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Chapter 1

INTRODUCTION
The words Sufi and Sufism used since the first century of the Hijri (eight century C. E), when Sufism (in Arabic: Tasawuaf, the fact of wearing a garment made of wool. Sufi, as an emblem of purity) was adopted to appoint the search for spiritual enlightenment, while Sufi was applied to characterize the person who had attained an obvious degree of nearness to God. Mystical understanding, the logical believer who testifies that there is no god if not God. Sufism gives the lesson love with God and lead wisdom life. Sufis give the lesson of unity. (Michon, 2005) Some Muslims argue that it was simply a response to the growing greediness in the Islamic world. However; this argument skirts the basic reason for Sufism, as during early Islamic times under Muhammads leadership, wealth was enjoyed and served as a great motivation for the military growth of Islam. Muslims, at the time, followed a legal system allowing unrestrained materialism, though they were fully observant of the present religious set of guidelines. The formal and legal nature of the Islamic system never addressed the issue of materialism, and as a result was seen as insufficient by those who became Sufis in their search for deeper spirituality. Consequentially, Islam was to all appearances a religion of a decidedly unspiritual nature. (Rippon, 1990) Sufism is clearly a reaction

or response to what was lacking in early Islam. The argument for Muslim materialism lends support to the concept of a spiritual invalid in Islam keenly felt by many Muslims as their civilization began to increase and come into contact with other religions. There was a hunger for more spirituality, along with the recognition that despite all of the Sharis Islam did not effectively deal with the problems of materialism. The very strength of Islam, in its reliance on a simple dogma and the five pillars of practice, proved to be the very weakness of Islam. While the Islamic system had allowed for rapid expansion, and the five practices were a uniting force, it soon became manifest that one could accept this structure and step right through it into whatever they pleased. In the early days this meant earthly success, as Islam spread rapidly through the desire for wealth and gain. Yet, just as those caught up in materialism had accepted and stepped through the framework of the Sharis, all the while continuing in their materialistic lives, so also the Sufis in reaction to the materialism of the Islamic civilization, stepped through the framework of legality into a world of spirituality. However, in their reaction, the Sufis created a

more serious problem for Islam, as due to their religiosity, they introduced new teachings, reinterpreting the Quran and Sunna. (M1ller, 1986) The earliest days onward, women have played an important role in the development of Sufism, which is classically understood to have begun with the Prophet Muhammad. Muhammad brought a message of integration of spirit and matter, of essence and everyday life, of recognition of the feminine as well as the masculine. Though cultural manifestations have covered over some of the original purity of intention, the words of the Qur'an convey the equality of women and men before the eyes of God. In the early years of this new revelation, Muhammad's beloved wife, Khadija, filled a role of great importance. It was she who sustained, strengthened, and supported him against his own doubt and bewilderment. She stood beside him in the midst of extreme difficulty and anguish and helped carry the light of the new faith. It was to Muhammad's and Khadija's daughter, Fatimah, to whom the deeper mystical understanding of Islam was first conveyed, and indeed she is often recognized as the first Muslim mystic. Her marriage with Ali bound this new manifestation of mysticism into this world, and the seeds of their union began to blossom.As the mystical side of Islam developed, it was a woman, Rabi'a al-Adawiyya (717-801 A.D.), who first expressed the relationship with the divine in a language we have come to recognize as specifically Sufic by referring to God as the Beloved. Rabi'a was the first human being to speak of the realities of Sufism with a language that anyone could understand. Though she experienced many difficulties in her early years, Rabi'a's starting point was neither a fear of hell nor a desire for paradise, but only love. "God is God," she said, "for this I love God... not because of any gifts, but for Itself." Her aim was to melt her being in God. According to her, one could find God by turning within oneself. As Muhammad said, "He who knows himself knows his Lord." Ultimately it is through love that we are brought into the unity of Being.Throughout the centuries, women as well as men have continued to carry the light of this love. For many reasons, women have often been less visible and less outspoken than men, but nevertheless they have been active participants. Within some Sufi circles, women were integrated with men in ceremonies; in other orders, women gathered in their own circles of remembrance and worshiped apart from men. Some women devoted themselves to Spirit ascetically, apart from society, as Rabi'a did; others chose the role of benefactress and fostered circles of worship and study. (Smith, 1928).

Sufism considers the two main sources the Holy Quran and Sunna. The meaning of Sufism is to purifying the soul. Sufis believe the ability of Quran and Sunna. Sufism had great impact on the people of Pakistan and India. Sufis give the attention for the spiritual issues and inner reality. Sufis always follow the Sharia. Sufis is refers to materialism. Sufis depends on sheikhs or masters. The master who teach and watch the follower. Sufis purchase the inner practice. Sufism is a very important part of Islam. Sufis are religious people and they always teach their follower about the five pillars of Islam. Sufis give the lesson that one with God. It means god has every time with him. Sufis believe the secret knowledge of Islam. Sufis get stages through their secret prays. Sufis believe on obliteration (Fana).Every Sufi saint related to any silsala and they enter this silsala when get knowledge from their teacher. There is a famous sufi teach :there is no god if not God. The Qadriya, Mevleviya, Chishtia, the Khwajagan, Naqshbandiya, Subhawardiya are famous orders of Sufism in Islam. And all Sufis are related to these orders. (RehmanFazler, 1979). The Sufis survived and prospered because theirs was the kingdom of God, untouched by the vagaries of time. They sang of the love of God and people resonated to their tune. They gave of themselves for the love of mankind and fought for what was right, often laying down their lives in the struggle. The ulema and kadis were defeated, because they were employees of the kings and could be fired from their jobs at will. Despite their independence, they were construed to be an arm of the ruling classes. The Islam that survived was a Sufic Islam, inward-looking, spiritual, amalgamating within its folds the cultures of the lands where it flourished. It was different in color and character from classical Islam (up to the destruction of Baghdad in 1258), which was empirical, vibrant, extrovert. It was this Sufic Islam that was destined to shape the history of Muslim peoples after the 13th century. Under the patronage of the State under Muslim rulers, the Sufi mystics while offering spiritual guidance and support to the Hindu subjects allured them for adoption of Muslim identity, superiority of Arbo-Persian-Turkish tradition and accordingly transplanted them in the cultural tradition of India. "The establishment of Sufi orders in India coincided with the rising political power of the Islamic penetration of the subcontinent accelerated in the 13th century. the most important element, was the establishment of Sufi orders throughout the vast subcontinent. Indeed, Islam spread in India and Pakistan not by the force of conquest or the elaborate arguments of mullahs and kadis but through the work of the great Sufi shaykhs. In this respect, Muslim India is different from the Arab countries where Islam was

introduced during the classical period (665-1258) through the work of the muhaddithin and the mujahideen.The process by which a faith enters the hearts of the believers has a profound impact on the way religion is felt and followed by them. The Sufi way strove to mend human behavior and to open up human vistas to the sublime peace that comes from proximity to God. Their miracles were the transformations of human hearts. The Muslims needed this spirituality as much as did the Hindus and the Buddhists. The Sufi could intuitively and immediately relate to the Indian psyche in a manner that the learned doctors of law could not. Thus it was the great Sufis who not only succeeded in introducing millions of Indians to Islam but also contributed to the evolution of a unique Hindustani language, culture, poetry and music which amalgamated the ancient inheritance of India with the vibrancy of Islam.(Rizvi, 1992). Mystic interpretation of Islamic life within the bonds of religious orthodoxy is known as Sufism, which was initially launched by God fearing people of Perso-Arab world. They renounced the world and devoted themselves to His service. As the seekers of Tawhid (Unity in God) they helped in spread of Islam through mystic movement with intellectualization of Sunnah (The orthodox customs of Islamic world) as one of its basic principles. The Sufis either in their life time or their tombs after death became a symbol of supernatural power with metaphysical features ascribed to them under the guidelines of Quran and Sunnah. The disciples of Sufis adopted the path of peace or even armed jehad for Shariatisation of the whole world as a mission of holy duty. "Seekers of Tawhid should strive to dedicate themselves to the Prophet Mohammad, so much so that their entire selves, including their hearts and their spirits, were free of thoughts other than of God" Mysticism is a practical spiritual discipline based on the insight of illuminated seekers after truth". It is in fact a mission of higher religious order of any faith, which disdains strife and conflict in any form. Joy of self-realization being the essence of religion is experienced after a long spiritual practice. The mystics discard outward form of religion once they attain such joy. The concept of Sufism was therefore, to focus the mystic power on the spiritual dimension of Islam with a view to shield the believers from the outwardly and unrealistic dogma of the faith. (Bourdieu, 1990) The spiritual mission of Sufism, the cult was primarily introduced in India for spread of Islam with a view to help the Muslim rulers for political domination. By and large the spiritual successors of mystic Islamic saints enjoyed the royal favour of Muslim rulers and gave moral support to the atrocious Muslim invaders and looked other way to ignore the growing social

conflict. They also guided the State in political affairs with their experience of regular interaction with common people. The way Sufis' tombs emerged as a place of pilgrimage suggests that the missionary objective of the Islamic mystics was formulated mainly for conversion and to establish the Perso-Arabian cultural domination in South Asia. Even though the Sufi saints got convinced with non-Islamic worldview on metaphysics in course of their interaction with nonMuslim saints, they did not allow their followers to accommodate it in the straight jacket of Islamic theology. Sufi saints commonly viewed as symbol of secularism however, never opposed Jejiya (Tax imposed on non-believers) levied on Hindus in Islamic India. Sufis had

accompanied the Muslim marauders in their conquest and brought Islam in contact with Hindu priests and saints. They were receptive to some of the local Hindu traditions may be for a tactical reason to entice the locals towards Islam but ensured that local norms are not accommodated against the watertight Islamic belief, dogma and practice of Quran, Hadith and Sharia which were the fountainheads of Sufism. Their deeply rooted belief and practice of Islamic norms within Perso-Arabic traditions remained the bedrock of the mystic movement. Therefore, in stead of advising the Muslim marauders against their inhuman deeds, the Sufis overlooked the plight of Hindu priests and saints, who were forced to flee and hide themselves. Passion to the essential spirituality of life was hardly found in any Muslim ruler or Prince except Dara Shikoh . He was perhaps the only sincere Muslim prince, whose "effort was to find a common ground between Hindu and Muslim religious thought"(William, 1976) Wali Allah started a tradition of reformed Sufism in which Islamic mysticism was far superior to other form of mystic philosophy. His reform in Sufi cult made the spirituality of Islam subservient to Political Islam. His doctrine for internal unity of Muslims through complete adherence to pure Islam was only to fight against the infidels and for reestablishment of assertive Islamic political power. His ideology had no scope to accommodate any order of non-Islamic mysticism, which he regarded unhealthy. He tried to comb out all the foreign influences, such as neo-Platonism and Veganism from Islamic mysticism. Carving out a new path for Sufism he became an active Islamist with a sole objective for resurgent Sunni political power in India(Ather,1993). The term "Sufi" derives from the Arabic word "Suf" (meaning "wool") and was applied to Muslim ascetics and mystics because they wore garments made out of wool. Sufism represents a dimension of Islamic religious life that has frequently been viewed by Muslim theologians and

lawyers with suspicion. The ecstatic state of the mystic can sometimes produce extreme behavior or statements that on occasion appear to border on the blasphemous. The cause of this is that the Sufis can sometimes feel so close to God that they lose a sense of their own self identity and feel themselves to be completely absorbed into God. This in fact is the goal of the Sufi. Through following a series of devotional practices, which lead to higher levels of ecstatic state, Sufis aspire to realize a condition in which they are in direct communion with God. Ultimately the individual human personality passes away and the Sufi feels his soul absorbed into God.In9th and 8th era difference Sufi chain embrege in all over the world. These Sufis chains spreads Islam and impact that society where these chain embrege. Various groups and figures emerged who encouraged a return to the pure values of the Prophet and the Quran.In India Sufism has lost the influence they once had but nevertheless remain a part of the religious identity of the area. The continued existence of such orders suggests the inseparability of religion and its mystical dimension. (Arberry,1950). Sufism created community. In every age and era since the time of Prophet Muhammad, upon whom be peace, to whom all Sufis look as inspiration, role model and guide, the Sufis have sought to establish the infrastructure that, in modern parlance, would be termed privatized social welfare. It was through institutions designed not only to serve the destitute, the homeless and the ill, but whose overall purpose was to redirect the society as a whole to the goal of uplifting the people spiritually, psychologically, morally and physically, that the Sufis were able to have a immense impact on the societies in which they functioned. The primary mechanism by which Sufism exerted maximal societal impact was a sophisticated system of charities and trusts (awqf). Tasawwuf, which is the essence of the true religious tradition of Prophet Muhammad and is distinguished by his high humanistic principles, is open to all religions and races. By nature, Islam is a religion open to peoples of every race. It does not differentiate between one Muslim and another. The Sufis have stretched the bounds of this principle to the point where they do not even see any difference between their religion and other faiths. They opened their doors to accept all other religions without distinction. This is how the Sufi Muslims, through their rarefied understanding of the nature of society emerged as the fountainheads of religious and moral character. This was because of their openness to all different experiences in religion and human philosophy, and their harmonizing with all other spiritual influences and backgrounds, coming altogether under the perfect human university, bringing the diverse

elements of society together under the commonality of the human experience without regard for the differences of culture and the happenstances of geography (Louis, 1954) Sufi is a unique word. "Sufi" is a unique Power. It does not relate to any particular religion. It belongs to all of humanity. "Sufi" is a clear, pure Essence that has filtered and settled slowly, deep within. It goes beyond the state of mounam (silence), even beyond the station of the mouna guru (the silent guru within us). It is that State of Stillness when the Resplendence of the Pure Clarity of Wisdom has sunk down and settled completely within its ultimate Completeness and Perfection. "Sufi" reveals the nature of the final state of the receding of that Perfection, when it has settled down slowly to its ultimate Stillness. It is not something that belongs to any one religion. It is the Essence which has been filtered out from all four religions by Wisdom. It is the Essence which has analyzed and sifted right from wrong, extracted the clear Filtrate that is the Truth, and out of that Truth distilled the Power that resides within all created lives-the Power that is God. It has ascertained and extracted the qualities, the tendencies, the awareness, and the intelligence of all these lives. And understanding clearly their characteristics, their intelligence, their actions, and their behavior, it scrutinizes and comprehends them through Wisdom, and from this understanding of all of creation it gives praise to the Glory of God. "Sufi" is to bestow Compassion on these lives, to bestow Love, Kindness, Compassion, and Mercy on all creations. Just as God protects all lives and nourishes each being with exactly the right type of food for its needs, Sufi gives to each one the explanation appropriate to its level of wisdom. Sufi explains, teaches, and leads them on the Good Path. Knowing the level of each and imparting the Wisdom that each one requires, Sufi leads them within the fold of the Mercy of God. Sufi work to show write path which leads to God. (Godlas, 2000) The devotional practices of Sufis vary widely. This is because an acknowledged and authorized master of the Sufi path is in effect a physician of the heart, able to diagnose the seeker's impediments to knowledge and pure intention in serving God, and to prescribe to the seeker a course of treatment appropriate to his or her maladies. The consensus among Sufi scholars is that the seeker cannot self-diagnose, and that it can be extremely harmful to undertake any of these practices alone and without formal authorization. Sufi psychology has influenced many areas of thinking both within and outside of Islam, drawing primarily upon three concepts. Ja'far al-Sadiq (both an imam in the Shia tradition and a respected scholar and link in chains of Sufi transmission in all Islamic sects) held that human beings are dominated by lower self called

the nafs, a faculty of spiritual intuition called the qalb or spiritual heart, and a spirit or soul called ruh. These interact in various ways, producing the spiritual types of the tyrant (dominated by nafs), the person of faith and moderation (dominated by the spiritual heart), and the person lost in love for God (dominated by the ruh) (Crapanzano, 1973 ) Three dimensions of the Deen of Islam, the science of tasawwuf, concerning the inward aspects of the Deen. Referring to Islam, he defined it as the science of fiqh, concerning the outward aspects of the Deen, and Iman being the science of tawhid, concerning the beliefs comprising the foundations of the Deen. It is the primal teaching of Islam, which had been passed on from one generation to another generation, complete and perfect, and its necessary knowledge comprises tawhid, fiqh, and tasawwuf. That is to say the doctrine of Unity, the obligations of worship, prayer, fasting, zakat, and hajj, and the science of the self which will lead to the necessary Islamic transformation of character desired by the Messenger for his people (may Allah bless him and give him peace). In regard to this matter, Shaykh Abdul Qadir alMurabit said as follows: Islam is not and can never be, by definition, in crisis or need of revisionist change, Islam, Kitab wa Sunna, is immutable in all places until the end of time. It is itself a critique and balance-principle against which all human ventures must be measured and them Self reformation and roohani (spiritual) progress are not normally possible without the suhbat (companionship) of the Auliya. By sitting in the company of a true Shaikh of Tasawwuf, the sincere seeker of the truth achieves islah (reformation) of the nafs and attains spiritual progress. Unfortunately, in our day the old and beneficial system of the Khanqah is disappearing. Few gain the benefit of sitting in the company of a true Shaikh.. (Uthman, 1996) Sufism started in the era of the Holy Prophet Hazret Muhammad(PBUH). From the traditional Sufi point of view, the esoteric teachings of Sufism were transmitted from Muhammad to those who had the capacity to acquire the direct experiential gnosis of God, which was passed on from teacher to student through the centuries. Some of this transmission is summarized in texts, but most is not. Important contributions in writing are attributed to Uwais al-Qarni, Harrm bin Hian, Hasan Basri and Sayid ibn al-Mussib, who are regarded as the first Sufis in the earliest generations of Islam. Harith al-Muhasibi was the first one to write about moral psychology. Rabia Basri was a Sufi known for her love and passion for God, expressed through her poetry. Bayazid Bastami was among the first theorists of Sufism; he concerned himself with fan and baq, the state of annihilating the self in the presence of the divine,

accompanied by clarity concerning worldly phenomena derived from that perspective.if we call someone "Sufi", all the world should be dead to him. God alone should be living. All the world within him should have died. The maya and karma that we call the world should be dead, while only the Resplendence of God and the Grace of God live on within him undyingly. It is such a State that is called "Sufi". There are so many meanings of "Sufi". This is just a little bit of the meaning. You should understand this Truth. For Sufi there are no differences, there is no world, there is no praise; there is no dancing, no play acting, no marijuana. Sufi does not put on costumes and dance. But whatever are the Qualities of God and whatever is God's Compassionate Benevolence, Sufi is those Qualities. The one who has imbibed those Qualities is Sufi. He does not acknowledge differences of races, religions, or any separations. He embraces only God. One who has attained this State is Sufi. One who has known and realized this state of: (La illaha Il Allahu)Nothing other than God Exists. You alone are God. This is Sufi. This is the Word of God. One who loses himself into nothingness, where the state of the self does not exist; one who knows the station where only God remains as that Solitary oneness that is God: this is the explanation of Sufi-a brief explanation. "Sufi" is to bestow Compassion on these lives, to bestow Love, Kindness, Compassion, and Mercy on all creations. Just as God protects all lives and nourishes each being with exactly the right type of food for its needs, Sufi gives to each one the explanation appropriate to its level of wisdom. Sufi explains, teaches, and leads them on the Good Path. Knowing the level of each and imparting the Wisdom that each one requires, Sufi leads them within the fold of the Mercy of God. (John Kingsley, 1994) Sufism has influenced many Muslims, and is, especially in the West, portrayed and regarded as a valuable and legitimate part of the Islamic faith. Sufis argue that tasawwuf has been present from the very beginnings of Islam, and profess to find evidence for their claims in the sunna and the Quran. On this basis they state that tasawwuf is the esoteric or inward (batin) aspect of Islam. According to Sufi doctrine a number of verses in the Quran provide clear support for their mysticism. The Sufis believe that Muhammad has said that every verse of the Quran has an outside and an inside a belief clearly in line with their quest for the haqiqa. However, the very method of Quranic interpretation used by the Sufis in order to support their claims, can arguably be seen as a reliance on eisegesis rather than exegesis. (Julian, 1989) Sufism is a Universalist spiritual movement started the West between 1910 and 1926, based on unity of all people and religions and the presence of spiritual guidance in all people,

places and things. A form of Sufism, and a branch of the Chishti order, it has its roots in the traditional framework of Islam but does not exist within it and is characterized by respect for other devotional traditions. Universal Sufis subscribe to the doctrine of Panentheism. Universal Sufis believe in esotericism, that everything has a hidden (batini) reality complemented by an apparent or (zahiri) reality. This is one of the bases of the belief that all religions are superficially diverse yet one in reality, and is the foundation of the universality of Universal Sufism. There is ten sufi thought or teachings which impressed all the human beings, There is one God the Eternal, the Only Being, None exists save Go There is one master the Guiding Spirit of all souls, who constantly leads all followers toward the light. There is one Holy Book the sacred manuscript of nature, the only scripture that can enlighten the reader. There is one Religion the unswerving progress in the right direction, toward the Ideal, which fulfills the life's purpose of every soul. There is one Law, the Law of Reciprocity, which can be observed by a selfless conscience together with a sense of awakened justice. There is one Family, the human family, which unites the children of Earth indiscriminately in the parenthood of God. There is one Moral Principle the love which springs forth from a willing heart, surrendered in service to God and humanity, and which blooms in deeds of beneficence. There is one Object of Praise, the beauty which uplifts the heart of its worshipper through all aspects, from the seen to the unseen. There is one Truth the true knowledge of our being, within and without, which is the essence of Wisdom. There is one Path the effacement of the limited self in the unlimited, which raises the mortal to immortality, in which resides all Perfection(Jose, 1994) Sufism, as a devotional and mystical current within the Islamic tradition, has been subject to the strains of modernization experienced across the Muslim world. Rapidly expanding urban populations, the diffusion of non-religious general education and the natural sciences, the erosion of family and village social hierarchies, the supplanting of royal with popular sovereignty, increased mobility and access to information. All have brought to Muslim communities stresses comparable to those experienced by Western societies in the course of their industrialization. But in much of the Muslim world, where economic modernization has come relatively late and in the face of competition with non-Muslim societies that made their head-start partly at the expense of Muslim colonies, confrontation with modernity has been especially traumatic. The material prosperity of the Western early developers has been attractive to later developing Muslim societies, but the social transformations associated with technological and economic change have

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not always been welcomed. Nor have the politics of post-colonial international relations between Western and Muslim-majority societies been reassuring, especially since the end of the Cold War and the post-September 11 War on Terror. The sense of heightened threat that many Muslims experienced at the end of the nineteenth century when colonial powers began introducing socially corrosive modern capitalism into their colonies has been reignited ( Malik, 2004). Sufism has been characterized as the science of the states of the lower self (the ego), and the way of purifying this lower self of its reprehensible traits, while adorning it instead with what is praiseworthy, whether or not this process of cleansing and purifying the heart is in time rewarded by esoteric knowledge of God. This can be conceived in terms of two basic types of law (fiqh), an outer law concerned with actions, and an inner law concerned with the human heart. The outer law consists of rules pertaining to worship, transactions, marriage, judicial rulings, and criminal lawwhat is often referred to, a bit too broadly, as qanun. The inner law of Sufism consists of rules about repentance from sin, the purging of contemptible qualities and evil traits of character, and adornment with virtues and good character. Sufism, which is a general term for Muslim mysticism, was originally a response to the increasing worldly power of Islamic leaders as the religion spread during the 8th Century and their corresponding shift in focus towards materialistic and political concerns. In particular, Harun al-Rashid, the fifth Abbasid Caliph, attracted negative attention for his lavish lifestyle, including gold and silver tableware, an extensive harem and numerous slaves and retainers, that stood in contrast to the relative simplicity of Muhammad's life (Emin Er, 2008.) Sufism, the seeker begins by finding a teacher, as the connection to the teacher is considered necessary for the growth of the pupil. The teacher, to be genuine, must have received the authorization to teach (ijazah) from another Master of the Way, in an unbroken succession (silsilah) leading back to Sufism's origin with Muhammad. It is the transmission of the divine light from the teacher's heart to the heart of the student, rather than of worldly knowledge transmitted from mouth to ear, that allows the adept to progress. In addition, the genuine teacher will be utterly strict in his adherence to the Divine Law. Sufism cannot be learned through books To reach the highest levels of success in Sufism typically requires that the disciple live with and serve the teacher for many, many years, (Hodgson, 1958). The spread of Sufism has been considered a definitive factor in the spread of Islam, and in the creation of integrally Islamic cultures, Asia. Persian Sufi poets and philosophers greatly

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enhanced the spread of Islamic culture in Anatolia, Central Asia, and South Asia. Sufism also played a role in creating and propagating the culture. Between the 13th and 16th centuries CE, Sufism produced a flourishing intellectual culture throughout the Islamic world, a "Golden Age" whose physical artifacts are still present. In many places, a lodge (known variously as a zaouia, khanqah, or tekke) would be endowed through a pious foundation in perpetuity (waqf) to provide a gathering place for Sufi adepts, as well as lodging for itinerant seekers of knowledge. The same system of endowments could also be used to pay for a complex of buildings, such as that surrounding the Sleymaniye Mosque in Istanbul, including a lodge for Sufi seekers, a hospice with kitchens where these seekers could serve the poor or complete a period of initiation, a library, and other structures. No important domain in the civilization of Islam remained unaffected .Sufism has contributed significantly to the elaboration of theoretical perspectives in many domains of intellectual endeavor. Sufis highly impact on culture through Islamic traditions. (Phillip, 2008) The devotional practices of Sufis vary widely. This is because an acknowledged and authorized master of the Sufi path is in effect a physician of the heart, able to diagnose the seeker's impediments to knowledge and pure intention in serving God, and to prescribe to the seeker a course of treatment appropriate to his or her maladies. The consensus among Sufi scholars is that the seeker cannot self-diagnose, and that it can be extremely harmful to undertake any of these practices alone and without formal authorization. Prerequisites to practice include rigorous adherence to Islamic norms (ritual prayer in its five prescribed times each day, the fast of Ramadan, and so forth). Additionally, the seeker taught to be firmly grounded in supererogatory practices known from the life of Muhammad (such as the "sunna prayers"). This is in accordance with the words, attributed to God, of the following, a famous Hadith Qudsi: My servant draws near to Me through nothing I love more than that which I have made obligatory for him. My servant never ceases drawing near to Me through supererogatory works until I love him. Then, when I love him, I am his hearing through which he hears, his sight through which he sees, his hand through which he grasps, and his foot through which he walks. It is also necessary for the seeker to have a correct creed (Aqidah), and to embrace with certainty its tenets. The seeker must also, of necessity, turn away from sins, love of this world, the love of company and renown, obedience to satanic impulse, and the promptings of the lower self. (The way in which this purification of the heart is achieved is outlined in certain books, but must be prescribed in detail

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by a Sufi master.) The seeker must also be trained to prevent the corruption of those good deeds which have accrued to his or her credit by overcoming the traps of ostentation, pride, arrogance, envy, and long hopes (meaning the hope for a long life allowing us to mend our ways later, rather than immediately, here and now).Sufi practices, while attractive to some, are not a means for gaining knowledge. The traditional scholars of Sufism hold it as absolutely axiomatic that knowledge of God is not a psychological state generated through breath control. Thus, practice of "techniques" is not the cause, but instead the occasion for such knowledge to be obtained (if at all), given proper prerequisites and proper guidance by a master of the way. Furthermore, the emphasis on practices may obscure a far more important fact: The seeker is, in a sense, to become a broken person, stripped of all habits through the practice of solitude, silence, sleeplessness, and hunger. Sufism had always been a reaction against authority, intellectualism and the mullah - thus making it ideally suited for ordinary people. Sufism had sustained Muslims before under just as trying circumstances, such as during the Mongol invasions when all the vestiges of Islam were wiped out, and later during the tsarist days. For the people to fall back on Sufism during the communist era was nothing new. The Sufis practiced the art of isolating themselves from their oppressors without necessarily trying to overthrow them, and their refusal to involve themselves in political parties or movements. (Javed, 2003) In the Sufi tradition Divine light appears as an essence within all human beings. Each stage of the spiritual journey is illuminated by its appropriate light. This light is known as the light of the "intellect" and imparts wisdom. The intellect that the Sufi refers to is a concept broader than just the capacity for rational or intelligent thought. To the Sufi, the intellect refers to the wisdom "found beyond the limitations of matter, and can thus take as its object of reasoning the whole of existence, not just the small manifestation of the material world In the Sufi tradition, the seeker, under the supervision of the teacher, settles in his heart. This is the base for his spiritual traveling for "the sight of heart surpasses the dimensions of time and space in their ordinary senses." "The Prophet said, 'Shun the ignorant learned!' The ignorant learned is he who is learned in mind and ignorant in heart(.Angha, 1991) Sufism started as a mystical reaction against conventional Islam's strict outlook on the faith. They believed that their government should promote greater free thinking and equality for everyone, as opposed to the traditional Islamic legalist government that followed the Quran as if it was a rigid law that the believers were forced to follow. This led to the split of a relatively

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small band of believers from the majority of Islams followers around 675 CE Sufism, as the new movement was called, allowed for a less restrictive form of Islam. The Sufis rooted their practice and theology in basic, mainstream Islamic principles and went on to encourage a special relationship with God through special spiritual disciplines. The Sufis believe that their lifetime goal is stated in Quran Sufism meditation exercises that are intended to bring one closer to Allah include dhikr, which is reciting prayers and passages from the Quran and repeating the names of attributes of God while performing physical movements, and Sufi whirling, where the dervishes (Sufi dancers), spin around in circles until they reach the point of bliss. Sufism is still being practiced in several diverse countries and cultures worldwide social impact. The Sufi movement are orders, Tariqas, which are guided by a man who is thought of as "the most spiritual".

Within the group Different Tariqas follow their own set of laws and rituals, although almost all orders gather around famous leaders.

Within Sufism, women are able to acquire a higher status, even equal to the status of men, in both the Islamic society and in the household.

Sufi converts still maintain certain Islamic social systems. Due to Sufism, priests and pastors are able to achieve a higher position within the social system because of their closer connection to God.

Cultural Impact

Through rich poetry in Arabic, Turkish and several other languages, Sufism was able to spread its mystical ideas throughout the Muslim world while enhancing an identity.

In Sufi culture, music, dance and poetry play a large role in their celebrations and rituals. To the right is an image of a whirling dervish, common to Turkey. Dervishes twirl in circles in meditation, humming significant worship tones.

Political Impact on the Globe

The Sufis' primary goal when they entered the land of India was to assist in expanding the Muslim faith and empire.

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Sufis were a source of important guidance to the leaders of the Islamic empire because of their experience and interaction among the common people.

The Sufi missionaries encouraged extension of the Empire in the regions they reached with their popular influence in the regions.

In regions where Sufis traveled to, rule was consolidated through educational facilities, as well as worship centers like the mosques.

. The impact of Sufism is significant in many aspects beyond religion. The Sufis absorption into foreign regions and cultures produces great works of art, particularly poetry and hymns, in numerous languages and dialects. As a result, they are some of the most important contributors to Islamic literature, and their works are poured over and examined the Sufis are primarily a belief movement that operates on feeling rather than forcing, their past influence did introduce some Islamic tradition. World Economic Impact Sufis had a roaming lifestyle and were willing to exchange ideas and goods from very distant lands.

They introduced several somewhat isolated regions to the magnificent trade opportunities of the Islamic Empire.

This helped struggling economies regain their footing. They, in turn, introduced the valuable goods of the previously isolated regions to the rest of the world.(Pareles, 2010) The Qadiriyah the oldest and most widespread order. It has branches all over the world

loosely tied to its centre at Baghdad. It was founded in Baghdad by 'Abd al-Qadir Jilani (d.1166), considered to be the greatest saint in Islam. It later became established in Yemen, Egypt, Sudan, the Maghreb, Central Asia and India. The Qadiriya stresses piety, humility, moderation and philanthropy and appeals to all classes of society being strictly orthodox. It is governed by a descendant of al-Jilani who is also the keeper of his tomb in Baghdad which is a pilgrimage centre for his followers from all over the world. The Jilaliya a Qadiri branch in the Maghreb, worship al-Jilani as a supernatural being, combining Sufism with pre-Islamic ideas and practices.

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The Naqshbandiya - was founded in Central Asia in the thirteenth century in an attempt to defend Islam against the ravages of the Mongol invasions. It later spread to the Indian subcontinent. The Naqshbandis tried to control the political rulers so as to ensure that they implemented God's will. They were politically and culturally active, the great poet Mir Dad (d.1785) belonged to this order. They were also connected to trade and crafts guilds and held political power in the 15th century in Central Asia and in Moghul India. A Naqshbandi branch, the Khaltawiyah, had an important part in efforts to modernise the Ottoman Empire during the 18th and 19th centuries. The Naqshbandiya developed mainly as an urban order with close links to the orthodox hierarchy. They recite their Dhikr silently, ban music and dance, and prefer contemplation to ecstasy. Their "middle way" between extreme asceticism and extreme antinomianism seemed acceptable to the orthodox hierarchy. They have been involved in underground movements against Soviet rule in Central Asia and supported the Afghan Mujahedin against the Russians. The Mawlawiyah this order was founded by Jalal al-Din Rumi (d.1273, called Mawlana), the greatest Sufi poet who wrote in Persian. Their rituals are aesthetically sophisticated, and their Sama' is famous for its exquisite combination of music, poetry and whirling dance (in the West they are called "Whirling Dervishes") which transports them into the trace like state. The Mawlawiya were especially attractive to the educated elite of the Turkish Ottoman Empire and were widespread in Anatolia where they had close links with the authorities. The Bektashiya a syncretistic order whose ritual and beliefs are a mixture of Shi'ism, Orthodox Christianity and gnostic cults. By the sixteenth century the Bektashis were the order of the famous Janissary corps, the elite military unit of the Ottoman Empire. Their magic-like rituals appealed to the illiterate masses of Anatolia. Their clergy were celibate, they practiced ritual confession and communion and had a trinitarian concept of God similar to that of the 'Alawis. The Tijaniya founded by al-Tijani in 1781 in Fez, Morocco, extended the borders of Islam towards Senegal and Nigeria and founded great kingdoms in West Africa. They taught submission to the established government and their influence is still an important factor in these countries where it is associated with conservative businessmen.

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The Daraquiya was founded in the early 19th century by Mulay 'Arabi Darqawi (d. 1823) in Fez in Morocco. It was the driving force behind the Jihad movement which achieved mass conversions to Islam in the mixed Berber-Arab-Negro lands of the Sahel. It is influential today in Mali, Niger and Chad and still widespread in Morocco. The Khalwatiya was founded in northwest Persia in the 13th century and spread to the Caucasus and to Turkey. It was closely associated with the Ottoman Sultans and had its headquarters in Istanbul. It has also spread to Egypt and Indonesia. The Suhrawardiya was started in Iraq by al-Suhrawardi (d.1234) who stressed serious training and teaching. They have many adherents in the Indian subcontinent. They were very involved politically in Iraq and Iran during the Mongol threat, seeking to ensure the survival of Islam. The Rifa'iya was founded in the marshlands of southern Iraq by al-Rifa'i (d.1187). They stress poverty, abstinence and mortification of the flesh, and are also known as the "Howling Dervishes" because of their loud recitation of the Dhikr. They focus on dramatic ritual and bizarre feats such as fire eating, piercing themselves with iron skewers and biting heads off live snakes. The Shadiliya was started by al-Shadili (d.1258) in Tunis. It flourished especially in Egypt under ibn-'Ata Allah (d.1309) but also spread to North Africa, Arabia and Syria. It is the strongest order in the Maghreb where it was organised by al-Jazuli (d. 1465) and has sub-orders under other names. The Shadiliya stress the intellectual basis of Sufism and allow their members to remain involved in the secular world. They are not allowed to beg and are always neatly dressed. They appealed mainly to the middle class in Egypt and are still active there. It is said that the Shadiliya were the first to discover the value of coffee as a means of staying awake during nights of prayer! The Chishtiya were founded by Mu'in al-Din Chishti in Ajmer, India. His teaching was simple and the order is known for its fervour and hospitality. They helped in the islamisation of the Indian subcontinent.

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The Sanusiya are a military brotherhood started by al-Sanusi (d.1837) in Libya with political and military as well as religious aims. They fought against the colonising Italians and the former King of Libya was head of the order. The Ni'matulahiya developed first in Persia and then in India as a specifically Isma'ili oriented Sufi order. The Ahmadiya is the leading order in Egypt with its centre at Tanta. It was founded by Ahmad al-Badawi (d. 1276).Sufism spreads through these Sufis chains in all over the world. Sufis highly impact on the social cultural, and religious life of people through waves and good behavior.(Trimingham, 1971) The Sufis never set out to found a new religion, a mazhab or denomination. They were content to live and work within the framework of the Muslim religion, using texts from the Quran much as Christian mystics have used the Bible to illustrate their tenets. Their aim was to purify and spiritualize Islam from within, to give it a deeper, mystical interpretation, and infuse into it a spirit of love and liberty. In the broader sense, therefore, in which the word religion is used in our time, their movement could well be called a religious one, one which did not aim at tying men down with a new set of rules but rather at setting them free from external rules and open to the movement of the spirit.. Perhaps we may say that if, in the past, Sufism's function was to spiritualize Islam, its purpose in the future will be rather to make possible a welding of religious thought between East and West, a vital, ecumenical commingling and understanding, which will prove ultimately to be, in the truest sense, on both sides, a return to origins, to the original unity.." Sufism is keeping ones distance .Sufism is surrendering ones soul .To the care of the inviolability of Love. I have heard that the ecstasy Of the "Wearers of wool" Comes from finding the taste of Love. Thats Sufism, nothing more. Sufism is nothing but a path, It is just this clear road, and nothing more. Good character and awareness of Love. The cure for hatred and vengeance. Thats Sufism, nothing more Contemplation that travels To the Divine throne, a farseeing gaze. Thats Sufism, and nothing more Sufism is the path of faith and affirmation of unity, It is an incorruptible religion. Thats Sufism, nothing more. Sufism is a smooth and illuminated path, It is the way to the most exalted Paradise. Thats Sufism, and nothing more.(Ahmed, 1994)

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Sufism has always claimed to be Muslim, but it has had a troubled relationship with Sunni and Shiite Islam. Sufi writings mention Christians, Gnostics, and Zoroastrians (Magians). Various Sufi schools have apparently been influenced by these, as well as Indian influence. Some Sufis are monastic-like, perhaps showing Christian influence. Strict Islamic Law and the five pillars of Islam are like a "schoolmaster" that Sufis say is fine for others, but they have gone beyond the need for it. Instead, Sufis follow books that other Muslims do not. People can be One with God is the key belief of Sufism. Thus a Sufi who is "one with God" could be considered Allah himself, because he is one with Allah..Seeking and experience a key motif of Sufism. According to some Sufis, Mohammed was the primal light in his pre-existence, and the universe rotates around some of the Sufi saints.(Baldick, 1989). Sufism is a broad chapter in Islam. Sufi impact through poetry .many sufies get popularity through poetry and music, sufies poetry represents the initial feelings of sufies. in Punjabi this poetry called kalam. Sufi beehive with people very kind. in fact Sufis give the lesson through kalam and this kalam highly impact on people because every Muslim and non Muslim impressed to kalam. in the kalam sufies give the lesson to love with ALLAH. Sufis spreads Islam through this kalam, Sufis give the lesson of different topics of this world and the day of judgment. this poetry is full of soz-o-gadaz, Sufis Write many books in Urdu, Punjabi and persion, Arabic on poetry. These books had famous today and this shows Wright pat hand resource to purity of soul, (Ranjha, 2009). In the Sufi Essays, expresses his disdain of [scholars of Islam in the West] following the older practice of explaining Sufism away as some kind of alien influence within Islam, and rejoices with the fact that many are now willing to accept the Islamic origin of Sufism and the unbreakable link connecting Sufism to Islam. Because Sufis are religious personailty.While these are responses to the questions initially posed, they seem to be more concerned with the maintenance of the outward appearance of Islamic unity, than with critical academic research and appraisal. Not only do these statements seem one-sided from a scholarly standpoint, but they also run counter to Nasr terms indigenous puritanical movements of a rationalist and antimystical kind found within Islam. As one author succinctly states, the fact remains that within Islam, Sufism is often frowned upon by Muslim orthodoxy, yet quite amazingly fawned upon and romantically fondled by Muslim masses. (Nasr, 1972)

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Education is must for men and women in Islam .Sufism is a sipuritrul and men or women become Sufis through initial practices. In Sufism women get important stage as men early age of Islam women Sufis have great role to spreads Islam. Hzrat rabia Basra is a great women Sufis in Islam. All chain spreads through the two students of hazart rabia Basra. Other many Sufis women work for Islam and show the right path. Women Sufis have important role for islam. Women Sufis show the people the right path which belongs to one God. women Sufi spreads Islam through their good behavior. in the verses of holy prophet (P.B.U.H) to get educating is nursery for men and women. (Khdokhail, 2009) It is reward from God that give us the Sufis in this age of martial world. Sufis spreads Islam in this era. there is no solution of soul in this world. Sufis teaches about the soul. There is two types of love one is outsider love which called love with outsider things. And the second love based upon the love with Allah. Sufis also give the lesson to pray Allah and purify the soul through the love of God. Because the (solution) soul in the love of ALLAH. Sufis language is very nice that impressed the people.( Bux, 1407H) The further one delves into Sufism from an academic perspective, the more clearer it becomes that both the origins and content of Sufism clearly show the inclusion of religious ideas and influences contrary and contradictory to orthodox Islam. The scholar states that [being] based on experience rather than doctrine, Sufism has always been more open to outside influence than other forms of Islam... in addition to early influences from Christianity, one can find elements of Zoroastrianism,Hinduism, and other diverse traditions. Sufism has been characterized[as the science of the states of the lower self (the ego), and the way of purifying this lower self of its reprehensible traits, while adorning it instead with what is praise worthy, whether or not this process of cleansing and purifying the heart is in time rewarded by esoteric knowledge of God. This can be conceived in terms of two basic types of law (fiqh), an outer law concerned with actions, and an inner law concerned with the human heart.The outer law consists of rules pertaining to worship, transactions, marriage, judicial rulings, and criminal law. The inner law of Sufism consists of rules about repentance from sin, the purging of contemptible qualities and evil traits of character, and adornment with virtues and good character.( Idries Shah, 1972)

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Sayed Johdi Jamal-ul-Din, Maghi Sultan Mahably Sultan, Hathi wan Sultan, Roudo sultan and Bahoo sultan (RA) have influenced the Sufism in Jhang. In the hand of these Sufis many non Muslim became Muslims. These Sufis have shown right way to the people and highly impact on community. These Sufis saints present Islam through spiritual knowledge and Miracles.Every year fare or Urs had conducted at the tombs of these sufis. In Jhang many Sufi saints came but sultan Bahoo (RA) had greatest contribution in Sufism. He is known as Sufism poet and wrote very much poetry in Sufism style. Mughal emperor Aurang Zaib Alamgeer has great affiliation with sultan Bahoo (RA) and his Sufism work. He focused on Zikir Allah and spiritual knowledge. According to Sultan Bahoo (R.A) God can be seen through meditation and the heart of eye.these sufies work for spreads of islam and these sufies higly impact of society cultural, social and religious side. these Sufis impressed the people through sufi music. Hazrat Bahoo sultan was a big Punjabi Sufi poet.He wrote many books .in which these books he give the lesson of Allah. (Bilal, 2000) Muslims have great love for Sufism. People came on the shrines of Sufis saints and make woves and distribute eating goods. They consider that these saints are ALLAH, s favorite persons and are a source of accepting their prayers to God. Sufis were taught to repentant because they believe in the Day of Judgment, as is common in most Islamic traditions. A Sufi practices to be selfless and pure in order to maintain a trust in Allah, ever striving for goodness. The Sufi practice of meditation is central because a student is always in the hands of the shaykh and should learn to stay composed and reflective. Abstinence is also important to a Sufi because detachment of the self is vital to become aware of the divine, and sexual relations interfere with this notion. Poverty is an essential state for the Sufi as well, primarily because it was held to be an imperative by the Prophet himself. Poverty and fasting are essential in learning not to be concerned with material things and to be concerned only with Allah. Lastly, prayer is the most vital practice of not only Sufism, but in all of Islam, because prayer pronounces piety. The repetition of Allahs name is necessary in Sufism because the Qur'an mentions the remembrance, or mention, of Allahs name numerous times. The Quran states Invoke the name of thy Lord and devote thyself to Him with utter devotion. Another part of the Quran declares that, Ritual prayer preserves from uncleanness and grave sin, but verily the remembrance of Allah is greater. These passages are held with great esteem and magnitude simply because the Quran

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states that, hearts become tranquil through the remembrance of Allah. Sufis are encouraged to practice dhikr, the prayer of Allahs divine names. (Buehler, 1998). After the Muslim victory of north India, Sufis began to power into the country. This is the only peaceful, friendly and tolerant element of Islam. Islam not imposed by sword. Aggressiveness Ulma and Qazis could not impress Hindu. But the Islam represented by Sufis appealed to them. Throughout Sufism's history, many Sufis have become very popular and wellknown. Abu Hamid Al-Ghazali, for example, became admired because he was able to restore confidence in the ulama and the philosophers about the prevailing attitude towards Sufism. Other well known Sufis such as al-Muhasibi and Mansur al-Hallaj provided major contributions to the beliefs of Sufism. They also caused some disturbance towards the ulama because of some outrageous comments they made.14 One of the most well-known Sufis was actually a woman. Rabiah al-Adawiyah introduced a new way of thinking to Sufism. Before her new idea, Sufism was more focused around aesthetic views towards Allah; however, she introduced love of Allah to Sufism. She preached that Sufism was not just an ascetic view but also a dedication towards Allah. She believed in a complete devotion towards Allah and Allah alone. Her innovative way of thinking about Sufism attracted many more Muslims to Sufism. (Karishna, 1982) Sufism is very much an active religion in today's world. Whenever the anniversary of member of Traiqas comes around, Sufis host a celebration. At the celebrations, community members that are interested come together to indulge in social activities. Some of the most central Sufi orders are the Shadhiliyah, the Chishtiyah, and the Mawlawiyah. Each of these orders caused dismay for the ulama because some of their practices were not in accordance with orthodox Islam. The Shadhiliyah, for example, commands not a life of solidarity, but a strict focus to ones profession. The Chishtiyah order was concerned with the ruling class and contributed a large amount to the success of Muslim music. The Mawlawiyah order distressed the ulama by being aggressive towards the sultan, as well as for the prompting the progression of Turkish poetry and fine arts. The orders also hold a responsibility for their missionary activities. By showcasing their love of Allah and embracing the equality of men, many orders were able to catch the attention of Hindus. Since missionary activity was exceedingly expansive, the missionaries gained some political influence as well. Two well known orders of Sufism, the Tijaniyah and the Sanusiyah, engaged in politics. In order to appeal Sufism to others who are not of an Islamic or Sufi background, symbols were needed to convey a point or idea. A man named

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Abu Yazd al-Basmati became the prominent figure who was attributed with the symbol of the wine or cup bearer. The wine symbolized an intoxication of love. The overpowering feeling of love of Allah was represented as wine because experiencing the true reality of Allah was like being intoxicated from wine. Another main symbol of Sufism that is still recognized today is the soul bird, which illustrates the human soul in congruence with a flying bird. The soul bird is often carrying a rose stem which symbolizes Allahs beauty. (Clarendon,1973) The Sufis are not an ethnic or religious group, but a mystical movement that is found all over the Islamic world and that still has a deep influence on the varied populations of the Subcontinent india, Sufism, the mystical belief of Islam, is the practice of seeking divine knowledge and love through personal experiences with Allah. It is described as an internal struggle, or jihad, towards knowing Allah. Another way of describing Sufism, or tasawwuf, is a direct relationship with Allah through discipline of oneself. A Sufi desires to become in such close relations with Allah that they alleviate themselves from all other materials objects of life. A revolt against the oppressive ulama of the Umayyad empire resulted in the propagation of Sufism beginning in 720 C.E.. Sufis believe that Sufism was established as a resistance to the ulama of the Umayyads because they felt there was little need for the revision of the objectives of a community by a select, elite group. Sufis found that a total commitment to Allah encouraged a more personal relationship unhindered by the possibly flawed interpretations of the ulama. In order to learn the practice of being a Sufi, one relied upon the knowledge of Traiqas. Traiqas were the original order of Sufism founded after the Prophets death. Within the orders shaykhs, or the teachers, taught the younger generations about divine love. (Spencer, 1971). Sufis within Islam itself. Many Muslims have become appalled with the violations of the Qur'an and the Sunna that all Sufis, including Ibn'Arabi, propagate. If the Sufi spiritual quest is to be viewed as legitimate, even within Islam itself, it must be rooted in the Quran and the Sunna of Muhammad. Sufism is a subject that has been well portrayed and appreciated yet at the same time their have been many critics who face difficulty accepting it as a religion and its roots. This leads us into the mere fact that in mainstream Islamic society there are many misconceptions about what Sufis actually believe. Sufism was extremely important to the development of Islam because it is in this tradition that the more spiritual and mystical aspects were preserved. Mainstream Islam tended to be rather scholastic in nature which is much more accepted and especially respected by those in the Islamic world. The early Muslims knew the meaning and

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reality of inner purity, reliance upon God, yearning and the actions based on that reliance and yearning which resulted in that purity, as well as the other basic Sufi concepts. It was only later on that these principles were discussed and recorded in a more structured way, in order to help the seeker on the path of knowledge, until he reached the point where he experienced subjectively what he had at first only learned about and accepted intellectually. The Islamic view is that a Sufi is an enlightened being following the outer Islamic Law while his heart is encompassed by the inner Reality. The Sufi writings are helpful to the practitioners of the Sufi path, but the written word is a secondary experience compared to the direct benefits and transmission of knowledge which occur when the seeker keeps the actual company of a spiritual master. Lastly Sufism is peaceful, especially due to the fact that it revolves around becoming close with Allah. These masters came to command the reverence and allegiance of thousands, even tens of thousands of disciples, each of whom had given an oath of obedience to the shaykh and through the shaykh, to the Prophet and ultimately to God., the Sufism that helped to spread Islam through Central and East Asia,. The Sufis expect that as the result of knowing God, one will have His love and, hence, joyfulness of spirit. This journey encompasses three stages: belief in God, knowledge of God, and love of God; the latter stage results in love of Gods creation. As the famous Turkish mystic poet Sufis look at this universe as a book of God every part of nature is considered as a sign of the divine.. (Hoffman, 1995) Music, and the humanities have been an essential part of many Sufi orders for generations. While the whole of Islam has historically produced great pieces of art and music, Sufism in particular uses the arts as essential in the expression of the mystical divine. Sufi musicians, poets and dancers are abundant within this mystical branch of Islam. A special form of spiritual dance, called a whirling dervish, is even used to symbolize the spiritual ascent of man towards God and perfection. The traditional Sufi exploration and emphasis on Gods love leads them to look for avenues in which they find unity with their creator. In search of this unity and in order to achieve these mystical experiences, the creative freedom of the arts are used to bring the participant closer to God. An interesting and curious aspect of Sufism is that the mystical branch of Islam has produced an unusual amount of poets. Whether poets are drawn to Sufism, or Sufism draws out the poetic side of these adherents is unknown. But one thing that clear: a remarkable amount of Sufis have chosen to record their praise and thoughts on God through the

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artistic medium of poetry. The Sufi masters sing of the all pervading love of which inundates their being when they become one with their beloved (Qureshi, 1986) Sufism is a bright part in Islamic History. Islam spreads through Sufi saints in subcontinent. And it leads to the age of Hazrat Muhammad (P.B.U.H). In the past Sufi saints give the lesson to pray the God. But now a days the fake peer damage the name of Sufism .People going from these fake peer to for the fulfillment of martial needs. But these fake peer only black mail the people and these fake Sufi saints are spout on Islam. These fake peer are uses drugs. In other Sufism was extremely important to the development of Islam because it is in this tradition that the more spiritual and mystical aspects were preserved. Mainstream Islam tended to be rather scholastic in nature which is much more accepted and especially respected by those in the Islamic world. The early Muslims knew the meaning and reality of inner purity, reliance upon Allah., yearning and the actions based on that reliance and yearning which resulted in that purity, as well as the other basic Sufi concepts. It was only later on that these principles were discussed and recorded in a more structured way, in order to help the seeker on the path of knowledge, until he reached the point where he experienced subjectively what he had at first only learned about and accepted intellectually. The Islamic view is that a Sufi is an enlightened being following the outer Islamic Law while his heart is encompassed by the inner Reality. The Sufi writings are helpful to the practitioners of the Sufi path, but the written word is a secondary experience compared to the direct benefits and transmission of knowledge which occur when the seeker keeps the actual company of a spiritual master. Lastly Sufism is peaceful, especially due to the fact that it revolves around becoming close with Allah. (Abdul Qavi, 2011) Sufism has influenced many Muslims. Sufis play an important role for Muslim faith in west. Islam spreads through Sufism. Sufis has ideas of trust in love of Allah and they impact the Spirtual life of people. Although there are many perceptions and followers of Sufism in mainstream Islam there are those who are filled with concerns and several misconceptions. The authors of various Sufi treatises often used allegorical language which couldn't be read by a person lacking knowledge of Sufism to describe these states. Ibn'Arabi is an excellent example of this due to his use of metaphorical interpretations of the Qur'an to support his views. The use of indirect language and the existence of interpretations by people who had no training in Islam or Sufism led to doubts being cast over the validity of Sufism as a part of Islam. Also, several groups emerged that considered themselves above the shari'ah and discussed Sufism as a method

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of bypassing the rules of Islam in order to attain salvation directly. The figurative and often puzzling language used by Sufis in their texts when interpreted by unqualified people opens avenues for many misunderstandings. Also, Sufi masters have introduced many special prayers and devotional acts into their schools, adding on and changing doctrine. Lastly, the biggest misconception of Sufism is that without having an educated opinion on the religion they assume that it is strictly mystic and filled with falsities. For the layman, and especially for Muslims who accept a more traditional mode of faith, these misconceptions can be hard to overcome. Sufism has gained a bad reputation primarily in its own culture, a result of the modern, unstable environment surrounding Islam. (Lings,1975). In Islam, an inter-faith discussion is needed with the rise of Muslim extremism. These terrorists groups propose to the world that they are the true Islam, while at the same time condemning men of other faiths to death simply by virtue of their culture. The initial response to such ignorance is anger, but the second must understand. Without understanding the reasoning behind a particular belief, or how it is propagated, one can never hope to obtain a grasp of how a religions truly works. Sufism encounters this same problem by being aligned as only a spiritual and mystical movement with no actual attachment to Islam, it has been denied a true status in Islam. Sufis do not follow the ruling or judgments of any of the ulama, causing them to be condemned by that powerful establishment. Ulama give the education in madrassah but sufi give education at tomb. Certainly, attempts have been made to synthesize traditional Islam with Sufism; acceptance across the spectrum of Islamic culture has not arrived entirely. With the rise of Islamic extremism, this fact has gained even more resonance, and it is no surprise that Sufism is considered an abomination by Muslim extremists. All religions are inherently based upon the same basic questions of life, such as the existence of higher beings or purpose, but the lack of cohesive knowledge of each other leads to blind ignorance and hateful reactions. Making rational and thoughtful decisions in inter-faith dialog will only come about through an understanding of the similarities and differences between these faiths; assumptions only lead to the perception of indifference. One could say that religious conflict is a failure of human understanding, but it is much more than that; it is a self-imposed isolationism, a refusal to learn about other faiths. Sufism is most definitely a form of Islam (Ansari, 1996) The Sufi's devotion to God and to the master of the Path represents this latter form of love. This third kind of love is not based upon any constraints or conditions, and the

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Sufi who possesses miss kind of love says with contentment and submission to God: "I am satisfied with whatever You want without any expectations, and love You without any thought of reward." The Sufi's love of God is not based upon any expectation of reward or fear of punishment, for the Sufi does not have any wishes and demands. The Sufi embraces and loves God's wrath as much as His grace, His hard hearted ness as much as His fidelity. Sufism is the school of divine ethics, and the master of the Path attempts to decorate the Sufi's heart with divine attributes. In truth, the master of the Path is like an alchemist who transmutes the traveler's copper-like heart into gold through the alchemy of his attention and teaching. The fire needed to smelt the copper of the heart, and thereby transmute it into gold through the master's alchemy, is called devotion (iradat). Without the fire of devotion, the copper of the heart will not burn, nor will the master's alchemy take effect: Sufis presents the complex interrelatedness of ethnic, cultural, religious, and generational identities and addresses important issues concerning representation, knowledge production, and adaptation. (jmal, 2006) Sufis or wali had a vital role in the spreads of Islam. There are many wali come to subcontinent due to spreads of Islam and show the right path to the people of this area they highly impact on the society to their good behavior their waves. Sufis show the right path and teaches them for initial practice and soul purity. Sufis wrote many books and a wide work in Islamic poetry. Sufis gives the lesson of one God. Their message impressed the people because it based upon love and truth. Their teaching show purity of their heart and soul. Message of the Sufis are universal and illuminate our mind and soul. Their message touch our soul and mind because message based upon love and truth. They love everyone without any dissemination people faith on them because they are the part of Islam and they have great contribution in the preaching of teaching of Islam. Sufi philosophy based upon universal love and brotherhood. (Moshan, 2010) Sufism are desirable and conducive to interreligious harmony, there are important impediments that prevent the spiritual tradition from having a greater impact. The first of these is the literalist opposition to more flexible interpretations of concepts from the Quran and the Prophetic tradition and the strict definition of the notion of invention in religion, or Bida. The second consist of deviations of some Sufi orders and subsequent criticisms by orthodox Muslims. The third consist of political obstacles, namely, impact of politicization of Islam by some groups,

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politicization of certain Sufi groups and the charge of passivism directed against certain other Sufi orders. Deviations of certain Sufi orders from the prophetic tradition include Saint and tomb worship, The first criticism of the Sufi tradition is the exaggerated veneration of spiritual masters, the preferring of sainthood to prophet hood (messengership) and Sufi masters to Prophets and their companions.. In particular, he uses a quote by Hasan Al-Basri (d. 110/728), a member of the first generation of Muslims after the generation of Prophets companions, known as the tabeen. This generation is revered and respected due to their having the opportunity to observe and learn from the companions of the Prophet. Al-Basri holds a special place among the tabeen. Al-Basri is credited with the refinement of the concepts of irfan, (personal and accurate knowledge of the divine, gnosis) and kalam, (Islamic theology). Born in 642 A.D. (22nd year of the Islamic calendar), Al-Basri spent most of is life in the first century of Islamic civilization. AlBasri is also a perfect representative of the balanced spiritual tradition, being counted in the Sufi lineages (silsile) as the last element of the chain before Ali, as well as being respected as an orthodox Sunni scholar. His compiled book called Riayah li huquq Allah (Observance of the Duties to Allah), a copy of which is reported to exist at Oxford, is regarded by some as the first book on Sufism. Mutahhari relates the following quote from Nicholson on Al-Basris significance, which also summarizes important stages of the Sufi tradition: The first Muslim to give an experimental analysis of the inner life was Harith al-Muhasibi of Basrah (Nicholson,1931) The Path (tariqah), as described by later writers, consists of acquired virtues (maqamat) and mystical states (ahwal). The first stage is repentance or conversion; then comes a series of others, e.g. renunciation, poverty, patience, trust in God, each being a preparation for the next57. Secondly, the urafa themselves trace their orders back to al- Hasan al-Basri; and from him to Ali (A), such as the chain of the sheikhs of Abu Said ibn Abi al-Khayr. Similarly, Ibn alNadim, in his famous al-Fihrist, traces the chain of Abu Muhammad Jafar al-Khuldi back to alHasan Al-Basri, stating that al-Hasan al-basri had met seventy of the Companions who had fought at Badr. Thirdly, some of the stories related of al-Hasan al-Basri give the impression that he was in fact part of a group that in later times became known as Sufis. Sufism includes many different practice regimes and their supporting social institutions, arts and scholarly justifications. Sufism has been connected justifiably with mysticism. (Roland, 1995)

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Sufism is a subject that has been well portrayed and appreciated yet at the same time their have been many critics who face difficulty accepting it as a religion and its roots. This leads us into the mere fact that in mainstream Islamic society there are many misconceptions about what Sufis actually believe. Sufism was extremely important to the development of Islam because it is in this tradition that the more spiritual and mystical aspects were preserved. Mainstream Islam tended to be rather scholastic in nature which is much more accepted and especially respected by those in the Islamic world. The early Muslims knew the meaning and reality of inner purity, reliance upon God, yearning and the actions based on that reliance and yearning which resulted in that purity, as well as the other basic Sufi concepts. It was only later on that these principles were discussed and recorded in a more structured way, in order to help the seeker on the path of knowledge, until he reached the point where he experienced subjectively what he had at first only learned about and accepted intellectually. The Islamic view is that a Sufi is an enlightened being following the outer Islamic Law while his heart is encompassed by the inner Reality. The Sufi writings are helpful to the practitioners of the Sufi path, but the written word is a secondary experience compared to the direct benefits and transmission of knowledge which occur when the seeker keeps the actual company of a spiritual master. Sufi masters have introduced many special prayers and devotional acts into their schools, adding on and changing doctrine.. (Troid, 2008) Sufis are not belongs to spiritual group but a supernatural association that is being present throughout the Islamic world. Sufism, Tasawwuf, which is the esoteric or inward (batin) aspect of Islam, is to be distinguished from exoteric or external (zahir) Islam just as direct contemplation of spiritual or divine realities is distinguishable from the fulfilling of the laws which translate them in the individual order in connection with the conditions of particular phase of humanity. Whereas the ordinary way of believers is directed towards obtaining a state of blessedness after death, a state which may be attained through indirect and, as it were, symbolical participation in Divine Truths by carrying out prescribed works, Sufism contains its end or aim within itself in the sense that it can give access to direct knowledge of the external. This knowledge, being one with its objects, delivers form the limited and inevitably changing state of the ego. The spiritual state of baqa, to which Sufi contemplatives aspire (the word signifies pure subsistence beyond all form), is the same as the state .The most usual explanation

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is that this word means only to wear wool (sufi) the first Sufis having worn, it is said only garments of pure wool. (William C. Chittick, 2007) Sufism is knowledge of self and perform silent prayers Canonical worship was then performed upstairs in the room for socializing, where low divans rimmed the room. The senior student on duty who usually acted as imam would swing around on his haunches to face the congregation, and lead a brief khaf (silent) dhikr (remembrance of God) and du`a (supplication). Hazrat mohideen chissti spreads islam and he behave with followers very kind.he give thelesson of khaf dhikr of 33 Subhanallah, 33 Alhamdulullah, and 33 Allahu akbar, to which 33 Istaghfurullah wa alaytu lalayh are often added. It was more just about Islam. (Harry, 2001) Sufis Saints love with the God and they believe spiritual knowledge. They love with Allah and prophet (P.B.U.H).they avoid from outside things. Sufis believed the initial prays. After the departure of the Beloved Prophet Muhammad (peace & blessings upon him) from this world in 632 C.E., those who were closest to him passed on his teachings to the sincere seekers of the next generation, who in turn became the perfected guides, or Shaykhs, for the generation after them. This process has continued down to our present time by the Mercy of Allah. In this way, every authentic Sufi guide has a chain of teachers which leads directly back to the Beloved Prophet Muhammad (peace & blessings upon him). Such a chain of teachers is known in Sufism as a "Silsilah" or a Shajarah".Often, one of the Shaykhs may be so prominent, or become so well-known, that his students will identify themselves by saying they follow the way of suchand-such a Shaykh. The Arabic word for way is 'tariqah'. (plural: 'turuq').So for example, students of the great Shaykh, Abd 'al-Qadir al-Jilani, and his successors down to the present day are said to follow the Qadiriya tariqah. Similarly, Bahauddin Naqshband gave his name to the Naqshbandiya tariqah, Khawaja Muin al-din Hasan Chishti to the Chishtiya tariqah, Abul Hasan Shadhili to the Shadhiliya tariqah, Ahmad Faruqi Sirhindi Mujaddid to the Mujaddidi tariqah and Sultan Makhdoom Ashraf Jahangir Allah be pleased with them all to the Ashrafiya tariqah.In the English language, each of these ''tariqahs'' is known as a 'Sufi Order'.Ultimately, all of these orders lead directly back to the Beloved Prophet Muhammad May Allah shower His mercy upom him, and their differences are mostly geographical and superficial (Hassan, 2003)

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Objectives
To study the attitude of people towards Sufis. To study the value of Sufism in community. To investigate the Sufis work in Islam. To study the impact of Sufism on social life of community.

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Chapter 2

REVIEW OF LITERATURE
Attar (1982) said Sufism was to authorize of such a possibility it must be identified with the very kernel (al-lubb) of the established form which is its support. It cannot be something super-added to Islam, for it would then be something less important in relation to the Spiritual means of Islam. On the contrary, it is in fact closer to their super human source than is the religious fanaticism and it participates actively though in a wholly inward way, in the function of revelation which manifestedthis customary form and continues to keep it alive. Qadosi, (2005). sufism was a branch of Islam in Sufism. Muslim Sufis play a vital role in the spread of Islam and in the formation of human personality and Islamic society .Sufis are miracal personailties. And behave with their followers very kindly and good . sufis show the two type of (external and internal) knoweledge Sufis give the lesson of internal puirty and clean the internal world of the heart through meditation and advise the people to live together with peace harmony. According to the Sufism we cannot see God with the eye of the heart through meditation.

ALLAH (11.61) Liston! No doubt there is no fear and sorrow for ALLAH s WALLI. John(1985) Recent anthropological studies especially have shown that, throughout the Muslim world, Sufi brotherhoods remain a fundamental part of the religious environment. The desire for an emotional aspect to religious life, in combination with the appeal of images which worship Muhammad and, indeed, the divine, has a substantial place in Islam and this is frequently provided by the Sufi tradition. Sufi has make no grouped at sect bases.Grouped around a spiritual leader and following certain practices designed to motivate the experience of God, Sufi brotherhoods flourish throughout the Muslim world, even if they are not always condoned by governments or establishment religious forces. Shah (1998) islamic Sufism was great impact on life of the people. Non Muslim people so much impressed from Sufism because Sufism give lesson of ALLAH, s love. Sufis preach Islam with love not with sword. Sufism is an important part of Islam. Sufis play an important

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role in the preaching of Islam. In this modern world people believe on Sufis and follow the teachings of these Sufis. Today with development people run away from religion and moral values have become weak, so crime rate is increasing day by day. They have everything but they do not have heart and mind peace. To seek heart peace they went on Sufis shrines and make woves for the fulfillment of heart desire. Sufis represent Islam through miracles which Allah bestows them. They have many followers and great impact on their lives. Followers of the Sufis celebrate Urs on shrines and show great affiliation with them. Zubari (2002) in history Islam spreads through three ways. first Islam spreads through Arabic business mans second Islam spreads through muslin ruler who attack on the people of subcontinent. third and most strong ways is Sufism. ln different era, different Sufi saints came from different areas in Jhugi Sial (Jhang) for the preach of Islam here from different areas of country. They are related to different orders but mostly are related to Qadriya order. They stayed in this aria for the order of their teacher. Women make woves at sufi tomb. They preach Islam here with the help of their spiritual power which ALLAH bestows to them. Hindus impress so they become Muslim.Urs and fair are counducted on the sufi tomb.urs started with reciete of Quran and Qawali.men and women are both participant in the urs. Titus Burckhardt (2007). The central role of Sufism at the heart of the Islamic world may be veiled from those who examine it from outside because estorism while it is conscious of the significance of forms is at the same time in position of intellectual rule in relation to them and can incorporate to itself at any rate for the exposition of its doctrine certain ideas or symbols derived from a heritage different from its own traditional background. Schimmel (1975) said that Muslim are lost, Commercial "sufis" (men who exhibit themselves as saints) are trading Tasawwuf as some mysterious cult of "Mysticism" a part from the Shariat and Sunnat of Rasulullah (P.B.U.H). But Qazi and Ulama have reduced Tasawwuf to potions, talisman, incantation empty rituals, and they have cloaked it with belief and theories of kufr and shirk. They have interwoven Tasawwuf with bid'ah and practices of corruption. All this have become necessary in the interest of their pecuniary benefits. A mystical cult appeals and preys on the mind of ignorant and unwary masses who seek an escape for their Shar'i duties and Ibadat in the fantasy of "mystical" concepts fraudulently conjectured by the fraudulent "sufis". Tasawwuf in reality is nothing but the rooh of Islam Islam consists of two fundamental parts, viz

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the external laws pertaining to Ibadat and. the internal state of beauty, concern, sincerity and perfection on which (he external laws are to be based. Thus Tasawwuf is an integral part of the Shariat of Islam. Any "tasawwuf_ beyond the confines of the Shariat is not the Tasawwuf of the Qur'an and Hadith, but is a practice of fraud and deception. The Tasawwuf of ALL the great and illustrious Auliyaa operate within strict control of the Sunnatof our Nabi (PBUH). A tasawwuf which is at variance with the tasawwuf of Rasulullah (PBUH) is not Tasawwuf, but is some satanic concept designed to obtain the pleasure of shaitaan. The main purpose of Tasawwuf is to eliminate the bestial qualities in man and to supplant them with the noble and virtuous qualities of angels. Siddiqui (2009) Two origins of the word sufi have been suggested. Commonly, the lexical root of the word is traced to saf which in Arabic means "purity". Another origin is sf "wool", referring to the simple cloaks the early Muslim ascetics wore.The two were combined by the Sufi al-Rudhabari who said, "The Sufi is the one who wears wool on top of purity." The wool cloaks were sometimes a designation of their initiation into the Sufi order.]. Others have suggested that word comes from the term ahl a-uffah ("the people of the bench"), who were a group of impoverished companions of Muhammad who held regular gatherings of ikr. the word sfi is derived from the Greek word sofia meaning wisdom While all Muslims believe that they are on the pathway to God and hope to become close to God in Paradise.after death and after the "Final Judgment. Sufis also believe that it is possible to draw closer to God and to more fully embrace the Divine Presence in this life The chief aim of all Sufis is to seek the pleasing of God by working to restore within themselves the primordial state of fitra, described in the Qur'an. In this state nothing one does defies God, and all is undertaken with the single motivation of love of God. Walbridge (2005) Sufis were give lesson of spiritual ideas and religious practices because they follow this thing. Sufis work in the field of science in thirteenth century. Sufis in reaction to the materialism of the Islamic civilization stepped through the framework of legality into a world of mysticism. However, in their reaction, the Sufis created a more serious problem for Islam, as due to their religiosity, they introduced new teachings, reinterpreting the Quran and sunna.

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Rahiem (2008) Sufis work for the development of Muslim legacy and they has important role in the preach of Islam. They have related to different chains, (Silsala).They stressed serious training and teaching they were very involved the seeking to ensure the survival of Islam .They have many adherents in the Indian subcontinent Aurberry (1970) most people who were drawn to the path of Sufism and become disciples of a master have, in fact, an image of the master in their minds, expecting the master to act according to this objective image of theirs. If, after a while, they come to conclude that the master is not acting according to their psychological image, they decide to leave this master, because, from their point of view, the master has not performed according to their opportunity, and in point of fact they expect the master to be the disciple of their own logical image, otherwise they conclude that he or she is no t a good master. Such disciples and, indeed, they are the majority used to be called 'drawn-andblown' disciples, referring to the story in which a certain master performed the marvel of bringing a bird to life, whereby many disciples were 'drawn' to him. Seeing the increase in the number of disciples, the master decided to test them and so one day he broke wind. All the would-be disciples left in repulsion, 'blown' away, as it were. So, in effect, they were drawn. For ages the saying has been 'The master's faithlessness is the disciple's faith,' meaning that if the master says something opposing to the disciple's beliefs or does something against the disciple's desires, and the disciple remains faithful to him, it is proof that the disciple truly has faith in the master. There are very few disciples in the school of Sufism who love their master as he is and not as they would like him to be . For this reason, a true Sufi is a rare thing in this world. Most come through their mind's eye and leave through. Massignon,(1954) Sufism is clearly a reaction or response to what was lacking in early Islam. The argument for Muslim materialism lends support to the concept of a spiritual void in Islam - keenly felt by many Muslims as their civilization began to expand and come into contact with other religions. There was a hunger for more spirituality, along with the realization that despite all of the sharia Islam did not effectively deal with the problems of materialism. The very strength of Islam, in its reliance on a simple creed and the five pillars of practice, proved to be the very weakness of Islam. While the Islamic system had allowed for rapid expansion, and the five practices were a uniting force, it soon became evident that one could accept this

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framework and step right through it into whatever they pleased. the Sufis created a more serious problem for Islam, as due to their religiosity, they introduced new teachings, reinterpreting the Quran and sunna.. BBC.(2008) Sufism was based on the fundamental importance of the relationship between student and teacher. In Sufism, the top of the pyramid is only reached by means of education and experience. Like any important job, it requires an intensive period of internship (much as is required to become a public servant, a doctor or a lawyer). This approach to training future leaders builds integrity and relies on the test of time to confirm true leaders, those who possess insight, wisdom and divine guidance. Sufi teachings focused on the importance of selfsacrifice and the need for those well-endowed to share from what God had graced them with whether in material wealth, learning or piety. Sufism eliminated the anarchy of self-centeredness and cooled the rebellion of desire and egoism, enabling the accomplished Sufi to lead others. The result of this disciplined practical training was that esteemed Sufi figures were, historically, wellaccomplished in the sciences of Islamic spirituality. Tasawwuf, which is the essence of the true religious tradition of Prophet Muhammad and is distinguished by his high humanistic principles, is open to all religions and races. By nature, Islam is a religion open to peoples of every race. It does not differentiate between one Muslim and another. Izutsu (1983) The sufis survived and prospered because theirs was the kingdom of God, untouched by the vagaries of time. They sang of the love of God and people resonated to their tune. They gave of themselves for the love of mankind and fought for what was right, often laying down their lives in the struggle. The ulema and kadis were defeated the sufism The Islam that survived was a Sufic Islam, inward-looking, spiritual, amalgamating within its folds the cultures of the lands where it flourished. It was different in color and character from classical Islam .which was empirical, vibrant, extrovert. It was this Sufic Islam that was destined to shape the history of Muslim peoples after the 13th century. Sahih Bukhari, { 3.32.230] Sufism is the the path of the gradual awakening of the heart, whereby we turn away from all that is illusory, and subsist in Reality. This was the condition that Muhammad (peace be upon him) described when he said, "My eyes sleep but my heart does not sleep"

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Algalani (1996) sufism considers the two main sources the Holy Quran and Sunna. The meaning of Sufism is to purifying the soul. Sufis believe the authority of Quran and Sunna. Sufism had great impact on the people of Pakistan and India. Sufis give the attention for the spiritual issues and inner reality. Sufis always follow the Sharia. Sufis is refers to materialism. Sufis depend on sheikhs or masters. The master teaches his students very carefully and watches his followers. Sufis purchase the inner practice. Esposito (2005) the Sufis were stretched the bounds of this principle to the point where they do not even see any difference between their religion and other faiths. They opened their doors to accept all other religions without distinction. The Sufis call to all people, just as God sends His Mercy to all humanity, without distinguishing between those who believe in His Existence and those who do not. The renowned Naqshbandi Sufi saint said, Sufis, in general, seek Gods mercy for everyone, not solely for Muslims Love Sufism teaches that Reality cannot be known by logical or rational methods. God must be approached through love, and only through divine grace and favor may intimacy with him be attained. From the perspective of the Sufis, as long as you remain yourself you cannot know God. Murata(2005) sufism considers the two main sources, the Quran and the sunna. However, on occasion they explained some of the sayings of the Quran and the sunna in different ways. The verses which relate to the purpose of Sufism purifying the soul - they [Sufis] talk about these verses deeply. The Sufis agreed on one thing that there were two sources for authority, the Quran and the sunna. Sufism gives special attention for the spiritual issues, because they believe that when a Muslim has good faith and good spiritual life then he will be a good Muslim. He will practice Islam perfectly, and he will follow the sharia - the Islamic law at the same time. So they insisted on this point of rituals.... the beginning the reason behind that is materialism which established shortly before Sufism, then this movement we consider it as a reaction in our Islamic history. Even now some Muslims are following Sufism, for the same reasons. As you know as well, the whole world is running to materialism. Sufism depends on shaikhs [guru-type leaders], special scholars who lead their students, teaching them and watching them, and we dont have those scholars to lead this movement. Leonard Lewishon (2005) Sufism teaches that reality cannot be known by logical or normal methods. God must be approached through love and only through marvelous grace and

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favor may intimacy with him be attained. Sufis give the lesson to love the people and kindness to animals. Sufism is the most universal manifestation of inner measurement of Islam. Shafy, (1999) sufism was a branch of Islam in Sufism Muslim Sufis play a vital role in the spread of Islam and in the formation of human personality and Islamic society .When wrong beliefs and customs are adding in Islam. Then Sufism eliminates these wrong beliefs in the Islam and present true Islam. Because sufis are religious personalities. In every era, Sufis defined Wright and wrong beliefs. They clean the internal world of the heart through meditation and advise the people to live together with peace harmony. According to the Sufism we cannot see God with the eye of the heart through meditation. there is difference between shria and triaqa.in fact Sufism is name of shria,tariaqa and haqiqat. Sufis studying Islamic books in there mudrsas. Sufis always work for morally and inial system. Sufis give the message to rulers and they never fear to these rulers. lama write many books but sufis made those people who get knowledge from these books. Sufis give the training to purity of their heart. David Berry (2002) sufis were masters of mystical knowledge. They passed down this most necessary knowledge by their selected pursue and this thing make a chain of Sufism which called Silsala. Sufis give the lesson to love the God.sufis behave with people very kindly. And love the humanity. Sufis all time show Wright way to non Muslim .Sufis believes that God is in all of us. Sufis focused on the interior practices. Sufis always welcome the non Muslim and they impressed the non Muslim by using the tolerant and good behavior. Safdar hussain (2005) Sufiism was playing important role in the spreading of Islam. Many sufies coming from different areas of world in Jhang. Hazart maghi sultan was a big Sufi saint of jhang. Hazrat sultan speed islam in the area of jhang and he highly impact on the life of people. In this time people of all sects (both men and women) making woves at the tomb of Hazrat Maghi sultan, mostly mureeds related to sial cast. Hazrat maghi sultan fullfill the people woves. People distributing goods at the tomb of maghi sultan after the fulfillment of woves. Different programs were conducted at the hazrat maghi sultan tomb during the Urs or fair like Mehfil e naat, kabadi, Neza bazi and other activities.

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Chapter 3

MATERIAL AND METHOD


Methodological Techniques and ways of analyzing the observation are important to sociological pursuits and Imperial research. Social scientists are confronted with the problems of measurement and conceptualization. Methodological techniques and way of analyzing the observation are important for sociological pursuits. The major objective of this chapter, therefore, is to explain various tools and techniques employed for the collection, analysis and interpretation of the data relating to the present study under investigation. The methods and techniques of research along with statistical test and operational definitions of the concepts being used are briefly described in this chapter. UNIVERSE The universe group of under observation out of which a sample is chosen is known as domain or universe. For the undertaking a scientific study selection and specification of universe is the first and important step. The entire group from which a sample is chosen is known as universe or population. Selection of universe is basic to all researchers. The present study will be conducted in district Jhang. The universe for the present study will be the shrines of six major Sufi saints which came in district Jhang for the preaching of Islam and whole universe will be covered. Name of the shrines are as given below. (a) Hazret Maghi Sultan (RA) in Mouza Maghi Sultan Teh. & Dist.Jhang. (b) Hazret Pak-Rah Sultan (RA) in Chak no.259 J.B. Pak-Rah Sultan Dist. Jhang. (c) Hazret Hathiwan Sultan (RA) in Jhang City. (d) Hazret Mahably Sultan (RA) in Thana Qadir pur Dist.Jhang. (e) Hazret Rodu Sultan (RA) in Athara Hazari Dist. Jhang. (f) Hazret Sultan Bahu (RA) in Ghermahraja Shorkot. SAMPLE According to Goode and Hatt (1952), A sample refers to small representation of the universe. The factors of time, cost and physical limitations usually play an important role in social research and therefore it is more economically and efficient to base studies on samples

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rather than to study the entire universe. Taken a one hundred and fifty mureeds of these Sufi saints.The 25 mureeds of each Sufi saints will be selected through convient sampling technique. TOOLS FOR DATA COLLECTION: 1. Interview schedule: The data were collected with the help of an interview schedule consisted of a set of questions which were asked from the respondents by the interviewers in a face-to-face situation. Interviews will be conducted in depth and well designed face to face interview schedule will be used for data collection. Researcher will be stayed on each shrine for face to face interview until 25 respondents will be completed. 2. Pre-Testing According to Goode and Hatt (1952) pre-testing is essentially a trial and error procedure where in the successful trails are repeated and errors avoided in the final questionnaire. The schedule was written in English, but at the time of interview, questions were asked both in Urdu and Punjabi according to the situation. The pre-test provides means of catching and solving unforeseen problems in the administration of the interviewing schedule such as phrasing and sequence of questions or its length. It may also indicate the need for additional questions or the climation of others. Questionnaire was pretested on 12 respondents before starting the actual research. After pretesting, some questions were modified to receive better response from the respondents. Finally, the questionnaire consisted of 48 questions. 1. Collection of Data The most important part of statistically work is perhaps data collection. The data were collected in 45 days by the researcher herself in a face-to-face situation. The interviews were conducted with the permission of the gadinasheens (predecessors) of Sufi saints shrines.

2.

Field Experience:

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Human behaviour is so complex and cannot be treated under controlled conditions as the happenings of physical sciences. It also depends upon the researchers efforts and experience to get reliable and correct information by observing and creating atmosphere of harmony, technically called report. The researcher spent 45 days in the field for the purpose of data collection. During the esearch the researcher faced work and interviewing many difficulties. a. As the data sources of the researcher were the shrines of the Sufi saints, respondents refused to provide information regarding Sufi saints without the permission of their peers (sultans). b. Due to this difficulty the researcher had to visit first their peers on their residence and after this visit the shrines in the presence of their peers on the shrines. c. During interviewing when the respondents were asked about their family income, they had a little information. Most of the respondents were avoiding answering due to little education. d. When researcher satisfied the gadinasheens and also respondents then he was permitted to collect data. e. Researcher had to waste a lot of time in explaining the purpose of the study to the respondents and the gadinasheens of the shrines because they did not understand the importance of social science research. f. In some cases the gadinasheens of the shrine sat beside the respondents, so they were hesitant to tell their true feelings. g. Researcher had to observe so many wrong activities on the shrines during the collection of data like offer sejda on grave, ringing the bell when enter the shrine and drugs used by the caretaker of the shrines.

3.

Data Analysis

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After data collection tally sheets were prepared and data were further analyzed and interpreted to draw conclusions and make necessary recommendations. It was compiled into tabular form in order to analyze it. Statistical Techniques 1. Percentage Each item of investigation was analyzed into a frequency distribution. The percentages were calculated as follows: F P Where P F N = = = Percentage Absolute frequency Total number of item = ----- x 100 N

OPERATIONALIZATION OF KEY CONCEPTS Concepts are the abstractions used by scientists as building blocks for the development of the prepositions and theories, which explain and predict the phenomenon (Goode and Hatt, 1952). This term is used to define certain scientific terminologies within research framework in order to clearly communicate the meaning to the reader. It is much more difficult in social sciences as compared to any other discipline because the same concepts are sometimes used with different meanings by different researchers. Some of the concepts used in the present study were defined as under. Socio-economic characteristics: According to the Horton and Hunt (1976) Socio-economic characteristics means a complex of attitudes that are interrelated but do not form a single dimensions. For present study the socio-economic characteristics were respondents age, education, chain (Silsla), caste sect, marital status, occupation and income are as under: Age

42

Age refers to ones chronological age that is number of years completed by a particular respondent. Information is based on respondents, own reply to an open ended question, what is your age? The information thus collected was further divided into five categories:

15-24 25-34 35-44 45-54 55+ Education Education is a basic element for the development of any society. Education is referred to the method of influencing human behaviour, so that it fits into the prevailing pattern of social interaction and organization. Education means the organized system of formal education prevalent in the educational institutions of the country. Illiterate Primary Middle Matric Inter Inter+ Chain (Silsla) An Arabic word which means religious order or genealogy. Chain of the respondents was categorized as below: Qadriya Chishtia Khwajagan Naqshbandiya Any other Sects Sects are sub religious groups. Sects of the respondents were categorized as below: Sunni

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Sheia Anyother Caste A caste is nearly a rigid social class into which members are born and from which they can withdraw or escape only with extreme difficulty. Jutt Rana Araien Malik Sial Anyother Marital Status Marital status is the living position of women in or out of the family when she has become young and mature. In the present study, the marital status is categorized as under: Unmarried Married Occupation It is the kind of work performed by the individual regardless of the working places where the work is performed . The occupation of the respondents was categorized as: Business Agriculture Government Servant Private Servant Any other Income Income is one of the major variables which determine the social and economic status of an individual within a social system. It is an objective characteristic indicating the earning of an individual and is considered as a factor responsible for creating, establishing and maintaining behavioral patterns towards various aspects. Income is the total money value of the services received by an individual from all sources including his own activities. The income categorizes were as below:

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3000 to 5000 5001 to 10000 10,001 to 15,000 15,001 to 20,000 20,001 to 30,000 30,000+

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CHAPTER-4

RESULTS AND DISCUSSION


Analysis of data and interpretation of results are the most important steps in scientific research. Without these steps generalization and prediction can not be achieved which is the target of scientific research. Generalization and conclusion are drawn on the basis of characteristics and attitudes of the respondents. Therefore, this chapter presents the required data analysis. The chapter on univariate analysis is the main section of the present thesis. The chapter provided general description of background and demographic conditions of the respondents. The discussion started with description of the education, age of the respondents, marital status, and no. of children, family type and income. This chapter also presents the respondents chain (Salsla), characteristics of their Peers (Sultan) and their opinions about Sufism in social life.
Table 1: Distribution of the respondents according to their education. Education Illiterate Primary Middle Matric Intermediate Above Total Frequency 42 19 30 24 13 22 150 Percentage 28.0 12.7 20.0 16.0 8.7 14.7 100.0

Table 1 presents the educational status of the respondents. About 28.0 percent of the respondents were illiterate, while 12.7 percent of the respondents were primary passed and about one-fifth i.e., 20.0 percent of them were middle passed. About 16.0 percent of the respondents were matriculated, 8.7 percent of them were intermediate and remaining 14.7 percent of the respondents had education above matric level. So the literacy rate was good among the selected respondents.

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Acording to Khdokhail, 2009 Education is must for men and women in Islam. Sufism is a sipuritrul and men or women become Sufis through initial practices. In Sufism women get important stage as men early age of Islam women Sufis have great role to spreads Islam. Hzrat rabia Basra is a great women Sufis in Islam. All chain spreads through the two students of hazart rabia Basra. Other many Sufis women work for Islam and show the right path. Women Sufis have important role for islam. Women Sufis show the people the right path which belongs to one God. women Sufi spreads Islam through their good behavior. in the verses of holy prophet (P.B.U.H) to get educating is nursery for men and women. Table 2: Distribution of the respondents according to their sex. Sex Male Female Total Frequency 93 57 150 Percentage 62.0 38.0 100.0

Table 2 reveals that a majority i.e., 62.0 percent of the respondents were male and 38.0 percent of them were females.Same results presented by Zubairi 2002 men and women are both particapent in the urs. Table 3: Distribution of the respondents according to their age. Age (in years) 15-24 25-34 35-44 45 and above Total Frequency 11 82 46 11 150 Percentage 7.3 54.7 30.7 7.3 100.0

Table 3 presents the age distribution of the respondents. Only 7.3 percent of the respondents had 15-24 years of age and a majority i.e., 54.7 percent of the respondents had 25-34

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years of age. Less than one-third 30.7 percent of the respondents had 35-44 years of age and remaining 7.3 percent of them had 45 and above years of age. Table 4: Distribution of the respondents according to their occupation. Occupation Business Agriculture Govt. Servant Private Servant Any other Total Frequency 11 71 23 10 35 150 Percentage 7.3 47.3 15.3 6.7 23.3 100.0

Table 4 presents the occupation of the respondents. About 7.3 percent of the respondents were businessmen, while a major i.e., 47.3 percent of them were agriculturist and 15.3 percent of the respondents were doing government jobs. Only 6.7 percent of the respondents were doing private jobs and little less than one-fourth i.e., 23.3 percent of the respondents belonged to any other occupations. Table 5: Distribution of the respondents according to their marital status. Frequency 86 64 150 Percentage 57.3 42.7 100.0

Marital status Married Unmarried Total

Table 5 presents the marital status of the respondents. A majority i.e., 57.3 percent of the respondents were married and 42.7 percent of the respondents were unmarried. According to Idries Shah 1972 the outer law consists of rules pertaining to worship, transactions, marriage, judicial rulings, and criminal law. The inner law of Sufism consists of rules about repentance from sin, the purging of contemptible

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Table 6:

Distribution of the respondents according to their numbers of children. Frequency 14 38 34 86* Percentage 16.3 44.2 39.5 100.0

No. of children None 1-3 4-6 Total

* 64 respondents were unmarried (see table 5). Table 6 depicts that 16.3 percent of married respondents had no child while a major proportion i.e., 44.2 percent of the respondents had 1-3 children and 39.5 percent of them had 46 children. Table 7: Distribution of the respondents according to their family type. Frequency 60 90 150 Percentage 40.0 60.0 100.0

Family type Nuclear Joint Total

Table 7 depicts the family type of the respondents. About 40.0 percent of the respondents were living in nuclear family system, while a majority i.e., 60.0 percent of them were living in joint family system. Table 8: Distribution of the respondents according to their caste. Caste Jutt Rana Arain Malik Sial Any other Total Frequency 20 7 20 10 51 42 150 Percentage 13.3 4.7 13.3 6.7 34.0 28.0 100.0

Table 8 presents the caste of the respondents. Table indicates that 13.3 percent of the respondents belonged to Jutt family, 4.7 percent of them belonged to Rana family and about 13.3

49

percent of the respondents were Arain. Only 6.7 percent of the respondents were Malik and about one-third i.e., 34.0 percent of the respondents belonged to Sial caste and more than onefourth i.e., 28.0 percent of them belonged to any other castes.According to Safder 2005 In this time people of all sects (both men and women) making woves at the tomb of maghi sultan, mostly mureeds related to sial cast. Table 9: Distribution of the respondents according to their income. Frequency 55 59 28 6 2 150 Percentage 36.7 39.3 18.7 4.0 1.3 100.0

Monthly income (Rs.) 3000-5000 5001-10000 10001-15000 15001-20000 20001-30000 Total

Table 9 presents the monthly income of the respondents. Little more than a one-third i.e., 36.7 percent of the respondents had Rs. 3000-5000 monthly income, while most of the respondents i.e., 39.3 percent had Rs. 5001-10000 monthly income and 18.7 percent of them had Rs. 10001-15000 monthly income. Only 4.0 percent of the respondents had Rs. 15001-20000 and 1.3 percent of them had Rs. 20001-30000 monthly income. So majority of the respondents belonged to lower income class. Table 10: Distribution of the respondents according to their source of income. Frequency 78 9 22 41 150 Percentage 52.0 6.0 14.7 27.3 100.0

Source of income Agriculture Public servent Govt. servant Any other Total

Table 10 presents the source of income of the respondents. Little more than a half i.e., 52.0 percent of the respondents major source of income was agriculture, 6.0 percent of them were public servant, 14.7 percent of them were govt. servant and 27.3 percent of the respondents had any other source of income.

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Table 11:

Distribution of the respondents according to their chain (Salsla). Frequency 73 52 4 21 150 Percentage 48.7 34.7 2.7 14.0 100.0

Chain (Salsla) Qadriya Barlvi Duyyobandi Any other Total

Table 11 presents the chain (Salsla) of the respondents. A major proportion i.e., 48.7 percent of the respondents belonged to Qadriya chain (Salsla), while about one-third i.e., 34.7 percent of them belonged Chishtia chain and only 2.7 percent of them belonged to Duyyobandi Salsla. About 14.0 percent of the respondents belonged to any other chain (Salsla). So most of the respondents in the selected area belonged to QadriyaSalsla. Same use by Claerdon 1973 Some of the most central Sufi orders are the Shadhiliyah, the Chishtiyah, and the Mawlawiyah. Each of these orders caused dismay for the ulama because some of their practices were not in accordance with orthodox Islam. The Shadhiliyah, for example, commands not a life of solidarity, but a strict focus to ones profession. The Chishtiyah order was concerned with the ruling class and contributed a large amount to the success of Muslim music . Table 12: Distribution of the respondents according to their sects. Sects Sunni Shiea Total Frequency 68 82 150 Percentage 45.3 54.7 100.0

Table 12 shows that 45.3 percent of the respondents reported that they belonged to Suni sects, while a majority i.e., 54.7 percent of them told that they belonged to Shiea sects. According to jhon 1985Sufi has make no grouped at sect bases. Grouped around a spiritual leader and following certain practices designed to motivate the experience of God,

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Table 13:

Distribution of the respondents according to their impression about Sufi Sultans. Impression Frequency 80 47 23 150 Percentage 53.3 31.3 15.3 100.0

Religious personality Miraccal personality Because my elders have faith on them Total

Table 13 shows that a majority i.e., 53.3 percent of the respondents reported that their Sultans religious personality were impressed them, 31.3 percent of them told that their Sultan miraccal personality were impressed them and 15.3 percent of the respondents told they impressed with their Sultan because their elders have faith on them. According to Murata 2005 Sufism gives special attention for the spiritual issues, because they believe that when a Muslim has good faith and good spiritual life then he will be a good Muslim Table 14: Distribution of the respondents according to name of their Peer or Sultans. Name Hazret Sultan Bahu Hazret Maghi Sultan(ra) Hazret Pak Rah Sultan (RA) Hazret Mahably Sultan (RA) Hazret Hathiwan Sultan (RA) Hazret Rodu Sultan (RA) Any other Total Frequency 44 19 4 10 22 9 42 150 Percentage 29.3 12.7 2.7 6.7 14.7 6.0 28.0 100.0

Table 14 presents the name of respondents peer or sultan. About 29.3 percent of the respondents reported that their peers name is Hazrat Sultan Bahu, 12.7 percent of them told that their peers name is Hazrat Maghi Sultan (RA) and 2.7 percent of them said that their peers name is Hazrat Pak Rah Sultan (RA). Only 6.7 percent of the respondents reported that their peers name is HazretMohably Sultan (RA), 14.7 percent of them said that their peers name is Hazret Hathiwan Sultan (RA) and 6.0 percent of them said that Hazret Rodu Sultan (RA). Whereas 28.0

52

percent of the respondents had any others as their peer (Sultan). Same result by Bilal 2000 Sayed Johdi Jamal-ul-Din, Maghi Sultan Mahably Sultan, Hathi wan Sultan, Roudo sultan and Bahoo sultan (RA) have influenced the Sufism in Jhang. In the hand of these Sufis many non Muslim became Muslims. These Sufis have shown right way to the people and highly impact on community. Table 15: Distribution of the respondents according to the cause of choosing of this sultan as their peer Response Religious person Due to fulfillment of woves provide religious guidance Religious person and due to fulfillment of woves Total 150 100.0 Frequency 92 42 10 6 Percentage 61.3 28.0 6.7 4.0

Table 15 depicts that a majority i.e., 61.3 percent of the respondents reported they their peers had a religious personality so they choose them as a Sultan, while 28.0 percent of the respondents choose their peer due to fulfillment of woves. About 6.7 percent of the respondents reported that their peers provided religious guidance to them so they selected him and 4.0 percent of the respondents told that their peers had a religious personality and they fulfillment of their woves so they choose him.According to Shafy 1999 When wrong beliefs and customs are adding in Islam. Then Sufism eliminates these wrong beliefs in the Islam and present true Islam.Because sufis are religious personalities. Table 16: Distribution of the respondents according to which characteristics of their sultan impressed them. Characteristics Islamic Political Good behaviour Total Frequency 120 1 29 150 Percentage 80.0 .7 19.3 100.0

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Table 16 indicates that a huge majority i.e., 80.0 percent of the respondents reported that their Peer had Islamic characteristics so they choose them, while only one respondent told that their peer was a political personality so they choose him and 19.3 percent of the respondents said that their Peers good behaviour impressed them, so they choose him.Same result presented by parels 2010 Political Impact of the Sufis' primary goal when they entered the land of India was to assist in expanding the Muslim faith and empire Table 17: Distribution of the respondents according to whose introduced this Sultan as their peer Person Grandfather Father/Mother Yourself Total Frequency 18 113 19 150 Percentage 12.0 75.3 12.7 100.0

Table 17 reveals that 12.0 percent of the respondents reported that their grandfather were introduced this Sultan as a Peer and 38.7 percent of them told that their father/mother were introduced this Sultan as a Peer so they also selected him. About 12.7 percent of the respondents told that they selected this Sultan as a peer himself. So majority of the respondents were selected their Sultan as peer because their family already Mureed of this Sultan. Table 18: Distribution of the respondents according to their pears behaviour with them. Peers behaviour Very kind Good Total Frequency 36 114 150 Percentage 24.0 76.0 100.0

Table 18 presents the Peers behavior with the respondents. About one-fourth i.e., 24.0 percent of the respondents reported that their Peers had very kind behaviour with them and a large majority i.e., 76.0 percent of the respondents told that their Peers had good behaviour with them. So all of the respondents had good opinion about their Peers. Same results presented by David Berry, 2002 Sufis were masters of mystical knowledge. They passed down this most necessary knowledge by their selected pursue and this thing make a

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chain of Sufism which called Silsala. Sufis give the lesson to love the God.sufis behave with people very kindly. And love the humanity. Table 19: Distribution of the respondents according to the lifestyle of their peer. Frequency 150 150 Percentage 100.0 100.0 Peers lifestyle Traditional Modern Total

Table 19 shows the lifestyle of the peer. All of the respondents told that their peers had modern lifestyle. According to Shah1998 In this modern world people believe on Sufis and follow the teachings of these Sufis. Today with development people run away from religion and moral values have become weak Table 20: Distribution of the respondents according to the role of their peer in the development of local area. Role of peers in the development of Frequency Percentage local area Educational institutions Religious institution No knowledge Total 6 6 138 150 4.0 4.0 92.0 100.0

Table 20 reveals that while only 4.0 percent of the respondents reported that their peer were constructed the educational institution in their local areas and another 4.0 percent of them told that their peer were constructed religious institutions in their area. Whereas a huge majority i.e., 92.0 percent of the respondents had no knowledge about the role of their peer in the development of local area. Table 21: Condition Distribution of the respondents according to the condition of the shrine. At present Frequency Good Bad Worst Total 118 22 10 150 Percentage 78.7 14.7 6.7 100.0 At Past Frequency 58 79 13 150 Percentage 38.7 52.7 8.7 100.0

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Table 21 shows the condition of the shrine. A significant majority i.e., 78.7 percent of the respondents reported that the shrine had good condition at present, 14.7 percent of them told that the shrine had bad condition and only 6.7 percent of them said that the shrine had worst condition at present. About 38.7 percent of the respondents reported that the shrine had good condition in past, while a majority i.e., 52.7 percent of them told that the shrine had bad condition and only 8.7 percent of them said that the shrine had worst condition in past. So above results indicates that the currently shrines had good conditions as compare to past. Table 22: Distribution of the respondents according to the source of income of their Peer. Source of income Agriculture Business Govt. Job holder Any other 12 Total Frequency 96 6 4 4 40 150 Percentage 64.0 4.0 2.7 2.7 26.7 100.0

Table 22 reveals that a majority i.e., 64.0 percent of the respondents reported that their Peer had agriculture occupation, while 4.0 percent of them Peers were doing their own business and 2.7 percent of them were govt. employees. Another 2.7 percent o the respondents peer had any other occupation and more than one-fourth i.e., 26.7 percent of the respondents were doing agriculture and business. So majority of the peers were agriculturist. Table 23: Distribution of the respondents according to their peers relation with any political party. Peers relation with any political party Yes No Dont know Total Frequency 124 11 15 150 Percentage 82.7 7.3 10.0 100.0

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Table 23 reveals that a majority i.e., 82.7 percent of the respondents reported that their Peer had relation with the political party, while only 7.3 percent of them told that their Peer had no relation with any political party, whereas remaining 10.0 percent of them had no knowledge about their peers relation with any political party. Table 24: Activities Recitation Naat Qawali Presented tribute to Hazrat Imam Hussain Taking bath to the shrine Address of Peer Zakar Lighting on shrine Regional games (Kabadi, Nezabazi, etc.) Dhamal/theater Marriage ceremony 17 7 11.3 4.7 15 18 2 4 93 10.0 12.0 1.3 2.7 62.0 Distribution of the respondents according to their activities they were conducted at shrine during Urs. Frequency Percentage 35 16 19 2 23.3 10.3 12.7 1.3

Table 24 evident the respondents activities at shrine during Urs. Table shows that 23.3 percent of the respondents conducted recitation of Holy Quran, 10.3 percent and 12.7 percent of them listen the Naat and Qawali, respectively. Only two respondents said that they presented tribute to Hazrat Imam Hussain, 10.0 percent of the respondents taking bath to the shrine and 12.0 percent of the respondents were listening address of their peer during Urs. Only 1.3 percent were conducted Zakar-e-Elahi, 2.7 percent of the respondents arranged the lightening on shrine, a large majority i.e., 62.0 percent of them conducted regional games (Kabadi, Nezabazi, Kushti etc), 11.3 percent of them arranged Dhamal/theater and 11.3 percent of the respondents arranged marriage ceremonies at shrines during Urs. According to Ranja 2009 Sufis spreads Islam through this kalam, Sufis give the lesson of different topics of this world and the day of judgment. this

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poetry is full of soz-o-gadaz, Sufis Write many books in Urdu, Punjabi and persion, Arabic on poetry. Table 25: Distribution of the respondents according to the inaugurated personality of the Urs Inaugurated by Sultan Any others Total Frequency 147 3 150 Percentage 98.0 2.0 100.0

Table 25 indicates that a huge majority i.e., 98.0 percent of the respondents reported that their Sultan inaugurated the Urs, while 2.0 percent of them told that any others i.e., religious or political leaders were inaugurated the Urs. Table 26: Distribution of the respondents according to the pattern of Urs starts. Frequency 62 63 19 6 Percentage 41.3 42.0 12.7 4.0

How Urs starts Recitation of Holy Quran Taking bath to the Shrine Qawali/Naat Recitation of Holy Quran & Taking bath to the Shrine Total

150

100.0

Table 26 reveals that 41.3 percent of the respondents reported that the Urs started with the recitation of Holy Quran, 42.0 percent told that the urs started with the taking bath of the Shrine, 12.7 percent of the respondents said that the Urs started with Qawali/Naat and 4.0 percent of them told that the Urs started with recitation of Holy Quran and Taking bath to the Shrine. same use by Rehman 1979 Sufism considers the two main sources the Holy Quran and Sunna. The meaning of Sufism is to purifying the soul. Sufis believe the ability of Quran and Sunna.

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Table 27:

Distribution of the respondents according to the type of activities performed by their Peers during Urs.

Type of activities performed by their peer during Urs Address to the mureeds Management of Urs Both (Address to the mureeds and management of Urse) Total

Frequency

Percentage

40 91 19

26.7 60.7 12.6

150

100.0

Table 27 presents the type of activities performed by their Peers during Urs. Little more than one-fourth i.e., 26.7 percent of the respondents peer addressed to their mureeds, a majority i.e., 26.7 percent of the respondents told that their Peer had participation in management activities of the Urs and 12.6 percent of the respondents said that their peers were doing both activities i.e., address to the mureeds and management of Urse.According to jmal 2006 Sufis presents the complex interrelatedness of ethnic, cultural, religious, and generational identities and addresses important issues.. Table 28: Distribution of the respondents according to the provision of financial

assistance for Urs celebration. Financial assistance provider for Urs Frequency celebration Mureeds Peer Mureeds & Peer Total 53 54 43 150 35.3 36.0 28.7 100.0 Percentage

Table 28 indicates that 35.3 percent of the respondents reported that the mureeds provided the financial assistance for Urs celebration, while 36.0 percent respondents peer himself provided the finance for Urs and 28.7 percent of the respondents told that mureeds and peer provided the financial assistance for Urs celebration.

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Table 29:

Distribution of the respondents according to approximately total no. of people participated in Urs celebration.

Approximately total no. of people participated in Urs celebration 500-2500 2501-5000 5001-10000 Total

Frequency

Percentage

27 82 41 150

18.0 54.7 27.3 100.0

Table 29 indicates that 18.0 percent of the respondents reported that approximately 5002500 peoples were participated in Urs celebrations and a majority i.e., 54.7 percent told that the 2501-5000 peoples were participated in the Urs and 27.3 percent of them said that about 50011000 peoples were participated in Urs celebration. Table 30: Distribution of the respondents according to the female participation in Urs. Females participated in Urs Yes No Total Frequency 143 7 150 Percentage 95.3 4.7 100.0

Table 30 reveals that a huge majority i.e., 95.3 percent of the respondents reported that the females had participation in Urs and only 4.7 percent of them told that the females had no participation in Urs. Table 31: Distribution of the respondents according to the female activities during Urs. Frequency 31 52 7 53 7 150 Percentage 20.7 34.7 4.7 35.3 4.7 100.0

Females activities during Urs Shopping Making woves Shopping & Making woves Dont know Not participated in Urs Total

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Table 31 depicts that about one-fifth i.e., 20.7 percent of the respondents reported that the females were doing shopping during Urs, while about one-third i.e., 34.7 percent of the respondents told that the female were involved in making woves during Urs and 4.7 percent of them were involved in both activities i.e., shopping and making woves, whereas 35.3 percent of the respondents had no knowledge about the females ativities during Urs and 4.7 percent of them said that the females had no participation in Urs. According to Zubairi 2002 women making woves at sufi tomb. Table 32: Distribution of the respondents according to the type of facilities provided by peer to the participants and mureeds during Urs celebration. Type of facilities Food Night stay facility Food & Night stay facility Total Frequency 82 22 46 150 Percentage 54.7 14.7 30.7 100.0

Table 32 presents the type of facilities provided by peer to the participants and mureeds during Urs celebration. A majority i.e., 54.7 percent of the respondents reported that their Peer provided the food facilities during Urs celebration, 14.7 percent of the respondents told that the Peers provided night stay and less than one-third i.e., 30.7 percent of the respondents said that the Peers provided food and night stay facility to them during Urs celebration. Table 33: Distribution of the respondents according to the type of woves they make on Sufi saints shrines. Type of woves Love Children Material needs Health Children & Material needs Any other Total Frequency 9 17 48 24 37 15 150 Percentage 6.0 11.3 32.0 16.0 24.7 10.0 100.0

Table 33 shows that 6.0 percent of the respondents were making love related woves on Sufi saints shrines, while 11.3 percent of them had woves related to their children and about one-

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third i.e., 32.0 percent of the respondents making woves related to their marital needs and 16.0 percent of them were making woves related to health. About one-fourth i.e., 24.6 percent of the respondents were making woves related to children and their marital needs and 10.0 percent of them had any type. Acording to Qavi 2011 the fake peer damage the name of Sufism .People going from these fake peer to for the fulfilment of martial needs.But these fake peer only black mail the people and these fake Sufi saints are spout on Islam Table 34: Distribution of the respondents according to their activities on the fulfillment of woves Activities on the fulfillment of woves Distribute eatable goods on shrine To give money to peer Distribute eatable goods on shrine & To give money to peer Total 150 100.0 Frequency 122 24 4 Percentage 81.3 16.0 2.7

Table 34 reveals that a large majority i.e., 81.3 percent of the respondents were distributed eatable goods at shrine on the fulfillment of their woves, while 16.0 percent of the respondents gave some money to peer and 2.7 percent of them were doing both activities (distributed eatable goods and give money to peer) on the fulfillment of their woves. .According to Safder 2005 People distributing goods at the tomb of maghi sultan after the fulfillment of woves.

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Table 35:

Distribution of the respondents according to their opinion about the difference between old Sufis and new peer.

Respondents point of view about the difference between old Sufis and new peer Old sufis are true representative of the teaching of Islam New sufis are not true representative of the teaching of Islam Total

Frequency

Percentage

108

72.0

42

28.0

150

100.0

Table 35 reveals that a large majority i.e., 72.0 percent of the respondents had viewed that the old Sufis are true representative of the teaching of Islam, while remaining 28.0 percent of the respondents had opinion that new Sufis are not true representative of the teaching of Islam. Table 36: Distribution of the respondents according to their purpose to come at Sufi tomb. Purpose For woves For pray Both (for woves and pray) Total Frequency 61 66 23 150 percentage 40.7 44.0 15.3 100.0

Table 36 indicates that 40.7 percent of the respondents reported that they come at Sufi tomb for woves, while a major proportion i.e., 44.0 percent of the respondents told that they come at Sufi tomb for pray and 15.3 percent of them had both purpose (for woves and pray) to some at Sufi tomb. So majority of them were come to Sufi tomb for pray. Table 37: Distribution of the respondents according to the reasons of making woves at Sufi tomb. Reason Tomb of Sufi Religious personality Total Frequency 71 79 150 percentage 47.3 52.7 100.0

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Table 37 indicates that 47.3 percent of the respondent making woves on shrines because these are Sufi tombs and majority of the respondents 52.7 percent making woves on the shrines because these are religious personalities. According to Nasar 1972 the unbreakable link connecting Sufism to Islam. Because Sufis are religious personality. Table 38: Distribution of the respondents according to the reasons of belief on Sufi sants. Reason Religious personality Political personality Total Frequency 114 36 150 Percentage 76.0 24.0 100.0

Table 38 depicts that a majority i.e., 76.0 percent of the respondents reported that they belief on Sufi sants due to his religious personality, while about one-fourth i.e., 24.0 percent of them said that their Sufi sants had a political personality. According to Parels 2010 the Sufis' primary goal when they entered the land of India was to assist in expanding the Muslim faith and empire.

Table 39:

Distribution of the respondents according to their point of view about the place of a Sufi in community.

Place of Sufi in community For respect For the fulfillment of woves Total

Frequency 148 2 150

Percentage 98.7 1.3 100.0

Table 39 shows that a huge majority of the respondents reported that the community had respectable place of a Sufi, while 1.3 percent said that the Sufi for the fulfillment of woves.

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Table 40:

Distribution of the respondents according to offer Sajda at Sufi tomb on grave.

Offer Sajda at Sufi tomb on grave For respect For the fulfillment of woves Never offer Sajda Total

Frequency 10 106 34 150

percentage 6.7 70.7 22.7 100.0

Table 40 indicates that only 6.7 percent of the respondents reported that the peoples offer Sajda at Sufi tomb for respect, while a majority i.e., 70.7 percent of them told that the people offer Sajda for the fulfillment of woves, whereas 22.7 percent of them said that the people never offer Sajda at Sufi tomb on grave. Table 41: Distribution of the respondents according to getting Taveez from Peer. Frequency 80 49 10 11 150 Percentage 53.3 32.7 6.7 7.3 100.0

Getting Taveez from Peer For health for the fulfillment of woves For health & for the fulfillment of woves Any other Total

Table 41 reveals that more than a half i.e., 53.3 percent of the respondents were getting Taveez from Peer for health, while about one-third i.e., 32.7 percent of the respondents were getting Taveez from Peer for the fulfillment of woves and 6.7 percent of them said that they were getting Taveez for both purpose i.e., for health and for the fulfillment of woves and remaining 7.3 percent of them were getting Taveez from Peer for any other purposes.

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Table 42:

Distribution of the respondents according to their opinion about the better activity at Sufi tomb.

Better activity Urs Fare Urs and Fare Total

Frequency 120 23 7 150

percentage 80.0 15.3 4.7 100.0

Table 42 indicates that a huge majority i.e., 80.0 percent of the respondents opinion that the Urs is the better activity at Sufi tomb, while 15.3 percent told that Fare is the better activity at Sufi tomb and 4.7 percent of them had opinion that the both activities i.e., Urs and fare are the best activities at Sufi tomb. Acording to Bilal 2000 these Sufis have shown right way to the people and highly impact on community. These Sufis saints present Islam through spiritual knowledge and Miracles.Every year fare or Urs had conducted at the tombs of these sufis. Table 43: Distribution of the respondents according to obey the teaching of their Sufi. Frequency 150 150 Percentage 100.0 100.0

Obey the teaching Yes No Total

Table 43 shows that all of the respondents reported that they obey the teaching of their Sufi.

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Table 44:

Distribution of the respondents according to the reasons of come on Sufi tomb on Friday.

Reasons Religious day Peer is available this day Total

Frequency 35 115 150

Percentage 23.3 46.7 100.0

Table 44 reflects that 23.3 percent of the respondents reported that the Friday is a religious day so they come on Sufi tomb on Friday, while a significant majority i.e., 76.7 percent of the respondents their peer was available this day so the visit the sufi tomb on Friday and Table 45: Distribution of the respondents according to the reasons of ringing the bell on entering and leaving from the Sufi tomb. Reasons Tradition To show your presence Total Frequency 88 62 150 Percentage 58.7 41.3 100.0

Table 45 reveals that 58.7 percent of the respondents reported that they traditionally ringing the bell on entering and leaving from the Sufi tomb, while 41.3 percent of them said that they ringing the bell on entering and leaving from the Sufi tomb to show their presence. Table 46: Distribution of the respondents according to the reasons of tie thread on tomb after making woves. Reasons As remembrance of woves Any other Total Frequency 118 32 150 Percentage 78.7 21.3 100.0

Table 46 shows that 78.7 percent of the respondents tie thread on shrines for remembrance of woves.

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Table 47:

Distribution of the respondents according to the reasons of people spending 9 nights at Sufi tomb.

Reasons Fulfillment and for woves For prays Any other Total

Frequency 138 9 3 150

Percentage 92.0 6.0 2.0 100.0

Table 47 shows that a huge majority i.e., 92.0 percent of the respondents reported that the people spending nine nights at Sufi tom on fulfillment and for woves and 6.0 percent of them told that the people spending 9 nights at Sufi tomb for pray and 2.0 percent of them said that they people had any other purposes for spending 9 nights at Sufi tomb. Table 48: Distribution of the respondents according to their peers contribution for the promotion of Islam. Contribution No knowledge Madrasa Mosque Religious institution Total Frequency 76 34 22 18 150 Percentage 50.7 22.7 14.7 12.0 100.0

Table 48 shows that about 22.7 percent of the respondents reported that their Peer built Madrasa for promotion of Islam, 14.7 percent of them built Mosque and 12.0 percent said that the Peer built religious institution for the promotion of Islam. Whereas a half i.e., 50.7 percent of the respondents had no knowledge about their peers contribution for the promotion of Islam. According to Phillip 2008 the same system of endowments could also be used to pay for a complex of buildings, such as that surrounding the Sleymaniye Mosque in Istanbul, including a lodge for Sufi seekers, a hospice with kitchens where these seekers could serve the poor or complete a period of initiation, a library, and other structures

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Table 49:

Distribution of the respondents according to opinion about commonly used drugs at tomb.

Commonly used drugs Churs Bang Any other Total

Frequency 3 123 24 150

Percentage 2.0 82.0 16.0 100.0

Table 49 depicts that 2.0 percent of the respondents had opinion that the Churs is commonly used at tomb, while a huge majority i.e., 82.0 percent of them told that the Bang is commonly used at tomb and 16.0 percent of them said that any other types of drugs used at tomb. According to Abdul Qavi 2011 these fake peer are uses drugs. In other Sufism was extremely important to the development of Islam because it is in this tradition that the more spiritual and mystical aspects were preserved.

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Chapter 5 SUMMARY
The term "Sufi" derives from the Arabic word "Suf" (meaning "wool") and was applied to Muslim ascetics and mystics because they wore garments made out of wool. Sufism represents a dimension of Islamic religious life that has frequently been viewed by Muslim theologians and lawyers with suspicion. The ecstatic state of the mystic can sometimes produce extreme behavior or statements that on occasion appear to border on the blasphemous. The cause of this is that the Sufis can sometimes feel so close to God that they lose a sense of their own self identity and feel themselves to be completely absorbed into God. Sufism is an important part of islam. Islam spreads in world through Sufism the first master of Sufism is the our Holy Prophet Hazrat Muhammad (PBUH). All Sufis order drived from the Holy Prophet (PBUH). Islam spread in subcontinent through Sufism. Sufis had highly impact on the people of subcontinent. This impact of Sufism based upon socially, economically, religiously and politically. Objectives To study the attitude of people towards Sufis. To study the value of Sufism in community. To investigate the Sufis work in Islam. To study the impact of Sufism on social life of community. The aim of present study to find out impact of Sufism on social life of community. The present study will be conducted on the six mazars of Sufis and universe for the present study will be based upon the six mazars of Sufis. Hazrat Bahoo(RA) Sultan, Hazrat Pakrah Sultan(RA), Hazrat Maghi Sultan(RA), Hazrat Mahbli Sultan(RA), Hazrat Rodu Sultan(RA) and Hazrat Hathiwan Sultan(RA). At the last 25 Mureeds will be selected from each Sufis tomb. A sample of 150 Mureeds respondents will be selected through convenient sampling techniques. The data will be collected through well designed interview schedule The following findings are found.

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MAIN FINDINGS
Majority of the respondents i.e. 28.0 percent of the respondents were illiterate. Majority of the respondents i.e. 62.0 percent of the respondents were male. Majority of the respondents i.e.54.7 percent were from the age group of 25-34. Majority of the respondents i.e.47.3 percent belong to agriculture occupation. Majority of the respondents i.e. 57.3 percent were married. Majority of the respondents i.e. 44.2 percent had 1-3 children. Majority of the respondents i.e. 60.0 percent had joint family. Majority of the respondents i.e. 34.0 percent belonged to sial caste. Majority of the respondents i.e. 39.3 percent belong to the 5001-10,000 income groups. Majority of the respondents i.e.48.7 percent belonged to the Qadriya chain (Silsla). Majority of the respondents i.e.54.7 percent belonged to Shiea sect. Majority of t he respondents i.e.53.3 percent faith on sultans because they are religious personalities. Majority of the respondents i.e. 29.3 percent said that their peers name is Hazret Sultan Bahu. Majority of the respondents i.e. 53.3 percent respondents choose their peer due to religious personalities. Majority of the respondents i.e. 80.0 percent were impressed to the Islamic characteristic. Majority of the respondents i.e. 75.3 percent that their father/mother selected this sultan as a peer. Majority of the respondents i.e.76.0 percent of the respondents said that their peers had good behavior. Majority of the respondents i.e.100.0 percent of the respondents told that their peers had modern lifestyle.

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Majority of the respondents i.e.92.0 percent of the respondents had no knowledge about the role of their peer in the development of local area. Majority of the respondents i.e.78.7 percent of the respondents reported that the shrine had good condition at present. Majority of the respondents i.e.64.0 percent of the respondents told that the source of income of our peer is Agriculture. Majority of the respondents i.e.82.7 percent of the respondents were told that their peer had relation with political party. Majority of the respondents i.e.62.0 percent of the respondents said that regional games were conducted on shrine on the occasion of Urse. Majority of the respondents i.e.98.0 percent of the respondents reported that their peers inaugurated of the Urse. Majority of the respondents i.e.42.0 percent of the respondents said that Urse started with taking bath to the shrine. Majority of the respondents i.e.60.7 percent of the respondents told that their peers manage the urs. Majority of the respondents i.e.36.0 percent of the respondents said that peer provide financial assistance for Urs celebration. Majority of the respondents i.e.54.7 percent of the respondents reported that approximately 2501-5000 people participated in Urs celebration. Majority of the respondents i.e.95.3 percent of the respondents said that female participated in Urs celebration. Majority of the respondents i.e.35.3 percent of the respondents reported that they did not know about female activities during Urs. Majority of the respondents i.e.54.7 percent of the respondents told that the peer provided the food facility during Urs.

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Majority of the respondents i.e.32.0 percent of the respondents said that they were making woves related to material needs. Majority of the respondents i.e.81.3 percent of the respondents said that they were distributed eatable goods on shrine when woves fulfilled. Majority of the respondents i.e.72.0 percent of the respondents reported that old shrines are true representative of the teaching of Islam. Majority of the respondents i.e.44.0 percent of the respondents said that they come on Sufi tomb for pray. Majority of the respondents i.e.52.7 percent of the respondents told that they make woves on Sufi tomb because they are religious personalities. Majority of the respondents i.e. 76.0 percent of the respondents told that they belief on peer because they are religious personalities. Majority of the respondents i.e. 98.0 percent of the respondents reported that Sufi has respect in community. Majority of the respondents i.e. 70.7 percent of the respondents told that they offer Sajda on the grave of Sufi for the fulfillment of woves. Majority of the respondents i.e. 53.3 percent of the respondents said that they get Taveez from peer for health. Majority of the respondents i.e.80.0 percent of the respondents opinioned that Urs should conduct on shrines. Majority of the respondents i.e.100.0 percent of the respondents said that they obey the teachings of peer. Majority of the respondents i.e.46.7 percent of the respondents said that they come on Sufi tomb Friday because peer is available that day. Majority of the respondents i.e.58.7 percent of the respondents told that ringing bell on Sufi tomb is a tradition.

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Majority of the respondents i.e.78.7 percent of the respondents said that they tie thread on Sufi tomb for remembrance of woves. Majority of the respondents i.e.92.0 percent of the respondents reported that they spent 9 nights on Sufi tomb for the fulfillment of woves. Majority of the respondents i.e.50.7 percent of the respondents told that they had no knowledge of Sufis contribution in the promotion of Islam. Majority of the respondents i.e.82.0 percent of the respondents told that Bhang is used as drug on Sufi shrine.

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SUGGESTON
People qurials in the base of Sufi tomb it should be stop. Govt should provide suricty on tomb. Caretaker of the tomb who stay at tomb day and night are most drug adicted people and they provide drug to other people and tomb had become a place of drug. Govt should stop these activities. In present time tomb had become the meet point of lover. per soul show the right path of islam. Govt should also stop these activities. Bad manners spreads at tomb like wine drinking,dance and sajda at grieve of the sufi tomb other bad activities. Govt should stop these activities. There is not proper living place at tomb male and female stay at night in one rooms. Govt should provide the difference facility to mureeds. Govt passed a law in which Govt had right to select tose peer who is true gaddi nasieen of sufi saints. True teachings of the Sufi Saints should present to the people. The present condition of the tomb was very bad. peer are not interested in tomb condition Govt should prepare tomb condition. People give the money to the peer and peer kill this money in wine drinking and other bad activities. people dont give the money to peer, they use this money in prepare the condition of tomb. More research work with large sample size should be done on Sufism. At the time of fair difference bad activates represents this is against to Sufism Govt should stop fair and give the permission for urs . The people dont know the real teaching of Sufis ,only true peer show them right path. There is not health facility at urs time Govt should provide health and transport faculties at the time of urs.

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CONCLUTION
Sufism started in the era of the Holy Prophet Hazret Muhammad(PBUH). From the traditional Sufi point of view, the esoteric teachings of Sufism were transmitted from Muhammad to those who had the capacity to acquire the direct experiential gnosis of God, which was passed on from teacher to student through the centuries. Some of this transmission is summarized in texts, but most is not. Important contributions in writing are attributed to Uwais al-Qarni, Harrm bin Hian, Hasan Basri and Sayid ibn al-Mussib. All Sufis orders starting to Hazrat Hassan basra. These orders spreads Islam allover the world and every Sufi follower of anyone of these orders (Qadria, Sahrverdya, Naqshbandin and chishtya) and the Sufis enlightenment the societies. Sufis always believe national practice and the purity of soul. Sufis learn the language of local people and spread Islam through that language. Sufis are real representative of Islam. Sufis impact on the social, cultural and religious and political life of people because everyone know when change the religion of a person the social values and norms automatically will changed. Sufism is an important part of Islam. Sufis play an important role in the preaching of Islam. In this modern world people believe on Sufis and follow the teachings of these Sufis. Today with development people run away from religion and moral values have become weak, so crime rate is increasing day by day. Because people forget the real teaching of Sufism and they present at this time default work such as (dancing, win drinking and offer sajdah) due to not awareness of real teaching of Sufism. Present peer has only gaining knowledge and they dont know the real teaching of Sufism. Due to this reason they dont guide the real path to the people They have everything but they do not have heart and mind peace. To seek heart peace they went on Sufis shrines and make woves for the fulfillment of heart desire. Objectives of the present study will be to study the chain of the Sufis (Sultans) and to create awareness among peoples about the teachings of Sufis.

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