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1 Physical Quantities and Units

1.1 Base quantities andSI units 1.2 Dimensions of physical quantities

1 1

1.3 Scalars and vectors

1.4 Uncertainties in measurements 2 Kinematics 2.1 Linear motion

2 6 2

2.2 Projectiles 3 Dynamics 3.1 Newtons laws of motion

4 12 4

3.2 Linear momentum and its conservation

3.3 Elastic and inelastic collisions 3.4 Centre of mass 3.5 Frictional forces 4 Work, Energy and Power 4.1 Work

2 1 2 5 2

4.2 Potential energy and kinetic energy

4.3 Power 5 Circular Motion 5.1 Angular displacement and angular velocity

1 8 1

5.2 Centripetal acceleration

5.3 Centripetal force

6 Gravitation 6.1 Newtons law of universal gravitation 6.2 Gravitational field

10 1 2

6.3 Gravitational potential

6.4 Satellite motion in a circular orbit 6.5 Escape velocity 7 Statics

3 1 6

7.1 Centre of gravity 7.2 Equilibrium of particles 7.3 Equilibrium of rigid bodies

1 1 4

8 Deformation of Solids 8.1 Stress and strain 8.2 Force-extension graph and stress-strain graph

5 1 2

8.3 Strain energy 9 Kinetic Theory of Gases 9.1 Ideal gas equation 9.2 Pressure of a gas

2 14 2 2

9.3 Molecular kinetic energy

9.4 The r.m.s. speed of molecules

9.5 Degrees of freedom and law of equipartition of energy

9.6 Internal energy of an ideal gas

10 Thermodynamics of Gases 10.1 Heat capacities 10.2 Work done by a gas 10.3 First law of thermodynamics

14 2 1 5

10.4 Isothermal and adiabatic changes

11 Heat Transfer 11.1 Conduction

10 5

11.2 Convection 11.3 Radiation

1 3

11.4 Global warming SECOND TERM: ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 12 Electrostatics

12

12.1 Coulombs law 12.2 Electric field

2 3

12.3 Gausss law 12.4 Electric potential

4 3

13 Capacitors 13.1 Capacitance 13.2 Parallel plate capacitor 13.3 Dielectrics

12 1 2 2

13.4 Capacitors in series and in parallel 13.5 Energy stored in a charged capacitor 13.6 Charging and discharging of a capacitor

2 1 4

14 Electric Current 14.1 Conduction of electricity 14.2 Drift velocity 14.3 Current density 14.4 Electric conductivity and resistivity

2 2 2 4

15 Direct Current Circuits 15.1 Internal resistance 15.2 Kirchhoffs laws 15.3 Potential divider

14 1 4 2

15.4 Potentiometer and Wheatstone bridge

16 Magnetic Fields 16.1 Concept of a magnetic field 16.2 Force on a moving charge

18 1 3

16.3 Force on a current carrying conductor 16.4 Magnetic fields due to currents 16.5 Force between two current-carrying conductors 16.6 Determination of the ratio e/m

3 4

3 2

16.7 Hall effect 17 Electromagnetic Induction 17.1 Magnetic flux

2 18 1

17.2 Faradays law and Lenzs law

17.3 Self induction

17.4 Energy stored in an inductor 17.5 Mutual induction

2 2

18 Alternating Current Circuits 18.1 Alternating current through a resistor 3

18.2 Alternating current through an inductor

18.3 Alternating current through a capacitor

18.4 R-C and R-L circuits in series

THIRD TERM: OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES, OPTICS, AND MODERN PHYSICS

19 Oscillations 19.1 Characteristics of simple harmonic motion 19.2 Kinematics of simple harmonic motion

12 1 4

19.3 Energy in simple harmonic motion

19.4 Systems in simple harmonic motion 19.5 Damped oscillations 19.6 Forced oscillations and resonance 20 Wave Motion 20.1 Progressive waves

3 1 1 12 3

20.2 Wave intensity 20.3 Principle of superposition 20.4 Standing waves

2 1 4

20.5 Electromagnetic waves

21 Sound Waves

12

21.1 Propagation of sound waves

21.2 Sources of sound

21.3 Intensity level of sound 21.4 Beat

2 2

21.5 Doppler effect 22 Geometrical Optics 22.1 Spherical mirrors

4 8 3

22.2 Refraction at spherical surfaces 22.3 Thin lenses 23 Wave Optics 23.1 Huygenss principle 23.2 Interference

2 2 16 1 2

23.3 Two-slit interference pattern

23.4 Interference in a thin film 23.5 Diffraction by a single slit

2 2

23.6 Diffraction gratings

23.7 Polarisation

23.8 Optical waveguides 24 Quantum Physics 24.1 Photons

2 20 8

24.2 Wave-particle duality

24.3 Atomic structure

24.4 X-rays

24.5 Nanoscience 25 Nuclear Physics 25.1 Nucleus

1 14 4

25.2 Radioactivity

25.3 Nuclear reactions

Candidates should be able to: (a) list base quantities and their SI units:mass (kg), length (m), time (s), current (A),temperature (K) and quantity of matter (mol); (b) deduce units for derived quantities; (c) use dimensional analysis to determine the dimensions of derived quantities; (d) check the homogeneity of equations using dimensional analysis; (e) construct empirical equations using dimensional analysis; (f) determine the sum, the scalar product and vector product of coplanar vectors; (g) resolve a vector to two perpendicular components; (h) calculate the uncertainty in a derived quantity (a rigorous statistical treatment is not required); (i) write a derived quantity to an appropriate number of significant figures. (a) derive and use equations of motion with constant acceleration; (b) sketch and use the graphs of displacement-time, velocity-time and acceleration-time for the motion of a body with constant acceleration (c) solve problems on projectile motion without air resistance; (d) explain the effects of air resistance on the motion of bodies in air. (a) state Newtons laws of motion; (b) use the formula F=m dv/dt+v dm/dt for constant m or constant v only (c) state the principle of conservation of momentum, and verify the principle using Newtons laws of motion; (d) apply the principle of conservation of momentum; (e) define impulse as F dt ; (f) solve problems involving impulse; (g) distinguish between elastic collisions and inelastic collisions (knowledge of coefficient of restitution is not required); (h) solve problems involving collisions between particles in one dimension; (i) define centre of mass for a system of particles in a plane; (j) predict the path of the centre of mass of a two particle system; (k) explain the variation of frictional force with sliding force; (l) define and use coefficient of static function and coefficient of kinetic friction. (a) define the work done by a force dW = F ds ; (b) calculate the work done using a force displacement graph; (c) calculate the work done in certain situations,including the work done in a spring;

(d) derive and use the formula: potential energy change = mgh near the surface of the Earth; (e) derive and use the formula: kinetic energy 1/2mv2 (f) state and use the work-energy theorem; (g) apply the principle of conservation of energy in situations involving kinetic energy and potential energy; (h) derive and use the formula P = Fv ; (i) use the concept of efficiency to solve problems.

(a) express angular displacement in radians; (b) define angular velocity and period; (c) derive and use the formula v = r ; (d) explain that uniform circular motion has an acceleration due to the change in direction of velocity; (e) derive and use the formulae for centripetal acceleration a = v /r and a = r ; (f) explain that uniform circular motion is due to the action of a resultant force that is always directed to the centre of the circle; (g) use the formulae for centripetal force F = mv2 /r AND F = mr2 ; (h) solve problems involving uniform horizontal circular motion for a point mass; (i) solve problems involving vertical circular motions for a point mass (knowledge of tangential acceleration is not required). (a) state Newtons law of universal gravitation and use the formula F= GMm/R2 ; (b) explain the meaning of gravitational field; (c) define gravitational field strength as force of gravity per unit mass; (d) use the equation g =GM/R for a gravitational FIELD; (e) define the potential at a point in a gravitational field; (f) derive and use the formula V= - GM/R ; (g) use the formula for potential energy U = - GMm/R (h) show that U= mgr = mgh is a special case of U = -GMm/R FOR SITUATION NEAR THE surface of the Earth; (i) use the relationship g = -dV/dr; (j) explain, with graphical illustrations, the variations of gravitational field strength and gravitational potential with distance from the surface of the Earth; (k) solve problems involving satellites moving in a circular orbit in a gravitational field; (l) explain the concept of weightlessness; (m) derive and use the equation for escape velocity ve = sqrt(( GM/R) ve =sqrt( 2gR)
2 2 2

(a) define centre of gravity; (b) state the condition in which the centre of mass is the centre of gravity; (c) state the condition for the equilibrium of a particle; (d) solve problems involving forces in equilibrium at a point; (e) define torque as = r F; (f) state the conditions for the equilibrium of a rigid body; (g) sketch and label the forces which act on a particle and a rigid body; (h) use the triangle of forces to represent forces in equilibrium; (i) solve problems involving forces in equilibrium (a) define stress and strain for a stretched wire or elastic string; (b) sketch force-extension graph and stress-strain graph for a ductile material; (c) identify and explain proportional limit, elastic limit, yield point and tensile strength; (d) define the Youngs modulus; (e) solve problems involving Youngs modulus; (f) distinguish between elastic deformation and plastic deformation; (g) distinguish the shapes of force-extension graphs for ductile, (h) derive and use the formula for strain energy; (i) calculate strain energy from force-extension graphs or stress-strain graphs. (a) use the ideal gas equation pV = nRT ; (b) state the assumptions of the kinetic theory of an ideal gas; (c) derive and use the equation for the pressure exerted by an ideal gas p = 1/3 c2; d) state and use the relationship between the Boltzmann constant and molar gas constant k = R/NA (e) derive and use the expression for the mean translational kinetic energy of a molecule, 1/2 mc2 = 3/2 kT; (f) calculate the r.m.s. speed of gas molecules; (g) sketch the molecular speed distribution graph and explain the shape of the graph (description and explain the shape of the graph (description (h) predict the variation of molecular speed distribution with temperature; (i) define the degrees of freedom of a gas molecule; (j) identify the number of degrees of freedom of a monatomic, diatomic or polyatomic molecule at room temperature; (k) explain the variation in the number of degrees of freedom of a diatomic molecule ranging from very low to very high temperatures;

(l) state and apply the law of equipartition of energy; (m) distinguish between an ideal gas and a real gas; (n) explain the concept of internal energy of an ideal gas; (o) derive and use the relationship between the internal energy and the number of degrees of freedom. (a) define heat capacity, specific heat capacity and (b) use the equations: Q = C , Q = mc , Q = nCV,m and Q = nCp,m ; (c) derive and use the equation for work done by a gas W = pdV ; (d) state and apply the first law of thermodynamics Q = U +W ; (e) deduce the relationship U = nC T V,m from the first law of thermodynamics; (f) derive and use the equation p,m V,m C C = R; (g) relate CV,m and Cp,m to the degrees of freedom; (h) use the relationship =C p,m/ CV,m to identify the types of molecules; (i) describe the isothermal process of a gas; (j) use the equation pV = constant for isothermal changes; (k) describe the adiabatic process of a gas; (l) use the equations pV = constant and TV 1 = constant for adiabatic changes; (m) illustrate thermodynamic processes with p-V graphs; (n) derive and use the expression for work done in the thermodynamic processes. (a) explain the mechanism of heat conduction through solids, and hence, distinguish between conduction through metals and non-metals; (b) define thermal conductivity; (c) use the equation dQ/dt = -kA d /dx for heat conduction in one dimension; (d) describe and calculate heat conduction through a cross-sectional area of layers of different materials; (e) compare heat conduction through insulated and non-insulated rods; (f) describe heat transfer by convection; (g) distinguish between natural and forced convection; (h) describe heat transfer by radiation; (i) use Stefan-Boltzmann equation dQ/dt = e AT4 (j) define a black body; (k) explain the greenhouse effect and thermal pollution; (l) suggest ways to reduce global warming.

(a) state Coulombs law, and use the formula F= Qq/ 40r

(b) explain the meaning of electric field, and sketch the field pattern for an isolated point charge, an electric dipole and a uniformly charged surface; (c) define the electric field strength, and use the formula E =F/q (d) describe the motion of a point charge in a uniform electric field; (e) state Gausss law, and apply it to derive the electric field strength for an isolated point charge, an isolated charged conducting sphere and a uniformly charged plate; (f) define electric potential; (g) use the formula V= Q/ 40r2 (h) explain the meaning of equipotential surfaces; (i) use the relationship E = -dV/ dr (j) use the formula U = qV. (a) define capacitance; (b) describe the mechanism of charging a parallel plate capacitor; (c) use the formula C = Q/V to derive C= 0A/d for the capacitance of a parallel plate capacitor; (d) define relative permittivity r (dielectric constant); (e) describe the effect of a dielectric in a parallel plate capacitor; (f) use the formula C = r 0A/d (g) derive and use the formulae for effective capacitance of capacitors in series and in parallel; (h) use the formulae U = 1/2 QV , U = 1/2 Q2/C and U = 1/2 CV2 (i) describe the charging and discharging process of a capacitor through a resistor; (j) define the time constant, and use the formula = RC; (k) derive and use the formulae Q = Q0 (1 - e resistor
t/t - t/t

), V = V0 (1 - e
- t/t

t/t

), I= I0 e
- t/t

- t/t

for charging a capacitor through a

(l) derive and use the formulae Q= Q0 e , V= V0 e and I= I0 e for discharging a capacitor through a resistor; (m) solve problems involving charging and discharging of a capacitor through a resistor. (a) define electric current, and use the equation I = dQ/dt (b) explain the mechanism of conduction of electricity in metals; (c) explain the concept of drift velocity; (d) derive and use the equation I = Anev; (e) define electric current density and conductivity; (f) use the relationship J = E; g) derive and use the equation = ne2t/ m

(h) define resistivity, and use the formula = RA/l (i) show the equivalence between Ohms law and the relationship J = E; (j) explain the dependence of resistivity on temperature for metals and semiconductors by using the equation = ne2t/ m (k) discuss the effects of temperature change on the resistivity of conductors, semiconductors and superconductors.

(a) explain the effects of internal resistance on the terminal potential difference of a battery in a circuit; (b) state and apply Kirchhoffs laws; (c) explain a potential divider as a source of variable voltage; (d) explain the uses of shunts and multipliers; (e) explain the working principles of a potentiometer, and its uses; (f) explain the working principles of a Wheatstone bridge, and its uses; (g) solve problems involving potentiometer and Wheatstone bridge. (a) explain magnetic field as a field of force produced by current-carrying conductors or by permanent magnets; (b) use the formula for the force on a moving charge F = qv B; (c) use the equation F = qvB sin to define magnetic flux density B; (d) describe the motion of a charged particle parallel and perpendicular to a uniform magnetic field; (e) explain the existence of magnetic force on a straight current-carrying conductor placed in a uniform magnetic field; (f) derive and use the equation F = IlBsin ; (g) state Amperes law, and use it to derive the magnetic field of a straight wire = 0I / 2r ; (h) use the formulae B = 0NI /2r for a circular coil and B = 0nI for a solenoid; (i) derive and use the formula F = I I l/2d for the force between two parallel current-carrying conductors; (j) describe the motion of a charged particle in the presence of both magnetic and electric fields (for v, B and E perpendicular to each other); (k) explain the principles of the determination of the ratio e/m for electrons in Thomsons experiment (quantitative treatment is required); (l) explain Hall effect, and derive an expression for Hall voltage VH ; (m) state the applications of Hall effect. (a) define magnetic flux as = B A;

(b) state and use Faradays law and Lenzs law; (c) derive and use the equation for induced e.m.f. in linear conductors and plane coils in uniform magnetic fields; (d) explain the phenomenon of self-induction, and define self-inductance; (e) use the formulae E = - L dI / dt and LI = N ; (f) derive and use the equation for the self inductance L = 0 N2A / l ; of a solenoid (g) use the formula for the energy stored in an inductor U = 1/2 LI 2; (h) explain the phenomenon of mutual induction,and define mutual inductance; (i) derive an expression for the mutual inductance between two coaxial solenoids of the same cross-sectional area M= 0 Np Ns / l p (a) explain the concept of the r.m.s. value of an alternating current, and calculate its value for the sinusoidal case only (b) derive an expression for the current from V =V0 sint ; (c) explain the phase difference between the current and voltage for a pure resistor; (d) derive and use the formula for the power in an alternating current circuit which consists only of a pure resistor; (e) derive an expression for the current from V =V0 sint ; (f) explain the phase difference between the current and voltage for a pure inductor; (g) define the reactance of a pure inductor; (h) use the formula ; L X =L (i) derive and use the formula for the power in an alternating current circuit which consists only of a pure inductor; (j) derive an expression for the current from V =V0 sint ; (k) explain the phase difference between the current and voltage for a pure capacitor; (l) define the reactance of a pure capacitor; (m) use the formula X c=1 /C (n) derive and use the formula for the power in an alternating current circuit which consists only of a pure capacitor; (o) define impedance; (p) use the formula Z = /(R2 + (X L XC )2) ; (q) sketch the phasor diagrams of R-C and R-L circuits.

(a) define simple harmonic motion; (b) show that x = Asint is a solution of a = 2x; (c) derive and use the formula v = /( A2 x2) ; (d) describe, with graphical illustrations, the variation in displacement, velocity and acceleration with time; (e) describe, with graphical illustrations, the variation in velocity and acceleration with displacement; (f) derive and use the expressions for kinetic energy and potential energy; (g) describe, with graphical illustrations, the variation in kinetic energy and potential energy with time and displacement; (h) derive and use expressions for the periods of oscillations for spring-mass and simple pendulum systems; (i) describe the changes in amplitude and energy for a damped oscillating system; (j) distinguish between under damping, critical damping and over damping; (k) distinguish between free oscillations and forced oscillations; (l) state the conditions for resonance to occur. (a) interpret and use the progressive wave equation y = A sin ( t kx) or y = A cos ( t kx); (b) sketch and interpret the displacement-time graph and the displacement-distance graph; (c) use the formula = 2 x / ; (d) derive and use the relationship v = f ; (e) define intensity and use the relationship I A2 ; (f) describe the variation of intensity with distance of a point source in space; (g) state the principle of superposition; (h) use the principle of superposition to explain the formation of standing waves; (i) derive and interpret the standing wave equation; (j) distinguish between progressive and standing waves; (k) state that electromagnetic waves are made up of electrical vibrations E = E0 sin ( t kx) and magnetic vibrations B = B0 sin ( t kx); (l) state the characteristics of electromagnetic waves; (m) compare electromagnetic waves with mechanical waves; (n) state the formula c = 1 / /( 00 ) , and explain its significance; (o) state the orders of the magnitude of wavelengths and frequencies for different types of electromagnetic waves.

(a) explain the propagation of sound waves in air (b) interpret the equations for displacement y = y0 sin ( t kx) and pressure p = p0 sin(t - kt + /2) (c) use the standing wave equation to determine the positions of nodes and antinodes of a standing wave along a stretched string; (d) use the formula n= SQRT(T/) to determine the frequencies of the sound produced by different modes of vibration of the standing waves along a stretched string; (e) describe, with appropriate diagrams, the different modes of vibration of standing waves in air columns, and calculate the frequencies of sound produced, including the determination of end correction; (f) define and calculate the intensity level of sound; (g) use the principle of superposition to explain the formation of beats; (h) use the formula for beat frequency f = f1 f2; (i) describe the Doppler effect for sound, and use the derived formulae (for source and/or observer moving along the same line). (a) use the relationship f = r/2 for spherical mirrors; (b) draw ray diagrams to show the formation of images by concave mirrors and convex mirrors; (c) use the formula 1/u + 1/v = 1/f for spherical mirrors (d) use the formula n1/u + n2/v =( n2 - n1 )/ r for refraction at spherical surfaces; (e) use the formula n1/u + n2/v =( n2 - n1 )/ r to derive the thin lens formula 1/u + 1/v = 1/f and lensmakers equation 1/fm = (nl /nm -1)(1/r1 - 1/r2) (f) use the thin lens formula and lensmakers equation. (a) state the Huygenss principle; (b) use the Huygenss principle to explain interference and diffraction phenomena; (c) explain the concept of coherence; (d) explain the concept of optical path difference, and solve related problems; (e) state the conditions for constructive and destructive interferences; (f) explain Youngs two-slit interference pattern; (g) derive and use the formula l = ax/ D for the fringe separation in Youngs interference pattern; (h) explain the phenomenon of thin film interference for normal incident light, and solve related problems; (i) explain the diffraction pattern for a single slit; (j) use the formula sin = /a for the first minimum in the diffraction pattern for a single slit; k) use the formula sin = /a as the resolving power of an aperture; (l) explain the diffraction pattern for a diffraction grating;

(m) use the formula d sin = m for a diffraction grating; (n) describe the use of a diffraction grating to form the spectrum of white light, and to determine the wavelength of monochromatic light; (o) state that polarisation is a property of transverse waves; (p) explain the polarisation of light obtained by reflection or using a polariser; (q) use the Brewsters law tan B = n; (r) use the Maluss law I = I0 cos ; (s) explain the basic principles of fibre optics and waveguides. (t) state the applications of fibre optics and waveguides. (a) describe the important observations in photoelectric experiments; (b) recognise the features of the photoelectric effect that cannot be explained by wave theory, and explain these features using the concept of quantisation of light; (c) use the equation E = hf for a photon; (d) explain the meaning of work function and threshold frequency; (e) use Einsteins equation for the photoelectric effect hf = W + 1/2mv2 max (f) explain the meaning of stopping potential, and use eVs = 1/2mv
2 max 2

(g) state de Broglies hypothesis; (h) use the relation = h/p to calculate de Broglie wavelength; (i) interpret the electron diffraction pattern as an evidence of the wave nature of electrons; (j) explain the advantages of an electron microscope as compared to an optical microscope; (k) state Bohrs postulates for a hydrogen atom; (l) derive an expression for the radii of the orbits in Bohrs model; m)Derive the fomula En= - Z2 e4 m /8e02h2n2 for Bohrs model; (n) explain the production of emission line spectra with reference to the transitions between energy levels; (o) explain the concepts of excitation energy and ionisation energy; (p) interpret X-ray spectra obtained from X-ray tubes; (q) explain the characteristic line spectrum and continuous spectrum including min in X-rays; (r) derive and use the equation lmin = hc / eV (s) describe X-ray diffraction by two parallel adjacent atomic planes; (t) derive and use Braggs law 2d sin = m ; (u) explain the basic concept of nanoscience; (v) state the applications of nanoscience in electronics devices. (a) describe the discovery of protons and neutrons (experimental details are not required);

(b) explain mass defect and binding energy; (c) use the formula for mass-energy equivalence E = mc2; (d) relate and use the units u and eV; (e) sketch and interpret a graph of binding energy per nucleon against nucleon number; (f) explain radioactive decay as a spontaneous and random process; (g) define radioactive activity; (h) state and use the exponential law dN/dt = -lN for radioactive decay; (i) define decay constant; t (j) derive and use the formula N = N0e ; (k) define half-life, and derive the relation l = ln2/t 1/2 (l) solve problems involving the applications of radioisotopes as tracers in medical physics; (m) state and apply the conservation of nucleon number and charge in nuclear reactions; (n) apply the principle of mass-energy conservation to calculate the energy released (Q value) in a nuclear reaction; (o) relate the occurrence of fission and fusion to the graph of binding energy per nucleon against nucleon number; (p) explain the conditions for a chain reaction to occur; (q) describe a controlled fission process in a reactor; (r) describe a nuclear fusion process which occurs in the Sun.

1.1 Base quantities andSI units 1.2 Dimensions of physical quantities 1.3 Scalars and vectors 1.4 Uncertainties in measurements 10.1 Heat capacities 10.2 Work done by a gas 10.3 First law of thermodynamics 10.4 Isothermal and adiabatic changes 11.1 Conduction 11.2 Convection 11.3 Radiation 11.4 Global warming 12.1 Coulombs law 12.2 Electric field 12.3 Gausss law 12.4 Electric potential 13.1 Capacitance 13.2 Parallel plate capacitor 13.3 Dielectrics 13.4 Capacitors in series and in parallel 13.5 Energy stored in a charged capacitor 13.6 Charging and discharging of a capacitor 14.1 Conduction of electricity 14.2 Drift velocity 14.3 Current density 14.4 Electric conductivity and resistivity 15.1 Internal resistance 15.2 Kirchhoffs laws 15.3 Potential divider 15.4 Potentiometer and Wheatstone bridge 16.1 Concept of a magnetic field 16.2 Force on a moving charge 16.3 Force on a current carrying conductor 16.4 Magnetic fields due to currents 16.5 Force between two current-carrying conductors 16.6 Determination of the ratio e/m 16.7 Hall effect 17.1 Magnetic flux 17.2 Faradays law and Lenzs law 17.3 Self induction 17.4 Energy stored in an inductor 17.5 Mutual induction 18.1 Alternating current through a resistor 18.2 Alternating current through an inductor 18.3 Alternating current through a capacitor 18.4 R-C and R-L circuits in series

19.1 Characteristics of simple harmonic motion 19.2 Kinematics of simple harmonic motion 19.3 Energy in simple harmonic motion 19.4 Systems in simple 19.5 Damped oscillations 19.6 Forced oscillations and 2.1 Linear motion 2.2 Projectiles 20.1 Progressive waves 20.2 Wave intensity 20.3 Principle of superposition 20.4 Standing waves 20.5 Electromagnetic waves 21 Sound Waves 21.1 Propagation of sound 21.2 Sources of sound 21.3 Intensity level of 21.4 Beat 3.1 Newtons laws of motion 3.2 Linear momentum and its conservation 3.3 Elastic and inelastic collisions 3.4 Centre of mass 3.5 Frictional forces 4.1 Work 4.2 Potential energy and kinetic energy 4.3 Power 5.1 Angular displacement and angular velocity 5.2 Centripetal acceleration 5.3 Centripetal force 6.1 Newtons law of universal gravitation 6.2 Gravitational field 6.3 Gravitational potential 6.4 Satellite motion in a circular orbit 6.5 Escape velocity 7.1 Centre of gravity 7.2 Equilibrium of particles 7.3 Equilibrium of rigid bodies 8.1 Stress and strain 8.2 Force-extension graph and stress-strain graph 8.3 Strain energy 9.1 Ideal gas equation 9.2 Pressure of a gas 9.3 Molecular kinetic energy 9.4 The r.m.s. speed of molecules 9.5 Degrees of freedom and law of equipartition of energy 9.6 Internal energy of an ideal gas 10 Thermodynamics of Gases

11 Heat Transfer 12 Electrostatics 13 Capacitors 14 Electric Current 15 Direct Current Circuits 16 Magnetic Fields 17 Electromagnetic Induction 18 Alternating Current Circuits 19 Oscillations 20 Wave Motion 1 Physical Quantities and Units 2 Kinematics 3 Dynamics 4 Work, Energy and Power 5 Circular Motion 6 Gravitation 7 Statics 8 Deformation of Solids 9 Kinetic Theory of Gases harmonic motion resonance SECOND TERM: ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM sound THIRD TERM: OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES, OPTICS, AND MODERN PHYSICS waves

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1. 1. 1. 1. 10 10 10 10 11 11 11 11 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 17 17 17 17 17 18 18 18 18

2 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 10. 10. 10. 10. 11. 11. 11. 11. 12. 12. 12. 12. 13. 13. 13. 13. 13. 13. 14. 14. 14. 14. 15. 15. 15. 15. 16. 16. 16. 16. 16. 16. 16. 17. 17. 17. 17. 17. 18. 18. 18. 18.

3 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 18.1 18.2 18.3 18.4

1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 1

19 19 19 19 19 19 2. 2. 20 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 21 3. 3. 3. 3. 3. 4. 4. 4. 5. 5. 5. 6. 6. 6. 6. 6. 7. 7. 7. 8. 8. 8. 9. 9. 9. 9. 9. 9. 10

19. 19. 19. 19. 19. 19. 2.1 2.2 20. 20. 20. 20. 20. 21 21. 21. 21. 21. 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 4.1 4.2 4.3 5.1 5.2 5.3 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.2 7.3 8.1 8.2 8.3 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 10

19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 19.5 19.6 2.1 2.2 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 20.5 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 4.1 4.2 4.3 5.1 5.2 5.3 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 7.1 7.2 7.3 8.1 8.2 8.3 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20

1 1 Physical Quantities and Units 1.1 Base quantities andSI units 1.2 Dimensions of physical quantities 1.3 Scalars and vectors 1.4 Uncertainties in measurements 2 Kinematics 2.1 Linear motion 2.2 Projectiles 3 Dynamics 3.1 Newtons laws of motion 3.2 Linear momentum and its conservation 3.3 Elastic and inelastic collisions 3.4 Centre of mass 3.5 Frictional forces 4 Work, Energy and Power 4.1 Work 4.2 Potential energy and kinetic energy 4.3 Power 5 Circular Motion 5.1 Angular displacement and angular velocity 5.2 Centripetal acceleration 5.3 Centripetal force 6 Gravitation 6.1 Newtons law of universal gravitation 6.2 Gravitational field 6.3 Gravitational potential 6.4 Satellite motion in a circular orbit 6.5 Escape velocity 7 Statics 7.1 Centre of gravity 7.2 Equilibrium of particles 7.3 Equilibrium of rigid bodies 8 Deformation of Solids 8.1 Stress and strain 8.2 Force-extension graph and stress-strain graph 8.3 Strain energy 9 Kinetic Theory of Gases 9.1 Ideal gas equation 9.2 Pressure of a gas 9.3 Molecular kinetic energy 9.4 The r.m.s. speed of molecules 9.5 Degrees of freedom and law of equipartition of energy 9.6 Internal energy of an ideal gas 10 Thermodynamics of Gases 10.1 Heat capacities 6 1 1 2 2 6 2 4 12 4 3 2 1 2 5 2 2 1 8 1 2 5 10 1 2 3 3 1 6 1 1 4 5 1 2 2 14 2 2 2 2 3 3 14 2 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 3 3 3 3 3 3 4 4 4 4 5 5 5 5 6 6 6 6 6 6 7 7 7 7 8 8 8 8 9 9 9 9 9 9 9 1 1 1 1. 1. 1. 1. 2 2. 2. 3 3. 3. 3. 3. 3. 4 4. 4. 4. 5 5. 5. 5. 6 6. 6. 6. 6. 6. 7 7. 7. 7. 8 8. 8. 8. 9 9. 9. 9. 9. 9. 9. 10 10

2 1P 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2K 2.1 2.2 3D 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 4W 4.1 4.2 4.3 5C 5.1 5.2 5.3 6G 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 7S 7.1 7.2 7.3 8D 8.1 8.2 8.3 9K 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 10 10.

10.2 Work done by a gas 10.3 First law of thermodynamics 10.4 Isothermal and adiabatic changes 11 Heat Transfer 11.1 Conduction 11.2 Convection 11.3 Radiation 11.4 Global warming SECOND TERM: ELECTRICITY AND MAGNETISM 12 Electrostatics 12.1 Coulombs law 12.2 Electric field 12.3 Gausss law 12.4 Electric potential 13 Capacitors 13.1 Capacitance 13.2 Parallel plate capacitor 13.3 Dielectrics 13.4 Capacitors in series and in parallel 13.5 Energy stored in a charged capacitor 13.6 Charging and discharging of a capacitor 14 Electric Current 14.1 Conduction of electricity 14.2 Drift velocity 14.3 Current density 14.4 Electric conductivity and resistivity 15 Direct Current Circuits 15.1 Internal resistance 15.2 Kirchhoffs laws 15.3 Potential divider 15.4 Potentiometer and Wheatstone bridge 16 Magnetic Fields 16.1 Concept of a magnetic field 16.2 Force on a moving charge 16.3 Force on a current carrying conductor 16.4 Magnetic fields due to currents 16.5 Force between two current-carrying conductors 16.6 Determination of the ratio e/m 16.7 Hall effect 17 Electromagnetic Induction 17.1 Magnetic flux 17.2 Faradays law and Lenzs law 17.3 Self induction 17.4 Energy stored in an inductor 17.5 Mutual induction 18 Alternating Current Circuits 18.1 Alternating current through a resistor

1 5 6 10 5 1 3 1 12 2 3 4 3 12 1 2 2 2 1 4 2 2 2 4 14 1 4 2 7 18 1 3 3 4 3 2 2 18 1 8 5 2 2 3

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10 10 10 11 11 11 11 11 SE 12 12 12 12 12 13 13 13 13 13 13 13 14 14 14 14 14 15 15 15 15 15 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 16 17 17 17 17 17 17 18 18

10. 10. 10. 11 11. 11. 11. 11. SEC 12 12. 12. 12. 12. 13 13. 13. 13. 13. 13. 13. 14 14. 14. 14. 14. 15 15. 15. 15. 15. 16 16. 16. 16. 16. 16. 16. 16. 17 17. 17. 17. 17. 17. 18 18.

18.2 Alternating current through an inductor 18.3 Alternating current through a capacitor 18.4 R-C and R-L circuits in series THIRD TERM: OSCILLATIONS AND WAVES, OPTICS, AND MODERN PHYSICS 19 Oscillations 19.1 Characteristics of simple harmonic motion 19.2 Kinematics of simple harmonic motion 19.3 Energy in simple harmonic motion 19.4 Systems in simple harmonic motion 19.5 Damped oscillations 19.6 Forced oscillations and resonance 20 Wave Motion 20.1 Progressive waves 20.2 Wave intensity 20.3 Principle of superposition 20.4 Standing waves 20.5 Electromagnetic waves 21 Sound Waves 21.1 Propagation of sound waves 21.2 Sources of sound 21.3 Intensity level of sound 21.4 Beat 21.5 Doppler effect 22 Geometrical Optics 22.1 Spherical mirrors 22.2 Refraction at spherical surfaces 22.3 Thin lenses 23 Wave Optics 23.1 Huygenss principle 23.2 Interference 23.3 Two-slit interference pattern 23.4 Interference in a thin film 23.5 Diffraction by a single slit 23.6 Diffraction gratings 23.7 Polarisation 23.8 Optical waveguides 24 Quantum Physics 24.1 Photons 24.2 Wave-particle duality 24.3 Atomic structure 24.4 X-rays 24.5 Nanoscience 25 Nuclear Physics 25.1 Nucleus 25.2 Radioactivity 25.3 Nuclear reactions

3 3 3

1 1 1 T 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2 2

18 18 18 TH 19 19 19 19 19 19 19 20 20 20 20 20 20 21 21 21 21 21 21 22 22 22 22 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 23 24 24 24 24 24 24 25 25 25 25

18. 18. 18. THI 19 19. 19. 19. 19. 19. 19. 20 20. 20. 20. 20. 20. 21 21. 21. 21. 21. 21. 22 22. 22. 22. 23 23. 23. 23. 23. 23. 23. 23. 23. 24 24. 24. 24. 24. 24. 25 25. 25. 25.

12 1 4 2 3 1 1 12 3 2 1 4 2 12 2 2 2 2 4 8 3 2 2 16 1 2 2 2 2 3 2 2 20 8 2 4 5 1 14 4 6 4

4 1 Ph 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 2 Ki 2.1 2.2 3 Dy 3.1 3.2 3.3 3.4 3.5 4 Wo 4.1 4.2 4.3 5 Ci 5.1 5.2 5.3 6 Gr 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 7 St 7.1 7.2 7.3 8 De 8.1 8.2 8.3 9 Ki 9.1 9.2 9.3 9.4 9.5 9.6 10 T 10.1

10.2 10.3 10.4 11 H 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 SECO 12 E 12.1 12.2 12.3 12.4 13 C 13.1 13.2 13.3 13.4 13.5 13.6 14 E 14.1 14.2 14.3 14.4 15 D 15.1 15.2 15.3 15.4 16 M 16.1 16.2 16.3 16.4 16.5 16.6 16.7 17 E 17.1 17.2 17.3 17.4 17.5 18 A 18.1

18.2 18.3 18.4 THIR 19 O 19.1 19.2 19.3 19.4 19.5 19.6 20 W 20.1 20.2 20.3 20.4 20.5 21 S 21.1 21.2 21.3 21.4 21.5 22 G 22.1 22.2 22.3 23 W 23.1 23.2 23.3 23.4 23.5 23.6 23.7 23.8 24 Q 24.1 24.2 24.3 24.4 24.5 25 N 25.1 25.2 25.3