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TheTheTheThe HumanHumanHumanHuman

TheTheTheThe HumanHumanHumanHuman HumanHuman ComputerComputer InteractionInteraction --Dix,Dix, Finlay,Finlay,

HumanHuman ComputerComputer InteractionInteraction --Dix,Dix, Finlay,Finlay, AbowdAbowd,, BeatleBeatle-- ((LectureLecture NotesNotes))

AbowdAbowd,, BeatleBeatle-- (( LectureLecture NotesNotes )) Vu,Vu, ThiThi HongHong NhanNhan ( vthnhan@vnu.edu.vn )(

Vu,Vu, ThiThi HongHong NhanNhan (vthnhan@vnu.edu.vn)(vthnhan@vnu.edu.vn) FacultyFaculty ofof InformationInformation TechnologyTechnology VietnamVietnam NationalNational UniversityUniversity,, HanoiHanoi

ContentsContentsContentsContents 1.1. IntroductionIntroduction ThinkinThinkin reasoninreasonin gg &&
ContentsContentsContentsContents 1.1. IntroductionIntroduction ThinkinThinkin reasoninreasonin gg &&

ContentsContentsContentsContents

1.1.

IntroductionIntroduction

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2.2.

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

3.3.

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HumanHuman MemoryMemory g:g:

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5.5.

EmotionEmotion

6.6.

IndividualIndividual differencedifference

 

7.7.

PsychologyPsychology andand thethe designdesign ofof interactiveinteractive systemssystems

thethe designdesign ofof interactiveinteractive systemssystems 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman PagePage 22
IntroductionIntroduction Information i/o … visual, auditory, haptic, movement Information stored in memory h t-t l
IntroductionIntroduction Information i/o … visual, auditory, haptic, movement Information stored in memory h t-t l

IntroductionIntroduction

Information i/o …

visual, auditory, haptic, movement

Information stored in memory

h

t-t

l

-t

sensory, s or - erm, ong- erm

Information processed and applied

reasoning, problem solving, skill, error

Emotion influences human capabilities Each person is different

influences human capabilities Each person is different 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a
InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels In interaction with a computer The human input is the data output by
InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels In interaction with a computer The human input is the data output by

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

In interaction with a computer

The human input is the data output by the computer and vice verse

In humans, input mainly occurs through the senses and output through the motor controls of the effectors

The most important senses in HCI

Vision, hearing, and touch

The primary effectors

Input Output Humans Computer Input Output
Input
Output
Humans
Computer
Input
Output

Eyes, ears, fingers, head and body position

Visual perception can be divided into 2 stages

Physical reception of the stimulus from the outside world The processing and interpretation of that stimulus

Physical reception of the stimulus from the outside world The processing and interpretation of that stimulus
world The processing and interpretation of that stimulus 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels VisionVisionVisionVision Eye: is a mechanism for receiving light and

VisionVisionVisionVision

Eye: is a mechanism for receiving light and transforming it into electrical energy

Light is reflected from objects in the visual field and their image is focused on the

back of the eye, where it is transformed into an electrical signal and passed to

the brain

The most important components are the cornea (giác mạc) and lens (thủy tinh

thể/đồn tử) and the retina (võng mạc) with the blind spot and photoreceptors(các

tế bào nhận kích thích ánh sáng): rods, cones located on the fovea (hố võng

mạc)

ế

đồ

ố

RodsRods areare highlyhighly sensitivesensitive toto lightlight andand areare usableusable underunder lowlow illuminationillumination ConesCones areare lessless sensitivesensitive toto lightlight andand cancan distinguishdistinguish colorcolor

lightlight andand cancan distinguishdistinguish colorcolor 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: TheTheTheThe signalsignalsignalsignal

Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: TheTheTheThe signalsignalsignalsignal interpretationinterpretationinterpretationinterpretation

Size and depth

Visual angle indicates how much of view an object occupies

(relates to size and distance from eye)

Visual acuity (thị lực) is ability to perceive detail

Familiar objects perceived as constant size

(in spite of changes in visual angle when far away)

ị ự (in spite of changes in visual angle when far away) 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: TheTheTheThe signalsignalsignalsignal

Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: TheTheTheThe signalsignalsignalsignal interpretationinterpretationinterpretationinterpretation (cont(cont(cont(cont d)d)d)d)

Perception of brightness

is a subjective reaction to levels of light emitted by an object affected by luminance of object

Colour

The eye perceive color because the cones are sensitive to light of different wavelengths 3-4% of the fovea is sensitive to blue, making blue acuity lower In reality, about 8% males and 1% females are colour blind

In reality, about 8% males and 1% females are colour blind 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: TheTheTheThe signalsignalsignalsignal

Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: TheTheTheThe signalsignalsignalsignal interpretationinterpretationinterpretationinterpretation (cont(cont(cont(cont d)d)d)d)

The visual system compensates for

Movements Changes in luminance

The context in which an object appears allows us to clearly disambiguate the interpretation of the object

Optical illusions sometimes occur due to over compensation

the human mind

judges an object's

size based on its

background

mind judges an object's size based on its background the Ponzo illusion the Muller Lyer illusion

the Ponzo

illusion

object's size based on its background the Ponzo illusion the Muller Lyer illusion 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe

the Muller Lyer illusion

its background the Ponzo illusion the Muller Lyer illusion 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: ReadingReadingReadingReading Consists of several

Vision:Vision:Vision:Vision: ReadingReadingReadingReading

Consists of several stages

The visual patterns of the words are perceived Decoded with reference to an internal representation of language The word is processed as part of the sentence or phrase using syntactic and semantic analysis

Reading involves saccades(cử động giật giật của mắt)

and fixations

độ

Perception occurs during fixation

ử độ ậ ậ ủ ắ Perception occurs during fixation 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels HearingHearingHearingHearing Provide information about environment: distances,

HearingHearingHearingHearing

Provide information about environment: distances, directions, objects, etc.

The ear receives vibrations in the air and transmits them through various stages to the auditory nerves

Physical sections

Outer ear: protects inner ear and amplifies sound

Middle ear: transmit sound waves like vibrations to inner ear

Inner ear: chemical transmitters are released and cause impulses in the auditory

nerves (thần kinh thính giác )

Features of sound

Pitch(độ cao thấp): frequency of the sound

Loudness(cường độ): amplitude of the sound

Timbre(âm sắc): type/quality of the sound

Amplitude
Amplitude

Frequency

sắc): type/quality of the sound Amplitude Frequency 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels HearingHearingHearingHearing (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.) Humans can hear sound

HearingHearingHearingHearing (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.)

Humans can hear sound at frequencies from 20Hz to 15kHz

Can perceive changes at low frequency about 1.5Hz

The hi her the fre uenc

g

q

y,

the more difficult to distin uish

g

Human auditory system has a filtering system which filter out the

distracting noise to concentrate on important sounds

“Cocktail party effect” – we still can concentrate on the conversation

effect” – we still can concentrate on the conversation 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels HearingHearingHearingHearing withHCIwithHCIwithHCIwithHCI Currently sounds are

HearingHearingHearingHearing withHCIwithHCIwithHCIwithHCI

Currently sounds are still mainly used to inform some thing, e.g.,

When pressing a wrong button

Welcoming to Windows when booting

Low battery status

Sound research has been carried out

Synthesize speech: Listening to an audio material instead of reading, which is especially beneficial to blind people & those who have weak visual acuity Use sounds to create effect in content displaying

acuity Use sounds to create effect in content displaying 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels TouchTouchTouchTouch Provides important feedback about environment Stimuli are

TouchTouchTouchTouch

Provides important feedback about environment

Stimuli are received via the receptors (cơ quan nhận cảm) in the

skin

ơ

Thermoreceptors: hot and cold

Nociceptors: pain

Mechanoreceptors (cơ quan cảm thụ cơ học): pressure

ơ

ơ

Kinesthesis (cảm giác về sự vận động của tứ chi & cơ thể)

độ

ơ

Second aspect of haptic perception

Awareness of the position of the body and limbs due to receptors in the

joints

of the body and limbs due to receptors in the joints 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels TouchTouchTouchTouch withwithwithwith HCIHCIHCIHCI E.g., we can perceive when a

TouchTouchTouchTouch withwithwithwith HCIHCIHCIHCI

E.g., we can perceive when a button is being pressed

New devices: haptic

perceive when a button is being pressed New devices: haptic 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g
MemoryMemoryMemoryMemory There are three types of memory function: Sensory memories Short-term memory or working memory
MemoryMemoryMemoryMemory There are three types of memory function: Sensory memories Short-term memory or working memory

MemoryMemoryMemoryMemory

There are three types of memory function:

Sensory memories

There are three types of memory function: Sensory memories Short-term memory or working memory Long-term memory

Short-term memory or working memory

Sensory memories Short-term memory or working memory Long-term memory Selection of stimuli governed by level of
Sensory memories Short-term memory or working memory Long-term memory Selection of stimuli governed by level of

Long-term memory

Selection of stimuli governed by level of arousal

memory Selection of stimuli governed by level of arousal 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory SensorySensorySensorySensory memorymemorymemorymemory Act as buffers for stimuli received via each of

SensorySensorySensorySensory memorymemorymemorymemory

Act as buffers for stimuli received via each of senses

iconic memory: visual stimuli echoic memory: aural stimuli haptic memory: tactile stimuli

These memories are constantly overwritten by new information coming in on these channels

Information is passed to sensory memory into short-term memory by attention

passed to sensory memory into short-term memory by attention 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory ShortShortShortShort----termtermtermterm memorymemorymemorymemory Is used to store information which is only

ShortShortShortShort----termtermtermterm memorymemorymemorymemory

Is used to store information which is only required fleetingly Can be accessed rapidly: ~ 70ms Also decay rapidly: ~ 200ms Has a limited capacity

Humans can store 7± 2 chunks of information E.g.,

212348278493202

0121 414 2626 HEC ATR ANU PTH ETR EET

E.g., 212348278493202 0121 414 2626 HEC ATR ANU PTH ETR EET 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LongLongLongLong----termtermtermterm memorymemorymemorymemory Has an unlimited capacity , a slow access

LongLongLongLong----termtermtermterm memorymemorymemorymemory

Has an unlimited capacity, a slow access time and forgetting occurs more slowly or not at all Information is stored here from the STM through rehearsal

2 types of LTM

Episodic (tình tiết) memory represents our memory of event &

ế

experiences in a serial form

Semantic memory is a structured record of facts, concepts, skills that

we have acquired, derived from the episodic memory

Semantic memory is structured as a network

The more general the information is, the higher is the level on which it is

stored

allows us to generalize about specific cases

it is stored allows us to generalize about specific cases 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: exampleexampleexampleexample ofofofof semanticsemanticsemanticsemantic

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: exampleexampleexampleexample ofofofof semanticsemanticsemanticsemantic networknetworknetworknetwork modelmodelmodelmodel

12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman PagePage 1919
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PagePage 1919

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: FramesFramesFramesFrames Other models about the organization of LTM… Frames Information

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: FramesFramesFramesFrames

Other models about the organization of LTM…

Frames

Information is organized in data structures Have slots to add attribute values

Fixed

legs: 4

DOG

Default diet: carniverous sound: bark

Variable

size:

colour

COLLIE

Fixed breed of: DOG type: sheepdog

Default size: 65 cm

Variable

colour

DOG type: sheepdog Default size: 65 cm Variable colour 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: ScriptsScriptsScriptsScripts Comprise a number of elements (like slots) which can be filled

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: ScriptsScriptsScriptsScripts

Comprise a number of elements (like slots) which can be filled with appropriate information

Script for a visit to the vet

Entry conditions:

dog ill

vet open owner has money

Result:

dog better owner poorer vet richer

Props:

examination table medicine instruments

Roles:

vet examines diagnoses treats owner brings dog in pays takes dog out

Scenes:

arriving at reception waiting in room examination paying

Tracks:

dog needs medicine dog needs operation

paying Tracks: dog needs medicine dog needs operation 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: ProductionProductionProductionProduction rulesrulesrulesrules IF-THEN rules If information

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: ProductionProductionProductionProduction rulesrulesrulesrules

IF-THEN rules

If information coming into the STM matches one of the condition in the LTM, the appropriate action is executed

IF a dog is wagging tail THEN pat the dog

IF a dog is growling THEN run away

THEN pat the dog IF a dog is growling THEN run away 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: 3333 mainmainmainmain activitiesactivitiesactivitiesactivities StorageStorage ofof

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: 3333 mainmainmainmain activitiesactivitiesactivitiesactivities

StorageStorage ofof informationinformation

Rehearsal of a piece of information from the STM (moved to LTM)

Total time hypothesis (Ebbinghaus 1885)

If the total learning time is increased, information is remembered better (amount retained is proportional to rehearsal time)

Distribution of practice effect (Baddeley & Longman 1978)

Optimization: the learning time should be well spread over time

Repetition alone is enough? To help learn efficiently, information should be meaningful & familiar

So that, it can be related to existing structures more easily incorporated into memory

structures more easily incorporated into memory 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: 3333 mainmainmainmain activitiesactivitiesactivitiesactivities Forgetting: 2 main theories

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: 3333 mainmainmainmain activitiesactivitiesactivitiesactivities

Forgetting: 2 main theories of forgetting

Decay

information held in the LTM is gradually lost but slowly

Inference

New information replaces old one (retroactive interference) The older information interferes with the newly acquired information (proactive inhibition)

Forgetting is affected by emotional factors too

Forgetting is affected by emotional factors too 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a

MemoryMemory

MemoryMemory LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: 3333 mainmainmainmain activitiesactivitiesactivitiesactivities Retrieval: 2 types of

LTM:LTM:LTM:LTM: 3333 mainmainmainmain activitiesactivitiesactivitiesactivities

Retrieval: 2 types of retrieval

Recall

information reproduced from memory can be assisted by cues (e.g., the category in which information can be placed)

Recognition

information gives knowledge that it has been seen before Less complex than Recall

that it has been seen before Less complex than Recall 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g
ThinkingThinkingThinkingThinking Require different amount of knowledge Some thinking are very directed and the knowledge
ThinkingThinkingThinkingThinking Require different amount of knowledge Some thinking are very directed and the knowledge

ThinkingThinkingThinkingThinking

Require different amount of knowledge

Some thinking are very directed and the knowledge required is

constrained

Others require vast amounts of knowledge from different

domains

Thinking can be divided in

Reasoning : deductive(diễn dịch), inductive(quy nạp),

aductive(Truy kích)

Problem solving

nạp), ễ ị aductive(Truy kích) Problem solving ạ 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking ReasoningReasoningReasoningReasoning Is the process in which we use the knowledge to draw conclusion or

ReasoningReasoningReasoningReasoning

Is the process in which we use the knowledge to draw conclusion or infer something new about the domain of interest DeductiveDeductive reasoningreasoning

Derive the logically necessary conclusion from the given premises E.g. If it is Friday then she will go to work It is Friday Therefore she will go to work Logical conclusion not necessarily true E.g. If it is raining then the ground is dry It is raining Therefore the ground is dry When the truth and logical validity clash E.g.Some people are babies Some babies cry Inference - Some people cry

are babies Some babies cry Inference - Some people cry 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking ReasoningReasoningReasoningReasoning Inductive reasoning generalizing from cases we have seen to infer

ReasoningReasoningReasoningReasoning

Inductive reasoning

generalizing from cases we have seen to infer information about cases we have not seen

E.g., all elephants we’ve been have trunks, therefore all elephants have trunks

Unbelievable

Can only prove False not True

have trunks Unbelievable Can only prove False not True 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking ReasoningReasoningReasoningReasoning Adduction Reasons from event to cause E.g., Sam drives fast when

ReasoningReasoningReasoningReasoning

Adduction

Reasons from event to cause

E.g., Sam drives fast when drunk

If I see him driving fast, assume drunk

Unbelievable

Can lead to false explanation

But still useful

Unbelievable Can lead to false explanation But still useful 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking ProblemProblemProblemProblem solvingsolvingsolvingsolving Is the process of finding a solution to

ProblemProblemProblemProblem solvingsolvingsolvingsolving

Is the process of finding a solution to unfamiliar task, using the knowledge we have

There are different views on problem solving

GestaltGestalt theorytheory

problem solving is both productive and reproductive productive draws on insight and restructuring of problem attractive but not enough evidence to explain `insight' etc. move away from behaviourism and lead towards information processing theories

and lead towards information processing theories 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking ProblemProblemProblemProblem solvingsolvingsolvingsolving (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.) ProblemProblem

ProblemProblemProblemProblem solvingsolvingsolvingsolving (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.)

ProblemProblem spacespace theorytheory

problem space comprises problem states problem solving involves generating states using legal operators People use these operators to move from the initial state to the goal state heuristics may be employed to select operators

UseUse ofof analogyanalogy

Problems solved by mapping knowledge relating to a similar known problem domain to the new problem Analogical mapping

problem domain to the new problem Analogical mapping 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking SkillSkillSkillSkill acquisitionacquisitionacquisitionacquisition Information structure is fine tuned at

SkillSkillSkillSkill acquisitionacquisitionacquisitionacquisition

Information structure is fine tuned at a deep level to enable efficient and accurate retrieval

Skills acquired via 3 levels

The learners uses general-purpose rules to interpret facts about a problem Develop rules specific to the task using proceduralization The rules are tuned to speed up performance, using generalization

are tuned to speed up performance, using generalization 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P

ThinkingThinking

ThinkingThinking ErrorsErrorsErrorsErrors &&&& mentalmentalmentalmental modelsmodelsmodelsmodels Types of

ErrorsErrorsErrorsErrors &&&& mentalmentalmentalmental modelsmodelsmodelsmodels

Types of errors slips

Right intention, but failed to do it right

C

Changes in context of skilled behaviour can cause error

h

i

l

kill

,

i

na

tt

en

ti

t

on e c.

auses: poor p ys ca s

Mistakes

wrong intention

An incorrect understanding of a situation can cause errors

because humans tend to create mental models , based on

experience, which may differ from the actual situation

on experience, which may differ from the actual situation 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e
EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion Various theoriestheories ofof howhow emotionemotion worksworks James-Lange: emotion is our
EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion Various theoriestheories ofof howhow emotionemotion worksworks James-Lange: emotion is our

EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion

Various theoriestheories ofof howhow emotionemotion worksworks

James-Lange: emotion is our interpretation of a physiological response

to a stimuli

Cannon: emotion is a psychological response to a stimuli

Schacter-Singer: emotion is the result of our evaluation of our

physiological responses, in the light of the whole situation we are in

Emotion clearly involves both cognitive and physical responses to

stimuli

involves both cognitive and physical responses to stimuli 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P
EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.) The biological response to physical stimuli is called affect
EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.) The biological response to physical stimuli is called affect

EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.)

The biological response to physical stimuli is called affect

Affect influences how we respond to situations

positive creative problem solving negative narrow thinking

“Negative affect can make it harder to do even easy tasks; positive affect can make it easier to do difficult tasks”

(Donald Norman)

can make it easier to do difficult tasks” (Donald Norman) 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g
EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.) Implications for interface design stress will increase the
EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.) Implications for interface design stress will increase the

EmotionEmotionEmotionEmotion (cont.)(cont.)(cont.)(cont.)

Implications for interface design

stress will increase the difficulty of problem solving

relaxed users will be more forgiving of shortcomings in design

aesthetically pleasing and rewarding interfaces will increase positive affect

and rewarding interfaces will increase positive affect 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a
IndividualIndividualIndividualIndividual differencesdifferencesdifferencesdifferences The principles and properties
IndividualIndividualIndividualIndividual differencesdifferencesdifferencesdifferences The principles and properties

IndividualIndividualIndividualIndividual differencesdifferencesdifferencesdifferences

The principles and properties discussed apply to the majority of people

But humans are NOT the same at all

Differences should be taken into account in the design

E.g., Divide the users into the target groups

in the design E.g., Divide the users into the target groups 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a
PsychologyPsychologyPsychologyPsychology &&&& thethethethe designdesigndesigndesign ofofofof
PsychologyPsychologyPsychologyPsychology &&&& thethethethe designdesigndesigndesign ofofofof

PsychologyPsychologyPsychologyPsychology &&&& thethethethe designdesigndesigndesign ofofofof interactiveinteractiveinteractiveinteractive systemssystemssystemssystems

Some direct applications

e.g.

blue acuity is poor blue should not be used for important detail

However, correctcorrect applicationapplication generally requires understanding of context in psychology, and an understanding of particular experimental conditions

A lot of knowledge has been distilled in

guidelines (chap 7) cognitive models (chap 12) experimental and analytic evaluation techniques (chap 9)

experimental and analytic evaluation techniques (chap 9) 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman P a g e P a
SummarySummarySummarySummary InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels HumanHuman MemoryMemory ThinkingThinking
SummarySummarySummarySummary InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels HumanHuman MemoryMemory ThinkingThinking

SummarySummarySummarySummary

InputInput--outputoutput channelschannels HumanHuman MemoryMemory ThinkingThinking EmotionEmotion IndividualIndividual differencedifference PsychologyPsychology andand thethe designdesign ofof interactiveinteractive systemssystems

thethe designdesign ofof interactiveinteractive systemssystems 12/16/201112/16/2011 TheThe HumanHuman PagePage 3939