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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 1 of 60 Page ID #:4

Andr E. Jardini (State Bar No. 71335)

aej~kpclegai.com
2 K.L. Myles (State Bar No. 243272)
3

klm~kpclegal.com KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARK


550 North Brand Boulevard, Suite 1500

4 Glendale, California 91203-1922 Telephone: (818) 547-5000


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6 Joseph S. Farzam (State Bar No. 210817)

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JOSEPH F ARZAM LAW FIRM


1875 Century Park East, Suite 1345

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Los Angeles, CA 90067


Telephone: (310) 226-6890

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10 Attorneys for Plaintiff

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PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.


11

12
13

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT CENTRAL DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA

14

15 PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.,


16 17

CiVJ.2- 0430 1 ~wl (~R I


) COMPLAINT FOR PATENT

Plaintiff,
v.

18 U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC.,


19

Defendant.

20
21

INTRODUCTION
1.
Plaintiff PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC., fies this complaint for

22

patent

23 'nfringement and

jury demand against defendant U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC. ("the

24 efendant"), and alleges as follows:


25

PARTIES
2.
Plaintiff

26

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC. ("PI-NET") is a California

KNAPP, 27 orporation with its principal place of

business in Menlo Park, California. PI-NET has been

PETERSEN 28

& CLARKE provider of innovative software products, services and solutions that enable distributed
-1ILl7';'lLl I OQOOOlOOQ,1

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 2 of 60 Page ID #:5

1 ransaction processing and control over public and private networks, including, without

2 imitation, the Internet and the World Wide Web.


3

3.

The patents asserted here were issued to Dr. Lakshmi Arunachalam, PI-NET'S

4 ounder. The patents disclose the fundamental technology underlying Web commerce by
5 se of

Web applications. The patents describe a method and apparatus for providing realthe pioneering

6 ime, two-way transactional capabilities on the Web. The examples of

7 echnology in the patents encompass the transactions commonly entered into by defendant
8 ith their vehicle rental customers.

4.

Defendant U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC. ("U-HAUL" and/or

10 'defendant") is a Nevada corporation headquartered in Phoenix, Arizona. U-HAUL

11 perates as a truck rental company in the United States.

12 mRISDICTION AND VENUE


13

5.

This action arises under the patent laws of

the United States, Title 35, United

14 States Code, including 35 U.S.C. sections 271 and 281-285. This Court has jurisdiction

15 ver the action pursuant to 28 U.S.c. sections 1331 and 1338(a).


16

6.

Upon information and belief, defendant is subject to this Court's specific and

17 eneral personal jurisdiction due at least to their substantial business within the State of

18 alifornia and this judicial distrct, including:


19

(a)

Operating a vehicle rental business by use of Internet transaction

20 capabilities which infrnge the patents herein alleged in California and in this judicial

21 distrct; and
22
(b)

Regularly doing or soliciting business, engaging in other persistent

23 courses of conduct; and/or


24
(c)

Deriving substantial revenue from products and/or services provided to

25 individuals in California and in this judicial district.


26
KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

7.

Venue is proper in this

judicial district under 28 U.S.c. sections 1391(b) (c)

27 nd (d) and 28 U.S.c. section 1400(b).

28 III
-21475044.1 08000/00951

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 3 of 60 Page ID #:6

GENERAL ALLEGATIONS
8.

On November 16. 1999, the United States Patent and Trademark Office duly

3 nd legally issued United States Patent Number 5,987,500 (the '''500 patent") entitled 4 'Value-Added Network System For Enabling Real-Time, By-Directional Transactions On A

5 etwork" to Dr. Lakshmi Arnachalam. PI-NET is the assignee of all rights, title and
6 'nterest in the '500 patent including the right to recover damages for past infringement. A
7 opy of

the '500 patent is attached to the complaint as exhibit A.


9.

On January 31,2012, the United States Patent and Trademark Office duly and

9 egally issued United States Patent Number 8,108,492 (the '''492 patent") entitled "Web
10 pplication Network Portal" to Dr. Lakshmi Arunachalam. PI-NET is the assignee of all

11 ights, title and interest in the '492 patent, including the right to recover damages for past
12 'nfringement. A copy of

the '492 patent is attached to the complaint as exhibit B.

13 10. The '500 patent is valid and enforceable. 14 11. The '492 patent is valid and enforceable.

15 12. Defendant infringes the '500 patent directly, contrbutorily and/or by active
16 'nducement by conducting real-time two-way transactions from Web applications across the
17 eb concerning rental transactions for automobiles and/or trcks. Such capabilities include
18 reservations system, payment information, pickup and drop-off times and locations,
19 election of a class of

vehicle, and other detailed information. This real-time two-way

20 ansactional capability on the Web is described in the '500 patent and infringed by

21 efendant.
22

13. Defendant infringes the '492 patent directly, contributorily and/or by active

23 'nducement by conducting real-time two-way transactions from Web applications across the

24
25

eb concerning rental transactions for automobiles and/or trcks. Such capabilities include
reservations system, payment information, pickup and drop-off times and locations,

26 election of a class of vehicle, and other detailed information. This real-time two-way
KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

27 ransactional capability on the Web is described in the '492 patent and infringed by
28

-31475044.1 08000/0095 i

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 4 of 60 Page ID #:7

14.

The online capabilities of defendant U- HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC.


its

2 'nfringes the '500 and '492 patents, exemplified, in part, by the following screen shot of

3 pening screen which displays the reservation, location and vehicle selection applications of
4 he inventions of

the patents-in-suit:

6 7
8

u
'Trlreks Trailers Storae Boxes 8. packing supplies, lO9tiHs ~,_ " y "
REmtltrutksal1dtriters
Get rates,a'aialirity and deals in your area,

9 10
11

1 mill ;om
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Pidate Pikuplocon

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Self-storage

Moving

Labor

Moving supplies
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Po. dry ,~;S"''\

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18 19

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20

15.

Defendant's infringing acts have been without express or implied license by


PI-

21 I-NET, and/or in violation of

NET'S rights or claims for relief.

22 FIRST CLAIM, FOR RELIEF


23 INFRIGEMENT OF THE '500 PATENT
24
16.

PI-NET incorporates by reference each and every allegation in paragraphs 1

25 hrough 15, as though fully set forth herein.

26
KNAPP,

17.

Defendant has been and now is infringing, inducing the infringement of,
the '500 patent, literally and/or under the doctrine

27 nd/or contributing to the infringement of

& CLARKE f equivalence, by conducting real-time two-way transactions on the Web in connection
-41475044.1 08000/00951

PETERSEN 28

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 5 of 60 Page ID #:8

1 ith the rental of vehicles to their customers.


2
18.

PI-NET has not authorized the defendant to use its technology for transactions

3 ver the Web with its customers as covered by the '500 patent.
4
19.

As a result of defendant's infringing conduct, PI -NET has suffered and will

5 ontinue to suffer, substantial and irreparable damage. Upon information and belief,
6 efendant's infringement, induced infringement and/or its contributory infringement of

the

7 500 patent wil continue unless enjoined by this Court.

20. 21.

Defendant's infringement is and has been wilfuL.

Upon information and belief, to the extent defendant lacked actual knowledge
the '500

10 fthe '500 patent prior to this lawsuit, at a minimum they had constructive notice of

11 atent by operation of at least 35 U.S.c. section 287.


12

22.

PI-NET has no adequate remedy at law for defendant's infringement,


the '500 patent. Unless the

13 ontributory infringement, and/or induced infringement of

14 efendant's infringing activities are enjoined by this Court, PI-NET wil continue to suffer
15 onetary damages in an amount not yet determined.

16 SECOND CLAIM FOR RELIEF


17 INFRIGEMENT OF THE '492 PATENT
18

23.

PI-NET incorporates by reference each and every allegation in paragraphs 1

19 hrough 22, as though fully set forth herein.


20

24.

Defendant has been and now is infringing, inducing the infringement of,
the '492 patent, literally and/or under the doctrine

21 nd/or contributing to the infringement of

22 f equivalents, by conducting real-time two-way transactions on the Web in connection with


23 he rental of vehicles to their customers.

24
25

25. PI-NET has not authorized the defendant to use its technology for transactions
ver the Web with its customers as covered by the '492 patent.
26. . As a result of defendant's infringing conduct, PI-NET has suffered and will

26
KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

27
28

ontinue to suffer, substantial and irreparable damage. Upon information and belief,
efendant's infringement, induced infringement and/or its contributory infringement of

the

-51475044 1 0800010095 i

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 6 of 60 Page ID #:9

1 492 patent wil continue unless enjoined by this Court.

2 27. Defendant had knowledge of the '492 patent prior to filing of this complaint
3 ut has continued to engage in their infringing conduct nonetheless. Defendant's
4 . nfringement is and has been willfuL.

5 28. Upon information and belief, to the extent any defendant lacked actual
6 owledge of

the '492 patent prior to this lawsuit, at a minimum they had constructive
the '500 patent by operation of

7 otice of

at least 35 U.S.c. section 287.

29. PI-NET has no adequate remedy at law for defendant's infringement,

9 ontrbutory infringement, and/or induced infringement of the '492 patent. Unless the

10 efendant's infrnging activities are enjoined by this Court, PI-NET wil continue to suffer
11 onetary damages in an amount not yet determined.

12 PRAYER FOR RELIEF


13 WHEREFORE, PI-NET prays for judgment:
14
1.

That defendant has infrnged, contributorily infringed and/or actively induced

15 infringement of the '500 patent.


16

2.

That defendant has infringed, contributorily infringed and/or actively induced

17 infringement of the '492 patent.


18

3.

That defendant's infringement was willfuL.

19
20 of

4.
infringement of

That defendant be preliminarily and permanently enjoined from further acts


the '500 patent.

21

5.

That defendant be preliminarily and permanently enjoined from further acts

22 of infringement of the '492 patent.


23
6.

That PI-NET be awarded damages adequate to compensate for defendant's

24 infringement of the '500 patent.


25
7.

That PI-NET be awarded damages adequate to compensate for defendant's

26 infringement of the '492 patent.


KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

27

8.

That PI-NET be awarded prejudgment interest and post-judgment interest at

28 the maximum rate allowed by law.


-6i 475044 i 08000/0095 i

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 7 of 60 Page ID #:10

9.

That the Court declare this to be an exceptional case pursuant to 35 U.S.c.

2 section 285, and award PI-NET its attorneys' fees.


3 10. That the Court award PI-NET enhanced damages pursuant to 35 U.S.c.
4 section 284.

5 11. That the Court award a compulsory future royalty.


6 12. That PI-NET be awarded costs of

Court; and

7 13. That PI-NET be awarded such other and further relief as the Court deems just

and proper.

10
11

Dated: May 17,2012

KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARK


- ("

12
13

By:

14
15 16

Andr E. rdini K.L. Myles Attorneys for Plam iff PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

17
18

19

20
21

22
23

24
25

26
KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

27
28

-71475044.1 08000/00951

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 8 of 60 Page ID #:11

1 DEMAND FOR mRY TRIAL


2 Plaintiff

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC. hereby demands a tral by jury in this

3 matter.

,4
5

Dated: May 17,2012

KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

6 7
8

By:

Andr E. J ard i

~~

~
==

9 10
11

K.L. Myles Attorneys for Plaintiff PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

12
13

14
15

16

17
18 19

20
21

22
23

24
25

26
KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARKE

27
28

-81475044.1 08000100951

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 9 of 60 Page ID #:12

EXHIBIT A

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 10 of 60 Page ID #:13

1111111111111111111111111111111111111111111~I11111111111111111111111111111

USOO5987500A

United States Patent (19)


Arnachalam
(54) VALUE-ADDED NETWORK SYSTEM FOR

(11)

Patent Number:

5,987,500
*Nov. 16, 1999

(45)

Date of Patent:

ENABLING RETIME, BY-DIRCTIONAL TRSACTIONS ON A NEfWORK


Calif

(56)

References Cited

PUBLICATONS

"Coding witb HTML forms: HTML goes interactive",


Aidrew Davidson, Dr. Dobb's Journal, V20, N, Jun. 1995,

(751 Inventor: Lakshmi Arunachalam, Menlo Park,

p.16.
Primary Exaiiirier-Robert B. Harrell
AtTorney, Agent, or Firm-Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor &

(73) Asignee: Pi-Net (nternational, (nc., Menlo Park,


Calif.
( *) Notice:

Zafman LLP
(57)

This patent issue.d on a continued prosecution application filed under 37 CFR


L.53(d), and is subject to the twenty year

ABSTRACT

The presnt invention provides a method and apparatus for

patent term provisions of 35 U.S.c.


154(a)(2).
(21) Appl. No.: 08/879,958

providing real-time, two-way transactional capabilities on the Web. Specifically, one embodiment of the present invention dislose a confguable value-added network switch for

enablig real-time transactions on the World Wide Web. The


configurable value added network switch compries a sys(22) Filed: Jun. 20, 1997

tem for switching to a transactional application in response


to a user specification from a World Wide Web application,

Related U.S. Application Data


(62) Divisioo of application No. 08(700,726, Aug. 5, 1996, Pat. No. 5,778,178 Provisional application No. 60/00,634, Nov. 13, 1995.

(60) (51) (52) (58)

Int. CI.6 ..........._.......................................... G06F 13/00


U.s. Ci. .........___....____........................__................ 709/203

a system means for transmitting a transaction request from the transactional application, and a system for processing the transaction request. Additionally, a method for enabling object routing is disclosed, comprising the steps of creating a virtual information store containing inormation entries and attributes associating eacli of the information entries and
the attributes with an object identity, and asigning a unique network address to each of the object identities. Finally, a

Field of Search ..........__............ 364!DlG. 1, DIG. 2;

395/762,200.3,200.31, 200.32, 200.43,


681,682,683, 684,685, 689; 7091200,
201, 202, 203, 213, 301, 302, 303, 304,

method is diclosed for enabling service management of the value-added network service, to perform OAM&P functions
on the services network.
35 Claims, 13 Drawing Sheets

305; 710/200

USER CONNECTS TO WEe SEAVER

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OF POSvcAPPUTION OPTIO

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 11 of 60 Page ID #:14

U.S. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 1 of 13

5,987,500

CAR WEB

DEALER

SERVER

CAR DEALER

105

BROWSE
LINK

104

103

WEB BROWSER
102

http://www.car.com

FIG.

I A (PRIOR ART)

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 12 of 60 Page ID #:15

U.S. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 2 of 13

5,987,500

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 14 of 60 Page ID #:17

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

'Sheet 4 of 13

5,987,500

300 r OSIMODEL

APPLICATION

307
PRESENTATION

306
SESSION
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305

TRANSPORT

304

NETORK
303
DATA LINK

302
PHYSICAL
301

FIG. 3

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DATABASE l------------- : ~~B SEAVER SERVICE CARRIERS a MIDDLEWAR . HARDWARE. PROVIDERS . TELCO ~

BACK CHANNELS ~ OF~ICE SERVICE~ ~ : MIDDLEWARE WEB SITE INTERNET ~


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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

FIG. 4A \0

HARDWARE ~------------- 'ATM WALK.IN ~ : HARDWARE CASH REGISTER ~

: SYSTEM KIOSK 0

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: LIVE TELLER

OFFICE CHANNELS ga

BACK SERVICE

DATABASE L.------------ EXCHANGE : ~~B SERVER SERVICE CARRIERS ~

! MIDDLEWARE TRANSWEB WEB SITE INTERNET ~ a

! MIDDLEARE : ~~ ~~sE . HARDWARE PROVIDERS . TELCO :

---------- APPLICATIONS .

HOST4GL CALL CTR DIAL-UP . CATV ~------------TP i

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Filed 05/17/12 Page 15 of 60 Page ID #:18

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 16 of 60 Page ID #:19

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 6 of 13

5,987,500

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USER
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TRANSACTIONS BUTTON

50
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WEB

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POINT-OFSERVICE APPLICATIONS 505 510

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 17 of 60 Page ID #:20

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 7 of 13

5,987,500

1------------,
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POINT-OF- SERVICE APPLICATIONS


BANK (1) CAR DEALER (2) PIZZERIA (3)

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WEB PAGE 505

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WEB SERVER 104

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 18 of 60 Page ID #:21

U.S. Patent
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Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 8 of 13

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 19 of 60 Page ID #:22

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 9 of 13

5,987,500

BANK

JI

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WEB PAGE 104

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560

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 20 of 60 Page ID #:23

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 10 of 13

5,987,500

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 21 of 60 Page ID #:24

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 11 of 13

5,987,500

WEB

SERVER
(NODE)

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OBJECT

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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 22 of 60 Page ID #:25

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 12 of 13

5,987,500

r VAN SWITCH 520

SWITCHING BOUNDARY

SERVICE SERVICE
702 701

ZQ 704
MANAGEMENT APPLICATION

SERVICE SERVICE

FIG. 7
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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 23 of 60 Page ID #:26

u.s. Patent

Nov. 16, 1999

Sheet 13 of 13

5,987,500

USER CONNECTS TO WEB SERVER RUNNING AN EXCHANGE

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,.

S-802

USER ISSUES REQUEST FOR TRANSACTIONAL APPLICATION

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WEB SERVER HANDS OFF REQUEST TO EXCHANGE

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EXCHANGE ACTIVATES GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE TO PRESENT USER WITH LAST OF POSVC APPLICATION OPTIONS

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SWITCHING COMPONENT IN EXCHANGE

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SWITCHES USER TO
SELECTED POSVC APPLICATION

t
OBJECT ROUTING COMPONENT

EXECUTES USER'S REQUEST

l-814

l
DATA RETRIEVED FROM DATA REPOSITORY VIA TMP

l-816

l
USER CONTINUES TRANSACTION (OPTIONAL) OR ENDS TRANSACTION

~81

C FIG. 8

(7-~r

1 ~

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 24 of 60 Page ID #:27

5,987,500
1 VALUE-ADDED NETWORK SYSTEM FOR

2
application scripts must be created for each account, as
illustrated in FIG. lB. The ban thus has to create individual scripts for each of its services to offer usrs access to these
servces. User 100 can then interact in a liited fashion with

ENABliNG RE-TIME, BY-DIRCTIONAL


TRNSACTlONS ON A NETWORK
RELATD APPLICATONS
This is a divisional of application Ser. No. 08nOO,726, filed Aug. 5, 1996, now US. Pat. No. 5,778,178,
FIELD OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates 10 the area of Internet communications. Specifcally, Ihe present invention relates
to a method and apparatus for configurable value-added

these individual applications. Creatig and managing indi-

vidual CGI scripts for each service is not a viable solution for merchants with a large number of services. As the Web expands and electronic commerce becomes
more desirable, the need increases for robust, real-time,

10 bi-directional transactional capabilities on the Web. A true


real-time, bi-directional transaction would allow a user to connect to a variety of services on the Web, and perform real-time transactions on those services. For example, although user 100 can browse car dealer Web page 105

network switching and object routing.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVNTION


With the Internet and the World Wide Web ("the Web") evolving rapidly as a viable consumer medium for electronic

15 today, the user cannot purchase the car, negotiate a car loan or perform other types of real-time, two-way transactions

that he can perform with a live salesperson at the car


dealership. Ideally, user 100 in FIG. 1A would be able to access car dealer Web page ios, select specifc transactions
20 that he desires to perform, such as purchase a car, and

commerce, new on-line services are emerging to fill the


needs of on-line users. An Internet user today can browse on

perform the purchase in real-time, with two-way interaction the Web via the use of a Web browser. Web browsers are capabilities. CGI applications provide user 100 with a limsoftware interfaces that run on Web clients to allow access ited ability for two-way interaction with car dealer Web page to Web servers via a simple user interface. A Web user's 105, but due to the lack of interaction and management capabilities today from a Web browser are, however, extremely limited. The user can perform one-way, browse- 25 between the car dealer and the bank, he wil not be able to

only interactions. Additionally, the user has limited


"deferred" transactional capabilities, namely electroDc mail
"deferred transactions" because the consumer's request is 30
not proces.'ed until the e-mail is received, read, and the

obtain a loan and complete the purchase of the car via a CGI

application. The ability to complete robust real-time, twoway transactions is thus not truly available on the Web today.

(e-mail) capabilities. E-mail capabilities are referred to as

SUMMARY OF 1HE INVNTON


It is iherefore an object of the present invention to provide a method and apparatu for providing real-time, two-way transactional capabilities on the Web. Specifically, one
transactions on the World Wide Web. The configurable value added network switch compries means for switching to a transactional application in response to a user specifcation from a World Wide Web application, means for transmitting

person or system reading the e-mail executes the transaction. This lraiisaction is thus not performed in real-time.

HG. lA ilustrates typical user interactions on the Web

today. User 100 sends out a request from Web browser 102 35 embodiment of the present invention discloses a con figin the form of a universal resource locator (URL) 101 in the urable value-added network switch for enabling real-time

following manner: http://ww.car.com. URL 101 is procesd by Web browser 102 that determines the URL corresponds to car dealer Web page ios, on car dealer Web
server 104. Web browser 102 then establihes browse link 40

103 to car dealer Web page ios. User 100 can browse Web
page LOS and select "hot li" to jump to other locations in

Web page lOS, or to move to other Web pages on the Web.

This interaction is typically a browse-only interaction.


Under limited circumstances, the user may be able to fill out 45 a form on car dealer Web page ios, and e-mail the form to car dealer Web server 104. This interaction is stil strictly a one-way browse mode communications link, with the e-mail providing limited, deferred transactional capabilities.
Under liited circumstances, a user may have access to 50

a transaction request from the tranctional application, and means for procesing the transaction request. According to another aspect of the present invention, a

method and apparatus for enablig objec routing on the World Wide Web is dislosed. The method for enabling
object routing comprises the steps of creatig a virtal

information store containing information entries and


attributes, associating each of the information entres and the

aitributes with an objeci identity, and assigning a unique


network address to each of the object identities.
Other objects, feanires and advantages of the present

two-way servces on the Web via Common Gateway Inter-

face (CGI) applications. CGI is a standard interface for


running external programs on a Web server. It alows Web servers to .create documents dynamically when the server receives a request from the Web browser. When the Web 55 server receives a request for a document, the Web server dynamically executes the appropriate CGI script and transmits the output of the execution back to the requesting Web browser. This interaction can ihus be termed a "two-way" transaction. It is a severely limited transaction, however, 60 because each CGi application is customized for a particular type of application or service.

invention wil be apparent from the accmpanying drawings and from the detailed description.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features and advantages of the presnt invention will


be apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the

detailed description or the present invention as set forth below,


FIG. lA is an illustration of a current user's browse

For example, as illustrated in FIG. IB, user 100 may


access bank ISO's Web server and altempt to perform
,.hDr-i~;nn ..r.,.....n! ii;"" .,..,. 1,..... ..,.,.,...~i Ii;A ,-... ,t~.. \1.1..1.. rrT

capabilities on the Web via a Web browser. FIG. IB is an illustration of a current user's capabilities

to perform limited transactions on the Web via eGI appli. transactions on checking account 152 and to make a pay- 65 cations. ment on loan account 154. In order for user 100 to access 2 illustrates a iypical computer sysiem on which the FIG.
~_~_..~I ;r,."..~':"""" ...... 1.."' ...:i:.~....

.y ,~/

'l %

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 25 of 60 Page ID #:28

5,987,500
3
AG.3 ilustrates the Open Systems Interconnection (OS!)
ModeL.

4
and instructions. A data storage medium 208 contaimng digital information is configured to operate with mas storage device 207 (0 allow processr 202 access LO the digital

AG. 4A ilustrates conceptually the user value chain as it


exists today.

information on data storage medium 208 via bus 201.

Processr 202 may be any of a wide variety of general FIG. 4B illustrates one embodiment of the present inven- 5 purose processors or microprocessors such as the Pention.

FIG. SA ilustrates a user accessing a Web server including one embodiment of the present invention.

tium microprocessor manufactured by InteFM Corporation or the Motorola 68040 or Power PCTM brand microprocessr manufactured by manufactured by Motorola

FIG. 5B illustrates the exchange component according to 10 Corporation. It wil be apparent to those of ordinary skill in one embodiment of the present nvention. the art, however, that other varieties of processors may also be used in a particular computer system. Display device 205 FIG. 5C illustrates an example of a point-of-service may be a liquid crystal device, cathode ray tube (CR1), or (POSvc) application lit. otber suitable display device. Mass storage device 207 may AG. 5D ilustrates a user selecting a bank POSvc appliIS be a conventional hard disk drive, floppy disk drive, cation from the POSvc application list. CD-ROM drive, or other magnetic or optical data storage FIG. 5E illustrates a three-way transaction accordig to device for reading and writing information stored on a hard one embodiment of the present invention. disk, a floppy disk, a CD-ROM a magnetic tape, or other FIG. 6A ilustrates a value-added network (VAN switch. magnetic or optical data storage medium. Data storage FIG. 6B illustrates the hierarchical addressing tree strc- 20 medium 208 may be a hard disk, a floppy disk, a CD-ROM, ture of the networked objects in DOLSIBs. a magnetic tape, or other magnetic or optical data storage medium. FIG. 7 ilustrates conceptually the layered architecture of a VAN switch. !n general, processor 202 retrieves processing instructions and data from a data storage medium 208 using mass storage FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating one embodiment of
the present invention.

25 device 207 and downloads this information into random


access memory

203 for execution. Processor 202, then

DETAlLED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

executes an instruction stream from random access memory

context of the present specifcation includes conventional

The present invention relates to a method and apparatus 30 flow of instructions executed by procesr 202. Equivalent for configurable value-added network switching and object input device 206 may also be a pointing device such as a routing and management. "Web browset' as usd in the conventional mouse or trackball device. The results of ths

203 or read-only memory 204. Command selections and information input at input device 206 are used to direct the

Web browsers such as NCSA Mosaic from NCSA and processing execution are then displayed o.n display device 205. Netscape Mosaic from Netscape. The present invention 35 The preferred embodiment of the present invention is is independent of the Web browser being utilized and the
user can use any Web browser, without modifcations to the Web browser. In the following detailed description, numerimplemented as a software module, which may be executed
on a computer system such as computer system 200 in a

conventional manner. Using well known techniques, the thorough understanding of the present invention. It wil be 40 application software of the preferred embodiment is stored

ous specific details are set fortli in order to provide a

apparent to one of ordinar skil in the art, however, that


these specifc details need not be used to practice the present

on data storage medium 208 and subsequently loaded into and executed within computer system 200. Once initiated,
the softare of the preferred embodiment operates in the

invention. In other instances, well-known strctures, inter-

faces and proceses have not been shown in detail in order


not to unnecessriy obsure the present invention.
45

manner desribed below.

FIG. 2 ilustrates a typical computer system 200 in which the present invention operates. The preferred embodiment of
the present invention is implemented on an mMTM Personal

FlG.3 ilustrates the Open Systems Interconnection (OSI) reference modeL. OS! Model 300 is an international standard that provides a common basis for the coordination of standards development, for the purpos of systems interconnec-

tion. The present invention is implemented to function as a Computer manufactured by IBM Corporation of Armonk, N.Y. Alternate embodiments may be implemented on a 50 routing switch within the "application layet' of the OSI

Macintosh computer manufactured by Apple


Computer, Incorprated of Cupertino, Calif. It wil be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art that other alternative
computer system architecnires may also be employed.

modeL. The model defines seven layers, with each layer


the use of a protocol. Physical

communicating with its peer layer in another node through


layer 301 is the lowest layer,

with responsibility to transmit unstructured bits across a


link. Data li layer 302 is the next layer above physical

layer 301. Data link layer 302 transmits chunk across the 2 comprise a bus 201 for communicating information, a link 2.d deals with problems lie checksumming to detect procesr 202 coupled with the bus 201 for processing d:ita corrptioD, orderly coordination of the use of shared information, main memory 203 coupled with the bus 201 for media and addressing when multiple systems are reachable, storing information and instructions for the processor 202, a read-only memory 204 coupled with the bus 201 for storing 60 Network bridges operate within data link layer 302. Network layer 303 enables any pair of systems in the static information and instructions for the processor 202, a network 10 communicate wiih each other. Nerwork layer 303 display device 205 coupled with ihe bus 201 for displaying
information for a computer user, an input device 206

In general, such computer systems as ilustrated by FlG. 55

coniains hardware units such as routers, that handle routing,

packet fragmenraiion and reassembly of packets, Transport coupled with the bus 201 for communicating information aod command selections to the processr 202, and a mass 65 layer 304 establishes a reliable communicaiion stre:im between a pair of systems, dealing wiili errors such as lost storagc device 207, such as a magnetic disk and associated

. ," .

24

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 26 of 60 Page ID #:29

5,987,500
5
tation. Session layer 305 offers services above the simple

6
example, user 100 can select button 500, entitled "Transctions" and Web server 104 hands user 100's request over to the exchange component. The button and the title can be replaced by any mechanism that can instruct a Web server to
hand over the consumer's request to the exchange component.

communication stream provided by transport Layer 304. These services include dialog control and chaining. Presentation layer 306 provides a means by whicb OSI compliant applications can agree on representations for data. Finally, application layer 307 includes services such as fie transfer,
access and mal!agement services (FTAM)

, c1ectrocic mail

and virtual terminal (VI services, Application layer 307

FIG. 5B illustrates exchange 501. Exchange 501 comprises Web page 505 and point-of-service (POSvc) applications 510. Exchange SOl als conceptually incluGes a switching component and an object routing component

provides a means for appLication programs to access tbe OSI

environment. As described above, tbe present invention is 10


implemented to function as a routing switch in application layer 307. Application layer routing creates an open channel

are transactional applications, namely applications that are designed to incorporate and take advantage of the capabilifor the management, and the selective flow of data from ties provided by the present invention. Although exchange remote databases on a network. 501 is depicted as residing on Web server 104, the exchange 15 can also reside on a separate computer system that resides on A Overview FIO. 4A ilustrates conceptually the user value chain as it the Internet and has an Internet address. Exchange 501 may existS today. The user value chain in FIG. 4A depicts the also include operator agent 503 that interacts with a man-

(descnbed in more detail below). POSvc applications 510

types of transactions that are performed today, and the


channels through which the transactions are performed. A
"transaction" fr the purposes of the present invention 20

agement manager (described in more detail below).


Exchange 501 creates and allows for the management (or
distributed control) of a service network, operating within the boundaries of an IP-based facilties network. Thus,
exchange 501 and a management agent component,

includes any type of commercial or other type of interaction


that a usr may want to perform. Examples of transactions
include a deposit into a bank account, a request for a loan

described in more detail below, under the headings "VAN

from a bank, a purchase of a car from a car dealership or a


purchase of a car with fiancing from a bank. A

Switch and Object Routing," together perform the


switching, object routing, application and service management functions according to one embodiment of the present invention.

large variety 25

of other transactions are also possible.

A typical usr transaction today may involve user 100

Exchange 501 processes the consumer's request and walkg into a bank or driving up to a teller machine, and displays an exchange Web page 505 that includes a list of interacting with a live bank teller, or automated teller machine (ATM) software applications. Alternatively, user 30 POSvc applications 510 accessible by exchange 501. A POSvc application is an application that can execute the type 100 can perform the same transaction by using a personal
computer (PC), activating application software on his PC to

component. One embodiment of the present invention supports HyperText Markup Laguage as the graphical user interface component. Virtual Reality Markup Language and Java are also supported by thi embodiment. A varety of provide only limited two-way capabilties, as desribed other graphical user interface standards can also be utiized above. Thus, due to this lack of a robust mechanism by to implement the graphical user interface. which real-time Web transactions can be performed, the An example of a POSvc application list is ilustrated in bank is unable to be a true "Web merchant," namely a 40 FIG. 5C. User 100 can thus select from POSvc applications merchant capable of providing complete transactional serBank 510(1), Car Dealer 510(2) or Pizeria 510(3). Numervices on the Web. ous other POSvc applications can als be included in this According to one embodiment of the present invention, as selection. If user 100 desires to pedorm a number of bankng ilustrated in FIG. 4B, each merchant that desires to be a Web merchant can provide real-time transactional capabil- 45 transactions, and selects the Bank application, a Ban POSvc application wil be activated and presented to usr ties to usrs who desire to access the merchants' services via

accss his bank account, and dialing into the bank via a modem line. If user 100 is a Web user, however, there is no current mechanism for performing a robust, real-time trans- 35 action with the bank as illustrated in FIG. 4A. COL scripts

of transaction that the user may be interested in performing. The POSvc list is displayed via the graphical usr interface

the Web. This embodiment includes a service network


runing on top of a facilities network, namely the Internet,

100, as ilustrated in FIG. 5D. For the purposes of


ilustration, exchange 501 in FIG. SD is

shown as runnin on

a different computer system (Web server 104) frm the application. users are described as utilzing PC's to access 50 computer systems of the Web merchants running POSvc

the Web or e-mail networks. For the purposes of this

the Web via Web server "switching" sites. (Switching is described in more detail below). Users may also utilize other personal devices such as network computers or cellular devices to access the merchants' services via appropriate
network computer sites and cellular provider sites, Five

applications (computer system 200). Exchange 501 may,

however, also be on the same computer system as one or more of the computer systems of the Web merchants.
Once Bank POSvc application 510 has been activated,

switching sites. These switching sites include non-Weh 55 user 100 will be able to connect to Bank services and utilize

the application to perform banking transactions, thus access-

ing data from a bast or dala repository 575 in the Bank components interact to provide this service network "Back Offce." The Bank Back Offce comprises legacy an exchange, an operator agent, a functionality, namely databases and other data repositories that are utilized by the management agent, a management manager and a graphical user interface. Al five components are described in more 60 Bank to store ilS data. Ths connection between user 100 and

detail below.

As ilustrated in FlG. 5A, user 100 accesses Web server 104. Having accessed Web server 104, user 100 can decide
that he desires to perform real-time transactions. When Web
server 104 receives user 100's indication that he desires to 65

Bank services is managed by exchange 501. As illustrated in FIG. 5D, ODce the connection is made between Bank POSvc

application 510(1), for example, and Bank services, an


operator agcnt 00 Web server 104 may be activated to ensure the availability of distribuied functions and capabilities.
;, ""...ilrl ia.,~ In r\~l-i~r ;Ic ,.I~pnic rn ,hie ('v~mnlp if rl-:nL.
Each Wcb merchant may choose the iypes of services ihai

perform real-iimc transactions, the request is handed over 10


____1___.__ ____.__.__. ~ri..~ s:_~_~ '11~1~ _~~"... iflt; t.-,....

/S .:~-

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 27 of 60 Page ID #:30

5,987,500
7
decided to include in their POSvc application acce to

8
identity. The networked object identity identifies the information entries and attributes in the DOLSIB as individual networked objects, andeacb networked object is assigned an
(nternet address. The Internet address is asigned based on the (P address of the node at which !he networked object resides. r;or example, in FIG. SA, Web server 104 is a node on the

checking and savings accounts, user 100 will be able to


perform real-time transactions against his checkig and

savings accounts. Thus, if user 100 moves $500 from his


checking account into his savings account, the transction 5

will be performed in real-time, in the same manner the


transaction would have been performed by a live teller at the

bank or an Ar machine. Therefore, unlike his prior access to bis account, user 100 now bas the capability to do more than browse his bank account. The ability to perform these 10 types of robust, real-time transactions from a Web client is
a signifcant aspect of the present invention.

Internet, with an IP address. All networked object assciated with Web server 104 will therefore be assigned aii Internet address based on tbe Web server 104's IP address. These networked objects thus "brancb" from the node, creating a

hierarchical tree structure. The Internet addres for each

networked object in the tree essentially establihes the POSvc application 510(1). For example, Bank may agree individual object as an "IP-reachable" or accesible node on with Car dealership to allow Bank cutomers to purchase a 15 the Internet. "IP utilizes this Internet address to uniquely car from that dealer, request a car loan from Dank and have identify and access the object from the DOLSIB. FIG. 6B the entire transaction performed on the Web, as ilustrated in ilustrates an example of this hierarchical addressing tree FIG. SE. In this instance, the transactions are not merely strctue. two-way, between the Wier and Bank, biit three-way, Eacb object in tbe DOLSIB bas a name, a syntax and an amongst the consumer, Bank and Car dealership. According 20 encoding. The name is an administratively assigned object to one aspect of the present invention, this three-way transID specifying aD object type. The object type together with action can be expanded to noway transactions, where n the object instance serves to uniquely identify a specific represents a predetermined number of merchants or other instantiation of the object. For example, if object 610 is service providers who have agreed to cooperate to provide information about models of cars, tben one instance of !hat services to users. The present invention therefore allows for 25 object would provide user 100 with information about a "any-to-any" communication and transactions on the Web, specific model of tbe car while anotber instance would thus facilitating a large, flexible variety of robust, real-time provide information about a diferent model of the car. The transactions on the Web. syntax of an object type defines the abstract data structure Finally, Bank may also decide to provide intra-merchant corresponding to that object type. Encoding of objects or intra-bank services, together with the inter-merchant 30 defines how the object is represented by the object type services described above. For example, if Bank creates a syntax while being transmitted over the network. POSvc application for use by the Bank Payroll department, C. Management and Administration Bank may provide its own employees with a means for As described above, exchange 501 and management agent submitting timecards for payroll processing by the Bank's 601 together constitute a VAN switch. FIG. 7 illustrates Human Resources (HR) Department. An employee selects 3S conceptually the layered architecture of VAN switch 520. the Bank HR POSvc application, and submits his timecard. Specifcally, boundary service 701 provides the interfaces The employee's timecard is procesd by accessing the between VAN switch 520, the Internet and the Web, and employee's payroll information, stored in the Bank's Back multi-media end user devices such as PCS, televisions or
Bank can also decide to provide other types of services in
Offce. The trausaclIon is thus proced in real-time, and the telephones. Boundary service 701 also provides the interface employee receives his paycheck immediately. 40 to the on-line service provider. A user can connect to a local B: Van Switching and Object Routing application, namely one accessible via a local VAN switch,
As descibe above, exchange SOl and management agent

or be routed or "switched" to an application accessible via


a remote VAN switch. Switching servce 702 is an OSI application layer switch. SWitching service 702 thus represents the core of the VAN switch. It performs a number of tasks including the routing

601, ilustrated in FIG. 6A, together constitute a value-added

network (VAN switch. These two elements may take on


diferent roles as necessary, including peer-to-peer, client- 45

server or master-slave roles. Management manager 603 is ilustrated as residing on a separate computer system on the Internet. Management manager 603 can, however, also reside on the same machine as exchange 501. Management manager 603 interacts with the operator agent 503 reiding 50
on exchange 501.

of user connections' to remote VAN switches, described in the paragraph above, multiplexing and prioritization of

requests, and flow control. Switching servce 702 also


faciltates open systems' connectivity with both the Internet
(a public swtched network) and private networks including back ,offce networks, such as bang networks. IDterconnected application layer switches form the applicatioD Det-

VAN swtch 520 provides multi-protocol object routing,

depending upon the specifc VAN services chosen. Ths


multi-protocol object routing is provided via a proprietary
incoIporates the same security featues as the traditional

work backbone. These switches are one significant aspect of


Management service 703 contains tools such as Information Management Services (lMS) and application Network

protocol, TransWeb Management Protocol (IP). TMP 5S the presnt invention.


Simple Network Management ProtoL)l, SNMP. It also

allows for tbe integration of other traditional security


and distributed on-line service information bases

ManagemeGt Services (NMS). These iocls are used by the end users to manage network resources, including VAN mechanims, including RSA security mechanisms. One embodiment of tbe present invention utilizes TMP 60 switches. Management service 703 also provides applica-

(DOLSlBs) 0 perform object routing. Alternatively, TMP can incorporate s-HTf, Javan" the WinSock API or ORB witb DOLSfBs to perform object routing. DOLSIBs are

tions tbat perform Operations, Administration, Maintenance & Provisioning (OAM&P) funciions. Tbese OAM&P functions include security management, fault management, con, figuration management, performance management and bil-

virtual information stores optimized for networkig. All 65 ing management. Providing OAM&P functions for applications in ihis manner is anotber significant aspect or information cntries and attributes in a DOLSIB virtual

,/

OZ(t

/ /,.~,

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 28 of 60 Page ID #:31

5,987,500
9
Finally, application service 704 contains application programs that deliver customer services. Application service

10
transaciional application further includes means for creating a transaction link betweeo said network application and said
tranactional application.

704 includes POSvc applications such as Bank POSvc


retrieval management, directory services, data staging,
conferencing, fiancial services, home bankg, nsk management and a vanety of otber vertical services. Each VAN service is designed to meet a particular set of requirements

descnbed above, and illustrated in FIG. 6A. Other examples 4. The configurable value-added network switch as of VAN services include multi-media messaging, archivaV 5 claimed in claim 2 wherein said means for receiving said
usr specification further comprises:

means for presnting said user with a lit of transactional


applications, each of said transactional application

related to perfonnance, reliability, maintenance and ability 10 to handle expected traffc volume. Depcnding on tbc type of service, the characteritics of the network elements will

being asciated with a particular value-added network


service provider; and

difer. VAN service 704 provides a number of functions including communications services for both management
and end usrs of the network and control for the usr over 15

means for submitting said user specification according to a user's selection of said transactional application from
said list of transaciional applications.

S. The configurable value-added network switch as

the user's environment.

claimed in claim 1 wherein said means for processing said


transaction request further compriss means for coupling
said means for tranmitting to a host means.

FIG. 8 is a flow diagram illustrating One embodiment of

the present invention. A user connects to a Web server


runing an exchange component in step 802. In step 804, the
usr isues a request for a transactional application, and the 20

6. The configurable value-added network switch as


claimed in claim 5 wherein said host means contains data

to an exchange in step 806. The exchange activates a graphical user interface to present user with a list of POSvc application options in step 808. In
web server bands off the request

corresponding to said transaction request.


7. The configurable value-added network switch as
claimed in claim 1 wherein said value-added network service prav'idees cooperating to provide said plurality of

step 810, the user makes a selection from the POSvc

application list. In step 812, the switching component in the 25


exchange switches the user to the seLected POSvc

transactional services to users.


8. The configurable value-added network switch as
claimed in claim I' further

application, and in step 814, the object routing component


executes the user's request. Data is retrieved from the

comprising means for controlling

appropnate data repository via TMP in step 816, and fially, the user may optionally continue tbe transaction in step 818 30
or end the transaction.

and priontiZing multiple transaction requests initiated by various users.


9. The configurable value-added network switch as

Thus, a configurable value-added network switching and

claimed in claim 1 further compnsing means for providing security management, fault management, configuration
management, performance management and biling man-

object routing method and apparatu is disclosed. These specifc arrangements and methods described herein are

agement.
10. A method for confguring a value-added network

merely ilustrative of the principles of the present invention. 35 switch for enabling real-time transactions on a network, said Numerous modications in form and detail may be made by method for configunng said value-added network switch those of ordinary skl in the art without departing from the compromising the steps of: scope of the present invention. Although this invention has switching to a transactional application in response to a been shown in relation to a particular preferred embodiment, usr specification from a network application, said it should not be considered so limited. Rather, the present 40 transactional application providing a user with a pluinvention is limited only by the scope of the appended rality of transactional servces managed by at least one claims. value-added network service provider, said valueWe claim:
1. A confgurable value-added network switch for
enabling real-time transactions on a network, said config- 45

added network service provider keeping a transction

flow captive, said plurality of transactional seivices

urable value-added network switch compromising:

being performed interactively and in .real time;

mt:ans for switching to a transactional application in response to a user specification from a network'

transmitting a transaction request from said transactional application; and procesing said transaction request. 11. The method for configuring said value-added network application, said transactional application providing a usr with a plurality of transactional services managed 50 switch as claime(j in claim 10 wherein said step of switching to a transactional application further comprises the steps of: by at least one value-added network service provider, recciving said user specifcation; said value-added network service provider keeping a transaction flow captive, said plurality of transactional enabling a switch to said transactional application; and
servces being performed interactively and in real time;
activating said transactional application.

means for transmilling a trdnsactim) request from said 55 12. The method for configuring said value-added network transactional application; and switch as claimed in claim 11 wherein said step of activating said transaciional application futher includes a step of means for processing said transaction request.
2. The configurable valuc-added nctwork switch as

creating a transaction link between said network application

claimed in claim 1 wherein said means for switching to a 60 and said transactional application. 13. The method for configuring said value-added netwnrk transactional application further compris: switch as claimed in claim 11 further comprising the steps means for receiving said user specification;
means for enabling a switch to said transactional appliof:
coiitrolling security;

cation; and

means for activating said transactional application, 65


3. The configurable value-added oetwork switch as

performing fault maoagement; providing configuration management;


_....~_=__ _~_t:..____~_. __~J

r-l-:;tTP.1 in ('":im? \l/h..,...;n C",,:rl ...r....... l~..r .....:.....:..,. ....:..1

CJ

)1

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 29 of 60 Page ID #:32

5,987,500
11 enabling biling management. 14. The method for configuring said value-added network switch as claimed in claim 11 wherein said step of receiving said user spefication further compries steps of:
presenting said user with a list of transactional
applications, ach cf said transactional application

12
to perform Operations, Administration, Maintenance & Provisioning (OAM&P) functions.
27. An object router on a network, said object router

being asociated with a particular Internet service pro-

comprising: means for assoiating an object identity with information entries and attributes, wherein the object identity represents a networked object;

vider; and
submitting said user specification according to a usr's
selection of said transactional application from said list 10

means for storing said information entries and said attributes in a virtual information store; and

of transactional applications.

means for assigning a unique network address to said

object identity. 15. The method for configuring said value-added network 28. The object router in claim 27 wherein said means for switch as claimed in claim 10 wherein said step of processassociating said object identity with said information entries ing said transaction request further comprises the step of 15 and said attributes in said virtual information store further transmitting said transaction request to a host means. includes means for associating a name, a syntax and an 16. The method for configuring said value-added network
switch as claimed in claim 15 wherein said host means

encoding for said object identity.

contains data corresponding to said transaction request.


17. The method for

29. The object router in claim 28 wherein said name of


object type

said object identity specifes an object type. configurig said value-added network 30. The object router in claim 29 wherein said switch as claimed in claim 10 wherein said value-added 20

network service providers cooperate to provide said plurality of transactional seivices to said user. 18. The method for confguring said value-added network switch as claimed in claim 10 further compriing the step of
controlling and prioritizing multiple transaction requests 25

and an object instance uniquely identify an instantiation of


said object type.

31. The object router in claim 30 wherein said syntax

defines a data structure for said object type.


32. The object router in claim 27 further comprising
means for utiliing said unique network address to identify

initiated by various users.


19. A method for enabling object routing on a network, said method for enabling object routing comprising the steps
of:

and route said object identity on ihe network.


33. The object router in claim 27 further comprising

associating an object identity with information entries and attributes, wherein the object identity represents a networked object;
storig said information entries and said attributes in a

30 and route said object identity on the Internet. 34. The object router in claim 27 further comprising the

meansfor utilizing ~aid unique network address 10 idenlify

step of utilizing said unique network address of said object


identity to perform Operations, Administration, Mainte-

virtual information store; and


asigning a unique network addre to said obje-et identity.

nance & Provisioning (OAM&P) functions.


35

35. A configurable value-added network system for

20. The method in claim 19 wherein said step of associating said object identity with said information entries and
said attributes in said virtual information store further

enablig real-time transactions on a network, said configurable value-added network system comprising:

includes the step of.asciating a name, a syntax and an 40


encoding for said object identity.

means for switclung to a transaciional application in response to a user specification from a network
application, said transactional application providing a

21. The method in claim 20 wherein said name associated with said object identity specifies an object type. 22. The method in claim 21 wherein said object type and
an object instance uniquely identify an instantiation of said 45
object type.

usr with a plurality of transactional services managed


by at least one value-added neiwork seivice provider,

said value-added network seivice provider keeping a transaction flow captive, said plu~ality of transactional
seivices being performed interactively and in real time;

23. The method in claim 22 wherein said syntax defies


a data structure for said object type.

mean for activating an agent to create a transaction link


between said user application and said transactional application;

24. The method in claim 19 further comprising the step of


utiliing said unique network address to identify and route 50

mean for transmitting a transaction request from said


transactional application; and a host means for processing said transaction request and
retrieving daia corresponding to said transaction

said object identity on the network.

25. The method in claim 19 further comprising the step of


utiliing said unique network address to identify and route

said object identity on the Internet. 26.l1e method in claim 19 further comprising the step of 55

request.
*

utiliing said unique network address of said object identity

;2 i

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 30 of 60 Page ID #:33

EXHIBIT B

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 31 of 60 Page ID #:34

11111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111111I111111111

US008108492B2

(12) United States Patent


Arunachalam
(54) WEB APPLlCATlON NETWORK PORTAL
(76) Inventor: Lakshmi Arunachalam, Menlo Park,

(10) Patent No.: (45) Date of Patent:


4,984,155 A

US 8,108,492 B2
Jan. 31, 2012

1!1991 Geier et aL
61 I 992 Staas, Jr. ei al-

5,125,091 A

CA (US)
( *) 1'otice:

Subject to any disclaimer, the terru of tlis

5,148,474 A 5,159,532 A 5.231,566 A 5.239,662 A

9/1992 Harampoulos ct aL 10/1992 Cradall


711993 lutinger et al

patent is extended or adjusted under 35


U.s.c 154(b) by o

5,285383 A 5,297,249 A
5.329,589 A 5.329,619 A 5.347,632 A 5.367.635 A

days.

8/1993 Danielson et al 2/1994 lindsey et al. 3/1994 Bernstein et al. 7/1994 Fraseret m. 7/1994 Page et aL
911994 Fi lepp et aL 11/1994 Bauer ei aL II 1995 Kight et aL 4/1995 Dellafera et aL

(21) App!. No.: i 2/628,060

(22) Filed:
(65)

Nii\'. 30, 2009

5.383,lB A

5.404,523 A

Prior Publication Data


US 201 0/0306 102 A 1

(Continued)
FOREIGN PATENT DOCUMENTS

Dec. 2, 2010

Related U.S. Application Data


(60)

WO WOOOi637S1 Al 1012000

WO W097/18515 AI 5fl997
OTHER PUBLICATIONS

Division of application No, 11/980,185, filed on Oct.

30, 2007, now Pat. No. 8,037,158, which is a coiitinuation-in-par of application No. 09/792,323,
filed on Feb. 23, 2001, iiow Pat. No. 7,340,506, which

U.S. AppL No. 121268,060, filed Nov. 30, 2009, Arnachalam.


c.s, Appl No. i 2/628,066, filed Nov. 30, 2009, Aninachal:un,

is a division of application No. 09/296,207, led on Apr. 21,1999. now Pat. No. 6,212,556, which is a coiitinuation-in-par of application No. 08/879,958, filed on lun. 20, 1997, now Pat. No. 5,987,500, which is a division of application No. 081700,726, filed on Aug. 5,1996, now Pat. No, 5,778,178.
(60)
Provisional applicatioJl No. 60/006,634, filed on Nov.

Li.S. Appl No. 121628,068, filed Nov. 30, 2009, Arnachalam.


Li ,S. Appl No. i 21628,069, fied Nov. 30. 2009. Arnachalam.

(Continutx)
Primary Examiner - "et Vu

13,1995.
(51)

(57)

ABSTRACT

The present inveiiion provides a method and apparaiis for


providing real-time, two-way transactional capabilities on the
Web. Specifically, one embodiment of

G06F 13/00 (2006.01)


U.S. CI. ____.......__..........__ 709/219; 709/225; 709/228
Fidd of

Int.CI.

the present invention

(52) (58)

Classification Search ,........__....... 709/217,

709/219,223,224,225,227,229
See application file for complete search history.
(56)

References Cited

discloses a method for enabling object routing, the method comprising the steps of creating a virtal information store containing information entries and attributes associating each of the information entres and the attributes with an object identity, and assiging a unique network address to each of the object identities. A method is also disclosed for enabling
service management of

the value-added network service, to

u.s. PATENT DOUMENTS


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perfonn OAM&P functions on the services network.

13 Claims, 13 Drawing Sheets

OPERTOR AGEtr

WE
SERVER

fj
1C

EXCHGE ~

WE
PAGE

:i il
PONT-oSERVCE APUCATlONS

swrra-

VAN

ROR
S.

OBECT

il

~1

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

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h it:t Iwww.ieee,security.org/CipheflPastlssu_ZZZ, W X 2 3 6.

Open Markei, "FasICGIA High-Perfonnance Web Seiver Inleiface", Apr, 1996, Reirieved on Apr. 5, 2009 hl1p:i/w\V",.fastcgi,comi

dcvkil'doc/fasicgi.whcpapcritstcgi .ht.n,\VBX 237

~-' i

~1J

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 37 of 60 Page ID #:40

US 8,108,492 B2
Page?
Sun Microsystems. "HoIJ:iv:i". Wikipedi:i the free encyclopei:i, Jun. 1995, Retrieved on Apr. 5, 2009 from hltp://en.wikipedia.org/
wikifHorJava, WBX238.
Open Market StoreBuilder (1995) WBX250. WebXpress Web StoreFront (1996) WBX25 I.

PNC, Industi.Net do eCommerce (/996) WBX252.


10KPowerShip,PowerParer (/996) WX253.

W3C Status Codes, HTRESP _html_w3_org, 1992 WBX239. Hewlett Packad, "HP Odapter/OpenODB", luI. 1994, Retrieved on
Apr. 5, 2009 from hltp:llweb.bilkentedu.ir/Online/oofaq/oo_faq_S_

T Berners Lee Hypnext Markup Language RFCI866(1995)WBX


254. E. Nebel RFCIl!67 (1995) WEBX25S. RFCI942 (1996) WEBX25.

S. i3.0.5.html. WBX240.

Internet Shopping "Ietwork_ISN Bus,ness Newswire (995)


WBX241. NCR Co-operative Frameworks 3, (1993) WBX242. Distributed Objects Everyhere. NEO. Wikipedia (/996) WX243.
NetMarket (1996) WBX244,

J. Seidman RFCI980 (1996) WBX257.

HTML-Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia-Notepad (/998)


WBX258. Bemers-Lee, T., RFC 1630, "Universal Resource Identifiers in WW~, Network Working Group, CERN, Jun. 199 WBX259. Object Broker Seivice MiddJew:ire Sourcebook (/995) WBX260. WBXexecsummai4809new2bizplan( I) (2009) WBX268. Kramer, Douglas Java Whitepaper May 1996, WX500.

Enterprise Object Netorks, Wikipedia (1996) WBX245. OMG Document No. 91_12_1 Revision I_I (1997) WBX246.
DigiC-i..h Sirunc:irds (1997) WBX247.

IBM System Object Model_SOM (/998) WBX248. IM System Object ModeLSOM,DSOM (/998) WX249.

* cited by examiner

./s
_-'-

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 38 of 60 Page ID #:41

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 1 or

13

US 8,108,492 B2

CAR WEB

DEALER

SERVER

DER

CAR

.1

~
WE
BROWSER

.1
http://w.car.com

FIG. IA (PRIORART)

3~

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 39 of 60 Page ID #:42

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 2 orB

US 8,108,492 B2

~~
z (!O ~i= ~~ 00 W:J o~
:i 0.

a:

~m

~~
~
w
Q)

zlc( "' 0(. .. ..


a. a. -c
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CD

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MAIN~
READ ONLY

MAS
STORAGE
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MEDIUM
DATA

MEMOR~
MEMORY

STORAGE

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~

i~ :: i-

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I
I

DISPLAY DEVICE

~ ).
BUS
A

~ ~
::
W

~h I J~
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Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

INPUT DeVICE

N 0 N

~
PROCESSOR '.

(' ('

r: ::
w

.. .
-

0 -. w

20-

gQ

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Filed 05/17/12 Page 40 of 60 Page ID #:43

= N

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 41 of 60 Page ID #:44

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012 Sheet 4 of 13

US 8,108,492 B2

300 r OSIMODEl

APPLICATION

aQ
PRESENTATION

SESSION

TRANSPORT

NETWORK

~ ~ ~ ~
ao
3Q

DATA

LINK

PHYSICAl

FIG. 3
_~J1'

BACK

-r
OFFE
CHANELS
SERVICE
o

~ r: ~ ~
l" ~ := l"

DATABE i MIODLeARE
i

WESIT
oWEBSERVER

,...__._------: MIODLEWARE

INTRNET

SEAE
CARRIERS

..........'! APPUCTIS
TELCO
CAL

OLS HARDWARE

PROVIDERS

HKT L.............
WIREESS
CTR

TP 4GL
DIAL.lP
-CATV

APPS : APP'ICATIOS .IVR L_________.._. PC i

..-.._-...~ OPERATING

: SYSTM
i

-------_..._-..-..
KIOSK

'~
WAl.1N

HARDWARE .--..------..- iATM i CAS REGISTER

! HARDWARE

(, ..
N o .. N

i uve TER '

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

FIG. 4A
BACK

SERVICE

OFFICE

CHANELS

rTRASWEB

('

00 =('

WEBSIT

..

DATABE !i MIotEWARE

"..............
'OI

EXCHANGE

WE SERVER.

INTERNET SERVlCE

CARRIERS
i

Ul Q
TELCO

! MlotEWARE
HADWARE
i CAL

iwee PAGE i POS APPS

PROVIOER

.. .. (,
WIRElSS

....._....'1 APLfCATl ~ L.............


i

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CATV

APPS i APPUCllONS
i

I..............
.pc

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.. ..... ...~ OPRATING

: SYSM
KIOSK

HARDWARE ~------.-.... oATM : HADWARE o CASH REGISTE


i i

WALK.IN

r: lJ
..CJ

UVETELlEA

FIG.

48

..~

.. o 00

\0 N

Filed 05/17/12 Page 42 of 60 Page ID #:45

""~.

~.. '-

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 43 of 60 Page ID #:46

U.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 6 of 13

us 8,108,492 B2

. . .

. .
USER

.1
TASACllONS SUlON

.O
WEBPAGE~
WEB SERVER.l

FIG. SA

G)
WE
PAGE

OPERATOR AGENT

..

WE
SEAVER

5:
.m
EXCHAGE .o

POlNT'(F~ SERVICE

VAN

SWITCH

APPUCATINS

ROR
52
52

OBJECT

51

FIG. 5D
41 /;

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 44 of 60 Page ID #:47

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012 Sheet 7 of 13

US 8,108,492 B2

r---..------..-,
i
l
I I
I

POINT -QF- SERVICE


J
I

APPLICATIONS

I I

-BANK (1) CAR DAER (2) PIZ2RIA (3)

il

,
f
I

----,. - --

WEBPAGE~ II

!X~~E~J
WE SERVER .1

FIG. S~
Lf?-

I I I

BANK 'BACK OFFice'

I
I

CLIENT I MANAGEMENT. AGENT I


I

r-----i
CHECKING ACCOUNT
NAME
I

= i-

~ i~

TJ ~'

Lj .

----..-1
PASSWORD
I

-.... - -I

~I

DATA

!' ~ 0 .. ~

~ ~

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

BANK (1) l- L -t --~


i

-+-.
I I

REPOSITORY

! i
I

il
I
I I I I

BANK (1)~

00

~ ~ ..

r: =0 .. .. w

_ EXCHAG.~
WEB SERVER 1M

COMPUTR SYSTEM 20

FIG. SD

00 ~ \0

c= rr ~oo i0

Filed 05/17/12 Page 45 of 60 Page ID #:48

eo

---,

\'S,j

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 46 of 60 Page ID #:49

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 9 orB

US 8,108,492 B2

BANK

\.

WEB

PAGE

'\

"

"\

'\

'\

"\

--- --- --

CAR DEALER

WEPAGE~

FIG. SE

!jcj

,~
~ t" ~ = t"

'J .

.L -MANGEMOO- -I..

II
I I POSVC I
I

1 . EXCHANGE 5011

". 1 .6 I .. I 1
\

r---------1 / ". - 1 MANAGER i .... , ~--------~ --7"----..

i: ::

'w )o
N 0 )o N

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

I .APlICATION 5Z I

I QQ1
_ VAN SWITCH ~ _

I AG!NT I

- MANAdEMENT 1

----,

I I L.--Ii____
I

WEB PAGE1Q1

rz

" .. ..

~~-/-/----- )

---._--

- - ./

0 ~

)o 0

~ ~ ..

::

)o

Lj r.

FIG. SA

~C/

~ \0

.. o C/

Filed 05/17/12 Page 47 of 60 Page ID #:50

co

~, ;'J\

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 48 of 60 Page ID #:51

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 11 of 13

US 8,108,492 B2

WEB

SERVER (NODE)

123.123.123.123

~' ~ OTHER
OBJECT

OBJECTS

OBJECT

123.123.123.123.1

123.123.123.123.3

OBJECT

123.123.123.123.2

FIG.

68

I'/

Ljb

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 49 of 60 Page ID #:52

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 12 of 13

US 8,108,492 B2

r VANSWfTCH~

SWITCHING BOUNDARY

SERVICE sERvice
12 IQ

1Q 1M
MANAGEMENT APPLICATION

SERVICE SERVICE

FIG. 7
17

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 50 of 60 Page ID #:53

u.s. Patent

Jan. 31, 2012

Sheet 13 of 13

US 8,108,492 B2

USER CONNECTS TO WEB SEAVER RUNNING AN EXCHANGE

~
l l

V-80

USER ISSUES REQUEST FOR

~80
.s80

TRANSACTIONA APPUCATION

WEB SERVER HADS OFF

REQUEST TO EXCHGE

t
EXCHANGE ACTIVATES GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACE TO PRESENT USER WITH LAST OF POSVC APPlICATION OPTIONS

i.
~8

80

l
USER MAKES REQEST FROM POSVC APPLICATION UST

.810
12

+
SWITCHING COMPONEN IN EXCHANE SWICHES USER TO
SELECTED POSVC APPLICATION

+
OBECT ROUTNG COMPONENT . 814 EXECUS USER'S REOUEST

+
DATA RETIEVD FROM DATA REPITORY VIA TMP

~816

+
USER CONTINUES TRNSACTION (OPTIONA) OR ENDS TRNSACTION

L.8l 8

~
t

FIG.

8
c
Of:

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 51 of 60 Page ID #:54

US 8,108,492 B2
1
WEB

APPLICATION NETIVORK PORTAL


CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

2
external progrms on a Web server. It allows \Veb servers to

create documents dynamically when the server receives a


request from the Web browser. When the Web server receives
a reuest for a document, the Web server dynamically

executes the appropriate CGI script and transmits the output This application is a divisiona and claims the priority of the execution back to the requesting Web browser. This benefit of U.S. patent application Sere No. 1l!980,185 filed interaction can thus be termed a "two-way" transaction. 11 is Oct. 30, 2007 now U.S. Pat. No. 8,037,158, which is a con, a severely limited transaction, however, because each CGI tinuation-in-pal1 of U.S, patent application Sere No. 09/792, application 323, now U.S. Pat. No. 7,340,506, filed Feb. 23, 2001, which J 0 or serv ice. is customized for a particular type of application is a divisional of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 09/296,207, Forexanple, as illustrated in FIG. 1B, user 100 may access . filed Apr. 2 i, 1999, now U.S. Pat. No. 6,212,556, which is a

continuation-in-part of U.S. patent application Sere No.


08/879,958, now U.S. Pat. No. 5,987,500, filed Jun. 20, 1997,

bank 150' s Web serer and attempt to peiform transactions on

checking account 152 and to make a payment on loan account


15 154. In order for

which is a divisional and claims the priority benefit of U.S. pateii application Ser. No. 08/700,726, now U.S. Pat. No.
5,778,178, filed Aug. 5, 1996, wluch claims t1e priority benefit of U.S. provisional application 60/006,634 filed Nov. 13,

user 100 to accesscheckiigaccount 152 and

1995. TIs applicmion also claims benefit under 35 U.S.c. oller users acce to these services. User 100 can then interact 119(e) to U.S. Provisional application Sere No. 60/006,634 20 in a limited fashion with these individual applications. Crefiled Nov. 13, 1995. The following applications are related ating and managing individual CGI scripts for each service is applications: application Sere Nos. 09/863,704; 12/628,066; not a viable solution for merchants with a lare number of 12/628,068; 12/628,069, 12/932,758 and 60/206,422, services.
BACKGROUND

loan account 154 on the Web, CGI application scripts must be created for each account, as illustrated in FIG. lB. The hank thus has to crete individual scripts for each of its services to

As the Web expands and electrnic commerce becmes


25 more desirable, the need increases for robust, real-time, bidirectional transactional capabilities on

1. Field of the Invention The present invention relates to the area of Internet communicatiollS. Specifically, the present invention relates to a

the Web. A tre real-

Additionally, the user has limited "deferr" transactional capabilities, namely electroiuc mail (e-mail) capabilities.
E-mail capabi'lities are referr to as "deferred transactions"
because the consumer's request is not proced until the

method and apparanis for coiifgurable value-added network 30 100 can browse car dealer Web page ios today, the user switching and object routing. cannot purchase the car, negotiate a car loan or peiforin other 2. Background of the Invention With the Internet and the World Wide Web Cthe Web") types of real-time, two-way transactions that he can perform with a live salespersoii at the car dealership. Ideally, user 100 evolving rapidly as a viable consumer medium for electroiiic commerce, new on-line services are emerging to fill the nees 35 in FIG. 1A would be able to access car dealer Web page 105, of on-line users, An Internet user (oday can browse on (he select specific transactions that he desires to perform, such as Web via the usc of a Web browser. Web browsers are software purchase a car, and peiforni the purchase iii real-time, with interfaces that run on Web clients to allow access to Web two-way interaction capabilities. CGI applications provide servers via a simple user inteiface. A Web user's capabilities user 100 with a limited ability for two-way interaction with today from a Web browser are, however, extremely limited, 40 car dea ler Web page 105, butdueto the lackofinterdctionand The user can peiform one-way, browse-only interactions. management between the car dealer and the ban, he will not
be able to obtain a loan and complete the purchase of

time, bi-directional trnsaction would allow a user to connect to a variety of seivices on the Web, and perform real-time traiisactions on those services. For exaiiiple, although user

via a CGI application. The,ability to complete robust realtime, two-way trdnsactions is thus not trly clvailable on the
45 Web today.

the car

e-mail is received, read, and the person or system reading ihe e-mail executesthetransction.lbs transaction is tIlUS not pedornied in real-time.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

FIG. lA illustrates tyical user interactions on the Web I t is therefore an object of the preent invention to provide today. User 100 sends out a request from Web browser 102 in 50 a method and apparatus for providing real-time, two-way the form of a universal resoun:e locator (URL) 101 in the translctonal capabilities on the Web. Speifically, one following maner: http://Vvww.ca.com. URL 101 is proembodiment oltIie present invention discloses a configuable cessed by Web browser 102 that determines the URL correvalue-added network switch for enabling real-time traiisacsponds to car dealer Web page 105, on car dealer Web server tions on the World Wide Web. TIie configurable value added
104. Web browser 102 then

establishes browse link 103 to car 55

dealer Web page ,1 OS. User i 00 can browse Web page ios and select "hot links" to jump to otherIocations in Web page 105, or (0 move to other Web pages on the Web. Ths interaction is

network switch comprises means for switching to a trasac-

iional application in response to a user specification fwin a


World Widc Wcb application, means for trsmitting a trans-

typically a browse-only intei'3ction. Under limited cirumstances, the user may be able to fill out a form on car dealer 60 Web page 105, and e-mail the form to car dealer Web server 104. This interaction is still strictly a one-way browse mode conumuiications link, with the e-mail providing liiruied,
deferred trallSactional capabilities.

action request from the transactional application, and means for processing the transaction request.

Accorclng (0 another aspect of the present invention, a methud ;Jnd aiparaius j(,r enabling object rouling on the
World Wide Web is disclosed. The method tor enabling object

Under limited circumstances, a user may Iiave access to 6'


two-way services

routing comprises the steps of creating a virnial infonnation store containing iiiforiiation entries and attributes, associatiug eacli oftlie infoniiation entries and (he al1ributes with an

on the Web via Common Gateway Inierl;1Cl:

(CGI) applic8tions, CGI is 8 st811dard iiitcrtiicc for niining

object identity, and assigning a uniyue netwurk address tu


cach olthc objcci idcntities.

i9

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 52 of 60 Page ID #:55

invention will be apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the detailed description.
BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS
Tne featiires amI advantages ofili present invention will

US 8, i 08,492 B2 3 4 Other objects, features and advantages of the present of ordinary skill in the an that other alternative computer
system architectures may also be employed. In general, such computer systems as ilustrated by FIG. 2 comprise a bus 201 for coininurucating iiormation, a pro5 cessor 202 coupled with the bus 201 for processing infonna-

be apparent from the accompanying drawings and from the detailed description of the present invention as set forth below.
FIG. .1 A is an illustrtioii of a current user's browse capa-

tion, main memory 203 coiipled with the bus 201 for storing information and instructions for the processor 202, a rcadonly memory 204 coupled with the bus 201 for storig static information and instrctions for the processor 202, a display
io device 205 coiipled with the bus 201 for

displaying inforniaiion for a computer iiser, an input device 206 coupled with the

bilities on the Web via a Web browser. FIG. IB is an illustr:tion ofa current user's capabilities to

bus 201 for communicating information and conuand selec-

tions to the processor 202, and a mass storage device 207,


such as a magnetic disk and associated disk drive, coupled

15 with the bus 201 for storing information and instrctions. A data storage medium 208 containing digiial information is FIG. 2 illustrates a tyical computer system on which the configured to operatc with mass storage device 207 to allow present invention may be utilized, processor 202 access to the digital information on data storFIG. 3 illustrates the Open SYSTems InterconnecTion (OSI) age medium 208 via bus 201. ModeL FIG. 4A illustrates conceptually the user value chain as it 2(1 Processor 202 may be any of a wide variety of general purose processors or microproessors such as the Penexists today.
tions.
tium TM microprocessor manufacrured by IntelT'" Corporation
FIG. 48 illustrates one embodiment of

perform limited transactions on the Web via CGI applica-

the pre-,ent inven-

FIG. 58 illustrates the exchange component according to one embodiment of the present invention. FIG. 5C illustrates an example of a point-of-service
(POSvc) application list.

tion. sor manufacture by manufactured by Motorola CorporaFIG. SA illustrates a user accessing a Web server including 25 tion. It will be apparent to those of ordinary skill in the art, one embodiment of the present invention. however, that other varieties of processors may also be used in

or the Motorola 68040 or Power PCI brand microproces-

a particular computer system. Display dcvice 205 may bc a liquid crystal device, cathode ray tube (CRT), or other suitable display device. Mass storage device 207 may be a con30 ventional hard disk drive, floppy disk drive, CD-ROM drive,

FIG. SD illustrates a user selecting a bank POSvc applicaor other magnetic or optical data stonige device for reading tion from the POSvc application list. and writing inforniation storcd on a hard disk, a floppy disk, FIG. SE illlistrates a three-way transaction according to a CD-ROM a magnetic tape, or other magnetic or optical data one embodiment of the present invention. storage medium. Data storage medium 208 may be a hard FIG. 6A illustrates a value-added network (VAN) switch. 35 disk, a floppy disk, a CD-ROM, a magnetic tape, or other FIG. 68 illustrates the hierarchical addresing tree strcmagnelic or optical data sttmige medium. ture of the networked objects in DOLSIBs. In general, processor 202 retrieves processing instructions FIG. 7 illustrates conceptually the layered architecture of a and data from a data storage mediwn 208 using mass storage VAN switch. device 207 and dowioads this infonllatioli into random FIG.8 is a flow diagrm illustrating one emboiment of the 4(1 access memory 203 for execution. Processor 202, then present invention. execules an instruction stream from random access memory
DETAILED DESCRIPT10N

203 or read-only memory 204. Command selections and


information input at iiiput device 206 are used TO direct the

such as NCSA Mosaic frm NCSA and Netscape


pendent of

flow of instructions executed by processor 202. Equivalent The present invention relates to a method and appartus for 45 input device 206 may also be a pointing device such as a configurable va lue-added network switching and object roiiconventional mouse or lrackball device. The results of this ing and management. "Web browser" as used in the context of processing execution are then displayed on display device the present specification includes conventional Web browsers 205.
the Web browser being ntilized and the user can

TIie preferred embodiment of the present invention is Mosaic from Netscape, The present invention is inde- iinplemented as a software module, which may be executed 50
use any Web browser, without modifications to the Web
browser. In the following detailed description, nwnerous spe-

on a computer sysiem such as computer system 200 iii j

conventional manner. Using well known tecluiiques, the


application softareofthe preferr embodiment is store on

the present invention is implemented on an IBMTM Personal routing switch witliin lhe "application layer" of the OSI Computer manufactured by IIM Corporation of Armonk, modeL. TIie model defines seven comN.Y Altemate embodiments may be implemented on a 6' muiiicaiing with its peer layer in layers, with each layer the use another node through Maciniosh compuier mmiufaciured by Apple Computer, of a pnifocol. Physical layer 301 is the lowesl layer, with Incorporated ofCiipeniiio, Calif It will be apparelll to those rcspoiisibi liiy to tr.iisiiilunslnicturcd bilS across a link. Data

cific details are set fort in order to provide a thorough underdata storage medium 208 and subsequently loaded into and standing of the present invention, It will be apparent to one of 5~ executed within computer system 200. Once initiated, the ordinary skill in the art, however, that these specific details software ofihe preferred embodiment operates in the manner need not be used to practice the present invention. In other described below. insiances, well-known strucrures, interfaces and processes FIG. 3 illustrates the Open Systems IntercolUiection (OSI) have not been shown in detail in order not to wuiecessarly reference modeL. OSI Model 300 is an international standard obscure the present invention. 60 that provides a COi1on basis for the coordination of stanFIG. 2 illustrdles a iypical computer system 200 in w!iich dad~ dev~lorrnent, !llf the purpose of ';ystenis inlerconnecthe psent invention openites. TIie preferred embodiment of tion. TIie present invention is implemented to function as a

~j)

/"

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 53 of 60 Page ID #:56

US 8,108,492 B2
5
link layer 3 02 is the next layer above physical layer 301. Data

6
cellular provider sites. Five components interact to provide this service network functionality, namely an exchange, an operator agent, a management agent, a management manager
and a grplcal user interface, All five components are

link layer 302 trnsmits chunk across the lin and deals with

problems like checksuning to detect data corrption,


the use of shared media and addressing when multiple systems are reachable. Network bridges operate within data link layer 302.
orderly coordination of

described in more detail below.

Network layer 303 enables any pair of systems in thc


network to communicate with each other. Network layer 303
contans hardware uits such as routers that handle routing,
packet fragmentation and reassembly of packets. Transport 10

As iJJustrated in FIG. 5A, user 100 accesses Web server


104. Having acccsscd Wcb server 104, s-r 100 can decide that he desires to perform real-iime transactions. When Web

layer 304 establishes a reliable communication stream

server 104 receives user 100's Iiidication that he desires to perfonn real-time transactions, the request is handed over to
an exchange component. Thus, from Web page ios, for

example, user 100 can select button 500, entitled "Trasactions" and Web server 104 hands user 100's request over to tion. Session layer 305 offers services above uie simple comthe exchange component. The button and the title can be munication stream provided by transport layer 304. 1bese i 5 replaced by any mechanism that can instrct a Web seiver to services include dialog control and chaining, Presentation
layer 306 provides a means by which OSI compliant applications can agree on representations for data. Finally, application layer 307 includes services such as file transfer, access
an management services (FTAM), electronic mail and vir- 20
lual terminal (Vf) service. Application layer 307 provides a

between a pair of systems, dealing with errors such as lost packets, duplicate packets, packet reordering and fragmenta-

hand over the consumer's request to the exchange component.

FIG. 58 illustrates exchange 501. Exchange 501 comprises Web page 505 and point-Gf-service (POSvc) applications

means for application programs to access the OSI environment. As described above, the present invention is implemented to function as a routing switch in application layer 307. Application layer routing creates an open channel for the 25

510. Exchange 501 also conceptually includes a switching component and an objeci rouiing component (described in
more detail below). POSvc applications 510 are transactional

management, and the seleciive flow of data fmll remote


databases on a network.

applications, namely applications that are designed to incorporate aiid take advantage of the capabilities provided by the present invention. Although exchange 501 is depicted as
residing on Weh server J 04, l1ie exchange can also reside on

A.Ovelview
FIG. 4A illustrates conceptually the user value chain as it
exists today. The uservaluechain in FIG. 4Adepicts the

a separate computcr systcm that resides on the Internet and

has an Internet address. Exchange 501 may also include


operator agent 503 that interacts with a management manager

of transactions rhat are perfiinned today, and the channels though wlich the transactions are pcrformed. A "transaction" for the purposes of the present invention includes any
type of commercial orother type of want to perform. Examples of

types 30

(described in more detail below). Exchange 501 creates and allows for the management (or distributed contrl) of . servicc network, operating witin the boundaries of an IP-based
facilities network. Thus, exchange 501 and a managemeii
agent component, described in

interaction that a user may


trasactions include a deposit 35

into a bank account, a request for a loan from a bank, a


tions are also possible.

headings "VAN Switch and Object Routing," together PI-

more detail below, under the

present inveiiion. Exchange 501 processes the consumer's request and disA typical user transaction today may involve user 100 40 plays an exchange Web page 50S that includes a listofPOSvc walking into a bank or driving up to a teller maclne, and applications 510 accessible by excharige50LA POSvc appliinteracting with a live ban teller, or automated teller macline
(ATM) softwa applications. Alternatively, user 100 can percation is an application that can execu1e the tye of trsac-

purchasc of a car from a car dealersip or a purchase of a car with fincing from a bank. A large variety of other transac-

form the switcbing, ohject routing, applicaiion and service


managcmeii functions according to one cmbodiment of

the

activatig applieation software on lis PC to access his (PC), 45 bank account, and dialing illto the bank via a modem line. lfuser 100 is a Web user, however, there is no curent mechanism for performing a robust, real-time transaction with the bank, as ilustrated in FIG. 4A. CGI scripts provide only limited twoway capabilities, as described above. Thus, due to this lack

form the same transaction by using a personal computer

the iisermay be interested in performing. TIie POSvc list is displayed via the graphical user interface component.
tion that

One embodiment of the present invention supports Hyper-

Text Markup Language as the gr.iphical nser interface componcnt. Virtual Reality Markp Language and Java TM are also
supported by this embodiment. A variety of other grphical

a mbusi mechanism by which real-time Web tnmsactions c.n be perfonned, the bank is unable to be a true "Web merchant,"

of 50

user interface standards can also be utilized to implement the graphical user interface.

namely a merchant capable of providing complete transactional services on the Web.


According to one embodiment of

An example of a POSvc applicalion list is illuslrdled in FIG, 5C User 100 can thus select 1fom POSvc applications Bank 510(1), Car Dealer 510(2) or Pizzeria 510(3). Nwnerous other POSvc applications can also be included in this
selection. If user i 00 desires to perform a number of banng

the present invention, as 55

iJustrdted in FIG. 48, each merdiaut that desires 10 be a Web


merchant can provide real-timc transactional capabilities to

transactions, and selects Ihe Bank applit:atioii, a Bank POSvc

application will bc activatcd and presented to user 100, as illustrated in FIG. SO. For the puroses of illustration, Web. Thjs embodiment includes a servce network running on top of a facilities network, namely the Internet, the Web or 60 exchange 501 in r'G. 5D is shown as ruwng on a different comput~r system (Web server 104) from the computer syse-mail networks. For the purposes or this application, users (ems of the Web merchallts run.lng POSvc applications are dcscribed as utilizing PC's to access the Web vi;) Web (computer system 200). Exchange 501 may. however, also be server "switching" sites. (Switcliing is described in more on (he same computer system as one or more of the computer detail below). Users may also utilize other personal devices such as network computers or cellular devices to access the 6' systems of the Web merchants. Once Bank POSvc application 510 has been activated, user rierchai1fs' services via "pprnpriare switching siles. llicse

users who desire to access the inerchaiis' services via the

switching sites include non- Web nctwork computcr sites ;ind

100 will he iJble Iii c()nnecl to Rank services and utiLize (he

;ippLic;irion 10 pcrJo11i banking Irans;icrions. tlius ;icccssing

_5'

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 54 of 60 Page ID #:57

US 8,108,492 B2
7
data from a host or data repository 575 in the Bank "Back

8
for the integtion o.f other trditional security mechanisms, including RSA securty mechansms.
One embodiment of the present invention utilizes TMP and distributed on-line service information bases (DOLSIBs) to perforni object routing. Alternatively, TMP can incorporate

Offce.~ The Ban Back Offce comprises legacy databases and other data repositories that are utilized by the Ban to store its data. TIs connection between user 100 and Bank
services is managed by exchange 501. As illustrated in folG.
50, once the connection is made between Bank POSvc appli-

cation 510(1), for cxample, a.'ld Ban services, an oper~tor agent oll Web server 104 may be activated to ensure the
availability of distributed fW1Ctiolis and capabilities.

s-HTf Java, the WinSockAPI orORB wiih DOLSIBs to

Each Web merchant may choose the types of services that 10

perform objixt rouiing. DOLSlBs arc virtal information stores optimized for networking. Ail information entries and attibutes in a OOLSIB virtal iiiforniation store are associated with a networked object identity. .The networked object

it would like to offer its clients. In this example, if Bank decided to include in their POSvc application access to
checking and savings accounts, user 100 wil be able to perform real-time trnsactions against his checking and savings
accounts. Thus, if user 100 moves $500 from his checking i 5

identity identifies the informatioii entres and aiiribiiies in the

DOLSIB as individual networked objects. and each networked object is assigned an Iiiternet address. The liiemet address is assigned based on tlie IP address of tlie node at
which the networked object resides.
For exaple, in FIG. SA, Weh server 104 is a node on the

account into his savings account, the transaction will be per-

formed in real-time, in thc samc mancr thc transaction


would have been performed by a live teller at the bank or an ATM machine, TIierefore, unlike his prior access to his accunt, user 100 now has the capability to do more than 20 browse his bank account. Theability 10 perform these types of robust, real-time transactions from a Web client is a significant aspect of

Internet, with an IP address. All networked object associated with Web server 104 will therefore be assigned an Internet
address based on the Web server 104's IP addess. TIiese

networked objects thus "brach" trom the node, creating a


hienirchical tree strucrure. The Inremer address for each nelworked object in the tree essentially establishes the individual
object as an "IP-reachable" or accessible node

the present invention.

TMP utilizes this Internet address to uniquely identify and POSvc application 510(1). For example, Bank may agree 25 access the object trom the DOLSJB. FIG. 613 illustrates ail with Oirdealership to allow Bank customers to piirchasea car example of this hierarchical addressing tree stricliie. from that dealcr, rcqucst a car loan from Bank, and have thc Each object in tlic OOLSIB has a nanie, a syntax and an entire transaction performed on the Web, as ilustrated in FIG.
5E. iii this instance, the transactions are not merely two-way,
between the user and Ban, but three-way, amongst the con- 30

Bank can also decide to provide other types of services in

on thelntemer.

encoding. The name is aliadministratively assigned object 10

specifYing an object type. TIie object type together with the

sumer, Bank and Car dealership. According to one aspect of

the present invention. this three-way transaction can be


expanded to noway transactions, where n represents a predetermined number of merchants oj- other service providers who
have agreed to cooperate to provide services to users. The 35

object instalice serves to uniquely identify a specific iiistantiation of the objecl. ForexainpJe, ifobject 610 is infiimiation about models of cars, then one instance of tliat object would provide user 100 with information about a specific model of the car while aliother instance would provide inforniation
about a different model of

present invention therefore allows for "any-to-any" communication and transactions on the Web, thus facilitating a large,
flexible variety of

the car. The syntax of an object type

defines theahstract dia stnicturecorresponding to that object

robust, real-time transactions on the Web.

Finally, Bank may also decide to provide intra-merchant or


intra-ban services, together with the inter-merchant services 40
described above. Forexample, if Bank creates a POSvc application tor use by the Bank Payroll depar1ment, Bank may provide its own employees with a means for submitting timecards for payroll processing by the Bank's Hwiian Resources

sented by the object type syntax while being transmitted over the network. C. Management and Administration As described above, exchange 501 and managemeii ageii
601 togetlierconstitute a VAN switch. FIG. 7 illustrates coneepnially the layered architecnire of

typc. Encoding of objects defincs how thc object is repre-

applicalon, and submits his timecard. The employee's time-

(HR) Deparent. An employee selectstlie Ban HR POSvc 45 between VAN switch 520, tlie Internet and the Web, and
telephones. Boundar service 701 also provides the intedaee to the on-line service provider. A user can connect to a local
application, namely one accessible via a local VAN switch, or

cifically, boundar service 701 provides the interfaces

VAN switch 520. Spe-

cad is processed by accessing the employee's payroll information, stored in the Bank's Back Offce. TIie transaction is thus processed in real-time, and the employee receives his

multi-media end user devices such as pes, televisions or

paycheck iillJlediately.
B. V,m Switching and Object Routing

50 be routed or "switched" to an application accessible via a


remote VAN switch. Switching service 702 is an OSI application laycr switch. Switching service 702 thus represents the core of the VAN switch. It perfomis a number of tasks including the routing of user connections to remote VAN switches, described in the paragraph above, multiplexing and pnoriiizatioii of requests, and flow control. Switching scrvice 702 also !cilitates open

As described abovc, exchange 501 and management agcnt 601, illustrated iii FIG. 6A, together constinite a value-added

network (VAN) switch. TIiese two elements may take on


different roles as necessary, including peer-to-peer, c1ient- 55

server or master-slave roles. Management manager 603 is


illustrated as residing Oil a separate computer system 011 tlie

Internet. Management manager 603 can, however, also reside


on tiie same machine as exchange SOL Management manager
603 interacts with the operator agent 503 residing on 60

systems' connectivity with both die Internet (a public


switched network) and private networks including back offce
nctworks, such as bankng networks. Interconnected applica-

exdwng~ 50 i.
V'\N switch 520 provides multi-protocol

iion layer swiiches fOllll the applicaiion nelwork backbone.


object routing,
TIlese switches are onc

depending upon the specific VAN services chosen. lls

signficant aspect olthe present inven-

multi-protocol object routing is provided via a proprietar Management service 703 contains tools such as lnJormaprotocol. TransWebT!I Management Protocol (TMP). TMP 65 tion Management Services (lMS) and application Nelwork iiicorpnrdies the Siie security Icatures as the trdtJitiollil MangeJlenl Services (NMS). These lools re used by the Simple Network Man:igeiicnt Protocol. SNMP, It also allows
cnd uscrs to iiaiwgc nctwork resources. including. VAN

tion.

j;-

,/

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 55 of 60 Page ID #:58

US 8,108,492 B2
9
switches. Management service 703 also provides applica-

10
2. The system of claim 1, wherein the VAN switch is an application layer switch in tbe application layer of the OSI
modeL.

tions that peiform Operations, Admnistration, Maintenance & Provisionig (OAM&P) fuctions. These OAM&P functions include security management, fault management, configuation management, peiformance management and bill-

ing management. Providing OAM&P functions for


applications in uis maner is anothcr signifcant aspect oftbe
present invention.

3. The system of claim 1, wherein the VAN switch enables the switching 10 Web merchant services in response to a Weh

server's receipt of a selection of one of the point-of-service


Web applications con'esponding to the Web merchant ser-

Finally, application service 704 contains application programs that deliver customer services. Application service 704 includes POSvc applications such as Bank POSvc described
above, and illustrated in FIG. 6A. Other examples of

vices from the point-of-service application list on the Web


10 4. The system of claim 1, wherein each Web merchant

page.

designed to meet a paricular set of rcquirements related to

offered as a VAN service, utilizing the VAN switch. services include multi-meda messaging, archival/retrieval management, directory services, data staging, conferencing, 5. The system of claim 1, wherein each Web application of fiancial services, home banking, risk management and a 15 the one or more Web applications is a value-added network varety of other vertical services. Each VAN service is (VAN) service or online service atop the Web, utilizing the
VAN

VAN

service includes one of the one or more Web applications

performance, reliability, maintenance and abilty to hadle


expected traffc volwne. Depending charactenstics of on the type

switch,

6. TIie system of claim 1, wherein the service network


includes the one or more Web applications and wherein the

of service, the

the network elements will differ. Vi\N ser- 20 service network manages the flow of real-time Web trasacvice 704 provides a number of functions including commutions from the one or more Web applications and includes the nications services for both management and end users of the VAN switch. network and control for the user over the user's environment. 7. The system of claim 1, wberein the Web server is conFIG.8 is a flow diagram illustrtjngone embodiment of the figured to receive a Web transaction request and wherein the present invention. A user connects to a Web server running an 25 Web transaction request is a request 10 peiforni one of the exchange component in step 802. In step 804, the user issues
applications, utilizing the VAN switch. hands off the request to an exchange in step 806. TIie 8, TIie system of claim 1, further comprising: exchange activates a graphical user interface to present user a computer sysiem executing a back-end transactional with a list of POSvc application options in step 808. In step 30 application for processing Ihe transaction request in 810, the user makes a selection from the POSvc application real-time, wherein said computer system includes a data list. In step 812, the switching component in the exchange repository, wherein the data repository is a data reposiswitches the user to the selected POSvc application, and in tory to store bankng data, and wherein retrieving data step 814, the object routing component executes the USer's request Data is retrieved from the appropriate data repository 35 includes retrieving banking data to complete a real-time via TMP in step 816, and finally, the user may optionally Web banking transaction as one of tIie real-time Web continue the transaction in step 818 or cnd the transaction. transactions from a banking Web application as one of
a request for a trnsactional appl ication, and the wcb servcr

real-time Web trsactions from one of ilie one or more Web

Thus, a confgurable value-added network switching and object routing method and apparatus is disclosed. lliese spe-

tbc one or more Web applications,


9. The system of claim 1, furter comprising the one or

in relation to a particular preferred emboiment, it should not 45 be considered so limited. Rather, the present invention is

cific arrangements and methods descnbed herein are merely 4(1 more Web applications offered as software-as-a-service atop iIuslrdlive ofihe prin(.;ples of the present invention. Numerthe Web. ous modifications in form and detail may be made by those of i O. A method for pertoiiiing real-time Web transactions ordinary skill in the art without departing from the scope of from a Web application, compnsing: the present invention. Although this invention has been shown receiving a request at a Web server, including a processor
and a memory, for a real-time Web transaction from a Web application on a Web page, wherein the Web server

limited only by the scope ofthc appcnded claims.


\\'liat is claimed is: 1. A system, compnsing: a Web server, including a processor and a memory, for

50

is conigured to hand over the request to a Value Added Network (VAN) switch; offering a plurality of Web applications including the Web application on a Web page, upon receipt from a Web

otlring onc or morc Web applications as rcspcctive point-of-serice applications in a point-of-service application list on a Web page; each Web application of tIie one or more Web applications 55 for requesting a real-iime Web transaction; a valuc-addcd nctwork (VAN) switch running on top of a facilities network selected from a group consisting ofilie World Wide Web, the Internet and an e-mail network, tbe
VAN switch for enabling the real-time Web trnsactions 60

server a selection of the Web application fmin the offere Web applications, the Web application corresponding to a respective back-end trnsactional applica-

tion, wherein the back-end transactional application is an application ruing at the baek-offce server of one or more Web merchanis or at the back-end;
receiving a request lor Web merchant services upon receipt by a Web server a selection of the Web application,

wherein the request for Web merchant services is a


request 10 cOlUiecl to the selected back-end transactional

from the une ur more \Veb applications; a service network running on top ofilie facilities neiwork for connecting through the Web server 10 a back-end transactional application: and
a computer system executing the Back-end transactional 65

applicariun Ii)r pnicessiiig the traiisaciiuii re'-uesi in real-timc.

applic;ition 10 perrorin an interactive real,i-inie Web transaction from the Web application, wherein the transactional application is an on-line service provided by one or more Web merchants or the back.end: switching utilizing the VAN switch to the back,end trans, actional appJ icaiion in response to receiving the request from the Wcb ser"er:

53

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 56 of 60 Page ID #:59

US 8,108,492 B2
11
providing distrbuted control of a service network, operat-

12
a list of one or more point-of-seivice employee Web applications on a Web page offercd by the business entity that operates the portal, said portal allowing access to the one or more point-of-service applications on the Web page from said list, and wherein the portal offers the one or

ing with the boundaes of an IP-based fcilities network; connecting to specified ones of the Web merchant services or to back-end services. wherein the connection to the
Web merchant seivices' or back-end transactional ser-

vices is managed: accessing data from a host or data repository coupled to the
bck offce server of one or more 'lfeb merclianf.s or to

more point-of-seivice applications as on-line services


on the Web page, and further wherein the portal is opcrated by the business entity over a seivice network running on top of a facilities net'Nork, the facilities network
being selected from a group consisting of tiie World
Wide Web, the Inremet and email networks, said

the back-end transactional application, wherein the back 10 offce server or back-end is coupled to legacy databases and other data repositories that are utilized by the one or

more of the Web merchants or the back-end transactional application to store data; and completing thc rel-time Web transactions from thc Wcb 15
application. 11. The method of claim 10, wherein the real-time Web transactions are Web transactions from the Web application accessing a value-added network seivice.
12. A computer-implemented system, operated by a busi-

network including a VAN Switch;

service

one or more back-end trsactional applications nining at

one or more back-end host computers, corresponding, respectively to the one or more point-of-seivice applicatiofL~ accessed, to complete a real-time Web trasac-

tion from the Web application on the Web page. 13. The portl of claim 12, wherein the one or more Web
applications include a plurality of point-ot~service applica-

ness entity comprising:

20 tions on the Web page, wlierein the business entity and the
sub-eniities o-Jfer Web applications which are selecied from a
group consisting of payroll Web applications, human

a Web application network portal, wherein the portl


includes memory and a processor and one or more Web
applications offered respectively by one or more Web mcrchants or other servicc providers, or by multiple

resources Web applications, expense report Web applications,


time card Web applications, travel Web applications, vacation

sub-entities of the business entity who have agreed to 25 Web applications, financial Web applications and sales commission Web applicaiions. cooperate to provide on-line Value Added Network
(VAN) services atop the Web for access by employees of tiie business entity;
*
* *

j7

/ij

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

Filed 05/17/12 Page 57 of 60 Page ID #:60

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT

CENTRA DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA


NOTICE OF ASSIGNMENT TO UNITED STATES MAGISTRATE JUGE FOR DISCOVERY

This case has been assigned to District Judge Dale S. Fischer and the assigned discovery Magistrate Judge is Carla Woehrle.
The case number on all documents filed with the Court should read as follows:

CV12- 4301 DSF (CWx)


Pursuant to General Order 05-07 of the United States District Cour for the Central District of Californa, the Magistrate Judge has been designated to hear discovery related motions.

All discovery related motions should be noticed on the calendar of the Magistrate Judge

NOTICE TO COUNSEL

A copy of this notice must be served with the summons and complaint on all defendants (if a removal action is fied, a copy of this notice must be served on all plaintiffs),
Subsequent documents must be filed at the following location:
(Xl Western Division

312 N. Spring St., Rm. G.8 Los Angeles, CA 90012

U Southern Division

411 West Fourth St., Rm. 1-053 Santa Ana, CA 92701-4516

U Eastern Division

3470 Twelfth St., Rm. 134


Riverside, CA 92501

Failure to file at the proper location wil result in your documents being returned to you.

CV-18 (03/06)

NOTICE OF ASSIGNMENT TO UNITED STATES MAGISTRATE JUDGE FOR DISCOVERY

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1 Andre E. Jardini (State Bar No. 71335) aej (fkpclegaLcom

Filed 05/17/12 Page 58 of 60 Page ID #:61

KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLAR


550 North Brand Boulevard, Suite 1500 Glendale, CA 91203
Telephone: (818) 547-5000

Facsimile: (818) 547-5329 Attorneys for Plaintiff

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT CENTRA DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA


CASE

NUMBER

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

PLAINTIFF(S) C V 12 ~ 04 3 0 1 ~H1L
v.

U-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC.

SUMMONS
DEFENDANT(S).

TO: DEFENDANT(S):
A lawsuit has been fied against you.
Within 21 days after service of

this summons on you (not counting the day you received it), you

must serve on the plaintiff an answer to the attached i: complaint 0 _ amended complaint
the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. The answer or motion must be served on the plaintiffs attorney, Andre E. Jardini, clo Knapp, Petersen & Clarke, whose
o counterclaim 0 cross-claim or a motion under Rule 12 of default will be

address is 550 North Brand Boulevard, Suite 1500, Glendale, CA 91203. If you fail to do so, judgment by entered against you for the relief demanded in the complaint. You also must file your answer or

motion with the court.


MAY 1 7 2012

Clerk, U.S. District Cour


By:
JULIE PRADO

Dated:

Deputy Clerk
(Seal of the Court)

rUse 60 days if

the defendant is the United States or a United States agency, or is an offcer or employee of

the United States. Allowed

60 days by Rule 12(a)(3)j

CV-OIA (10/1 i

SUMMONS

Aiiericc:n Lcg4lINel, Inc. A


_:\'ww. F(,!"ni~ \'V0rkflow~ ~-

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1


you are representing yourself 0)

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, CENTRA DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA


CIVIL COVER SHEET
DEFENDANTS

Filed 05/17/12 Page 59 of 60 Page ID #:62

I (a) PLAINTIFFS (Check box if

PI-NET INTERNATIONAL, INC.

V-HAUL INTERNATIONAL, INC.

(b) Attorneys (Finn Name, Address and Telephone Number. If you are representing yourself, provide same.)

Attorneys (If Known)

Andre E. Jardin, Esq. (State Bar No. 71335 KNAPP, PETERSEN & CLARK 550 Nort Brand Boulevard, Suite ,1500 Glendale, CA 91203 Tel: (818) 547-5000; Fax: (818) 547-5329
II. BASIS OF JURISDICTION (Place an X in one box only.)
o i U.S. Government Plaintiff

II. CITIZENSHIP OF PRINCIPAL PARTIES - For Diversity Cases Only


(Place an X in one box for plaintiff and one for defendant.)

g 3 Federal Question (U.S. Government Not a Party

PTF DEF
Citizen ot1'his State

PTF DEF

o i 0 I Incorporated or Principal Place

04 04

of Business in this State o 2 U.S. Government Defendant 04 Diversity (Indicate Citizenship Citizen of Another State of Parties in Item II)
o 2 0 2 Incorporated and Principal Place 0 5 0 5

of Business in Another State

Citizen or Subject of a Foreign Countr 0 3 0 3 Foreign Nation


iv. ORIGIN (Place an X in one box only.)
g I Original 0 2 Removed from 0 3 Remanded from o 4 Reinstated or 0 5 Transferred from another distrct (specify): 0 6 Multi-

06 06
o 7 Appeal to Distrct

Proceeding State Court Appellate Court

Reopened Distrct

Litigation

Judge from Magistrate Judge

V. REQUESTED IN COMPLAINT: JURY DEMAND: g Yes 0 No (Check 'Yes' only if demanded in complaint.)

CLASS ACTION under F.R.C.P, 23: 0 Yes g No 0 MONEY DEMANDED IN COMPLAINT: $

400 State Reapportionment 110 Insurance

710 Fair Labor Standards

0410 Antitrust 0 120 Marine 310 Airplane


o 430 Banks and Banking 0 130 Miler Act 0 315 Airplane Product

510 Motions to Vacate Act


370 Other Fraud Sentence Habeas 0 720 Labor/Mgmt.

o 450 Commerce/iCC 0 140 Negotiable Instrument Liability

o 371 Truth in Lending Corpus Relations


o 380 Other Personal 0 530 General 0 730 Labor/Mgmt. Property Damage 0 535 Death Penalty Reporting &

o 460 Deportation Overpayment & Slander


Organizations 0 151 Medicare Act 0340 Marine

Rates/etc. 0 150 Recovery of 0320 Assault, Libel &

o 470 Racketeer Influenced Enforcement of 0 330 Fed. Employers'

and Corrupt Judgment Liability

o 385 Property Damage 0 540 Mandamusl Disclosure Act


G'1.",_,w;'proiUC!~i~,eJl~" Other . 0 740 Railway Labor Act

~~~i:~Ji$1O 550 Civil Rights 0790 Other Labor


o 22 Appeal 28 USC 555 Prison Condition Litigation
USC 157

o 480 Consumer Credit 0 152 Recovery of Defaulted 0 345 Marine Product

o 490 CablelSat TV Student Loan (Exc!. Liability

0810 Selective Service Veterans) 0 350 Motor Vehicle

o 423 Withdrawal 28 Securi Act


441 Voting
o 442 Employment
o 443 Housing! Acco-

158 791 Emp!. Ret. Inc.

0850 Securities/Commodities/ 0 153 Recovery of 0355 Motor Vehicle

Exchange Overpayment of Product Liability


USC 3410 0 160 Stockholders' Suits Injury

o 875 Customer Challenge 12 Veteran's Benefits 0360 Other Personal

o 890 Other Statuory Actions 0 190 Other Contrct 0 362 Personal Injury-

mmodations 0891 Agrcultural Act 0 195 Contract Product Med Malpractice 0444 Welfare o 892 Economic Stabilization Liability 0 365 Personal Injury-

Act 0 196 Franchise Product Liability


Fee Determi- 0230 Rent Lease & Ejectment . .

o 445 American with


Disabilities -

o 893 Environmental Matters 0 368 Asbestos Personal 0894 Energy Allocation Act 0210 Land Condemnation Injury Product o 895 Freedom of Info. Act 220 Foreclosure

O . Liabilit

Employment
446 American with
Disabilities -

0900 Appeal of

nation Under Equal 0 240 Tort to Land 462 Natur.ahz.ation Access to Justice 0 245 Tort Product Liability Apphcation

Other
o 440 Other Civil

870 Taxes (U.S. Plaintiff or Defendant)


o 871 IRS-Third Part 26

o 950 Constitutionality of.State 0 290 All Other Real Propert 0 463 Ha?eas C0I)us-

Rights

Statutes Alien Detainee


Actions

USC 7609

o 465 Other Immigration

FOR OFFICE USE ONL Y: Case Number: AFTER COMPLETING THE FRONT SIDE OF FORM CV-71, COMPLETE THE INFORMATION REQUESTED BELOW.
CV -71 (05/08)

CIVIL COVER SHEET

American LegalNet. Inc,

Page I of 2

ww.FormsWorkflow.com

Case 2:12-cv-04301-DSF-CW Document 1

UNITED STATES DISTRICT COURT, CENTRA DISTRICT OF CALIFORNIA


CIVIL COVER SHEET

Filed 05/17/12 Page 60 of 60 Page ID #:63

VIII(a). IDENTICAL CASES: Has this action been previously filed in this court and dismissed, remanded or closed? ~ No 0 Yes

If yes, list case number(s):


VIII(b). RELATED CASES: Have any cases been previously fied in this court that are related to the present case? 0 No ~ Yes
If

yes, list case number(s): CV12-03970 PSG (JEMx); CV12-04036 (GHK) (Ex); CV12-4270 R (AJWx)

Civil cases are deemed related if a previously fied case and the present case:
(Check all boxes that apply) 0 A. Arise from the same or closely related trnsactions, happenings, or events; or ~ B. Call for determination of the same or substantially related or similar questions of law and fact; or
Dc For other reasons would entail substantial duplication oflabor if heard by different

judges; or

~ D. Involve the same patent, trademark or copyrght, and one of the factors identified above in a, b or c also is present.
IX. VENUE: (When completing the following information, use an additional sheet if

necessary.)

(a) List the County in this District; California County outside of this District; State if other than California; or Foreign Country, in which EACH named plaintiff resides. this box is checked, eo to item (b). the government, its agencies or employees is a named plaintiff. If o Check here if
I County in this District:. California County outside of this District; State, if other than California; or Foreign Country
i

I Los Angeles County


,

(b) List the County in this District; California County outside of o Check here if

this District; State ifother than California; or Foreign Country, in which EACH named defendant resides. the government, its agencies or employees is a named defendant (fthis box is checked go to item (c)
California County outside of

County in this District:.

this District; State, ifother than California; or Foreign Country

Los Angeles County

(c) List the County in this Distrct; California County outside of this Distrct; State if other than California; or Foreign Countr, in which EACH claim arose. Note' In land condemnation cases ,use the location of the tract of land involved
County in this District:.
California Countv outside of

this District; State, if other than California; or Foreign Country

, ,

Los Angeles County


* Los Angeles, Orange, San Bernardino, Riverside, Ventu Note: In land condemnation cases, use the location of the tr
X. SIGNA TVRE OF A TIORNEY (OR PRO PER):

Date May 17, 2012

pleadings Notice to Counsel/Parties: The CV-71 (1S-44) Civil Cover Sheet and the info tion c ntained herein neither replace nor supplement the filing and serice of or other papers as required by law. This form, approved by the Judicial Conference 0 nited States in September 1974, is required pursuant to Local Rule 3 -1 is not fied but is used by the Clerk of the Court for the purpose of statistics, venue and initiating the civil docket sheet. (For more detailed instrctions, see separate instrctions sheet.)

Key to Statistical codes relating to Social Security Cases:

Nature of Suit Code Abbreviation

Substantive Statement of Cause of Action

861 HiA

All claims for health insurance benefits (Medicare) under Title 18, Part A, of the Social Security Act, as amended. Also, include claims by hospitals, skilled nursing facilities, etc., for certification as providers of services under the
progrm. (42 V.S.C 1935FF(b))
All claims for "Black Lung" benefits under Title 4, Part B, of

8~ BL
863 DIWC 863 DIWW

the Federal Coal Mine Health and Safety Act of 1969.

(30 V.S.C. 923)

the Social Security Act, as All claims fied by insured workers for disability insurance benefits under Title 2 of amended; plus all claims fied for child's insurance benefits based on disability. (42 V.S.C 405(g))
All claims fied for widows or widowers insurance benefits based on disability under Title 2 of

the Social Security

~4 ssm
865 RSI
CV -71 (05/08)

Act, as amended. (42 V.S.C 405(g))


All claims for supplemental security income payments based upon disability fied under Title 16 of the Social Security Act, as amended.
All claims for retirement (old age) and survivors benefits under Title 2 of

the Social Security Act, as amended. (42


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V.S.C (g))

CIVIL COVER SHEET

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