage of Meeting Exchange lines is designated for regularly scheduled conferences. The default is 0, which means that no lines are available for on-demand conferences. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange requires a conference name for each conference. Operators and moderators provide conference names when they schedule conferences. l Enabled Meeting Exchange requires a conference name. l Disabled (default) Meeting Exchange does not require a conference name. Defines the number of seconds, 3 20, that Meeting Exchange gives participants for entering a single DTMF digit. The default is 5. Note: This setting and the following settings with Flex in their title only apply to flexflow conferences. A flexflow conference is a specific type of demand conference. In flexflow conferences, all call routing is based on the conferee passcode. In addition to the conferee passcode, moderators enter a moderator passcode, which grants access to a moderator-specific menu.

Conf. Name Required

Flex Short Time

Note:

Flex Short Attempts Flex Long Time Flex Long Attempts Flex Minimum Dial Out Digits Flex Maximum Dial Out Digits

Specifies the number of attempts, 1 5, that Meeting Exchange gives participants for entering a single DTMF digit. The default is 3. Specifies the number of seconds, 560, that Meeting Exchange gives participants for entering a sequence of DTMF digits. The default is 40. Specifies the number of attempts, 13, that Meeting Exchange gives participants for entering a sequence of DTMF digits. The default is 1. Specifies the minimum number of digits that Meeting Exchange allows for a dial out. The default is 4, the maximum is 99. Specifies the maximum number of digits that Meeting Exchange allows for a dial out. The default is 4, the maximum is 99. 5 of 6

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Table 6: Conference Scheduler Configuration Parameters (continued) Menu Item Flex Leader Pin Modify Description Defines whether Meeting Exchange allows moderators to modify their moderator passcode using the DTMF commands on their telephone keypad. l Enabled (Default)The moderator can modify the moderator passcode by pressing 2 on a telephone keypad to access the Default Conference Options menu before the conference starts. l Disabled The moderator cannot modify the moderator passcode in the Default Conference Options menu before the conference starts. The minimum moderator passcode length is set to 4. The maximum length is set to 16. The audio prompt message that Meeting Exchange plays to moderators when they are modifying their moderator passcode refers to the minimum and maximum length values. NRP-Oper Timeout (Last Attempt) This setting does not apply to flexflow conferences. When Name Record/Playback is set to OPER in the conference scheduler, this setting specifies where Meeting Exchange places a participant who fails to press # after recording their name. l Conf (Default) Meeting Exchange places participants who record a name, but who do not press #, into the conference. l Enter Meeting Exchange places participants who record a name, but who do not press #, into the Enter queue. 6 of 6

Creating sign-ins to Meeting Exchange


A sign-in consists of a login name and a password created for a Bridge Talk user. The privilege level for a sign-in specifies which Bridge Talk resources that sign-in can use and what management interface menus the sign-in can access. Users with the higher-level sign-ins can access more resources than users with lower-level sign-ins. This section describes how to create, modify, and delete user sign-ins. You must create sign-ins for operators who supervise attended conferences using Bridge Talk.
l l l

A short note about sign-ins Creating sign-ins Viewing and deleting sign-ins

68 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Creating sign-ins to Meeting Exchange

A short note about sign-ins


Table 7 lists and describes sign-ins levels. Table 7: Sign-In Levels and Privileges Sign-In Level Maintenance Privileges Access to all Bridge Talk resources and management interface options, including maintenance, administrator, operator, scheduler tasks, and network configuration. Access to all Bridge Talk resources and administrator-level management interface options. Access to Bridge Talk operator tasks only. No access to the System Administrator menu. Access to the Bridge Talk Scheduler application.

Administrator Operator Scheduler

Creating sign-ins
You must have maintenance or administrator privileges to create sign-ins. A maintenance-level user can create, delete, and view all sign-ins. An administrator-level user can create and delete administrator sign-ins and all lower-level sign-ins. To create sign-ins: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin or dcbmaint. 2. Navigate to the System Administration Main Menu. 3. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Sign-In Management. Meeting Exchange displays the System Sign-In Management menu. The menu varies depending on your your sign-in level. 4. Select the sign-in level option you want to create. 5. Enter values for:
l

Sign-In Name. Sign-in names can be up to eight characters in length and can include only letters and numbers. Password Telephone number. This is an optional field.

l l

Do not use underscores (_), hyphens (-), spaces, or other special characters in the sign-in name or password field. These two fields are case-sensitive. For example, lee, Lee, and

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LEE represent three different sign-in names. You cannot use identical sign-in names, but different sign-in names can have identical passwords. 6. Save your input. Meeting Exchange creates the sign-in. 7. Restart the server.

Viewing and deleting sign-ins


Maintenance level users can view and delete all sign-ins on the system. To display sign-ins:
l

From the System Sign-In Management menu, select View/Delete Current Sign-In. Meeting Exchange displays the current sign-ins.

To delete a sign-in 1. Display the current sign-ins. 2. Highlight the sign-in that you want to delete. 3. Press ENTER. A confirmation message appears. 4. To delete the sign-in you selected, press Y. Press N or ESC to cancel the deletion. If you press Y, Meeting Exchange displays a confirmation message and deletes the sign-in.

70 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Chapter 6: Configuring the Meeting Exchange media server


The media server component of Meeting Exchange provides a number of functions, such as, audio mixing, Dual Tone Multi Frequency (DTMF) detection, message playing, and conference recording. There are two types of media server: The S6200 and the S6800. Meeting Exchange 5.2 uses a number of features from the Avaya Common Media Server. These features reduce deployment risks and increase the predicability of the server performance. There are no changes required in the installation and configuration of the servers. This chapter describes the features from the Avaya Common Media Server. It also describes how to configure the media server. To successfully deploy the media server, you must configure three files: audioPreferences.cfg, system.cfg, and softmediaserver.cfg.
l l l l

Avaya Common Media Server features Configuring codecs Configuring the system settings Configuring the media settings

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Avaya Common Media Server features


Meeting Exchange 5.2 contains a number of new features, which are related to the Avaya Common Media Server. Table 8 describes these new features. Table 8: New Media Server Features Name Support for the following codecs: l G.729 l G.726 l G.722 l iLBC Real Time Transport Control Protocol (RTCP) and Real Time Transport Control Protocol eXtended Reports (RTCP-XR) Secure Media Real-time Transport Protocol (SRTP) Description These codecs encrypt and decrypt the digital audio transmissions on Meeting Exchange channels. For more information on configuring codecs, see Configuring codecs on page 72.

RTCP provides out-of-band statistics and control information for an RTP flow. RTCP XR supplements the statistics that are contained in the standard RTCP report.

SRTP defines a profile of RTP (Real-time Transport Protocol), intended to provide encryption, message authentication, and integrity, and replay protection to data. Meeting Exchange now supports this protocol for all audio and data transfers. For more information, see Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP) on page 179. Using the media loopback mechanism, Meeting Exchange actively monitors the media delivery performance by looping media back to the transmitter. This active monitoring provides valuable audio quality statistics for use in diagnosing any audio issues. System administrators can now update the tables which translate between telephone numbers and URIs without restarting the server. For more information, see Configuring dialing patterns on page 89.

Media loop back

Easier configuration of dialing patterns

Configuring codecs
In a single server S6200 deployment, your codec choices have implications for the capacity of Meeting Exchange because some codecs use a large amount of system resources. For

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Configuring codecs

example, a single call using the ILBC codec uses the equivalent of approximately 15 G.711 calls. It is important to note that Meeting Exchange still treats the call as a single call in terms of port allocation. If you need to support multiple codecs in a single server S6200 deployment, Avaya recommends making the following changes to the system.cfg file. The system.cfg file is located in /usr/ipcb/config/system.cfg. The changes involve adjustments to the CoreAffinity parameter. After an installation or an upgrade, the CoreAffinity parameter is not included in the system.cfg file, by default. You must add it. You must also make some changes to the processTable.cfg file by adding or removing lines, depending on the number of softms required. The processTable.cfg file is located in / usr/ipcb/config.
l

On an S6200, using G.711: - Configure the processTable.cfg to use 6 softms - Configure the system.cfg value CoreAffinity=FC (use cores 2 to 7) On an S6200, using only one codec, other than G.711: - Configure the processTable.cfg to use 8 softms - Configure the system.cfg value CoreAffinity=FF (all available cores) On an S6200, using multiple codecs with less than 800 calls: - Configure the processTable.cfg to use 8 softms - Configure the system.cfg value CoreAffinity=FF (all available cores) On an S6200, using multiple codecs with more than 800 calls: - Configure the processTable.cfg to use 7 softms - Configure the system.cfg value CoreAffinity=FE (use cores 1 to 7) Note: If you need to support multiple codecs in your deployment, you must also configure the MaxChannelCount parameter in system.cfg. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for assistance in selecting an appropriate value.

Note:

To configure codecs: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid craft password. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/audioPreferences.cfg.

Note:

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3. In the audioPreferences.cfg file, configure the values as listed in Table 9. Avaya recommends these values for a successful deployment of Meeting Exchange. Table 9: audioPreferences.cfg Parameters mimeSubtype PCMU PCMA G722 G729 payloadType 0 8 9 18 Note: If you are using this codec, ensure that you set the ptime attribute to 20 for all incoming calls to Meeting Exchange. The ptime attribute relates to the packet size in terms of milliseconds of voice. A ptime of 20 means that each packet contains 20 milliseconds of voice content.

Note:

iLBC30 iLBC20 wbPCMU wbPCMA telephone-event

97 98 102 103 127/120 Note: The default value is 101. If your deployment consists of H.323 endpoints, configure this value to 127. If your deployment consists of H.323 and SIP endpoints, configure this value to 120.

Note:

iSAC G726_16 G726_24 G726_32 G726_40

104 105 106 107 108

If you want to disable a specific codec, remove it from the list or comment it out using a #

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Configuring the system settings

symbol. 4. Restart the server.

Configuring the system settings


The settings in the system.cfg file relate to Differentiated Service TOS Value (IP TOS) and Ethernet VLAN Value (VLAN). In the system.cfg file, you must also enter an ethernet link. Table 10 describes the IP TOS and VLAN settings. Table 10: IP TOS and VLAN Concept IP TOS Description TOS is type of service. The TOS value is a differentiated service setting for SIP IP packets. Differentiated services attempt to guarantee quality of service on large networks, such as the Internet. Using TOS, you can assign priority to certain traffic, such as network-critical traffic. The Ethernet VLAN Value structure places restrictions on traffic flow, permitting traffic to pass among a select group of network nodes, to the exclusion of other network nodes, based on the assigned group membership of individual nodes or switch ports. The VLAN Value range is between 0 and 32. The default value is 0. However, the choice of an appropriate VLAN value depends on the network being used and the type of traffic; signalling or media.

VLAN

To configure the SIP signaling IP TOS and VLAN parameters and the ethernet link: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/system.cfg. 3. Configure the parameters as required. For example: # diff serv values that will appear on the TOS field of the IP packet DiffServSignallingTOSValue=46 DiffServMediaTOSValue=24 # vlan values EthernetSignallingVlanValue=0 EthernetMediaVlanValue=0

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4. In the same file, you must also enter an Ethernet Link ID. This is the interface from which the media server takes connections. You can list the interfaces in order of priority. For example: LinkNetworkDevice=bond0,eth0 5. Save your changes.

Configuring the media settings


You must configure a number of settings in the softmediaserver.cfg file. For a complete list of all the parameters in the file, see List of softmediaserver.cfg parameters on page 357.
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Configuring automatic gain control Configuring comfort noise generation Configuring transport settings Configuring drive settings Configuring the active speaker notification interval

Configuring automatic gain control


Automatic Gain Control (AGC) acts on loud signals to condition them around the specified value. Currently, low signals or signals below the target level are not modified. If you disable AGC, Meeting Exchange does not regulate volume. Table 11 describes the settings relating to AGC. To configure AGC: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/softmediaserver.cfg. 3. Configure the settings, as described in Table 11. Table 11: Parameters Relating to AGC Parameter AutomaticGain agcTarget Description The valid values are 0=Off and 1=On. The target power level during mixing. The valid values are 6dBFS to 20dBFS in 2dBFS steps.

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Configuring the media settings

4. Save your changes.

Configuring comfort noise generation


Comfort noise generation adds background white noise to a conference to avoid total silence when none of the participants are talking. If you disable comfort noise generation, Meeting Exchange does not play white noise when none of the participants are talking. To configure comfort noise generation: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/softmediaserver.cfg. 3. Configure the settings, as described in Table 12. Table 12: Parameters Relating to Comfort Noise Parameter ComfortNoiseGeneration ComfortNoiseLevel SilenceSuppression ConfPlayThreshold Description The valid values are 0=Off and 1=On. The level at which Meeting Exchange plays the comfort noise. The valid values are 0=Off and 1=On. The energy threshold for silence suppression.

4. Save your changes.

Configuring transport settings


Note:

Note: Please reference the release notes before configuring these settings. Certain patches to Communication Manager and/or Meeting Exchange may be needed to enable this functionality.

It is a good idea to configure the packet loss concealment and the channel statistics update. In the softmediaserver.cfg file, you must also set TOS and VLAN values, as you did in the system.cfg file. For more information on the system.cfg file, see Configuring the system settings on page 75. 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/softmediaserver.cfg.

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3. Configure the settings, as described in Table 13. Table 13: Parameters Relating to Transport Parameter PacketLossConcealment ChannelStatisticsUpdate securityEnabled Description The valid values are 0=Off and 1=On. Determines how often Meeting Exchange prints statistics to a file. To disable the statistics log, enter 0. Determines whether Meeting Exchange uses SRTP for audio transmission. The valid values are 0=Off and 1=On. Note: For more information, see Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP) on page 179.

Note:

srtpCryptoSuite

Determines which encryption and authentication algorithms Meeting Exchange uses for SRTP with RTP. For example, srtpCryptoSuite=AES_CM_128_HMAC_SHA1_80. Note: For more information, see Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP) on page 179.

Note:

srtcpCryptoSuite

Determines which encryption and authentication algorithms Meeting Exchange uses for SRTP with TCP. For example, srtcpCryptoSuite=AES_CM_128_HMAC_SHA1_80. Note: For more information, see Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP) on page 179.

Note:

rtcpTxIntrv EnableTTY EnableTTYRedundancy DTMFRegenerationFormat

Determines the minimum RTCP transmission interval in milliseconds. Determines whether Meeting Exchange supports the text telephone feature for the hearing impaired. Determines whether Meeting Exchange supports redundancy for the text telephone feature. Determines whether Meeting Exchange can regenerate DTMF in a specific format. For inband processing, enter 1, for out of band processing, enter 2, and to ensure that the choice is determines by negotiation with Session Description Protocol (SDP), enter 0.

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Table 13: Parameters Relating to Transport Parameter DefaultNetworkInterface Description Determines which network interface that Meeting Exchange uses. For example, defaultNetworkInterface=bond0,eth0. Determines the differenciated service on IP packets. The default can be 0 or 26. Determines the VLAN service on IP packets. The default is 0.

DiffServMediaTOSValue EthernetMediaVlanValue

4. Save your changes.

Configuring drive settings


The drive settings are highly sensitive. Please consult your Avaya Support Representative for more information about making changes to these files. The drive settings include the configuration of the read and write infrastructure, the size of the cache, and the frequency of hard drive access. To configure the drive settings: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/softmediaserver.cfg. 3. Configure the settings, as described in Table 14. Table 14: Parameters Relating to Drives Parameter globalReadCacheMinNumBuffers Description Defines the minimum number of buffers in the global cache. For example, globalReadCacheMinNumBuffers=128. Defines the maximum number of buffers in the global cache. For example, globalReadCacheMaxNumBuffers=182. Defines the maximum size of files in the global cache. Meeting Exchange stores all files with a size smaller than this value. For example, globalReadCacheBufferSize=480000.

globalReadCacheMaxNumBuffers

globalReadCacheBufferSize

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Table 14: Parameters Relating to Drives Parameter localReadCacheBufferSize Description Defines the size of the local read cache. The local read cache is twice this value. Meeting Exchange uses a second buffer as a look ahead buffer. For example, localReadCacheBufferSize=160000. Defines the maximum size of the local cache. Meeting Exchange stores the files on a disk when the cache reaches this size. For example, localWriteCacheBufferSize=400000.

localWriteCacheBufferSize

4. Save your changes.

Configuring the active speaker notification interval


By default, Meeting Exchange checks each channel every 2000 milliseconds to see if someone is speaking. The active speaker notification interval parameter controls this timer. The active speaker notification parameter is called asnInterval. For example, if asninterval is 500, Meeting Exchange checks each channel every 500 milliseconds. The asninterval value overrides the default value on the application server. To configure the active speaker notification interval setting: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config/softmediaserver.cfg. 3. Configure the settings, as described in Table 15. Table 15: Parameter Relating to Active Speaker Notification Interval Parameter asnInterval=2000 Description Sets the Active Speaker Notification Interval in milliseconds. It is an int.

4. Save your changes.

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Chapter 7: Configuring external servers


For security and resilience purposes, it is a good idea to store certain essential files on external servers, rather than on the Meeting Exchange application server. If you use external servers in the customer site, you can also provide additional storage space and free up space on the Meeting Exchange application server. External servers in this type of deployment are called Network File System (NFS) servers. If you wish to use an NFS server, depending on the type of Meeting Exchange solution, the following options are available to you:
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If you have a standalone S6200 server, you can store your conference recordings on an external NFS server. You store all other files internally, on the Meeting Exchange system. To implement this configuration, follow these steps: Mounting the recording directory on the application server on page 82. If you have a distributed S6200 server, you can store your conference recordings, conference roster, audio prompts, and welcome messages on an internal NFS server. To implement this configuration, follow the steps in Implementing Resilience for Meeting Exchange Guide, which is available on support.avaya.com. If you have a distributed S6200 server, you can store your conference recordings on an external NFS server and you store all other files on an internal NFS server. To implement this configuration, follow the steps in Implementing Resilience for Meeting Exchange Guide, which is available on support.avaya.com and then Mounting the recording directory on the application server on page 82.

Typically, external NFS servers provide more robustness than internal NFS servers which reside on the application server. The Implementing Resilience for Meeting Exchange Guide, which is available on support.avaya.com contains more information about NFS functionality. It also contains sample deployments. It is a good idea to read that information as a background to the current chapter.

File location
Typically, the recordings, prompts, roster, and messages are stored in the following directories on the Meeting Exchange application server. Both the application server and the media server must reference and access the same file. For example, both servers must view a single instance of a recording. This is called a cross-solution consistent view of the directories:
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usr3/confrp usr2/prompts usr2/roster usr3/confwl

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Mounting
If there are external NFS servers in your deployment, you must make the application server and the media server aware of the existence of the external NFS servers. You do this by mounting the NFS servers on the application server and the media server. The mount command is a simple Linux command. In Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 2, the process of mounting the recordings directory is partially automatic in the following way:
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The media server automatically mounts the recording directory, usr3/confrp. The application server does not mount the recording directory and so you must manually mount it, as described in Mounting the recording directory on the application server on page 82.

This process applies to both standalone and distributed S6200 solutions with an external NFS server for conference recordings.

Mounting the recording directory on the application server


The process of mounting the recording directory on the application server consists of two tasks:
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You must update a parameter in system.cfg on each application server. You must use the Linux mount command to mount the NFS directory.

When you complete these two tasks and restart Meeting Exchange, the application server generates an Inter Process Communication (IPC) event and sends it to the media server, by way of a program called Server Comms. The Server Comms program translates the IPC event into a format that the media server can interpret. IPC events are internal and Server Comms makes them external. Essentially, the Server Comms program translates the IPC event into a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) event. In this way, the application server communicates the location of the recordings to the media server(s). The media server receives the TCP event and automatically mounts the NFS server. The media server mounts the NFS server using the information provided by the system.cfg file that you updated on the application server. To mount the recording directory on the application server and any standby application servers: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Enter the command: su sroot

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Mounting the recording directory on the application server

3. Enter the following command to navigate to the system.cfg file: cd /usr/ipcb/config cat system.cfg 4. Enter the IP address of the NFS server in the nfsConfRecordingIP parameter in system.cfg. 5. Save the file. 6. Enter the following command to navigate to the fstab file: cd /etc 7. Set the mount options in /etc/fstab to those specified by the parameter nfsMountOptions in system.cfg. This parameter defaults to the following: -t_nfs_-o_rw,async,bg,soft,tcp,noac 8. Save the file. 9. Enter the following command to mount the directory and restart Meeting Exchange: mount /usr3/confrp service mx-bridge restart

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Chapter 8: Branding the customer experience


This chapter describes how to configure Meeting Exchange to provide conference participants with a different conferencing experience, based on the telephone number they used to access the conference. Conferencing experience consists of audio messages, languages, and conference call flow. This chapter also describes how to configure Meeting Exchange to interpret the telephone numbers that participants use to dial a conference and the telephone numbers that participants use to dial out from a conference to another potential participant. Avaya refers to these mechanisms as call routing. To configure call routing, you must customize a number of files in your deployment of Meeting Exchange. These files include cbutil, telnumtoURI, and URItotelnum. This chapter contains the following sections:
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A short note on the customer experience Obtaining conference telephone numbers Configuring Meeting Exchange number collection Configuring Meeting Exchange to handle a number it does not recognize Configuring the telephone number branding Configuring reservation groups Configuring dialing patterns

A short note on the customer experience


As mentioned in the introduction to this chapter, you can configure Meeting Exchange to provide conference participants with a different conferencing experience, based on the telephone number they used to access the conference. Conferencing experience consists of audio messages, languages, and conference call flow. For example, a company can provide each department in the company with a different telephone number for conference access. Meeting Exchange will play a different message to each of the departments, such as "Welcome to the Engineering Department Conference System", "Welcome to the Sales Department Conference System", "Welcome to the Finance Department Conference System", and so on. Service providers can use this feature to customize the conferencing experience for each of the companies which avail of their conferencing service. Similarly, service providers and companies can use this feature to play audio messages in different languages to their customers. For more information on recording

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audio messages, see Recording new audio messages on page 151. This feature is called call branding or call routing. Meeting Exchange 5.2 supports 30,000 entries for call branding. When you installed Meeting Exchange, you configured a basic call routing entry in order to execute your test call. For more information, see Configuring call branding on page 40. This chapter describes how to configure call routing for the in-service operation of your Meeting Exchange deployment.

Obtaining conference telephone numbers


Your customer should provide the telephone numbers which they wish to use for conferencing. These telephone numbers should be dialed number identification service (DNIS) numbers. In some regions, DNIS numbers are called direct dial inward (DDI) numbers.

Configuring Meeting Exchange number collection


To configure the number of digits that Meeting Exchange selects from the full DNIS: 1. Log in as a dcbadmin User to access the System Administrator Main Menu. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Call Routing Configuration > Digit Parameters. 3. Configure the Number of Digits parameter. For more information on this parameter, see Call Routing configuration properties on page 288. 4. Save your changes.

Configuring Meeting Exchange to handle a number it does not recognize


There are two aspects to this configuration. You can configure Meeting Exchange to attempt to make a partial match when it receives fewer digits that it expects. You can also configure Meeting Exchange to handle DNIS numbers that it does not recognize.
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Configuring partial matching Configuring the wildcard

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Configuring the telephone number branding

Configuring partial matching


To configure the number of digits that Meeting Exchange selects from the full DNIS: 1. Log in as a dcbadmin User to access the System Administrator Main Menu. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Call Routing Configuration > Digit Parameters. 3. Configure the Short Collection Search parameter. For more information on this parameter, see Call Routing configuration properties on page 288. 4. Save your changes.

Configuring the wildcard


To configure a wildcard: 1. Follow the steps described in Adding a DNIS on page 47. The wildcard entry should be ???? 2. Ensure that the number of question marks reflects the number of digits that Meeting Exchange is expecting to receive. 3. Save your changes.

Configuring the telephone number branding


This section contains an example scenario of a call branding configuration for an in-service conferencing server. You must configure your deployment to meet the specific requirements of your customer requirements. In this example, a service provider provides conferencing capabilities to three companies. Each of the three companies use the Avaya call flow. The Meeting Exchange application server collects four digits. If it receives a DNIS that it does not recognize, it sends the caller to the operator for assistance. To enable this scenario: 1. Follow the steps described in Configuring Meeting Exchange number collection on page 86 to set the value of the Number of Digits parameter to 4.

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2. Follow the steps described in Adding a DNIS on page 47 to add the following entries: cbutil add ???? 0 1 1 n ENTER -l "DNIS UNKNOWN" -c "DNIS unknown cbutil add 1234 0 1 1 n SCAN -l "Avaya Call Flow" -c "Company A" cbutil add 2345 0 1 1 n SCAN -l "Avaya Call Flow" -c "Company B" cbutil add 3456 0 1 1 n SCAN -l "Avaya Call Flow" -c "Company C"

Configuring reservation groups


A feature called reservation groups enables participants to use a single conference passcode to enter a number of different conferences. These conferences must use different DNIS numbers. For example, if a moderator chairs a number of conferences which each have different DNIS, the moderator can use the same moderator code to enter all of these conferences. This feature is especially useful if the conferences occur at the same time or overlap. To enable this feature, you must associate each DNIS with a reservation group. Meeting Exchange supports up to 1000 reservation groups, numbered from 1 to 999. The default value of reservation groups is 0. To configure reservation groups in your deployment, you must add each reservation group. For more information on adding reservation groups, contact your Avaya Support Representative. Once you add a reservation group, you can set the value of rg in cbutil for each DNIS.
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Adding reservation groups Configuring call branding for reservation groups

Adding reservation groups


To add a reservation group: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Enter the command: su sroot 3. Enter the following commands to add the reservation groups: cd /usr/dcb/dbase/bridgedb_postgres/exe.other ./bridgedb_maintain_pg.sh prompt do_resgroup bridgedb 4. Follow prompts on the display.

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Configuring dialing patterns

Configuring call branding for reservation groups


To configure a DNIS to use the reservation groups feature: 1. Follow the steps described in Adding a DNIS on page 47 to add the following entries: cbutil add ???? 0 1 1 n ENTER -l "DNIS UNKNOWN" -c "DNIS unknown" cbutil add 1234 1 1 1 n SCAN -l "Sales department" -c "Company A" cbutil add 2345 1 1 1 n SCAN -l "Finance department" -c "Company A" cbutil add 3456 2 1 1 n SCAN -l "Research department" -c "Company A" cbutil add 3456 2 1 1 n SCAN -l "Accounts department" -c "Company A" In this example, the Sales and Finance departments use reservation group 1. The Research and Accounts departments use reservation group 2. Operators using Bridge Talk can now schedule conferences using the reservation groups feature by entering the reservation group number in the Res Group field on the Bridge Talk Conference Scheduler. For more information, see Using Meeting Exchange, which is available on support.avaya.com. 2. Use the Client Registration Server (CRS) Front End to add new wholesalers to represent each department. For more information on administering the CRS Front End, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.

Configuring dialing patterns


Conference participants dial telephone numbers to access Meeting Exchange. Similarly, participants dial telephone numbers once they are in a conference to dial out to other potential participants. These two types of calls are called incoming calls and outgoing calls. Meeting Exchange changes each telephone number to a Uniform Resource Identifier (URI). A URI consists of a string of characters used to identify or name a resource on the Internet. Simply speaking, participants deal with telephone numbers. Meeting Exchange deals with URIs. Meeting Exchange contains two files, which translate telephone numbers to URIs. One file converts incoming telephone numbers to URIs and the other file converts outgoing telephone numbers to URIs. These files are called: telnumToURI.tab and the URIToTelnum.tab. Essentially, these files act as a conversion between a traditional form of telephony in the form of DNIS/DDI numbers and the more modern, SIP form of transmission. Before you deploy Meeting Exchange, you must configure these files.
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A short note about syntax Configuring patterns for dialing out

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Configuring patterns for dialing in

A short note about syntax


The files, telnumToURI.tab and URIToTelnum.tab, use the same format. They contain three columns of information. The last column contains a comment or textual information about the first and middle columns. The first column provides a pattern match for the input value. Meeting Exchange searches this column in order. This column supports wild cards. Table 16 describes the symbols that may be used in the file. Table 16: Wild Cards Name Asterisk Question Mark Symbol * ? Description Match zero or more characters. This symbol matches any character, not just digits. Match a single character in an exact postion.

In the files, telnumToURI.tab and URIToTelnum.tab, the middle column provides the translation for the entry in the first column. This column supports string substitutions using the syntax, $n, where n is an integer. Essentially, this file functions by looking for a pattern in the left column and produces an output based on the middle column. The middle column uses this syntax:
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$0 substitutes the full input string. $1 substitutes the first wild card. $n substitutes the nth wild card.

The system considers ??? a single wild card, but treats *?* as three distinct wild cards. It is also worth noting that while * matches any character, not just digits, it does not match empty strings at the beginning. For example: *sip:* matches <sip:xxxx@ but does not match sip:xxxx@ So to alleviate this issue, Avaya normally add one extra entry for the empty character. *sip:* sip:*

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Table 17 demonstrates some wild card substitutions. Table 17: Wild Card Substitutions Input 51234 9123456 1234 Pattern Match 5* ?*?6 * Translation sip:$1@10.221.10.100 sip:$2@10.221.10.100 sip:$0@10.221.10.100 Output sip:1234@110.221.10.100 sip:1234@110.221.10.100 sip:1234@110.221.10.100

Configuring patterns for dialing out


When they are in a conference, participants can dial out to other potential participants. To initiate a dial out, participants typically enter a DTMF pattern, such as *1. As an aside, customers can choose to disable the dialout feature in their deployment. The telnumToUri.tab file is stored in the /usr/ipcb/config directory. Generally this file starts with one or more comments. Like most text files, comments begin with the hash (#) character. Following the comments, the file has one or more lines containing data. Each data line contains three pieces of information: TelnumPattern, TelnumConversion, and Comment. Table 18 describes these data. Table 18: TelnumToUri.tab file Entry TelnumPattern Description This entry is the telephone number that participants dial. This entry may contain wildcards for pattern matching. For example, 93???? matches any telephone number that begins with the digits 9 and 3, such as 931234, 939999, or 938765. Meeting Exchange replaces the TelnumPattern with this entry when it dials out to the new caller. This entry always begins with the characters sip: followed by the dial out number, the @ character, and ends with the IP address of the media gateway or proxy. For example: sip:6352@10.221.10.111. The characters $1 in this column replace the first wildcard matched from the TelnumPattern column. Any text that provides some information about the pattern. Some examples are: bridge, media gateway, or proxy server. This field must not have any spaces so many people use underbars to separate the words.

TelnumConversion

Comment

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Avaya recommends adding an entry to handle situations where a participant does not enter a dial out telephone number. To configure this row, enter an asterisk * in the TelnumPattern column. This configuration operates for all Meeting Exchange deployments, with the exception of deployments that include Avaya Web Portal and Avaya Audio Console. If your deployment includes the Avaya Web Portal and Avaya Audio Console applications, you must include an entry for these applications in the telnumToUri.tab file. During the operation of Avaya Web Portal and Avaya Audio Console, the Meeting Exchange application server makes an outgoing telephone call to the Meeting Exchange Web server. From the participants perspective, this call occurs behind the scenes. To ensure that Meeting Exchange can make this outgoing call, you must include a row that uses the asterisk * symbol, using the following syntax: * sip:1234@<Web Server IP address> modAPIoperator

Configuring patterns for dialing in


The UriToTelnum.tab file works in tandem with the cbutil file to brand the customer experience for callers who dial into a conference or who dial a conference recording. Simply speaking, the UriToTelnum.tab file states that the Meeting Exchange application server should recognize a given URI and identify this URIs corresponding DNIS. The cbutil file states that Meeting Exchange application server should recognize this DNIS and handle the call in a certain way, for example, by routing the call into a conference callflow or a conference playback callflow. Similarly, the telnumtoUri.tab states that the Meeting Exchange application server should recognize a DNIS entered by a Moderator during a conference and dial out using a corresponding URI. The UriToTelnum.tab file is stored in the /usr/ipcb/config directory. The UriToTelnum.tab file is similar in structure to the TelnumToUri.tab file. Each data line contains three pieces of information: TelnumPattern, TelnumConversion, and Comment. Table 19 describes these data. Table 19: UriToTelnum.tab file Entry TelnumPattern (sometimes called URI or SIP pattern) Description The IP address of the telephone line that the participant dialed. This entry always begins with the characters sip: followed by the dial-in number, the @ character, and ends with the IP address of the media gateway or proxy. Since Meeting Exchange may not recognize every dial-in telephone number, this entry usually contains wildcards for pattern matching. For example, *@10.221.10.11, matches any call delivered via that IP address.

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Table 19: UriToTelnum.tab file Entry TelnumConversion Comment Description Meeting Exchange replaces the TelnumPattern with this entry and then routes it to the corresponding call flow. Any text that provides some information about the pattern. Some examples are: bridge, media gateway, or proxy server. This field must not have any spaces so many people use underbars to separate the words.

As with the telnumtoUri.tab file, Avaya recommends adding an entry to handle situations where Meeting Exchange receives a call from a URI that it is not defined in the file. To configure this row, enter an asterisk *, followed by @, and then another asterisk * in the TelnumPattern column. In addition, you can add rows for each operator. These rows are optional and are for situations where you want to be able to dial into a specific operator. If you add these rows, you can ensure that operators can dial into the Meeting Exchange application server. Use the following syntax for these lines: op<DNIS>x<operator index>@<ip address> The operator index is the identity number associated with an operator, such as operator 1, operator 2, and so on, rather than the Logical Channel Number (LCN) of the operator. The call handler does not perform any processing on the DNIS number at this stage, but it is important to enter a numeric value at this point in the syntax. You can configure a dial in for other channels in the same way. The other channels are the link, record/playback, and music channels. For example, for a music channel: mu<DNIS>x<operator index>@<ip address> For the link channel, use LK, for the record/playback channel, use RP.

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94 Administering Meeting Exchange Servers

Chapter 9: Configuring blast dial lists


Meeting Exchange enables operators and moderators to dial a large group of potential participants using a single command. This feature is called a blast dial. For the successful operation of the blast dial feature, you must create and save blast dial lists. This section introduces the blast dial feature. It contains the following sections:
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Introducing blast dial lists Configuring blast dial Creating blast dial lists Using blast dial lists Dialing out to blast dial lists Viewing and printing blast dial lists

Introducing blast dial lists


In a typical blast dial, Meeting Exchange dials an entire list of phone numbers simultaneously. When potential participants answer the call, an audio message prompts them to press specific digits on their telephones to join the conference. The blast dial feature uses dial lists to store the information that it requires. Each entry in the dial list includes a participant name and telephone number. Entries can also include a company name, a question and answer (Q&A) priority and a moderator status flag. Each list has a unique 8-character name and an optional access code. The number of dial lists is limited only by the amount of hard drive space available on the application server. Operators can create, modify, print, and delete dial lists using BridgeTalk. Operators can also import dial lists using CRS Front End. When they are booking conferences, operators, using Bridge Talk or CRS Front End, can set the blast dial feature to:
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Dial the dial list automatically as soon as a moderator enters the conference. Dial the dial list when the moderator presses a DTMF keypad sequence on their telephone. This sequence is typically *92.

Using Bridge Talk, operators can also dial a single entry in a dial list. This feature is called fast dial. When a Blast Dial List contains a sixteen digit code containing all zeros (0000000000000000), participants are immediately placed into a conference when the line is answered without

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hearing an annunciator. If the blast dial list does not contain the sixteen zero code then the bridge plays an annunciator message to participants when the line is answered. Aside from the blast dial list feature, Meeting Exchange enables moderators to dial out to multiple participants using another method. Using Web Portal, moderators can add participants to their personal address book. Using Avaya Audio Console, moderators can dial out to single or multiple participants from their address book. They can also edit and save their address book as a .csv file. There is no direct relationship between blast dial lists stored on the application server and the address book feature. For more information on managing and using the address book, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Configuring blast dial


To configure a number of parameters in relation to how Meeting Exchange handles the blast dial feature, log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin to display the System Administration Main Menu. Using the System Administration Main Menu, you can customize the operation of blast dial. For more information, see Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59. In addition, see Blast dial configuration properties on page 266 for a list of the blast dial configuration properties. In addition to manually-created blast dial lists, Meeting Exchange 5.2 now generates blast dial lists automatically. When operators, using CRS Front End, or moderators, using Web Portal, book a new conference, Meeting Exchange automatically saves the current conference participant list as the dial list using the conference reference number as the filename. Meeting Exchange makes this file available for transfer to a dial list directory on the Meeting Exchange server. This is a new feature in Meeting Exchange 5.2. To enable this feature, you must: 1. Create a directory on the CRS server. 2. Update the system parameters table with the path of the directory on the CRS server. Meeting Exchange will save the automatically-generated participant lists to this directory. 3. Configure a scheduled job to transfer the files to the Meeting Exchange application server, or bridge. You can use any method for transferring the files, such as FTP or secure file transfer (WinSCP).

Creating blast dial lists


System Administrators and operators can create blast dial lists. Moderators, using Web Portal, cannot create blast dial lists. They can only associate existing blast dial lists with their conferences.

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Creating blast dial lists

As an aside, when they are booking a conference, operators can prevent moderators from making use of the blast dial feature. This conference property does not impact the operators ability to blast dial.
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System administrators Operators

System administrators
As a System Administrator, you can create a new blast dial list. You can also use the directory server in your organization to generate the content of the list.
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Creating a new blast dial list Generating a blast dial list from the LDAP server Viewing and printing blast dial lists

Creating a new blast dial list


As a System Administrator, you can create blast dial lists using any text editor. To create a blast dial list: 1. Open a new file in any text editor. 2. Start the first line with an @. You can also enter a security code in this line. If you enter a security code in this line, potential participants must enter the code using their telephone keypad before they enter the conference. Security codes may contain up to 16 characters. A dial list for a conference with a security code equal to 84758475 would start with this line: @84758475 A dial list for a conference with no security code begins with this line: @ 3. Enter the participant name, company name, and telephone number, using this format: <Participant name> <Telephone Number> / <Company Name>

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4. For more information, see Table 20. Table 20: Dial List records Field Participant Name Description Optional participant name, up to 20 characters. May start with one of these special characters: @ to indicate moderator status + to indicate Q&A Top Priority = to indicate Exclude from Q*A These symbols display in the CDR record, but do not display when the record is viewed in Bridge Talk. Required telephone number, up to 40 digits including 0-9, comma, space, #, *. Optional Company Name, up to 20 characters.

Telephone Number Company Name

5. Save the dial list. The dial list file name cannot have a space in it; dial_list is fine, dial list is not. Save it to this location: /usr/dcb/dbase/diallists.

Generating a blast dial list from the LDAP server


When the operator selects an LDAP group as their blast dial list, Meeting Exchange locates the the group members and writes them to a blast dial list file for the conference. This file resides in the file directory \temp\diallist. You must ensure that this file directory is accessible to the Meeting Exchange application server. For more information on enabling CRS for LDAP blast dial list support, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Viewing and printing blast dial lists


To access the dial lists: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the dial lists: a. Select View. b. Select Dial Lists. c. Select a dial list. Meeting Exchange displays the dial list. To print the detail record: a. Select Print.

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Using blast dial lists

a. Select Dial Lists. a. Select a dial list. b. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the dial list.

Operators
Operators can create blast dial lists using the Meeting Exchange application called Bridge Talk. Operators can also use another appliation called Client Registration Server (CRS) Front End to import blast dial lists.
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Bridge Talk CRS Front End

Bridge Talk
Operators can create dial lists using Bridge Talk. To create an entry in a dial list, they must enter the participant name, company, Q&A priority, and telephone details. They can also optionally enable moderator status for the participant. For more information on creating and modifying dial lists using Bridge Talk, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

CRS Front End


Using CRS Front End, operators can import blast dial lists in .csv format. When operators are booking a conference, they can associate the blast dial list with a conference. For more information on importing blast dial lists using CRS Front End, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Using blast dial lists


Operators and moderators can associate blast dial lists with conferences.
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Operators Moderators

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Operators
When they are booking a conference, operators can add blast dial lists to the conference. They can use Bridge Talk or they can use the CRS Front End.
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Bridge Talk CRS Front End

Bridge Talk
Operators can add blast dial lists to attended and unattended conferences, using the Conference Scheduler dialog.
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If they are booking an attended conference, operators can select a dial list by clicking the Dial List button on the Schedule Conference dialog. The Dial List button also provides operators with the ability to create, edit, and delete dial lists. If they are booking an unattended conference, operators must select Auto or Manual from the Auto Blast drop-down list. Once they make a selection, Bridge Talk enables the Dial List button. Operators can also select the audio prompt message.

For more information on adding blast dial lists to conferences using Bridge Talk, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

CRS Front End


Operators can add blast dial lists to attended conferences and unattended conferences.
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If they are booking an attended conference, operators can enter a dial list name in the Attended Conference Options panel in the Options dialog. They also have the option of linking an LDAP list to the conference. If they are booking an unattended conference, operators must select the Moderator checkbox on the Book Reservation dialog. On the Options dialog, they can set the Blast Mode and audio message prompt. In addition, For both conference types, Meeting Exchange automatically saves the current conference participant list as the dial list using the conference reference number as the filename. Meeting Exchange makes this file available for transfer to a dial list directory on the Meeting Exchange server.

For more information on adding blast dial lists to conferences using CRS Front End, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

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Dialing out to blast dial lists

Moderators
When they book conferences, moderators can add blast dial lists to their conferences using the Web Portal application. In addition, as with booking a conference using CRS Front End, eeting Exchange automatically saves the current conference participant list as the dial list using the conference reference number as the filename. Meeting Exchange makes this file available for transfer to a dial list directory on the Meeting Exchange server. As an aside, System Administrators can choose to hide the blast dial option for moderators who have the Web Portal application.

Dialing out to blast dial lists


Operators and moderators can dial out to a blast dial list during a conference. It is worth noting that the participants callflow when they receive a blast dial call is very similar to a participant callflow for regular conference entry. As blast dial participants enter the conference, Meeting Exchange announces their arrival based on the settings that the operator or moderator have configured for that conference, such as play entry tones, play an entry message, prompt for a roll call name. However, Meeting Exchange does not require blast dialed participants to enter passcodes or a PIN code.
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Operators Moderators

Operators
If they are using Bridge Talk, operators can dial a blast dial list during a live conference using the Fast Dial menu option. For more information on dialing a blast dial list during a live conference using Bridge Talk, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Moderators
Moderators can dial a blast dial list by pressing the DTMF keypad sequence *92. When they initate a blast dial, Meeting Exchange plays an audio message to indicate that it has commenced the blast dial. The callflow for participants who respond to a blast dial is the same as for participants who dial into the conference.

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Moderators can also dial multiple participants using another method. Using Avaya Audio Console, moderators can dial out to single or multiple participants from their address book. This feature does not make use of blast dial lists. For more information on using the Avaya Audio Console application, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Viewing and printing blast dial lists


System Administrators and operators can print blast dial lists:
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System administrators Operators

System administrators
To view and print dial lists that are currently configured: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the dial list: a. Select View. b. Select Dial Lists. c. Select a dial list. Meeting Exchange displays the dial list. To print the dial list: a. Select Print. b. Select Dial Lists. c. Select a dial list. Meeting Exchange displays the dial list.

Operators
Operators, using Bridge Talk can print blast dial lists, using the Fast Dial menu option. For more information on printing a blast dial list using Bridge Talk, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

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Chapter 10: Viewing Meeting Exchange information


Meeting Exchange produces a large number of reports to enable you to view conference activity. Many of these reports act as an audit trail which can help you to diagnose and resolve any issues which arise in Meeting Exchange. You can also use these reports to analyze conference activity in your network. This chapter describes the most useful reports that Meeting Exchange produces. It contains the following sections:
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Introducing reports Accessing records using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu Accessing reports using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu Accessing records using a relational database Accessing records using a remote host Accessing reports using the Client Registration Server Accessing reports using Bridge Talk Accessing reports using Web Portal Accessing reports using the Reports Application Accessing LAN statistics reports Accessing logs Accessing port capacity reports Accessing polling reports

Introducing reports
Meeting Exchange collects a lot of data about conference activity and provides a number of ways of accessing this information. Much of this information consists of Call Detail Records (CDRs) and Conference Detail Records (CODRs). Meeting Exchange stores this data in a database called the CDRs database. If your deployment of Meeting Exchange consists of several application servers, you can collect all the CDR and CODR files from each of the application servers and store them in a single CDRs database. For this purpose, Avaya has created an application called the CDR Loader application. For more information, see:
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Call Detail Record (CDR) reports Conference Detail Records (CODR) reports CDR Loader application

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Aside from CDR and CODR information, Meeting Exchange also collects a lot of data in relation to conferencing traffic, operator activity, and participant activity. Meeting Exchange also creates a large number of alarm and log files. You can access this information using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator Main Menu.

Call Detail Record (CDR) reports


A CDR is the computer record produced by a telephone exchange. The record contains details of a call that passed through it. Meeting Exchange produces CDRs for each call. Meeting Exchange generates a CDR whenever a participant line disconnects from the audio conferencing server. You can configure the output format of CDR reports. For example, customers may not want to include all CDR fields when they view and print CDR reports.

Conference Detail Records (CODR) reports


A CODR is the computer record produced by a telephone exchange. Meeting Exchange produces conference detail records (CODR) for each conference. The CODR contains details of the conference, such as the start and end time. Meeting Exchange generates a CODR whenever a conference ends and all conference lines are cleared. To enable Meeting Exchange to generate a CODR, the conference must have a conference ID. A conference ID is a unique number that identifies a conference. You can configure Meeting Exchange to automatically assign a conference ID. Alternatively, you can configure the system parameter Automatic Conf. ID to enable operators to assign a conference ID. For more information on configuring the generation of conference IDs, System configuration properties on page 294. Occasionally, operators may want to reuse a conference ID for several sessions. For example, operators may set aside a particular conference for sales associates to use throughout the day. Sales associates call into the conference at 9 AM, 11 AM, and 4 PM. The operator assigns the conference ID 00000001234 to this conference. If the operator does not run the Conference Clear_all command in Bridge Talk, Meeting Exchange retains the conference ID. Each time a session empties, Meeting Exchange generates a new CODR with each CODR having the conference ID 00000001234. To enable operators to reuse a conference ID for several sessions, you must ensure that the system parameter Automatic Conf. Clear is OFF. For more information on Automatic Conf. Clear, see System configuration properties on page 294.

CDR Loader application


If your deployment consists of a number of Meeting Exchange application servers, you can configure Meeting Exchange to collect the CDR and CODR files from all of the application servers. This feature is particularly useful in a multisite or multicabinet environment. The application which manages this process is called the CDR Loader application. The CDR Loader

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Accessing records using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu

application resides on the CRS server and stores all of the collected data in the CDRs database. For more information on accessing this information, see Accessing reports using the Client Registration Server on page 115. For the CDR Loader application to operate successfully, you must configure each application server and also configure the CDR Loader application on the CRS server. For more information on configuring the CDR Loader and the CDRLoader.ini file on the CRS server, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications. This guide is available on support.avaya.com. The CDR Loader application operates by importing CDRs and CODRs from each application server using file transfer protocol (FTP) or secure FTP (SFTP). It stores the data that it receives in two tables called Cdr700 and Codr700. A scheduled SQL server task, which runs at configurable intervals, reads the data from these special tables, converts it into the correct format, and inserts it into the standard CDRs tables. To configure the CDR Loader application on each Meeting Exchange application server: 1. Launch SQL Server Management Studio. 2. Right-click on the bridge table under the CDRs database and select Open Table. 3. Enter the application server name and IP address in the fields provided and press Return on the keyboard. When you press Return, the database enters the default values in all the remaining fields. 4. Edit the Login and Password field to craft and craft01 respectively. 5. Ensure that the value in the last field in the table, the Cabinet Reference field, is consistent with the cabinet reference information that you have configured on the CRS Front End that is associated with this specific application server. For more information on configuring cabinets in the CRS Front End, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications. This guide is available on support.avaya.com. 6. Repeat these steps for each application server in your deployment. In each case, ensure that you update the cabinet reference.

Accessing records using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu
You can view and print CDRs and CODRs using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator Main Menu. Meeting Exchange collects a large amount of data about conference activity but using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator Main Menu, you can choose which fields that you want to view and print.
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Configuring the fields for viewing and printing Viewing and printing detail records

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Configuring the fields for viewing and printing


Meeting Exchange produces the CDRs and CODRs in a raw tabular format. To configure the output format of detail record reports, you must log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin and navigate to the Configurations menu. For more information on navigating to the Configurations menu, see Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59. To configure the output format of detail record reports, you must select which fields that you want to view and print. For more information, see CDR Configuration Properties on page 269 and CODR Configuration Properties on page 279. The records are stored in their respective files in a raw tabular format without column headings. You can copy the files for further processing using a text editor or spreadsheet application. Each day, Meeting Exchange saves the detail records to a daily CDR file and a daily CODR file. It stores the files in these locations with these formats:
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/usr/dcb/cdr for example, Nov09.cdr /usr/dcb/codr for example, Nov09.cod.

Meeting Exchange saves 30 files and automatically deletes the oldest file. Meeting Exchange does not delete CDR and CODR files that you have stored outside of their default directories. You can retain files for safekeeping outside the default directories.

Viewing and printing detail records


To view or print detail records: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the detail record: a. Select View. b. Select CDRs or CODRs. c. Select the report style. d. Select the report. Meeting Exchange displays the report. To print the detail record: a. Select Print. b. Select CDRs or CODRs. c. Select the report style.

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Accessing reports using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu

d. Select the report. e. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the report.

Accessing reports using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator main menu
You can view and print conference reports using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator Main Menu. These conference reports use the CDR and CODR information that Meeting Exchange collects and present the information in a table. You can only access a conference report for a conference that has ended. If a conference is in-progress, you cannot access a conference report for that conference.
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Working with conference report information Viewing and printing conference reports

Working with conference report information


Conference reports include:
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Conference date, conference ID, and conference name Meeting Exchange system (bridge) name Contact name or contact telephone number, but not both: This field is for scheduled conferences only. Conference start time: The time that the first participant entered the conference. Recorded file number: The number of the file that Meeting Exchange uses to store the conference recording. Scheduled duration minutes: The number of minutes between the conferences specified start and end times. Scheduled participants: The number of lines that the User has reserved for a scheduled conference. Conference duration: The interval between the first person joining the conference and the last person leaving the conference. Total conference minutes: The approximate sum of the line conference minutes. Notes: Information entered by the operator.

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Features status: This is the ON/OFF setting for each of 11 conference features. ON indicates that a feature was used during the conference. Playback and Record fields: These fields have three ON options: ANL=analog, DIG=digital, A/D= analog/digital. Unattended status: This is an ON/OFF setting. Maximum participants: The greatest number of simultaneous participants. Line numbers Line moderator status: This is a Y/N setting. Line names Line phone numbers, if recorded, or company name, if recorded Line start times: The time each line entered the Meeting Exchange system. Line conference minutes: The number of minutes each line was in the conference, rounded down to the nearest minute with a one-minute minimum. Line connect time: The number of minutes the line was connected to Meeting Exchange system, rounded down to the nearest minute with a one-minute minimum.

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Viewing and printing conference reports


To view or print detail records: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the detail record: a. Select View. b. Select Conference Reports. c. Select a record. The records have the file extension .cod, which refers to CODR. d. Select either Telephone Number or Company Name. This field will display on the conference report.

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e. Select either Report On A Single Conference or Report On All Conferences. You can display a single conference or all conferences on the selected day. If you select Report On A Single Conference, you must select a particular conference in the next dialog. Meeting Exchange displays the conference report. To print the detail record: a. Select View. b. Select Conference Reports. c. Select a record. The records have the file extension .cod, which refers to CODR. d. Select either Telephone Number or Company Name. This field will display on the conference report. e. Select either Report On A Single Conference or Report On All Conferences. You can print a single conference or all conferences on the selected day. If you select Report On A Single Conference, you must select a particular conference in the next dialog. f. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the conference report.

Accessing records using a relational database


You can view CDRs and CODRs using a Meeting Exchange relational database. This database is called bridgedb and is a PostgreSQL database, which is an object-relational database management system (ORDBMS). For more information on the implementation of relational database files, contact your Avaya Support Representative.

Accessing records using a remote host


If a Meeting Exchange deployment is in a LAN environment, you can view CDRs and CODRs on a separate computer, or remote host, in your network. Meeting Exchange can send CDRs

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and CODRs to the remote host in real time. Meeting Exchange uses a socket mechanism to facilitate this transmission. To enable this feature, you must configure Meeting Exchange and the remote host. This feature is commonly called the autocdr process.
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Introducing the transmission process Configuring the Meeting Exchange server Configuring the remote host

Introducing the transmission process


When you configure Meeting Exchange for the autocdr process, you store the IP address of the remote host in a particular file on the Meeting Exchange server. Once the Meeting Exchange server locates the remote host IP address, it waits indefinitely for a request from the remote host. The remote host sends requests that include the following information:
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Command number Starting date(s) Starting record number Autocdr mode

When Meeting Exchange receives a request, it opens a file, looks for the starting record number and sends the information to the remote host. Meeting Exchange sends all files after this date. If the remote host requests CDRs and CODRs, Meeting Exchange sends the CDRs for the starting date, then CODRs for that same day, then CDRs for the following day, and so on. The request from the remote host contains a Mode flag. The Mode flag determines how Meeting Exchange processes the request:
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If Mode flag = N, Meeting Exchange processes each request synchronously; The Meeting Exchange server completes each request, then returns to listening for another command. If Mode flag = Y, Meeting Exchange processes the request as above, then stops listening for commands and sends all records to the remote client asynchronously.

If the connection between the Meeting Exchange server and the remote host breaks, Meeting Exchange stops processing requests from the remote host. You must re-establish the connection and issue a request, specifying the date, starting sequence number, and mode. It takes up to 45 seconds to re-establish a lost or broken connection. Each request from the remote host and response from Meeting Exchange contains a header string. This header string contains the following information:
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Field type (51 or 52). CDRs have a field type of 51. CODRs a field type of 52. Month (JanDec) Day (0131)

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Sequence number (0000099999) Data Valid flag (Y = store this data, N = end of file reached) Mode flag (Y/N)

When Meeting Exchange sends CDRs and CODRs after midnight, they reflect the new date. In addition, Meeting Exchange resets the sequence number to 00000. The date and sequence number of a CDR reflect the start time of the call. Thus, CDRs generated after midnight may have a mix of sequence numbers and dates, because the system generates records as calls disconnect. For example, a thirty-minute call started 07/26/09 at 23:45 ends the following day (07/27/09) at 00:15. The CDR date is 07/26/09 and the sequence number is pre-00000. Table 21 provides an overview of the information flow between the Meeting Exchange server and the remote host. Table 21: Meeting Exchange Server Action and Remote Host Response Meeting Exchange.. Initializes (warm/cold boot). Listens for connection requests.
<=====

Remote Host...

Requests connection.

Verifies host in /etc/hosts file. Establishes connection.

=====> <=====

Sends valid request. Receives/stores data. Sees blank record; throws away blank record; closes file.

Request Autocdr Mode Flag=N. Locates/transfers requested file. Reaches end of file. Sends blank record (seqnum=99999, Data Valid flag = N) Waits for next command. Request Autocdr Mode Flag=Y. Locates/transfers requested file. Stops listening for commands. Continues sending records as events occur. Loses/closes connection. Stops sending records. Listens for connection requests.

=====>

=====>

=====>

Receives/stores data. Continues storing data.

=====>

==/ /=>

Loses/closes connection.

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Configuring the Meeting Exchange server


To configure the Meeting Exchange server for the autocdr process: 1. Enter the IP address of the remote host in the /etc/hosts file on the Meeting Exchange server. 2. Enter the port number on which Meeting Exchange listens for requests from the remote host in the /etc/services file. You must add this information to the /etc/services file on the Meeting Exchange server and to the the /etc/services file on the remote host. You can define this port as any number greater than or equal to 5000 that does not conflict with other port numbers in the /etc/services file. The service name of this port is autocdr. The following command string is an example: autocdr <service number>/tcp where the white space between autocdr and <service number> is a tab character. 3. Set the Automatic CDR Print system parameter to LAN. For more information on Automatic CDR Print, see System configuration properties on page 294. Once you configure the Automatic CDR Print parameter, the autocdr process locates a port number in the /etc/services file and listens on that port for requests from the remote host. 4. Configure the output format of CDRs and CODRs using the Meeting Exchange System Administrator Main Menu. For more information, see CDR Configuration Properties on page 269 and CODR Configuration Properties on page 279. Using this functionality, you can include a subset of the CDR and CODR fields in each response, rather than transmitting all fields.

Configuring the remote host


There are three main steps in the configuration of the remote host:
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Writing an application Defining a port Testing the configuration

Writing an application
To access the CDR and CODR information on the Meeting Exchange server, you must configure the remote host. You must write a small client program and install it on the remote host. The program must contain socket commands consisting of plain ASCII text. Meeting Exchange responds to these four valid commands:

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REQUEST_CDR_FILE (cmd=01) This command asks Meeting Exchange to send CDR records to the remote host. REQUEST_CODR_FILE (cmd=02) This command asks Meeting Exchange to send CODR records to the remote host. REQUEST_CDR_CODR_FILE (cmd=03) This command asks Meeting Exchange to send CDR and CODR records to the remote host.

REQUEST_PING (cmd=04) This command asks Meeting Exchange to send a message back confirming a connection.

Each request is 13-bytes of ASCII text. All fields in the requests are fixed-length. Request numbers should be right justified and zero filled. The format of REQUEST_CDR_FILE is: struct request_cdr_file { char cmd[2];// "01" char month[3];// MMM (e.g. "Jan") char day[2];// DD (e.g. "01") char seqnum[5];// NNNNN (e.g. "00012") char mode[1];// Y or N }; The format of REQUEST_CODR_FILE is: struct request_codr_file { char cmd[2];// "02" char month[3];// MMM (e.g. "Jan") char day[2];// DD (e.g. "01") char seqnum[5];// NNNNN (e.g. "00012") char mode[1];// Y or N };

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The format of REQUEST_CDR_CODR_FILE is: struct request_cdr_codr_file { char cmd[2];// "03" char cdrMonth[3];// MMM (e.g. "Jan") char cdrDay[2];// DD char mode[1];// Y or N char codrMonth[3];// MMM (e.g. "Jan") char codrDay[2];// DD }; The format of REQUEST_PING is: struct request_ping { char cmd[2];// "04" char rfu[11]; }; These commands, REQUEST_CDR_FILE, REQUEST_CODR_FILE REQUEST_CDR_CODR_FILE, cause the Meeting Exchange server to send records for the specified days file, beginning with sequence # NNNNN. If you set the Mode Flag in the request to N, the Meeting Exchange server sends a blank record upon reaching end-of-file (EOF). This blank record includes the requested files date and a sequence number of 99999, with N as the Data Valid Flag in the header. However, if you set the Mode Flag in the request to Y, the Meeting Exchange server does not send an end of file blank record. Instead, the server continues sending records as they become available until the connection is lost or broken. The command REQUEST_PING allows the remote host to check if the connection to Meeting Exchange is open and the server is running. The REQUEST_PING command is padded to the same size as a REQUEST_CDR_FILE command. If the connection to Meeting Exchange is open and the server is running, Meeting Exchange sends the same message back to the remote host. (e.g. "01") char codrSeqnum[5];// NNNNN (e.g. "00012") (e.g. "01") char cdrSeqnum[5];// NNNNN (e.g. "00012")

Defining a port
You must define a port in the the /etc/services file. For more information, see 2 in Configuring the Meeting Exchange server on page 112.

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Testing the configuration


Avaya recommends testing the autocdr process by making a socket connection and sending one of the socket commands.

Accessing reports using the Client Registration Server


Using the Client Registration Server (CRS) Front End, operators can access the data in the CDRs database. They can only view the data when the conference is over. They can also save it as a .txt or .csv file. They can access the data using the Schedule on the CRS Front End. For more information on accessing CDRs and CODRs using the CRS Front End, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Accessing reports using Bridge Talk


Using the Bridge Talk, operators can access the data in the CDRs database.They can view and print a large number of reports, such as conference status reports, conference activity reports, line connect times, and so on. They can also view information about past conferences and about operator activity. For more information on accessing CDRs and CODRs using Bridge Talk, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Accessing reports using Web Portal


Using the Web Portal application, moderators can access the data in the CDRs database. It is important to note that each report only shows their conferences and conference usage. They cannot see the usage patterns of other moderators. The Web Portal application produces Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and charts. Available reports include Audio Conference reports, Data Conference reports, and port usage reports. System Administrators can also use the Web Portal application to generate reports. These reports obtain data from the CDRs and BSRes2 databases, as well as data from the application server. These reports provide live System Administrators with information about resource and User usage. Available reports include booking reports, moderator console reports, session load reports, and user session reports.

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For more information on how moderators can access CDRs and CODRs using Web Portal, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. For more information on how System Administrators can use the Web Portal to generate reports, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications Guide. Both of these guides are available on support.avaya.com.

Accessing reports using the Reports Application


The Meeting Exchange solution includes an application called the Avaya Reports application. The Avaya Reports application produces Microsoft Excel spreadsheets and charts using the data in the BSRes2 and CDRs databases. Operators can use the Reports application to analyze report data to respond to specific customer queries about conference usage, duration, individual attendance, and activity during a conference. System Administrators can use the Reports application to analyze report data to check that system resources are being used efficiently. Examples of reports include reports on client activity, conference lists, system utilization, and participant lists. System Administrators can configure the Reports application to ensure that it generates reports at times when Meeting Exchange is not under heavy load, such as overnight. This flexibility ensures that the process of reports generation does not impact the performance of the audio conferencing server. For more information on the configuration of the Reports application, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications Guide. For more information on the use of the Reports application, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. Both of these guides are available on support.avaya.com.

Accessing LAN statistics reports


You can view a report that contains some basic information about the IP, ICMP, IGMP, TCP, and UDP packet traffic that Meeting Exchange has received and sent. This LAN statistics report provides a very limited information but could be a useful starting point for troubleshooting. For the most part, service providers rather than enterprise customers will view these statistics. To access the LAN statistics report: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. 3. Select View. 4. Select LAN Statistics. Meeting Exchange displays the report.

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Accessing logs

Alternatively, you can log into Meeting Exchange as a craft user and navigate to /usr/dcb/ lanstats.

Accessing logs
Using the System Administrator Main Menu, you can access a number of log files, as follows:
l l l l

Accessing general logs Accessing modification logs Accessing operator logs Accessing participant logs

Accessing general logs


You can view a log that contains messages from all software processes that Meeting Exchange uses. This log includes information about system information, software errors, and trunk alarms. The name of the log file is the current date (for example, Dec09). Meeting Exchange stores a maximum of 30 log files. This file is a useful starting point for troubleshooting. To access the logs: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the logs: a. Select View. b. Select Logs. c. Select a log. Meeting Exchange displays the log. To print the log: a. Select Print. a. Select Logs. a. Select a log. b. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the dial list.

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Alternatively, you can log into Meeting Exchange as a craft user and navigate to /usr/dcb/ logs directory.

Accessing modification logs


You can view a log that shows any changes that a Bridge Talk operator makes to live conferences. This file is a useful audit trail of operator actions. To access the logs: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the conference modification logs: a. Select View. b. Select Modify Logs. c. Select a conference modification log. Meeting Exchange displays the log. To print the conference modification log: a. Select Print. a. Select Modify Logs. a. Select a conference modification log. b. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the log. Alternatively, you can log into Meeting Exchange as a craft user and navigate to /usr/dcb/ modilog directory.

Accessing operator logs


If you enable the Transaction Logs parameter in the System Configuration Menu, Meeting Exchange creates an audit trail of Bridge Talk operator actions. For more information on the Transaction Logs parameter, see System configuration properties on page 294. For more information on configuring the system configuration properties, see Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59. Meeting Exchange creates a log each day. To customize your log, you can filter the available data using a number of filters. Table 22 lists the filtering criteria.

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Table 22: Operator Transaction Filters Filter Month Day Operator Sign-in Command Setting
l l l l

All For all months. Select a month. All For all days in the month. Select a day of the month.

Enter the operator Station Number for which you want to see transactions. Enter the sign-in name of the operator for which you want to see transactions.
l

All (default) Display a list of all the commands that are logged in the transaction log on the lower part of the screen. Select the command you are interested in: - ACCESS - CONFERENCE - DEBUG_MODE - FASTDIAL - HELP - LINE - LOGIN - LOGOUT - NEXT_ENTER - OPERATOR_TALK - OPTIONS - PURGE - SET

The resulting log references operator actions. Table 23 can help you to interpret the log details in terms of the Bridge Talk operator actions. Table 23: Logged Operator Transactions Command Access/Dial Access/Hangup Access/Next_Available Parameters Linenum; name; company; digits Linenum Linenum 1 of 6

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Table 23: Logged Operator Transactions (continued) Command Access/Next_Enter Access/Place Access/Release Access/Transfer Access/User_Selected Conference/AUX1 Conference/AUX2 Conference/ClearAll Conference/EntryTone Conference/ExitTone Conference/Gain Conference/Hangup Conference/ID Conference/Lecture Conference/Lock Conference/Music Conference/Music/Stop Conference/Name Conference/Note Conference/Playback/Digital Conference/Playback/ External Conference/Poll/Clear Conference/Poll/Exit Conference/Poll/Help Conference/Poll/Include Parameters Linenum; seizetime Linenum; confnum Linenum Linenum; number/Extension Linenum Confnum; aux1 Confnum; aux2 Conference Confnum; entry tone = On/Off Confnum; exit tone = On/Off Confnum; gain = On/Off Confnum Confnum; confid Confnum; lecture = TRUE/FALSE Confnum; lock = TRUE/FALSE Confnum; musicSource; mode=On Confnum; mode=Off Confnum; name Confnum; note Confnum; channum; filename; skiptime Confnum; channum Confnum; linenum Confnum Access/User_Selected Confnum; includeall = TRUE/FALSE 2 of 6

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Table 23: Logged Operator Transactions (continued) Command Conference/Poll/Mute Conference/Poll/Poll Conference/Poll/Release Conference/Poll/Start Conference/Promptset Conference/QA/Clear Conference/QA/ Close_Mute_Line Conference/QA/Exit Conference/QA/Open_Line Conference/QA/Recall Conference/QA/Resume Conference/QA/Start Conference/QA/Stop Conference/QA/Access_Help Parameters Confnum; linenum; mute = TRUE/FALSE Confnum; pollmode = TRUE/FALSE Access/Release Confnum confnum;promptset Confnum Confnum; linenum Confnum Confnum; linenum Confnum; linenum Confnum; linenum Confnum Confnum time operator_number operator_name CONFERENCE/QA/ACCESS_MOD confnum;linenum time operator_number operator_name CONFERENCE/QA/RELEASE_MOD; confnum;linenum Confnum; channum; filename;autogenname Confnum; channum Confnum; secure allowed = TRUE/FALSE Confnum fromConf; toConf Mode Listname; confnum; startlinenum; annunciator Listname; accesscode 3 of 6

Conference/QA/ Release_Help Conference/Record/Digital Conference/Record/External Conference/SecureAllowed Conference/Play_Rec/Stop Conference/Transfer Debug_Mode Fastdial/Blast Fastdial/Create

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Table 23: Logged Operator Transactions (continued) Command Fastdial/Modify Fastdial/Remove Help/Conf Help/Individual Line/Aux1 Line/Aux2 Line/Aux3 Line/CallType Line/CompanyName Line/Fault Line/Hangup Line/Moderator Line/Mute Parameters Listname; accesscode Listname Confnum; helpreqtime Linenum; helpreqtime Linenum; aux 1 Linenum; aux 2 Linenum; aux 3 Linenum; call type Linenum; company Linenum; mode = TRUE/FALSE Linenum Linenum; moderator = TRUE/FALSE Line/Mute linenumb = ;selfMute = TRUE/ FALSE; operMute = TRUE/FALSE Note: When the operator has Talk ON then operMute=False. If the operator has Talk OFF, then operMute=True. Linenum; name Linenum; number Linenum; Promptset Linenum; telnum Linenum;toConf or Linenum; phone; userCode; pinCode Linenum; vll = TRUE/FALSE Channum; apiTabidx Session= 4 of 6

Line/Name Line/Number Line/Promptset Line/Reconnect Line/Transfer

Line/VirtualLink Login Logout

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Table 23: Logged Operator Transactions (continued) Command Options/Annunciator/ Playback Options/Annunciator/Record Options/Annunciator/ Set_Msg Options/Annunciator/Stop Options/Chat Options/Listen/Line/HangUp Options/Listen/Line/Mute Parameters Msgnum Msgnum Msgnum; text Msgnum Destopernum; text Linenum Line/Mute linenumb = ;selfMute = TRUE/ FALSE; operMute = TRUE/FALSE Linenum Linenum Linenum = all Confnum Confnum = all Confnum Linenum = all RemoteIPAddr; signInLevel; serverType RemoteIPAddr ConfirmNum; confSecCode; modSecCode; confID ConfirmNum; confSecCode; modSecCode; confID; maxChans; startDate/Time; endDate/ Time; inProg ConfirmNum; confSecCode; modSecCode; confID; maxChans; startDate/Time; endDate/ Time; inProg Month; day; numItemsFound VersionMajor; versionMinor 5 of 6

Options/Listen/Line/Release Options/Listen/Line/Start Purge/Call_Counts Purge/Disconnects Purge/Disconnects/All Purge/Mins_Per_Conference Purge/Total_Line_Times Scheduler/Login Scheduler/Logout Scheduler/Conference/ Create Scheduler/Conference/ Modify/Before Scheduler/Conference/ Modify/After Scheduler/Getsched Scheduler/Getver

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Table 23: Logged Operator Transactions (continued) Command Scheduler/Usage Scheduler/Lsconf Parameters LinesAvail; linesEnt; opersAvail; confsAvail Month; day; confirmNum; confID; confCode; confName; signinName; attended; onDemandLines; inProg; numItemsFound SaveWeeks ConfirmNum ConfirmNumIn; confirmNumOut Debug TimerA; timerB; timerC Confnum; linenum Linenum; answer = ON/OFF NightTime = TRUE/FALSE Oldscantime; newscantime 6 of 6 To access the operator transaction logs: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the operator transaction logs: a. Select View. b. Select Operator Trans. Logs. c. Use the Log Selection screen to specify your filter criteria. d. Save your filter criteria. Meeting Exchange displays the log. To print an operator transaction log: a. Select Print. a. Select Operator Trans. Logs. a. Select a log.

Scheduler/Conference/Purge Scheduler/Conference/ Remove Scheduler/Conference/ Setspecial Scheduler/Debug Scheduler/Timer Set/ACS Set/Answer Set/Night_Time Set/Scan_Time

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b. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the log. Alternatively, you can log into Meeting Exchange as a craft user and navigate to /usr/dcb/ dbase/ologs directory.

Accessing participant logs


If you enable the Log User Transaction parameter in the System Configuration Menu, Meeting Exchange creates an audit trail of conference participant actions. For more information on the Log User Transaction parameter, see System configuration properties on page 294. For more information on configuring the system configuration properties, see Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59. Meeting Exchange creates a log each day. You can configure Meeting Exchange to save these log files on the local application server. Alternatively, you can configure Meeting Exchange to send these log files to a remote computer. By default, Meeting Exchange stores the logs files in /usr/dcb/utlogs. To configure Meeting Exchange to send these log files to a remote computer, you must configure the local2.notice field in the /etc/syslog.conf file by adding the following information to the default location: @serverName. User transaction logs record the following information:
l l l l l l l l

Calls ANI/DNIS All DTMF entered Channels moving to user conferences Announcement segments played to a user Customer disconnects with the reason Toggling mute Performing a dial out operation Commands <date> <time> <system id> <service name>: <application specific data>

The logs contain information in the following format:

The <application specific data> format is: chan <nn> dtmf <xxx> chan <nn> move to conf <nn> chan <nn> play segment <xxx> chan <nn> disconnect with reason <xxx>

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An ellipse (...) following the segment number indicates that there are multiple segments for this log entry.

Accessing port capacity reports


You can view traffic statistic files that contain information about port capacity. The traffic statistic files enable you to view the usage patterns and conference activity. You can compage the scheduled activity with the actual conference activity. Meeting Exchange generates a daily file containing statistics that it updates every 15 minutes. Meeting Exchange lists the minimum, maximum, and average counts for the following categories:
l

System Capacity The number of lines currently available for conferences. This count excludes remote operator lines, faulted lines, and lines out-of-service. Channels Scheduled Information about the number of channels that operators and moderators have currently scheduled for conferences. Channels In Scheduled Conf The scheduled channels that Meeting Exchange is currently using. Compare this information to Channels Scheduled to see if scheduling and usage patterns agree. Channels In Use - Total The channels that Meeting Exchange is currently using for both scheduled and unscheduled conferences. Total Utilization The percentage of channels that Meeting Exchange is currently using.

Meeting Exchange maintains a maximum of 30 traffic statistics files. It automatically deletes the oldest file. To access the traffic statistics files: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the traffic statistics files: a. Select View. b. Select Traffic Stats. c. Select a file. Meeting Exchange displays the traffic statistics. To print a traffic statistics file: a. Select Print. a. Select Traffic Stats. a. Select a file.

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Accessing polling reports

b. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the traffic statistics. Alternatively, you can log into Meeting Exchange as a craft user and navigate to the /usr/ dcb/traffic directory.

Accessing polling reports


If operators, using Bridge Talk, and moderators, using Conference Viewer, conduct polls during their conferences, you can view the polling results and polling tags after the poll takes place. The polling tags are the titles of the voting categories in a poll. To access the polling files: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin user. 2. Navigate to System Administrator Main Menu > File Management. To view the traffic statistics files: a. Select View. b. Select Polling Results or Tag Files. c. Select a file. Meeting Exchange displays the polling files. To print a traffic statistics file: a. Select Print. a. Select Polling Results or Tag Files. a. Select a file. b. Select a printer. Meeting Exchange prints the polling files. Alternatively, you can log into Meeting Exchange as a craft user and navigate to the /usr/ dcb/dbase/polprnts directory.

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Chapter 11: Configuring PINs


PIN code is an identification number that is unique to each participant (both moderators and conferees). The name of the participant and their unique identification number are stored in a PIN list. When operators using the CRS Front End and moderators using the Web Portal, create a new participant, the CRS generates a PIN code for each new participant. If customers require additional security for their conferences, they can book conferences that require a conference passcode and the participants PIN code to access the conference. This chapter describes how to configure PINs for your customers. It contains the following sections:
l l l l

A short note on PIN functionality Conference types PIN mode and the user experience A short note on PIN lists

A short note on PIN functionality


At conference booking time, an operator using the CRS Front End or a moderator using the Web Portal can specify a PIN Mode. The PIN Mode options are:
l l l

Off System Conference

Off
If an operator or moderator selects Off, Meeting Exchange does not use PIN codes for the conference reservation.

System
If an operator or moderator selects System, Meeting Exchange grants conference access to a participant if they enter the correct passcode and a PIN code which matches any entry in the systems PIN list, which is stored in a database table on the Meeting Exchange application

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server. The CRS creates this PIN list automatically. When an operator adds new participants to a Clients address book or a moderator adds new participants to their own address book, the CRS allocates a PIN to each new participant. Meeting Exchange stores the PIN in a system-generated PIN list. System PIN Mode primarily identifies attendees.

Conference
If an operator, using CRS Front End, selects Conference, Meeting Exchange grants conference access to a participant only if they have been invited to that particular conference. In other words, it grants access if a participant enters the correct passcode and a PIN code which matches any entry in that particular conferences PIN list. The CRS automatically creates a conference PIN list for each conference. The conference PIN list contains the PINs of participants who have been specifically invited to that particular conference. Alternatively, if operators wish to use a specific PIN list, the CRS allows them to enter a name in the PIN List field. For more information on creating these PIN lists, see Creating PIN lists on page 132. Conference PIN Mode adds security to the conference.

Conference types
This section describes how PIN Mode operates for different conference types. There are a number of conference types:
l l l l

Unattended conferences Attended conferences Flexflow conferences Self Registration conferences

Unattended conferences
For Unattended conferences, operators and moderators can choose Off, System, or Conference PIN Mode.

Attended conferences
For Attended conferences, Meeting Exchange disables PIN Mode functionality.

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PIN mode and the user experience

Flexflow conferences
For Flexflow conferences, operators and moderators can choose Off, System, or Conference PIN Mode.

Self Registration conferences


If an operator using CRS Front End books a Self Registration conference, Meeting Exchange disables the PIN Mode options on the interface. The PIN Mode options are inaccessible to operators because, for Self Registration conferences, the Meeting Exchange automatically uses the Conference PIN Mode. The CRS generates a subset of the PIN List database table for each Self Registration conference. This subset contains only the invited, or registered, participants.

PIN mode and the user experience


Meeting Exchange Users are participants, either moderators or conferees, who attend conference calls. The User experience varies depending on the PIN Mode. Table 24: User Experience PIN Mode Off System Conference Experience when Entering the Conference Participants enter their passcode on the telephone keypad. Participants enter their passcode and their PIN code on the telephone keypad. Participants enter their passcode and their PIN code on the telephone keypad.

A short note on PIN lists


You can create any number of PIN lists. You can then copy these files to the application server and load them into the bridgedb database. This section describes how to create, copy, and load PIN lists. It contains the following sections:
l

Creating PIN lists

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Loading PIN lists

As an alternative to creating, copying, and loading PIN lists, the CRS automatically generates a PIN list for each conference. The automatically-generated PIN list contains the PINs of participants who have been invited to the particular conference. The CRS names this automatically-generated PIN list using this naming convention: cl_conference reference.txt. If operators wish to make use of this automatically-generated PIN list, they simply leave the PIN List field blank. If they leave the PIN List field blank, the CRS automatically assigns the automatically-generated conference PIN list to the conference. On the Web Portal, moderators cannot edit the PIN List field. Meeting Exchange automatically assigns the PIN list, cl_conference reference.txt to the conference. If operators and moderators add or delete participants after they book the conference, the CRS updates the PIN list dynamically. If operators import a list of participants from an external file, using the Import button on the CRS Front End, the CRS adds their PINs to the systems PIN list.

Creating PIN lists


To create a PIN list, you require two files:
l l

PINs.txt PINlist.txt

You must create these files in a special format. If they do not conform to the format, you may be unable to load them on to the application server. Both files require the use of the pipe (|) to separate the fields. If you do not enter any information in an optional field, ensure that you enter a space, followed by pipe. For example: 8975| |

PINs.txt
Table 25 describes the format of the pins.txt file.
.

Table 25: PINs.txt File Format Field CompanyRef ClientImportID ClientFirstName ClientLastName Type Integer Char(50) Char(30) Char(30) Required N N You can enter either: ClientFirstName and ClientLastName or ClientFullName 1 of 2

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Table 25: PINs.txt File Format (continued) Field ClientFullName ClientCompanyName ClientAddrLine1 ClientAddrLine2 ClientAddrLine3 ClientAddrLine4 ClientMainPINCode ClientMainPhone ClientMainFax ClientEmail LineAux1 LineAux2 LineAux3 InsertTimet Type Char(80) Char(60) Char(40) Char(40) Char(40) Char(40) Char(16) Char(40) Char(40) Char(30) Char(80) Char(80) Char(80)
Integer in seconds since midnight, 1 Jan 1970 in GMT.

Required Y, or ClientFirstName and ClientLastName N N. Reserved for future use. N. Reserved for future use. N. Reserved for future use. N. Reserved for future use. Y. Must be unique for non-NULL values. N N. Reserved for future use. N. Reserved for future use. N N N N

InsertLogin UpdateTimet

Char(30)
Integer in seconds since midnight, 1 Jan 1970 in GMT.

N N

UpdateLogin

Char(30)

N 2 of 2

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PINlist.txt
Table 26 describes the format of the pinlist.txt file. Table 26: PINList.txt File Format
Field Type Required

PINListName ClientMainPINCode PINCompanyName PINClientName

Char(30) Char(16) Char(60) Char(40)

Y Y Reserved for use by the CRS Self Registration application. Reserved for use by the CRS Self Registration application.

Loading PIN lists


To load the PIN lists to the Meeting Exchange application server, you must copy the files to a batchdata directory. From this directory, you must load the lists to the application server database called bridgedb. 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an sroot user. Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid sroot password. The sroot login provides a higher level of access to the server than the craft login. 2. Navigate to /usr/dcb/dbase/bridgedb/batchdata/. 3. Start a Session Control Protocol (SCP) session using the Meeting Exchange application server name for the PIN code files. scp <system_name> 4. Log in to the bridgedb database. login: brdgdbo Password:******* Note: Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid bridgedb password. 5. At the SCP prompt, enter binary to indicate that you want to copy the files in binary format: scp> binary

Note:

Note:

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6. Run the following command command to move the pinlist.txt file from your workstation to the Meeting Exchange /usr/dcb/dbase/bridgedb/batchdata/ directory. put pinlist.txt pinlist.txt 7. Run the following command to move the pins.txt file from your workstation to the Meeting Exchange /usr/dcb/dbase/bridgedb/batchdata/ directory. put pins.txt pins.txt 8. Exit the SCP session: scp> quit 9. Run a full database backup before you load the two files into the bridgedb database. This step ensures that you can restore the database if there is an error. bridgedb_maintain_pg.sh no_prompt backup bridgedb 10. Run the following scripts to load the two files: batch_load_pg.sh prompt pins /tmp/pins.txt batch_load_pg.sh prompts pinlist /tmp/pinlist.txt Meeting Exchange displays this prompt: Batch loading started. This may take a moment so please be patient... Batch load was successful! 11. Run a full database backup as described in step 9. Now the PIN list is available for use. You must distribute the PIN list name to operators if you want them to use it.

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Chapter 12: Configuring recording


Meeting Exchange includes a feature which enables customers to record their conferences. This feature is useful for customers who wish to store any or all conferences for security reasons. It is also useful for customers who wish to make conferences available for playback, for example, to people who were unable to attend a conference. Meeting Exchange can store and manage recordings within the Meeting Exchange server environment. If customers use this option, it is often called on-bridge recording. Alternatively, customers can send the conferences to an external device for recording, management, and playback. If customers use this option, it is often called off-bridge recording. If customers use the off-bridge recording option, they cannot make use of the playback facilities within Meeting Exchange. This chapter is mainly concerned with on-bridge recording. As an aside, some people also refer to the recording feature as Digital Record and Playback (DRP). People use this term because the featcfg file lists the recording feature as DRP. Also, it is called digital because it is stored on the hard disk in a digital form. For more information on the featcfg file, see Enabling features on page 39. To configure recording, you must perform a number of tasks, as follows:
l l l l l

Enabling the recording feature Configuring recording properties Configuring the playback call flow Managing files Supporting an older method of conference playback for Web Portal users

Enabling the recording feature


To enable the recording feature, follow the same set of steps that you used for many other Meeting Exchange features: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an sroot user. Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid sroot password. The sroot login provides a higher level of access to the server than the craft login.

Note:

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2. Navigate to /usr/dcb/bin and run the following command: featcfg The server lists the features and displayed their status as installed or not installed. 3. Enable recording using the following command: featcfg +DRP 4. Reboot the server using the following method, which Avaya recommends: a. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbmaint. b. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Re-initialization. c. Select Yes at the confirmation. d. Press the Enter/Return key. The server reboots and enables the recording feature.

Configuring recording properties


To customize the recording feature, you must configure a number of parameters in the System Configuration menu. For a list of all the parameters in the System Configuration menu, see System configuration properties on page 294. For more information on navigating to the System Configuration menu, see Customizing Meeting Exchange properties on page 59. For legal reasons, in many countries, participants must be informed that the conference is being recorded. As a result, Meeting Exchange plays an audio message to inform them that the conference is being recorded. If an operator or a moderator pauses the recording and then subsequently resumes it, Meeting Exchange replays the audio message. This is not configurable. To configure recording properties: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbmaint 2. Navigate to the System Administration Main Menu. 3. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Configurations. The Configurations screen provides you with an entry point for the customization of all of the conferencing properties. 4. Select System Configuration.

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5. Use the System Configuration screen to configure the recording properties. You must scroll through a number of pages to locate all the parameters that relate to the recording feature. System configuration properties on page 294 describes the parameters: Bridge Record Phone Number Dial String PreDial Delay Period Short Jump Medium Jump Long Jump Automatic Record All Secure Blocks Record Bridge Num DRP:Auto-gen fname 6. Navigate to the System Maintenance Main Menu. 7. Use the FDAPI Configuration screen to configure the number of annunciator channels. The Number of Ann Chans is the parameter. Meeting Exchange uses annunciator channels for playing greetings and in-conference announcements as well as for recording and playing back conferences. Essentially, Meeting Exchange uses annunciator channels for any sound data going to or from the internal hard-disk. This setting sets the maximum number of those resources that Meeting Exchange uses at any one time. In an in-service deployment, the record and playback featues hold the annunciator channel resource for long periods of time. For this reason, the record and playback usage is capped at a sub-set (70%) of the value entered here. Meeting Exchange reserves 30% for the playing of regular audio messages during conferences. This metric aims to balance the requirements of the regular conference audio messages and the recording and playback feature. This parameter represents the number of overall annunciator channels. The platform limit is 1500. This is also the default value. For more information on FDAPI resources, see Configuring server resources on page 52.

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Configuring the playback call flow


To enable conference playback, you must add a cbutil entry for a playback callflow. For more information on configuring cbutil, see Configuring call branding on page 40. Table 4 lists the cbutil columns. Meeting Exchange ignores many of these columns for the playback callflow. For example, in a playback callflow, Meeting Exchange ignores <rg>, <crs>, and <cre>. When users dial the DNIS that you configure for playback, Meeting Exchange plays the audio message that you enter in the <msg> column. In a typical in-service scenario, you could enter a greeting message number here. If you enter a zero value in the <msg> column, Meeting Exchange does not play a greeting message. Next, Meeting Exchange plays an audio message to prompt the user for a conference reference number. Once they enter the correct conference reference number, Meeting Exchange prompts them for their passcode. If they enter a valid passcode, Meeting Exchange may additionally prompt them for their name before granting them access to the conference recording. If there are one or more recordings associated with the conference reference, Meeting Exchange lists the total number of recordings and plays a series of messages that offer access to each recording.

Managing files
As a system administrator, you must manage the recording files and ensure that users can access them when required.
l l

Ensuring access for users Managing recordings

Ensuring access for users


Calls to the playback callflow occupy on-demand port resources. Your allocation of on-demand resources must take account of these lines. For more information on allocating port resources for on-demand and scheduled calls, see Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62.

Managing recordings
Meeting Exchange stores conference recordings in /usr3/confrp as Raw PCM audio, 8 KHz sample rate, 16-bit resolution, mono, mu-Law files, wrapped up in a .WAV header.

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As a general rule:
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The S6200 can store approximately 2400 hours of recordings. The S6800 can store approximately 1200 hours of recordings.

Individual recording files contain up to four hours of digitally recorded conference dialog. As a system administator, you must manually manage the /usr3/confrp folder to ensure that it does not grow excessively large. Also, if you upgrade to Meeting Exchange 5.2 from an older version of Meeting Exchange, you must rename existing recording filenames. In previous versions of Meeting Exchange, recording filenames were a maximum of eight characters. The Meeting Exchange 5.2 playback feature cannot play these recordings because it requires the filenames to have a different naming convention, as follows: <Reservation Comfirmation Number>+<Bridge Num>+XXXX If you enable automatic naming of the recordings, using the DRP:Auto-gen fname parameter, the value of XXXX begins with 0001 and grows to 09999999. If you enable automatic naming, the value of XXXX grows sequentially, as follows:
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If the operator or moderator stops and then restarts recording during the conference, Meeting Exchange increments the value of XXXX. Similarly, if all participants leave the conference and later re-join, Meeting Exchange increments the value of XXXX.

If you disable automatic naming and opt for manual naming of the recordings, the value of XXXX begins with 1 and grows to 99999999. Manual names can be any name that does not already exist. If there is no reservation confirmation number, Meeting Exchange allocates zeros to the filename in place of a valid confirmation number. This scenario could occur if an operator, using Bridge Talk, selects participants and places them into an empty conference room. To access older recordings after you upgrade, you must rename them to accomodate this new naming convention. You must add the <Reservation Comfirmation Number>+<Bridge Num> prefix to the old filename. For more information, see Upgrading from Meeting Exchange 5.0.x, 5.1.x, or 5.2 to 5.2 Service Pack 1 on page 193.

Supporting an older method of conference playback for Web Portal users


For users of the Web Portal application, or moderators, Meeting Exchange still supports an older method of conference playback. With the older functionality, moderators dial the conference telephone number and enter the recording filename. Moderators can obtain the recording filename from the My Recorded Conferences screen. The limitation with this method is that if the recording was made using a previous version of Meeting Exchange, such as Meeting Exchange 5.1, they cannot access the recording using this method. They must use the

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new method instead. If the recording was made using Meeting Exchange 5.2, they can access the recording using this older method. If you delete a recording from the recordings folder at/usr3/confrp, these recordings may still appear on the Web Portal My Recorded Conferences screen. However, moderators will not be able to access them.

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Chapter 13: Configuring languages


This chapter describes how Meeting Exchange handles languages. It contains the following sections:
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Introduction to localization A point of clarification regarding languages

Introduction to localization
It is important to note that the Meeting Exchange 5.2 server processes and graphic user interfaces (GUIs) use English text. System administrators must understand English in order to successfully install, configure, and monitor Meeting Exchange. Similarly, operators and moderators must understand English in order to interact with GUIs, such as Bridge Talk, CRS Front End, and Web Portal. However, Avaya has translated the audio messages into a number of languages. This translation feature extends to all moderator and conferee audio messages. Customers can use this feature to provide conference participants with a localized experience. This feature is especially useful in a deployment in which a customer creates a large number of on-demand conferences so that users do not need to interact with a booking interface. Similarly, it is useful in a deployment with in which a customer has English-speaking operators and foreign language participants. Meeting Exchange 5.2 supports a number of languages, such as, English, Simplified Chinese, Japanese, Malaysian, Korean, French, German, Italian, Russian, Spanish, Brazilian Portuguese, and so on. In order to use a translated set of audio messages, see Configuring audio messages on page 147. In particular, see the section Prompt sets on page 147 for a real world example of how to configure Meeting Exchange for German audio messages.

A point of clarification regarding languages


At this point, it is worth clarifying an important distinction between system language and conference language. System language is often called DNIS-driven language.
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System language Conference language

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Participant experience

System language
When you configure call branding, using the cbutil tool, you create an association between a dialed number identification service (DNIS) and an audio prompt set. This association creates the system language. In each row of a cbutil table, the <dnis> variable represents the DNIS and the <ps> variable represents the audio prompt set. So, for example, you could create an association between the DNIS 12345 and the English audio prompt set. For more information, see Configuring call branding on page 40 and in particular, Table 4.

Conference language
When operators or moderators book a conference, using CRS Front End, Bridge Talk, or Web Portal, they can create an association between the conference and an audio prompt set. This association creates the conference language. Bridge Talk operators can access the Prompt Set drop-down list in the Conference Scheduler utility, CRS Front End operators can access the Prompt Set drop-down list on the Options dialog, and Web Portal moderators can access the Prompt Set drop-down list on the Advanced Booking Options screen. For more information, see Using Meeting Exchange, which is available on support.avaya.com. Users cannot specify an audio prompt set if they book their conference using Avaya Conference Scheduler for Microsoft Outlook or the Avaya Scheduling Plug-in for IBM Lotus Notes.

Participant experience
When participants dial the DNIS, Meeting Exchange always plays audio messages in the system language. For example, if you associate the DNIS with the English audio prompt set, participants always hear English messages. Once participants enter their conference passcode, Meeting Exchange has visibility of the conference settings. At this point, there are two possible outcomes, as follows: Each row of the cbutil tool also has a parameter called Use Conference Prompt Set <ucps>. The default value of <ucps> is Y.
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If you set <ucps> to N, Meeting Exchange plays the system audio prompt set when the call routes to the bridge and until the caller joins the conference. After the caller joins the conference, the Meeting Exchange server uses the system audio prompt set to play prompts to the individual callers line and uses the conference audio prompt set to play prompts to the whole conference. Examples of prompts played to everyone in the conference include: - Message Number 359 Your Conference is now being recorded

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A point of clarification regarding languages

- Message Number 361 Conference Recording has stopped - Message number 455 The Conference Recording is currently paused - Message Number 343 The Conference is now in silent mode - Message Number 343 The Conference is now in talk mode Note: When Meeting Exchange routes callers to the Enter queue, it plays the audio prompts from Prompt Set 0 only.

Note:

For more information, see Table 4.

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Chapter 14: Configuring audio messages


During a conference, Meeting Exchange plays audio messages to participants to inform them of conference information and to prompt them for a response. These audio messages are sometimes called audio prompts or annunicator messages. A group of audio messages is often called a prompt set. This chapter describes how to install and configure audio messages. It contains the following sections:
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A short note about audio messages Recording new audio messages Enabling system wide messages

A short note about audio messages


This section introduces some technical points in relation to audio messages. It contains the following sections:
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Prompt sets Per-conference messages System wide messages

Prompt sets
A group of audio messages is often called a prompt set. Avaya ships Meeting Exchange with the capability of supporting 20 prompt sets. You can configure your deployment to use one or several of these prompt sets. Each prompt set contains 2000 message slots. By default, Meeting Exchange uses 299 of these message slots for the basic audio messages that guide participants through the process of using the conferencing server. For a full list of default messages, see Audio messages on page 323. In the remaining message slots, you can record new messages and configure Meeting Exchange to use these new messages. For more information, see Recording new audio messages on page 151. Avaya does not recommend recording new messages over the default messages. Avaya stores the Meeting Exchange prompt sets on the application server in the /usr2/ Prompts/Set# directory, where Set# ranges from Set0 to Set20. Set0 contains the default

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English audio messages. Each of the directories contains a folder for messages and a folder for numbers. For example: /usr2/Prompts/Set0/messages/ /usr2/Prompts/Set0/numbers/ /usr2/Prompts/Set1/messages/ /usr2/Prompts/Set1/numbers/ By default, the English language messages are shipped in Prompt Set 0 and all other prompt sets are linked to Prompt Set 0. However, Avaya has recorded the 299 default messages in a number of languages, in addition to English. Here is an example of a deployment of prompt sets. Table 27: Prompt Sets Language English Simplified Chinese/Mandarin Japanese Name/label in the CRS and Web Portal Prompt Set 1 Prompt Set 2 Prompt Set 3 Note: Prompt Set 3 is reserved for Japanese word ordering

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English Korean French German Italian Russian Latin Spanish Brazilian Portuguese English for teletype devices English Canadian French

Prompt Set 4 Prompt Set 5 Prompt Set 6 Prompt Set 7 Prompt Set 8 Prompt Set 9 Prompt Set 10 Prompt Set 11 Prompt Set 12 Prompt Set 13 Prompt Set 14 1 of 2

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Table 27: Prompt Sets (continued) Language Castilian Spanish English (United Kingdom) Name/label in the CRS and Web Portal Prompt Set 15 Prompt Set 16 2 of 2 Avaya does not ship the translated messages by default. If you wish to obtain a copy of a these messages, contact your Avaya Support Representative. There are a number of steps involved in the configuration of any additional language. For example, if you want to configure your deployment to play German messages: 1. Contact your Avaya Support Representative and obtain a copy of the German prompt set. 2. Open a PuTTY session and log in as an sroot user. Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid sroot password. 3. Make Prompt Set 2 available for prompts, as follows: rm Set2 mkdir Set2 mkdir Set2/messages mkdir Set2/numbers 4. Save the German prompt set to: /usr2/Prompts/Set2/messages/ /usr2/Prompts/Set2/numbers/ 5. You must perform the next steps on each of the Bridge Talk client machines: a. Close all instances of Bridge Talk. b. Open the Template.xml file in the Bridge Talk installation directory and configure the following parameters to ensure that the German prompt set is displayed as an option on Bridge Talk. For a full description of Template.xml parameters, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com. <Property value="2" type="Integer" name="numPromptSetLangs"/> <Property value="English" type="String" name="promptSetLang1"/> <Property value="German" type="String" name="promptSetLang2"/> c. Save the changes. Now, the prompt sets are enabled.

Note:

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The audio messages are Raw PCM audio, 8 KHz sample rate, 16-bit resolution, mono, mu-Law files. These messages have a filename but no file extension. The filename of the saved messages is one less than the message number on Meeting Exchange. For example, message 2 has a filename of 1. You can configure the instances in which Meeting Exchange plays messages by logging on to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin and navigating to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Voice Message Configuration. For more information on the audio message parameters, see Voice Message configuration on page 311. As there are 2000 message slots in each prompt set and only 299 default messages, you can use the spare message slots to record customized messages, such as Per-conference messages on page 150 or System wide messages on page 151.

Per-conference messages
Operators can use Bridge Talk to record messages to any message slot. For example, they can record a new message for a specific conference. Using the Client Registration Server (CRS) Front End, they can associate the message with the conference. If operators use Bridge Talk to schedule their conference, they cannot associate the message with the conference. The message slot that they use must be in the prompt set that is associated with the conference. So, if Prompt Set 1 is associated with the conference, operators must record the conference message in a message slot within Prompt Set 1. Here is an example of a real world scenario:
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A Bridge Talk operator records a message using their telephone audio path and the Tools > Annunciator dialog. They record the message in Prompt Set 2, message slot 1500. They edit the corresponding text field with the message text. Meeting Exchange stores the message in /usr2/Prompts/Set2/messages/1499 A CRS operator schedules a conference and selects Prompt Set 2 and message 1500 as the conference message.

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This feature is only available for deployments of Meeting Exchange on the S6200 server platform. It is not available if your deployment consists of an S6800 conferencing server. The CRS Front End does not have visibility of the message text so Avaya recommends maintaining a separate transcript of messages for operators who have CRS Front End access but not Bridge Talk access. Moderators can also use a DTMF keypad sequence (#2, by default) to record their own message for their conference. These messages, created by moderators, are entirely independent of the messages that the operator creates. These messages can be up to 30 seconds in length. To avoid confusion, it is a good idea to refer to the messages that the operator creates as conference welcome messages and to refer to the messages that the moderator creates as personal welcome messages.

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For more information on using Bridge Talk and the CRS Front End, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

System wide messages


Operators can also use Bridge Talk to record messages that Meeting Exchange plays to all conferences. Meeting Exchange plays this message before any conference-specific messages. System administrators enable this system wide message using the Configurations menu. For more information, see Enabling system wide messages on page 155. A known issue exists in Meeting Exchange 5.2 in relation to these per-conference and system messages. Specifically, the Avaya Conferencing Provider Application Programming Interface (ACP API) does not support these messages. So, if the ACP API is used to route participants to a conference, the participants do not hear these messages. It is important to note that the Avaya Plug-ins for Microsoft Outlook and IBM Lotus Notes use the ACP API to support the Click to Join button. So, if participants enter a conference by clicking Click to Join, they do not hear the per-conference or system messages.

Recording new audio messages


This section describes how to record new audio messages. It contains the following sections:
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A short note about recording audio messages Configuring prompt set names Configuring prompt set names Maintaining a transcript of messages

A short note about recording audio messages


By default, Meeting Exchange follows certain rules in relation to playing audio messages. It is important to consider these rules when recording and configuring new audio messages.
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By default, Meeting Exchange plays message 1 on each telephone line entering the conferencing system. Meeting Exchange plays message 242 to callers who respond to a blast dial, unless the operator specifies another message when they initiate the blast dial. Meeting Exchange plays message 247 as the PIN code prompt for unattended conferences with PIN codes security in effect.

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Meeting Exchange immediately places callers who are attending attended conferences, in the Enter Queue. If you configure call branding for your customer, Meeting Exchange plays the message that you configure in for that call branding entry. If you assign 0 to a DNIS, Meeting Exchange disables messages for any conferences that use this DNIS.For more information on configuring call branding, see Branding the customer experience on page 85. Meeting Exchange 5.2 supports 30,000 entries for call branding. Meeting Exchange plays some messages to individual lines and plays other messages to the entire conference. When Meeting Exchange plays a message to the entire conference, it mutes all conference lines. Meeting Exchange may delay some actions until the message finishes playing. Meeting Exchange plays tones during messages. If participants are listening to a line-specific message, Meeting Exchange does not play any conference tones to that participant. When Meeting Exchange plays a message to the conference, operators can perform actions, such as removing a line from a conference. If an operator accesses a line waiting for a line message, Meeting Exchange does not play any message to that line that it was intending to play. Meeting Exchange records all audio messages along with the conference. Under conditions of extremely heavy load, Meeting Exchange may delay playing a message. This behavior can result in a pause between a conference event and the corresponding message. This behavior can occur if messages are long or if many participants enter a conference within a short period of time. If this situation occurs, Avaya recommends adjusting the lengths of messages or substituting a tone for a message. You can configure Meeting Exchange to play a continuously looping on hold message in the Enter Queue. If you enable the On-Hold Msg. Frequency parameter, this change does not take effect until the Enter Queue clears. For more information on the On-Hold Msg. Frequency parameter, see System configuration properties on page 294.

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Configuring prompt set names


In a default installation of Meeting Exchange 5.2, the prompt sets are called Prompt Set 1, Prompt Set 2, and so on. So, when Bridge Talk operators click the Message Prompt Set drop-down list, they see the prompt sets listed as Prompt Set 1, Prompt Set 2, and so on. Operators access this drop-down list in step 3 of Recording new messages on page 153. Before you deploy Bridge Talk in a multi-language environment, Avaya recommends changing these labels so that they represent the appropriate language. To change the label names, you must update the Template.xml file located in the Bridge Talk installation path. For more

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information on the parameters in this file, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Recording new messages


There are two ways to record new messages. You can use an external audio editing program or you can use the Avaya program, Bridge Talk. This section describes how to use Bridge Talk. For more information on using Bridge Talk, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com. Before you use Bridge Talk to record messages, you must first perform two configuration tasks:
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On the Meeting Exchange application server, you must make the prompt sets available. On Bridge Talk, you must configure template.xml to display the prompt sets in the Message Prompt Set drop-down list.

Both of these steps are described in Prompt sets on page 147. It is important to note that if your deployment consists of an S6800 server, Meeting Exchange does not support recording from Bridge Talk to multiple prompt sets. Some messages are initial segments, such as The file number you entered is:. Some messages are middle segments, such as the digits 0-9. Some messages are tail segments, such as Participants currently in your conference. Some messages are standalone segments, such as Conference security has been activated. When recording new messages, you must record silence before and after the spoken portion using the following guidelines:
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Record approximately 0.5 to 0.9 seconds of silence before and after messages that are standalone segments. Record approximately 0.05 to 0.09 seconds of silence before middle and tail segments. Record approximately 0.2 to 0.3 seconds of silence after initial and middle segments. If the message consists of several segments, record approximately 0.5 to 0.9 seconds of silence before the first segment and after the last segment.

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To record a new message: 1. Dial in an Operator line to Bridge Talk. For more information about using Bridge Talk, see Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com. 2. Navigate to Tools > Annunciator to display the Annunciator Messages dialog. 3. Select a prompt set from the Message Prompt Set drop-down list. You can record a message in any message slot in any prompt set. 4. Select a message slot from the list of message slots. 5. Click Record and say the message.

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6. Click Stop when you are finished. 7. Click Playback to verify the message. It is good practice to enter the message text in the Message Summary column. 8. Click Close.

Maintaining a transcript of messages


Meeting Exchange ships with a written transcript of the default messages. This transcript is useful for seeing the message text without having to listen to each message. If you record new messages, Avaya recommends keeping this list up to date with the new message text. You can maintain a transcript of messages using two methods. As a system administrator, you can maintain the transcript file on the application server. Alternatively, operators can maintain the transcript using Bridge Talk. For more information on maintaining the transcript in Bridge Talk, see Using Meeting Exchange, which is available on support.avaya.com. It is important to note that there is only one transcript file, regardless of the number of translated prompt sets that you have installed in your deployment. This means that the text description of the messages in prompt set 1 is the same for all other prompt sets. To update the written transcript on the application server: 1. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin to display the System Administration Main Menu. 2. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Configurations. The Configurations screen provides you with an entry point for the customization of all of the conferencing properties. 3. Select Call Routing Configuration. 4. Select Flexible Annunciator Messages. The Flexible Annunciator Messages screen lists all the message text. You have to scroll down to see the first default pre-recorded message. 5. Make any changes you require and save your changes. You can save up to 70 characters.

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Enabling system wide messages

Enabling system wide messages


You can configure Meeting Exchange to play a message to all conferences. Meeting Exchange plays this message before any per-conference messages. In-service examples of the use of this feature include messages such as:
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This is a loss of service announcement. Conferencing services will not be available 2am to 7am January 20th due to essential maintenance. Apologies for any inconvenience. Half price conferencing this weekend!

To enable a system wide message: 1. Record a message using Bridge Talk and make a note of the message slot. For more information, see Recording new audio messages on page 151. 2. Log in to Meeting Exchange as dcbadmin to display the System Administration Main Menu. 3. From the System Administrator Main Menu, select Configurations. The Configurations screen provides you with an entry point for the customization of all of the conferencing properties. For more information on this screen, see Finding parameters by name on page 265. 4. Select System Configuration. 5. Set the System alert parameter to ON. Enter the message number, from 1 to 2000 in Alert message. A important point to note in relation to system wide messages is that if a caller dials in using SCAN callflow, Meeting Exchange plays the message in the language configured to the DNIS. If a caller dials in using the DIRECT callflow, Meeting Exchange plays the message in the language associated with the conference. This behavior is due to the fact that the DIRECT callflow routes the call directly to the conference. For more information on callflows and the DNIS, see Table 4.

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Chapter 15: Connecting Meeting Exchange to your network


You can connect Meeting Exchange to your existing network in a number of ways. You can directly connect the Meeting Exchange infrastructure to a single Avaya Aura Communication Manager. You can also connect the Meeting Exchange infrastructure to Communication Manager by way of a SIP Enablement Server (SES) proxy. You can also connect Meeting Exchange to Avaya Aura Session Manager. The Avaya Systems Integration Lab (SIL) has fully tested Meeting Exchange 5.2 with Session Manager. The documentation which describes this integration is available on the Avaya DevConnect website. For more information, see http:// www.avaya.com/gcm/master-usa/en-us/corporate/alliances/devconnect/index.htm. Additionally, if your network is a circuit-switched telephone network, you can connect Meeting Exchange to an Audiocodes Mediant media gateway. The Audiocodes gateway is a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) media gateway, which acts as a translation unit between a Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) telecommunications network and the Meeting Exchange VoIP telecommunications network. The media gateway performs the conversion from Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) to VoIP. This conversion enables your deployment to use the Session Initiation Protocol (SIP). SIP is a signaling protocol, widely used for controlling multimedia communication sessions such as voice and video calls over Internet Protocol (IP). This chapter describes some sample deployments. The requirements of your network infrastructure may differ from those described here. Use these instructions as a general guide. The Meeting Exchange solution also supports a number of other integrations and several hardware options from other vendors. For more information on these deployments, contact your Avaya Support Representative.
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Connecting directly to Communication Manager Connecting to an SES proxy Connecting to AudioCodes

Connecting directly to Communication Manager


You can connect Meeting Exchange to a single Communication Manager. A Meeting Exchange and Communication Manager integration routes incoming calls using a series of hierarchical tables. When a caller makes a telephone call to Communication Manager, the Communication Manager server analyses a dial plan table to see if the telephone number pattern matches an entry. If it finds a match, it reads the corresponding routing instructions. As an example, these instructions could direct the server to analyze a second table, called the Uniform Dial Plan (UDP) table. Again, it analyses the UDP table to see if the pattern matches an

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entry. If it finds a match, it reads the corresponding routing instructions. As an example, these instructions could direct the server to analyze a third table, called the Automatic Alternate Routing (AAR) table. If it finds a match, it reads the corresponding trunk information and will route the call through that trunk. As a last step, the server analyses a route pattern table to see if there are any further instructions before it places the call into the Meeting Exchange server. Instructions could include adding or removing some digits from the telephone number string. These steps through each of the hierarchical tables illustrates the possibilities and flexibility of Communication Manager. You can configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. To enable this functionality, you must perform a number of tasks, as follows:
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Adding Meeting Exchange to the node names list Adding a signaling group Adding a trunk group Adding a dialplan entry Adding a UDP entry Adding an AAR entry Adding a route pattern Configuring Meeting Exchange for Communication Manager

The steps in the following sections describe how to connect Communication Manager to Meeting Exchange.

Adding Meeting Exchange to the node names list


To add Meeting Exchange as a node: 1. Navigate to change node-names ip. 2. Enter the name of the Meeting Exchange server in the Name column. 3. Enter the IP address of the Meeting Exchange server in the IP Address column. 4. Save your changes.

Adding a signaling group


Typically, the signalling board on Communication Manager is a Control Local Area Network (CLAN) board. If your deployment uses a single CLAN board to connect your SIP trunk from Communication Manager to Meeting Exchange, there is a single point of failure if this is the primary connection. A more resilient option would be to configure multiple CLAN boards to connect to Meeting Exchange. For example, in a configuration with two CLAN boards, Meeting

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Exchange sends a SIP option message to both CLAN boards. If both CLAN boards are operational, Meeting Exchange connects the call to the first CLAN board. If the first CLAN board fails, it responds with a service unavailable message when Meeting Exchange sends a SIP option message. If Meeting Exchange receives a service unavailable message, it sends a SIP invite message to the second CLAN board and connects the call. Similarly, there are mechanisms in place in Communication Manager which enable it to detect if the Meeting Exchange server has failed. For example, using Look Ahead Routing (LAR), you can configure a routing preference for additional connection attempts if Communication Manager cannot connect to the Meeting Exchange server on the first attempt. For more information on configuring multiple CLAN boards and the LAR table, see the Communication Manager documentation, which is available on support.avaya.com. As an alternative to using a CLAN board, you can use a processor ethernet to provide network connectivity. You must set up a processor ethernet on Communication Manager. Before you can configure the processor ethernet, you must ensure that the feature is enabled in your license file. The main configuration takes place on the Configure server - Set Identities page, but you must also add the processor ethernet if it has not already been added. The command to add the processor ethernet is: add ip-interface procr. You can then set the trunk and signalling in the exact same way as for a CLAN board. You set Near-end Node Name to the hostname: procr. On the Meeting Exchange side, configure the TelnumToUri.tab file to connect to the network using the processor ethernet. For more information, see Administering Avaya Aura Communication Manager and Installing and Upgrading the Avaya S8300 Server, which are available on support.avaya.com. To add a signaling group: 1. Navigate to add signaling-group. 2. Ensure that the Group Type is sip. 3. Ensure that the Transport Method is tls. When you select tls, Communication Manager enters the value 5061 in the Near-end Listen Port and Far-end Listen Port fields. 4. Enter the name of a signaling board on the Communication Manager gateway in the Near-end Node Name field. This is the signaling board that you have selected for the connection from Communication Manager to Meeting Exchange. It is typically a CLAN board. 5. Enter the name of the Meeting Exchange server in the Far-end Node Name field. 6. Ensure that Direct IP-IP Audio Connections is n. 7. Ensure that DTMF over IP is rtp-payload. 8. Save your changes.

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Adding a trunk group


To add a trunk group: 1. Navigate to add trunk-group. 2. Enter a label to refer to the Meeting Exchange server in the Group Name field. 3. Ensure that the Service Type is tie. 4. Ensure that the Group Type is sip. 5. Ensure that the TAC is 113. 6. Enter the signaling group that corresponds to the signaling group that you added in Adding a signaling group on page 158 in the Signaling Group field. 7. Set the Number of Members field to the number of telephone lines or ports that you require in this trunk. Each trunk supports 255 ports. 8. Navigate to the second screen in the add trunk-group series. 9. Set the Preferred Minimum Session Refresh Interval to 600. 10. Navigate to the second screen in the add trunk-group series. 11. Set the Numbering Format to private. 12. Navigate to the fourth screen, called Protocol Variations, in the add trunk-group series. 13. Set the Telephone Event Payload Type as follows:
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If your deployment consists of only H.323 endpoints, set the Telephone Event Payload Type to 127. If your deployment consists of H.323 and SIP endpoints, set the Telephone Event Payload Type to 120.

14. Save your changes.

Adding a dialplan entry


To add a dialplan entry: 1. Navigate to change dialplan analysis. 2. For each of the conference telephone numbers, enter number in the Dialed String column. You enter a partial string, rather than entering each individual telephone number. For example, you can enter 45 in the Dialed String field. In this way, Communication

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Manager can process instructions for all telephone numbers that start with 45, such as 4511, 4512, 4513, 4514, and so on. 3. Enter the number of digits in the telephone number in the corresponding Total Length column, 4. Enter the routing instruction in the Call Type column. For example, if you would like Communication Manager to analyze the UDP table to see if the pattern matches an entry, set this column to udp. 5. Save your changes.

Adding a UDP entry


To add a uniform dialplan entry: 1. Navigate to change uniform analysis. 2. In the Matching Pattern and Len columns, enter the numbers that you entered in the Dialed String column and Total Length columns in Adding a dialplan entry on page 160. You can configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. Here, we present an illustrative configuration. 3. Enter aar in the Net column to ensure that Communication Manager analyzes the AAR table to see if the pattern matches an entry. 4. Save your changes.

Adding an AAR entry


To add an automatic alternate routing digit analysis entry: 1. Navigate to change aar analysis. 2. In the Dialed String and Total Min Max columns, enter the numbers that you entered in the Matching Pattern and Len columns in Adding a UDP entry on page 161. You can configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. Here, we present an illustrative configuration. 3. Enter the number of the trunk on which you would like Communication Manager to send the call to Meeting Exchange in the Route Pattern column. 4. Ensure that the Call Type column is set to aar. 5. Save your changes.

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Adding a route pattern


To add a route pattern: 1. Navigate to change route pattern. 2. Enter the number of the trunk on which you would like Communication Manager to send the call to Meeting Exchange in the Grp No column. 3. Configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. For example, you could instruct Communication Manager to drop two digits from the telephone number by entering 2 in the No. Del Dgts field. This instruction ensures that Communication Manager only sends the remaining digits to Meeting Exchange. 4. Save your changes.

Configuring Meeting Exchange for Communication Manager


To complete an integration with Communication Manager, there are a number of configuration tasks to perform on the Meeting Exchange application server. These steps are detailed in this section. To configure Meeting Exchange: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log to the Meeting Exchange server as a craft user. Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid craft password. 2. Navigate to the following directory and view the system.cfg file: cd /usr/ipcb/config cat system.cfg 3. Ensure that the transport method for both the MyListener and respContact settings is tls, using the following syntax: MyListener=sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP;transport=tls respContact=<sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP;transport=tls> This step is because Communication Manager expects the Transport Layer Security (TLS) method of transmission.

Note:

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Connecting to an SES proxy

4. Configure two further settings as follows: minSETimerValue=100 sessionRefreshTimer=1800 Avaya recommends these values because they optimize communications between Meeting Exchange and Communication Manager. Your deployment may have specific requirements and you may want to set different values. The minSETimerValue corresponds to a field in the Communication Manager trunk-group screen called Preferred Minimum Session Refresh Interval (sec). The sessionRefreshTimer corresponds to a field in the Communication Manager signaling group screen called Session Establishment Timer (min). 5. Save your changes. 6. In the same directory, view the telnumToUri.tab file: cat telnumToUri.tab Meeting Exchange uses the telnumToUri.tab file to enable operators and moderators to dial out to an external telephone number from the Meeting Exchange application server. In a deployment with Communication Manager, Meeting Exchange routes the dial out calls through Communication Manager. 7. Add an entry row to the table to represent Communication Manager using the following syntax: sip:Digit String@Communication Manager IP:5061;transport=tls This step is because Communication Manager expects the Transport Layer Security (TLS) method of transmission. 8. Save your changes.

Connecting to an SES proxy


The steps in the following section describes how to configure an SES proxy in your deployment. In a deployment of Meeting Exchange with an SES proxy, the SES proxy acts as a gateway between Communication Manager and Meeting Exchange. In this scenario, any calls to Meeting Exchange route through the Communication Manager server, then the SES proxy server, before terminating on the Meeting Exchange application server. Communication Manager handles all H.323 and PSTN calls. Typically, Communication Manager does not handle SIP calls. The SES proxy handles SIP calls. If your deployment uses some SIP endpoints, you must perform some additional configuration steps. To enable this deployment, you must perform a number of tasks, as follows:
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Configuring Meeting Exchange for an SES proxy Configuring Communication Manager for an SES proxy

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Configuring Communication Manager and the SES proxy for SIP calls

Configuring Meeting Exchange for an SES proxy


To configure Meeting Exchange: 1. Complete steps 1 to 5 from Configuring Meeting Exchange for Communication Manager on page 162. 2. In the same directory, view the proxyConfigTable.cfg file. cat proxyConfigTable.cfg 3. Add an entry to represent the SES proxy server that you intend to use. Table 28 describes the fields. Table 28: ProxyConfigTable.cfg Field ProxyUri Contact Description The IP address of the SES proxy server that you intend to use. The address of the Meeting Exchange DNIS that you wish to allocate to the SES proxy server. The address of the SES proxy DNIS that corresponds with the Meeting Exchange DNIS that you entered in the Contact field. The address of the SES proxy DNIS that corresponds with the Meeting Exchange DNIS that you entered in the Contact field. The account username which Meeting Exchange will use to register with the SES proxy server. The account password which Meeting Exchange will use to register with the SES proxy server. Syntax sip:<SES proxy IP address> sip:<DNIS>@<Meeting Exchange IP address> sip:<DNIS>@<SES proxy IP address>

To

From

sip:<DNIS>@<SES proxy IP address>

usrName

XXXX

passWord

XXXX

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Table 28: ProxyConfigTable.cfg Field refreshTime Description The refresh time should be 1800, as you configured in the system.cfg file. A unique numeric identifier for this entry. Syntax 1800

ID

4. In the same directory, view the mxmonitor.cfg file. cat mxmonitor.cfg 5. Ensure that sipsource is set to local. The default value for sipsource is crs. 6. In the same directory, view the processTable.cfg file. cat processTable.cfg 7. Ensure that sipAgent has an autoStart value of 0. Also, ensure that mxmonitor has an autoStart value of 1. 8. Lastly, add an entry to the cbutil file for the Meeting Exchange DNIS that you wish to allocate to the SES proxy server. For more information, see Adding a DNIS on page 47.

Configuring Communication Manager for an SES proxy


As in the case of a direct connection to Communiation Manager, the same routing processes apply: A Meeting Exchange and Communication Manager integration routes incoming calls using a series of hierarchical tables. When a caller makes a telephone call to Communication Manager, the Communication Manager server analyses a dial plan table to see if the telephone number pattern matches an entry. If it finds a match, it reads the corresponding routing instructions. As an example, these instructions could direct the server to analyze a second table, called the Uniform Dial Plan (UDP) table. Again, it analyses the UDP table to see if the pattern matches an entry. If it finds a match, it reads the corresponding routing instructions. As an example, these instructions could direct the server to analyze a third table, called the Automatic Alternate Routing (AAR) table. If it finds a match, it reads the corresponding trunk information and will route the call through that trunk. As a last step, the server analyses a route pattern table to see if there are any further instructions before it places the call into the Meeting Exchange server. Instructions could include adding or removing some digits from the telephone number string. To enable a Meeting Exchange integration with an SES proxy, you must perform the following tasks on the Communication Manager server:
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Adding Meeting Exchange to the node names list

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Adding the SES proxy to the node names list Adding a signaling group for Meeting Exchange Adding a signaling group for the SES proxy Adding a trunk group for Meeting Exchange Adding a trunk group for the SES proxy Adding a dialplan entry for Meeting Exchange Adding a dialplan entry for the SES proxy Adding an AAR entry for Meeting Exchange Adding an AAR entry for the SES proxy Adding a route pattern for Meeting Exchange Adding a route pattern for the SES proxy

Adding Meeting Exchange to the node names list


To add Meeting Exchange as a node: 1. Navigate to change node-names ip. 2. Enter the name of the Meeting Exchange server in the Name column. 3. Enter the IP address of the Meeting Exchange server in the IP Address column. 4. Save your changes.

Adding the SES proxy to the node names list


To add the SES proxy as a node: 1. Navigate to change node-names ip. 2. Enter the name of the SES proxy server in the Name column. 3. Enter the IP address of the SES proxy server in the IP Address column. 4. Save your changes.

Adding a signaling group for Meeting Exchange


To add a signaling group: 1. Navigate to add signaling-group. 2. Ensure that the Group Type is sip.

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3. Ensure that the Transport Method is tls. When you select tls, Communication Manager enters the value 5061 in the Near-end Listen Port and Far-end Listen Port fields. 4. Enter the name of a signaling board on the Communication Manager gateway in the Near-end Node Name field. This is the signaling board that you have selected for the connection from Communication Manager to Meeting Exchange. It is typically a CLAN board. 5. Enter the name of the Meeting Exchange server in the Far-end Node Name field. 6. Ensure that Direct IP-IP Audio Connections is y. 7. Ensure that DTMF over IP is rtp-payload. 8. Save your changes.

Adding a signaling group for the SES proxy


To add a signaling group: 1. Navigate to add signaling-group. 2. Ensure that the Group Type is sip. 3. Ensure that the Transport Method is tls. When you select tls, Communication Manager enters the value 5061 in the Near-end Listen Port and Far-end Listen Port fields. 4. Enter the name of a signaling board on the Communication Manager gateway in the Near-end Node Name field. This is the signaling board that you have selected for the connection from Communication Manager to the SES proxy server. It is typically a CLAN board. 5. Enter the name of the SES proxy server in the Far-end Node Name field. 6. Ensure that Direct IP-IP Audio Connections is y. 7. Ensure that DTMF over IP is rtp-payload. 8. Save your changes.

Adding a trunk group for Meeting Exchange


To add a trunk group: 1. Navigate to add trunk-group. 2. Enter a label to refer to the Meeting Exchange server in the Group Name field. 3. Ensure that the Service Type is tie. 4. Ensure that the Group Type is sip.

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5. Ensure that the TAC is 113. 6. Enter the signaling group that corresponds to the signaling group that you added in Adding a signaling group for Meeting Exchange on page 166 in the Signaling Group field. 7. Set the Number of Members field to the number of telephone lines or ports that you require in this trunk. Each trunk supports 255 ports. 8. Navigate to the second screen in the add trunk-group series. 9. Set the Preferred Minimum Session Refresh Interval to 600. 10. Navigate to the second screen in the add trunk-group series. 11. Set the Numbering Format to private. 12. Save your changes.

Adding a trunk group for the SES proxy


To add a trunk group: 1. Navigate to add trunk-group. 2. Enter a label to refer to the SES proxy server in the Group Name field. 3. Ensure that the Service Type is tie. 4. Ensure that the Group Type is sip. 5. Ensure that the TAC is 113. 6. Enter the signaling group that corresponds to the signaling group that you added in Adding a signaling group for the SES proxy on page 167 in the Signaling Group field. 7. Set the Number of Members field to the number of telephone lines or ports that you require in this trunk. Each trunk supports 255 ports. 8. Navigate to the second screen in the add trunk-group series. 9. Set the Preferred Minimum Session Refresh Interval to 600. 10. Navigate to the second screen in the add trunk-group series. 11. Set the Numbering Format to private. 12. Navigate to the fourth screen, called Protocol Variations, in the add trunk-group series. 13. Set the Telephone Event Payload Type to 120. 14. Save your changes.

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Adding a dialplan entry for Meeting Exchange


To add a dialplan entry: 1. Navigate to change dialplan analysis. 2. For each of the conference telephone numbers, enter number in the Dialed String column. You enter a partial string, rather than entering each individual telephone number. For example, you can enter 45 in the Dialed String field. In this way, Communication Manager can process instructions for all telephone numbers that start with 45, such as 4511, 4512, 4513, 4514, and so on. 3. Enter the number of digits in the telephone number in the corresponding Total Length column, 4. Enter the routing instruction in the Call Type column. For a deployment with an SES proxy, Avaya recommend setting this value to aar. 5. Save your changes.

Adding a dialplan entry for the SES proxy


To add a dialplan entry: 1. Navigate to change dialplan analysis. 2. For each of the conference telephone numbers, enter number in the Dialed String column. You enter a partial string, rather than entering each individual telephone number. For example, you can enter 45 in the Dialed String field. In this way, Communication Manager can process instructions for all telephone numbers that start with 45, such as 4511, 4512, 4513, 4514, and so on. 3. Enter the number of digits in the telephone number in the corresponding Total Length column, 4. Enter the routing instruction in the Call Type column. For a deployment with an SES proxy, Avaya recommend setting this value to aar. 5. Save your changes.

Adding an AAR entry for Meeting Exchange


To add an automatic alternate routing digit analysis entry: 1. Navigate to change aar analysis.

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2. In the Dialed String and Total Min Max columns, enter the numbers that you entered in the Matching Pattern and Len columns in Adding a dialplan entry for Meeting Exchange on page 169. You can configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. Here, we present an illustrative configuration. 3. Enter the number of the trunk on which you would like Communication Manager to send the call to Meeting Exchange in the Route Pattern column. 4. Ensure that the Call Type column is set to aar. 5. Save your changes.

Adding an AAR entry for the SES proxy


To add an automatic alternate routing digit analysis entry: 1. Navigate to change aar analysis. 2. In the Dialed String and Total Min Max columns, enter the numbers that you entered in the Matching Pattern and Len columns in Adding a dialplan entry for the SES proxy on page 169. You can configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. Here, we present an illustrative configuration. 3. Enter the number of the trunk on which you would like Communication Manager to send the call to the SES proxy in the Route Pattern column. 4. Ensure that the Call Type column is set to aar. 5. Save your changes.

Adding a route pattern for Meeting Exchange


To add a route pattern: 1. Navigate to change route pattern. 2. Enter the number of the trunk on which you would like Communication Manager to send the call to Meeting Exchange in the Grp No column. 3. Configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. For example, you could instruct Communication Manager to drop two digits from the telephone number by entering 2 in the No. Del Dgts field. This instruction ensures that Communication Manager only sends the remaining digits to Meeting Exchange. 4. Save your changes.

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Adding a route pattern for the SES proxy


To add a route pattern: 1. Navigate to change route pattern. 2. Enter the number of the trunk on which you would like Communication Manager to send the call to the SES proxy in the Grp No column. 3. Configure the fields to process the telephone number according to the specific requirements of your deployment. For example, you could instruct Communication Manager to drop two digits from the telephone number by entering 2 in the No. Del Dgts field. This instruction ensures that Communication Manager only sends the remaining digits to the SES proxy. 4. Save your changes.

Configuring Communication Manager and the SES proxy for SIP calls
Communication Manager handles all H.323 and PSTN calls. Typically, Communication Manager does not handle SIP calls. The SES proxy handles SIP calls. Within the environment of Communication Manager, Session Initiation Protocol (SIP) calls are often called Off PBX stations. If your deployment includes SIP telephones, you must perform some additional configuration tasks on the Communication Manager server and on the SES proxy server, as follows:
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Configuring the SES proxy for SIP Configuring Communication Manager for SIP

Configuring the SES proxy for SIP


To configure the SES: 1. Open the SES Administration interface. 2. Add an entry to the Communication Manager Servers list, as follows: a. Enter information to refer to the Communication Manager server. b. In the SIP Trunk IP Address field, enter the IP of the signaling board that you have selected for the connection from Communication Manager to the SES proxy. This is the CLAN IP address. c. Add extensions to the Communication Manager server. For example, you can add the Meeting Exchange application server as an extension. 3. Save your changes.

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Configuring Communication Manager for SIP


To configure Communication Manager: 1. Add a new station, using the login details that you used for the Communication Manager server in Configuring the SES proxy for SIP on page 171. 2. Create an off-pbx-telephone station-mapping using the same Communication Manager extension details.

Connecting to AudioCodes
The AudioCodes gateway is a Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) media gateway, which acts as a translation unit between a Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN) telecommunications network and the Meeting Exchange VoIP telecommunications network. The media gateway performs the conversion from Time Division Multiplexing (TDM) to VoIP.

Configuring Meeting Exchange for AudioCodes


To configure Meeting Exchange: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log to the Meeting Exchange server as a craft user. 2. Navigate to the following directory and view the system.cfg file: cd /usr/ipcb/config cat system.cfg 3. Add the IP address of the Meeting Exchange application server: IPAddress=(XX.XX.XXX.X)

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4. Configure the MyListener and respContact settings as follows: If you are using the Transport Layer Security (TLS) method of transmission: MyListener=sips:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP:5061;transport=tls respContact=<sips:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP:5061;transport=tls> If you are using the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) method of transmission: MyListener=sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP:5060;transport=tcp respContact=<sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP:5060;transport=tcp> If you are using the User Datagram Protocol (UDP) method of transmission: MyListener=sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP:5060;transport=udp respContact=<sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP:5060;transport=udp> 5. Configure two further settings as follows: minSETimerValue=900 sessionRefreshTimer=900 6. Save your changes. 7. In the same directory, view the telnumToUri.tab file: cat telnumToUri.tab Meeting Exchange uses the telnumToUri.tab file to enable operators and moderators to dial out to an external telephone number from the Meeting Exchange application server. . 8. Add an entry row to the table to represent the AudioCodes gateway using the following syntax: sip:Digit String@AudioCodes gateway IP:5060;transport=tcp 9. Save your changes. 10. Lastly, you must add a DNIS entry to the cbutil table. Ensure that you select SCAN as the function. For more information on cbutil, see Configuring call branding on page 40. In particular, for more information on the cbutil fields, see Table 4.

Configuring AudioCodes for Meeting Exchange


To configure the AudioCodes gateway, you must perform a number of tasks. You can perform these tasks using the AudioCodes gateway embedded Web server. The embedded Web server

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presents a set of Web-based configuration screens. You can access these screens using any standard Internet browser, using this syntax: http://<IP address of AudioCodes gateway> On these configuration screens, you can click Submit or Burn to save your configuration. These buttons are located at the top of the screen. You can also click Reset to discard your configuration updates. This option is located in the Device Actions menu. The steps for configuring AudioCodes are as follows:
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Configuring PSTN trunks Configuring TDM Configuring direct connectivity Configuring call routing Configuring transport type Configuring TLS Configuring codecs Configuring DTMF

Configuring PSTN trunks


To configure the PSTN trunks: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to PSTN Settings > Trunk Settings. 4. Click Stop Trunk to modify the selected trunk. 5. Scroll to General Settings. 6. Select E1 Euro ISDN from the Protocol Type drop-down list. 7. Scroll to Trunk Configuration. 8. Select Recovered from the Clock Master drop-down list. 9. Select HDB3 from the Line Code drop-down list. 10. Select E1 Framing MFF CRC4 EXT from the Framing Method drop-down list. The E1 trunk always uses the HDB3 line code and the MFF CRC4 EXT framing method. 11. Scroll to ISDN Configuration. 12. Select User side from the ISDN Termination Side drop-down list. 13. Leave the remaining fields in this section as the default values and click Submit or Burn.

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Configuring TDM
To configure TDM: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to TDM Configuration > TDM Bus Settings. 4. Select ALaw from the PCM Law Select drop-down list. 5. Select Network from the TDM Bus Clock Source drop-down list. 6. Select Disable from the TDM Bus PSTN Auto Clock and TDM Bus PSTN Auto Clock Reverting drop-down lists. 7. Select 9 from the TDM Bus Local Reference drop-down list. 8. Click Submit or Burn.

Configuring direct connectivity


To configure direct connectivity: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Proxy & Registration. 4. Select No from the Use Default Proxy drop-down list. 5. Click Submit or Burn.

Configuring call routing


To configure call routing: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Routing Tables > Tel to IP Routing. 4. Add an entry to represent the call route from Meeting Exchange to the AudioCodes gateway. For example, to ensure that all calls to Meeting Exchange route to the AudioCodes gateway, enter the wildcard symbol, *, as follows: a. Enter * in the Src. Trunk Group ID, Dest Phone Prefix, and Source Phone Prefix fields. b. Enter the IP address of the Meeting Exchange application server in the Dest. IP Address field.

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5. Select UDP, TCP, or TLS from the Transport Type drop-down list to match your deployment requirements. 6. Click Submit or Burn.

Configuring transport type


You can configure the AudioCodes gateway to communicate with Meeting Exchange using UDP, TCP, or TLS communication:
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Configuring TCP Configuring TLS

Configuring TCP - To configure TCP: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Protocol Definition > SIP General Parameters. 4. Select TCP from the SIP Transport Type drop-down list. 5. Enter 5060 in the SIP TCP Local Port and SIP Destination Port fields. 6. Click Submit or Burn. Configuring TLS - The TLS method of communication requires the exchange of keys. When you buy Meeting Exchange, Avaya ships the TLS keys on the Meeting Exchange application server in the /usr/local/ssl/certs folder. By default, Avaya encrypts these key files. To enable the TLS method of communication, you must decrypt a key file and install it on the AudioCodes gateway. This key file is called CliCert1.pem. The decryption and installation steps are included here. For dialing out over TLS, use the following format: sips:DigitString@AudioCodes gateway IP:5061;transport=tls To configure TLS: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Protocol Definition > SIP General Parameters. 4. Select TLS from the SIP Transport Type drop-down list. 5. Enter 5061 in the SIP TLS Local Port and SIP Destination Port fields. 6. Navigate to Security Settings > General Security Settings. 7. Select TLS 1.0 only from the TLS Version drop-down list. Meeting Exchange only supports TLS 1.0.

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8. In the Internet browser address field, enter: http://<IP address of AudioCodes gateway>/AdminPage 9. Enter HTTPSCIPHERSTRING in the Parameter Name field. 10. Enter ALL in the Enter Value field. 11. Click Apply New Value. Meeting Exchange supports the following cipher strings: TLS_RSA_with_DES_CBC_SHA TLS_RSA_with_AES_128_CBC_SHA Advanced Encryption Standard (AES) is a symmetric 128-bit block data encryption technique. It replaces the older Data Encryption Standard (DES) which uses a 56-bit key. 12. Decrypt the TLS key on the Meeting Exchange application server: a. Open a PuTTY session and log to the Meeting Exchange server as a craft user. b. Navigate to the following directory and enter this command: cd /usr/local/ssl/certs openssl OpenSSL> rsa -in CliKey1.pem -out CliKey1Decrypt.pem c. When Meeting Exchange prompts you for a password, enter CliKey1. 13. Install the TLS key files on the AudioCodes gateway: a. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. b. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. c. Navigate to Security Settings > Certificates. d. Browse to CliCert1.pem in the Send Trusted Root Certificate Store file from your computer to the device field. Click Send File. e. Browse to CliKey1Decrypt.pem in the Send Private Key file from your computer to the device field. Click Send File.

Configuring codecs
To administer your codec requirements: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Protocol Definition > Coders. 4. In the first row, enter the codec information for your preferred codec. For example: a. Select G.711 A-law from the Coder Name drop-down list.

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b. Select 20 from the Packetization Time drop-down list. c. Select 64 from the Rate drop-down list. d. Enter 8 in the Payload Type field. e. Select Disabled from the Silence Suppression drop-down list. 5. Click Submit or Burn. AudioCodes allocates the highest priority to the codec in the first row and uses it whenever possible. The remaining rows represent your descending order of preference and priority. Meeting Exchange supports G.711, G.722, G.726, G.729AB, and iLBC.

Configuring DTMF
Meeting Exchange supports two methods of transmission with regard to DTMF tones. Meeting Exchange can transmit DTMF information in the same channel as voice information. This is called in-band DTMF. Alternatively, Meeting Exchange can transmit DTMF information in a separate channel. This is called out-of-band DTMF or RFC 2833.
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Configuring in-band Configuring out-of-band

Configuring in-band - To configure in-band DTMF transmission: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Protocol Definition > DTMF & Dialing. 4. Select No from the Declare RFC 2833 in SDP drop-down list. 5. Click Submit or Burn. Configuring out-of-band - To configure in-band DTMF transmission: 1. Access the Web interface for the AudioCodes gateway. 2. Click Configuration on the left of the screen. 3. Navigate to Protocol Configuration > Protocol Definition > DTMF & Dialing. 4. Select Yes from the Declare RFC 2833 in SDP drop-down list. 5. Select RFC 2833 from the 1st Tx DTMF Option drop-down list. 6. Click Submit or Burn.

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Chapter 16: Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP)


The secure realtime transport protocol (SRTP) is a form of encrypted transport. Using this protocol, you can ensure that communications between Meeting Exchange and Avaya Aura Communication Manager are secure and protected. To configure this form of secure communications, you must perform some configuration tasks on the Communication Manager server and on the Meeting Exchange server. This chapter describes each of these tasks and is a subset of the tasks described in Connecting Meeting Exchange to your network on page 157. To complete these steps, you must be familiar with many Communication Manager terms. For SRTP to operate successfully in your deployment, you must set the Communication Manager to be non-shuffling. In other words, in an SRTP-enabled deployment, there can be no direct IP connectivity between endpoints. Communication Manager must handle the media for each endpoint.
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Configuring Meeting Exchange Configuring Communication Manager Verifying SRTP

Configuring Meeting Exchange


To configure Meeting Exchange for secure communications, you must update four files on the Meeting Exchange application server or bridge. The four files are:
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/usr/ipcb/config/system.cfg /usr/ipcb/config/softmediaserver.cfg /usr/ipcb/config/telnumToUri.tab /usr/ipcb/config/UriToTelnum.tab

To configure SRTP: 1. Open a terminal window, such as PuTTY. PuTTY is a Linux SSH client that allows you to connect to other machines, giving you a terminal window. You can download PuTTY from http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/ .~sgtatham/putty/download.html. 2. Log in to the application server (bridge) virtual machine using PuTTY. 3. Enter the name craft and the password craft01.

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4. Use the sroot command to change from craft to sroot access. The sroot command is: su sroot The password is sroot01. 5. Navigate to the following directory and view the system.cfg file: cd /usr/ipcb/config cat system.cfg 6. Ensure that the transport method for both the MyListener and respContact settings is tls, using the following syntax: MyListener=sip:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP;transport=tls respContact=<sips:Digit String@Meeting Exchange application server IP;transport=tls> This step is because Communication Manager expects the Transport Layer Security (TLS) method of transmission. 7. Save your changes. 8. In the same directory, view the softMediaServer.cfg file: cat softMediaServer.cfg 9. In this file, enable security by ensuring that it is set to 1, or true. securityEnabled=1 10. Save your changes. 11. In the same directory, view the telnumToUri.tab file: cat telnumToUri.tab Meeting Exchange uses the telnumToUri.tab file to enable operators and moderators to dial out to an external telephone number from the Meeting Exchange application server. In a deployment with Communication Manager, Meeting Exchange routes the dial out calls through Communication Manager. For more information on the telnumToUri.tab file, see Configuring patterns for dialing out on page 91. 12. Add an entry row to the table to represent Communication Manager using the following syntax: sips:Digit String@Communication Manager IP:5061;transport=tls This step is because Communication Manager expects the Transport Layer Security (TLS) method of transmission. 13. Save your changes.

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14. In the same directory, view the UriToTelnum.tab file: cat UriToTelnum.tab The UriToTelnum states that the Meeting Exchange application server should recognize a DNIS entered by a Moderator during a conference and dial out using a corresponding URI. For more information on the UriToTelnum file, see Configuring patterns for dialing in on page 92. You must modify the <sip values to change them to <sips. For example, for the wildcard entry: ""*"*<sips:*"$1@Communication Manager 15. Restart the Meeting Exchange application server.

Configuring Communication Manager


This section describes some sample deployments. The requirements of your network infrastructure may differ from those described here. Use these instructions as a general guide. You must connect the Communication Manager server and the Meeting Exchange server in the usual way, by adding Meeting Exchange as a node on Communication Manager, as described in Connecting directly to Communication Manager on page 157. You can configure a deployment in which some network regions support SRTP and some do not support SRTP. Aside from the settings and procedures described in Connecting directly to Communication Manager on page 157, there are a number of configuration settings of particular importance to an SRTP configuration, as follows:
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On the ip-codec set screen, configure a new codec set. For the new codec set, set Media Encryption to 1-srtp-aescm128-hmac80. Ensure that this is the only entry in the list. Ensure that the none entry is not in the list. On the ip-network region screen, assign a name and switch off Direct IP-IP Audio Connections. Associate the codec-set you just configured. On the add signaling-group and add trunk group screens, follow the exact steps here Adding a signaling group on page 158 and here Adding a trunk group on page 160. Associate these entities with the SRTP-enabled network region.

Verifying SRTP
It is a good idea to verify the secure communications before you place Meeting Exchange in service. To verify this functionality, you require several downloadable applications:

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A sniffer trace application, such as tcpdump for the Linux operating system. tcpdump is a command-line packet analyzer. Click here to download it: http://www.tcpdump.org/ #latest-release. Wireshark or Ethereal. Wireshark and Ethereal are network protocol analyzers. Click here http://www.ethereal.com/download.html or http://www.wireshark.org/download.html to download. WinSCP. WinSCP is an application which enables you to securely copy files over a network. The Linux operating system already contains utilities that perform the actions of WinSCP and PuTTY, so you do not need to download them. Note: To perform these verification steps, you must be familiar with WinSCP, Wireshark or Ethereal and a sniffer trace application, such as tcpdump.

Note:

1. Log in to the application server (bridge) virtual machine using PuTTY, as described in Configuring Meeting Exchange on page 179. 2. Enter this command to ensure that all processes are up and running: dcbps The number of processes various across deployments. 3. Ensure that the sipagent process is running. 4. Log in to Communication manager and ensure that the signaling group and trunk are in service. You can check their status using the status signaling group and status trunk group screens. 5. Place a telephone call to Meeting Exchange and ensure that it uses SRTP. For more information, see Making a call on page 48. 6. Place a telephone call from Meeting Exchange, using the Dial Out feature, To dial out, you can press *1 on your telephone, by default. 7. Using a sniffer trace application, obtain a sniffer trace of the telephone call which you made to the Meeting Exchange server. a. Once the call is complete, press CTRL+C to terminate the trace. b. Transfer the trace file to a computer running the Wireshark or Ethereal applications. You can transfer the file using the WinSCP application. c. Confirm that no payload data is saved and that you cannot access any playback of the call.

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Chapter 17: Configuring security features


Meeting Exchange 5.2 contains a number of enhanced security features. These features enable customers to allocate varying levels of protection to their communications. The features are described in this manual and in the rest of the Meeting Exchange 5.2 documentation suite, which is available on support.avaya.com. This chapter references some of these features.
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Configuring secure recordings Configuring additional PINs

Configuring secure recordings


Moderators can lock conferences. The act of locking a conference prevents further participants from joining and also excludes operators. You can configure Meeting Exchange to allow moderators to record locked conferences or you can configure Meeting Exchange to prevent them from recording locked conferences. For more information, see Configuring recording properties on page 138.

Configuring additional PINs


Meeting Exchange 5.2 supports highly secure conferencing through the addition of new challenges and barriers to conference entry. Now, Operators can book secure conferences that require participants to enter a passcode, an employee identification number, and a secret PIN. For more information on this feature, see Using Meeting Exchange and Administering Meeting Exchange Applications. Both of these guides are available on support.avaya.com.

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Chapter 18: Configuring electronic passcode validation (EPV)


External passcode validation (EPV) is an optional feature that enables Meeting Exchange to validate moderator and conferee passcodes and Personal Identification Numbers (PIN codes) on an external server.
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Introducing EPV Introducing the process Configuring the XML code Configuring EPV for flexflow conferences Configuring billing Configuring settings relating to stranded participants Testing the configuration

Introducing EPV
With EPV enabled, you can integrate Meeting Exchange into a distributed audio conference infrastructure where you can use external servers to schedule conferences. In this configuration, you can store conference parameters on external databases. If you decide to implement a Meeting Exchange solution that involves EPV, you must disable the Conference Scheduler application. The Conference Scheduler application is part of the Bridge Talk application. Operators use it to schedule conferences. With EPV, an external reservation server supports all conference reservations. To disable the Conference Scheduler application, configure the Status parameter, as described in Table 6. When EPV is enabled, Meeting Exchange uses HTTP to send requests to the external passcode server, where passcodes and PIN codes are stored and validated The external server communicates directly back to Meeting Exchange by sending an XML document that conforms to the Document Type Definition, (epv.dtd). Figure 15 shows the components and data flow in the distributed infrastructure.

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Figure 15: EPV Enabled-System


External ComponentsDistributed Infrastructure Audio Conference Platform
EPV

Passcode Database Server HTTP


Passcode Validation & Data Transfer Database Query Program

Conference Reservation Server


Reservation Interface

Conference Interface Conference Information Reservation Records Data Transfer & Synchronization

L XM
Conference Records

Conference 1 Conference 2 Conference 3

System Memory

Reservation database

XML Document
HT T

epv.dtd

Note:

Note: Meeting Exchange creates daily log files of EPV events. The files are located in the /usr/dcb/apilog directory. The filename consists of a single string that denotes the year, month, and day (yyyymmdd). For example, file 20090109 is generated for January 09, 2009.

Introducing the process


When the first caller attempts to enter a conference by providing a passcode in response to a system prompt, Meeting Exchange requests validation of the passcode from the passcode database server. If the database server determines the passcode is valid, it confirms the request and uploads the conference information to Meeting Exchange, where it is stored in system memory. Meeting Exchange starts the conference and validates passcodes entered by all subsequent callers based on the conference information in memory received from the database server. If the first caller enters an invalid passcode, the passcode database server withholds validation and notifies Meeting Exchange. The number of times that Meeting Exchange repeats the passcode prompt to the caller depends on the value specified for the Scan Attempts parameter for the Schedule. For more information the Scan Attempts parameter, see Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62 and Table 6 in particular.

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Configuring the XML code

If a reservation includes a PIN code, the database server confirms the request in the same manner as it validates the conference passcode. If a caller enters an invalid PIN code, Meeting Exchange repeats the PIN code prompt based on the Scan Attempts parameter.

Configuring the XML code


This section describes the protocol for EPV servers capable of parsing the arguments from the request URI, validating the passcode, and returning the result in XML form. It contains the following sections:
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Configuring the chdbased.reg file Understanding the format of requests Testing your code Understanding the format of responses

Configuring the chdbased.reg file


An EPV implementation relies on configuration information stored in the chdbased.reg file installed in the /usr/dcb/dbase/admin directory. The file contains a section, [xmldatasource] which defines the configuration settings for EPV. At installation time, the chdbased.reg file contains the following default settings:
[xmldatasource] version=1.0 bridgeid=spectel700 address=localhost URI=/epvtest pingURI=/epvtest/ping.htm cmdURI=/epvtest/epvcmd.html port=80 timeout=10 connections=1 test=false

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Table 29 describes the attributes and settings in the chdbased.reg file. Use the information in this table to edit the chdbased.reg settings for your configuration. Table 29: chdbased.reg Attribute Settings Attribute Version BridgeId Address URI Description Current version of the protocol. One to 63 characters identifying the bridge name. The IP address or name of the EPV server. The Universally Recognized Identifier is used for passcode validation requests. Entries in this field are limited to 127 characters. The URI points to either an HTML page for a production system, or to a directory on the HTTP server for a test environment. Points to page containing the keep alive response. Entries in this field are limited to 127 characters. The URI that defines where the system sends the conference attribute updates. Currently only updates to the Leader PIN are supported. The Port the system connects to on the HTTP server. 80 is the default for HTTP. The amount of time in seconds to wait for a response from the EPV server. The number of connections to open to the EPV server. Each connection handles a single EPV request. Requests are asynchronous , therefore several requests may be made without blocking call processing. The attribute setting depends on the EPV servers capacity. For instance, if the EPV server can only process one request at a time, connections should be set to 1. However, if it can process multiple requests simultaneously, connections should be set to more the 1. Used for testing with a dumb HTTP server. When test is set to True, the passcode being verified is used as the name of an htm file. For example, to validate a passcode of 97979 on a test HTTP server, place a file with the name 97979.htm in the /epvtest directory.

PingURI cmdURI

Port Timeout Connections

Test

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Configuring the XML code

Understanding the format of requests


When the chdbased.reg configuration information is accurate and the specified EPV server is available, Meeting Exchange establishes the specified number of connections to the EPV server. Each passcode and PIN code validation request is sent to the EPV server using the HTTP GET command. The passcode, the PIN code, and several other parameters, are sent in the GET request as arguments in the URI. Table 30 describes information sent to the EPV server. Table 30: GET Request Arguments Argument pc V Description The passcode to validate. Version of the protocol Default Value none Setting for the version attribute in the epdv.reg file. The default is 1.0. Setting for the bridgeid attribute in chdbased.reg. Default is spectel700 none none

Bn

Bridge name

Pt An

The port or channel on which the call resides. Automatic Number Identification (ANI) digits, if available. Typically the phone number of the caller. Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS) digits, if available. Typically the number the caller dialed to reach the bridge. Reservation Group number The current time, in seconds, that have elapsed since midnight, 1 January 1970, Greenwich Mean Time

Dn

none

rq ct

0 none

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The HTTP GET request uses the following syntax: GET [URI, with arguments] HTTP/1.1 Host: [address from chdbased.reg] [empty line] For example: GET / epvtest?pc=97979&v=1.0&bn=spectel700&pt=1&an=6354&dn=6200&ct=9999 HTTP/1.0 Host: webmaster7 Where: Table 31: Explanation of argument This argument: Address URI pc V Bn Tip:
Tip:

Is set to this value: webmaster7 /epvtest 97979 1.0 spectel700

This argument: Pt An Dn ct

Is set to this value: 1 6354 6200 9999

Refer to rfc2616 for a complete description of the HTTP Request. All internet Request For Comments documents (i.e. RFCs) are available at www.ietf.org.

Understanding the format of responses


Once the External Passcode server validates the GET message from the bridge, the external passcode server replies with a valid XML response which conforms to the epv.dtd. Note: The dtd is installed in /usr/dcb/dbase/admin.

Note:

Figure 16 shows a valid XML response which uses epv.dtd:

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Configuring the XML code

Figure 16: Example XML response using the epv.dtd


<?xml version="1.0"?> <!DOCTYPE spectel PUBLIC "-//Avaya Inc//DTD for Avaya Conferencing Systems//EN" "spectel.dtd"> <!-- Sample vFlow conference passcode:701 Leader PIN:777 MUSIC=on MOD HUP=off NAME REC=off Entry/Exit=message EXTREC=t ADDSEC=t AUXCODE=t --> <spectel> <spectelSys700> <epvResponse> <passcodeStatus>VALID</passcodeStatus> <passcode>701</passcode> <conferenceInfo> <startTime>0</startTime> <duration>1440</duration> <maxChans>60</maxChans> <codeDuration>1440</codeDuration> <conferenceID>9701</conferenceID> <DTMFCommandSet>2</DTMFCommandSet> <confSecCode>701</confSecCode> <leaderPin>777</leaderPin> <leaderPinStatus>0</leaderPinStatus> <lpMin>3</lpMin> <lpMax>7</lpMax> <confName>XML701</confName> <confSecurity>1</confSecurity> <confEntryTone>3</confEntryTone> <confExitTone>3</confExitTone> <modHangup>0</modHangup> <musicSource>1</musicSource> <onDemandLines>1</onDemandLines> <nrpSetting>0</nrpSetting> <pinMode>0</pinMode> <pinlistName></pinlistName> <billingCodes>D</billingCodes> <extRecord>1</extRecord> <addSecCode>1</addSecCode> <auxCode>1</auxCode> <resGroup>0</resGroup> </conferenceInfo> </epvResponse> </spectelSys700> </spectel>

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Configuring EPV for flexflow conferences


Typically, flexflow conferences are conferences in which all participants enter a conferee passcode on their telephone keypad. After entering a conferee passcode, moderators can enter a moderator passcode to promote their status. In flexflow conferences, moderator passcodes are often called leader PINs. It is important to understand that, in the context of flexflow conferences, the leader PIN is the moderator passcode. The PIN, in this situation, is a passcode. Within the wider Meeting Exchange environment, a PIN is defined as an identification number that is unique to each participant (both moderators and conferees). The name of the participant and their unique identification number are stored in a PIN list. When operators using the CRS Front End and moderators using the Web Portal, create a new participant, the CRS generates a PIN code for each new participant. For more information on PIN code and PIN mode, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.
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Configuring leader PINs Configuring mandatory billing codes for flexflow

Configuring leader PINs


If Meeting Exchange is configured for flexflow, when it queries the EPV server for the passcode, the EPV server can return a value identifying the status of the Leader PIN for the conference. The status can be: valid, expired, or expiring. When Meeting Exchange returns the "expired" or

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"expiring" status values, it plays an audio prompt requesting that the Leader PIN be updated. Table 32 describes the fields and settings related to Leader PIN expiration status values. Table 32: Flexflow Leader PIN Status Values Field leaderPinStatus type Integer Description The expiration status of the Leader PIN for a vFlow conference. Where, -1 (Valid) The Leader PIN is valid and is not set to expire within the next 15 days. The system does not play a warning regarding pending expiration. (default) 0 (Expired) The Leader PIN has expired. The system prompts the user, "This Leader PIN has expired and must be changed." 1-15 (Expiring) The Leader PIN will expire in this number of days. The system prompts the user, "This Leader PIN is set to expire in <number> of days. Press 1 to change or star (*) to defer." Minimum string length for a new Leader PIN. 0 - 16, or the maximum value allowed by the system configuration. The default entry, 0 ,causes the system to use the system-wide setting. Maximum string length for a new Leader PIN. 0 - 16, or the maximum value allowed by the system configuration. The default entry, 0 ,causes the system to use the system-wide setting

lpMin

Integer

lpMax

Integer

Figure 17 is an excerpt from an XML response which shows the Leader PIN settings for an expired PIN code. In this example, the new Leader PIN is set to "777." This three-digit string meets the requirement established by the minimum length (lpMin) and maximum length (lpMax) settings. Figure 17: EPV HTML Command
<leaderPin>777</leaderPin> <leaderPinStatus>0</leaderPinStatus> <lpMin>3</lpMin> <lpMax>7</lpMax>

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Meeting Exchange can send commands to the EPV server to update conference schedule data. The cmdURI parameter in the xmldatasource section of the /usr/dcb/dbase/admin/ chdbased.reg file defines the URI where EPV commands are sent. To construct EPV commands, you append the cmdtok parameter to an http request sent to the URI defined by cmdURI. This parameter identifies which command Meeting Exchange is requesting. The cmdtok parameter is followed by a set of command-specific parameters. Currently, the only supported command updates the leader PIN in a flexflow conference. The cmdtok parameter for the Update Leader PIN command: cmdtok=1 Figure 18 shows the full http request used when sending the Update Leader PIN command to the default cmdURI. This example assumes that the EPV server returned a valid Conference ID that is a unique identifier for any given schedule. Figure 18: Update Leader PIN Example
http://<epv_server>:8080/epvtest/epvcmd.html? cmdtok=1& confID=<conferenceID>& v=1.0& bn=<bridgename>& lp<leaderPIN>& ent<EntryTones>& exit<ExitTones> & qs<QuickStart> & mh<Modhang> & nrp<NRP>

Figure 19: Example cmdURI within chdbased.reg


[xmldatasource] version=1.0 bridgeid=edison installed=true name=xmldatasource address=epv URI=/epvtest pingURI=/epvtest/epvping.html cmdURI=/epvtest/epvcmd.html port=8080 test=false

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Configuring billing

Configuring mandatory billing codes for flexflow


Meeting Exchange can prompt the leader to provide a billing code for their conference when they enter their flexflow conference. To make the billing code mandatory, set the following parameter: <forceAuxCode>=1 Set this field to 0 to not require the billing code. If this field is set to 1, the leader will be disconnected if he fails to enter the billing code after three attempts.

Configuring billing
The billingCodes parameter controls whether Meeting Exchange prompts moderators for a billing code upon conference entry. Figure 16 shows a sample billingCodes value. The supported billing codes values are D/E/2: <billingCodes>D</billingCodes> Meeting Exchange does not prompt for a billing code. <billingCodes>E</billingCodes> Meeting Exchange prompts for a billing code. <billingCodes>2</billingCodes> Meeting Exchange prompts for two billing codes.

Configuring settings relating to stranded participants


On systems configured with EPV servers, the stranded participant feature can be enabled on a per conference basis for both flexflow and regular, or scan, call flow conferences. When a single participant remains in a conference for a preconfigured number of minutes, Meeting Exchange

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Configuring electronic passcode validation (EPV)

plays an audio prompt to enter any DTMF key to keep the conference active. Table 33 shows the stranded participant settings available through EPV. Table 33: EPV Stranded Participant Settings Field <spctConfThreshold> Definition Number of participants in conference to disconnect Whether to block a DTMF key to keep the conference alive Number of times to replay the termination warning message Number of minutes to wait before playing initial message to stranded participant Interval between warning prompts Range 0-2000 0 = disabled 0= false 1= true 0-5 Default 1

<spctConfBlockInput>

<spctConfNumPrompts>

System setting

<spctConfPeriodX>

2-1400

60

<spctConfPeriodZ>

1-60

System setting

Testing the configuration


When you have configured Meeting Exchange to operate with EPV, you can use the following tools and methods to test your configuration:
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Testing your code Using the keep alive response Using the xCalcli test program Using a Web browser to validate PIN codes

Testing your code


For testing you may want to send a message to a dumb server one which is only capable of returning an HTML page as specified in the URI. EPV can operate in this mode when the test attribute in chdbased.reg is set to True.

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Testing the configuration

When EPV operates in test mode, the passcode becomes the name of an ascii file containing a valid XML response. Using the values from the prior example, the GET request now looks like this: GET /epvdtest/97979.htm HTTP/1.1 Host: webmaster7

Using the keep alive response


The following sample Keep Alive response conforms to the epv.dtd.
<spectel> <spectelSys700> <pingResponse> <ping>ALIVE</ping> </pingResponse> </spectelSys700> </spectel>

Using the xCalcli test program


The xCal Client sample application, xCalcli resides in /usr/dcb/bin after a successful installation. xCalcli uses the same libraries that EPV uses to make requests and receive data from an external passcode validation server. Use xCalcli to:
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verify connectivity to the server verify your sample/test XML files

Enter the xcalcli command at any command line. 1.Cmd> xcalcli The xcalcli dialog displays.

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2. Cmd> <menu option> Menu options are described in Table 34: Table 34: xCalcli Menu Options Menu Option v Description Validate passcode. When you select 'v', the xcalcli prompts you to enter a passcode, ANI, DNIS, and LCN (i.e. port). Enter a value and press return for each prompt. Validate PIN code If you enter "i", it will prompt for the PIN code and try to validate that PIN with the configured EPV server. Depending on the reply that is returned, it will report either Valid or Invalid with the value of the lines company, line name, and telnum fields. Ping the server. Use this option to send a ping or keep alive request. Start keep alive timer Stop keep alive timer Print this message Quit xcalcli.

p t s ? q

Using a Web browser to validate PIN codes


You can use a web browser such as Microsoft Internet Explorer or Firefox Mozilla to send a get to the EPV server. The following is an example of a typical PIN code http get: http://135.35.55.99:8080/ pinQuery.xml?pin=5555&list=123456789&v=1.0&bn=conf_br_003

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Testing the configuration

Many of the query elements come from the EPV configuration as shown in Table 35 Table 35: Web PIN Code query Element 135.35.55.99 8080 pinQuery.xm 5555 123456789 Definition pinURI field in <xmldatasource> section of /usr/dcb/dbase/ admin/chdbased.reg Port field in chdbased.reg pinURI field in chdbased.reg The user entered PIN The conference reservations <pinlistName> field. Retrieved when the conference is started in the EPV servers passcode reply Configured in chdbased.reg as the bridgeid

conf_br_003

Figure 20 is an example of a reply for a valid PIN: Figure 20: Reply for a Valid PIN <?xml version="1.0?> <spectel> <spectelSys700> <epvPinResponse> <pinStatus>VALID</pinStatus> <code>5555</code> <pinInfo> <linename>test_linename</linename> <company>test_co</company> <telenum>555-1212<telenum> </pinInfo> <epvPinResponse <spectelSyst700> </spectel>

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For an invalid PIN, the response shows <pinStatus>INVALID</pinStatus> and the <pinInfo> ... <pinInfo> tag is empty.

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Chapter 19: Configuring alarms


Meeting Exchange contains two features which notify you if there are any problems with the operational performance of the conferencing servers. You can use this information to react to any issues and take actions to address the cause of the problem. These features related to each other and are called Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) and core services.
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Introducing SNMP Introducing core services

In addition to these alarm features, Meeting Exchange produces a large number of reports which provide information about the conferencing servers. For more information, see Viewing Meeting Exchange information on page 103.

Introducing SNMP
This section describes Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP). Avaya uses SNMP to monitor the performance of Meeting Exchange. The SNMP system emits alarms, which are called traps. The SNMP system is highly configurable. You can configure the conditions that trigger traps. You can configure the thresholds that trigger traps. You can also configure where the SNMP system sends the traps.
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Introducing the traps Adding and deleting traps Configuring threshold values of trap receivers Verifying that SNMP is running Debugging SNMP

Introducing the traps


Table 36 shows the SNMP traps that Avaya ships with Meeting Exchange. These traps operate for both the Network Management System (NMS) and Initialization & Administration System (INADS). NMS and INADs represent two ways to implement SNMP in your network. A Managed Information Base (MIB) defines which information is captured by the SNMP system. Meeting Exchange supports a number of MIBs. For more information, see Supported management information bases (MIBs) on page 315.

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Configuring alarms

If you are using INADs, you must perform an extra configuration step. The NMS system does not require this extra configuration step. In an INADs deployment, you must set the Product ID. The Product ID must be a unique number, of no more than 10 digits, which Meeting Exchange sends in all INADS traps to distinguish which server is generating the traps. Table 36: SNMP Traps Trap avMX6200ProcessStartedNotification avMX6200ProcessStoppedNotification Trap Description This trap is generated when a critical Avaya Meeting Exchange process has been started. This trap is generated when an Avaya Meeting Exchange process has been stopped. When you kill a softms process on a Pyramid system, the following is the trap sequence: Kill softms A. Trap receiver shows: l softms A stopped l softms B started l softms C started l softms B stopped This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the reserved port pool equals or exceeds the upper watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding lower watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated. The default value for a High Threshold is 85%. This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the reserved port pool falls below the lower watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding upper watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated. The default value for a Low Threshold is 75%. This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the unreserved port pool equals or exceeds the upper watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding lower watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated. The default value for a High Threshold is 85%. 1 of 2

avMX6200ReservedPortPoolUsageIn crease

avMX6200ReservedPortPoolUsageD ecrease

avMX6200UnreservedPortPoolUsageI ncrease

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Introducing SNMP

Table 36: SNMP Traps (continued) Trap avMX6200UnreservedPortPoolUsage Decrease Trap Description This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the unreserved port pool falls below the lower watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding upper watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated. The default value for a Low Threshold is 75%. This trap is generated when the application server fails over. This trap is generated when the media server does not respond. Note: This trap is only generated on single server configurations. It is not generated in a distributed server environment.

avMX6200ApplicationServerFailover avMX6200MediaServerFailed

Note:

csCPUUtilization

If the CPU usage reaches or exceeds an upper threshold (default is 90%), an SNMP alarm will be sent identifying the system impacted. This functionality is provided by Avaya Core Services components. The system allows configuration of a system-wide disk space usage threshold (default is 80%). If the disk usage reaches or exceeds this threshold, an SNMP alarm is sent identifying the system impacted. This functionality is provided by Avaya Core Services components. 2 of 2

csDiskUsageThreshold

Adding and deleting traps


To match the requirements of your customer, you can specify one or more endpoints to receive SNMP traps from your deployment. You can do this by inserting or deleting entries in the snmptrapreceiver table. The following script provides an example for manually inserting and deleting an SNMP trap receiver entry. Each entry requires a unique ID. In this example, the ID is 1, the trap receiver IP is 10.110.120.130, and the port is 162.

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Configuring alarms

To insert an SNMP trap receiver entry: 1. Obtain the IP address of the SNMP trap destination. 2. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. Note: PuTTY is a terminal emulator application which can act as a client for the SSH protocol. Contact your Avaya Support Representative for a valid craft password. 3. Connect to coreservices database: su postgres bash-3.00$ psql coreservices Welcome to psql 8.1.4, the PostgreSQL interactive terminal. Type: \copyright for distribution terms \h for help with SQL commands \? for help with psql commands \g or terminate with semicolon to execute query \q to quit 4. View the SNMP trap receiver table: coreservices=# select * from snmptrapreceiver; id | enabled | snmpdevicetype | ipaddress | portnumber | snmpnotifytype | snmpversion | name | authprotocol | authpassphrase | privprotocol | privpassphrase ----+---------+----------------+-----------+------------+---------------+-------------+------+--------------+----------------+-------------+---------------(0 rows) 5. Insert or delete the SNMP trap receiver entry:
l

Note:

To insert: You must configure the SNMP in the database for NMS and INADS. Configuring the traps is slightly different in both cases: - For NMS, the SNMPdevicetype = 1 - For INADS, the SNMPdevicetype = 2 coreservices=# insert into snmptrapreceiver (id, enabled, snmpdevicetype, ipaddress, portnumber, snmpnotifytype, snmpversion, name, authprotocol,authpassphrase, privprotocol,

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Introducing SNMP

privpassphrase) values ('1', 'true', 1, '100.110.120.130', 162, 1, 2, 'avaya', 1, '', 1, ''); INSERT 0 1
l

To delete: Enter the following command: coreservices=# delete from snmptrapreceiver where id = '1'; DELETE 1

6. Verify the insertion or deletion.


l

To verify an insertion: coreservices=# select * from snmptrapreceiver; id | enabled | snmpdevicetype | ipaddress | portnumber | snmpnotifytype | snmpversion | name | authprotocol | authpassphrase | privprotocol | privpassphrase ----+---------+----------------+-----------------+------------+---------------+-------------+-------+--------------+---------------+--------------+---------------1 | t 1 | | (1 row) | 1 | 100.110.120.130 | 2 | avaya | 1 | 162 | | 1

To verify a deletion: coreservices=# select * from snmptrapreceiver; id | enabled | snmpdevicetype | ipaddress | portnumber | snmpnotifytype | snmpversion | name | authprotocol | authpassphrase | privprotocol | privpassphrase ----+---------+----------------+-----------+------------+---------------+-------------+------+--------------+----------------+-------------+---------------(0 rows)

7. Exit Coreservices. coreservices=# \q bash-3.00$ exit exit

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Configuring threshold values of trap receivers


All threshold-based traps have default values. These default values are listed in Table 36. This section describes how to change the default values. It contains the following sections:
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Configuring CPU and disk space usage traps Configuring Port usage traps Note: If you make changes to system.cfg, you must restart the server. If you make changes to the database, you do not need to restart the server.

Note:

Configuring CPU and disk space usage traps


This section describes how to change the default values for the CPU and disk space usage traps. It contains the following sections:
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Configuring CPU utilization trap Configuring disk space usage trap Tip:

Tip:

CPU utilization and disk space usage traps are implemented using mon. You can learn more about mon here: http://mon.wiki.kernel.org/index.php/Main_Page

Configuring CPU utilization trap - To configure CPU utilization trap: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Navigate to /etc/mon/mon.cf Interval indicates how often the system checks the CPU level. In Figure 21, the system checks the CPU utilization every 10 minutes. Monitor cpu.monitor indicates the threshold level percentage when SNMP traps are generated. In Figure 21, the threshold is set to 90%. Figure 21: CPU Utilization Trap

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Configuring disk space usage trap - To configure disk space usage trap: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Navigate to /etc/mon/mon.cf Interval indicates how often the system checks the hard disks capacity. In Figure 22, the system is checked every hour. Monitor disk.monitor indicates the threshold level percentage when SNMP traps are generated. In Figure 22, traps are sent once the various drive partitions reach 80% usage. Figure 22: Disk Space Usage Trap

Configuring Port usage traps


You can configure the reserved and unreserved port pool usage using the system.cfg file, as follows: 1. Open a PuTTY session and log in as a craft user. 2. Navigate to /usr/ipcb/config and access system.cfg. 3. Uncomment the appropriate parameter. The parameters are as follows: #ReservedPortPoolUsageThresholdLow= #ReservedPortPoolUsageThresholdHigh= #UnreservedPortPoolUsageThresholdLow= #UnreservedPortPoolUsageThresholdHigh= 4. Insert the threshold that you would like in your implementation.

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Note:

Note: When you manually configure these settings in system.cfg, you must enter actual numbers of ports and not a percentage of a particular port pool. For example: ReservedPortPoolUsageThresholdLow=60 ReservedPortPoolUsageThresholdHigh=100 Unreserved Port Pool Usage is only triggered when usage exceeds threshold. Reserved Port Pool Usage is triggered when usage reaches threshold. The default settings on the conferencing server are: Threshold Low = 75% Threshold High = 85%

Verifying that SNMP is running


To verify that SNMP is operating correctly, run the following command to ensure that the SNMP trap receiver is receiving the traps: bridge restart You should receive multiple traps.

Debugging SNMP
This section describes some of the common issues with SNMP. It contains steps and suggestions to overcome these issues.
l

If traps are not generating, you should ensure the following core services are running: /opt/coreservices/lifecycle/bin/lc list There should be 12 services started. /opt/coreservices/dss/bin/dss list -h localhost -p 50000 There should be 2 services started. /opt/coreservices/dss/bin/dss list -h localhost -p 31050 There should be 21 services started. If you do not receive traps for CPU Utilization or Disk Space Usage, you should ensure that mon.cf is configured. Also ensure that the following processes are running: mon (service mon status) syslogreader (/opt/coreservices/syslog/bin/syslogreader status)

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Introducing core services

If there are no INADS traps being generated, you should ensure the following line is in / usr/share/tomcat-5.5.9/shared/classes/alarm.properties. INADSMinorNotifyEnabled=true

Introducing core services


Core services is a process which monitors the performance of Meeting Exchange and produces a number of logs. You can view these logs in an Internet browser.
l l l

Running and verifying core services Configuring core services Viewing the logs

Running and verifying core services


The core services process should always run in the background while Meeting Exchange is in operation. You can use the following commands to start, stop, and verify core services.
l

Start /sbin/service wdinit start It can take up to 15 minutes to correctly start Meeting Exchange when core services are running.

Stop /sbin/service wdinit stop When you stop wdinit, the tomcat service may still be running. You should stop the tomcat service to ensure the core services will start up correctly the next time.

Restart /sbin/service wdinit restart Verify that all processes are running as part of core services: /opt/coreservices/lifecycle/bin/lc list Meeting Exchange outputs a list of the services that it has started. These services include, PEAlarmRetrieverServer_key, PENworkLogServer_key, PENetworkLogRetrieverServer_key, PEAlarmServer_key, PESDAS_key, MessageBrokerService, AdminTomcat, and so on. There are ten services in total. If the services do not start, Meeting Exchange generates an exception error.

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Configuring core services


The core services process produces a number of logs. To configure these logs, you must edit an XML file on Meeting Exchange. The XML file is in the following directory: /usr/ipcb/config/ipcblog4j.xml To enable logging to the HOST_LOG_SERVER, edit the following lines at the end of the file: <root> <priority value=all /> <appender-ref ref=system /> <appender-ref ref=HOST_LOG_SERVER /> </root> To disable logging to the HOST_LOG_SERVER, edit the lines as follows: <root> <priority value=all /> <appender-ref ref=system /> <!--appender-ref ref=HOST_LOG_SERVER/--> </root>

Viewing the logs


You can use an Internet browser to view the logs which the core services process produces. 1. Open an Internet browser. 2. Navigate to: http://<Meeting Exchange application server IP address>:8080/CS-OAM 3. Disable any pop-up blocker software. 4. On the Log in screen, enter a login ID and a password. Note: Contact your Avaya Support Representative for password information. 5. Navigate to System Maintenance > Log Viewer or Alarm Manager. 6. Select the required settings.

Note:

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7. Click OK.

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Chapter 20: Introducing multisite


This chapter includes these topics:
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Introducing multisite Architecture Multisite terminology

Introducing multisite
Multisite refers to a network of Client Registration Servers (CRS) located in different geographical locations. It links conferences distributed over audio conferencing servers (bridges) located anywhere in the world. A caller dials into a local bridge and enters their global password. The caller will be connected to other bridges within the multisite network if other global participants are present. In this way, multisite dramatically increases the capacity of a single conference where, in conjunction with large conference support, a single conference distributed across three globally linked bridges can be as large as 12,000 ports. The potential volume of traffic increases, while callers reduce their costs, as many lines can dial locally into one bridge while only one long distance link is needed to globally connect the conference. Multisite optimizes system resources to ensure that conferencing is more economical. It allows the administrator to schedule one global conference to span multiple sites. This reduces administrative costs while at the same time it increases port capacity by connecting multiple conferencing servers within a single network.

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How multisite can be used to create global conferences


The following list describes a typical sequence:
l

An operator selects the Global option from the CRS Front End scheduling application or the Multi-Site Conference option via the Web Portal. The CRS assigns a Global Conference ID to the reservation. The reservation, including the number of requested lines and global conference features, is scheduled on all bridges in the multisite network. Participants join a global conference by dialing the Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS) or Direct Dial Inward (DDI) number and entering a PIN to any of the participating bridges. As participants join, a central, virtual hub is created, which links all bridges. See About hubs and linking servers on page 214. As more callers dial in, multisite adds links to additional conferences automatically. Each location includes an idle backup bridge available for failover, if needed. Multisite connects all the participants in a single conference call.

About hubs and linking servers


Each conferencing server has the same link priority. The first server dialed becomes the hub for the conference. Each additional server dialed becomes a spoke for the conference. Servers designated as spokes dial out a virtual link line to connect to the hub. If a designated hub disconnects from an active conference and the conference does not end (moderator hangs up), then the remaining bridges can reestablish the conference links. For an overview, see Figure 23. For more information on global conference features, see About global conferences on page 249.

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Figure 23: Three-node site with backup servers

Site 1 MultiSite engine


2 3

Site 2

2 3

Site 3

2 3

Figure notes: 1. Multisite engine 2. CRS database 3. CRS 4. Application server

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Maximum number of sites and conferences


Table 37 shows the capacity and performance requirements that multisite supports. Table 37: Capacity Number of Supported sites deployed simultaneously within a global conference. The sites do not include redundant sites configured for failover purposes only. Conferences that can be booked as global conferences. Simultaneous global conferences Concurrent conferences on a single application server. Note: Reserve one common conference room for participants who are placed on hold (Hold is room 999). 4000 Maximum number 3

100,000 300 1999

Note:

Ports per site

Single dial-in number to access global conferences


Callers only have to dial one application server number, which can be local for their area. The dial-in numbers can then be configured on the system specifically for global conferences.

Multisite required components


Table 2 lists the required multisite components. Table 38: Multisite required components Component CRS 5.2 installed on a Windows 2003 server Description Each CRS includes several parameters, such as: l Link priority that determines each bridges probability of becoming a hub. l Link telephone number, which is the number other bridges must dial if that bridge becomes the hub. 1 of 2

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Table 38: Multisite required components (continued) Component Multisite for Meeting Exchange 5.2 Description Multisite communicates with the CRS using a variety of different messages, such as Make Me Hub. As new bridges join the global conference network, their link priority rating determines whether or not they become the hub. If they are successful, other bridges must dial their link telephone number. If they are not successful, they must dial the link telephone number of the successful bridge. Using Web Portal, users can schedule conferences, select various conference options, and manage active conferences from their workstations. Meeting Exchange S6200/S6500/S6800 conference servers designed for use with a wide variety of conferencing applications. Note: Multisite is not backwards compatible with previous conference server releases. 2 of 2

Web Portal 5.2

Meeting Exchange 5.2

Note:

Multisite optional components


The CRS stores CDRs and booking information based on the Global Conference ID. Companies can collect global conference information using one or more optional components listed in Table 39. Table 39: Multisite optional components Component Billing Description The Avaya Billing (SBill) utility generates a file for a variety of fixed or customized output formats for use in external, third-party invoicing applications. For more information on billing, see Billing architecture on page 222 and also see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com. The Notifications Subsystem program sends Fax and E-mail conference notifications to conference participants. The Notifications Subsystem contains templates that can be used for global conference notifications. These templates contain important international information, such as dialing codes and telephone numbers. 1 of 2

Notifications Subsystem

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Table 39: Multisite optional components (continued) Component Reports Description The CRS Reports application generates reports through Microsoft Excel. Reports can include data on individual conferences, client usage, and system port utilization. The CDR Loader retrieves CDR and CODR files from the bridge and updates the CDR database used by the Billing and Reports utilities. The CRS Stored Procedure Interface (CSPI) supports conference range attributes for read and write interfaces. 2 of 2 Note: You must run the SBill utility on all the CRS servers in the network to obtain complete global conference information.

CDR Loader Global CSPI

Note:

For more information on billing or reports, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.

Architecture
Multisite comprises four architectures:
l l l l

Network architecture Link line architecture Failover configuration and fault identification Billing architecture

Network architecture
Multisite uses a hub network architecture. The multisite hub network maximizes system resources by enabling customer configuration of the preferred hub through the link priority mechanism. Link priority, which determines the probability of a bridge becoming a hub, is set as follows:
l l

Zero (0) is the highest priority Five (5) is the lowest

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Architecture

Note:

Note: NAT should be disabled.

If all links have the same priority, the hub is the site where the conference first opens.

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System failover
In a multisite network, a standby system monitors the active system and determines if the active system fails. If this occurs, the standby system promotes itself to be the active system and takes over all processing. The newly promoted system also re-routes trunks to the former active system, which is demoted to standby status. See Figure 24. Figure 24: Multisite architecture

Booking a global conference


4 5

Figure notes: 1. Global bridge site 1 2. Global bridge site 2 and Hub 3. Global bridge site 3 4. Conference scheduling 5. Global conference

Note:

Note: The CRS system and the standby CRS system exist on the same IP subnet.

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Link line architecture


A virtual link line (VLL) is a network communications channel with a point-to-point connection. AUTOVLLs connect servers to the hub. The system creates AUTOVLLs between servers as callers dial into their local conferences and disconnects the links when callers leave their conferences. VLLs use IP lines for linking conferences, based on the hub and spoke model. See Figure 25. Figure 25: Global conference network

1 1 1

2 2

Figure notes: 1. AUTOVLL (Virtual Link Line) 2. Central hub is the bridge with the highest link priority

Multisite uses specific DNIS digits to label incoming lines as VLLs automatically. When the receiving bridge answers the line, the calling bridge dials the moderator passcode for the conference to identify the target conference for the link. The bridge automatically assigns moderator status to a VLL.

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Each bridge creates a VLL by dialing out to a neighboring bridge using a defined DNIS or DDI number and the system labels the line, AUTOVLL. An example of a call branding AutoVLL is: 2300 0 0 1 N AUTOVL AutoVLL

Note:

Note: The line name must be named AutoVLL. AUTOVLLs only link two active conferences and do not transmit DTMF commands entered by moderators or participants from a telephone keypad.

Failover configuration and fault identification


If the active or backup CRS or application server fails, the system sends a notification to the system administrator. This notification may be in form of SNMP trap, E-mail, SMS, pager alert, or Bridge Talk system message.

Billing architecture
Multisite ensures that global conferences are billed accurately by centralizing billing data in the CRS that originates the booking. At a scheduled time, recommended to be at an off-peak time, the originating bridge runs a Global CDRs script. This script collects data from each participant bridge and compiles data on individual callers and their duration in the global conference. The conference originator is then billed for the cost of the global conference using the SBill utility.

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Table 40: Overview of billing architecture

1 4

5 6

Figure notes: 1. Global bridge site 1, the conference organizer 2. Global bridge site 2 3. Global bridge site 3 4. Global CDRs script 5. Participant data 6. Bill generated

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Multisite terminology
Table 41 provides a list of terms used with regard to multisite and Meeting Exchange. Table 41: Glossary Table Term Active CRS Definition Processes all requests sent to the CRS. The active CRS replicates data changes to the standby CRS system, which can take over in case of system failure. A call-branding function performed by the bridge on a call when the incoming digits match an entry in the Call Branding table. The bridge labels the line, AUTOVLL. A measure of the amount of data that a network can hold at one time. A way of assigning specific greeting messages, company names, line names, and system functions (Direct, Enter, AutoVL, or Scan) to caller lines. A way of processing a call. Call Detail Record. Conference Detail Report. An audio conferencing system (bridge). Client Registration Server. The CRS Front End is a reservation application that books conferences on a CRS server. Each bridge has its own CRS, which shares booking information with other CRS servers in the network. Directory System Agent. A generic term for database-holding directory information. Direct Dial Inward. Depending upon the configuration, a bridge plays a welcome message to callers dialing in, prompts callers to enter a participant code, and enters the participant into the appropriate conference. Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol. A TCP/IP protocol that enables a network connected to the Internet to assign a temporary IP address to a host automatically when the host connects to the network. Dialed Number Identification Service. Depending upon the configuration, a bridge plays a welcome message to callers dialing in, prompts callers to enter a participant code, and enters the participant into the appropriate conference. 1 of 4

AUTOVLL

Bandwidth Call branding

Call routing CDR CODR conference server CRS

DSA DDI

DHCP

DNIS

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Multisite terminology

Table 41: Glossary Table (continued) Term DNS Definition Domain Name System. The system in which hosts on the Internet have both a domain name address, such as msite1.mycompany.org and an IP address, such as 123.45.6.7. Domain name addresses are translated automatically into numerical IP addresses, which are used by the packet-routing software. Dual Tone Multi-frequency dialing used by the Touch-Tone phone system. Euro ISDN. An E-carrier that can handle 30 voice channels. A conference reservation that the CRS sends to all servers on the MultiSite network. A backup operational mode in which primary system components such as a CRS or application server, can be taken over by secondary system components. A single conference call made up of reserved conferences that run on multiple, remote bridges linked by audio channels. A master bridge maintains information on all bridge activity and broadcasts the information to all other active nodes. A bridge can act as master or backup master, as required. A disk drive reserved for use if an active drive fails. A place of convergence where data arrives from one or more directions and is forwarded to one or more other locations. A linking architecture where one or more nodes act as interconnection points for other nodes. Internet Protocol. Interactive Voice Response. A telephony technology that uses touch-tone telephones to interact with a database, such as entering or retrieving information. Local Area Network. A line used to link one bridge to another in establishing large conferences. A location defined as a combination of two sites, one site is active and the other acts as redundant backup (Hot standby). 2 of 4

DTMF E1 Global booking Fail over

Global conference Global Conference Master Hot standby Hub Hub and Spoke IP IVR

LAN Link line Location

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Table 41: Glossary Table (continued) Term NAT Definition Network Address Translation (NAT) mode. An IETF standard that enables Local Area Networks (LANs) to configure one set of IP addresses for internal use and another set of addresses for external use. A junction or device of some type. In local area networks, a device that is connected to the network and is capable of communicating with other network devices. The process of reserving more than the maximum number of lines available for a given time period. Lines configured for operators, music, record/play, or link lines are not included in the systems count of available lines. Personal Identification Number. Public Switched Telephone Network. A local area network in which devices (nodes) are connected in a closed loop, or ring. Messages in a ring network pass around the ring from node to node in one direction. When a node receives a message, it examines the destination address attached to the message. If the address is the same as the node's, the node accepts the message; otherwise, it regenerates the signal and passes the message along to the next node in the ring. A roll call of participant names or preset dial list. Signalling Control Card. A hardware component within the S6x00 Convedia server. Session Initiated Protocol, or Session Initiation Protocol. An application-layer control protocol; a signalling protocol for Internet Telephony. A deployment unit for global conferences that comprises bridge hardware and a co-located application server like a bridge control software and CRS. Receives all data changes from the active CRS system and monitors the active system to determine if it is functional. If the active system is no longer functional, the standby CRS promotes itself to be the new active system and takes over all processing. A T-carrier that can handle 24 voice channels. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol. 3 of 4

Node

Overbooking

PIN PSTN Ring network

Roster SCC SIP

Site

Standby CRS

T1 TCP/IP

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Multisite terminology

Table 41: Glossary Table (continued) Term TDM Definition Time Division Multiplexing. A digital transmission capability that allows users to access a single radio-frequency channel without interference. TDM allocates separate time slots to each user within a channel. The Ethernet standard for baseband local area networks using twisted-pair cable carrying 10 megabits per second (Mbps) in a star topology. User Datagram Protocol. A standard user channel used to provide audio between conferences on two or more Avaya bridges. VLLs can be dialed in or out, but do not respond to DTMF digits during conferences. See AUTOVLL. A Wide Area Network. 4 of 4

Ten Base T (10BaseT) UDP Virtual Link Line (VLL) WAN

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Chapter 21: Upgrading from Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 1 to Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 2
Note: Before you upgrade from Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 1 to Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 2, you must install the latest patch on your 5.2 Service Pack 1 system.

Note:

To upgrade to version 5.2 Service Pack 2, you must install the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM file. You must follow this RPM file with the latest recommended patch, which is also an RPM file. An RPM file is a Red Hat Package Manager file. All patches are cumulative and so you only need to install the latest released patch. When installing the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM, changed files are backed up to /usr3/BACKUPS/ before-5.2.2.0.10.tar.gz. If customizations have been made to any of these files, they will not exist after the upgrade. Possible files that may have been customized are:
l l

Example 1: grimreaper.sh - used to manage the cleanup of old log files Example 2: backup.sh - used to backup configuration

In the Meeting Exchange 5.2 Service Pack 2 release, there are new default Welcome messages that contain Avaya branding. By default, the RPM does not install these new messages. If you wish to use these these new messages, contact your Avaya Support Representative.

Installing the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM file


To install the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM file: 1. Copy the RPM file to the Meeting Exchange bridge. Suggested location: /home/craft 2. Using the PuTTY application, log on to the bridge as an sroot user. You can download PuTTY from http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/ download.html. a. Enter the name craft and the password craft01.

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b. Use the sroot command to change from craft to sroot access. The sroot command is: su sroot The default password is sroot01. 3. Stop the bridge: #bridge stop 4. Install the RPM: #rpm --force --nodeps -ihv mx-bridge-sp-5.2.2.0.10-1.i386.rpm Force is necessary because some of the upgrade files naturally conflict with the existing bridge files. Nodeps is necessary because there are some unnecessary dependencies. 5. Verify the RPM installation: #rpm -qa | grep bridge-sp The bridge should display the following: mx-bridge-sp-5.2.2.0.10-1 6. Verify the version: #version The bridge should display the following: 5.2.2.0.10 7. Start the bridge: #bridge start 8. Now you must load the recommended patch. The instructions for loading the patch are described in the corresponding patch instructions.

Rolling back to a previous version


If you wish to revert to the state of the system prior to the upgrade, you must undo the upgrade steps in reverse order: You must uninstall the recommended patch. You must then uninstall the RPM (5.2.2.0.10). When you install the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM file, it backs up any changed files to the following directory: /usr3/BACKUPS/before-5.2.2.0.10.tar.gz. When you uninstall the upgrade, or rollback, the script restores any files that it finds in /usr3/BACKUPS/

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before-5.2.2.0.10.tar.gz. It is important to note that if you have made any changes to these files between the upgrade and the rollback, you will loose these changes. To rollback: 1. Using the PuTTY application, log on to the bridge as an sroot user. You can download PuTTY from http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/ download.html. a. Enter the name craft and the password craft01. b. Use the sroot command to change from craft to sroot access. The sroot command is: su sroot The default password is sroot01. 2. Stop the bridge: #bridge stop 3. Uninstall the recommended patch. The instructions for uninstalling the patch are described in the corresponding patch instructions. 4. Uninstall the 5.2.2.0.10 RPM file: #sudo rpm -e mx-bridge-sp-5.2.2.0.10-1 5. Start the bridge: #bridge start

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Chapter 22: Configuring multisite


This chapter describes the following:
l l l l

Multisite environment requirements Installing multisite for Meeting Exchange Setting up a CRS for multisite use Configuring MultiSite.ini for multisite use

Multisite environment requirements


Table 42 lists the recommended environment requirements. Table 42: Multisite environment requirements Requirement Maximum latency between sites Available bandwidth Recommended 60ms each way 512 kbps

If the network characteristics are inferior to the recommended requirements described in Table 42, the end user experience will be impacted in the following areas:
l l l

Time taken to place links between conferences Time taken for DTMF commands to propagate between systems Time taken to schedule a global conference (only noticeable for repeat bookings)

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Opening ports between sites


Table 43 list the ports that need to be opened for use by Meeting Exchange. Table 43: Ports Port 1100 1105 Description NSI DoubleTake port Service port

Table 44 list the ports that need to be opened to allow the CRS servers to communicate with each other. Table 44: CRS ports Port 20 and 21 53 123 123 1433 1525 5021 Type TCP TCP UDP UDP TCP TCP TCP Source CRS All devices Web Portal CRS Web Portal CRS S6200 bridge Destination S6200 bridge DNS S6200 bridge S6200 bridge CRS S6200 bridge CRS Description CDR Loader. Fetches CDRs and CODRs by way of FTP. DNS name server requests. (Optional) Time synchronization. Request and return (bidirectional). Time synchronization. Request and return (bidirectional). ODBC for web reports - TomCat. Informix for Self Registration pin codes to bridge. Modapi control. 1 of 2

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Table 44: CRS ports (continued) Port 5050 5050 6600 6601 20002 20004 Type TCP TCP TCP UDP TCP TCP Source Web Portal Web Portal S6200 bridge S6200 bridge Web Portal CRS Destination CRS CRS Web Portal Web Portal S6200 bridge S6200 bridge Description Web Portal scheduling to Reserver. Additional TCP session to the Reserver for the Audio Console. API for Web-based applications to control bridge (Audio Console CMAPI). API for Web-based applications to control bridge (Audio Console CMAPI). Moderator command/ control for Bridge Talk. SSL-encrypted moderator command/ control for Bridge. 2 of 2

Installing multisite for Meeting Exchange


To install multisite: 1. Copy entire MSE folder to desired location. 2. Start MSE. 3. Consult install.txt if you want to modify MSE operation.

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Configuring multisite

Setting up a CRS for multisite use


Each CRS server connects to a local bridge but maintains TCP/IP connectivity to all other CRS servers in the multisite network. Figure 26: CRS connectivity within the multisite network

Multisite

Figure notes: 1. CRS 2. S6200/S6800 3. TCP/IP

To configure a CRS for multisite use, use the System Administrator tab in the CRS Front End application to:
l l

Identify all other CRS servers in the network. Verify that the list of time zones is identical on all CRS servers in the network. Note: Synchronize all CRSs and bridges to one source, otherwise the GCD process will not accurately determine which bridge to make the hub.

Note:

Configure the Notifications Subsystems global template to include conference access numbers for all the bridges in the network.

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There should be several telephone access numbers but only one number per bridge. Participants can use the telephone number of the nearest bridge. For example, callers in Canada would dial a Toronto access number. Callers in Boston would call a New York number. Note: Avaya recommends that you create a unique login for each CRS and bridge to ensure that each node connects only to its own resources. For more information on configuring login information, see Configuring MultiSite.ini for multisite use on page 244.

Note:

For information on configuring a CRS, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com. For an introduction to creating global conferences, see About global conferences on page 249.

SQL 2000 and SQL 2005 SP2


Due to encryption enhancements in SQL 2005 Service Pack 2, Avaya has updated the process of CRS failover in Meeting Exchange 5.2. Contact Avaya Support Engineers for more information about these configuration steps.

Linking CRS servers


In order to configure CRS servers for multisite use, it is necessary to link the servers. This is done through the SQL Enterprise Manager. Note: An expert knowledge of the workings of the SQL Enterprise Manager is necessary to complete this task.

Note:

Registering the server


To register the server: 1. Click Start > Programs > SQL Enterprise Manager. The SQL dialog displays. 2. Right-click SQL Server Group. 3. From the submenu list, select New SQL Server Registration option. Tip:
Tip:

If the Wizard dialog displays, select Disable Wizard to cancel. 4. In the Registered SQL Server Properties dialog, click the Server list box.

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Figure 27: Registered SQL Servers Properties Dialog

5. In the Select Server dialog, select a server name from the Active servers list and click OK. Figure 28: Select Server Dialog

6. Select the Use SQL Server authentication option as shown in step 4. 7. Enter a login name. The login name is . 8. Enter a password. The password is . 9. Click OK to register the server.

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Setting up the stored procedure


To configure the stored procedure: 1. From the New Server option lists select database. 2. From the Database list, select BSRes2. 3. Click Stored Procedure. 4. Double-click to open the p_getsystemparameter from the Stored Procedures list. The Stored Procedures window displays. 5. Under Select Statement, enter the site link number for the local server in the @SiteLinkNum section. For more information, see Link line architecture on page 221. 6. Enter the site link priority in the @SiteLinkPriority section: where 0 has the highest priority and 5 the least priority 7. Enter the time zone of this side in the @SiteTimeZoneName and @SiteTimeZoneType. This should match the TimeZoneType table under the System Administrator tab in the CRS Front End application. 8. Close the Stored Procedures window.

Configuring SQL stored procedures


You must create the BSRes2 database first by using the following two stored procedures:
l l

DoProcessGCDChanges RunMultiSiteCDRs Note: These stored procedures (also called jobs) are listed in the stored procedures folder in the BSRes2 database.

Note:

DoProcessGCDChanges
You can configure the DoProcessGCDChanges SQL job on any one of the nodes within the multisite network. It should only be configured on one node. To configure DoProcessGCDChanges: 1. From the SQL Enterprise Manager box, expand the Local Server folder. 2. Expand the Management folder. 3. Expand the SQL Server Agent folder. 4. Right-click on Jobs and select New Jobs from the submenu. 5. In the New Jobs Properties box under the General tab:

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a. Enter DoProcessGCDChanges in the Name field. Figure 29: New Jobs Properties Dialog

b. In the Owner field, select a name, for example, . c. Enter DoProcessGCDChanges in the Description field. 6. In the Steps tab: a. Click the New button. b. In the General tab, enter Step1 in the Step name field. Figure 30: New Job Step

c. Choose BSRes2 in the Database field. d. Under Command, enter DoProcessGCDChanges for the command name. e. In the Advanced tab under On success action, choose the Quit the job reporting success for the success action option. f. Click OK.

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7. In the Schedules tab: a. Click the New Scheduler button. b. In the New Jobs Scheduler dialog, enter Schedule1 in the Name field. c. Choose Recurring. d. Click the Change button. e. In the Edit Recurring Schedule dialog, select Daily. Figure 31: Edit Recurring Schedule Dialog

f. Under Daily Frequency, select Occurs every 1 minute, and click OK. 8. In the New Jobs Properties dialog, click Apply and then OK. The configuration is complete. Note: The Notification tab does not require configuration.

Note:

RunMultiSiteCDRs
Use SQL Script to install the RunMultiSiteCDRs SQL job on all nodes in the multisite network. To install the RunMultiSiteCDRs SQL job: 1. Choose Start > Programs > Microsoft SQL Server > Query Analyzer. 2. In the Connect to SQL Server dialog, select the server to which you want to connect, for example, Local. 3. Choose the Windows authentication option and click OK. 4. In the Query Analyzer dialog, choose File > Open, and navigate to the /ReadCDR700 folder on the root directory.

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5. Select MultiSiteCDRs.sql and click Open. 6. From the Database list on the tool bar, choose CDRs. 7. Execute the query by pressing f5 (or click the arrow 8. Wait for the script complete message. 9. Verify that you successfully installed the RunMultiSiteCDRs job by opening the SQL Enterprise Manager and navigating to the Local/Management/SQL Server Agent/Jobs folder. 10. Double-click to open RunMultiSiteCDRs. 11. Select the Schedules tab and click the Edit button. 12. In the Edit Job Schedule dialog, click the Change button. 13. Under the Daily Frequency in the Edit Recurring Job Schedules dialog, reset the default time (12:00 AM) to a time recommended by your system administrator, and click OK. Note: Each server requires a designated time to process global conference information from the other nodes in the multisite system. To avoid conflicts, the system administrator may choose to stagger the start times for running RunMultiSiteCDRs on each server one half hour apart during off-peak hours. 14. In the Edit Job Schedule dialog, click OK. 15. In the RunMultiSiteCDRs Properties dialog, click Apply and OK. The configuration is complete. button on the toolbar).

Note:

Configuring the MSDTC log file


The following sections describe how to modify the default MSDTC setting to the recommended setting for Windows 2003 operating systems. To modify the MSDTC log file on a Windows 2003 system: 1. Choose Start > Settings > Control Panel. 2. In the Control Panel window, double-click on Administrative Tools. 3. In the Administrative Tools window, double-click on Component Services. 4. Expand the Microsoft Transaction Server and the Computer folders. 5. Right-click on My Computer and select Stop MSDTC. 6. Right-click on My Computer and select Properties. 7. Click on the MSDTC tab.

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Setting up a CRS for multisite use

Figure 32: My Computer Properties Dialog

8. In the MSDTC dialog, enter 32 in the Capacity field, and click the Reset Log button. 9. Click Yes in the DTC Console Message dialog. 10. Under Status in the MSDTC dialog, click Start, and click OK.

Creating a new server in the CRS Front End


To create a new server in the CRS Front End: 1. Open the CRS Front End by double-clicking the CRS Front End icon on your desktop. 2. Click System Administration. The System Administration fields appear. 3. Select Server and click New. 4. Enter the server name and click Save. For information on creating new servers in CRS Front End, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.

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Viewing servers
To view the servers: 1. Open the CRS Front End by double-clicking the CRS Front End icon on your desktop. 2. Click Customer Bookings. 3. Select the *Multi-Site* company from the company list on the left-hand side. The new server displays in the company details section. 4. To view bridge information, click on the Bridge tab. If configured for an Active/Standby environment, multisite receives bridge information stored on the CRS. The CRS displays bridge information on the Bridge tab, which includes the bridge name, IP addresses, and status (Active or Standby). Multisite parses this information and tries to connect to the active bridge and bypassing the entries listed in the default MultiSite.ini file (bridgenames). If an application server fail over occurs, multisite shuts down. BSMon then restarts multisite, which sends a request to the CRS for an updated active/standby bridge list and connects to the newly active bridge.

Configuring MultiSite.ini for multisite use


Before running multisite, you must first configure the multisite.ini file. The multisite application (MSE.exe) can be told the location of the multisite.ini file. For example: MSE.exe c:\Avaya\MultiSite\MultiSite.ini The default location for the MultiSite.ini file is %windir%\MultiSite.ini. To set up the multisite.ini file: 1. Using Windows Explorer, locate the <installation path> multisite folder. 2. Open the MultiSite.ini file using any text editor, such as Notepad.

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Configuring MultiSite.ini for multisite use

3. Add the following values listed in Table 45, where indicated. Table 45: ini file description Parameter with default Mutisite SaveSettings=1 LogLevel=2 LogSize=100 LogArchives=50 LogBuffered=1 BridgePollingInterval=30 RefreshSecs=0 CRSBridgeList=1 CRSHost=127.0.0.1 Port=5050 CRSEncryption=1 TellCRSAboutLocals=0 NumVLLRetries=5 LinkTime=30 AutoBridgeReconnect=1 0..1 0..5 50..10000 1..100 0..1 20..120 600.87400 0..1 <ipaddress> <port> 0..1 0..1 0..20 10..180 0..1 Range Description General MSE settings Whether settings should be written back to MultiSite.ini on success Log Level (0=Error; 1=Information, 2=Verbose, 3,4,5=Debug) Log Size in Kb Number of log files kept Whether buffering is on (buffered logs have little effect on performance) Number of seconds between pinging CRS and bridge (heartbeat) Number of seconds between refreshing bridge and crs conference lists Whether we should get our bridge IP from the CRS bridge table The IP address of the CRS ResSrvr The port of the CRS ResSrvr Whether CRS ipaddress:port is encrypted Whether to inform the CRS ResSrvr about opening/closing of local conferences Number of VLL retry attempts The maximum number of seconds to wait for a VLL to link Whether MSE should close down or retry to connect to bridge on bridge connection failure The maximum number of minutes to wait for a bridge connection If desired, a portgroup name from /usr/dcb/ dbase/admin/portGroupsOB.txt (will limit VLLs to this range.) 1 of 2

ReconnectTime=15 PortGroupsOB=MultiSite

0..60 <portGroupOB>

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Table 45: ini file description (continued) Parameter with default EventPort=13912 Range <our-port> Description Incoming port that bridge will send events to our machine on. Verify firewall has this open. This is the address sent to the bridge. It will try to send events to our-ip:our_port A section for all bridges known. One line per bridge. <bridge_info> If CRSBridgeList is set, this ip-address will be replaced by the one got from the CRS This entire section applies to this bridge name. <op_name> <op_pass> 0..1 The operator name that MSE will use to logon to the bridge The operator password that MSE will use to logon to the bridge Whether the bridge modapi communication is encrypted For Query window details (support view) <title> <x,y> <x,y> <ConfRef> Caption written to MSE application title bar Top, left co-ordinates for main window (Allows placement) Top, left co-ordinates for query window (Allows placement) Query window, initial ConferenceRef displaye 2 of 2 4. Save and close the multisite.ini file.

EventIPAddress=local-ip BridgeNames MyBridge=127.0.0.1,2000 4,1212,5 MyBridge OperatorName=msite OperatorPassword=x IsEncrypted=1 Layout Title= MainTopLeftPos=183,108 QueryTopLeftPos=0,0 QueryRef=0

<our-ip>

Configuring multisite for BSMon


You can configure multisite to start by BSMon. For information, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.

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Stopping multisite
To stop multisite, just click the Close button.

Setting up the audio conference server


The system administrator should configure each bridge/server in the network to ensure that multisite operates seamlessly.
l

Add specific multisite sign-in accounts on the bridge using the Administrator Menu > Configurations > Sign In menu of the system administration software. These sign-in accounts should match the sign-in accounts defined in the MultiSite.ini file. See Table 45. To set up call branding, use the command line cbutil utility located in the /usr/dcb/ bin directory to specify phone numbers to route calls. If Communications Manager is not part of the implementation, set up outgoing call branding using the /usr/ipcb/config/telnumToUri.tab file. If you want to include options like Attended Originator Dial Out (ODO), or Lecture, enable the options uniformly on all bridges in the multisite network. The CDR End Date (cdr_end) feature enables a system to generate CDRs or a CODR for a conference on the end date rather than the start date when a conference extends past midnight.

Utilizing global conference resources


When a global conference is booked, you do not need to allow for additional resources for each conference. At the utmost, the number of link lines in a conference is a function of the number of callers who have dialed into other bridges. However, you do need to monitor the availability of bridge resources for linking. For example, when all participants are dialed into the same bridge no resources are used for linking. A link line uses a resource. However, a link line does not occur unless it is initiated by a participant dialing into a bridge other than the local one. A possible alternative approach for managing linking resources is to use the standard resource pool for linking and activate overbooking.

Overbooking settings
Set up the overbooking level for each site as a function of the number of ports on the site relative to the number of ports (at the site with the most ports) and site-cost weighting.

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For example, overbooking needs to be enabled to allow for the fact that a ten-participant conference booked over four bridges will only use, at most, ten ports for callers and two for links (each link requires a port at each end). Therefore, the conference may use only 14 ports out of 40 booked. Tip:
Tip:

Determine which site may require the most links. If bridges are significantly different in size, the overbooking parameter may need to be increased on the smaller site to accommodate global conferences. Note: The key to resource management is essentially the same as for an on-demand environment, for example, the Reports utility. Monitoring link line usage is a key part of this process.

Note:

Setting up global conference billing


Since a global conference results in billing data distributed over multiple sites, you must configure a stored procedure (Global Billing) to run on a daily basis, as well as separately on each site. All locally based Call Detail Records (CDRs) generated by the global conference must be relocated to a single, targeted site for reports and billing purposes. Transferred CDRs acquire the global conference reference number (Global Ref) of the CRS on which the conference was originally booked. Although each CDR includes a field that references the site on which the CDR originated, the global conference reference number takes precedence. Each CRS in the network forwards the CDRs to the site identified by the reference number. Web, post-conference, and CRS reports include the total participant counts based upon the global conference reference number. Therefore, global CDR billing information is captured one time only at the referenced site and not the originating site. Tip:
Tip:

Run the billing application after CDRs are transferred to ensure complete global billing information.

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Chapter 23: Running multisite


This chapter describes the following:
l l l l

About global conferences Scheduling global conferences Conference features Tracking billing information for global conferences

About global conferences


Global conferences are scheduled, unattended conferences that start and end at a predefined time and run on several bridges simultaneously. End users book global conferences on a CRS, which automatically propagates the reservation across all other CRS servers in the multisite network. If several active conferences share the same Global Conference ID, multisite links them together using specific moderator VLL lines called AutoVLLs. The spokes dial to the hub using the number specified in the CRS system parameters. Using one of the following formats, the spokes pass the conferee passcode for access the conference:
<DNIS>...<CONFEREE PASS CODE>#

Or
4300...1234#

A global conference begins:


l

When the first participant dials a specified telephone number into the nearest bridge in the multisite network and enters a conference passcode. As additional participants dial into the global conference from remote bridges, multisite creates audio links between neighboring, active bridges within the network.

Operators can use the operator console, Bridge Talk, to connect to a bridge in the network and view a local conference segment of the global conference. Note: If the hub is no longer in the global conference, for example, if the number of participants on the hub bridge goes to zero, the actve spokes will re-establish the handshake with one another to keep the global conference running.

Note:

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Scheduling global conferences


An operator can create global conferences using the CRS Front End application. Note that you must include a moderator for the conference to control conference features, such as lecture or security. Note: You can only schedule global conferences using a CRS, which propagates a global conference across all other CRSs in the multisite network. 1. Double-click the CRS icon displayed on your desktop. 2. Click Customer Bookings. 3. Select the company and the client for whom you wish to create a scheduled conference. 4. Click Create Reservation. 5. Enter your reservation details. When you select Global, the CRS automatically selects a moderator for the conference. Note: To install passcodes across a multisite system, it is important to have a passcode management strategy so that all sites can be installed efficiently. For example, you should plan the installation sequence and manage the passcode range on each site. For information, see the Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com. 6. Confirm the reservation. 7. Enter a title for the reservation. The application displays the Booking Summary dialog.

Note:

To schedule a global conference:

Note:

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About global conferences

Figure 33: Booking Summary Dialog

The CRS books the conference locally and propagates the reservation across all CRSs in the network. The CRS assigns a global reference number (Global Ref) to each local segment of the global conference. Tip:
Tip:

symbol in the Booking Summary dialog signifies a global conference.

Here are some important reminders when scheduling a global conference:


l

Conference features and passcodes are identical for all bridges; however, area-specific Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS) or Direct Dial Inward (DDI) numbers remain local. Multisite keeps track of CDR information for global conferences through the global conference ID stored in each CRS database. The telephone number can be a global conference (800) number or a local number. Each conference, including the number of requested lines and global conference features, is scheduled on all bridges in the multisite network. Note: To avoid scheduling conflicts, you should run only one instance of multisite for each conference server and CRS unit at a time.

l l

Note:

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For more information about scheduling, see Using Meeting Exchange, which is available on support.avaya.com.

Managing global conferences


Similar to a regular conference, operators can modify the local segments of the global conference features, mute lines, respond to help requests, and so on. Multisite is positioned as an unattended solution since operators cannot see more than one segment of the global conference on their workstation. Using the CRS Front End, an operator or administrator can view various details of global conferences by clicking the GCD button on the Conference Schedule dialog. Table 46 describes the Conference Schedule options. Table 46: GCD options in the CRS Conference Schedule dialog Feature Server Ref LinkServer LinkPhone LinkPty LmodP GmodP GmodA Glock Gbcas GmuAl GmuLk Gkeep Description The site name. The local conference reference number. The current hubs server name. The current hubs phone number. The current hub link priority. (0 is the highest, 5 is the lowest priority). Displays the presence of the local moderator. Denotes the presence of the global moderator. Indicates the arrival of the global moderator. Displays that the global lock function is active. Indicates that the global broadcast function is active. Displays that the global mute all function is active Denotes that the global mute lock function is active. Indicates that the global keep function is active. 1 of 2

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Conference features

Conference features
Multisite supports most local and global conference features described in the following sections.

Global level conference features


At the global conference level, moderators can use the features listed in Table 47. Table 47: Moderator-controlled features specific to global conferences Feature Lecture Secure/lock Description The moderator can lecture a global conference. If scheduled, the moderator can secure a global conference. Note: If a moderator secures the conference, a new participant or AUTOVLL cannot join the conference.

Note:

Moderator Hang up

If scheduled, the system hangs up all callers when the last moderator leaves the conference. The moderator can use DTMF commands to toggle this feature on or off during the conference. If scheduled, the system plays music to all callers until the first moderator joins the conference. If scheduled, conference participants can hear Entry tones/messages and Exit tones/messages. There are several Entry and Exit tone options depending upon the bridge configuration. Note: Set this feature to OFF or TONES only. Participants hear the tones as soon as a link line (AUTOVLL) joins the conference.

Music Entry tones/Exit tones

Note:

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Local conference features


Table 48 details the features that are exclusive only to the local segment of global conferences. Table 48: Moderator-controlled features specific to local conferences Feature Conference Record/Playback Description Moderators can start recording the conference on the bridge where they dial in. The global conference is recorded as long as the link lines are in place. The file recording is stored on the local bridge where the conference was recorded. Moderators must start the recording manually by entering DTMF commands. Note: A moderator must be present to record the conference. Tip:
Tip:

Note:

The moderator should manually start the recording to avoid creating multiple copies that may not be complete.

Originator Dial Out (ODO) Participant count Roster

If enabled on the system, the moderator can dial out to place additional local participants into a local segment of a global conference; however, they cannot dial out from a different bridge to which they dial in. The moderator can hear a count of participants for the local segment of the conference only. Moderators or participants can hear a roll call of participant names or preset dial list for the local segment of the conference only.

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Non-supported features
Table 49 describes the global conference features not available for this release. Table 49: Global conference features not currently supported Feature Subconference Roll call Subconference/ Intercept Description The moderator can create a subconference for the local segment of the global conference. The system can only play a local participant roll call (roster). Any participant or moderator can initiate an unattended subconference at any time during a conference by entering *93. The moderator only intercepts the last caller in the local conference segment. The system allows direct entry into a conference. Q&A is exclusively an attended conference feature. Polling is exclusively an attended conference feature. 1 of 2

DNIS/DDI Direct Q&A Polling

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Tracking billing information for global conferences


Each CRS server tracks Call Detail Records (CDRs) and billing information for its local bridge and transmits the CDR data back to the bridge where the conference was originally booked. If no participants dialed into a specific bridge, no CDR data is available. Billing is run independently at each site, but reports can be run from a central site. For more information about reports and billing, see Administering Meeting Exchange Applications, which is available on support.avaya.com.

Global conference resource monitoring


The CRS reports application provides this capability. This provides port utilization of link lines and conference resources.

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Chapter 24: Navigating multisite


Meeting Exchange 5.2 contains a Windows interface for the multsite application. Using this Windows interface, you can easily monitor the status of the multisite engine. This chapter describes the new interface. It contains the following sections:
l l l l l

Introduction CRS panel Bridge panel Stats panel Log Messages area

Introduction
The multisite interface consists of four separate areas. The multisite interface has been designed primarily as a tool for Support Engineers.
l l l l

CRS panel Bridge panel Stats panel Log Messages area

Figure 34 shows the interface.

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Figure 34: Multisite Interface

CRS panel
The CRS panel shows:
l

The IP address of the CRS in the following format: <ipaddress>:<port>:<enc|ssl|>. The status of the connection. The status values are Disconnected, Connected - Logged Out, Connected - Logged In, Connected - Syncing). The delay, which is represented by the slowest response received from this server. The version of this server.

l l

Bridge panel
The Bridge panel shows the same information as the CRS panel, but refers to the bridge server. For more information, see CRS panel on page 258.

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Stats panel

Stats panel
The Stats panel shows:
l

The number of globals that are currently active. For example: G0050; H0040; O0010 = 50 globals, 40 Hubs, 10 Outgoing links. The number of waiting messages in the CRS and bridge queues. - CRS example: T0005; R0002 = 5 messages to be transmitted to CRS, 2 messages to be received from CRS. - Bridge example: T0005; R0002; E0007 = 5 messages to be transmitted to Bridge, 2 messages to be received from Bridge, and 7 messages in the event queue from the Bridge.

The current server uptime for both the CRS and bridge servers. For example: B0072h; C0072h = Bridge up 72 hours, CRS up 72 hours. s=seconds, m=minutes, h=hours

Log Messages area


The Log Messages area shows the log message. Each log consists of:
l l l l

Time (hh:mm:ss) Source (which thread in the multisite engine is logging it) Type (Error / Info / Verbose / Debug) Text (The actual log information) Select Track Latest to enable the Log Messages area to scroll as new logs arrive so that the latest log is alwyas on top. Select Log To Screen to display the logs in the Log Messages area. Click Log Reset to delete all log files. The multisite application stores a configurable number of log files regardless of whether you click this button. The Log Reset button is useful to reset the display.

At the base of the Log Messages area, there are two checkboxes.
l

There are also three buttons:


l

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Click Query to view the currently in-progress conference in more detail. For more information, see Figure 35. Click Close to close the application.

Figure 35: Example Query Dialog

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Appendix A: Configuration task list


This appendix lists the common Meeting Exchange configuration tasks that you can perform using the System Administrator Main Menu > Configurations menu. It contains the following sections:
l l

Tips for using this document Configuration tasks

Tips for using this document


If you do not know the name of the parameter you want to configure but you do know the end result of the configuration task, that you want to perform, you can use this chapter to find the information you require. It provides an alternative method for finding information on the Meeting Exchange parameters. For example, using the Adobe Reader search option, search for a term such as pause to find the information you require to specify the pause before Meeting Exchange plays a message to an incoming telephone line. These chapters contain related information:
l

Configuring the Meeting Exchange application server on page 57 describes how to navigate to the Configurations menu. It also provides an overview of each configuration sub-menu. Finding parameters by name on page 265 lists the configuration parameters. It provides an alternative method of finding the information that you require.

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Configuration tasks
Table 50 lists the common configuration tasks. Table 50: Common Configuration Tasks I want to... Configure conference playback. Where to find this information
l l

Table 58 Configuring recording on page 137 Table 58 Configuring recording on page 137

Configure conference recording.

l l

Configure DTMF. Configure lecture settings. Configure mute settings. Configure operator help, assistance. Configure PINs. Configure roster, roll call. Configure sub conferencing. Configure the output of reports. Enable or disable dial out for Moderators. Enter the name of the conferencing server. Specify audio messages, prompts.

Table 58 Table 58 Table 58 Table 59


l l

Table 58 Configuring PINs on page 129

Table 58 Table 58 Table 52 Table 53 Table 58 Table 58 Table 60 Configuring audio messages on page 147 Table 58 Table 58

Specify automatic conference IDs. Specify date and time formats.

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Table 50: Common Configuration Tasks I want to... Specify how long Meeting Exchange waits for passcodes. Specify messages. Where to find this information Table 51 Table 58 Configuring audio messages on page 147 Table 51 Table 58 Table 60 Table 54

Specify the Meeting Exchange response to invalid passcodes. Specify the number of digits that Meeting Exchange captures when callers dial the conference server. Specify the number of lines that Meeting Exchange dials in a blast dial. Specify the number of telephone digits which Meeting Exchange expects.

Table 51
l l l

Table 54 Configuring call branding on page 40. Configuring Meeting Exchange number collection on page 86.

Specify the pause before Meeting Exchange plays a message to an incoming telephone line. Specify tones, beeps, sounds.

Table 57

l l l l l

Table 54 Table 58 Table 60 Warning Tone configuration on page 313. Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62.

Specify what happens when participants hang-up their telephone line. Specify what to do with faulty telephone lines. Specify whether Meeting Exchange allows early entry into conferences. Specify whether Meeting Exchange extends conferences.

Table 57 Table 57 Table 58 Table 58

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Table 50: Common Configuration Tasks I want to... Turn logging on or off. Where to find this information
l l

Table 58 Viewing Meeting Exchange information on page 103 Table 54 Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com.

Write a transcript of audio messages.

l l

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Appendix B: Finding parameters by name


This appendix lists the Meeting Exchange parameters that you can configure using the System Administrator Main Menu > Configurations menu. It contains the following sections:
l l l l l l l l l l l

Tips for using this document Blast dial configuration properties CDR configuration properties CODR configuration properties Call Routing configuration properties Operator configuration properties Supervision configuration properties System configuration properties Timed Assist configuration Voice Message configuration Warning Tone configuration

Tips for using this document


If you know the name of the parameter you want to configure, you can use the Adobe Reader search option to locate a detailed description of each parameter. For example, search for the parameter name Annunciator Delay to find the information you require to specify the pause before Meeting Exchange plays a message to an incoming telephone line. These chapters contain related information:
l

Configuring the Meeting Exchange application server on page 57 describes how to navigate to the Configurations menu. It also provides an overview of each configuration sub-menu. Configuration task list on page 261 lists the configuration tasks. It provides an alternative method of finding the information that you require.

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Blast dial configuration properties


Table 51 describes the blast dial configuration properties. Table 51: Blast Dial Configuration Properties Parameter Max. Channel Blast Description The number of channels (1 to 16) that Meeting Exchange simultaneously dials during a blast dial. The default is eight channels. Dialing channels in groups with a short pause between each group prevents flooding the network with calls. The Blast Delay parameter specifies the pause between blast dials. The number of seconds (0 to 60) that Meeting Exchange waits before dialing the next group of channels in a blast dial. The default is two seconds. The Meeting Exchange response to participants who enter an invalid passcode or participants who do not enter the digits within the time allowed. The Scan Time parameter specifies the allowed time. There are two values: l ENTER (default) The participant is placed in the Enter Conference to wait for operator assistance. l Hang-up The system disconnects the caller. The Invalid Code setting also specifies the Meeting Exchange response to participants entering codes for secured blast conferences. This parameter applies to coded blast dials only. In coded blasts, the called party must acknowledge the call using a DTMF command within a configurable time. This step ensures that Meeting Exchange quickly disconnects calls that are answered by voicemail. 1 of 2

Blast Delay

Invalid Code

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CDR configuration properties

Table 51: Blast Dial Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Scan Time (5 to 20) Description The number of seconds (5 to 20) that Meeting Exchange scans for additional passcode digits after a participant enters the first digit. The default is 20 seconds. Avaya recommends adjusting this parameter to accommodate the longest passcode on your system. This parameter applies to coded blasts only. In coded blasts, the called party must acknowledge the call using a DTMF command within a configurable time. This step ensures that Meeting Exchange quickly disconnects calls that are answered by voicemail. Specifies what happens to lines that remain in the Call Progress (CLPG) state after a blast dial. (Some lines may remain in the CLPG state because no one answers the blast dial, or the participant fails to enter digits.) l 30 to 600 (seconds) The system automatically hangs up lines remaining in the CLPG state beyond the specified time. This includes participants using rotary phones, who cannot enter DTMF commands. l 0 (default) There is no timeout. Lines remain in the CLPG state until an operator accesses the line or clears or exits Blast Dial, which hangs up all lines in the CLPG state. Avaya recommends specifying a timeout value when operators are not available to clear the lines. 2 of 2

CLPG Timeout (0, 30 to 600 s)

CDR configuration properties


Meeting Exchange records all CDRs in full. This CDR Configuration option only specifies the formatting options for viewing and printing. This section contains the following sections:
l l

Formatting considerations CDR configuration properties

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Formatting considerations
Using the CDR Configuration and CODR Configuration options, you can configure the properties of four different types of CDR and CODR reports.They are:
l l l l

Style 1 (Short Format) Style 2 (Long Format) Style 3 (Custom Format) Auto CDR or Auto CODR

For each type of report, you can include or exclude report fields to suit customer requirements. Each time you print a CDR or CODR report, you can choose which of the types of report you require. You can modify all style names except for the Auto (CDR or CODR) style name. This flexibility enables you to assign style names that indicate the types of data fields that you have included or excluded from a style. The default names, Short Format, Long Format, and Custom Format do not indicate the scope of data that you can include in an output style you can configure the Short Format to include all data, and conversely you can configure the Long Format to include a single data item. You cannot modify the Auto (CDR or CODR) style name. Additionally, you cannot view or print these reports. The Auto style is the default style for CDRs and CODRs exported by Meeting Exchange to a remote host by the autocdr process. Column width for an output style is directly proportional to the number of fields that you include in a style. The more fields you specify, the more columns appear in the report output. You may want to limit the number of fields for records so that they print on a single line for easier reading. If you exceed the number of fields that fit into a single line, the report prints the additional fields on a second line below the first. Most printers accommodate CDRs and CODRs up to 80 columns long, printing each record on a separate line. To print CDRs and CODRs with more than 80 columns, Avaya recommends the use of landscape mode to accommodate all data. Meeting Exchange determines the total columns a CDR format requires and displays this information next to the style name you choose in the selection box when you print or view CDRs and CODRs. Knowing the number of columns is useful when setting up printers. This value is defined as follows: number of columns = (total field sizes + number of fields) -1 All fields except Style Name and Headers in CDRs and CODRs and Phone in CDRs are simple ON/OFF toggles, where ON includes the field in the style. For more information about viewing and printing CDR reports, see Call Detail Record (CDR) reports on page 104.

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CDR configuration properties


Table 52 describes the fields available for a CDR report. For more information about viewing and printing CDR reports, see Call Detail Record (CDR) reports on page 104. Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties Parameter Style Name Size n/a Options Up to 15 characters Description Name of a CDR output style. The system stores four different CDR styles. You can rename all styles except the Auto CDR style. Style Name text is not included in the source of CDR files. Up to three lines of headings can be included in the report output. The Headers field accepts entries from 0 to 60. Enter a 0 to disable headers. Any other value (x) prints headers every xth CDR. For example, the default value for the Custom Format style is 57. When you select this style for printing or viewing, the output includes a Header every 57th CDR included in the output file. Headers text is not included in the source of CDR files. Number of the telephone line used for this call (1 - 1200). Example n/a

Headers

n/a

0 to 60

n/a

Line Number

OFF, ON

1001 1 of 10

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Conf Num Sml Size 3 Options OFF, ON Description Number of the last conference room in which the telephone line was included up to room 999. This number will be 999 if the conference room is number 999 or above because Conf Num Sml is accurate up to room 998 only. Use the Conf Num Whl field to determine the conference room number as it accomodates all 2000 possible conferences. If the conference takes place in room 1001, Conf Num Sml = 999 and Conf Num Whl = 1001. If the conference takes place in room 5, Conf Num Sml =5 and Conf Num Whl = 5. Time of day the line connected to the system, recorded to the nearest second and based on a 24-hour clock. Time of day the line disconnected from the system, recorded to the nearest second. Total time the line was connected to the system, rounded down to the nearest minute with a 1-minute minimum. Because call duration represents a lines entire activity on the system including minutes spent with an operator or in the Enter Queue it typically exceeds the time indicated by the Conf Minutes field. Example 01 to 999 ** indicates that the line was not placed in a conference

Seize Time

OFF, ON

hh:mm:ss 12:30:49

Disc. Time

OFF, ON

hh:mm:ss 15:43:29 150

Call Duration

OFF, ON

2 of 10

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CDR configuration properties

Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Line Name Size 20 Options OFF, ON Description For an attended conference, the Line Name is the name entered by the operator in the Bridge Talk Line Detail dialog. For an unattended conference, the information depends on whether PIN codes were used for the conference. If PIN codes were not used, the Line Name is the passcode of participant. If PIN codes were used, the Line Name is the PIN code of the caller. For DNIS/DDI calls processed by the Call Routing feature, the CDR Report takes the line name from the corresponding Call Branding table entry. Indicates whether a participant had moderator status at any time during the conference. It has three possible values: N, Y, and A indicating participant, moderator, and alternate moderator respectively. Alternate moderator represents the co-chair feature. The participant phone number stored on Meeting Exchange in dial lists and in the PIN code database. Options for the this field let you choose the length that best meets your requirements SHORT (11 digits), MEDIUM (20 digits), LONG (40 digits), or OFF (0). The phone number from which a caller actually dials is represented by the Calling Phone parameter. Name of the conference in which the line is included. The system name appears in the Conf Name field for the first entry in a CDR. Example Sales Rep 1 or 4321

Mod. Status

OFF, ON

Phone

11, 20, or 40

OFF, short (11), medium (20), long (40)

978-555-34 56

Conf Name

12

OFF, ON

Sales mtg

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Conf ID Size 12 Options OFF, ON Description Conference ID number or confirmation number. For attended conferences, you can configure Meeting Exchange to automatically assign conference IDs, or an operator can assign them manually. The conference ID for scheduled attended conferences may be entered by the operator or by an external reservation system. Unattended conferences are always assigned a conference ID. For scheduled conferences, this is either the operator or moderator-assigned ID (up to 12 alphanumeric characters) or the Meeting Exchange-generated confirmation number (up to 12 digits). When an operator or moderator assigns an ID to a conference, this ID replaces the Meeting Exchange-generated ID and confirmation number when the conference starts, so this ID appears in the CDR for that conference. Total minutes a line spends in the conference, rounded down to the nearest minute with a 1-minute minimum. Because participants move about on the system, such as when they wait in the Enter conference, this value is typically less than the total time the line is connected to the system, as specified by the Call Duration parameter. Example 000000000 015, or dept 23

Conf Minutes

OFF, ON

120

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Conf Entry Time Size 8 Options OFF, ON Description Time of day the telephone line entered the conference based on Greenwich Mean Time (GMT). The system records the time the line entered the conference to the nearest second. Calls that never join a conference (for example, a disconnect from INP) show a conference entry time that corresponds to 00:00 GMT. Type of call based upon the setup of the call, typically one of the following values: Dial-in Participant called in to the attended or unattended conference. ODO An operator or moderator made the call or initiated the call, such as in a blast dial. Other possible values include: VLL, u_Blast, or any string. Example hh:mm:ss e.g. 08:59:30

Call Type

10

OFF, ON

ODO

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Disc. Reason Size 2 Options OFF, ON Description Code indicating the reason that Meeting Exchange disconnected a call. Valid codes include: 0 = Unknown 1 = Network 2 = Operator hangup 3 = Invalid code 4 = Code timeout 5 = Conference secured 6 = Invalid code time of day 7 = Maximum lines reached 8 = Conference time expired 9 = Transferred to a PBX ext. 10 = Line timeout 11 = CLPG timeout (Blast conferees only) 12 = Other system 13 = Fault 14 = Alarm 15 = DSP failed 16 = Error 17 = DNIS/DDI hang up (Systems with DNIS/DDI only) 18 = ODO hang up 19 = Moderator hang up (unattended) 20 = Transferred to another conference 21 = SP Disconnect 22 = Channel hot swapped 23 = Billing code error 24 = Session has timed out 25 = No system resources available 26 = Invalid security credentials 27 = Glare on the channel Codes 3-8 apply to unattended conferences. Code 18 occurs when ODO moderators hang up a line that they have dialed or their own line. Example 19

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Company Name Size 20 Options OFF, ON Description Company name associated with a line. Meeting Exchange takes it from dial lists (fastdials and blasts) or an operator enters it. For DNIS/ DDI calls processed by the Call Routing feature, Meeting Exchange takes the company name from the corresponding entry in the call branding configuration table. DNIS/DDI digits that match an entry in the Call Branding table for dial-in calls processed by the Call Routing feature. Indicates whether a line was transferred by the operator to the specified conference from another conference. Y The line was transferred. N The line was not transferred. Transferred lines have at least two CDRs because Meeting Exchange issues a separate CDR each time a participant transfers to a conference. All but the first CDR show a Y in the transfer field. All but the last CDR show disconnect reason 20 in the Disc Reason field. Indicates whether a line disconnected and then reconnected to the system. Y The line disconnected then reconnected. Operators must use the Reconnect command to flag reconnected lines. A reconnected line has two CDRs, with the CDR from the second connection showing Y in the reconnect field. The field is blank if a line was not reconnected. PIN code required for a line. This field applies only to unattended conferences with PIN codes enabled. Example xyz corp.

DNIS Digits

16

OFF, ON

978555625 5

Transfer

OFF, ON

Y or N

Reconnect

OFF, ON

PIN Code

16

OFF, ON

4321

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Access Time Size 8 Options OFF, ON Description The time that an operator first accessed a dial-in line after it entered the system. This field allows System Administrators to distinguish between the time a call entered the system, was first accessed by an operator, and was placed in a conference. The field is blank if the line was never accessed or was a dial-out call. Phone number from which a caller dialed in to the conference. Applies only to systems configured to collect ANI digits. Unique number Meeting Exchange assigns to a main conference and all sub-conferences created from it. This number associates main conferences with sub-conferences. Indicates the type of conference in which the telephone line is included: 0 This conference is not a sub-conference or a conference that has been intercepted by an operator. 1 This conference is a sub-conference. 2 This conference has been intercepted by an operator. The date the telephone line connected to Meeting Exchange. Displays the Network Type, which can be PSTN or VoIP that was used for the conference: 0The participant called via a PSTN line. 1The participant called via a VoIP line. Any caller record information, such as an email address. Example hh:mm:ss 08:55:30

Calling Phone

40

OFF, ON

978-552-62 22

Cross Ref

12

OFF, ON

000000000 123

User Conf Type

OFF, ON

0, 1, or 2

Seize Date

OFF, ON

mm/dd/yy e.g. 12/01/ 02 0 or 1

Network Type

OFF, ON

Line Aux1

60

OFF, ON

name@co mpany.com 8 of 10

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Line Aux2 Line Aux3 Passcode Size 60 60 16 Options OFF, ON OFF, ON OFF, ON Description Any caller record information. Any caller record information In a Flexflow conference, this field is the last passcode that the participant entered via DTMF. In a Flexflow call, this is a billing reference number that a moderator assigns to a conference. In Bridge Talk, this field is called the Accounting Code. The audio prompt set used in the conference. Not applicable for this platform. Number of the last conference in which the line was included. 01 to 2000 ** indicates that the line was not placed in a conference 63656 Example n/a n/a 9785

Aux Code

40

OFF, ON

63655

Prompt Set Video Info Conf Num Whl

2 5 5

OFF, ON OFF, ON OFF, ON

1, 2, 3 ...20

Aux Code2

40

OFF, ON

When ON, the conferencing server prompts moderators for a second billing code for their conference. You cannot set a second billing code using the Avaya Bridge Talk application. This value records the number of requests for operator assistance during the call. Participants request help by entering *0 on their telephone keypad. The default value is OFF.

Oper Help Reqs

OFF, ON

99

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Table 52: CDR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Last Help Req Size 8 Options OFF, ON Description This value records the time of the last request for operator assistance. The default value is OFF. This value records the unique participant identifier of the caller. Participants must enter this DTMF numeric code to access their conference when Operators select Identify or Identify and Validate from the Participant ID drop-down list at conference booking time. Example 22:30:00

Unique Participant Identifier

4-16

OFF, ON

1234

10 of 10 For more information about viewing and printing CDR reports, see Call Detail Record (CDR) reports on page 104.

CODR configuration properties


Meeting Exchange records all CODRs in full. This CODR Configuration option only specifies the formatting options for viewing and printing. Meeting Exchange produces CODR reports in a similar way to CDR reports. For more information about viewing and printing CODR reports, see Call Detail Record (CDR) reports on page 104.
l

For more information on formatting reports, see Formatting considerations on page 268.

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Table 53 describes the fields available for a CODR report.

Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties Parameter Style Name Size n/a Options Up to 15 characters Description Name of a CODR output style. The system stores four different CODR styles. You can rename all styles except the Auto CODR style. Style Name text is not included in the source of CODR files. Up to three lines of headings can be included in the report output. The Headers field accepts entries from 0 to 60. Enter a 0 to disable headers. Any other value (x) prints headers every xth CODR. For example, the default value for the Custom Format style is 57. When you select this style for printing or viewing, the output includes a Header every 57th CODR included in the output file. Headers text is not included in the source of CODR files. Number of the last conference room in which the telephone line was included up to room 999. This number will be 999 if the conference room is number 999 or above because Conf Num Sml is accurate up to room 998 only. Use the Conf Num Whl field to determine the conference room number as it accomodates all 2000 possible conferences. If the conference takes place in room 1001, Conf Num Sml = 999 and Conf Num Whl = 1001. If the conference takes place in room 5, Conf Num Sml =5 and Conf Num Whl = 5. Name of the conference in which the line is included. The system name appears in the Conf Name field for the first entry in a CODR. Example n/a

Headers

n/a

0 to 60

n/a

Conf Num Sml

OFF, ON

01 to 999 ** indicates that the line was not placed in a conference

Conf Name

12

OFF, ON

Sales mtg

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Conf ID Size 12 Options OFF, ON Description Conference ID number or confirmation number. For attended conferences, you can configure Meeting Exchange to automatically assign conference IDs, or an operator can assign them manually. The conference ID for scheduled attended conferences may be entered by the operator or by an external reservation system. Unattended conferences are always assigned a conference ID. For scheduled conferences, this is either the operator or moderator-assigned ID (up to 12 alphanumeric characters) or the Meeting Exchange-generated confirmation number (up to 12 digits). When an operator or moderator assigns an ID to a conference, this ID replaces the Meeting Exchange-generated ID and confirmation number when the conference starts, so this ID appears in the CODR for that conference. See Automatic Conf. ID in System configuration properties on page 294 for details on configuring the system to automatically generate conference IDs. Maximum number of simultaneous conference participants, excluding operators (1 1200). Date and time the conference begins. Start Time is rounded up to the nearest second, based on a 24-hour clock. Example 000000000 015, or dept 23

Max User Count Start Time

OFF, ON

100

17

OFF, ON

mm/dd/yyhh:mm:ss e.g. 07/27/ 0208:59:30 2 of 9

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Conf Duration Size 8 Options OFF, ON Description Period in minutes, rounded up to the nearest minute, between the first participant joining the conference and the last participant leaving the conference. The interval extends from the Start Time to the Conf End Time. This is the length of the conference itself, in contrast to the Conf Minutes, which is the total individual line minutes. Approximate sum of the individual line times for a conference. While a conference itself may last for only 30 minutes, the Conf Minutes typically exceeds this value. The ratio of Conf Minutes to Conf Duration varies with the number of participants and how long each of them remains in the conference. Sometimes conferees wait in the conference room several minutes before the conference begins. Because the system begins tracking conference minutes as soon as the first person joins the conference, the tracked minutes may not match the actual conference time and thus lead to over-billing. Type of conference: A Attended (Operator assistance scheduled for this conference.) U Unattended (Operator assistance not scheduled for this conference. The system classifies the conference as unattended even if operator assistance is provided on an ad hoc basis.) O On-Demand (Operator assistance not scheduled for this conference. This is a re-occurring type of conference.) Example 1440

Conf Minutes

OFF, ON

1600

Attended (U/A)

OFF, ON

A or U or O

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Status Info. Size 43 Options OFF, ON Description Indicates which of 11 different conference features were used in a conference. An ON appears in the CODR if the feature was used at any time during the conference; otherwise, OFF appears. The header label for each of the tracked features appear in the following order: ENT Entry Tone EXIT Exit Tone LEC Lecture LNK Linking MUS Music PBK Playback REC Record Q&A Question & Answer POL Polling SEC Security Valid output for the ENT and EXIT fields include: OFF, SYS, MSG, TON, or BTH (both). The PBK and REC field output indicates the recording and playback mode: ANL Analog DIG Digital A/D Analog and digital OFF Off Conference information text entered either by an operator using Bridge Talk. Example ENT EXIT REC - DIG PBK - DIG

Notes

60

OFF, ON

... and all conferees were successfull y entered to the conference ... mm/dd/yyhh:mm:ss e.g. 07/27/ 0210:00:00 4 of 9

Conf End Time

17

OFF, ON

Date and time the last participant leaves the conference. It is recorded to the nearest second, based on a 24-hour clock.

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Contact Name Contact Phone RP File Number Size 20 20 8 Options OFF, ON OFF, ON OFF, ON Description Contact name entered for a conference. Contact phone number for a scheduled conference. File name specified for participant-requested record or playback. When set to ON, Meeting Exchange extracts the file name specified for record or playback from the information generated during the conference. This field contains information only when a participant initiated recording or playback. Operator-initiated recording names are not saved. Number of minutes scheduled for this conference. For scheduled attended conferences, this field applies only if the Startup Notify Time parameter is set to ON and the conference is automatically setup by the system. Meeting Exchange calculates the scheduled conference duration from the Start and End Times specified in the conference reservation form. Example Ann Smith 978-555-99 99 confrcrd

Sched Duration

OFF, ON

1440

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Sched Partips Size 4 Options OFF, ON Description Number of ports reserved for participants in a scheduled conference. This field always applies to scheduled unattended conferences; however, it also applies to attended conferences if the systems Startup Notify Time parameter is set to ON and the conference is automatically setup by the system. Meeting Exchange extracts the number of ports scheduled for the conference from the conference reservation form. The Auto Conf ID parameter must also be set to OFF for schedule duration and participants to be tracked. Additional field for up to 20 characters of conference information along with the conference name. Additional field for up to 20 characters of conference information along with the conference name. The billing reference number that a moderator assigns to a conference. The conference confirmation number. The value for this field associates this CODR with other CODRs (with the same value) created for a single conference distributed across multiple bridges. This parameter is only relevant in a MultiSite configuration. Example 1000

Auxiliary 1

20

OFF, ON

confinfo1

Auxiliary 2

20

OFF, ON

confinfo2

Billing Code Confirm Num Global ID

20 12 12

ON, OFF ON, OFF ON, OFF

63656 100000009 875 109643678 643

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Cross Ref Size 12 Options ON, OFF Description A unique number that Meeting Exchange assigns to a main conference CODR and all sub-conference CODRs created from it to associate main conferences with the sub-conferences. Indicates the type of conference: 0 This conference is not a sub-conference or an intercept conference. 1 This conference is a sub-conference. 2 This conference is an intercept conference. The total number of sub-conferences created from this conference. The default is zero. The total number of intercept conferences created from this conference. Indicates whether the conference has an associated data conference. Nindicates no associated data conference. Yindicates an associated data conference. Indicates whether the Conference Viewer application is associated with the conference. Nindicates the Conference Viewer application is not associated. Yindicates Conference Viewer application is associated. Indicates the Prompt Set used for the conference. Must be a value between 1 and 20. ON, OFF Conference security code. Example 000002163 846

User Conf Type

ON, OFF

Sub Conf Count Intercpt Count Data Conf

ON, OFF

0004

ON, OFF

0001

ON, OFF

Conf Viewer

ON, OFF

Prompt Set

19

Conf Sec Code

16

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Mod Sec Code Self Reg Size 16 1 Options ON, OFF ON, OFF Description Moderator security code. Indicates whether the Self Registration application is associated with the conference. Nindicates the Self Registration application is not associated. Yindicates Self Registration application is associated. The Account Number links the schedule to the owner's profile on an external database. For configurations using a CRS, this field links to the Account Number on the CRS. Not applicable for this platform. Number of the last conference in which the telephone line was included. 01 to 2000 (** indicates that the line was not placed in a conference .) 63657 Example 200987 Y

Account Number

50

ON, OFF

903100007 9

Adhoc Creater Conf Number Whl

128 5

ON, OFF OFF, ON

Billing Code 2

20

OFF, ON

When ON, Meeting Exchange prompts moderators for a second billing code for their conference.

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Table 53: CODR Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter User Conf Type Size 3 Options OFF, ON Description When ON, the following values are valid: 6: This is a playback conference 101: This CODR was generated as a result of a recording being stopped. 102: This CODR was generated as a result of a recording being paused. 103: This CODR was generated as a result of a playback being stopped. 104: This CODR was generated as a result of a playback being paused. This field contains the whole playback file name. The default value is OFF. This field records the co-moderator pass code. Example 6

RP FNAME Whl CoCh Sec Code

23

OFF, ON

654321

16

OFF, ON

1234567 9 of 9

For more information about viewing and printing CODR reports, see Conference Detail Records (CODR) reports on page 104.

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Call Routing configuration properties


Table 54 describes the call routing configuration properties. Table 54: Call Routing Configuration Properties Parameter Digit Parameters Description The Digit Parameter option enables you to specify the number of digits used for Call Routing entries in the Call Branding table. For more information on call routing, see Configuring call branding on page 40. When you access the Digit Parameters option, Meeting Exchange displays the Digit Parameters screen. For more information on the Digit Parameters screen, see Table 55. The Flexible Annunciator Messages option enables you to compose, edit, and save text versions of annunciator messages. You can compose a message script for a narrator to read for a message recording, or you can determine what messages are available on the system without having to listen to the messages. Avaya delivers verbatim text for default prerecorded messages. However, the text for a message does not have to match its recorded version. You may want to abbreviate the text or insert keywords in the text that indicates when and why the message is played. The Flexible Annunciator Messages option is especially useful when you are setting up the Call Branding table and you want to view messages to determine which one to specify for an entry in the table. For more information on configuring call branding, see Branding the customer experience on page 85. For more information on customizing audio messages, see A short note about audio messages on page 147.

Flexible Annunciator Messages

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Operator configuration properties

Table 55: Digit Parameters Properties Parameter Number of Digits Size 1-16 Options 1-16 Description The right-most number (from 1 to 16) of DNIS/DDI digits the system will use to route a call. This number must not exceed the actual number of DNIS/DDI digits received from the network. The system assumes receipt of a complete DNIS/DDI number when this limit is reached, ignoring any extra digits sent. (You can include DNIS/DDI digits in a CDR. See Configuring CDRs on page 214.) The default is 4. Controls the search performed in the Call Branding table when the system collects too few DNIS/DDI digits. ON The system attempts a partial match in right to left order. For example, if Meeting Exchange only collects the digits 127 when four digits are required, it matches these digits to the first entry in the table having 127 as its right most three digits. The system searches the Call Branding table in ascending order until it finds the first match. OFF (default) Any DNIS/DDI collection failing to contain the prescribed number of digits is processed according to the wildcard entry (????) in the Call Branding table. Empty collections always match the wildcard entry (????). Example 4

Short Collection Search

OFF, ON

OFF

Operator configuration properties


Table 56 describes the operator configuration properties.

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When you navigate to the Operator Configuration menu, Meeting Exchange displays the Edit Operator Channel screen. The Operator Channel screen displays the range of operator channels that you have configured on the Flex-DAPI Configuration screen. For more information on Flexible Digital Auxiliary Port Interface (FDAPI) resources, see Configuring server resources on page 52. On the Edit Operator Channel screen, you must specify an operator channel. When you specify an operator channel, Meeting Exchange displays the Operator Configuration screen for that operator. For more information on the Operator Configuration screen, see Table 56. Table 56: Operator Configuration Properties Parameter Printing Beep Mode Description This feature is not implemented in the current release. Meeting Exchange plays a tone when it places a participant in the Enter Queue, Help Queue, or Disconnect Mode. Entry tones apply on a per conference basis. l No Beep Do not beep. l Single Beep (default) Play a 1-beep tone. l Continuous Beep Play a beep every one to five seconds (as specified by the Beep Time parameter). Specifies the duration in seconds, from 1 to 5, between beeps if you specify Continuous Beep as the Beep Mode parameter. The default is 5.

Beep Time

Remote (audio)
Important:

Important: This feature is not implemented in the current release.

Specifies whether Meeting Exchange uses a revenue channel for the operator audio path instead of an FDAPI operator channel: Y Use a revenue channel for the operator audio path. You can specify the number of the revenue channel to which you want to assign the audio path with the Channel parameter. l N (default) Use the FDAPI channel for the operator audio path. Switching the operator audio path from an FDAPI operator channel to a remote channel (Y) does not free an FDAPI operator channel configured for the system.
l

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Table 56: Operator Configuration Properties (continued) Parameter Channel Description Displays the FDAPI operator channel or enables you to specify a revenue channel number. l If you set the Remote parameter to N, this parameter displays the FDAPI operator channel number. l If you set the Remote parameter to Y, this parameter enables you to enter a channel number from the available revenue channels. If you specify a revenue channel for operator audio, do not include this channel in a hunt group. This feature is not implemented in the current release. 2 of 2

Term Prompt

Supervision configuration properties


Table 57 describes the supervision configuration properties.
.

Table 57: Supervision Configuration Parameters Parameter Annunciator Delay Description Specifies the pause before the system plays a message to an incoming telephone line. To specify a delay, enter a value between 1 to 5 seconds. The default value is 0. Specifies the pause before Meeting Exchange begins to dial digits if a moderator initiates a dial out from the conference. This delay verifies dial tone. Valid time intervals range from 1 to 5 seconds. The default value is 1. Consult your phone network provider to determine the most suitable dial delay for your system. Note: This feature is not implemented in the current release. 1 of 3

Dial Delay

Note:

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Table 57: Supervision Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Disconnect Mode Description This setting determines what Meeting Exchange does when participants, who are attending attended conferences, hang up their telephone line. This parameter does not determine what Meeting Exchange does when participants who are attending unattended conferences, hang up their telephone line. There are two possible values: l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange puts disconnected lines back on hook, and the lines are immediately available for a new call. It is a good idea to set Disconnect Mode to OFF when you need to make disconnected lines immediately available for new calls. l ON Meeting Exchange puts disconnected lines into a pending state, awaiting an action from the operator. During this time, the Bridge Talk application displays a visual indicator to inform the operator that the participant has hung up their telephone line. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange displays additional information about the telephone line when a participant attending an attended conference, hangs up their telephone line. There are two possible values:
l

Disconnect Notification

ON The following message appears on the chat line of each active workstation when a qualifying line disconnects: O: DC: 0001 NAME C:0003 NAME where: 0 = Global Message DC = Message Type (in this case, Disconnect) 0001 = Line Number NAME = Line Name C:0003 = Conference Number NAME = Conference Name This information is helpful in determining whether to re-establish the connection or alert the conference moderator of the disconnect.

OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not display disconnect information. 2 of 3

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Table 57: Supervision Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Wink Timeout Description Specifies how long Meeting Exchange waits for a wink-back from the far end before disconnecting the line. Note: This feature is not implemented in the current release.

Note:

Line Fault

Specifies whether Meeting Exchange disconnects faulted telephone lines. Operators commonly place telephone lines in a faulted state to take them temporarily out of service. There are two possible values: l OFF Meeting Exchange does not disconnect faulted lines. Meeting Exchange does not allow dial-outs from this line. Meeting Exchange ignores any telephone calls to the faulted line. Callers to the faulted line hear their call ringing the faulted line. Callers do not hear a busy tone. l ON (default) Meeting Exchange disconnects faulted lines. Callers to the faulted line hear the busy tone. Callers do not hear their call ringing the faulted line. 3 of 3

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System configuration properties


Table 58 describes the system configuration properties. Table 58: System Configuration Parameters Parameter System Name Description Displays the TCP/IP host name assigned to the system when system software is installed. The name appears on screens and in various system files and serves as the alias for the system IP address. Specifies the number of beeps in an entry tone when a participant enters a conference. Customers can enable or disable entry tones on a per-conference basis. Also, Bridge Talk operators can enable entry tones in an attended conference. Moderators can enable entry tones for scheduled conferences. l Single Beep (default) l Double Beep Specifies the number of beeps in an exit tone when a participant exits a conference. Customers can enable or disable exit tones on a per-conference basis. Also, Bridge Talk operators can enable exit tones in an attended conference. Moderators can enable exit tones for scheduled conferences. l Single Beep (default) l Double Beep Specifies whether Meeting Exchange sounds a tone when it receives DTMF (Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency) dialing input. l ON Meeting Exchange emits an acknowledgment tone when participants press valid DTMF digits on their telephones to enter a response to a poll question or to place themselves in either the Help or Q&A queues. These acknowledgment tones assure participants that Meeting Exchange received their DTMF input. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not emit an acknowledgment tone. However, participants typically hear normal DTMF tones as they press digits on their telephone keypad. 1 of 17

Entry Tone

Exit Tone

DTMF Acknowledge

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Transaction Logs Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange generates operator Transaction logs. ON (recommended) Meeting Exchange generates transaction logs. OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not generate transaction logs. For more information on log files, see Viewing Meeting Exchange information on page 103. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange automatically exports the automatic call detail record (CDR) and conference detail record (CODR)s. l LAN Meeting Exchange exports CDRs across the network to a client in real-time. If you set this value, you must restart Meeting Exchange. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not automatically generate real-time CDRs and CODRs. You can configure this feature to process records in real time. For more information, see Accessing records using a remote host on page 109 Specifies whether Meeting Exchange automatically clears attended conference settings when a conference ends. Meeting Exchange generates a CODR and a Conference Report for a conference only after that conference has been cleared. l ON The system automatically clears conference settings when the last participant exits an attended conference. Settings cleared include: Entry Tone, Exit Tone, ID, Lecture, Links, Lock, Music, Name, Note, Playback, Record, Security, and Time information. l OFF (default) An operator must run the Conference Clear_all command in Bridge Talk to remove features from completed attended conferences. Note: Meeting Exchange always automatically clears unattended conferences. 2 of 17

Automatic CDR Print

Automatic Conf. Clear

Note:

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Attended ODO Description Defines whether moderators can use their telephones to dial out to add participants to an active conference. This is useful for contacting participants who cannot dial in. l ON In an attended conference, a moderator can use Originator Dial Out (ODO), if there is a free channel configured for ODO Allow. l OFF (default) In an attended conference, a moderator cannot use ODO. Meeting Exchange restricts ODO to one moderator at a time per conference. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange plays message 221; You are the first participant in this conference, when the first participant enters a conference. l ON Meeting Exchange plays the message. l OFF Meeting Exchange does not play the message. 3 of 17

First Person Message

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Auto Extend Duration Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange attempts to automatically extend the duration of in-progress unattended conferences for 25 additional minutes. l OnDefault Meeting Exchange attempts to extend unattended conferences. Successful extension depends on the availability of lines and security codes. Users can change this setting on a per-conference basis, using many of the Meeting Exchange booking applications. l OffDefault Meeting Exchange does not attempt to automatically extend unattended conferences. Users can change this setting on a per-conference basis, using many of the Meeting Exchange booking applications. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not attempt to automatically extend unattended conferences. Users cannot change this setting on a per-conference basis. Meeting Exchange attempts to extend a conference three additional times after successfully extending it the first time. This means that a conference can extend up to 100 minutes beyond its original end time. If you enable warning tones, each time Meeting Exchange plays a warning tone, it also attempts to extend the conference, including one last time just before the conference ends. If you do not enable warning tones for unattended conferences, Meeting Exchange attempts to extend a conference one time just before a conferences end time. Meeting Exchange plays annunciator message 241 to inform participants that it has extended their conference; otherwise, the conference ends at the scheduled end time. Note: If your deployment uses an External Passcode Validation (EPV) process, Auto Extend Duration is always disabled. For more information on EPV, see Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62. 4 of 17

Note:

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Auto Extend Ports Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange can allocate additional participant ports (lines) to unattended conferences while they are in progress. l OnDefault Meeting Exchange attempts to allocate additional ports to accommodate additional conferees as required. Successful allocation of ports depends on the availability of (non-reserved) ports. Users can change this setting on a per-conference basis, using many of the Meeting Exchange booking applications. l OffDefault Meeting Exchange does not attempt to allocate additional ports. Users can change this setting on a per-conference basis, using many of the Meeting Exchange booking applications. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not attempt to allocate additional ports. Users cannot change this setting on a per-conference basis. Note: Flexflow conferences do not support Auto Extend Ports.

Note:

Early Start Minutes

Specifies whether participants can enter unattended conferences earlier (1 - 30 minutes) than the scheduled start time if ports are available. l OFF (default) Participants cannot enter conferences earlier than the scheduled start time. l 1 - 10, 15, 20, 25, 30 (minutes) Participants can enter conferences earlier than the scheduled start time. The setting specifies how early participants can enter conferences. Note: Two or more conferences may have conflicting security codes if you enable Early Start Minutes and a User extends an earlier conference. Meeting Exchange detects when a conflict will occur. As a result, if Meeting Exchange detects a conflict, Users cannot edit and save their reservation until they change the conference start or end time. 5 of 17

Note:

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Ignore DTMF Commands Description Determines whether Meeting Exchange ignores DTMF commands entered by participants. l ON Meeting Exchange ignores DTMF commands entered by participants. Meeting Exchange also blocks help requests when this feature is active. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange interprets all DTMF commands entered by participants. Note: Flexflow conferences do not support Ignore DTMF Commands.

Note:

Operator Assistance

Specifies whether operators provide help to entire conferences or only to the participant who requests help. l INDVL (default) The operator helps only individual conferees who request help. Meeting Exchange temporarily removes the participants from the conference to speak privately with the operator. l CONF The operator provides help to the entire conference. Meeting Exchange does not remove anyone from the conference. All conferees hear whatever assistance is provided by the operator. Operators individually help participants requesting help from muted lines, regardless of the setting. 6 of 17

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Automatic Conf. ID Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange automatically assigns IDs for unscheduled attended conferences. CODRs and conference reports require Conference IDs. l ON Meeting Exchange automatically assigns a unique conference ID when the first participant enters a conference. Conference IDs facilitate conference tracking and let you generate CODRs and conference reports. l OFF (default) Operators assign IDs using the Conference ID command. If an operator assigns an ID and Meeting Exchange also assigns an ID, the operators ID overrides the system-generated ID. Note: In the case of scheduled attended conferences, if you set Automatic Conf. ID parameter to OFF and the Startup Notify Time parameter to a non-zero value, Meeting Exchange ensures that the conference ID matches the confirmation number. This facilitates matching a conference reservation to the resulting CODR generated when the conference ends.

Note:

Starting Conf. ID

Specifies the 12-digit starting number for system-assigned conference IDs. The default is 000000000001. The system increments IDs by 1 (000000000002, 000000000003, and so on). As with Automatic Conf. ID, if an operator assigns an ID and Meeting Exchange also assigns an ID, the operators ID overrides the system-generated ID. Unfortunately, in the current release, Meeting Exchange does not link the Starting Conf. ID value to a bridgedb value called NextConfirmNum. This absence of a link can cause issues. When the Starting Conf. ID value differs from the value of NextConfirmNum in the database, you must update the Starting Conf ID value so that the database can see the changes. For example, if Starting Conf ID is set to 000000000001 on the System Configuration screen, but the NextConfirmNum is 8933 in bridgedb, you must: 1. Delete the reservations. 2. Edit the System Configurations Starting Conf ID to 000000000002 (or any other value). 3. Save the changes 4. Edit the System Configurations Starting Conf ID to 000000000001. 5. Save the changes. 7 of 17

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Moderator Lecture Description Specifies whether moderators can mute all non-moderator lines. l ON Moderators can mute all non-moderator lines and place the conference in Lecture mode. Operator screens update to show that the conference is in Lecture mode, indicating that non-moderator lines within the conference are muted. This feature is not available during Q&A and Polling sessions. l OFF (default) Moderators cannot mute lines for Lecture mode. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange mutes moderator lines during a recorded conference playback. l ON Meeting Exchange mutes moderator lines during playback. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not mute moderator lines during playback. If you update this setting on a live system, with a playback in progress, the update does not impact active conferences. Specifies whether participants can mute their own lines. If an operator mutes or unmutes a participant, this operator action always overrides the participant mute status. If an operator mutes a line, a participant cannot unmute it. l OFF (default) No one can mute his own line. l Participant Conferees can mute their own lines. l Anyone All participants, including moderators, can mute their own lines. Muted moderators retain all moderator privileges such as Lecture and moderator hang-up, but their audio input is not fed into a conference. Specifies whether a participant can create a sub-conference from a main conference by pressing *93 on their telephone keypad. If Meeting Exchange cannot fulfill a sub-conference request, it plays message 24, This operation is currently unavailable. l ANYONE Any participant (conferees and moderators) can create a sub-conference. l MODERATOR Only a moderator can create a sub-conference. l OFF (default) Sub-conferencing is disabled. 8 of 17

Playback Mute

Self Mute

Sub Conferencing Mode

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter On-Hold Msg. Frequency Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange plays the On Hold message (# 208) in the Enter queue and the frequency with which it plays the message. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not play the On Hold message. l 5, 10, 15,... 50, 55, 60 The interval, in seconds, after which Meeting Exchange plays the On Hold message. For example, if you specify 5, the message plays every 5 seconds. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange automatically sets up scheduled attended conferences and notifies operators for those conferences. l OFF (default) Disables startup. l 0 Meeting Exchange starts the setup and sends notification messages at the conferences specified start time. l 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, or 30 minutes The number of minutes before the conferences scheduled start time that set up begins and messages are sent. Meeting Exchange checks for conferences that need setup at 1-minute intervals. Tip:
Tip:

Startup Notify Time

If there are concurrent attended conferences with the same name, Bridge Talk only displays one of them.

To ensure that Meeting Exchange displays the fields Contact Name, Contact Telephone, Scheduled Participants, and Scheduled Minutes in Conference Reports, you must enable this field. Date Format Specifies one of the following system date formats: l US standard date format (default): mm/dd/yyyy l An alternate format: yyyy/mm/dd l International format: dd/mm/yyyy Date Format has no effect on date formats in CDRs and CODRs. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange uses a 12-hour (default) or 24-hour clock format for all time references on the bridge, including system time, schedule times, and operator screens. Time Format has no effect on time formats in CDRs and CODRs. 9 of 17

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter PIN Mode Description Specifies PIN code requirements for unattended conferences scheduled on the system. l Optional (default) Callers do not have to enter a PIN code, however they may enter one. They must press the pound key (#) in response to a PIN code prompt. l Required Callers are required to enter a PIN code in response to a PIN code prompt. The PIN code does not have to be unique per participant, for example one PIN code per conference. l Unique Required Callers are required to enter unique PIN codes (a unique PIN code for each caller).

!
Important:

Important: This option is not available if PIN codes are not installed.

Conference Passcode (Flexflow Only)

Allows for an additional passcode that participants enter on their telephone keypad to join a Flexflow conference. A moderator creates the passcode using DTMF commands when starting the conference. Meeting Exchange does not save the passcode after the conference ends. This code is often called a security code or a second level passcode. You must configure this setting in order for the Flexflow conference attribute called Security Code to operate successfully. Specifies whether Meeting Exchange combines and saves the roll-call audio file. l ON Meeting Exchange saves combined roster recordings for a conference to an audio file in the systems /usr3/ savedroster directory. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not save an audio file of roster recordings. 10 of 17

Save Roster Enable

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Bridge Record Description Specifies whether Meeting Exchange records conference information on the bridge or to an external device. l On-bridge (default)The system records conference information to the bridge. l Off-bridgeThe system records conference information to an external device. In an Off-bridge deployment, you must enter a value in the Phone Number and Dial String parameters. Note: Typically, conference recordings are stored on the usr3/confrp drive of the IBM 3650 M2.

Note:

When you configure Meeting Exchange for Off-Bridge Recording and a User schedules a conference for a maximum of 10 participants, the conference can have either: l 9 participants and an external recording, or l 10 participants and no external recording. If you configure Bridge Record to Off-bridge and operators are using Bridge Talk Conference Scheduler, you must also configure Bridge Talk Conference Scheduler to Off-bridge. If you do not configure Off-bridge recording in both locations, Meeting Exchange defaults to On-bridge. Phone Number Dial String Specifies the number to dial when Bridge Record is set to Off-bridge. This is the number of the external recording device. The DTMF digits that Meeting Exchange sends to the external recording device after the recorder answers the call. Some of the information contained in the Dial String may be vendor specific. Some information may be derived at run time. Use these values in the string to specify run-time values: l %Pexpanded at run time to contain the conference passcode. l %Texpanded at run time to contain conference start time in Linux time format (seconds since 1/1/1970). l %Cexpanded at run time to contain conference confirmation number. For example, if you set the Dial String to *000#*%P#*%T#%C## and the following conference properties apply in your conference: l The Passcode is 1234 l The conference starts on April 3, 2010 at 9:58 AM l The confirmation number is 123456789012. Under these conditions, Meeting Exchange sends the string *000#*1234#*1272880680#*123456789012## to the external recording device. 11 of 17

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter PreDial Delay Period Log User Transaction Description Designates number of seconds that Meeting Exchange waits before sending a Dial String to the external recording device. The maximum setting is 50. Identifies whether Meeting Exchange logs all of a callers DTMF actions and the Meeting Exchange responses. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not create a User Transaction log. l ON Meeting Exchange writes caller DTMF and the Meeting Exchange responses to a User Transaction log, which is a text file. For more information on log files, see Viewing Meeting Exchange information on page 103. During playback, users can move through the conference recording using rewind and forward options. By default, to rewind a playback by a short amount, users press 1 on their telephone keypad. By default, to forward a playback by a short amount, users press 3 on their telephone keypad. This parameter sets the number of seconds for that short amount. During playback, users can move through the conference recording using rewind and forward options. By default, to rewind a playback by a medium amount, users press 4 on their telephone keypad. By default, to forward a playback by a medium amount, users press 6 on their telephone keypad. This parameter sets the number of seconds for that medium amount. During playback, users can move through the conference recording using rewind and forward options. By default, to rewind a playback by a long amount, users press 7 on their telephone keypad. By default, to forward a playback by a long amount, users press 9 on their telephone keypad. This parameter sets the number of seconds for that long amount. 12 of 17

Short Jump

Medium Jump

Long Jump

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Automatic Record All Description Identifies whether Meeting Exchange records all conferences, regardless of the per-reservation setting. l OFF (default)Meeting Exchange does not automatically record all conferences. l ONMeeting Exchange automatically records all conferences. As an aside, at reservation time, operators and moderators can enable two settings relating to recording: Operators, using the CRS Front End or Bridge Talk, and moderators, using the Web Portal, can enable the automatic recording of a conference. If they enable this feature, Meeting Exchange automatically starts recording the conference as soon as participants begin to talk. Operators, using the CRS Front End or Bridge Talk, and moderators, using the Web Portal, can also enable moderator control of the recording feature. If they enable this feature, moderators can start and stop the conference recording. The default value is ON. For more information on creating reservations using CRS Front End, Bridge Talk, or the Web Portal, see the Using Meeting Exchange Guide. This guide is available on support.avaya.com. The value of Automatic Record All supersedes any reservation-specific settings. Secure Blocks Record Identifies whether Meeting Exchange allows conference recording when a moderator secures, or locks, the conference. l ON (default)If a moderator locks a conference, by pressing *7 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange terminates any in-progress recording and does not allow the moderator to begin recording. l OFFIf a moderator locks a conference, Meeting Exchange continues any in-progress recording and allows the moderator to begin recording. 13 of 17

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Bridge Num Description This three digit number uniquely identifies the Meeting Exchange application server, or bridge. The Meeting Exchange recording feature uses this number for all recording filenames. If Meeting Exchange automatically names a recording, it uses the following conventions: <Conference Comfirmation Number>+<Bridge Num>+XXXX The value of XXXX grows sequentially, as follows: l If the operator or moderator stops and then restarts recording during the conference, Meeting Exchange increments the value of XXXX. l Similarly, if all participants leave the conference and later re-join, Meeting Exchange increments the value of XXXX. As an example, this scenario occurs when moderators use their on-demand conference for a weekly meeting. Meeting Exchange views this weekly recurring meeting as multiple instances of a single conference. If your deployment consists of a number of application servers, called a multicabinet environment, there are implications for the automatic naming convention. Meeting Exchange encodes all recording filenames on a given bridge with the bridge number. This fact can be used to keep recordings from difference bridges from having name conflicts if customers copy them to a common playback device. Conversely, if customers can guarantee that name conflicts will not occur due to other factors, such as configuring confirmation numbers to be unique across all recording source bridges, then customers can set the Bridge Num values to be the same on all bridges. In this scenario, users can play multi-sourced files from a single-source playback. This scenario only operates successfully in a deployment that includes a CRS server. If there is no CRS server, you must set Bridge Num to a unique value on all servers. Avaya recommends consulting with your Avaya Support Representative for advice if your deployment includes a complex server environment. As an aside, operators and moderators can manually specify the filename of a conference recording. They can enter almost any digit string for this purpose but it must not start with zero. Automatic filenames always start with zero. This filename forms the XXXX portion of the complete recording filename: <Conference Comfirmation Number>+<Bridge Num>+XXXX For more information, see Managing recordings on page 140. 14 of 17

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter DRP:Auto-gen fname Description Identifies whether Meeting Exchange automatically allocates a filename to a conference recording when an operator or moderator manually initiates a recording. l ON (default)Meeting Exchange automatically allocates a filename to a conference recording. l OFFMeeting Exchange does not automatically allocate a filename to a conference recording. Instead, operators manually enter a filename and moderators enter a DTMF string on their telephone keypad to represent the filename. Identifies whether Meeting Exchange records users' names when they are in the playback callflow. For more information on the playback callflow, see Configuring the playback call flow on page 140. l OFF (default)Meeting Exchange does not prompt the user for their name during the playback callflow. l ONMeeting Exchange prompts the user for their name during the playback callflow. Meeting Exchange adds the recording filename to the roll call file and stores it in /usr2/pkbrosters. When Meeting Exchange detects that a single participant is in the conference, this is the number of minutes that Meeting Exchange waits before playing a prompt requesting a DTMF digit to indicate that the conference should continue. The number of times that Meeting Exchange plays the prompt requesting a DTMF digit to indicate that the conference should continue. The number of minutes that Meeting Exchange waits after requesting a DTMF digit before playing subsequent prompts. Once it receives a DTMF digit, Meeting Exchange resets the timer to the Single Person (SP) 1st period. If a caller enters an incorrect passcode, this setting determines if Meeting Exchange plays an error message that mentions the actual individual DTMF digits entered by the caller. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange plays an error message that states that the caller entered a wrong code. This message does not mention the actual digits. l ONMeeting Exchange plays an error message that mentions the individual DTMF entries entered by the caller, so that the caller can recognize if they entered an incorrect code. 15 of 17

Playback Roll Call

Single Person (SP) 1st Period

# of SP Subsequent Prompts SP Prompt Waiting Period

Recite wrong passcode

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter Country Code Interational Prefix Local Prefix Description These are three separate parameters. Meeting Exchange is configured to present its international prefix, country code, and local prefix to support a "+" as part of Audio Console dialout with LDAP address book look-up. You must enter the appropriate information for each parameter. Provides the option for a moderator to join a Flexflow conference when they enter a single passcode instead of the default Flexflow requirement of two passcodes. l ON - moderator joins conference upon entry of one code. This code must be unique. l OFF - moderator must enter two codes to join a Flexflow conference. The # terminator after participants speak their name for the roll call feature is optional. The setting can be from 0 to 16. l 0 - Participants must press # after they state their name (default). l 1-16 - Number of seconds that Meeting Exchange waits to automatically place line into conference. Tip:
Tip:

Flex Leader Code

NRP Seconds

Avaya recommends setting NRP Seconds to 3.

Web ID Length

Moderators can use DTMF commands to associate a Web conference with the audio conference. To associate a Web conference with an audio conference, moderators press *95 on their telephone keypad and enter the ID of the Web conference. This parameter represents the the number of digits that moderators can enter to associate a Web conference with the audio conference. The maximum value is 16. Determines if moderators can end their conference using the DTMF command ##. l ENABLED - Moderators can press ## to end their conference. l DISABLED - If moderators press ##, they cannot end the conference. 16 of 17

DTMF Conf Hangup

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Table 58: System Configuration Parameters (continued) Parameter System alert Description Determines if Meeting Exchange should play a message to all conferences. If enabled, Meeting Exchange plays the message before any per-conference messages. l ON Meeting Exchange plays a message to all conferences. l OFF (default) Meeting Exchange does not play a message to all conferences. For more information, see Enabling system wide messages on page 155. If you set System alert to ON, you must specify which message that Meeting Exchange should play to all conferences. There are 2000 message slots in each prompt set, so valid values for this field are 1-2000. 17 of 17

Alert message

Timed Assist configuration


The time-sensitive operator help feature allows you to establish time-based rules for delivering operator help to conference participants. In the event of a request for help from a participant, you can configure Meeting Exchange to dial the operator, place the participant on hold, or dial out to another telephone number. You can configure up to 49 rules. If a participant requests help while the conference is playing music and, after the help intervention, the operator and participant both decide to return to the conference, the operator must turn off the music if they wish to speak to the conference participants. To configure time-sensitive operator help settings: 1. As with navigating to the other parameters in this chapter, navigate to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Timed Assist Configuration. Meeting Exchange displays the Timed Assistance screen. 2. On this screen, you can press the following keys:
l l l

I or INSERT to insert a new rule. D to remove the selected rule. ENTER to edit the current rule

The first rule on the Timed Assistance screen always has the Data Type set to DEFAULT. Meeting Exchange uses this rule when none of the other rules apply. Although you can configure the action of this rule, you cannot delete this rule.

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Voice Message configuration

3. Press I to add a configuration. Meeting Exchange displays the Timed Assist Configuration screen. To enter a setting that passes midnight, for example 5:00 PM to 7:00 AM, you must create two rules, one as Start Time 5:00 PM and End Time 12:00 AM and the second as Start Time 12:00 AM and End Time 7:00 AM. 4. Enter data into the fields. Table 59 describes the fields. Table 59: Timed Assist Configuration dialog Field Start Time End Time Date Type Description The start for the time range in hour: minutes: [AM | PM] The end for the time range in hour: minutes: [AM | PM] DEFAULT, WEEKDAY, or WEEKEND Only one action is allowed at one time. Therefore, time ranges for the same data type cannot overlap. Select WAIT_FOR_HELP, PLAY_MSG, or DIAL_OUT. Enter the action for the Code. For example, if the code is PLAY_MSG, enter the message record number. When the Code is DIAL_Out, enter the Phone number for the system to dial. The WAIT_FOR_HELP code does not require an action setting.

Action Code Action Setting

5. Press ESC and save your changes. Meeting Exchange saves configuration data to /dbase/admin/operatorhelp.txt.

Voice Message configuration


You can configure Meeting Exchange to play a tone, a voice message, or both to notify participants of conference events, provide instructions for conference functions, and announce how much time is left in a conference. To configure tones and voice: 1. As with navigating to the other parameters in this chapter, navigate to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Voice Message Configuration. Meeting Exchange displays the Voice Message Configuration screen. 2. Select the appropriate option for each type of message listed on the screen. Table 60 lists each of the types of message.
l

Tone Meeting Exchange sounds the currently defined tone to indicate condition.

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Message Meeting Exchange plays a preassigned voice message (msg nnn) to indicate condition. For descriptions of voice messages, see Configuring audio messages on page 147. Both (default) Meeting Exchange sounds the tone and plays a preassigned voice message to indicate condition. Avaya recommends using Tone or Both when an immediate warning is required. The Message setting could delay the warning message if all annunciators are busy when the condition requiring the warning occurs. The settings apply to every conference supported by Meeting Exchange. You do not have to reboot the system after changing settings. You can also configure entry and exit tones on a per-conference basis using any of the Meeting Exchange booking applications.

3. Press ESC and save your changes. Table 60: Voice Message Configuration Parameters Field ODO Messages Description Played when a moderator attempts to dial out to another telephone line during a conference but Meeting Exchange is unable to accomodate the request. Played when an operator or moderator locks a conference. Played when an operator or moderator unlocks a conference. Played when a participant enters the conference. Played when a participant leaves the conference. Played when a participant enters an invalid conference passcode. Played when a participant enters an invalid conference passcode and Meeting Exchange places them in the queue for operator assistance. Played when a participant enters an invalid PIN code. Played when a participant enters an invalid PIN code and Meeting Exchange places them in the queue for operator assistance. Played at configurable intervals to indicate that the conference is due to end soon. For more information, see Warning Tone configuration on page 313. Played as the conference ends.

Security On Security Off Conference Entry Conference Exit Security Code Error1&2 Security Code Error3 PIN Code Error1&2 PIN Code Error3

Warning Tone (15-1 mins) Warning Tone (0 mins)

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Warning Tone configuration


You can specify how often warning tones sound during the last 15 minutes of an unattended conference to notify participants that the conference is about to end. The warning tone is a 2-beep tone followed by a 3-beep tone. It is important to note that you must enable two additional parameters in order to successfully configure warning tones. These two additional parameters are called Auto Hang-up and Warning Tones. These parameters are located in the Conference Scheduler application. The Conference Scheduler application is a command line utility that Avaya provides to enable you to configure a large number of settings for conferences, such as how long to retain conference records and the number of available lines for on-demand conferences. You can access the Conference Scheduler application by logging into Meeting Exchange as a dcbadmin and navigating to System Administrator Main Menu > Configure Scheduler. For more information on the Conference Scheduler application, see Customizing the scheduler utility on page 62. The values that you configure using the Conference Scheduler application are global values. By default, Meeting Exchange sounds warning tones at each of the following intervals before the conference is scheduled to end:
l l l l

15 minutes 10 minutes 5 minutes 4, 3, 2, 1 minutes until the conference ends

To configure the frequency with which warning tones are sounded: 1. As with navigating to the other parameters in this chapter, navigate to System Administrator Main > Configurations > Warning Tone Configuration. Meeting Exchange displays the Warning Tone Configuration screen. 2. Select Y or N under the minute number to specify when you want warning tones to play. The changes do not impact in-progress conferences, which use the previous configuration. 3. Press ESC and save your changes.

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Appendix C: Supported management information bases (MIBs)


Meeting Exchange 5.2 supports the following MIBs:
l l l

Meeting Exchange MIB Core Services MIB Meeting Exchange Server Monitoring MIB

Most of the traps generated by the system come from the Meeting Exchange MIB: AV-MX-S6200-MIB DEFINITIONS ::= BEGIN IMPORTS MODULE-IDENTITY, OBJECT-TYPE, NOTIFICATION-TYPE, enterprises FROM SNMPv2-SMI sysName FROM SNMPv2-MIB entPhysicalAssetID FROM ENTITY-MIB applSrvName FROM APPLICATION-MIB ipAdEntAddr FROM IP-MIB ItuPerceivedSeverity FROM ITU-ALARM-TC-MIB ituAlarmAdditionalText FROM ITU-ALARM-MIB csAlarmSeverity FROM AV-CORE-SERVICES-MIB; avmx6200mib MODULE-IDENTITY LAST-UPDATED "200810130000Z"-- 13 Oct 2008 ORGANIZATION "AVAYA" CONTACT-INFO "Avaya Customer Services

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Postal: Avaya, Inc. 211 Mount Airy Rd Basking Ridge. NJ 07920 USA Tel: +1 908 953 6000 WWW: http://www.avaya.com" DESCRIPTION Edition S6200. reserved." REVISION DESCRIPTION "Revision X.X.X - For MX Bridge 5.2." ::= { avMX6200Mibs 1 } --- The following are defined in AVAYA-GEN MIB -avaya products mibs OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { enterprises 6889 } OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { avaya 1 } OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { avaya 2 } "200810130000Z" -- 13 Oct 2008 "A MIB to support Meeting Exchange Groupware Copyright (C) 2007 by Avaya Inc. All rights

avMX6200Prod OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { products 22 } avMX6200Mibs OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { mibs 22 } --- Top level components of this MIB -avMX6200Notifications OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { avmx6200mib 1 } -Notification group

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avMX6200Objects Objects --

OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { avmx6200mib 2 } --

-- Common Object groups for CoreServices MIB -avMX6200NotifyObj --- Core Services Notify group (csNotifyObj) -avMX6200AlarmSeverity OBJECT-TYPE SYNTAX MAX-ACCESS STATUS DESCRIPTION "Alarm severities are based on ITUPerceivedSeverity (RFC 3877)" ::= { avMX6200NotifyObj 1 } --- MX Suite 5.0 Notifications -avMX6200ProcessStartedNotification OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION NOTIFICATION-TYPE ItuPerceivedSeverity read-only current OBJECT IDENTIFIER ::= { avMX6200Objects 1 }

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"This trap is generated when an Avaya Meeting Exchange process has been started." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 101 } avMX6200ProcessStoppedNotification OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated when an Avaya Meeting Exchange process has been stopped." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 102 } avMX6200ReservedPortPoolUsageIncrease OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the reserved port pool equals or exceeds the upper watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding lower watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated." NOTIFICATION-TYPE NOTIFICATION-TYPE

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::= { avMX6200Notifications 103 } avMX6200ReservedPortPoolUsageDecrease OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the reserved port pool falls below the lower watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding upper watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 104 } avMX6200UnreservedPortPoolUsageIncrease OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the unreserved port pool equals or exceeds the upper watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding lower watermark has been crossed NOTIFICATION-TYPE NOTIFICATION-TYPE

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Supported management information bases (MIBs)

since the last time this trap was generated." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 105 } avMX6200UnreservedPortPoolUsageDecrease OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated when the number of used ports in the unreserved port pool falls below the lower watermark configured for that pool providing the corresponding upper watermark has been crossed since the last time this trap was generated." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 106 } NOTIFICATION-TYPE

avMX6200ApplicationServerFailover OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION

NOTIFICATION-TYPE

"This trap is generated when the application server fails over."

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::= { avMX6200Notifications 107 } avMX6200MediaServerFailed OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated when the media server does not respond." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 108 } avMX6200ServerRebooted OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "This trap is generated after the host server was rebooted." ::= { avMX6200Notifications 109 } END The CPU Utilization and Disk Usage SNMP traps come from the Core Services MIB: csCPUUtilization NOTIFICATION-TYPE NOTIFICATION-TYPE NOTIFICATION-TYPE

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OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr, entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "CPU utilization is at least 80% (MINOR)." ::= { csCPUNotifications 1 }

csDiskUsageThreshold OBJECTS { sysName, ipAdEntAddr,

NOTIFICATION-TYPE

entPhysicalAssetID, csAlarmSeverity, applSrvName, ituAlarmAdditionalText } STATUS current DESCRIPTION "Disk usage has exceeded 80% (MAJOR)" ::= { csDiskNotifications 8 }

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Appendix D: Audio messages


This appendix lists the Meeting Exchange messages that Avaya ship with Meeting Exchange 5.2. For more information on audio messages, see Configuring audio messages on page 147. Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages Message Number 0 Filename 0 Actual Words Welcome. You have reached the audio conferencing system. After the tone, enter your conference passcode followed by the pound key. Thank you. After the tone please state your name followed by the pound key. The following participants are in the conference. I'm sorry. The "Dial Out" feature is currently unavailable. I'm sorry. Your conference is at capacity. Dial out cannot be performed. I'm sorry. Dial out is not authorized at this time. Conference security has been turned on. Conference security has been turned off. Someone has entered the conference. Someone has left the conference. I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid passcode. Please try again. I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid passcode. Please stay on the line for the next available operator. I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid PIN code. Please try again. I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid PIN code. Please stay on the line for the next available operator. Your conference is scheduled to end in 15 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 14 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 13 minutes. 1 of 16

179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193 194

178 179 180 181 182 183 184 185 186 187 188 189 190 191 192 193

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 216 Filename 194 195 196 197 198 199 200 201 202 203 204 205 206 207 208 209 210 211 212 213 214 215 Actual Words Your conference is scheduled to end in 12 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 11 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 10 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 9 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 8 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 7 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 6 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 5 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 4 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 3 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 2 minutes. Your conference is scheduled to end in 1 minute. Your conference time has now expired. Thank you. Thank you for your patience. Please stay on the line for the next available operator. I'm sorry. Conference recording is not available. I'm sorry. Conference playback is not available. Please enter your recording file number followed by the pound key or press star to cancel. Conference recording has stopped. The recording file number is Press 1 to begin the recording. Press 2 to re-enter the recording file number or press star to cancel. Press 1 to begin the playback. Press 2 to re-enter the recording file number or press star to cancel. Conference playback has stopped. 2 of 16

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 217 Filename 216 Actual Words I'm sorry. The recording file number you have entered cannot be used. Please enter a different recording file number followed by the pound key or press star to cancel. Conference recording has been turned on. Conference playback has been turned on. Enter the number of minutes to skip at the beginning of the playback followed by the pound key or press star to cancel playback. You are currently the only participant in this conference. There are currently participants in your conference. Roster playback is complete. Please enter the phone number that you wish to dial followed by the pound key or press star to cancel. Dial out has been cancelled. The phone number you have entered is: Press 1 to make this call. Press 2 to re-enter the phone number or press star to cancel. Your call could not be completed. The line may be busy. The selected conference is not currently active. Please check the scheduled time and timezone. This conference has been locked by the moderator and entry is not allowed at this time. Please contact the conference organizer for additional information. This conference has reached its maximum capacity. Please contact the conference organizer for additional information. No digits have been detected. Please enter the billing code for this conference followed by the pound or press star to cancel. The billing code entered for this conference is 3 of 16

218 219 220

217 218 219

221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230 231

220 221 222 223 224 225 226 227 228 229 230

232 233 234 235

231 232 233 234

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 245 Filename 235 236 237 238 239 240 241 242 243 244 Actual Words Press 1 to accept, press 2 to change or press star to cancel. This conference will end when the last moderator hangs up. This conference will not terminate after the last moderator hangs up. This operation has been cancelled. This operation is currently unavailable. Your conference has been extended an additional 25 minutes. Hello. Your conference is about to begin. To join, press 1. Hello. Your conference is about to begin. Please enter your conference passcode followed by the pound key. Please standby while your participants are dialed. Not enough lines are available to dial in all participants. Please standby while some participants are dialed. To determine the number of participants in the conference press star 8 when dialing has completed. Your blast dial has completed. Please enter your pin code followed by the pound key. I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid passcode. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid PIN code. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye The main conference is locked. Entry is not allowed at this time. The moderator has been notified of your request. Please standby. A participant in sub-conference is requesting re-entry but this conference is currently locked. Please unlock conference to allow re-entry, Re-entry to the main conference is now allowed. You are the only moderator in this conference. Please unlock the conference before joining the sub-conference. Your operator request has been cancelled. 4 of 16

246 247 248 249 250

245 246 247 248 249

251

250

252 253 254

251 252 253

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 255 256 Filename 254 255 Actual Words I'm sorry. There are no operators currently available. Main Menu. To request operator help press star 0. To dial out press star 1. To record the conference press star 2. To play back a recording press star 3. To toggle lecture mode press star 5. To mute or unmute your own line press star 6. To toggle security press star 7. To playback roster press star 8. To enter billing code press star 9 1. To blast dial a dial list press star 9 2. To enter a sub-conference press star 9 3. To listen to the name of the recording press star 9 4. To enter your Web conference ID press star 9 5. To mute all lines, allowing them to unmute themselves, press star 9 6. To toggle moderator hang-up press star 9 8. To end this call now press pound pound. To play this menu again press pound 0. Main Menu. To request operator help press star 0. To play back a recording press star 3. To mute or unmute your own line press star 6. To play back roster press star 8. To enter a sub-conference press star 9 3. To enter your Web conference ID press star 9 5. To play this menu again press pound zero. You are entering a conference that is muted. To unmute just your line press star 6. I'm sorry the system did not detect any entry. Please enter the second billing code followed by the pound key or press star to cancel. The second billing code for this conference is You have been added to the Q&A queue. You have been removed from the Q&A queue. Press 1 to accept or press 2 to change. Im sorry. Recording file numbers may not begin with zero. Conference playback has been paused. I'm sorry. The system is currently busy. Please try again later. Please enter your conference reference number followed by the pound key. I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid conference reference number. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye. 5 of 16

257

256

258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268 269

257 258 259 260 261 262 263 264 265 266 267 268

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Audio messages

Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 294 Filename 269 270 271 272 273 274 275 276 277 278 279 280 281 282 283 284 285 286 287 288 289 290 291 292 293 Actual Words There are no recordings for this conference. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye. There are recordings available for this conference. To access the conference recorded on day of month at January February March April May June July August September October November December The conference playback instructions are as follows. Press any key to skip these instructions. Press 1 to rewind 1 minute. Press 4 to rewind 5 minutes. Press 7 to rewind 20 minutes. Press 3 to skip ahead 1 minute. Press 6 to skip ahead 5 minutes. 6 of 16

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 306 Filename 294 295 296 297 298 299 300 301 302 303 304 305 Actual Words Press 9 to skip ahead 20 minutes. Press 5 to pause or resume the playback. Press star to stop playback and choose another recording. You have reached the end of the playback. Press 1 to choose another recording any other key to disconnect. Thank you for using the conference playback feature. Your call will be disconnnected. Goodbye. Press... Thank you. Enter the area code and number followed by the pound key. To cancel this request and return to the conference press star. You have entered To proceed with dialing press pound. To change this number press star. is invalid. Please enter the correct digits followed by pound. The following options are available once you press pound to begin dialing. To place the participant in conference press star 1. To join the participant and continue dialing press star 2. To disconnect the line press star 3. To disconnect the line and continue dialing press star 4. To proceed with dialing press pound now. I'm sorry your entry is invalid. Enter the valid digits followed by pound. After joining the call press star 2 to record your conference. For assistance press star 0. To start your conference press 1 now. Default conference options. All changes made to the default options will apply to active and future conferences with the exception of quick start. Changes to quick start will apply to future conferences only. 7 of 16

307 308 309 310

306 307 308 309

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Audio messages

Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 311 Filename 310 Actual Words Main Menu. To change your 4 digit leader pin press 1. To configure participant name record and entry and exit announcement options press 2. To change quick start options press 3. To change auto-continuation option press 4. For an overview of different conference options press 9. To return to the previous menu press star. I'm sorry. This feature is not enabled. Please contact your system administator to change your leader PIN. Press star to return to the previous menu. I'm sorry. This feature is not enabled. Default options overview. Callers are prompted to record their name as they join a conference call. At any time during the conference these names can be replayed privately to any conference participant by pressing star 9. Quick start allows conferences to begin immediately without waiting for the leader to arrive. Autocontinuation allows all conferences to automatically continue after the leader disconnects. Entry and exit announcement options determine what will be heard when participants join and leave the conference. Options include, name announcements, entry and exit tones or silence. Quick start is enabled. To disable quick start press 1. To return to the previous menu press star. Quick start is disabled. To turn on quick start press 1. To return to the previous menu press star. Auto continuation is enabled. To turn off auto continuation press 1. To return to the previous menu press star. Auto continuation is disabled. To turn on auto continuation press 1. To return to the previous menu press star. Participant name record is enabled. To turn off participant name record press 1. To change conference entry and exit announcement options press 2. To return to the previous menu press star. Participant name record is disabled. To turn on participant name record press 1. To change conference entry and exit announcement options press 2. To return to the previous menu press star. 8 of 16

312

311

313 314

312 313

315 316 317 318 319

314 315 316 317 318

320

319

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 321 Filename 320 Actual Words Participants will be announced, when joining and leaving the conference, by tones. To select name announce press 1. To select tones press 2. To select silence press 3. To return to the previous menu, press star. Participants will be announced, when joining and leaving the conference, by name. To select name announce press 1. To select tones press 2. To select silence press 3. To return to the previous menu press star. Participants will not be announced when joining and leaving the conference. To select name announce press 1. To select tones press 2. To select silence press 3. To return to the previous menu press star. I'm sorry. Participant name record must be on to choose this option. I'm sorry. Your entry is invalid. You will now be placed into conference. To mute your line press star 6. To unmute press star 7. You are the first participant. To mute your line press star 6. To unmute press star 7. To mute your line press star 6. To unmute press star 7. I'm sorry. Your entry is invalid. Enter the valid digits followed by pound. Welcome to Avaya's "Instant Conference". Enter your conference passcode followed by the pound key. The conference has been locked by the leader. The conference has been unlocked. If you are the leader press star now. Please enter your leader PIN followed by pound. I'm sorry. This conference has been locked by the leader. Please hang up and contact your system administrator for assistance. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye. 9 of 16

322

321

323

322

324 325 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336 337

323 324 327 328 329 330 331 332 333 334 335 336

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Audio messages

Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 339 Filename 338 Actual Words The following conference commands are available to the leader. To request an operator join your conference press star 0. To request an operator speak to you individually press 0 0. To dial out press star 1. To record the conference press star 2. To change conference entry and exit announcement options press star 3. To lock the conference press star 4. To unlock the conference press star 5. To mute your individual line press star 6. To unmute your line press star 7. To select or deselect conference continuation after you disconnect press star 8. To hear a private roll call of participants press star 9. To hear a private participant count press star pound. To mute all lines except the leader press pound pound. To unmute all lines press 9 9. To join a sub-conference press 9 3. To hear the recording filename press 9 4. To end the conference press 7 7. The following conference commands are available. To request an operator join your conference press star 0. To request an operator speak to you individually, press 0 0. To mute your line press star 6. To unmute your line press star 7. To hear a private roll call of participants press star 9. To hear a private participant count press star pound. To join a sub-conference press 9 3. You are now muted. You are no longer muted. The conference is muted. The conference is unmuted. I'm sorry. That entry is invalid. Please stay on the line for the next available operator. I'm sorry. This feature is disabled. The following participants are in the conference. has joined the conference. has left the conference. Your request will be answered by the next available operator. To cancel your request press star 0. Your operator request has been canceled. To change conference entry and exit announcement options press 2. To return to conference press star. 10 of 16

340

339

341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351 352

340 341 342 343 344 345 346 347 348 349 350 351

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 372 Filename 352 353 354 355 356 357 358 359 360 361 362 363 364 365 366 367 368 369 370 371 Actual Words The conference will be allowed to continue after you disconnect. To set the conference to end when you disconnect press star 8. The conference will end when you disconnect. To allow the conference to continue after you disconnect press star 8. You will now be placed into conference. To mute your line press star 6. To unmute press star 7. The leader has not arrived yet. Please standby. To start recording the conference press 1. To cancel press star. Please standby while your recording connection is established. To cancel the recording press star 2. The conference is now being recorded. Press 1 to stop recording. Press 2 to pause or resume recording. Press 3 to hear the recording file number or press star to cancel. The conference is no longer being recorded. After the tone state your name followed by the pound key. I'm sorry. No line is available for Dial Out. TONE - Note: This file contains 2 short beeps and doesn't require professional recording. I'm sorry. The passcode you have entered is invalid. Please stay on the line for the next available operator. I'm sorry. The leader PIN is invalid. For assistance please contact your service provider. An operator is requesting to join your locked conference. To allow operator entry press star 5 to unlock your conference. This is a quick start conference. Please enter your new leader PIN followed by the pound key. The leader PIN must be... to digits. To return to the previous menu press star. Your new leader PIN is 11 of 16

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Audio messages

Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 373 374 375 376 Filename 372 373 374 375 Actual Words I'm sorry. The leader PIN must be between and digits long. Please re-enter your leader PIN followed by pound. To skip entering a conference passcode press star now. If you have a conference passcode please enter it now followed by the pound key. The passcode may be 4 to 9 digits long. A conference passcode will not be required for this conference. Your conference passcode is To change this entry press star now. Please enter the conference passcode followed by pound. I'm sorry. The conference passcode must be between 4 and 9 digits long. Please re-enter your passcode followed by the pound key. Please enter the conference passcode followed by the pound key. I'm sorry. The conference passcode you have entered is not correct. For assistance please contact your conference organizer. Please enter the billing code for this conference followed by pound. You will now be disconnected by the leader. The phone number you entered is not allowed at this time. This conference has been secured by the leader and entry is not allowed at this time. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye I'm sorry. We did not get your name. After you state your name please press the pound key. Your call will now begin. For operator assistance any time during your call press star 0. To mute your line press star 6. To unmute press star 7. For more information press star star. Recording. You are being placed into a conference in muted mode. 12 of 16

377 378 379 380 381

376 377 378 379 380

382 383

381 382

384 385 386 387 388 389

383 384 385 386 387 388

390 391

389 390

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 392 393 394 395 Filename 391 392 393 394 Actual Words To stop the recording press star 2. An operator is requesting to join your locked conference. To allow operator entry press star 7 to unlock your conference. I'm sorry. We did not get your name. Please standby for an operator. Please select the sub-conference you wish to join by pressing a digit between 1 and 9. You may also press zero to go back to the main conference or press star to cancel. The sub-conference number you have entered is invalid. You will now to returned to your conference. The sub-conference number you have entered is invalid. A moderator has requested for everyone to re-join the main conference. You will now be transferred back to the main conference. Sub-conference. is currently locked. A participant from another sub-conference is trying to enter this sub-conference. Press 1 to unlock sub-conference or press star to cancel. The main conference is currently locked. A participant from a sub-conference is requesting re-entry. Press 1 to unlock the main conference or press star to cancel. has been locked by the moderator and entry is not allowed at this time. A moderator has been notified of your request. Please standby. Everyone has been moved back to the main conference. Please re-join the main conference now by pressing star 9 3 0. Entry to the sub-conference you were trying to join is now allowed. I'm sorry. The conference you were trying to join cannot be unlocked at this time. Please enter 1 through 9 to join a sub-conference. Press 0 to go back to the main conference. Press pound to return all participants to the main conference or press star to cancel. 13 of 16

396 397 398

395 396 397

399 400

398 399

401

400

402

401

403 404 405 406

402 403 404 405

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Audio messages

Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 407 Filename 406 Actual Words Your conference is currently locked. An operator is unable to assist you. Press 1 if you want to unlock your conference and request help. Press star if you want to cancel the help request. Your conference is in the help queue. If you lock it an operator will be unable to assist you. Press 1 if you want to lock your conference and be removed from the help queue. Press star if you want to cancel this request and remain in the help queue. Your conference is currently locked. An operator is unable to assist you. The conference file number is Please hold while an assistant is dialed. After the assistant joins press star 2 to add the assistant to your conference or press star 3 to hang-up the assistant and return to your conference. I'm sorry. An assistant cannot be reached at this time. Please try again later. You will now be returned to your conference. This is a secure conference. The option to add an assistant to the conference is not available at this time. Please hold while an assistant is dialed. Press star 2 to hang-up the operator at any time. I'm sorry. An assistant cannot be reached at this time. Please try again later. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye. I'm sorry. Conference recording was unable to start. Please press any key to remain in conference. Virtual link line. Someone has joined the conference via a Virtual link line. Someone has left the conference. Virtual link line. Virtual link line has entered the conference. Virtual link line has left the conference. Conference gain is on. Conference gain is off. Please standby for operator help. 14 of 16

408

407

409 410 411

408 409 410

412 413 414 415 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425 426

411 412 413 414 416 417 418 419 420 421 422 423 424 425

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 446 Filename 426 427 428 429 430 431 432 433 434 435 436 437 438 439 440 441 442 443 444 445 Actual Words The conference is in lecture mode. The conference is no longer in lecture mode. Your leader PIN has expired and must be changed now. Your leader PIN will expire in days. To change your leader PIN press 1. To keep your current leader pin and continue press 2. day. To change your leader PIN press 1. To keep your current leader pin and continue press 2. Your new leader PIN must be different from the current leader PIN. digits. There was a system error when trying to update your leader PIN. Your leader PIN has reverted back to... I'm sorry. The billing code entered is invalid. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye. The number of participants is below the minimum required. The call will be disconnected if more participants do not join. The conference will now be disconnected. Please enter your second billing code followed by pound. Welcome to the conference welcome message recording facility. Press 1 to record or press any other key to exit. Press 1 to record, press 2 to play, press 3 to delete, or press any other key to exit. Please record the message after the tone followed by the pound key. The message has been successfully deleted. The billing code entered is invalid. Please enter your unique Participant Identifier followed by the pound key. 15 of 16

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Table 61: Meeting Exchange 5.2 Audio Messages (continued) Message Number 447 448 449 450 451 450 451 451 451 Filename 446 447 448 449 450 451 452 453 454 Actual Words Sorry. You have entered an invalid unique participant identifier. Please try again. Sorry. You have entered an invalid unique participant identifier. Please disconnect now. Thank you. Sorry. You have entered an invalid unique participant identifier. Please stay on the line for next available operator. Please enter your Secret PIN followed by the pound key I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid secret PIN. Please try again I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid Secret PIN. Your call will be disconnected. Goodbye I'm sorry. You have entered an invalid secret PIN. Please stay on the line for the next available operator. Conference is in silent mode. To unmute yourself Press *6 Conference recording is currently paused 16 of 16

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Appendix E: Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) commands


This chapter lists the default keypad codes which participants enter on their telephone keypad to attend and participate in regular conferences. This chapter also lists the default keypad codes which participants enter to listen to conference recordings. When attending and participating in conferences, moderators can access a larger number of options than conferees. When listening to conference recordings, moderators and conferees have access to the same options. For the purposes of DTMF mappings, Meeting Exchange 5.2 effectively supports two different conference types. These conference types are commonly called scan conferences and flexflow conferences. The conference recording playback options are the same for both conference types. For flexflow conferences, moderators are often called leaders. For more information about configuring telephone numbers, or DDIs, for scan and flexflow conferences and playback, see Configuring call branding on page 40.
l l l

Scan conferences Flexflow conferences Commands for playing back a recording

Scan conferences
The scan conference DTMF sequence uses the sFlowDigits.reg configuration file. It is important to note that some mappings are not configurable. For more information, contact your Avaya Support Representative. If you make any changes to the default DTMF mappings, you must ensure that you also configure the audio prompt messages to play the correct message. For more information, see Audio messages on page 323. Typically, scan conferences are regular conferences in which the participants enter a moderator passcode or a conferee passcode on their telephone keypad to access the conference.
l l

Moderator commands Conferee commands

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Moderator commands
Table 62 lists the moderator telephone keypad commands for scan conferences. Table 62: Moderator Commands Press... *0 To... Request help by entering the Help Requests queue. As a system administrator, you can configure this feature to play a message, to connect to an operator with audiopath capabilities, or to connect to an assistant without audiopath capabilities. Play the number of conference participants, followed by a roll call of conference participants when used in conjunction with the name record/ playback feature. If there is no roll call, this command simply plays the number of conference participants. l If there is no roll call, Meeting Exchange always plays this message as a private message. l When you enable roll call: - If a conferee presses *8, Meeting Exchange plays this message as a private message. - If a moderator presses *8, Meeting Exchange can play this message as a private message or as a conference message, depending on how you configure NRP. You can set NRP to CONF or INDIVIDUAL. Initiate a dial out. Once a moderator enters *1 on their telephone keypad, the moderator will be placed into a self-explanatory Interactive Voice Response (IVR) sequence for requesting, collecting, and dialing a telephone number. Once the telephone call has been made, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: *2 Returns both moderator and caller to the conference. *3 Returns moderator to the conference and hangs up the called party. Enter the conference recording menu. If Meeting Exchange is not currently recording the conference, it plays the options for starting a recording session. If Meeting Exchange is currently recording the conference, it plays the following options: 1 Ends the recording. 2 Toggles the pause/resume feature. 3 Replays a conference recording file number. * Exits the menu. 1 of 3

*8

*1

*2

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Scan conferences

Table 62: Moderator Commands (continued) Press... *3 To... Enter a playback menu, which enables the moderator to play a conference recording to the entire conference. Meeting Exchange 5.2 now contains a new method for playing a conference recording. This older DTMF command is a legacy feature, which plays the conference recording to the entire conference. Additionally, this older playback feature does not support pause and resume. For more information on the new functionality, see Commands for playing back a recording on page 349. Turn Lecture on or off. Meeting Exchange places all participant lines in mute. Participants cannot unmute their individual lines while in lecture mode. Mute or unmute the telephone line. Turn Mute All on or off. When a conference is in mute-all mode, all current participants are placed into muted mode. In addition, any new participants join the conference in muted mode. When a moderator unmutes a conference, all current participants remain in muted mode until they press *6 on their telephone keypad. However, any new participants join the conference in unmuted mode. Turn conference security on or off. End the conference. Enter a billing code. Meeting Exchange plays a message which prompts the moderator for a billing code for the conference. Trigger an unattended, automatic Blast Dial or reblast. For the successful operation of this command, the operator, using Bridge Talk or CRS Front End, or the moderator, using Web Portal, must enable Blast Dial for the conference. 2 of 3

*5

*6 *96

*7 ## *91

*92

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Table 62: Moderator Commands (continued) Press... *93 To... Start a subconference or join a subconference. Once a moderator enters *93 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1-9 Places the moderator into a subconference room. For example, if a moderator presses 7, Meeting Exchange places them into subconference number 7. Note: If the moderator presses the current subconference number, Meeting Exchange ignores the command.

Note:

0 Returns the moderator to the main conference. # Plays a warning message into all subconferences to indicate that participants will be rejoining the main conference shortly. After a few moments, Meeting Exchange transfers all lines back to the main conference. * Does nothing. It exits this menu. *94 *95 *98 Replay the last or current conference recording file number. Associate a Web conference with the audio conference. Toggle moderator hang-up. This sequence turns on or turns off the moderator hang-up option. If a conference has moderator hang-up enabled, Meeting Exchange closes the conference when the last moderator leaves the conference. If a conference does not have moderator hang-up enabled, Meeting Exchange does not close the conference when the last moderator leaves the conference. Leave a Q&A queue. Meeting Exchange places moderators in the Q&A queue, by default. Record a personal greeting for the conference. Once a moderator enters #2 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1 Records a greeting. 2 Plays the current greeting. 3 Deletes the current greeting. 3 of 3

1 #2

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Scan conferences

Conferee commands
Table 63 lists the conferee telephone keypad commands for scan conferences. Table 63: Conferee Commands Press... *0 To... Request help by entering the Help Requests queue. As a system administrator, you can configure this feature to play a message, to connect to an operator with audiopath capabilities, or to connect to an assistant without audiopath capabilities. Mute or unmute the telephone line. Play the number of conference participants, followed by a roll call of conference participants when used in conjunction with the name record/playback feature. If there is no roll call, this command simply plays the number of conference participants. l If there is no roll call, Meeting Exchange always plays this message as a private message. l When you enable roll call: - If a conferee presses *8, Meeting Exchange plays this message as a private message. - If a moderator presses *8, Meeting Exchange can play this message as a private message or as a conference message, depending on how you configure NRP. You can set NRP to CONF or INDIVIDUAL. Start a subconference or join a subconference. Once a conferee enters *93 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1-9 Places the conferee into a subconference room. For example, if a conferee presses 7, Meeting Exchange places them into subconference number 7. Note: If the conferee presses the current subconference number, Meeting Exchange ignores the command.

*6 *8

*93

Note:

0 Returns the conferee to the main conference. *1 Enter a Q&A queue. Once a conferee enters *1 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following option available: 1 removes the conferee from the Q&A queue.

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Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) commands

Flexflow conferences
The flexflow conference DTMF sequence uses the flexflow_cfg.reg configuration file. For more information, contact your Avaya Support Representative. Typically, flexflow conferences are conferences in which all participants enter a conferee passcode on their telephone keypad. After entering a conferee passcode, moderators can enter a moderator passcode to promote their status. There are other keypad commands in the flexflow_cfg.reg file but they are within comment tags. When you upgrade Conferencing, the upgrade script does not make any changes to the existing flexflow_cfg.reg file. When you install a new instance of Conferencing, the installation script places the new flexflow_cfg.reg file in usr/dcb/dbase/admin. The new flexflow_cfg.reg file contains all the latest keypad commands, including some within comment tags, such as ToggleMuteIndividual. If you want to enable any commands which are not the default commands, you must modify the flexflow_cfg.reg file for new installations and upgrades. For example, if you require *6 for ToggleMuteIndividual, you must add it to the toggle line and remove it from the explicit Mute line. If you make any changes to the default mappings, a program called /usr/dcb/bin/ flexdigits is a useful utility to test your customized flexflow_cfg.reg before you place the new settings into a live environment. To test your configuration changes, enter the file name after the utility. For example: usr/dcb/bin/flexdigits testFlexFlow_cfg.reg This program parses the input file and reports any errors. If you make any changes to the default DTMF mappings, you must ensure that you also configure the audio prompt messages to play the correct message. For more information, see Audio messages on page 323.
l l

Moderator commands Conferee commands

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Flexflow conferences

Moderator commands
Table 64 lists the default moderator telephone keypad commands for flexflow conferences. Table 64: Moderator Commands Press... *0 To... Display the conference in the help request queue. Once the conference enters this queue, an operator, using Bridge Talk can see that the conference requires assistance. This feature requires operator support. Display an individual telephone line in the help request queue. Once moderators enter this queue, an operator, using Bridge Talk can see that they require assistance. This feature requires operator support. Initiate a dial out. Once a moderator enters *1 on their telephone keypad, the moderator is placed into a self-explanatory Interactive Voice Response (IVR) sequence for requesting, collecting, and dialing a telephone number. Once the telephone call has been made, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: *1 Return to the conference with the called party. *2 Return to the conference without the called party. *3 Deposit the called party into the conference and stay in the IVR sequence to make another call. *4 Hang-up that call and and stay in the IVR sequence to make another call. Enter the conference recording menu. If Meeting Exchange is not currently recording the conference, it plays the options for starting a recording session. If Meeting Exchange is currently recording the conference, it plays the following options: 1 Ends the recording. 2 Toggles the pause/resume feature. 3 Replays a conference recording file number. * Exits the menu. Enter an IVR sequence to change entry and exit tones and announcements. Turn conference security on. This sequence locks the conference. Turn conference security off. This sequence unlocks the conference. 1 of 3
t

00

*1

*2

*3 *4 *5

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Table 64: Moderator Commands (continued) Press... *6 *7 *8 To... Mute the telephone line. Unmute the telephone line. Toggle between two options, as follows: l The conference will continue after the moderator leaves. l The conference will end when the moderator leaves. This option is similar to the moderator hang-up option in the scan conference call flow. Play an available list of participant names into the telephone line. Turn Mute All on. Meeting Exchange mutes all conferee lines in the conference. Conferees can unmute their individual lines while in mute all mode. Turn Mute All off. Meeting Exchange unmutes all conferee lines in the conference. Play the number of participants. Play a menu which lists the available DTMF telephone keypad sequences and their associated functions. To read the message text, see 339 on page 332. End the conference. This DTMF sequence ends the conference if a parameter called DTMF Conf Hang Up is configured on the Meeting Exchange application server. For more information, see DTMF Conf Hangup on page 309. 2 of 3

*9 ##

99 *# **

77

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Flexflow conferences

Table 64: Moderator Commands (continued) Press... 93 To... Start a subconference or join a subconference. Once a moderator enters *93 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1-9 Places the moderator into a subconference room. For example, if a moderator presses 7, Meeting Exchange places them into subconference number 7. Note: If the moderator presses the current subconference number, Meeting Exchange ignores the command.

Note:

0 Returns the moderator to the main conference. # Plays a warning message into all subconferences to indicate that participants will be rejoining the main conference shortly. After a few moments, Meeting Exchange transfers all lines back to the main conference. * Does nothing. It exits this menu. 94 95 #2 Replay the last or current conference recording file number. Associate a Web conference with the audio conference. Record a personal greeting for the conference. Once a moderator enters #2 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1 Records a greeting. 2 Plays the current greeting. 3 Deletes the current greeting. At the start of a conference, after the moderator enters their conferee passcode and then upgrades their status with a moderator passcode, they can press 2 to enter an IVR sequence that enables them to make changes to their conference properties. All changes made to the default conference properties will apply to active and future conferences with the exception of quick start. For more information, see 309 on page 329. Once in this menu: Press: 1 to enter an IVR sequence to change the moderator, or leader, passcode. 2 to change the conference entry and exit tones. 3 to change the settings in relation to quick start, which relates to whether the conference begins when the first conferee arrives or when the first moderator arrives. 4 to change the settings in relation to conference closure. 9 to hear an explanation of each of these conference properties. For more information, see 313 on page 330. 3 of 3

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Conferee commands
Table 65 lists the default conferee telephone keypad commands for flexflow conferences. Table 65: Conferee Commands Press... *0 To... Display the conference in the help request queue. Once conferees enter this queue, an operator, using Bridge Talk can see that the conference requires assistance. This feature requires operator support. Display an individual telephone line in the help request queue. Once conferees enter this queue, an operator, using Bridge Talk can see that they require assistance. This feature requires operator support. Mute the telephone line. Unmute the telephone line. Play an available list of participant names into the telephone line. Play the number of participants. Play a menu which lists the available DTMF telephone keypad sequences and their associated functions. To read the message text, see 339 on page 332. Start a subconference or join a subconference. Once a conferee enters *93 on their telephone keypad, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1-9 Places the conferee into a subconference room. For example, if a conferee presses 7, Meeting Exchange places them into subconference number 7. Note: If the conferee presses the current subconference number, Meeting Exchange ignores the command.
t

00

*6 *7 *9 *# **

93

Note:

0 Returns the conferee to the main conference. # Plays a warning message into all subconferences to indicate that participants will be rejoining the main conference shortly. After a few moments, Meeting Exchange transfers all lines back to the main conference. * Does nothing. It exits this menu.

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Commands for playing back a recording

Commands for playing back a recording


Table 66: Moderator and Participant Commands To play back a recording, dial the dedicated playback line and enter the conference passcode Once a participant dials the special playback line and enters the conference passcode on their telephone keypad, they are placed into a self-explanatory IVR sequence for validating conference security information, listing files which are available for playback, and collecting information for identifiying the callers file choice. Once the playback of the chosen file begins, Meeting Exchange makes the following options available: 1 Rewinds the playback by a small amount. 4 Rewinds the playback by a medium amount. 7 Rewinds the playback by a large amount. 3 Forwards the playback by a small amount. 6 Forwards the playback by a medium amount. 9 Forwards the playback by a large amount. 5 Toggles the start/stop feature. * Returns to the start of the playback menu. For more information on configuring the rewind and forward jumps, see Configuring recording properties on page 138.

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Appendix F: Feature List


Table 67 displays the list of features that are currently available on Meeting Exchange. Avaya enables a number of features, by default. You can enable or disable the features which you require for your deployment, using the featcfg command. For example: To enable the Digital Record and Playback (DRP) feature: /usr/dcb/bin/featcfg +drp service mx-bridge restart For more information on DRP, see Configuring recording on page 137. You must restart the server if you make any changes to the feature list. See Enabling features on page 39 for more information. Table 67: Feature Configuration Feature Name A-law Audio Encoding Conference Scheduler Local Area Network Feature Alias A_law sched Description UK only Enables the conference scheduler. Enables connection to a LAN if a LAN card and LAN drivers are installed. Enables the bridge to process DNIS digits and play all available annunciators. Enables operators to record conference dialogue to and playback recordings. Do Avaya charge for it? Now obsolete. No Yes Installed by Default?

lan

No

Yes

DNIS/Flexible Annunciators

dnis

No

Yes

Digital Conference Record Playback

drp

No

No

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Feature List

Table 67: Feature Configuration (continued) Feature Name State of Texas style ODO Warning Messages PIN codes Line Overbooking Scheduler API Feature Alias lsodo Description Enables DTMF input. Enables voice messages. Enables PIN codes. Enables scheduler overbooking. Enables Conference Scheduler interface. Enables alternate touch tones. Note: Does not apply to Flex Flow. Setting for bridges installed in the United Kingdom only Setting for the maximum number of logins and is set to 255. Enables moderator interface. Enables inclusion of bridge name in CDR and CODR files. Enables question and answer conference feature. Enables polling conference feature. Do Avaya charge for it? Now obsolete. Installed by Default?

msg pins overbook schapi

No No No No

Yes No No Yes

Alternate Termination Tone Gain Modification

att

No

No

gain

Now obsolete.

Number of Logins

logins x (where x is the number of logins) modapi bridge

No

Yes

Moderator Control API Bridge Name in CDR

No No

Yes Yes

Q&A (installed by default) Polling (installed by default)

qa

No

Yes

poll

No

Yes

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Table 67: Feature Configuration (continued) Feature Name Multi-Bridge Control System Line Faulting Disconnect Mode CDR End Date Feature Alias mbcs Description Enables multi-bridge control feature. Enables line faulting. Enables disconnect mode. Enables the system to generate a CDR or a CODR for a conference on the end date rather than the start date when a conference extends past midnight (into the next day). Enables EPV feature. Do Avaya charge for it? No Installed by Default? Yes

fault disconnect cdr_end

Now obsolete. No No No No

External Passcode Validation (EPV) from an external database Unattended Blast SNMP

epv

Not applicable in this release.

No

ublast

Enables moderators to initiate blast dials. Enables implementation of the SNMP agent. Sets a flag that requests that BridgeTalk hide/ disable the Conference Scheduler interface (front end). Enable PSTN features

No

No

snmp

Yes

No

Hide Scheduler

hidesched

No

No

Public Switched Telephone Network

pstn

No

Yes

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Feature List

Table 67: Feature Configuration (continued) Feature Name Flex call flow NRP Operator Only Mode Feature Alias flex nrpoper Description Enable the Flex call flow. Turns on the ability to schedule a conference with Name Record/Play Operator Mode. This Mode prompts participants to record information that only the operator may play back. Also turns on the ability to turn on the Saved Roster Enable in the dcbadmin System Configuration Screen. Do Avaya charge for it? No No Installed by Default? No No

T3 Transport

t3

Now obsolete. 4 of 4

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Appendix G: Configuration changes that require a reboot or a restart


This appendix lists the Meeting Exchange configuration changes that require a reboot or a restart. A point of clarification:
l

A restart takes approximately 60 seconds and involves stopping and restarting the application server, or bridge, processes. A reboot takes longer and involves stopping and restarting all Meeting Exchange servers and applications. A reboot can take several minutes. Many people refer to a reboot as powering down the system. For more information, see Rebooting or powering down Meeting Exchange on page 356.

The following configuration changes require either a reboot or a restart: 1. Any changes to featcfg require a restart. For more information, see Feature List on page 351. 2. Any changes to FDAPI require a restart. For more information, see Configuring server resources on page 52. 3. Any changes in the /usr/picb/config directory require a restart. The files include: - Alarm, logging, and SNMP files. For more information, see Configuring SNMP on page 54. - System.cfg. For more information, see Configuring the system settings on page 75. - softMediaServer.cfg. For more information, see Configuring the media settings on page 76. - proxyConfigTable.cfg. For more information, see Connecting to an SES proxy on page 163. - Mxmonitor.reg. For more information, see Connecting to an SES proxy on page 163. 4. Changes to the following network configuration files require a reboot: - Changes to IP addresses - Changes to subnet masks - Changes to the default gateway - Changes to NTP - Changes to hostnames - Changes to network interface settings For more information on these tasks, see Customizing the server IP on page 33.

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Configuration changes that require a reboot or a restart

5. Changes to sFlowDigits.reg that modify the DTMF commands for the SCAN call flow require a restart. For more information, see Dual Tone Multi-Frequency (DTMF) commands on page 339. 6. Changes to flexflow_cfg.reg that modify the DTMF commands for FLEX flow require a restart. 7. Any changes to chdbased.reg require a restart. This file contains the settings for the External Passcode Validation (EPV) feature. 8. Changes to the timezone, using the tzset command require a reboot. For more information, see Configuring the system timezone on page 38. 9. Changes to NFS configuration require a restart. For more information, see Figure 17.

Rebooting or powering down Meeting Exchange


This task does not require root access to the system. Customers can carry out this task. This procedure takes approximately 15 to 20 minutes. 1. Open a PuTTY session. 2. Log in to the Meeting Exchange application server as a dcbmaint user. For more information about the dcbmaint user level, see A short note about sign-ins on page 69. 3. Select System Shutdown from the System Maintenance Main Menu. 4. Type YES. The system displays a message that it is shutting down. 5. Leave the system alone for 5 minutes. 6. Power down. The Power On/Off switch turns the system on and shuts the system off. The Reset button initiates a power-off/power-on cycle. 7. Leave the system alone for 5 minutes. 8. Power Up. The system will take 5-8 minutes to become live again. 9. Check for alarms and check logs for any problems. Some systems may not go live on the first Power up attempt. If this happens, repeat the shutting down procedure.

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Appendix H: List of softmediaserver.cfg parameters


For more information on configuring the softmediaserver.cfg file for audio and data conferencing, see Configuring the media settings on page 76. For more information on configuring the softmediaserver.cfg file, see Configuring softmediaserver.cfg on page 198. Table 68: Softmediaserver.cfg Parameters Name and Default Value AutomaticGain=0 agcTarget=-12 ComfortNoiseGeneration=0 ComfortNoiseLevel=60 Description Media server runtime parameter. Automatic gain can be on or off (1 or 0). It is an integer (int). The AGC target power level. It is an int. Generate comfort noise when nobody is speaking in the conference. It can be on or off (1 or 0). It is an int. The level at which comfort noise is to be set. The value can vary from 30 to 60. Comfort noise is louder when the value is lower. Avaya recommends a value of 60. It is an int. Enable this option to enable silence suppression. Silence suppression is the process of not transmitting information over the Meeting Exchange network when the parties involved in a conference call are not speaking, thereby reducing bandwidth usage. Essentially, silence suppression prevents the Meeting Exchange server from sending packets during silence periods. Avaya recommends that you disable silence suppression because during a conference, the Meeting Exchange server should always be sending packets. When silence suppression is enabled, this value represents the energy threshold at which the media server stops sending audio. The values can vary from -20 to -60. Avaya recommends a value of -45. This value means that if the signal out of the conference is less than 45 (DB) decibels, the Meeting Exchange server does not send a packet. Energy threshold for Audio Talkers. Recommended value is -18 dB, but the value can vary between -50 dB and -5 dB as required. It is an int. 1 of 2

SilenceSuppression=1

ConfPlayThreshold=-45

AudioTalkerThreshold=-18

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List of softmediaserver.cfg parameters

Table 68: Softmediaserver.cfg Parameters (continued) Name and Default Value baseRtpPort=42000 Description Initial port for the rtp data. It is an int. The range of UDP ports used for the RTP media is defined by the number of channels per software media server and the number of software media servers configured: ((maxChannels * 2) * numberOfSoftms processes) + baseRTPPort) For example, (((702 x 2)x 6) + 42000) = 50424 shows the default value of 702 maxChannels per Softms x 2 which is the number of UDP ports used in an audio call. This value (1404) is then multiplied by the number of Softms processes configured on the system, in this example 6 giving a value of 8424. When added to the base range of 42000 this gives a final UDP port number of 50424. The UDP range in this case is 42000 - 50424. As an aside, the calculation if the conferencing bridge has video enabled is as follows: ((maxChannels * 4) * numberOfSoftms processes) + baseRTPPort) Note there are 4 UDP RTP streams for audio and video instead of 2. Maximum number of channels in media server. It is an int. Maximum conference size. It is an int. Enable PLC, on = 1, off = 0. It is an int.

maxChannels=702 maxChannelsPerConferenc e=300 PacketLossConcealment=0 SRTP config securityEnabled=0

Whether or not SRTP should be used for audio streams. 0 = disabled 1 = enabled. It is an int. Note: For more information, see Configuring secure real-time transport protocol (SRTP) on page 179.

Note:

Note:

Note: There are additional parameters in this section but they are not listed here because they should only be changed by an Avaya Support Representative. 2 of 2

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Glossary
Automatic Number Identification Application Server ANI enables Meeting Exchange to capture the telephone number of a caller. An application server is the location of many of the core Meeting Exchange processes. It is the "heart" of the Meeting Exchange solution. It handles all telephone calls to Meeting Exchange and selects a media server on which to terminate each call. It interprets all DTMF inputs, SIP information, database requests, and it processes billing data. The application server communicates with the media server to provide a complete conferencing solution. It is often called a call handler application server. A conference that is supervised by an operator. Typically, an operator greets participants when they dial the conference telephone number. Operators can also help moderators to conduct polls or question and answer sessions. Operators can use Meeting Exchange applications such as Bridge Talk to perform these tasks. Attended conferences are usually more expensive than unattended conferences because of the cost of an operator. In a blast dial, the Meeting Exchange simultaneously dials an entire list of phone numbers to establish a conference. When conferees answer the call, the Meeting Exchange prompts them to press specific digits on their telephones to join the conference without operator assistance. Moderators can initiate a blast dial when they are in a conference. Bridge Talk is an Avaya application that you can use to manage conferences. You can perform tasks such as scheduling and controlling live conferences. Call Handler is a term that is commonly used to refer to the application server. A conferee is a conference participant who does not have access to any advanced conference management features during a live conference. Conferees attend conferences that moderators control. Conferees can mute their own telephone line but they cannot mute the telephone lines of other conferees. A conferee is often called a regular participant or an attendee. A CDR is the computer record produced by a telephone exchange. The record contains details of a call that passed through it. Meeting Exchange produces CDRs for each call. Meeting Exchange also produces conference detail records (CODR) for each conference. The CODR contains details of the conference, such as the start and end time. See Call Detail Record.

Attended Conference

Blast Dial

Bridge Talk Call Handler Conferee

Call Detail Record

Conference Detail Record

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Dell 1950 Servers

Dell 1950 Servers

For previous versions of Meeting Exchange, the Dell 1950 servers provided the media server component for a S6200 server solution. For Meeting Exchange 5.2, Avaya support the IBM X3550 M2 server for all components, with the exception of Avaya Web Conferencing recording functionality. For Avaya Web Conferencing recording functionality, customers require the IBM X3650 M2 server. For customers who are running Meeting Exchange 5.1 on a Dell 1950 server and who wish to upgrade to Meeting Exchange 5.2, Avaya will continue to support the Dell 1950 server. However, this support for the Dell 1950 server only extends to customers using the G.711 codec. A DDI is a telephone number on the customers private telephone exchange. A typical deployment has a range of numbers. When a caller dials into a conference, Meeting Exchange recognizes the DDI that they have dialed and routes the call in accordance with a number of configuration settings. A DDI is also known as a Dialed Number Identification Service (DNIS). A distributed S6200 configuration is a deployment which contains multiple S6200 servers. This configuration provides more capacity than a single S6200 and emulates the scale of a S6800 deployment. Avaya Business Partner and Avaya Support Representatives often refer to this configuration as a Pyramid configuration. See Direct Dial Inward.

Direct Dial Inward

Distributed S6200

Dialed Number Identification Service Flexflow Conference

A flexflow conference is a specific type of demand conference. In flexflow conferences, all call routing is based on the conferee passcode. In addition to the conferee passcode, moderators enter a moderator passcode, which grants access to a moderator-specific menu. Using this menu, moderators can edit conference attributes via DTMF from their telephone keypad. An FDAPI resource is a permanant link between the Meeting Exchange server and an operator or an API connection. You must configure an FDAPI resource for each operator in your deployment. You need an FDAPI resource for each concurrent operator. You must also configure an FDAPI resource for each API connection in your deployment. For Meeting Exchange 5.2, the IBM 3650 M2 server provides the media server component. INADS is an Intialization and Administration System. INADS is a computer system that receives alarm notification calls and generates trouble tickets to track the resolution of that alarm. If you select INADS, the SNMP trap is sent to an Avaya Services Security Gateway (SSG). An SSG is used for outbound connections through a virtual private network (VPN) from the customer system to Avaya Services.

Flexible Digital Auxiliary Port Interface

IBM 3650 M2 Intialization and Administration System

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Passcode

Load Balancing

This is a method of resilience that is suitable for the S6200 and the S6800 media servers. This method of resilience prevents one server from being heavily loaded, while another server remains idle or relatively idle. Meeting Exchange also supports resilience in the application server. For more information, see Implementing Resilience for Meeting Exchange, which is available on support.avaya.com. Media Processing Cards (MPCs) provide the media server component for a S6800 server solution. In this regard, it can be useful to think of MPCs as media servers. The media server component of Meeting Exchange provides a number of functions, such as, audio mixing, Dual Tone Multi Frequency (DTMF) detection, message playing, and conference recording. There are two types of Media Server; The S6200 and the S6800. In a S6200 solution, the media server components are the IBM 3650 M2 servers. In a S6800 solution, the media server components are the Media Processing Cards (MPC). A moderator is a conference participant who has access to a number of special features during a live conference. These features enable moderators to control the conference. These features may include the ability to start and stop recording, extend the size and length of a conference, start lecture mode, and dial out to new participants. A moderator is often called a Host or a Chairperson. If the Avaya Web Portal application is deployed in their organization, moderators can access Web Portal. In the Microsoft environment, moderators are often called Leaders or Presenters. This is a method of resilience that is only supported on the S6800 media server. This method of resilience involves N number of media servers and a single standby MPC. With this method of resilience, the standby is idle until the application server detects an issue on the active media server(s). NMS is a Network Management System. NMS is a commerical software system used for managing data networks. NMS are often extended to the management of attached systems and their embedded software. Usually, NMSs use SNMP as the management protocol. Examples are HP OpenView and IBM Tivoli. Participants are people who attend conference calls. There are two types of participants; moderators and conferees. A passcode enables entry to a conference. There are two types of passcode: Conferee passcode and moderator passcode. A conferee passcode grants access to conferee-level conference features. A moderator passcode grants access to moderator-level conference features. In the Meeting Exchange 5.2 applications, Passcode is often shorted to Code. In the wider Meeting Exchange environment, many people refer to passcodes as security codes, host codes, conference codes, access codes, entry codes, and even PIN codes.

Media Processing Cards (MPC) Media Server Component

Moderator

N+1

Network Management System Participant Passcode

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PIN Code

PIN Code

PIN code is an identification number that is unique to each participant (both moderators and conferees). The name of the participant and their unique identification number are stored in a PIN list. When operators using the CRS Front End and moderators using the Web Portal, create a new participant, the CRS generates a PIN code for each new participant. The CRS Front End interface refers to this field as User PIN. The PINs and the name of the participant are stored in a database table. If an operator, using the CRS Front End or a moderator using the Web Portal books an unattended conference, they can choose a PIN Mode in the Options dialog. The Radisys media server is a carrier-class media server optimized for large IP Multimedia Subsystem (IMS) network deployments. Radisys CMS6000 and CMS9000 MPCs are examples. If an operator books a Flexflow conference using the CRS Front End, they can enable Security Passcode at booking time. If the operator enables this feature, the audio conferencing server plays a message such as "Would you like to associate a second level passcode with this conference?" to moderators after they enter their moderator passcode. Moderators can then enter a code using DMTF. Moderators are responsible for distributing this code to conferees. To successfully access the conference once the moderator has registered the code, conferees require their conferee passcode and the Second Level Passcode. This feature is not available to moderators who book conferences using Web Portal. SNMP is a system of alarms which monitor the condition of the network. If there are problems on the network, the network sends an alarm. You can configure the alarm thresholds so that you can control the conditions that elicit an alarm. This is the name of the message that an application server sends to the telephone endpoints to inform them of a new media server. An unattended conference is a conference that is not supervised by an operator. Typically, callers manage their own progression through Meeting Exchange using the audio prompts. A facility to access an operator in the event of difficulties may or may not be present, depending on the configuration. Unattended conferences are cheaper than attended conferences.

Radisys Media Server (convMS) Second Level Passcode

Simple Network Management Protocol (SNMP) SIP Re-invite Unattended Conference

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Index

Index

Symbols
+DRP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 /usr/ipcb/config . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91, 207

B
beep mode, operator channel parameter . Billing compatible software, description of . . Billing Code field in CODRs . . . . . . . Billing Code, CODR field . . . . . . . . blast delay, blast dial parameter . . . . . blast dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . blast delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . creating lists . . . . . . . . . . . . introducing . . . . . . . . . . . . . LDAP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . moderators . . . . . . . . . . . . . operators . . . . . . . . . . . . . . printing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . system administrators . . . . . . . . Blast dial, configuring CLPG (Call Progress) timeout period . invalid code response . . . . . . . . max. channel blast . . . . . . . . . scan time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Bridge Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . Broadcast Scheduler component, overview of . . . . . . . BSRes configuring stored procedure . . . . .

. . . . . 290 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
217 284 284 266 101, 266 . . 266 . 95, 96 . . . 96 . . . 95 . . . 98 101, 102 . . 101 . . 101 . . . 98 . . 102

A
access time, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 accessing the software . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32 Administrator sign-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 AGC . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 76 alarms . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 Annunciator Delay, supervision configuration parameter291 annunicator messages See audio messages architecture link line. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Attended conference, Polling, non-supported feature . . . . 255 conference, Q&A, non-supported . . . . . . . . 255 Attended (U/A), CODR field. . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Attended ODO, system parameter . . . . . . . . . 296 audio messages ACP API . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151 Bridge Talk . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 enabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 149 per-conference message . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 recording . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 151, 153 system wide messages . . . . . . . . . . 151, 155 transcript of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 154 audioPreferences.cfg. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 73 Auto Hang-Up, code group parameter . . . . . . . . 65 Auto-Extend Ports, system parameter . . . . . . . . 298 Auto-Extend-Duration, system parameter . . . . . . 297 Automatic CDR Print, system parameter. . . . . . . 295 Automatic Conf. Clear, system parameter . . . . . . 295 Automatic Conf. ID, system parameter . . . . . . . 300 Automatic Security Codes, code group parameter . . 66 AutoVLL definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 VLL dialout, overview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 222 Aux Code, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Auxiliary 1, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Auxiliary 2 field in CODRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Auxiliary 2, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284

. . . .

. . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

267 266 266 267 304

. . . . . 217 . . . . . 239

C
call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . call branding . . . . . . . . . . . definition . . . . . . . . . . . introducing . . . . . . . . . . Call Duration, CDR field . . . . . . call routing DDI Direct . . . . . . . . . . definition . . . . . . . . . . . DNIS Direct . . . . . . . . . . call routing configuration properties Call Type, CDR field . . . . . . . Calling Phone, CDR field . . . . . cbutil . . . . . . . . . . . . . . CDR definition . . . . . . . . . . . CDR End Date

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . .

. . . . .

288

. 42
224

. 41
270

. . 255 . . 224 . . 255 . . 288 . . 273 . . 276 . 41, 140

. . . . . . . . 224

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Index
cdr_end, installing on bridge . . . . . . . . . . . 247 CDR End Date Filename cdr_end, description of . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 CDR fields access time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 call duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 call type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 calling phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 company name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 conf entry time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 conf ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272, 280 conf minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 conf name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271, 279 conf number . . . . . . . . . . 270, 277, 279, 286 Cross Ref . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276, 285 disc. reason . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 disc. time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 DNIS digits . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 headers . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269, 279 Line Aux1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Line Aux2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 Line Aux3 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 line name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 line number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 mod. status . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 Network Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Passcode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 PIN code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Prompt Set . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 reconnect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 style name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269, 279 transfer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 User Conf Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 CDR report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 269 cdr_end CDR End Date Filename, description of . . . . . 247 installing on bridge . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 Channel, operator channel parameter . . . . . . . . 291 chdbased.reg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 187 Client Registration Server component, overview of . . . . . . . . . . . . . 216 CLPG Timeout, blast dial parameter . . . . . . . . 267 Code group caller destination when maximum lines exceeded . 64 callers trying to enter conference at wrong time . . 64 destination of caller failing to enter code on time . 64 destination of callers entering a valid code . . . . 64 destination of callers entering invalid codes . . . . 63 enabling/disabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 enabling/disabling automatic hang-up . . . . . . 65 enabling/disabling ODO . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 enabling/disabling warning tones . . . . . . . . 65 naming . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63, 67 number of enter code prompts . . . . . . . . . . 64 time between entry prompts . . . . . . . . . . . 64 user or system security code assignment . . . . . 66 codecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 CODR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 CODR fields attended (U/A) . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 auxiliary 1 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 auxiliary 2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 billing code . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 conf duration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 conf end time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 conf minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Conf Viewer . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 confirm number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 contact name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 contact phone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 Data Conf . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Global ID . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 Intercept Count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 notes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 recorded file number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 sched duration min. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 283 sched partips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 284 start time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 status info. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Sub Conf Count . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 User Conf Type . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 CODR reports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278 comfort noise generation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 common media server . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 Company Name, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Components description of, related software . . . . . . . . . 216 optional, reporting, billing . . . . . . . . . . . 217 Conf Duration, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Conf End Time, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Conf Entry Time, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 273 Conf ID, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272, 280 Conf Minutes, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . 272 Conf Minutes, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . 281 Conf Name, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 271, 279 Conf Num Wh . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277, 286 Conf Number, CDR field . . . . . . 270, 277, 279, 286 Conf Viewer, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Conference passcode, setting for . . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 Conference ID description of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 conference language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 Conference Name Required, code group parameter . 67 Conference Retention. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 Conference Secured, code group parameter . . . . . 64 Conference server

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Index
definition . . . . . . . . . . . . Conferences adding intercept . . . . . . . . global, description of . . . . . . Polling, attended feature . . . . Q&A, attended feature . . . . . conferences recording . . . . . . . . . . . . Configuration featcfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . configuring active speaker notification interval automatic gain control . . . . . . blast dial . . . . . . . . . . . . call branding . . . . . . . . . . codecs . . . . . . . . . . . . . comfort noise generation . . . . drive settings . . . . . . . . . . featcfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . languages . . . . . . . . . . . media server . . . . . . . . . . NTP server . . . . . . . . . . . server IP . . . . . . . . . . . . the EPW . . . . . . . . . . . . timezones . . . . . . . . . . . transport settings . . . . . . . . Confirm Number, CODR field . . . . Contact Name, CODR field . . . . . Contact Phone, CODR field. . . . . Creating user sign-ins . . . . . . . Cross Ref, CDR field . . . . . . . . CRS definition . . . . . . . . . . . . global reference number . . . . opening ports between sites . . .

. . . . . . . . 224 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 . 252 . 255 . 255

. . . . . . . . 254 . . . . . . . . 59 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80 . . . 76 . . . 96 . . . 42 . . . 73 . . . 77 . . . 79 39, 59, 351 . . . . 143 . . . . 71 . . . . 38 . . . . 33 . . . . 22 . . . . 38 . . . . 77 . . . . 284 . . . . 283 . . . . 283 . . . . 69 . 276, 285 . . . . . . .

DNIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . direct, call routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DNIS Digits, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DNIS-driven language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DNS definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DoProcessGCDChanges configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DTMF creating subconferences, moderator commands . 347, 348 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DTMF Acknowledge, system parameter . . . . . .

155 224 255 275 143 225 239 342, 225 294

E
E1 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . Early Start Minutes, system parameter . enable . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Enabling/disabling features with featcfg enabling/disabling features with featcfg Entry Tone, system parameter. . . . . EPV. See External Passcode Validation Ethernet standard, 10BaseT . . . . . . . . Exit Tone, system parameter . . . . . External Passcode Validation chdbased.reg . . . . . . . . . . . process . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . 225 . . 298 . . 137 . . . 59 . 59, 351 . . 294

. . . . . . 227 . . . . . . 294 . . . . . . 187 . . . . . . 186

. . . . . . . . 224 . . . . . . . . 251 . . . . . . . . 234

F
fast dial See blast dial FDAPI . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . featcfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40, Features adding intercept . . . . . . . . . . . . recording, a conference . . . . . . . . File Format PIN Codes . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PIN Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . First Person Message, system parameter . Flex additional passcode, setting for . . . . .

D
Data Conf, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Date Format, system parameter . . . . . . . . . . 302 DDI definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 DDI Direct call routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 default messages . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 DHCP definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 224 Dial Delay, supervision configuration parameter . . . 291 Dial String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Dial-out use of, when scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 DIRECT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 155 Disc. Reason, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 274 Disc. Time, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Disconnect Mode, supervision configuration parameter292

. . . . 139 59, 138, 351 . . . . 255 . . . . 254 . . . . 132 . . . . 134 . . . . 296 . . . . 303

G
Global conference ID, overview . . . . . . . . . . . . 214 conference, definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 conferences, supported, non-supported features 252 Global Conference Master

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Index
definition . . . . . . . . . . . . Global ID, CODR field . . . . . . . Global Ref assigned by CRS . . . . . . . . Glossary . . . . . . . . . . . . . Group Name, code group parameter

. . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . . . 284 . . . . . . . . 251 . . . . . . . . 359 . . . . . . . . 63

H
Hang up operator, global conference, description of Headers, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . Hub definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Hub and Spoke definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . 252 . 269, 279 . . . . 225 . . . . 225

I
IBM 3550 M2 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ID global conference, overview of . . . . . . Ignore DTMF Commands,system parameter . installing introduction to . . . . . . . . . . . . . Intercept last caller, conference feature . . . . . . Intercept Count, CODR field . . . . . . . . Invalid Code, blast dial parameter . . . . . . Invalid Code, code group parameter . . . . Invalid Time of Day, code group parameter . IP definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . IVR definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . 27, 29 . . . . 214 . . . . 299 . . . . 28 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 . 285 . 266 . 63 . 64

system language . . . . . . . . . . . . . licensed ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . licenses . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Line Aux1, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . Line Aux2, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . Line Aux3, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . Line Fault, supervision configuration parameter . Line Name, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . Line Number, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . Link setting site link priorities . . . . . . . . . . Link line definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Loading the EPW . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Local conference, participant counts . . . . . . . conference, roll call option . . . . . . . . . conference, subconference . . . . . . . . Local server setting site link number, for local server . . . localization See languages Log User Transaction . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . .

143

. 39 . 39
276 277 277 293 271 269

. . 239 . . 225 . . . 24 . . 254 . . 255 . . 255 . . 239 . . 305

M
Maintenance sign-in . . . . . . . . . . . Max. Channel Blast, blast dial parameter . . Max. Lines Reached, code group parameter Mod. Status, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . Moderator dial out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Moderator Lecture, system parameter . . . mu-Law . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . mx-ipChange.sh . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . .

. 69
266

. 64
271 254 301 140 . 34

. . . . 225 . . . . 225

J
Jobs DoProcessGCDChanges . . . . . . . . . p_getsystemparameter . . . . . . . . . . RunMultiSiteCDRs . . . . . . . . . . . . running stored procedures. . . . . . . . . stored procedures, setting site link priority in stored procedures, setting time zones in . .

N
. . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 . 239 . 241 . 239 . 239 . 239
NAT definition . . . . . . Netwok Type, CDR field. Node definition . . . . . . Notes, CODR field . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282

L
LAN definition . . . . . . restrictions . . . . . languages conference language configuring . . . . .

O
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 225 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 111 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 144 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 143
ODO, enabling dial out . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 296 On-Demand Percentage, Schedule code group parameter 67 On-Demand services, specifying percentage of lines . 67 On-Hold Msg. Frequency, system parameter . . . . 302 Operator Assistance, system parameter . . . . . . 299 Operator channels, configuring channel number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 291

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Index
remote operator . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . operator channels, configuring beep mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . beep time . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . operator configuration properties . . . . . . . . . Operator sign-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . operatorhelp.txt . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Originator Dial Out (ODO), code group parameter . Overbooking definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . setting up level, per site . . . . . . . . . . . . Overbooking (%), Schedule code group parameter . Overbooking, percentage of system lines . . . . .

. 290 . 290 . 290 . 290 . 69 . 311 . 65 . 226 . 247 . 66 . 66

operator configuration . . supervision configuration. system configuration . . . time assist configuration . voice message . . . . . warning tones . . . . . . PSTN definition . . . . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

289 291 294 310 . 311 313

. . . . . . . . . . . 226

Q
Q&A attended feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255

P
p_getsystemparameter setting time zones, link priorities . . . . . . . . . 239 Participants count, local conference . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Passcode optional, for Flex conference. . . . . . . . . . . 303 Passcode, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 per-conference message . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 150 Phone Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 304 Phone, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 271 PIN Codes CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 creating files . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 file format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 132 installing with featcfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 352 PIN Lists file format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 PIN Lists . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 134 PIN Mode, system parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . 303 playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 Playback Mute, system parameter . . . . . . . . . 301 Polling attended feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 Ports enabling overbooking . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 247 opening, between sites . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 Priority setting site link priorities, from stored procedure . 239 Prompt Set, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 277 prompt sets . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 147 names of . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 152 prompts See audio messages properties blast dial . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 266 call routing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 288 CDR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 267, 269 CODR . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 278

R
Reconnect, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 275 Recorded File Number, CODR field . . . . . . . . 283 recording a conference, moderator feature . . . . . . . . 254 configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 138 enabling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 files. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 introduction to . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 137 playback . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 140 use of, when scheduling . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 Web Portal . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 141 Remote (operator), operator channel parameter . . 290 Reports compatible software, description of . . . . . . . 218 Resources reserving additional ports by overbooking . . . . 247 Retention period, for Schedule group conference records66 Ring network definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 Roll call use of, local conference . . . . . . . . . . . . 255 RTCP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 72 RunMultiSiteCDRs configuring . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 Running and verifying Core Services. . . . . . . . . 25

S
Save Roster . . . . . . . . . . . . . Save Roster, system parameter . . . . SBill application, optional component . . SCAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Scan Attempts, code group parameter . Scan Time, blast dial parameter . . . . Scan Time, code group parameter . . . Sched Duration Min., CODR field . . . Sched Partips, CODR field . . . . . .

. . . . . . 303 . . . . . . 303 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
217 155 . 64 267 . 64 283 284

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Index
Schedule code group . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 conference retention . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 66 percentage of system lines for On-Demand services67 percentage of system lines for overbooking . . . . 66 Scheduler sign-in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 Scheduling recording option . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 254 secure shell . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Seize Date, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 276 Seize Time, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 270 Select statements @SiteLinkNum . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 @SiteLinkPriority . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 @SiteTimeZoneName . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 @SiteTimeZoneType . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Self Mute, system parameter . . . . . . . . . . . . 301 server IP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Sign-ins creating . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69 displaying . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70 SiteLinkNum setting site link number, for local server . . . . . 239 setting, in stored procedure . . . . . . . . . . . 239 SiteLinkPriority setting site link priority, in stored procedure . . . . 239 Sites opening ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 234 SiteTimeZoneName setting time zone, in stored procedure . . . . . . 239 SiteTimeZoneType setting time zone, from stored procedure . . . . . 239 SNMP . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 201 softmediaserver.cfg . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 77 Software compatible, for billing and reports . . . . . . . . 216 SQL jobs, configuring DoProcessGCDChanges . . . . 239 jobs, configuring RunMultiSiteCDRs . . . . . . . 241 SSH . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 Start Time, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 280 Starting Conf. ID, system parameter . . . . . . . . 300 Startup Notify Time, system parameter . . . . . . . 302 Status Info., CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 282 Status, code group parameter . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Stored procedure, BSRes database . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Stored procedures DoProcessGCDChanges . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 p_getsystemparameter . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 RunMultiSiteCDRs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 241 setting site link priority in . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 setting time zones in . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 Style Name, CDR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 269, 279 Sub Conf Count, CODR field . . . . . . . . . . . . 285 Sub Conferencing Mode, system parameter . . . . . 301

Subconferences starting, using moderator commands . . 342, viewing . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Supervision configuration annunciator delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . dial delay . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . disconnect mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . line fault . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . wink timeout . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . supervision configuration properties . . . . . . System configuration attended ODO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . auto-extend ports . . . . . . . . . . . . . auto-extend-duration . . . . . . . . . . . automatic CDR Print . . . . . . . . . . . . automatic conference ID . . . . . . . . . . automatically clearing conference settings . Bridge Record . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . date format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Dial String . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . DTMF acknowledge . . . . . . . . . . . . early start minutes . . . . . . . . . . . . . entry tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . exit tone . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . first person message . . . . . . . . . . . Ignore DTMF Commands . . . . . . . . . Log User Transaction . . . . . . . . . . . moderator lecture . . . . . . . . . . . . . on-hold msg. frequency . . . . . . . . . . operator assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . Phone Number . . . . . . . . . . . . . . PIN mode . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . playback mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Save Roster. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Self mute . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . starting conference ID . . . . . . . . . . . startup notify time . . . . . . . . . . . . . sub conferencing mode . . . . . . . . . . system name . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . time format . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . transaction logs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . system configuration properties . . . . . . . . system language . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . System Name, system parameter . . . . . . . system wide messages . . . . . . . . . . . .

347, 348 . . 255

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

291 291 292 293 293 291

296 298 297 295 300 295 304 302 304 294 298 294 294 296 299 305 301 302 299 304 303 301 303 301 300 302 301 294 302 295 294 144 294 151, 155

T
T1 definition . . TCP/IP definition . . telnumToUri.tab 10BaseT definition . .

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 226 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 227

368

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Index
testing the installation . . . . . . . Time Format, system parameter . . Time zone setting, from stored procedure . . time-based rules . . . . . . . . . . Timeout, code group parameter . . . time-sensitive operator . . . . . . . timezone . . . . . . . . . . . . . tips . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . TOS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Transaction Logs, system parameter transcript of messages . . . . . . . Transfer, CDR field . . . . . . . . traps . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

. . . . . . . . 32 . . . . . . . . 302 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 239 . 310 . 64 . 310 . 38 . 265 . 75 . 295 . 154 . 275 . 202

U
UDP definition . . . . . . . . . UI (User Interface) . . . . . . Unattended conferences enabling originator dial out warning tones . . . . . . User Conf Type, CDR field . . User Conf Type, CODR field .

. . . . . . . . . . . 227 . . . . . . . . . . . 249 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65 . 65 . 276 . 285

V
Verifying SNMP Trap Information . . . Viewing global conferences . . . . . . . . subconference . . . . . . . . . . Virtual Link Line See also VLL VLAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . VLL AutoVLL, line dialed out, description voice message configuration . . . . .

. . . . . . . 24 . . . . . . . 252 . . . . . . . 255 . . . . . . . 75 . . . . . . . 222 . . . . . . . 311

W
WAN definition . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warning tones enabling for unattended conferences . . . . . . warning tones . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Warning Tones, code group parameter . . . . . . Wink Timeout, supervision configuration parameter

. 227 . 65 . 313 . 65 . 293

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369

Index

370

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