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COMMUNICATIONS AND

PARTNERSHIPS DEPARTMENT
PRESS PACK
GERHARD RICHTER
PANORAMA
6 JUNE - 24 SEPTEMBER 2012
GERHARD
RICHTER
GERHARD RICHTER
PANORAMA
6 JUNE - 24 SEPTEMBER 2012
GALERIE 1, LEVEL 6
CONTENTS
1. PRESS RELEASE PAGE 3
2. PRESENTATION OF THE EXHIBITION PAGE 5
- PLAN 0F THE EXHBT0N
- EXHBT0N 0VERVEW
3. EXTRACT FROM THE CATALOGUE PAGE 10
4. EXTRACTS FROM NICHOLAS SEROTAS INTERVIEW
WITH GERHARD RICHTER PAGE 14
5. CHRONOLOGICAL SEQUENCE PAGE 17
6. PUBLICATIONS PAGE 20
7. LIST OF WORKS PRESENTED IN THE EXHIBITION PAGE 21
8. IMAGES FOR THE PRESS PAGE 28
9. USEFUL INFORMATION PAGE 31
X
Communications and
Partnerships Department
75191 Paris cedex 04
Director
Franoise Pams
telephone
00 33 (0)1 44 78 12 87
e-mail
francoise.pamscentrepompidou.fr
press officer
Cline Janvier
telephone
00 33 (0)1 44 78 49 87
e-mail
celine.janviercentrepompidou.fr
www.centrepompidou.fr
21 May 2012
PRESS RELEASE
GERHARD RICHTER
PANORAMA
6 JUNE - 24 SEPTEMBER 2012
GALERIE 1, LEVEL 6
From June 6th 2012, the Centre Pompidou pays tribute to Gerhard Richter, one of the great figures
of contemporary painting. The result of a team effort with Londons Tate Modern, and the Neue
Nationalgalerie in Berlin, the Panorama retrospective at the Centre Pompidou brings together a
selection of 150 major works by Gerhard Richter. The artist has been fully involved in the original
design conceived specifically for the exhibition which offers a double insight, both chronological
and thematic, into his career from the 1960s until his most recent works.
I pursue no objectives, no system, no tendency; I have no programme, no style, no direction. I like
the indefinite, the boundless. I like continual uncertainty.
Gerhard Richter has this uncanny ability to reinvent and transform himself, and yet every time
to push his work into a new direction and to promote a new vision of painting and of art history.
Ever since the start of his career, Gerhard Richter has been experimenting with radically different
pictorial styles. Thus, moving away in the seventies from the photo-paintings he had created from
photographs in the early sixties, Richter embraced a new form of abstraction in which he blended
colour grids, gestural abstraction and monochromes. All through the 1980s he kept reinventing
the historical genres of the portrait, landscape and historical painting, imbuing them with his own
erudite and innovative manner. At the same time, he was also exploring a new kind
of abstract paintings suffused with acid colours in which geometric and gestural shapes dissolve.
In the 1990s, the artist fine-tuned what would become his signature technique of spreading wet
paint with a large wooden or metal board.
Communications and
Partnerships Department
75191 Paris cedex 04
Director
Franoise Pams
telephone
00 33 (0)1 44 78 12 87
e-mail
francoise.pamscentrepompidou.fr
press officer
Cline Janvier
telephone
00 33 (0)1 44 78 49 87
e-mail
celine.janviercentrepompidou.fr
www.centrepompidou.fr
Betty [Betty]
1988
Oil on canvas
102 72 cm
Saint Louis Art Museum
30 April 2012
4
His first exhibition in a French museum took place at the Centre Pompidou in 1977. In addition
to celebrating the artists 80th birthday, Panorama is a tribute to one of the greatest painters
of the past fifty years.
The catalogue Gerhard Richter. Panorama is published by the ditions du Centre Pompidou and
edited by Camille Morineau, curator of the exhibition and at the Muse national dart moderne.
Organised by Centre Pompidou in association with Nationalgalerie Staatliche Museen zu Berlin
and Tate Modern, London
At the same time the Louvre presents Gerhard Richter, Dessins et aquarelles, 1957-2008,
from June 7
th
to september 17
th
2012.
The exhibition Gerhard Richter has been supported by LVMH / Mot Hennessy . Louis Vuitton
In media partnership
with
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6
EXHIBITION OVERVIEW
ROOM 1
PAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY
Painting Irom a photograph seemed to me the most unartistic thing that anyone could do.
Gerhard Richter appeared on the European scene in the early 1960s with works inspired directly from
photographs, which he called photo-paintings. He immediately became established as an alternative
to American Pop Art and European informal art, defending a new vision of painting.His works, produced
on the basis of his own photographs or images selected from the newspapers are imbued with a strict
expressive neutrality. However, his selection of subjects made him one of the first artists of his generation
to face up to Germanys Nazi past and the emergence of a Western consumer culture.
The fidelity to the original image is the result of a classic duplication procedure: after squaring up the
photos, the image is enlarged by means of an episcope, then recopied onto the chosen medium. The final
blurred effect is obtained by rubbing the still-wet paint with a brush, either in horizontal bands or by
blurring the edges.
ROOM 2
INHERITING A TRADITION
do see myselI as the heir to a vast, great, rich culture oI painting which we have lost, but which places
obligations on us.
Richter disagreed with Marcel Duchamps proclamations on the end of painting as an artistic medium,
stressing its powerful link with reality. With his large canvases representing landscapes, mountains,
clouds and seascapes, he has established himself as an heir to the German Romantic tradition. His vast
spaces where nature is the only protagonist recall the melancholy panoramas of Caspar David Friedrich.
Richter invites us to undergo a spiritual experience linked to the contemplation of a grandiose nature;
sublimated and impenetrable.
With his Clouds series, which he began in 1968, he nevertheless borrows from Duchamp the notion of
chance of which the latter was so fond. This ever-changing, unpredictable and inconsistent motif enabled
him to oppose even the very idea of form, and to define a method of anti-composition.
ROOM 3
OPPOSING THE MOTIF
pursue no ob|ectives, no system, no tendency, have no programme, no style, no direction. like
the indeIinite, the boundless. like continual uncertainty.
In the late 1960s, Gerhard Richters pictorial language underwent its first radical shift with his first
non-figurative compositions. These canvases extend the experiment with chance begun in the Clouds series,
but developing towards abstraction.
In the Colour Charts, inspired by the colour samples offered in paint shops, the artist suppresses any
figurative element, gesture or message. The rectangles are faultless, the colours smooth and uniform.
The layout may be random but the rectangles are laid out according to a strictly determined protocol.
During the same period, Richter returned to his photo-paintings and created the Details series; photographs
of details of existing paintings enlarged and projected onto canvas. The chromatism of this series
enabled him to experiment in a different manner with a range of infinite shades.
7
ROOM 4
RELEASING ABSTRACTION
Horrible gaudy sketches, sentimental things Iunctioning through the association oI ideas, anachronistic,
stereotypical, ambiguous, practically pseudo-psychodramatic and thereIore unintelligible, without
meaning or logic, iI indeed there must be any.
Following the first experiments with non-figurative language, the works of the 1980s present more lyrical
compositions: the gesture surges with energy, splattered paint, brushstrokes and flat sweeps of colour
challenge one another, creating breathtaking contrasts on canvases of frequently monumental format.
Rapid movement alternates with more careful work with the aerograph and brush; the process of creation
is long and laborious. The artist often allows several months to pass between the layers of paint.
This pictorial space is not constructed to be harmonious, but complex: the paintings of Richter function
like models of a varied and constantly changing world.
The 1980s mark the beginning of the large abstract canvases which today represent two thirds of the
artists production and which have earned him international recognition.
ROOM 5
REVEALING CHANCE
Letting a thing come, rather than creating it.
In the 1990s, Gerhard Richter continued to paint abstract canvases using a large wooden plank and
a metal squeegee which spreads the still-wet paint and gives it a fluid aspect with multiple hues. Once
he has applied several layers of paint, Richter scrapes them in broad vertical and horizontal movements.
The colour is randomly fixed to the canvas and the interplay of superimposition creates unexpected mattered
effects. The veil of paint thus spread partially hides the underlying surface and allows only some details
of the canvas to emerge. Often, at a later stage, the artist scratches and tears off pieces of canvas in
an ongoing process of construction and deconstruction.
As with his abstracts from the preceding decade, Richter accepts the appearance of figurative forms
in these works, and explains how this is often inevitable: the spectator cannot prevent him or herself
from seeing something even in the most abstract paintings, because everything is rooted in the world;
everything relates in some way to the world and experience.
8
ROOM 6
SEEING THROUGH: GREY AND GLASS
0rey is a colour - and sometimes, to me, the most important oI all.
0rey was absent oI opinion, nothing, neither/nor. t was also a means oI maniIesting my own relationship
with apparent reality. didn`t want to say: t is thus and not otherwise.
Closely paralleling his personal worries, Richter began to paint dark works in a period of uncertainty and
unhappiness. These were born during a destructive instant in which the artist, dissatisfied with the result
of a figurative painting, decided to erase it by covering it with a layer of grey paint. Although identical
at first sight, each canvas is different from the others: the shades of grey, the modulations of the light
on the surface, the way in which the paint is spread out with a roller, paintbrush or fingers; all produce
a set of optical variations.
Another device enabling the artist to force an acuteness of regard on spectators, the Panes of Glass
implode the concept of painting as a window open onto the world.
Glass, which Richter has used throughout his career, also led him to work with mirrors, starting in
the early 1980s.
ROOM 7
RETHINKING CLASSICISM
The classical is what holds me together. t is that which gives me Iorm. t is the order that do not
have to attack. t is something that tames my chaos or holds it together so that can continue to exist.
That was never a question Ior me. That is essential Ior liIe.
Among the paintings of the classical genre revisited by Richter, landscapes find an increasingly important
place in his work. Always painted from photographs taken during his travels or of his surrounding
environment, these canvases give pride of place to nature and the sky, without any human presence.
The sometimes misty, diaphanous, opaque atmosphere obtained through the use of various techniques
of shading accentuates their melancholic and atemporal nature.
ROOM 8
REVEALING INTIMACY
have painted my Iamily so Irequently because they are the ones who really aIIect me most.
Richter painted his first portraits in the mid 1960s. The most recent, Ella (his second daughter) dates
from 2007. This portrait gallery is composed solely of representations of people close to the artist, and,
exceptionally, a self-portrait.
In 1965, Gerhard Richter painted his uncle Rudi, his aunt Marianne and his father Horst. He painted
his uncle in Nazi uniform, taking inspiration from a photograph in which he posed, smiling, and which
was taken shortly before he died in the war. The portrait of his mentally fragile aunt Marianne is based
on a photograph showing her with Richter as a child, before she was killed by the Germans as part of
the Third Reichs eugenics programme. The dark atmosphere of these first portraits is directly linked
to the traumatic experience of the war. But a feeling of intimacy both sublime and natural also emanates
from the portraits of his wife and children, and of his friends and family.
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ROOM 9
18 OCTOBER 1977
t`s about grieI - compassion and grieI. 0ertainly also Iear.
Following his indirect references to Germanys past in some of the 1960s photo-paintings, Richter
took up historical painting once again in 1988. The series, entitled 18 October 1977, evokes the date
of the death of the leaders of the revolutionary Baader-Meinhof group on 18 October 1977 in Stammheim
prison. Under the single title of this fateful date, these fifteen paintings based on press photographs
describe a series of events which took place over a longer period; the arrest, death and funerals
of the founder members of the RAF (Red Army Faction): Holger Meins, Ulrike Meinhof, Gudrun Ensslin,
Andreas Baader and Jan-Carl Raspe.
The artist here creates a kind of profane chapel of remembrance to this traumatic event in German
history.
ROOM 10
CONTINUING TO PAINT
A lot oI people Iind other mediums more attractive-put a screen in a museum and nobody wants
to look at the painting anymore. But painting is my proIession, because it has always been the thing
that interested me most. And now `m oI a certain age, come Irom diIIerent tradition and, in any case,
can`t do anything else. `m still very sure that painting is one oI the most basic human capacities,
like dancing and singing, that make sense, that stay with us, as something human.
t`s not that `m always thinking about how to make something timeless, it`s more a desire to maintain
a certain artistic quality that moves us, that goes beyond what we are, and that is, in that sense,
timeless.
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3. EXTRACT FROM THE CATALOGUE
Some Interpretations of the Word Panorama: Exhibition, Reflection, Overview and
Freeze Frame
By Camille Morineau, Curator of the exhibition
Gerhard Richter was born in Dresden in 1932; this exhibition was a celebration of his eightieth birthday.
One of the leading figures in the contemporary art world, he explored new relationships between painting
and photography in the early sixties, created a new kind of abstraction at the start of the 1970s, and,
then, in the 1980s, reinterpreted historical genres such as portraiture, historical painting, and landscape,
in an erudite, unexpected fashion. With each decade, from his early recognition at international exhibitions
(he represented Germany at the Venice Biennale as early as 1972) all the way to a number of retrospectives
(the last took place at New Yorks Museum of Modern Art in 2002), this important painter has astonished
us not only with his aptitude for self reinvention, but also with his ability to transform the very history of
painting with each new path he takes.
Panorama is, first and foremost, the title of a catalogue, the making of which is the result of collective
effort, much like the exhibition itself. It is organized into six chapters each covering approximately
a decade, and describes the issues, the oeuvre (both that which has been exhibited and that which is not
for public display), the public commissions, the sketches, the sheets for Atlas, and the artists writings.
Panorama, then, also describes the structure of an exhibition that aimed to make the public aware
of the richness of this oeuvre, a richness that changes at each step along the way. Finally, we added
Panorama to the word retrospective to underline the effect of condensed temporality that Richters
work creates today. In the 19
th
Century, a panorama brought together unity of time and place. Is that
coherency a coherency based on a relationship to ancient history, on recurrences and mirror effects
that we wanted to recreate, particularly for the Parisian incarnation of the exhibition, and it was for this
reason that we made the exhibitions narrative a thematic one.
Exhibition: A 5election oI Works, Three nterpretations
The panorama, invented in 1787 and popularized in the 19
th
Century, consisted of a large, convex painting
installed in a big, black room: visitors reached it via a platform, and then found themselves surrounded
by an immense image, usually a cityscape or battle scene. The illusion was all the more effective
because the upper and lower edges of the painting were invisible, as were the light sources. Pedagogy
and pleasure were in competition: the eye devoured the illusion more readily than it would have an actual
landscape, which would have been geographically or historically inaccessible anyway. In our retrospective
exhibition, like in any panorama, not everything is represented; however, we have tried to represent
the multiple facets of the artists oeuvre in a single space. This would have been impossible without
the artists help, and I hereby take this opportunity to thank him once again. We drew up a general list
of works, then, in consultation with the artist, each curator defined how that list should be adapted to
a specific institution, public, or countrywhich works should be added or removed, for example,
or how they should be displayed or hung.
While the artist was indeed generous with his time and open to our suggestions, the collaboration
between curators was also an exciting experience. London curators Mark Godfrey and Nicholas Serota
and their German counterparts, Dorothe Brill and Udo Kittelmann, were attentive colleagues whose
comments and choices enriched the overview of Richters oeuvre exhibited in Paris.
In London, the visitor followed a chronological path through Richters work, and the emphasis was on
his abstract oeuvre. This was fitting in a city that is more familiar with his figurative painting (his Portraits
were exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery in London in 2009). In Berlin, the open, transparent
architecture of Mies van der Rohes Neue Nationalgalerie was set off by the presence of Richters
11
4900 Colours Version I (2007) all around the building. In Paris, the exhibition design was inspired by
the nineteenth-century panorama: the visitor wandered around the work from a central, triangular room
(the headland), discovering each theme as it appeared in chronological order (the landscape).
This headland was not only geographical, but historical too: the grey monochromes and glass panels
recalled Richters first exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in 1977 the year the museum opened,
and the same year as the Marcel Duchamp retrospective. It was also a metaphorical headland: firstly
because the rooms triangular shape evoked the representative schema of the eyes angle of vision;
but also because all of the worksfrom the monochromes and greys to the mirrors and works on, under,
or in glass, and from the 1960s to the present day have consistently and acutely radically questioned
the process of vision.
ReIlections: Mirrors, 0opies, and Doubles
This category of Richters paintings and sculpture is one of the least known and valued today; however,
the central position accorded to it in the Parisian version of Panorama was the result of an interpretative
decision, one that only the benefit of hindsight made possible. It reflected the important place that these
works occupy at the heart of Richters work, and more precisely, the way in which these specific elements
allow us to reread his oeuvre. Both the works in glass, and their reflectionsthe mirrorsallow us
to rediscover a corpus-in-process, the work of reflection and mise en abyme, of doubles, repetitions,
and symbols.
The mirror, an object Richter uses daily to watch his work in the process of being made, has been
a device common to many artists since the dawn of the art form itself. It also served as a stage prop
in the joint 1981 Gerhard Richter/Georg Baselitz exhibition: Richter installed actual mirrors, the size
of large paintings, in the exhibition space as a means of responding to the importance of Baselitz
in Germany at the time (he was a kind of master for the rising generation of German fauves). Rather than
engaging in dialogue with the pictorial neo-impressionist gestures literally reflected in Baseltizs work,
then, these objects stood against them in brutal visual and symbolic contrast. A year later (CR: 485-1/2)
and again in 1988 (CR: 619), these mirror-devices became works in their own right. In the meantime,
1986s little Mirrors [Spiegel] (CR: 619) have rise to a new edition of his work. The paintings and sculptures
created from more or less reflective glass, painted over or under, first appeared as early as 1967
and were then regularly produced, becoming particularly prevalent at the beginning of the 2000s. From
a retrospective point of view, mirrors and glass today represent two of the most original series of Richters
oeuvre: astonishingly diverse,
1
they are essential to an understanding of the artists work, as he himself
has suggested on several occasions: It is the only image that constantly changes. And perhaps the sign
that shows us that all images are mirrors.
2
But if we look a little closer, other works that use neither mirrors nor glass also call the idea of reflection
into question. We know that the first Seascapes are collages in which the sky and sea sometimes blend
together in an artificial horizon.3 The book Ice [Eis] (1981) is another striking example, where Richter
arranges over one hundred of the black-and-white photographs of the reflection of icebergs in still
waters that he had taken during a trip to Greenland in 1982. These photographs explore the multiple
possibilities of these reflective games: up to four of them are laid out per double page, and sometimes
on the other side as well, so that the book can be read from front to back or vice versa in other words,
in all directions.
The mirror games, inversions, reflections and variations on similar images in Ice are not all that far
from the abstract pictorial work in the making. The majority of Richters monumental abstract paintings
from the 1980s are diptychs, both true and false, in which an actual or implicit symmetry organizes how
we read the work.
4
While some pairs are clearly suggested by shared titles followed by a I or a II,
5
others
are merely evoked by titles that are similar to those of similarly sized or identically composed works.
6

In this way, many of the figurative paintings are clearly organized in pairs, or doubles. Two works with
the same title or subject matter are often painted together: there are two almost identical Davos from
1981; two reversed Crnes, one with a candle, from 1983; two Apple [pfel] (CR: 560-1 et 2) studies
from 1984, which differ only in their frames; two differently-sized Staubach (CR: 572), also from 1984;
two views of Venice [Venedig] (CR: 586-1 and 3), both dating from 1985; two almost identical Chinon in 1987;
12
and two views of Landscape near Koblenz [Landschaft bei Koblenz] (CR: 639, 640) from the same year.
Doubling also appears to have been the rule for the figurative paintings of the 1990s.
7
Doubles that are spaced out in time, sometimes as much as ten years apart, are even more revelatory.
These are less the repetition of a specific motif than of a theme: a portrait of the same person, a kind
of bouquet of flowers, a wall with a landscape as background, a traumatic event in history. It is as if
for each significant work created, another will appear, albeit not always immediately and with a visibly
different point of view. Black and white and colour, the historical and the personal: both versions exist.
Two women coming down a flight of stairs (CR: 92) in 1965 and (CR: 134) in 1966; Olympia and Diane,
the mirror images of each other in 1967; even apparently isolated works such as Chicago (1992) end up
finding a reversed double eight years later (Juist); Betty, who lounges in an initial 1977 portrait, turns
away from the viewer in another, painted eleven years later. And isnt it possible to see September (2005)
as the double of October (1989)?
Another great 20th-Century painter, Matisse, used this technique in his Paires and Series; the Centre
Pompidou exhibited these at the same time as Panorama, in an exhibition that not only exposed the
technique for the first time, but, by virtue of its co-presence with the Richter retrospective, highlighted
this shared trait in the work of the two painters.
0verview: a Panorama oI 0lassical Art History en abyme
In addition to reproducing his own work, either exactly or with slight modifications, Richter has been
reproducing masterpieces since the early 1960s. Whether these reproductions are faithful copies or
interpretations, they are always a form of respect. Quite apart from his regular references to Duchamp,
we can cite such works as Family after Old Master [Familie nach Altem Meister] (CR: 26; 1965), inspired
by a John Singleton Copley portrait of his family (1776), or the 1973 series, Annunciation after Titian
[Verkndigung nach Tizian] that he created from a postcard of the painting. During the 1980s, he paid
homage to Chardin and Morandi in a less direct fashion, with his still lifes of apples and bottles;
to Poussin with his large landscapes; to Ingrs The Valpinon Bather (1808) with the portrait of Betty
turning away from him; and to Vermeer with Reader [Lesende], in which his young wife adopts the same
pose as the Woman Reading a Letter (1657). Unlike many twentieth-century artists, Richter does not
situate himself solely within the modern tradition: he is as resolutely classical in the works he chooses
as his references as he is in the way he evokes them. And indeed, he references such masters with
no irony, unlike other painters the American Pop Artists or the European New Realists who,
like Richter, have used photography to appropriate or cite the works of former masters. We are far from
Lichensteins playful versatility here, with his chaotic rendition of the style of modern masters as they
are seen on the other side of the Atlantic; nor are we close to the same games played by Martial Raysse
in France. Consider the classical genre of vanitas, specially the motif of the skull: while Richters Skulls
might share the melancholy of those of Polke in the series the latter dedicated to Goya, or of those
of Warhol (1976), they are also distinguished by their stylistic neutrality, their smooth, expert touch,
and the presence of the candle that sometimes lights them. Richter not only paints the subject matter
of the master, but he does so in the style of the masters: this is more imitation than citation. Now, this way
of inhabiting the classical tradition through imitation is an exact definition of classicism at a higher level,
as Andr Gide illustrated in the famous speech he gave at the beginning of the last century, in which he
extolled the virtues of imitation, and not invention, as a desirable source of renewal in art.
8
Richter cites
this reference to classicism more and more often himself.
9
Since 1988, he himself has even interpreted
the doubt that has always been central to his work as a further sign of his closeness to the masters,
10

a fact that has clearly distinguished him from his contemporaries since the late eighties, but that has
actually always been at the heart of his work. Richter wants to create to continue to paint but
to paint nothing new, nothing that might resemble the modern utopia of the new. Put simply, while for
his Neo-Dada, performer, Pop Art or Flux contemporaries this nothing overflows out of painting,
and specifically even works against it, with Richter this often melancholy and even desperate critical
approach develops inside the pictorial field, and its aim is to celebrate painting.
13
Richter has succeeded in building an immense corpus of work, much of which is not based on the invention
of subject matter, but rather on different modes of reproduction the complete or partial reproduction
of photographs, for example, or of the work of others, of his own work through internal reflexivity,
a doubling of images, mirror effects.
What the abstract paintings, no matter when they were created, have in common with the photo-paintings
is this freeze frame process in which the person that fixes or freezes a state of being, even at the risk
of destroying it (the photographer) takes precedence over the person that had created it (the painter).
This can take the form of fixing a photograph of a painting in paint (the Soft Abstracts of the 1970s),
stopping the superposition of pictorial elements floating in the tri-dimensional space of the photograph
(the Free Abstracts on the 1980s) or the superposition of the coloured veils covering the abstract scraper
paintings of 1990-2000. This is so true that what we see in the recent abstract paintings looks like
the before state of a painting whose after we cannot help but imagine. This before and after or
front and back polarity, which is also that of the short duration of photography (the frozen image) and
the long duration of painting (the constructed image), is profoundly central in Richters work. In other
words, photography, as reproduction or frozen image, functions as much outside the work as an iconographic
source (in the photo-paintings ), as inside it as the driving force behind its appearance (in the abstractions).
And in both the abstract works and the figurative ones, we often find evidence of a doubling, both
a resemblance and a visible difference, between the image and its photographic reproduction.
It would seem, then, that the photographic period simply served to help Richter produce work that
would be duplicable, and whose unique character would be profoundly, irrevocably in doubt. And as we
have seen, it is this same doubt that enables the artist to position himself in the tradition of his masters
and in a long history of painting. I dont believe in this idea of the absolute painting. There can only be
approaches, repeated attempts, research.
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1 On the edges of the naked glass panels are real mirrors, but also glass that has been painted on top and below, or that has been coloured, set in metal
structures, framed, or even fixed by different kinds of metal bars. Hubertus Butin describes this complexity in Gerhard Richter and the Reflection on
Images, Butin 2004, p.19-23.
2 Gerhard Richter, Interview with Hans Ulrich Obrist, 1993, Richter 1999, p.217.
3 See Mark Godfreys contribution to this book, p.81-82.
4 His abstract work is punctuated by these diptychs, true or suggested: CR: 492-5 and Clouds (CR: 514-1), Garden (CR: 515) and Lilies (CR: 516), true diptychs,
dating from 1982; S.D.I. (CR: 596; 1985-1986) and Mediation (CR: 617; 1986) which are false diptychs; StJames, Andrew, Bridget and John (1988) as well as
CR: 636 (1987) show how an internal rhythm can be created; CR: 702 et CR: 726-727 explore the tension that exists between the continuity of the scraper
technique and the division of the canvas.
5 Pairs whose title designates them as such: versions 1 and 2 of Station (1985), for example; Victoria, Claudius and Courbet (1986), Flint Tower and Salt Tower
(1988).
6 These titles are different but similar; the symmetry or parity is suggested more by a similarity of composition and size: in 1983, Juno and Janus, Eduard and
Lon; Pforte and Pfad.
7 Indeed, these pairs are further multiplied, with two works for each of the following titles: Reader (CR: 799-1 and 804) and Flowers (CR: 815-2 and 3), Tulips
(CR: 825-1 and 2), Jerusalem (CR: 835-1 and 2), Self-portrait (CR: 836-1 and 2), Waterfall (CR: 847-1 and 2), Marine (CR: 852-1 and 2), Farm and Snow (CR:
861-1 and 2), etc., all the way to House in Forest (CR: 890-1 and 891-1).
8 Andr Gide, De linfluence en littrature (speech, Salon de la libre esthtique de Bruxelles, 29March 1900), Paris, Allia, 2010 [new edition].
9 Until the late 1980s, Richter talked about his relationship to history in the third person: Romanticism is far from being a closed book []. We still need
these paintings. Interview with Irmeline Lebeer, 1973, Richter 2009, p.82. I am Goethe and Polke is Schiller; Im the classical one. Interview with
Astrid Kasper, 2000, Richter 2009, p.368.
10 With regards to the masters, Richter says: I believed that it was crucial to be able to paint like the masters, and I couldnt do it. Interview with Jan
Thorn-Prikker about the 18October 1977 cycle, 1989 Richter 1999, p.165. From this point on, he accepted the influence of certain painters, as well as
his inability to equal them.
11 Id., Interview with Jan Thorn-Prikker, op.cit., p.159.
14
4. CONVERSATION BETWEEN GERHARD RICHTER
AND NICHOLAS SEROTA, SPRING 2011
Nicholas Serota: Over fty years, you have worked in sculpture, in drawing, in photographs, by painting over
photographs, but you have always remained very loyal to painting. Of course you are known as a painter, but
in the contemporary world such loyalty to painting is quite unusual.
Gerhard Richter: A lot of people nd other mediums more attractive put a screen in a museum and
nobody wants to look at the paintings any more.
But painting is my profession, because it has always been the thing that interested me most. And now
Im of a certain age, I come from a different tradition and, in any case, I cant do anything else. Im still
very sure that painting is one of the most basic human capacities, like dancing and singing, that make
sense, that stay with us, as something human.
NS: You sometimes describe yourself as a classical painter.
GR: Im never really sure what that word means, but however inaccurately I use it, classical was always
my ideal, as long as I can remember, and something of that has always stayed with me, to this day.
Of course, there were difculties, because in comparison to my ideal, I didnt even come close. And some
of my paintings reflect exactly this problem. For example, the Titian series (p.111): really I just wanted
to have this lovely picture, thats to say, paint it for myself from a postcard. That didnt work, and so
we now have these ve pictures as a record of my defeat. Its the same with the grey monochromes and
the Colour Charts, where the different colours are randomly placed the starting point, the source of
paintings like that always has something to do with helplessness. And if they do turn out all right, then
its only because I have set out the problem as clearly as possible, and have found the appropriate form for it.
NS: [] . But how do you begin a painting?
GR: Sometimes I am lucky, and have the idea this could be a painting.
NS: From looking at an image?
GR: Yes, in the case of the realistic paintings, either I see it in reality, and take a picture of it, or a photograph
in my collection jumps out at me, from all the others. It can sometimes take years before I actually paint it.
In the case of the abstractions, I get vague notions of pictures that are just asking to be painted. Thats
how it starts, but nearly always the result is not at all what I imagined.
NS: So the painting begins with the very old craft of putting paint on canvas with a small brush
GR: A fresh start like that is a kind of ritual, with its own order, mixing the colours, nding the right hues,
the smell, all these things foster the illusion that this is going to be a wonderful painting. And then that
moment of defeat, when I see that its just not working. Thats whats going to happen here. Tomorrow
Ill try again.
NS: Do you often abandon abstract paintings?
GR: Yes, I alter them much more often than the representational ones. They often turn out completely
different to what Id planned.
NS: So you begin with an idea in your head about a feeling you want to create in a particular painting?
How do you begin the abstract paintings?
GR: Well, the beginning is actually quite easy, because I can still be quite free about the way I handle
things colours, shapes. And so a picture emerges that may look quite good for a while, so airy and
colourful and new. But that will only last for a day at most, at which point it starts to look cheap and fake.
And then the real work begins changing, eradicating, starting again, and so on, until its done.
15
NS: So, you begin with the decision to make a picture of a certain format?
GR: Yes, a format, that seems right for the vague notion I have of the picture, and usually that does
for a whole series of pictures.
NS: I think you once said that elegance is okay in science and mathematics, but not in art. Why is elegance
a negative in art?
GR: Mathematicians talk about elegant solutions. I like that. But it is usually to be found in the design
world, elegant furniture and clothes. Although I dont actually mind if people describe paintings as
elegant after all, at least the grey panes Ive made do have a very elegant aspect.
NS: So what is the purpose of art?
GR: For surviving this world. One of many, many like bread, like love.
NS: And what does it give you?
GR: [laughs] Well, certainly something you can hold on to it has the measure of all the infathomable,
senseless things, the incessant ruthlessness of our world. And art shows us how to see things that are
constructive and good, and to be an active part of that.
NS: So it gives a structure to the world?
GR: Yes, comfort, hope, so it makes sense to be part of that.
NS: Are there subjects that you cannot paint?
GR: Well, I dont believe there are subjects that cant be painted, but there are a lot of things that
I personally cant paint
NS: With September did you think about the possibility of making a painting on the subject in 2001
or did it come much later?
GR: Four years later, actually. Although of course I was very struck by the images in the papers,
I didnt think you could paint that moment and certainly not the way some people did, taking the inane
view that this most awful act was some kind of an amazing Happening, and celebrating it as a mega
work of art
NS: So you tried to nd a way of dealing with the subject without making it spectacular?
GR: Yes, concentrating on its incomprehensible cruelty, and its awful fascination
NS: When you are making the realistic paintings, do you have to be very precise?
GR: Yes, in the widest sense of the word.
NS: What are you trying to achieve with these realistic images?
GR: Im trying to paint a picture of what I have seen and what moved me, as well as I can. Thats all.
NS: With a brush you have control. The paint goes on the brush and you make the mark. From experience
you know exactly what will happen. With the squeegee you lose control.
GR: Not all control, but some control. It depends on the angle, the pressure and the particular paint I am using.
NS: So do you like the possibility of having control, but also some things not under control?
GR: Yes, thats our job. Chance is given, unpredictable, chaotic, the basis. And we try to control
that by intervening, giving form to chance, putting it to use.
16
NS: I think you quoted with approval something that Cage said once: I have nothing to say and I am saying it.
What is the spirit in Cage that you are close to?
GR: Well, a sentiment like that is very close to my own reluctance to talk, and it also seems to me a very
valid critique of all the many overblown statements we hear. But above all, in my view Cage is a very great
musician. The way he handles chance, whether in his I Ching pieces, or other everyday noises. Even if
it does at rst sound like provocative nonsense, random tinklings and squeaks. But then you come to
understand better and better how wonderfully clever and sensitive it is, how carefully it is constructed.
Wonderful.
NS: I want to end by asking you why you have painted your family so frequently?
GR: I know them best. [laughs]
NS: But its unusual. There are not many painters who have painted their families.
GR: Perhaps I just took myself too seriously. [laughs] It no doubt has to do with my own life story.
17
5. CHRONOLOGICAL SEQUENCE
1932
Gerhard Richter is born in Dresden to Hildegard Richter, a bookseller, and Horst Richter, a teacher.
19391945
At the outbreak of war, the family leaves Dresden to seek refuge in the countryside. Richters father
and uncle join the Nationalist-Socialist party; his aunt, mentally unstable, is exterminated as a result of
the Nazi eugenics programme. Richter himself is enrolled in an educational German youth programme.
1949
Creation of the German Democratic Republic (GDR).
19501956
Richter returns to Dresden which has been destroyed by bombing. He becomes a member of the Liberal
Democratic party.
1961
Erection of the Berlin Wall. Richter and his wife flee to Dsseldorf in West Germany, where he enrols
at the Academy of Fine Arts and meets Sigmar Polke, Blinky Palermo and Konrad Lueg. Takes classes
under Karl Otto Gtz.
1962
Begins his photo-paintings: paints Table from a photograph. All his previous paintings having been destroyed.
1964
Completes his course at the Academy of Fine Arts in Dsseldorf.
1965
Visits the Marcel Duchamp exhibition at the Haus Lange Museum in Krefeld.
1966
Begins painting grey monochromes and the Colour Charts. Birth of his daughter Babette, aka Betty.
1968
Creates the first series of Landscapes, following a trip to Corsica with his family. He goes on to paint
Mountains and Seascapes, explicitly countering the legacy of German Romanticism. The series Townscapes
depicts the German towns destroyed by American bombing during the Second World War.
1969
Creates Atlas, a repertoire of forms collating the artists sketches and drawings, together with all his
photographs. Atlas, which now comprises over seven hundred plates, has been exhibited on several occa-
sions as a compilation of Richters reflections on painting.
1971
Professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Dsseldorf (until 1994). His students include Thomas Schtte,
Ludger Gerdes, Thomas Struth and Thomas Ruff.
18
1972
Exclusive representative of the German Pavilion at the 36th Venice Biennial with 48 Portraits,
Townscapes, three Clouds, Mountains and green abstract paintings. Takes part in Harald Szeemanns
documenta V in Kassel, in the Photo-Realist Painting section,.
19731976
Paints a series of five pictures inspired by Titians Annunciation, continues his large-format Colour Charts
and Greys. Returns to his Seascapes and creates a new series, Tourist, and another inspired by artists
Gilbert & George.
1977
Following their 192-day trial, the members of the far-left Red Army Faction were sentenced to life
imprisonment for murder. On 18 October the three group leaders were found dead in their cells.
Exhibition at the Centre Pompidou in Paris featuring works dating mainly from the 1970s.
19801985
In the first half of the 1980s, his artistic practice straddles large acid-toned gestural abstractions and
figurative paintings of skulls, candles and flowers, which are met with worldwide acclaim in the United
States and all over the world.
1981
He and Ema divorce. Receives the Arnold Bode Prize in Kassel.
1982
Marries artist Isa Genzken. Shows his latest abstract canvases at documenta VII.
1983
Moves with Isa Genzken to Cologne, where he still lives today.
1988
Paints 18 October 1977, a cycle of fifteen pictures representing the deaths of the Red Army Faction leaders,
and another portrait of his eldest daughter Betty.
1989
Adopts a darker chromatic palette and paints the monumental triptych November, December and
January. Starts work on his overpainted photographs.
1990s
Throughout this decade, he hones his squeegee technique, which soon becomes his signature.
1992
Takes part in documenta IX in Kassel
1993
Exhibition at the Muse dArt Moderne de la Ville de Paris. He and Isa Genzken divorce.
1995
Marries Sabine Moritz, with whom he is to have three children: Ella, Moritz and Theodor. Paints the series
S. with Child, dedicated to his new wife and their first child.
1997
Wins Golden Lion at the 47th Venice Biennial. Takes part in documenta X in Kassel with Atlas.
19
1999
Uses aluminium supports for his works for the first time. Hangs his piece Black, Red, Gold in the entrance
hall of the Reichstag in Berlin.
2001
Takes part in 49th Venice Biennial with his series Rhombus.
2002
Retrospective at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, curated by Robert Storr
2005
Paints September depicting the attack on the Twin Towers in New York.
2007
Completes the stained glass window of Cologne Cathedral. Presents his final series of monumental
abstractions, Cage, at the 52
nd
Venice Biennial.
20082010
Begins series of small enamels under glass and completes his last bouquet.
2011
New series, Strip (p. 55), composed of large digital prints made up of parallel lines.
20
6. PUBLICATIONS
CATALOGUE
Gerhard Richter. Panorama
French edition directed by Camille Morineau
24 x 32 cm. 304 p., 300 ill. colour. 44.90
The Centre Pompidou is dedicating a major retrospective to the artist, which will unite more than
300 works and will be the cultural event of summer 2012. For this event, the Centre Pompidou will
be publishing a reference work without parallel on the market: more than 300 reproductions, an exclusive
interview with the artist and contributions from major art historians and specialists on Richters work.
Liste des auteurs
An English version of this catalogue, under the direction of Mark Godfrey and Nicholas Serota,
together with a German version, under the direction of Dorothe Brill, have also been published.
ALBUM
Gerhard Richter. Panorama
By Camille Morineau and Lucia Pesapane
Bilingual French/English
27 x 27 cm. 60 p., 60 ill. colour. 8.90
A journey in images through the retrospective: a selection of major works with short explanatory texts.
MOTIFS
Gerhard Richter
A co-production by Editions du Centre Pompidou, Heni Publishing and Walther Knig
21 x 14 cm
492 p., 29,90
Published to celebrate the Paris stage of this retrospective, this stunning art-object book is based
on the most recent series of works by the artist, which are presented during the exhibition.
The work opens with a decorative motif, which is then simplified until a superimposition of lines
is obtained. The book is composed of a succession of images that immerse the reader in the artists
universe, enabling the appreciation of his creative approach.
GERHARD RICHTER IPAD APPLICATION
The Gerhard Richter application offers a selection of the most significant work of the artist during
the Panorama retrospective. Each of the 60 works selected has his own description. The application
contains also five interviews of the curator of the exhibition, Camille Morineau.
Thanks to this application, the works can be selected and shared on all social networks.
Achim Borchardt-Hume
Dorothe Brill
Mark Godfrey
Rachel Haidu
Christine Mehring
Camille Morineau
Nicholas Serota
21
6. LIST OF WORKS PRESENTED
01/PAINTING PHOTOGRAPHY
Bombers [Bomber)
1963
Oil on canvas
130 180
Stdtische Galerie Wolfsburg
Brigid Polk 1971
Oil on canvas
125 150
Hessisches Landesmuseum, Darmstadt
Dead [Tote] 1963
Oil on canvas
100 150
Nicolas Berggruen Charitable Trust
Egyptian Landscape
[gyptische Landschaft] 1964
Oil on canvas
150 165
Private collection
Courtesy Hauser & Wirth
Ferrari
1964
Oil on canvas
145 200
Collection of the Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth,
Museum purchase,
Sid W. Richardson Foundation
Endowment Fund
Folding Dryer [Faltbarer Trockner]
1962
Oil on canvas
105 170
Froehlich Collection, Stuttgart
Mustang Squadron [Mustang-Staffel]
1964
Oil on canvas
88 150
Private collection
Nose [Nase)
1962
Oil on canvas
78 60 cm
Collection Corinne Michaela Flick, London
Negroes (Nuba) [Neger (Nuba)]
(CR:45)
1964
Oil on canvas
145 200
Courtesy Gagosian Gallery
Stool in Prole [Stuhl im Prol]
1965
Oil on canvas
90 70
Museum Boijmans van Beuningen, Rotterdam
Tiger
1965
Oil on canvas
140 150
Museum Morsbroich, Leverkusen
Table [Tisch]
1962
Oil on canvas
90 113
Harvard Art Museums/Busch-Reisinger Museum, long-
term loan from a private collection, New York
Toilet Paper Roll [Klorolle]
1965
Oil on canvas
55 40
Private collection
Woman with Child (Beach)
[Frau mit Kind (Strand)]
1965
Oil on canvas
130 110
Private collection
02/INHERITING A TRADITION
4 Panes of Glasses [ 4 Glasscheiben]
1967
Glass and Iron
190 x 100 cm each
Herbert Foundation
Annunciation after Titian [Verkndigung nach Tizian]
(CR:343-1)
1973
Oil on linen
125 200
Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, Smithsonian
Institution, Washington, D.C. Joseph H. Hirshhorn Pur-
chase Fund, 1994
Cloud [Wolke]
1970
Oil on canvas
200 300
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Purchased 1973
Cloud [Wolke]
1970
Oil on canvas
200 300
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Purchased 1973
Cloud [Wolke]
1970
Oil on canvas
200 300
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Purchased 1973
Ema (Nude on a Staircase) [Ema (Akt auf einer Treppe)]
1966
Oil on canvas
200 130
Museum Ludwig, Cologne/Ludwig Bequest
Seascape (Cloudy)
[Seestck (bewlkt)]
1969
Oil on canvas
200 200
Private collection, Berlin
22
Seascape (Sea-Sea)
[Seestck (See-See)]
1970
Oil on canvas
200 200
Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie
Study for Clouds (Abstract) [Wolkenstudie (Abstrakt)]
1970
Oil on canvas
100 80
Private collection
03/OPPOSING THE MOTIF
1024 Colors [1024 Farben]
1973
Oil on canvas
254 x 478
Paris, Centre Pompidou,
Muse National dArt Moderne
Detail (Brown)
[Ausschnitt (braun)]
1970
Oil on canvas
135 150
Museum Folkwang, Essen
Detail (Red-blue)
[Ausschnitt (rot-blau)]
1970
Oil on canvas
200 300
Private collection
Six Colours [Sechs Farben] (CR:142)
1966
Enamel on canvas
200 170
Private collection, Berlin
Townscape M2 [Stadtbild M2] 1968
Oil on canvas
85 90
Stdel Museum, Frankfurt am Main, Loan of Frankfurter
Sparkasse
Townscape Paris [Stadtbild Paris] (CR:175)
1968
Oil on canvas
200 200
Froehlich Collection, Stuttgart
Townscape PX [Stadtbild PX] (CR:174-3)
1968
Oil on canvas
102 92
Bayerische Staatsgemldesammlungen Mnchen - Pi-
nakothek der Moderne -
Wittelsbacher Ausgleichsfonds Collection Prinz Franz
von Bayern
04/RELEASING ABSTRACTION
Glenn (CR:532)
1983
Oil on canvas
190 500
Muse dArt Moderne de
Saint-Etienne Mtropole
June [Juni] (CR:527)
1983
Oil on canvas
250 250
Centre Pompidou, Muse national dart moderne, Paris
Red-Blue-Yellow [Rot-Blau-Gelb] (CR:335-4)
1973
Oil on canvas
200 200
Collection de LInstitut dart
contemporain, Rhne-Alpes
Red-Blue-Yellow [Rot-Blau-Gelb] (CR:339-1)
1973
Oil on canvas
98 92
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Yellow-green [Gelbgrn] (CR:492)
1982
Oil on canvas
260 400
Museum Frieder Burda, Baden-Baden
05/REVEALING CHANCE
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1987
Oil on canvas
300 300
Froehlich Collection, Stuttgart
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1992
Oil on aluminium
100 100
Private collection
p.216
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1992
Oil on canvas
200 140
Kunstmuseum Winterthur
p.217
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1983
Oil on canvas
70 50
Sprengel Museum Hannover,
on loan from a private collection
Forest (3) [Wald (3)]
1990
Oil on canvas
340 260
Private collection
23
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1997
Oil on canvas
260 340
High Museum of Art, Atlanta Georgia; purchase with
funds from Alfred Austell Thornton in memory
of Leila Austell Thornton and
Albert Edward Thornton Sr, and Sarah Miller Venable and
William Hoyt Venable.
A.B. St John
1988
Oil on canvas
200 260
Tate. Presented by the Patrons of New Art through the
Friends of the Tate Gallery 1988
Blanket [Decke]
1988
Oil on canvas
200 140
Private collection, Berlin
06/SEEING THROUGH: GREY AND GLASS
11 Panes [11 Scheiben]
2004
Glass
290 212 54
ARTIST ROOMS Tate and National Galleries of Scotland.
Acquired jointly through The dOffay Donation with assis-
tance from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and the
Art Fund 2008
Alps II [Alpen II]
1968
Oil on canvas
200 450
Museum Kppersmhle fr Moderne Kunst, Collection
Strher
Ball III [Kugel III]
1992
Stainless-steel sphere with
matte nish
diameter 16
Private collection
Grey Streaks [Grauschlieren]
1968
Oil on canvas
200 200
Private collection
Grey Beams [Graue Strahlen]
1968
Oil on canvas
50 40
De Pont Museum of Contemporary Art, Tilburg
Coloured Grey [Bunt auf Grau]
1968
Oil on canvas
50 50
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Untitled (Stroke)
[Ohne Titel (Strich)]
1968
Oil on canvas
80 40
Collection Elisabeth and Gerhard Sohst at Hamburger
Kunsthalle
Grey [Grau]
1973
Oil on canvas
90 65
Private collection
Grey [Grau]
1973
Oil on canvas
300 250
Centre Pompidou, Muse national dart moderne, Paris
Double Pane of Glass [Doppelglasscheibe]
1977
Glass, iron, painted in grey
on one side
200 150 50
Muse Dpartemental dArt Contemporain de Roche-
chouart
Mirror [Spiegel]
1981
Mirror
225 318
Kunsthalle Dsseldorf
Curtain III (Light)
[Vorhang III (hell)]
1965
Oil on canvas
200 195
Staatliche Museen zu Berlin, Nationalgalerie
Shadow Picture [Schattenbild]
1968
Oil on canvas
67 87
Coll. Fundao de Serralves Contemporary Art Mu-
seum, Porto, Portugal
Stroke (on Red) [Strich (auf Rot)]
1980
Oil on canvas
190 2000
Private collection
Grey on back of glass
[Grau hinter Glas]
2002
Oil on glass
121.4 91.4
Private collection
Silicate [Silikat]
2003
Oil on canvas
290 290
Kunstsammlung Nordrhein-Westfalen, Dsseldorf
24
07/RETHINKING CLASSICISM
Bhler Hhe
1991
Oil on canvas
52 72
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Chinon
1987
Oil on canvas
200 320
Centre Pompidou, Muse national dart moderne, Paris
Iceberg in Mist [Eisberg im Nebel]
1982
Oil on canvas
70 100
The Fisher Collection, San Francisco
Jerusalem
1995
Oil on canvas
126 92
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Krems
1986
Oil on canvas
72 102
Private collection, Berlin
Meadowland [Wiesental]
1985
Oil on canvas
90 95
The Museum of Modern Art,
New York. Blanchette Hooker Rockefeller, Betsy Babcock,
and Mrs. Elizabeth Bliss Parkinson Funds, 1985
Sketch [Skizze]
1991
Oil on canvas
52 62
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Venice [Venedig]
1986
Oil on canvas
86 121
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Sketch [Skizze]
1991
Oil on canvas
35 40
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Sketch [Skizze]
1991
Oil on canvas
35 40
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Farm [Gehft]
1999
Oil on canvas
46 51
Private collection
Waldhaus
2004
Oil on canvas
142 98
Private collection
08/REVEALING INTIMACY
Aunt Marianne
[Tante Marianne]
1965
Oil on canvas
120 130
Yageo Foundation, Taiwan
Betty
1977
Oil on wood
30 40
Museum Ludwig, Cologne/
private collection
Betty
1988
Oil on canvas
102 72
Saint Louis Art Museum. Funds given by Mr and Mrs R.
Crosby Kemper Jr through the Crosby Kemper Founda-
tions, The Arthur and Helen Baer Charitable Foundation,
Mr and Mrs Van-Lear Black III, Anabeth Calkins and
John Weil, Mrs and Mrs Gary Wolff, the Honorable and
Mrs Thomas F. Eagleton. Museum Purchase Dr and
Mrs Harold J. Joseph, and Mrs Edward Mallinckrodt, by
exchange.
Flowers [Blumen]
1994
Oil on canvas
71 51
Carr dArt, Muse dArt
Contemporain de Nmes
Bouquet
2009
Oil on canvas
60 88.5
Private collection
Court Chapel, Dresden [Hofkirche, Dresden]
2000
Oil on canvas
80 93
Bettina and Donald L. Bryant Jr Collection
Ella
2007
Oil on canvas
40 31
Private collection
Flowers [Blumen]
1977
Oil on canvas
40 50
Private collection
Horst with Dog [Horst mit Hund]
1965
Oil on canvas
80 60
Private collection
25
Lilies [Lilien]
2000
Oil on canvas
68 80
National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa. Purchased 2002
Reader [Lesende]
1994
Oil on canvas
72 102
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. Purchase through
the gifts of Mimi
and Peter Haas and Helen and
Charles Schwab, and the Accessions
Committee Fund: Barbara and Gerson Bakar, Collectors
Forum, Evelyn D. Haas, Elaine McKeon, Byron R. Meyer,
Modern Art Council, Christine and Michael Murray,
Nancy and Steven Oliver, Leanne B. Roberts, Madeleine
H. Russell, Danielle and Brooks Waler, Jr, Phyllis Wattis,
and Pat and Bill Wilson
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
36 41
Hamburger Kunsthalle, Permanent
loan of Stiftung fr die Hamburger Kunstsammlungen
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
41 36
Hamburger Kunsthalle
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
52 62
Hamburger Kunsthalle
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
52 56
Hamburger Kunsthalle
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
61 51
Hamburger Kunsthalle,
Permanent loan of Stiftung fr die Hamburger Kunst-
sammlungen
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
62 72
Hamburger Kunsthalle,
Permanent loan of Stiftung fr die Hamburger Kunst-
sammlungen
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
36 51
Hamburger Kunsthalle
S. with Child [S. mit Kind]
1995
Oil on canvas
46 41
Hamburger Kunsthalle
Self-Portrait [Selbstportrait ]
1996
Oil on canvas
51 46
Tatsumi Sato
Small Bather [Kl. Badende]
1994
Oil on canvas
51 36
Private collection
Uncle Rudi
2000
Cibachrome photograph xed on Dibond plate, framed,
behind glass
87 50
Private collection
09/18 OCTOBER 1977
18 October 1977 [18 Oktober 1977]
The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Sidney and
Harriet Janis Collection, gift of Philip Johnson, and
acquired through the Lillie P. Bliss Bequest (all by ex-
change); Enid A. Haupt Fund; Nina and Gordon Bunshaft
Bequest Fund; and gift of Emily Rauh Pulitzer, 1995
Comprising of:
Dead [Tote]
1988
Oil on canvas
62 67
Dead [Tote]
1988
Oil on canvas
62 62
Dead [Tote]
1988
Oil on canvas
35 40
Hanged [Erhngte]
1988
Oil on canvas
200 140
Man Shot Down 1
[Erschossener 1]
1988
Oil on canvas
100 140
Man Shot Down 2
[Erschossener 2]
1988
Oil on canvas
100 140
Cell [Zelle]
1988
Oil on canvas
200 140
Confrontation 1
[Gegenberstellung 1]
1988
Oil on canvas
112 102
26
Confrontation 2 [Gegenberstellung 2]
1988
Oil on canvas
112 102
Confrontation 3 [Gegenberstellung 3]
1988
Oil on canvas
112 102
Youth Portrait [Jugendbildnis]
1988
Oil on canvas
67 62
Record Player [Plattenspieler]
1988
Oil on canvas
62 83
Funeral [Beerdigung]
1988
Oil on canvas
200 320
Arrest 1 [Festnahme 1]
1988
Oil on canvas
92 126
Arrest 2 [Festnahme 2]
1988
Oil on canvas
92 126
10/CONTINUING TO PAINT
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on Aludibond
50 72
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on canvas
51 47
Private collection
Abstract Painting
[Abstraktes Bild]
1999
Oil on canvas
51 56
Tamaki and Kiyoshi Wako
From Aladdin
2010:
Bagdad (CR:914-15)
37 50
IFRIT (CR:915-20)
33 43.5
IFRIT (CR:915-24)
33 45
IFRIT (CR 915-26)
35 50
Private collection
Candle [Kerze]
1982
Oil on canvas
100 100
Museum Frieder Burda,
Baden-Baden
Skull [Schdel]
1983
Oil on canvas
55 50
Private collection

Strip 2011
Digital impression on paper
200x440
Private Collection
27
11/CAGE WALL
Cage 1
2006
Oil on canvas
290 290
Tate. Lent from a private collection 2007
p.268
Cage 2
2006
Oil on canvas
300 300
Tate. Lent from a private collection 2007
p.269
Cage 3
2006
Oil on canvas
290 290
Tate. Lent from a private collection 2007
p.270
Cage 4
2006
Oil on canvas
290 290
Tate. Lent from a private collection 2007
p.271
Cage 5
2006
Oil on canvas
300 300
Tate. Lent from a private collection 2007
p.272
Cage 6
2006
Oil on canvas
300 300
Tate. Lent from a private collection 2007
p.273
31
9. USEFUL INFORMATION
Admission
11 - 13, depending on time
concessions 9 - 10
ticket valid the same day for
the Muse national dart moderne
and all exhibitions
Free for under-18s
and members of
the Centre Pompidou
(holders of the annual pass
Buy on-line and print at home
www.centrepompidou.fr
MATISSE, PAIRES ET SRIES
UNTIL 18 JUNE 2012
press officer
Cline Janvier
01 44 78 49 87
celine.janviercentrepompidou.fr
ANRI SALA
2 MAY 6 AUGUST 2012
press officer
Thomas Lozinski
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MULTIVERSITS CRATIVES
2 MAY 6 AUGUST 2012
press officer
Anne-Marie Pereira
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PORTRAITS DE FAMILLE
16 JUNE - 24 SEPTEMBER 2012
press officer
Anne-Marie Pereira
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LA TENDENZA
ARCHITECTURES ITALIENNES
1965-1985
20 JUNE - 10 SEPTEMBER 2012
press officer
Anne-Marie Pereira
anne-marie.pereiracentrepompidou.fr
ON AIR
STUDIO 13/16
21 JUNE - 2 SEPTEMBER 2012
press officer
Thomas Lozinski
thomas.lozinskicentrepompidou.fr
Camille Morineau
conservator
at the Muse national dart moderne,
assisted by
Lucia Pesapane
Centre Pompidou
75191 Paris cedex 04
telephone
00 33 (0)1 44 78 12 33
mtro
Htel de Ville, Rambuteau
Opening
11am 9pm every day,
ex. Tuesdays and 1 May
PRACTICAL INFORMATION AT THE SAME TIME AT THE CENTRE CURATORS