Sie sind auf Seite 1von 6

ACDIS Undergraduate Certificate in Global Security

The Program in Arms Control, Disarmament, and International Security (ACDIS) at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign is pleased to offer a Certificate in Global Security for undergraduate students. This certificate program has been established to provide students at the University of Illinois with a coherent framework for developing a base of knowledge within the multi-disciplinary field of global security studies, to complement studies in their existing major(s). The ACDIS certificate program will also serve to highlight the unique talents of Illinois students as they enter into competitive job markets. The certificate will illustrate a students awareness of the importance of understanding a myriad of complex processes behind global security dynamics in todays world, and their focus upon such questions during their undergraduate degree program of study. Students who complete the certificate will be prepared to use their knowledge and skills in government, the private sector, NGOs, and academia, and in fields such as international relations, diplomacy, politics, business, law, health, finance, and media. This certificate will provide students with an added credential that they can present to prospective employers. Completion of the certificate will not be noted on a students transcript. However, students may add this credential to their resumes. ACDIS will provide a printed document certifying completion upon the students graduation and verification by ACDIS that the student has met certificate requirements. Students participating in the ACDIS certificate program will also be eligible for scholarship opportunities from ACDIS to support internships and research in the US and abroad with a global security focus.

Certificate Completion Requirements


Students must complete at least fifteen credit hours in courses in global security from an approved list (included below). Of the total required fifteen hours, students should complete at least six hours from each of two categories, Social Science and Humanities and Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Technology. All courses to be applied to the certificate must be taken for full credit; they cannot be taken pass/fail or audited. A given course may, however, be used to satisfy a students requirements for a major or minor and this certificate.

How to Register for the ACDIS Certificate Program


Students must currently be enrolled at the University of Illinois in order to register for the program. Students who want to participate in the certificate program should express interest prior to the completion of the required coursework, and must meet with the ACDIS Director or Associate Director for an advising appointment. Please contact ACDIS Office Manager Kathy Conner to schedule an appointment: ACDIS Room 359 Armory Building 505 East Armory Avenue Champaign, IL 61820 333-7086 andconnr@illinois.edu

1 Revised October 2011

Global Security Courses at the University of Illinois


approved for the ACDIS Undergraduate Certificate in Global Security
The following courses are eligible to be applied towards the ACDIS Undergraduate Certificate in Global Security. To complete the certificate, students must achieve a passing grade in courses comprising at least fifteen credit hours total, and at least six hours from each of the Social Sciences and Humanities and the Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Technology categories. All courses to be applied to the certificate must be taken for full credit; they cannot be taken pass/fail or audited. A given course may, however, be used to satisfy a students requirements for a major or minor and this certificate. Certain special topics courses not listed below that have a significant global security component may also be eligible for inclusion in a students certificate program plan. Please consult the ACDIS office with questions about whether a particular special topics course might be eligible.

Social Sciences and Humanities (at least six hours required from this category)
GEOG/GLBL 110 (Geography of International Conflicts) Focuses on contemporary cultural conflicts, competition among nations for economic and mineral resources; treats territorial disputes from a cultural and geographic perspective. Case studies vary to illustrate types of contemporary conflicts. 3 hours. GEOG 210 (Contemporary Social & Environmental Problems) Geographic perspectives on contemporary national and international problems. Topics vary each term and include such themes as environmental quality, food production, urban problems, and particular social and political conflicts. Same as ESES 210. 3 hours. GEOG 310 (Political Geography) Problems and issues surrounding the geographic distribution of political actions and outcomes in the context of globalization. Topics include war and peace, access to natural resources, nationalism, democratization, terrorism, and the politics of identity. Prerequisite: Junior standing or consent of instructor. 3 hours. GLBL 392 (International Diplomacy and Negotiation) Examines the complexities of international diplomacy and negotiations among states and other actors. Focuses on three main subject areas: negotiation analysis, applied negotiation, and the interaction of practical considerations that affect negotiations. Utilizes theoretical case-based, and active-learning approaches during the semester as topics are explored in detail. Issues and topics include security, public health, economic development, human rights, and the environment. 3 hours.

2 Revised October 2011

HIST/GLBL 251 (War, Military Institutions, and Society Since 1815) Land and naval warfare since Napoleon; technology, tactics, strategy, administration, and military institutions in themselves and as they relate to western and non-western societies; and conventional and nuclear warfare. 3 hours. HIST 274 (US & World Since 1917) History of American foreign relations since World War I. 3 hours. PHIL/RLST/GLBL 385 (The Ethics of War and Peace) brings students to an in-depth understanding of historical and current thinking on the ethics and morality of acts of war, and of refraining from acts of war in the face of an unjust peace. 3 hours. PS/GLBL 283 (Introduction to International Security) Surveys the major issues associated with arms control, disarmament and international security. Also examines the military, socio-economic, and political dimensions of weapons systems, military strategy, the ethics of modern warfare, nuclear proliferation, and regional security issues. 3 hours. PS 339 (Political Violence) Survey of various forms of political violence and examination of competing theories about why these types of political violence occur and their implications. The different categories of violence under examination constitute pressing topics in the study of conflict in both international relations and comparative politics. These categories, which may overlap conceptually or empirically, include phenomena such as mass collective action in protests, riots, repression and torture, coups, civil war and insurgency, genocide and massacres, sexual violence during war, self sacrifice, and terrorism. Prerequisite: PS 240 or PS 241 or PS 280, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. PS/GLBL 357 (Ethnic Conflict) Explores the bases of nationalist and ethnic identities across a variety of different national and cultural contexts, and how these are related to conflict at the intrastate and interstate levels. Consideration is given to the characteristics and patterns of ethnic conflict with special emphasis on how and when ethnic tensions become manifested in violent conflict. The course concludes with consideration and evaluations of various domestic and international approaches to conflict management and resolution. 3 hours. PS 381/396 (International Conflict) Examines the conditions that promote war and peace between states. General topics covered are: historical patterns in warfare; causes of war, including arms races and power distributions; outcomes of war; and approaches to peace. Credit is not given for both PS 381 and PS 396. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 281 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. PS 386 (International Law) Analyzes the concepts and bases of public international law. Topics include sources and subjects of international law, as well as issues of jurisdiction, territory, law of the sea, and use of military force. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. 3 Revised October 2011

PS 387 (National Security Policy) Examines principal theories of international security and evaluates their capacity to explain the security behavior of states and other key international actors. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. PS 390 (American Foreign Policy) Considers the major foreign policy decisions currently confronting the United States government: analyzes their background, principal issues, and alternative actions, as well as the policy formulation process. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. PS 391 (Soviet & Post-Soviet Foreign Policy) Surveys Soviet and Post-Soviet foreign policy from 1917 to the present, with emphasis upon the forces shaping this policy; special attention to the interplay of ideology and national interest in policy formulation. Prerequisite: PS 280 or PS 283, six hours of Political Science credit, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. PS 394 (Crisis Diplomacy) A comparative study of foreign policy decision-making and diplomacy among the major states from 1816-1948 with a focus on crisis bargaining, management, and escalation. Foreign relations of Britain, France, Germany, Russia, Italy, Japan, and the United States are covered in light of international relations theories. Emphasis is placed on how domestic political struggles, like those between hard liners and accommodationists, and external factors, like alliances and international norms, affect decision-making. Comparisons are made between those crises that are peacefully settled and those that escalate to war and/or get out of control. Prerequisite: PS 280, PS 281, PS 283, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. RLST 481 (Muslim Ethics in Global Age) Exploration of contemporary, often revisionist Muslim ideas on a broad range of ethical issues that face societies today, such as human rights, democracy, gender equality, just war, pluralism, and bioethics. Prerequisite: Previous coursework on Islam or the Middle East. 3 hours. SOC 160 (Global Inequality and Social Change) Introduces sociological concepts of poverty, inequality, and social change within a global context. Themes explored include basic food security, poverty and hunger; population and resource distribution; foreign aid and development institutions; and social policies and movements for change. Course approach is historical and transnational, and typically includes case studies from Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the United States. This course can be used to fulfill either Western or Nonwestern general education categories, but not both. 3 hours. No longer offered The following Social Sciences and Humanities courses are no longer regularly offered. Students who took these courses will still receive credit toward the certificate. ANTH/GLBL 188 (Ethnic Wars and Globalization) ARTH/GLBL 352 (Art, Propaganda, and War) 4 Revised October 2011

Natural Sciences, Engineering, and Technology (at least six hours required from this category)
ATMS 140 (Climate and Global Change) Introduces climate change and its interactions with the global environment; surveys the physical, chemical, biological and social factors contributing to global change; includes topics such as greenhouse warming, acid rain, ozone depletion, distinguishes anthropogenic influences and natural variability of the earth system; addresses societal impacts, mitigation strategies, policy options and other human responses to global change. Same as ESES 140. 3 hours. CS 461 (Computer Security I) Fundamental principles of computer and communications security and information assurance: ethics, privacy, notions of threat, vulnerabilities, and risk in systems, information warfare, malicious software, data secrecy and integrity issues, network security, trusted computing, mandatory and discretionary access controls, certification and accreditation of systems against security standards. Security mechanisms: authentication, auditing, intrusion detection, access control, cryptography, security protocols, key distribution. Same as ECE 422. Prerequisite: CS 241 or ECE 391. 3 hours. GEOL/GLBL/ENVS 118 (Natural Disasters) Introduces the nature, causes, risks, effects, and prediction of natural disasters including earthquakes, volcanoes, landslides, subsidence, global climate change, severe weather, coastal erosion, floods, mass extinctions, and meteorite impacts; covers geologic principles and case histories of natural disasters as well as human responses (societal impact, mitigation strategies, and public policy). 3 hours. MATH/GLBL 267 (Math Issues in National Security) Applications of mathematics to aspects of physical, biological, and social sciences that affect national security. Prerequisite: completion of the Quantitative Reasoning 1 requirement, or consent of instructor. 3 hours. MATH 490 (Math Issues in National Security II) is a sequel to MATH 267 which goes more deeply into the underlying mathematical structure of the subjects introduced in MATH 267. These include ballistic missile defense, game theory, applications of probability to decision making and risk management, and applications to other aspects of physical, biological, and social sciences that affect national security. It is advised that students who take this course have recently studied differential equations. Prerequisite: completion of MATH 267 or consent of instructor. 1-4 hours. NPRE/GLBL 201 (Energy Systems) Examines patterns of energy production and utilization and discusses the technical aspects of renewable energy resources, advanced fossil fuel systems and advanced nuclear systems. 2 or 3 hours. NPRE/GLBL/PS 480 (Topics in Energy and Security) Examines the interplay between security and supplies of energy, mineral resources, and water. Traces the evolution of thte 5 Revised October 2011

importance of various fuels (including coal, oil, uranium, and natural gas) in the FrancoPrussian, First and Second World Wars, in subsequent conflicts in Asia and Africa, and in military planning for possible future conflicts. Reviews relevant theories of international conflict and examines the role of individual leaders versus institutional factors in the precipitation and outcome of pivotal wars. Reviews data and results of econometric analyses relevant to past and projected future energy use and discusses the role of policy formation and execution in influencing uncertainties about outcomes. Junior standing is required. Prerequisite: Composition 1 and Quantitative Reasoning 1. 3 hours. NPRE/GLBL 481 (Writing Seminar on Technology and Security) develops writing skills in standard computer, desktop publishing, and electronic publishing formats, based on academic material identical to that covered in NPRE/GLBL 482 and NPRE/GLBL 483. That includes theory, global and regional security environments, and arms control and verification relevant to military uses of nuclear energy and the impact of the military uses of nuclear energy on the nuclear electrical power sector; and seminars on technology of domestic and international security and the regional and international contexts that influence the nature of security problems. For graduate credit, writing projects include documentation of computational work using software appropriate for typesetting of mathematical formulas. Credit is not given for both NPRE/GLBL 481 and either NPRE/GLBL 482 or NPRE/GLBL 483. 3 hours. NPRE/GLBL 482 (Military and Civilian Uses of Nuclear Energy) examines theory, global and regional security environments, and arms control and verification relevant to military uses of nuclear energy and the impact of the military uses of nuclear energy on the nuclear electrical power sector. Topics include theory of international conflict, arms control agreements, delivery vehicles, fission and fusion reactions and the role of tritium, detection of fissile materials, and military and civilian uses of nuclear energy in South Asia, the Far East, the Middle East, Russia, and NATO. Junior standing is required. 1 hour. NPRE/GLBL 483 (Seminar on Security) technology and security issues are analyzed through preparation of reports on a weekly seminar chosen from a regular seminar offering or an alternative approved list. Topics covered include technology of domestic and international security and the regional and international contexts that influence the nature of security problems. Prerequisite: junior standing and completion of the Composition 1 requirement; or graduate standing. 1 hour. PHYS/GLBL 280 (Nuclear Weapons and Arm Control) Beginners course on the physics of nuclear weapons, nuclear weapon effects, delivery systems, and defenses against nuclear attack; non-technical, but about technology. Designed to assist students in making informed judgements about nuclear armaments and arms control; includes presentation of current issues. This course satisfies the General Education Criteria for an Advanced Composition course. 3 hours.

6 Revised October 2011

Bewerten