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Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

COURSE DESCRIPTION
The goal of Foundations English 201 is to help students learn how to reason carefully and express ideas clearly. Students develop these competencies as they learn to recognize strong arguments, uncover assumptions, evaluate evidence, recognize rhetorical patterns, and infer ideas from data. To apply their understanding of these skills, students write summaries, essays synthesizing ideas from diverse sources, critiques of arguments, and research papers that focus on issues relevant to their majors.

COURSE STRUCTURE
Reading and writing assignments in Foundations English 201 are organized around a theme: "Knowledge, Understanding, and Wisdom." In a BYU-Idaho faculty address, then president David A. Bednar suggested that we associate "knowledge" with our minds--acquiring facts and ideas. We associate "understanding" with our hearts-internalizing the knowledge we find most meaningful. Finally, we associate "wisdom" with our hands--applying in useful ways that which we have come to know and understand. Elder Bednar's insights provide an apt framework for Foundations English 201. Unit One, "Knowledge," examines those skills linked to acquiring knowledge: active reading and summary. Unit Two, "Understanding," moves toward taking knowledge to heart and assessing its worth: synthesis and critique. Lastly, Unit Three, "Wisdom," explores ways to apply knowledge and understanding to solve problems: research and argument.

LEARNING OUTCOMES
Students will develop reading and writing skills during each of the course units:

Knowledge
ACTIVE READING AND SUMMARY

Understanding
SYNTHESIS AND CRITIQUE

Wisdom
RESEARCH AND ARGUMENT

o o o o

Comprehend and retain complex texts Recognize rhetorical purposes and patterns Make inferences from data Paraphrase and summarize texts accurately

o o o

Infer connections among related texts Analyze and critique complex arguments Consider evidence, assumptions, ambiguities, and fallacies of logic Recognize that reason often precedes revelation

Develop a research strategy appropriate to a major-specific issue Discern relationships among appeals of ethos, pathos, and logos Integrate sources into a persuasive paper according to an acceptable style Compose an argument that reflects original thought and avoids plagiarism

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

COURSE REQUIREMENTS
Major Assignments

A Graphic Vision of Our Course

Students will complete the following writing assignments: o An individual annotation code, complete with an illustration of the application. o A summary presenting the essence of a text by reducing it to its most important points (250 words). o A synthesis paper integrating three to four sources from the anthology (1500 words). o A critique of a substantive argument (1500 words). o A proposal for the research paper. o A research paper focused on an issue relevant to the student's major, presented according to APA format (3000 words).

Minor Assignments
DAILY QUIZZES

Quizzes may be given at the beginning of class. They will only be based upon the reading for that day. The purpose of these quizzes is not to trick you but to reward you with points for attending class and for doing your reading carefully. To illustrate my goodwill, during the quiz you can use any handwritten reading notes you have taken (not notes written in your book, however).Quizzes cover the days reading and can take three different forms: 1) formal five question quizzes, 2) cold call quizzes where I call on students randomly to respond to questions orally, and 3) various in-class writing tasks. These quizzes cannot be made up under any circumstances except University excused absences. Since each quiz is only worth five points, missing one or two will not damage your grade, but be careful as these points do add up.
PREPARATION POINTS

Frequently you will have work that is assigned to do outside of class, and it will be listed on the course outline as due. Bring these smaller assignments to class with you in the format discussed during our sessions together. You will receive points (usually five) for being prepared with this written work. To receive full credit, you must be present at the beginning of class, and the task must be completed on time and in the format required. You will not receive credit for arriving late with your assignment.
GROUP REVISION WORKSHOPS

On rough draft due dates, you will receive five points for arriving to class on time with completed paper in hand. You cannot receive credit for a partial, electronic, or handwritten draft. You can earn another five points by being on task for the entire time allotted for the workshop and providing thoughtful and meaningful feedback for your classmates.
REFLECTIVE LEARNING BLOG

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

At the end of each week, you will reflect on your experiences related to our class on a blog on our I-Learn page, discovering what you have learned through your reading and studying, in-class discussions, research, writing, etc. You will respond to questions like: What have you learned this week? What have you done to improve your writing and reading? How have you participated this week in class? How might you improve your learning next week?

Texts
We will use the texts listed below in our class (Stephen Pinker on the right is just an author/researcher I really like who has wild and crazy hair). The online anthology is purchased through the bookstore and accessed through I-Learn. In the first half of the semester you will be required to print off many documents from this anthology, and we have done it this way to save you the cost of purchasing an entire anthology. However, you do need to plan for the additional cost of printing off, on a high quality printer, many of the essays. You should locate or purchase a three ring binder to collect these documents in. Also, throughout the semester we will be practicing annotation skills, and you will sometimes be required to turn in these readings with your markings.

Concise Rules of APA Style

Asking the Right Questions, 9th Ed.

The Way of

Wisdom

UNIVERSITY AND COURSE POLICIES


Student Honor
As we follow the path of discipleship and learn to be more like Christ (thinking, feeling, and acting as He does). Living a life of honor: Begins as we learn and live the baseline standards of the Honor Code, understand their purposes, and are true to the promises we have made. Continues as we heed the promptings of the Spirit to raise our personal bar of righteousness and foster a spirit of integrity, sacrifice, consecration, love, service, and willing obedience as students and throughout our lives. Prepares our hearts for devoted discipleship in the family, church, work, and community. Please review these sections in the online catalogue at byui.edu: o Honor Code | Academic Honesty | Dress and Grooming Standards

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

Assessment
FEEDBACK
In

giving feedback on your written work, I see myself as a coach. In this role, I try to encourage you in things that you are doing well. I also try to provide you with constructive feedback as a reader of your paper. You will notice that I react to your paper as I read through it, with notes in the text and in the margins that reflect what I am thinking as I read your paper. Since audience awareness is essential in effective writing, these comments are intended to help you see and understand how someone besides yourself reacts to your written message. In addition to these comments directly on the text of your paper, I will provide you with a feedback form which will give you a quick view of your performance on specific skills pertaining to each assignment. In this class you are not in competition with each other for a grade, but you are evaluated on your mastery of the skills essential to the writing task. I will provide you with the feedback form for each task when you receive the assignment. This will allow you to become familiar with each of the criteria prior to my evaluation of your work. I hope that these feedback forms will become revision guides as you move from assignment to assignment. The third form of feedback that you will receive from me is an end note at the bottom of the feedback form. I usually keep these very brief and address my comments to you personally. All three forms of feedback are intended to coach and help you. You will be most effective in progressing as a writer if you accept the feedback with humility and a desire to improve rather than becoming defensive about your writing. Please = 100- 93% remember that I am on your side, and I want you to succeed. Nothing will make A Excellent A- = 93-90% me happier than every student in the class raising their skills to a level where B+ = 89-87% everyone receives an A.
B = 86-84% Very good Of course a grade will be attached to your written work, based upon the project B- = 83-80% as a whole. This is called holistic grading, and it means that the grade reflects the overall effectiveness of the project with all of the individual parts and skills taken C+ = 77-79% into consideration. The grade will be applied in accordance with the following C = 76-74% Average scale. C- = 73-70% I am always happy to discuss any graded assignment with you, but to encourage you to take responsibility for your own work, I need you to do a couple of things D+ = 69-67% for me. First, wait 24 hours to schedule an appointment with me. This will give D = 66-64% Below average both you and I some distance from the paper and some objectivity. Second, this D- = 63-60% will also provide some time for you to think of some revision ideas for your paper. Please come to this conference with at least three ideas to improve your F = 59-0% Incomplete paper, and this will be a starting point for our discussion. Please be aware that no single paper or assignment can destroy your grade. I make an effort in the class to balance the points that come from the papers with other assignments such as quizzes and draft work EVALUATION

Attendance
Darin L. Hammond Rigby Hall 300 496-4382 email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

Since much of our learning will take place in class as we discuss, analyze, and write together, attendance is mandatory. You can earn an extra percentage point or two on your final grade with your perfect attendance. You are allowed two absences for whatever reason (illness, funerals, weddings, etc.), and each absence thereafter will result in a final grade reduction of one percent. Eight absences or more will be grounds for failure of the course. The only excused absence must be university approved (field trips, conferences, etc. for other classes), so plan your absences accordingly. Three late arrivals (after the prayer) will equal an absence. Absence is never an excuse for a late assignment, no exceptions, so talk with me before the due date if you are having problems. Also, quizzes cannot be made up under any circumstances.

Class Participation
You are expected to come to class daily with your reading and writing assignments accomplished and ready to discuss ideas with the class and small groups as suggested in the BYU-I Learning Model. If you do not participate in class, your learning will be hindered, and your grade will be affected. Your grade can be reduced by up to 20% if over the course of the semester you have failed to be an active participant in the learning of the class. You will account for your participation and learning in weekly reflective learning blog entries.

I-Learn and Email


For this class you will be expected to monitor your campus email and blackboard daily. Frequently you will receive assignments, instructions, reminders, etc., and you will be expected to access those before our class period. In addition, lost or missed handouts can be accessed through blackboard. All major assignments will be posted as attachments on discussion boards. If you access your campus email rarely, forward your mail to the address you use.

Conferences
I always love to collaborate with you in your reading and writing. Please feel free to come by my office or chat after class. Remember as we meet together that I cannot take "I cant show you my report card. Its still in litigation." over your paper. In other words, I am here to be a Cartoon by Jonny Hawkins sounding board and a reader for you. You cannot simply send me an email draft of your paper asking me to make it an A or to fix it for you. The paper would become mine instead of yours. So, come to our conferences with three or four areas you would like some feedback and input on. Remember that it is your paper, and I will always try to help you make it the best you can without taking it over. Also, students usually find the Writing Center extremely useful in revising their work.

Success
This is an intensive class, but you can succeed, and I want to assist you. Several things will help in meeting your goals for the semester: Regular attendance and active participation in class Thorough studying and application of readings 6 hours minimum studying and writing time outside of class per week An inquisitive and open mind with readingslooking for value rather than flaws

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

Effective application of writing process on writing projects: prewriting, drafting, rewriting, editing Willingness to use resources such as writing center, tutors, textbooks, etc. to revise and polish written work Individual initiative in generating ideas and goals for improving reading and writing skills Humility and dedication in applying feedback from past assignments to current assignments Passion and commitment in writing, reading, and learning

Awesome Help for All Students


Go to http://www.byui.edu/AcademicLearning or the McKay Library 272 for information about how the writing, reading, math, and study skills centers can help you increase success in all of your classes. To schedule a tutor for a specific class, log on to Tutor Request under Student Services and follow the instructions.

Grievances
I make every reasonable effort to consider your attitudes, values, beliefs, and feelings as I choose material to teach course-related concepts. I take great care in choosing the works we read. In the unlikely event that I offend you or, in your opinion, I overstep my bounds, please come talk to me about it. I promise to listen to your concern, to take it seriously, and to explain my actions, if necessary. Follow this advice, offered by the Savior: if a teacher offends you, go and tell him his fault between thee and him alone (Mat. 18:15). Finally, consider the following from a 1995 Scroll article: There are several steps students can take if they have any concerns about a teacher, his/her teaching method, or the way students are treated in the classroom. The first and most effective way is to talk to the teacher directly. This step solves 90% of problems between teachers and students, [Max] Checketts [academic vice president at BYUI] said. If students dont understand what is being taught, they should go directly to the teacher for clarification. Students have the right to contact the professor and make an appointment with him or her to discuss concerns. Going to someone above the teacher first is a waste of time ... Students will have better luck if they start at the bottom; itll save a lot of extra headaches. Students end up talking to the teacher anyway. Teachers have the right to hear student concerns about them first. By going to someone above them, students are not giving teachers the opportunity to represent themselves fairly. ... Another concern students have is the subject material being presented to the class. ... [BYUI] cant skip teaching sensitive issues. Were a Church school and we must give the same education as one would get at another [university].

Electronics in Class
While I realize how important texting, email, Facebook, and the like are for you, please be courteous to your classmates and instructor by refraining from their use during our class time together. Unless I indicate otherwise, laptops are not needed in class and should be stowed away out of sight. Use of cell phones or laptops during class will be disruptive, and you will be marked absent as a result. Remember that attendance is important for your grade and your behavior in class does as well.

Students with Disabilities

BYU-Idaho is committed to providing a working and learning atmosphere which reasonably accommodates qualified persons with disabilities. If you have any disability which may impair your ability to complete this course successfully, please contact the Services for Students with Disabilities Office at (208) 4961158. Reasonable academic accommodations are reviewed for all students who have qualified documented disabilities. Services are coordinated with the student and instructor by this office. If you need assistance or feel you have been unlawfully discriminated against on the basis of disability, you may seek resolution through established policy and procedures by contacting the Personnel Office at (208) 496-1130.

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

Sexual Harassment
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 prohibits sex discrimination against any participant in an educational program that receives federal funds, including federal loans and grants. Title IX also covers student-to-student sexual harassment. If you encounter unlawful sexual harassment or gender-based discrimination, please contact the Personnel Office at (208) 496-1130.

Tentative Outline Follows

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-4382

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201

Tentative Outline
Let us seek to live intellectually. --David O McKay
JAN INTRODUCTION TO THE COURSE 4 W Syllabus, course outline, quizzes Favorite passage for next time Pre-reading, reading, and annotating Morowitz 6 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM IDENTIFY A FAVORITE PASSAGE, A PARAGRAPH OR TWO, FROM ONE OF THE ESSAYS AND EXPLAIN YOUR REACTION IN 250 WORDS (PRINT OUT) PREPARE FOR QUIZ OVER ALL READING READ AND ANNOTATE PRINT OFF AND READ THE SYLLABUS MORTIMER'S "HOW TO MARK A BOOK" (FINISH READING AND ANNOTATING) MOROWITZS DRINKING HEMLOCK AND OTHER NUTRITIONAL MATTERS IN THE WAY OF WISDOM (FROM OUR I-LEARN PAGE ANTHOLOGY) CHAPTER 1, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS PRINT AND READ HOW TO ANNOTATE AND AND HOW TO PTIC UNDER THE ASSIGNMENTS ON I-LEARN To Be Assigned Academic Skills Portfolio, Learning Blog In-class Annotating code, PTICs, PTIC Morowitz, Why all this matters A man in search of truth has no peculiar system to sustain, nor peculiar dogma to defend or theory to uphold; he embraces all truth, and that truth, like the sun in the firmament, shines forth and spreads its effulgent rays over all creation, and if men will divest themselves of bias and prejudice, and prayerfully and conscientiously search after truth, they will find it wherever they turn their attention. --John Taylor

9 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY BEGIN IDENTIFY YOUR ANNOTATION CODE
OR KEY

READ AND ANNOTATE VIRUS OF THE MIND , "INTRODUCTION" HAMMONDS KNOWLEDGE AND FAITH HARTVIGSENS LEARNING IS OUR THEOLOGY To Be Assigned Annotation and Summary Portfolios In-class PTICing and Annotating Using Past Readings If there is any truth in heaven, earth, or hell, I want to embrace it. I care not what shape it comes in to me, who brings it, or who believes in it, whether it is popular or unpopular. --Brigham Young 11 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY

READ AND ANNOTATE TWAINS CORN-PONE OPINIONS ALDOUS HUXLEYS PROPAGANDA UNDER A DICTATORSHIP CHAPTER 2, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS In-class Asking issue questions, LC versus PR questions, identifying conclusions, "Propaganda" quiz 13 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM

IDENTIFY AN EXAMPLE OF GROUPTHINK FROM YOUR PERSONAL EXPERIENCE AND EXPLAIN IN 250 WORDS (PRINT OUT)

PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY LIST TEN OF THE BEST QUESTIONS YOU
GENERATE FROM THE READINGS FOR TODAY (IN YOUR MARGINAL ANNOTATIONS) (PRINT OUT)

READ AND ANNOTATE VIRUS OF THE MIND , CHAPTERS 1 AND 2 CHAPTER 3, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS In-class Mapping an argument and identifying reasons

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201


16 M CIVIL RIGHTS DAY NO CLASS 18 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM 23 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM ACADEMIC SKILLS PORTFOLIO PARTS I AND II READ AND ANNOTATE VIRUS OF THE MIND , CHAPTERS 7 AND 8 C ONCISE R ULES , 209-255 (BECOME FAMILIAR WITH HOW TO USE THIS SECTION, WHERE ENTRIES ARE LOCATED, AND HOW TO FIND DIFFERENT KINDS OF SOURCESYOU NEED TO REVIEW IT ALL) To Be Assigned Synthesis Paper In-class Inventing the synthesis paper, paraphrasing 25 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY READ AND ANNOTATE VIRUS OF THE MIND , CHAPTERS 9 AND 10 In-class Quoting Sparingly 27 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY READ AND ANNOTATE VIRUS OF THE MIND , CHAPTERS 11 AND 12 SCUDDER IN THE LABORATORY OF AGASSIZ In-class APA documentation, incorporating sources 30 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM SYNTHESIS PAPER DRAFT In-class Evaluating a Synthesis By recognizing our universe as one of law, order, and intelligence, science has driven fear from the hearts of men. Intelligence acts in intelligent ways. The intelligence at the head of all things may be trusted to act intelligently. There arises therefrom a trust in the things about us. The age-old horror, called fear, which has so long distracted humanity, vanishes. Superstition is laid low. Men come to understand better the love of God, and his offerings of goodness. Certainly, in so doing, science has contributed to religious faith. --John A. Widtsoe

ACADEMIC SKILLS PORTFOLIO PART I, HARD COPY AT THE BEGINNING OF CLASS PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY READ AND ANNOTATE
VIRUS OF THE MIND , CHAPTERS 3 AND 4

CALANDRAS ANGELS ON A PIN PRINT OFF AND READ HANDOUT SUMMARY, QUOTATION, AND PARAPHRASE FROM I-LEARN UNDER ASSIGNMENTS AND RESEARCH PAPER C ONCISE R ULES , 171-188 (LEARN HOW TO CITE IN TEXT)
In-class Writing summaries and APA in-text documentation 20 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY

WRITE A 250-WORD SUMMARY OF ONE OF


THE PIECES WE HAVE STUDIED SO FAR/NOT FROM YOUR PART 1 (PRINT A COPY)

READ AND ANNOTATE VIRUS OF THE MIND , CHAPTERS 5 AND 6 C ONCISE R ULES , 188-207 In-class Questioning and inferring to clarify summaries, introducing sources, citing sources

Truth is truth forever. Scientific truth cannot be theological lie. To the sane mind, theology and philosophy must harmonize. They have the common ground of truth on which to meet. --John A. Widtsoe

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201


FEB DUE 1W LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM PTIC READINGS FOR TODAY READ AND ANNOTATE LIPPMANN THE INDISPENSABLE OPPOSITION THOREAUS ON CIVIL DISOBEDIENCE" (FOUND IN THE READINGS FOLDER ON ILEARN) In-class Finding issue questions to write about in your major, inclass prewriting activity to find an issue question 3F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM CONTINUE REVISING SYNTHESIS PAPER READ AND ANNOTATE OBAMA A MORE PERFECT UNION LAKOFF MUCH MORE THAN RACE: WHAT MAKES A GREAT SPEECH GREAT In-class Discussion of issues, debates, fairness, biases 8 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM BRS PART 1 PRINT OUT AND BRING TO CLASS BASIC RESEARCH STRATEGY PART 2 FROM THE ASSIGNMENTS TAB UNDER RESEARCH READ AND ANNOTATE INFORMATIONAL SOURCES SUCH AS ARTICLES
AND BOOK CHAPTERS FOR YOUR RESEARCH PROJECT

To Be Assigned Basic Research Strategies Part 2 In-class Library research, informational and branching sources, narrowing an issue question 10 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM BRS PART 2 READ AND ANNOTATE INFORMATIONAL SOURCES SUCH AS ARTICLES
AND BOOK CHAPTERS FOR YOUR RESEARCH PROJECT

6 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM SYNTHESIS PAPER PRINT AND BRING TO CLASS BASIC RESEARCH STRATEGY PART 1 FROM THE ASSIGNMENTS UNDER RESEARCH To Be Assigned Basic Research Strategy Part 1 In-class Library research, directional and background sources, evaluating sources, finding an issue question The doctrine of the Latter-day Saints is truth Now, sir, you may think that it is a broad assertion that it is truth; but sir, the first and fundamental principle of our holy religion is that we believe that we have a right to embrace all and every item of truth, without limitations or without being circumscribed or prohibited by the creeds or superstitious notions of men. --Joseph Smith

To Be Assigned Research proposal and project In-class Purpose and rationale, outline, timeline, annotated bibliography 13 M Due LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM READ AND ANNOTATE PRINT AND READ RESEARCHING TIPS FROM I-LEARN UNDER ASSIGNMENTS AND RESEARCH PAPER INFORMATIONAL SOURCES SUCH AS ARTICLES
AND BOOK CHAPTERS FOR YOUR RESEARCH PROJECT

In-class Annotated bibliographies, professional presentation and credibility 15 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM BEGIN DRAFTING RESEARCH PROPOSAL READ AND ANNOTATE INFORMATIONAL SOURCES In-class Annotated bibliographies, professional presentation and credibility

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201


17 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM DRAFT OF RESEARCH PROPOSAL READ AND ANNOTATE INFORMATIONAL SOURCES In-class Evaluating proposals The study of science is the study of something eternal. If we study astronomy, we study the works of God. If we study chemistry, geology, optics, or any other branch of science, every new truth we come to the understanding of is eternal; it is a part of the great system of universal truth. It is truth that exists throughout universal nature; and God is the dispenser of all truth. --Brigham Young 20 M PRESIDENTS' DAY NO CLASS 22 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM BEGIN REVISING THE PROPOSAL READ AND ANNOTATE INFORMATIONAL SOURCES In-class Researching, the tree method 24 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM READ AND ANNOTATE INFORMATIONAL SOURCES In-class Researching 27 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM RESEARCH PROPOSAL CONTINUE RESEARCH, READING, AND
WRITING THE RESEARCH PAPER UNTIL FINISHED

29 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM SUMMARY WORKSHEET READ AND ANNOTATE CARRS IS GOOGLE MAKING US STUPID? VIDALS DRUGS CHAPTER 7, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS CHAPTER 8, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS To Be Assigned Evidence Worksheet In-class Detecting ambiguity in Vidals Drugs MAR DUE 2F LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM EVIDENCE WORKSHEET READ AND ANNOTATE ASSOCIATED PRESS, "SCIENCE JOURNAL FINDS WIKIPEDIA PRETTY ACCURATE" ASSOCIATED PRESS, "SOFTWARE TESTS ACCURACY OF WIKIPEDIA ENTRIES" POSTMAN, NEIL, "AMUSING OURSELVES TO DEATH" CHAPTER 6, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS To Be Assigned Fallacies Worksheet In-class Defining Terms and detecting ambiguity One of the grand and fundamental principles of Mormonism is to receive truth, let it come from whence it may. --Joseph Smith 5 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM FALLACIES WORKSHEET READ AND ANNOTATE SUTHERLAND, BENJAMIN, "THE PEOPLE'S ENCYCLOPEDIA" CHAPTER 5, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS To Be Assigned Assumptions Worksheet In-class Values and assumptions, evaluating assumptions

To Be Assigned Critique of an Argument In-class Representing an argument in standard form, values, arguing from value based assumptions, summary True science is a discovery of the secret, immutable and eternal laws, by which the universe is governed; and when practically applied, sets in motion the mighty wheels of useful engines, with all the various machinery which genius has invented, or art contrived. It ameliorates the condition of man, by extending the means of intellectual, moral, social, and domestic happiness. --W.W. Phelps

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201


7 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM ASSUMPTIONS WORKSHEET READ AND ANNOTATE 16 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM READ AND ANNOTATE SPEED READ THE FOLLOWING CHAPTERS

ULLMAN, ELLEN, NEEDED: TECHIES WHO KNOW SHAKESPEARE CHAPTER 4, A SKING THE R IGHT Q UESTIONS
To Be Assigned Analysis of Language (Ambiguity) Worksheet In-class Logos, ethos, pathos, how strong is the proof? 9F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM ANALYSIS OF LANGUAGE (AMBIGUITY WORKSHEET) In-class Group Workshop, Writing Summary and Conclusion

o WHAT SIGNIFICANT INFORMATION IS OMITTED? (P. 147) o WHAT REASONABLE CONCLUSIONS ARE POSSIBLE (P. 157)

In-class Formatting Research Paper and APA Style 19 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM FINAL DRAFT OF CRITIQUE PAPER In-class Grading Session, Must Be in Attendance 21 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM RESEARCH, READING, WRITING In-class Formatting the research paper 23 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM RESEARCH, READING, WRITING HARD COPY PTIC AND THESIS OF THE
RESEARCH PAPER

12 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM DRAFTS OF ALL PARAGRAPHS READ AND ANNOTATE BEDNAR, DAVID A., "LEARNING TO LOVE LEARNING" In-class Logical fallacies, grammar review, commas We should gather all the good and true principles in the world and treasure them up, or we shall not come out true Mormons. --Joseph Smith 14 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM DRAFT 2 OF CRITIQUE PAPER, REVISED READ AND ANNOTATE SPEED READ THE FOLLOWING CHAPTERS

To Be Assigned In-class Rewriting vs. editing, Economy 26 M DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM WORK ON ECONOMY AND RESEARCH PAPER In-class Rewriting vs. editing, Economy Worksheet 28 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM WORK ON ECONOMY AND RESEARCH PAPER In-class Coherence in writing, Economy Worksheet formatting the research paper Research Paper question and answer

Economy Worksheet

o ARE THERE RIVAL CAUSES? (P. 122) o ARE THE STATISTICS DECEPTIVE? (P. 137)

In-class Evaluating critiques, sentence errors

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

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Advanced Writing and Critical Reading FDENG 201


30 F DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM DRAFT OF RESEARCH PAPER To Be Assigned Oral Presentations In-class Evaluating research papers, workshop APR DUE 2M LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY BY 5:00 PM REVISE, POLISH, PERFECT RESEARCH PAPER ORAL PRESENTATIONS In-class Oral Presentations 4 W DUE LEARNING BLOG FRIDAY B AND Y 5:00 PM REVISE, POLISH, PERFECT RESEARCH PAPER ORAL PRESENTATIONS ECONOMY OF WRITING WORKSHEET In-class Oral Presentations The honest investigator must be prepared to follow wherever the search of truth may lead. Truth is often found in the most unexpected places. He must, with fearless and open mind "insist that facts are far more important than any cherished, mistaken beliefs." --Hugh B. Brown

Darin L. Hammond

Rigby Hall 300

496-1495

email: hammondd@byui.edu

13 | P a g e