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Vol.

XX, No. 238

Price 10 cents

atk^^netic

library

18

""^i

MUSCLE
BUILDING
Luther Halsey Gulick.MD

American Sports Publishing Co. ^'^... 21 Warren Street. New YorK. ^.-^

=D
A. G. SPALDING

&

BROS.

^'^"'

Special
and a
The hundreds
of

Award
Grand
Prize

O^

for their
Fair.

at the World's Gymnasts who competed in the different events in the Stadium during the year proclaimed the apparatus made by A. G. Spalding & Bros, the best that they had ever worked on, and the team of German Turners that came to America especially to compete in the International Championships at St. Louis on and 2, 1904, requested that they be perJuly

Gymnasium Equipment

mitted to use

the

apparatus

of

the

Spalding Gymnasium Exhibit


in the

Gymnastic Tournament, and at the conclutwo-day meeting, voluntarily forwarded BROS, a testimonial to A. G. SPALDING
sion of the

&

highly complimenting the firm


of their

on the manufacture The same request was made by the Young Men's Christian Association of America, and the apparatus was used by them for the Championships with best In the International AA.U. Championresults. ships A. G. Spalding & Bros.' apparatus was likewise used, and the Chairman of the Committee declared the apparatus to be the best ever used
Gymnastic Apparatus.
in

connection with

championship

meeting.

Muscle Building

4
Practical Points
for

Practical People

LUTHER HALSEY GULICK,


President

M. D.

American Physical Education

Association

Director

Physical Train-

ing Public Schools,

New

York City

Published by

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING


15

CO.

Warren

Street,

New

York City

1 3

LIBHARY

or

JONGRESS
rttH;eivBci

Iwu Copies

^^

JUN
p,

13

1905
entry

Jojjyiijirii

6*^wLASS O

XXC. Noi

//^ ooq COPY


b/

Copyright, 1905

BY
:kMERICAN SpOKTS PUBLISHING

COMPANY
.i

New York

MUSCLE BUILDING.

MUSCLE BUILDING
VIBEATORY EXERCISE.
Many
their
their

business

men

at forty are fat

and flabby;
and pulpy,

arms are weak,

their

hands are

soft

abdomens are prominent and

jelly-like.

When
like

they run a block for a train, they


disordered gasoline autos.
tion because tliey
sit still

pufl'

and blow

Men
too

get inio this condieat

much; because they


drink.
to.

more than they need, and because they

No
It

one gets into this condition. because he wishes


is

against the wish of everyone to have his body in

this

kind of order.

He

well
it

knows that
away

it

lessens

his

working capacity, that


fun of living; that

takes

a great deal

of the

it

prevents his enjoying


a

vigorous tilings as he did


that
life. it

when

young man; and


end of his
of this

will probably cut off years at the

The reason
is

that

lie

does not
it

come out

condition

that he thinks

will involve a serious

modification of his

mode

of living, a serious altera-

tion of his business haljits.

He

thinks

it will

involve

No. 1 The way


fully

shown

in which squeezing Intensly uses many muscles Is beautiThe model has rolled up a wad of paper and is squeezhere.

ing it as hard as he can.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
doing an hour or two of monotonous

7
exercise in a

irymnasinm every day.

Every

man would

like to

have a firm hand, strong,

clean-cut arms, muscles that stand out, a body that


is solid,

held together by firm muscles, strong vigor-

ous neck, and large chest.

A man

cannot very well


;

change the shape of the bones of his body

but aside

from

this,

much

can be done in a very short tim.^


or

every day.
to bring
sires,

month

two of work will help much

about that shape of the body that one deof

and that character


of vigorous

muscle which

is

one of

the

marks

manhood.
to

It is the

purpose of this book


a

show how busi-

ness

men may, by

few niinutes each day, develop


that they desire.
is

their muscles in the


is

way

That which

discussed in this article

not a complete system of

physical training.
a

This work does not aim to make


does not aim to

man

graceful;

it

make him

a long

distance runner, a jumper, or a fencer.


of exercise

This plan

does
a

succeed in almost every case, in

quickly

making
It

man

muscularly strong and well


to

developed.

does

tend

mttke

man

stand

have a clearer straighter, to respect himself more, to

No. 2-Exercises of contracting- the hand, if they are always followed by exercises by extending the fingers, which are shown in this picture, will never leave the hand in bad position. The delicate modeling of the muscles ol ;;he forearm is admirably shown.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
head and better body.
It does not take
it

9
any apparatus

it

can be done anywhere;


it

takes but little time.


it

All that

demands

is

the willingness to do

on the

part of the man.

Many men

have, in a single month,

changed the whole appearance of their bodies from


one of weakness to one of strength, from a condition
of flabbiness to a condition of solidity. It
is

com-

mon
his

achievement for a

man

to increase the girth of

upper arm half an inch, or even an inch, in a


to

month;

put two inches on his chest in the same


If a

length of time.
with, he

man's muscles are fat

to begin

may

expect in the course of a month, to

make them hard and muscular.


not expect to increase the
his
size, as

In

this case

he will

much

as he will if

arms are merely

soft to begin with

and he has

simply to build up.

THE ARMS.
We
will begin with

an explanation of how

to devel-

op the arms.

Ordinarily, in the

gymnasium one

pulls

against weights running over a pulley, or he lifts

dumb

beljs,

the object being to furnish resistance

for the muscles to

work against; good

results are

No. 3-The blurring of the hands In this illustration is due to the trembling which is caused by the intense effort which is being made ihe model as the well shows the powerful contraction of the muscles as far do^vn and ot waist. The beautiful modeling of the shoulder muscle, the deltoid shoulder blade, are the muscles of the back which move the scapula, or
rarely exhibited as finely as in this cut.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
j^j^

secured in this way; but to get the biggest developmeiit in the most rapid way, the muscles should be

^^

contracted
time.
a

to

the full extent of their ability every


'

few contractions that are just as strong as

man

can make, will count more in the development

of size

and

also of strength

than a very large number

of contractions of a
his

moderate kind.

Everyone uses

hands a great

deal,

and yet the forearm does not

grow large and

strong.

The reason

is

that a great

deal of long continued moderkte use does not develop

the muscles as
intense kind.
It
is

much

in size as a few exercises of

tlie

common

experience for people working

all

the winter in a gymnasium, working faithfully for

an hour three times

a week, to expect they will

have
are

increased their measurements very

much; they

frequently disappointed to find that their measure-

ments have remained about the same.

It

is

true, the

muscles are harder than they were before, they sleep

and digest

their food better than before, but they

had

expected a big gain in size of the arms, chest and body


muscles.

The

trouble in all these cases


is

is

that they

do not take the kind of exercise that

adapted to

No. 4 In this exercise, the muscles of the front of the body, particularly the abdomen, are being contracted vigorously. Every one w^ho does this exercise vigorously, should do twice as many in which the muscles of the back are contracted; the over-development of the muscles of the front of the body tends to make the individual round shouldered and flat chested.

MUSCLE BUILDING.

13

building up muscular size; they took the exercise


that
is

adapted
all

to

building
there

up
is

health.

It

is

not
of

at

true
that

that
will

any
all

one
the

kind

exercise
to
is

accomplish

known

results

be
true

obtained
that

from
is

exercise,

any more
medicine

that

it

there

any

one

which

will accomplish all the results to be expected

of medicine.

One may

exercise in order to
;

becomo
exer-

graceful in walking and moving about


cise in

one

may

order to become skillful in fencing, boxing,

base ball or athletics; one

may

exercise in order to

reduce fat; exercise

may

be taken in order to increase


;

the activity of sluggish liver, and so on


case
if

but in each

the results are to be secured, exercise

must be
Thus,

adapted to the particular objects in mind.


there
is

no such thing

as a best exercise or as best

exercises.
article,
is

The

object of the exercises described in this

to increase the size

and strength of the


to increase their en-

muscles.

There

is

no attempt

durance or the

skill

with which one can use them.


to increase the

These exercises do not directly aim

usually follows to health of the body, although this

some

extent.

MUSCLE BUILDING.

^[g

The fundamental
cles shall be

principle

is

that from the mus-

demanded

as great

power

as possible; a

hundred movements of

light
five

character will not

build up muscle as rapidly as


effort.

movements

of great
to all

This

is

a general principle

and applies

the muscles of the body.

One
that
^^f

of the old statements of the evolutionists

is

unction makes structure"

this is one of the

great guides in physical training.


cise that
if

The kind

of exer-

demands

a given structure will in general,

persisted in, give that structure.


a

For example:

to

pound with

hammer

all

day does not demand big


is

muscles, so that the result of the exercise

to secure

endurance rather than

size

and strength; on the

other hand, to put up a hundred-pound bell docs not

demand endurance, but


result
of

size

and strength

so
is

the
in-

putting up a hundred-pound bell

crease of size

and strength.

In the gymnasium one

rarely pulls to the full extent of his power, because

he cannot

tell

exactly liow

much weight he can

lift,

nor are the pulley weights adapted to heavy weights.

The plan here

described

is

to

have the muscles pull

against each other.

Thus

it is

easy to have

them work

No. 6- An illustration of the front of the thigh showing comes down and terminates abruptly.

how the muscle

MUSCLE BUILDING.
to their

Yl
;

utmost capacity without straining them


7

for
'

example: in illustration No.


the muscles that clinch his

the model
as

is

using

hand

hard

as possible,

and

at the

same time

is

contracting the muscles that


is

open his hand; the result

that the

hand

stays half

way open, the

fingers are rigidly fixed, the tendons


is

of the wrist are prominent, the fore-arm

hard.

This exercise repeated fifteen to twenty times in


die

morning, the same number of times


as a

at
is

night,

and a few times occasionally

man

walking

along the street by day, will do more


size of the

to increase the
all

muscles of the forearm than

the handetc.,

shaking, hand-writing, handling knife and fork,


that a

man

will do all day.'


is

And more

than

this, a

carpenter

who

handling tools eight hours a day

will not develop so big or so strong a

forearm as wdll

the

man who

takes this method.

The long continued

exercise with the

hammer, saw and plane does not

produce as strong contraction, and hence does not


build up as large tissues, as this intense

work that

is

done through the antagonistic muscles.

You

will notice

when you do

this exercise as

hard
fore-

as possible, that the fingers

and even the whole

MUSCLE BUILDING.

^9
This

arm
is

will shake with the intensity of the effort.

the reason for the term vibratory.

The

position

should be held under extreme contraction about three


seconds, then the muscles should be allowed to become
soft

and the hand should be dropped.

In about three

seconds more the exercise should be repeated.

The
firsL

tendency will be not to work sufficiently hard at

Every ounce of power that you have must be put into


it,

if

you are going

to

gain more power.

It is

only

by the investment of what you have, that you will


gain more.

Nature gives only what

is

necessary

if

you make a demand upon your muscles for more

power than you have, nature


you ; but
if

will gradually give

it to

you do not use what you have

to the full-

est extent,

you will not be given much increase.


I

few moments ago,

said

that each

exercise

should not be continued for more than three seconds,

and that then the muscles should be relaxed.


reason for this
is

The

that the circulation

may

be helped.

When
it

a muscle becomes hard by vigorous contraction,


all

tends to force out


it.

the blood and

lymph

that

is

in

New

blood enters in under greater difficulties

than under normal conditions; for this reason the

No.

8 Holding a wad

power for two or three seconds,


the whole arm.

Its effect is well

of paper in the hand and squeezing it with all one's is an excellent method for developing shown in the picture.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
exercise should not be long in duration.

21

The muscles
In order

should be allowed to become soft again.


to favor its

accomplishment a number of vigorous

exercises rather short in duration should be taken.

One common way

of exercising the forearm


it,

is

to

put something in the palm and grip


a piece of wood, or even a
1

a rubber ball,

wad of

paper,
is

(Cut Nos.
two-fold;

and 8).

The

trouble with this exercise

first, it

develops only one set of muscles, the flexors,


fingers are left un-

and the muscles that extend the

developed; secondly, as a result of the development


of the flexing muscles, and the non-development of

the extensors, the

hand when not

in use tends to

hang

with the fingers almost closed into the palm (No. 9).

The strong muscles have overbalanced


so that the

the

weak ones
method

hand

is

held nearly shut.

By

the

that I have proposed, flexors and extensors are de-

veloped together, and no matter

how

strong the fore-

arm becomes, the hand and


normal
position.

fingers will

hang

in a

The

question

may

naturally be asked as to

why

have said that gripping with the hand or exercising


in

some other way the muscles of the forearm with the

greatest vigor will result in developing the muscles

No. 9 A person

who continues an

exercise which developes the

much

hand too
accom-

panying

will soon acquire a hand which hangs, as is shown in the illustration; this is ungraceful and clumsy.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
of the upper

23
is

arm and

the chest.

The reason
are^,

this

the muscles which close the

hand

some of them,

attached to the forearm, thus the tendons have to


pass through the wrist.

In order that they may work


held rigid.

efficiently it is necessary that the wrist he

You

canntt

possil)ly clinch

your hand hard and have

the wrist free of movement.

Xow,

in order to

have

the wrist held in a rigid position^ all the muscles run-

ning from

it

up

to the

forearm (and some of them

run to the lower part of the upper arm), must be


contracted with great vigor.
also be held rigid, for the

The elbow

joint

must

muscles which attach to the


efficiently

upper arm could not act


of origin movable, so

were their points

it is

necessary for the muscles

v.hich control the elbow to be contracted vigorously.


Tlicse muscles,
j-houlder blade

some of them, go up and attach


and
clavicle.
1)e

to the

So the muscles which

hold the shoulder mlust

fixed in order that the big

muscles of the chest and l)ack

may have

solid support.
fix
a

The

ribs

have

to be fixed solidly.

In order to
AYhen

the
per-

ribs solidly

we have
hold
as

to stop breathing.

son

takes
it

of

anything with
as possible,

the

hand and

squeezes

hard

he holds his breath.

No. 10 If the muscles are pressed deeply after the exercise, them.

it

will benefit

MUSCLE BUILDING.
If this exercise
is

25
'

tried in front of a looking-glass

one will see that gripping can be done to a moderate


extent withont contracting the muscles of the upper

arm.

So that when one squeezes

as

hard as

possible^

practically all the muscles of the

arm and body

are

involved.

This

is

the reason

why

squeezing of the

hand

as

hard
the

as possible will

remit in the developas


well.

ment
and
I

of

arm and shoulder

(Nos.

8.)

have explained

this

exercise

somewhat

full}-,

as it is a type of all the others.

All the exercises

that are mentioned are exercises in which one group


of muscles
is

pitted against

its

natural opponent, so

that both are exercised to their fullest extent.

You

will find that to contract these muscles of the fore-

arm

as intensely as j)Ossible will involve the stiffening

of the

whole arm, and, indeed, of the upper part of

the body.
ticular part

Always put your attention upon the parwhere you wish the chief
effect.

You

will

find, also, that

you cannot contract these muscles with

the greatest power without holding the breath; ac-

cordingly, before beginning the exercise

it

is

well to

take half a dozen breaths just as deep as you can;


first

blow out

all

the air possible

from the chest and

No. 11- After the various muscles have been gone over as in the precedingilhistration the muscles should be slapped; this effort gives a stimulating effect which has most excellent results. One should slap all the muscles of the body; the model is merely slapping his arms.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
then inhale to the fullest extent.
or four times

27
Repeat this three

and then begin.

If this deep l)reathing

makes you

a little dizzy the first

few days,

it

shows

that you need the exercise very much.


is

The

dizziness

to

l)e

overcome simply by persistence.

Take deep
to feel

breaths just

up

to the point It will

where you begin


not be

dizzy and then stop.

many

days before

you can do

all

the deep breathing that you want to

without feeling dizzy.

Having done
a deep breath
cise,

the preliminary deep breathing take


it

and hold

while you do the

first

exer-

which
for
also

consists of contracting the fingers of the

hand
and

three
let

seconds.
fingers

Then
relax;

let

the breath go,

the

take another

deep

breath and contract the hand muscles again.


this

Eepeat
take

ten times.

The

wdiole exercise ought to

one minute.

Then with
left

the right hand, squeeze the the wrist to the elbow


treat the right

muscles of the
quickly;

arm from
left

with the

hand similarly

arm.
elbow.
right.

Then

slap the left


this

arm from

the wrist to the

Follow

with similar treatment of the

(See cuts 10 and 11.)


are

You

now ready

for the second exercise,

which

?^^i""^*^^Von was taken Immediately following the preceding: ?u only difference in the two being, that in this case the palm is facing Iv. the shoulder, while the other case the palm is away from the shoulde^ fje^ter contraction of the biceps with the palm toward the ^hnnSZ ^ already shown When this muscle is being measured, it 1 !^^ 1^ always be contracted _ should this way, for otherwise it will appear to ^^vvcdi. w. be much smaller than it really is.

MUSCLE BUILDINGo
is to
is

29

exercise

and develop the upper arm.

The hand
which
to

to he placed in a similar position to that

was taken when the muscles of the forearm were


he exercised.

But now the attention

is

to he fixed

upon

the ]jiceps, the large muscle which shows on


It is to be contracted

the front of the upper arm.

against the triceps, the muscles on the hack of the

arm, as hard as
in Xos.

is

possible.

The

biceps

is

well

shown

12 and 13.

Some

also

show the contracsame time.


In

tion of the

hand occurring

at the

the model

(No. 5), the biceps are being strained

against the muscles on the back of the arm.

The

same preliminary deep breathing should be taken


in this case,
cise

and indeed

in every case.

The

exer-

should be repeated ten times as before.


use in doing the exercise unless one
it all is

There
going

is little

to put into

the effort possible.

In some of the pictures that are shown, the outlines of the

hand

are a trifle Ijlurred; the reason for

this is that in spite of the


it w^as

most rapid exposure that

possible to
it

make

indoors, with a specially preto

pared camera,

was impossible not

show the

vi-

bration of the hands under the intense effort that

No. 13 The little bunch near the elbow well shows tTie small muscles which turn the palm toward the shoulder. It also shows in excellent form the construction of the biceps in the forward part of the arm and of the triceps on the back of the arm pulling against the biceps.
-

MUSCLE BUILDING.
was being made
5
l.y

Ql

the

iiuxlci.

Illustrations

Nos.

and
as

7 sliow the tricej)s


it is

on the back of the upper


bic-eps.
is

arm

pulling against the

The next
shoulder.

part of the body to be exercised


is

the

This
is

best

done

at the

same time that the

upper back

being developed.
in

Illustrations Nos. 3

and 15 show these muscles


tion.

most vigorous contrac-

The muscle on top

of the shoulder^ the deltoid, of the

and the great surface muscle

upper back are

pulling the shoulder up and lifting the arm; while


the great muscles of the chest are pulling the

arm

forward, and the other fibres of the trapezius are


pulling the shoulder back and down.
that the shoulders

The
if

result is

and arms are

set as

in iron.
all their

These great masses of muscles, pulling with


inherent force,
greatest solidity.
bind,

the

joints

together

with the

The

illustrations

show well the


extent to which
joints
is

contraction of these muscles.


this contraction
is

The

carried

on over other

well shown.

The

douljle line of

muscle extending

half

way down

the middle of the back shows two


their de-

muscles which pull the shoulder together;

velopment

is

well

shown

in Xo.

3.

The tremen-

dous sweep of the great band of muscle coming from

No. 14 In this picture

is shown, how in extreme effort, the small muscles which lift the toes, are exceedingly active. The tendons on the back of the foot which stand out, are being pulled with great vigor.

MUSCLE BUILDING.

33

scapula, the lower back, winding over the edge of the

and then forward and upward


superbly shown.

to the

upper arm,

is

This

is

the latissimus dorsi, the

most powerful muscle that we have, by which we


pull the

arms down

to the sides.

This

is effective

in

'^chinning" one's

self.

Taking

a full breath, place yourself in this posi-

tion as rigidly as possible for two or three seconds,

then relax, and take a second breath easily, then


another full breath, and repeat the exercise
;

pull the

muscles with the utmost power that you possess.


will find it necessary to stiffen the

You
it

neck and hold

well back.

Remember

that the shape of the body


is

when
it

it is

being exercised vigorously

the shape that

tends to take during rest;

so always exercise in
erect.

positions that are strong


illustrations

and

Some

of the

show the contractions of the muscles


These are given
as

on the front part of the body.

positype-forms rather than as the most desirable of

tions for

much

exercise.

Exercises in

ivliich the

bach

and necl are held


carriage

rigidly erect, tend toward better

and should

be taken about twice as frequently

as exercises that pull the body forward.

?;r,rl"Z

f""'^-!

v?^ i^'^^'u^ ^'"

""/
1

ence

^ '^

muscles of the upper extremities and of the ^t^ u^5 the body. The shading of color about the edge of the remains of a Summer's tan rather than the differ-

MUSCLE BUILDING.

35

Illustration Xo. 16 shows well the exercise of the


thigh.

The great muscles

that extend the legs arc

being contracted with the greatest vigor so that they


stand out in massive folds.
little;

Most men walk quite a

the result

is

that the average

man

has better

legs

than he has arms.


in

These muscles are fully deotherwise


are pretty

veloped
flabby.

many men, who

It is well to
little.

bend the knee, hip and anklo


slowly contract the muscles to

joints a

Then

your utmost power until they stand out under the


skin like piles of coiled rope, or like steel bands

under the pressure of intense

'

strain.

After con-

tracting the muscles of one thigh ten times, contract

the muscles of the other thigh,

similarly

and an

equal

number

of times.

Illustration No. 17 shows well the contraction of

the great muscles which flex the leg on the thigh!

These muscles do not show particularly well in ordinary use.

The

exercise should be carried out on

both sides of the body.

Nos. 3 and 19 show the

great muscles of the lower back in active contraction


also

show how the muscles of the forearm, upper arm


at the

and shoulder are working

same time.

The

No. 16 This illustration

is to show the contraction of the "quadriceps extensor femoris," which is the large muscle at the front of the thigh, immediately above the knee. It shades off into a heavy flat tendon, which includes the knee cap. In the model the shadows to the left show where the belly of the muscle is shading off into the tendon. This muscle straightens the leg every time one raises up from having stooped to the floor. The straightening of the knee is accomplished by means of this muscle. It is one of the strongest muscles of the body.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
fine lines

^7

running outward and downward from the


intensity of the effort that

spinal
is

column show the

being made.

The distended

veins on the forearm

are also indications of a


exercise should be carried
Illustrations Xos. 3

similar character.

This

on

as are the others.

and 19 show

exercises

which

are designed to be general

a large fraction of all

the muscles of the body are working at once.


'No.

In

18 the superficial muscle of the neck


great activity.
is

is

shown

in

its

There

one danger to which these general exis,

ercises are exposed, that

when

so

many muscles

are used at once in such a vigorous way, the blood

pressure of the body

is

increased with great rapidity.

If the exercises are done excessively, the heart will

be

made

irritable
a

and sometimes over-developed.

have known

number

of persons who, seeing the good

effects of these exercises,

have concluded that

if

the

amount prescribed
twice as

in these exercises

would be good,

much would

be twice as good, and have over-

done the matter seriously.


scribing for an

My

father was once preto

Hawaiian chief

whom

he gave

some

pills,

with instructions to take one three times

thigh are here admirably shown. No 17-The ereat muscles of thebeing on the front, and those which flex muscles whkh extend the thigh of these muscles is well shown.

The

Sbeing oTthe back. The knotted character

MUSCLE BUILDING.
a day.

^^

He was

so

much

benefited by the first that he

concluded to take the whole box the following morning.

His

life

was saved with great

difficulty.

Another general caution in the use of these exercises

needs to be given, and that

is

that beneficial

effects

are not usually secured by those

who have

completely passed the growing period. I should never

encourage a

man

of over fifty to expect to profit

by

such exercises, and a


less
is

man

over forty should expect

than the young

man may.

Big girth of mucle

to be secured

with advantage only during years


at its

when

the body

is

maximum

of efficiency.

Before undertaking to carry out this system of


exercises, several things should be done.

First de-

termine

how long

it

will be carried out; plan perrate,


is

haps for one month, or at any

some

definite

period, otherwise one's resolution

apt to weaken

and one
continue
pressing.

will gradually do less


it

and

less,

thinking to
is

when
is

it

is

easier

and business

not so

This

usually an absolute fallacy.


it

Men

stop

and do not begin

again.

The thing

to do is

to undertake a definite plan.

One month
It is long

is

a good
to

length of time to undertake.

enough

No. 18 Platysma myodies : This

is a thin sheet of muscle which runs from the lower face down to the front of the body. Many animals have a corresponding muscle over most of the body. They can twitch their skin all over, just as we can twitch the skin of the neck. The skin of the chest can be pulled up nearly an inch, after one has become a little practised in the use of this muscle as a whole.

MUSCLE BUILDING.
tax the will
of most men;
it is

4^

short enough to be
affords time

within the ability of most


to secure results

men

it

enough

which should be ample encourage-

ment

for continuation for another month.

Second;,

having settled the length of time that the


will be followed out, next determine ab-

programme
solutely

how much time each

day,

and

at

what time
in

these exercises will be carried on.

Ten minutes

the morning will do, but ten minutes in the morning

and night

will do more.

It will be well to

make a

written record of one's purposes.

Third, measure the girth of your forearm, upper

arms contracted (cuts Nos. 12 and 20), and


chest contracted

straight,

and expanded,

waist, thigh

and neck.

If

you can get these measurements taken by someone


is

who
and

familiar with such work, they will be accurate

satisfactory.

You
at the

should have your measure-

ments taken again


the same

end of the month in exactly

way

that they were taken at the beginning.


of course, be taken without

They should,
ing on, that

any cloth-

is,

next to the skin, otherwise they will

be quite unreliable.

Arm
20.

should be as in No. 12

when measured, not No.

No. 19-The model

action at once. The straining of the muscles of the forearm, upper arm and shoulder, and also right leg, show peculiarly well. This is one of the type of exercises which if long persisted in, tend to produce irritated heart, as it throws so much work upon the heart suddenly.

is

throwing as many muscles of the body as he can mto

MUSCLE BUILDINa

43

Fourth, select two exercisers on which to work.

At
and

the end of the


6

month

take two others.

Nos. 8

make

a good combination on

which

to start.

After the exercise, particularly in the morning,


it is

well to dip a towel in cool water, cold if

it is

pleasant,

and pass

it

rapidly over the whole body.

This should be followed by vigorous rubbing with a


coarse towel.

Get a

silk crash towel, or

even an or-

dinary crash towel of good length, and after you

have been dried by the bath towel, use this over your

body and limbs with the same vigor and speed that
the

modern shoe

polisher exhibits

when doing

his

work, until the whole body glows and feels the


your shoes look.

way

::.:^

No. 20 The large muscle of the upper arm or the biceps. This muscle not only bends the forearm upon the upper arm, it also twists the forearm
so that the palm faces the shoulder. In this illustration, the palm is away from the shoulder; and while the muscle is contracted vigorously, still the length of the muscle is evident. When the muscle is being measured
it

should be held as in cut No.

12.

THE FINEST EQUIPPED GYMNASIUM IN THE WORLD


The progress made in the manufacture and the mechanical perfection of the various gymnastic appliances shown in the complete gymnasium installed by A. G. Spalding & Bros, at the World's Fair, demonstrated that the firm is alive to the imperative need of the times. Physical training is being rapidly advanced and in the congested sections of the country it is a growing problem how to provide for the new conditions. This is particularly true in public school work and similar institutions. Real estate in large cities is extremely valuable, and as a consequence, gymnasiums are often reduced in size and wholly inadequate to the growing needs. This means that the apparatus of the past of a fixed or cumbersome character must be superseded by appliances that may be rapidly and conveniently handled in a manner to accommodate the constantly increasing number of boys and girls needing systematic physical development. A. G. Spalding & Bros., who outfitted the complete gymnasium at the World's Fair and received the Grand Prize and Gold Medal in competition for their exhibit, are to be congratulated on their enterprise.

LIST

OF APPARATUS INSTALLED IN WORLD'S FAIR GYMNASIUM.


6 50 50 50 50 200
Medicine
Ball Racks. Pairs 1-2-lb. Model Dumb Belli. Pairs 1-lb. Model Dumb Bella. Pairs 1-lb. Indian Clubs. Pairs 1 1-2-lb. Indian Clubs. Pairs Club and Bell Hangers, on
stands.

20 No. OR Robert Reach Triplicate Chest Machines. 20 Special Rowing Attachments. 1 New Style Spalding Wrist Roll. 1 No. 50A Quarter Circle. 25 Sections Bar Stalls. 25 Bar Stall Benches. 2 No. 200 Neily Patent Bom. 6 Bar Saddles, [and Vaulting Bars. 3 Special Combination Horizontal Bar to Horizontal 1 Suspended

swing up
1 No.

83

Low

Special. Parallel.

New Style Spalding Parallel Bars Special. 3 No. 25 Jump Boards. Vaulting Horses. 3 No. 3 Pairs Special Jump Stands.

4 Dozen Wands. 4 Dozen. Bar Bells. 2 Wand Racks. 4 Dozen Savage Bar Bells. 8 Dozen Hangers for Bar Belli. 20 Head Gears. 20 Foot Gears. 1 Set Ring Hockey. 2 Sets Rope Quoits.

50 Bean Bags and Cabinet.


2 Sets Shuffleboard.

3
3
1
1

3 8 12
1
1

Grasshopper Spring Boards. No. 520 Storming Boards. No. 207 Vaulting Box. No. 28 Incline Board. Pairs No. 125 Flying Rings. No. 126 Traveling Rings. No. 98 Climbing Ropes. 40-ft. Ladder and Braces. Horizontal Window Ladder.

50 Rubber Balls and Cabinet.


4 8-ft. Jump Ropes. 4 20-ft. Jump Ropes. 1 Volley Ball Outfit. 4 Jump Frames. 50 Nickel Wands. 1 Wand Cabinet mounted on rolleri for nickeled wands. 1 Game Cabinet. 50 Grace Hoops. 2 Grace Hoop Racks. 1 Pair Physician's Scales. [eter. 1 Stadiometer. 1 Chest, Back and Loin Dynamom1 Chinning Bar. 1 Pair Wall Parallels.
1 Chin Gauge. 1 Wet Spirometer. 1 Dozen Glass Mouth Pieces. 1 Pair Chest Calipers. 1 Pair Shoulder Calipers.
1

2 Vertical 3 3 3
5-ft. 3-ft. 3-ft.

Window
X X X
2-in. 2-in. 2-in.

Ladders.

2 Striking Bag Discs and Bags. 11 5ft. X 10-ft. X 2-in. Mats.

X X
X

6-f t. 10-ft.
5-ft.

x 15 1 Tumbling ft. X 8 in., curled hair. 2 Pairs Official Basket Ball Goals. 2 Pairs Official Screens for Basket Ball Goals. 2 No. Official Basket Balls. 2 No. 1 Medicine Balls. 2 No. 2 Medicine Balls. 2 No. 3 Medicine Balls.

Mats. Mats. Mats. Mattress 5 ft.

Spirometer

Dynamometer

shelf.

for Grip.

Cut No. may

The above is a combiuatiou piece of wall apparatus wbieli be used as a rowing weight, bacli and loin pulley, direct chest pulley with upright backboard, or intercostal overhead pulleys. Either set of handles is always ready for use, and requires no
1

adjustment.

Cut No. new

4 Shows a combined horizontal and vaulting bar of entirely The bars are suspended by overhead guys construction. and these guys are tightened and the bar drawn into position use of one lever on each upright. The prinat the floor by the ciple is radically new, and is certainly most successfully applied. The bar requires only two floor plates and two points

of attachment at the floor, eliminating the spread of guys, thereby saving floor space and greatly facilitating the handling of the apparatus in clearing the floor for other work.

Cut No. 5 Illustrates


larly

a pair of parallel bars, the design of which was particucommended by the entire body of Turn Verein representatives who used them in the Olympic gymnastic contests.

r
DURAND LOCKERS

=^

WERE USED EXCLUSIVELY


OF

IN THE GYMNASIUM THE PHYSICAL CULTURE DEPARTMENT AT THE WORLD'S FAIR AND RECEIVED THE

GRAND PRIZE
FOR BEING THE BEST, MOST COMPLETE AND SERVICEABLE LOCKER MADE

DURAND LOCKER

CO.

Chicago,

IRON

DUMB BELLS
Made on approved
in black enamel.

models,

nicely Lalanced and finished


Sizes, 2 to
lb.,

40 lbs.

Per
lbs.,

6c.
lb.

Over 40

8c. per

length

made

specially.

Bar Bells, any weight, with wrought iron handle, any Per lb., lOc.

NICKEL=PLATED DUMB BELLS


Nick

Spalding's

Trade-Mark
Our Trade-Mark

Wood Dumb
made
1^

Bells

Bells are

of selected material, neatly

decorated, well finished and of perfect balance.


1-4

pound.

. . . .

Spalding's Trade-Mark Indian Clubs


Our Trade-Mark Indian Clubs are of selected material and perfect in shape. They are finely polished, with ebonite centre band and gilt stripe top and bottom. Each pair wrapped in paper bag.
1-2
3-4 1
1 1-2

pound pound pound pound


pound.

Per pair. $

.40

2 2 1-2
3

4
5

pound pound pound pound

Special Award and


were won by A. G.
sition, 1904, for

Grand Prize

SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Expo-

the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair.

Spalding

Gymnasium Shoes
cut, best grade canvas shoe; white rubber sole; in ladies'

Low

and men's sizes; men's made of white


canvas, ladies' black.
No.
1.

Pair,

$1.25

Low cut canvas shoe,


with rubber
No.K.
sole.
Pair, 75c.

Low cut canvas, canvas sole; very popular for

gymnasium.
Pair, 35c.

No. E.

A.

C.

SPALDING & BROS.


St.

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

Buffalo Philadelphia Denver Cincinnati Montreal, Can.

New Orleans Syracuse London, England

San Francisco

Special Award and Grand Prize


Ze won by AG. SPALDING &
ltion,li?^f-J!!.%^fi'nT^^^^^^^
BR^^^^^^^^

shownatthe World's Fa..

Spalding

Gymnasium Shoes

Selected leather, electric sole, flexible shoe.

very easy and

No. 20No. 21.

Low

Cut.

Per

pair,

High Cut.

.50 .75

Low

extra light and cut shoe, selected leather, men s sizes. elkskin sole; in ladies' and

No.

ee.

Per

pair,

$2.50
New Orleans Syracuse London, England
San Franiscco

A
New
York

C.

SPALDING & BROS.


^t.

So^on

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

Philadelphia Buffalo Montreal, Can. Cincinnati

Denver

'

SPECIAL AWARDN>(ieAND PRIZE


SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair.
were won by A. G.

Spalding
Horsehide
sole;

Gymnasium Shoes
la-

soft

and
dies'

flexible;

in

and men's
sizes.
Pair,

No. 155.

$3.50

Kangaroo; elkskin
sole, extra light, hand

made.
No. 15.
Pair,

$4.00

High cut, best grade canvas shoe, white rubber sole in ladies
;

and men's sizes; men's made of white


canvas, ladies' black.
No. IH.
Pair,

$1.50

High cut canvas


shoe,

rubber
Pair,

sole.

No. M.

$1.00

A.

C.

SPALDING & BROS,


Louis Baltimore
St.

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

San Francisco

Buffalo Philadelphia Denver Cincinnati Montreal, Can.

New Orleans Syracuse London, England

SPECIAl AWARD *nd GRjUND PRIZt Expo& BROS,


TiV>vA were won uy j^. r

SPALDING

gr.'.S;i^^.tl^^^^^^^^

at the Louisiana Purchase complete and most attractive installation of Bhown at the World's Fair.

BASKET BALL SHOE

Made
The

sole. of selected leather with special rubber construction of suction caused by the peculiar

purchase the sole enables the player to obtain a good make this shoe on the floor, a feature that should very popular with basket ball players.

No. BB,

Per

pair,

4.00

For

ladies;

otherwise same as No. BB.

No. BBL.
A.

Per

pair,
Sc

$3.50
BROS
New Orleans Syracuse London, England
San Francisco

C.

SPALDINC
St.

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

Denver Philadelphia Buffalo Montreal, Can. Cincinnati

Special Award and Grand Prize


SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair.
were won by A. G.

Spalding

Championship
BALL-BEARING SWIVEL

Hammer

npHE SPALDING CHAMPIONSHIP Originally deBALL-BEARING HAMMER, signed by


John Flanagan, the champion of the world, has been highly endorsed only after repeated trials in championship events. The benefits of the ball-bearing construction will be quickly appreciated by all hammer throwers. Each hammer put up complete in sole
leather carrying case.

No. 02. No. 06. No. 02X. No. 06X.

12-lb., with sole leather case.

$12.00
12.00 10.00 10.00

with sole leather case. 12-lb., without sole leather case. 16-lb., without sole leather case.
16-lb.,

A.

C.

SPALDING
Louis Baltimore
St.

Sc

BROS.
San Francisco

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Washington Kansas City

New Orleans

Syracuse Pittsburg Denver Philadelphia Buffalo London, England Montreal, Can. Cincinnati

SPECIAL AWAeD>"(ieAND PRIZE


were won by A. G.

SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's fair.

Spalding's

New
Lead

Regulation
each

Hammer

With Wire Handle


No. No.
9. 12-lb.,

10. 16-lb.,

Lead, Practice, $4.25 Lead,Regulation,4.50

Iron

EACH
$2.50 3.00

No. No. No.

12.

8-lb., Iron, Juvenile,


,

14. 12-lb.

Iron, Practice,

15. 16-lb., Iron,

Regulation, 3.25

No. 6H.

Extra Wire Handles each For above hammers, 50c.

Shot

No. No. No. No. No.

19.

16-lb.,

21.

12-lb.,

Lead. Lead.

Each, $2.50
2.25
'' ''

23.
25.
18.

16-lb., Iron. 12-lb., Iron.


8-lb., Iron.

L75 L50 L25


<&,

A.

C.

SPALDING
St.

BROS.

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Washington Kansas City

Denver Philadelphia Buffalo Montreal, Can. Cincinnati

San Francisco New Orleans Syracuse Pittsburg London, England

SPECIAL AWARD CRANft PRIZE


*^^ Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904. for the best, most complete and SnTqoi' fo'^-f^; h?^^^^^^ ^ ^^?^- ^* most attractive Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at theinstallation of World's f"ir

Indoor Shot
With our improved leather cover. Does not lose weight even when
No. No.
^,

,4.

16-lb.
8-lb.

26.

used constantly. No.3. 12-lb.IndoorShot.Each,$7.00 Indoor Shot. 50 Indoor Shot. s.'oo


. .

''7

Regulation

Weights
Made
pion
J.

after
S.

model

submitted by ChamMitchel,
all

and endorsed by

weight
Packed
in

throwers.

box and

guaranteed correct in weight and in exact accordance with rules of A. A. U.


No. 2

Lead

56-lb.

Weights

Complete, $8.50
A.

G.

SPALDING
St.

&.

New York
Boston
iJuttalo

BROS

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Philadelphia Denver Cincinnati Montreal. Can

Washington Kansas City

San Francisco New Orleans Pittsburg Syracuse London, England

SPECIAL AWAeD"fieAND PRIZE ExpoBROS,


at the Louisiana Purchase SPALDING & and most attractive installation of Ition 1904 for the best, most complete gSastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's fair.

were won by A. G.

INDOOR RUNNING SHOES


Made With
or

Without Spikes.

Fine leather, rubber tipped sole, with spikes. No. 111. Per pair, $3.50 Leather shoe, rubber tipped, with spikes. No. 112. Per pair, $3.00 Leather shoe, rubber tipped, no spikes. No. 114, Per pair, $2.50

INDOOR JUMPING SHOES


Best leather Indoor Jumping Shoe, hand-made, rubber soles. No. 210. Per pair, $5.00
A.

C,

SPALDING & BROS,


St Louis Baltimore

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

Saji Francisco

gew

Orleans

Denver Philadelphia Buffalo Montreal, Can. Cincinnati

^^^^^^ff^^ London, England

SPECIAL AWARD<D<i|AND PRIZE


SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's fair.
were won by A. G.

Full Sleeve Shirks


Best

Worsted, full fashioned, stock colors and sizes.

No. ID.

Each, $3.75
sizes.

Cut Worsted, stock colors and

No. 602. No. 3D.

Each, $1.75 Each, $ 1 .00

Cotton, Flesh, White and Black.

Knee Tights
Best

Worsted, full fashioned, stock colors and sizes.

No. IB.

Per pair, $2.75

Cut Worsted, stock colors and


sizes.

No. 604.

Per pair, $ 1 .25

Sanitary Cotton, stock colors and


sizes.

No. 4B.
A.

Per pair, 50c.


C,

New York
Boston

SPALDING & BROS,


St. Louis Baltimore

Chicago Minneapolis

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

Buffalo Philadelphia Denver Cincinnati Montreal, Can.

San Francisco New Orleans Syracuse London, England

SPCCim AWARD GRAND PRIZt DING &


BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exp(> by A G. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^.^ ^^a most attractive installation of were won V A. r GPAT

Running Pants ^^^^ White or black Sateen,


-;V-----------m

fly

front, lace back.

1
^

^^-

^*

^/

1 1

Per

pair, $1.25

White or black Sateen,


back,
fly front.

lace

i
I

^^^

a
vl
Silesia

If

Per
fly
3.

pair; $1.00

'"roT^r'^lack

front,

lace back.

No.

Per

pair, 75c.
fly
4.

White or black

Silesia,

front,

lace back.

No.

Per

pair, 50c.
fly

White

Silesia,

front,

lace back.

No. 6. Per pair, 35c.


Stripes

down

sides of

any of these running pants,

25 cents per pair extra.

A
^^.
'

C.

SPALDING & BROS.

Kor"

SSnnrpons

^^^JT"^''

lai&\ MotS can.

c^ Touis

Washington

San Francisco

Ka^^s City
'^'*'''""

- 0'J-=

London, England

Special Award and Grand Prize


were won by A. G SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Expothe best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair.
sition, 1904. for

full Length Tights


full

ond Trousers
stock

Full Tights, best worsted,

fashioned,
Per

colors and sizes.

No. lA.

pair, $3.75

Full Tights, cut worsted,

stock colors and sizes.

No.

605.

Per

pair, $2.00

Full Tights, cotton,


quality.

full

White, Black,
Flesh.

No. 3A.

Per

pair, $1.00

Y. M. C. A.

TROUSERS
Y. M. C. A.

Regulation Style

REGULATION STYLE
pair, $1.75

No.
No.

4.
3.

Flannel,

medium

quality.

Per

Flannel, good quality.

2.50

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of athletic goods mailed free to any address.

A.

G.

SPALDING & BROS.


St.

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Washington Kansas City


Pittsburg

Denver Philadelphia Buffalo Montreal, Can. Cincinnati

San Franiscco New Orleans Syracuse

London, England

5palding's

Running
Shoes
Arthur
F. Duffey Holder of the world's record, 9 3-5s. for 100 yards, wears Spalding bhoes in all his races.

M. W. Long
Holder ot the world's 440 yards record; the American, English and International champion,
wears Spalding Shoes
races.
in all his

B. J.

Wefers

Holder of the world's record for 220 yards, made his record with a pail of Spalding Shoes.

John

F.

Cregan

half-mile and Intercollegiate champion, and thousands of others attribute their success on the path to the fait that they had a well-fitting, light, serviceable shoe to wear.

The American

Nearly every American, Interand Interscholastic record has been made when the contestant wore Spalding Shoes.
collegiate

Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue of athletic goods

mailed free to any address

A. G.
New York
St.

SPALDING & BROS.


Philadelphia
Buffalo

Louis

Denver

Chicago Boston Minneapoli 5

San Francisco
Baltimore Montreal, Can.

Kansas City London, England

JIU JITSU
Spalding's

^^^^

Athletic

Library

No. 233

Per Copy 10 Cents

A
By

COURSE
Prof. E. B.

Warman rn

A Complete Course of Physical Training for Home


pert,

kfenrific Physical Trainrng


Usv
is

Bv'^Pmf'FVw'^y'^.?' well known physical culture exBy Prof, E. B. Warman, the Training Simplified.
the man is considered-brain and practical book where the body. By following

whole

a complete, thorough and " apparatus


is

directions as follows: breathing; exercises for the fingers wrists elbows, shoulders, neck, hips, knees, ankles; a word about the muscles; the arms and thighs; and chest; waist; sides; back and abdomen; bowing;shoulders bending; squeezer, etc., etc. Fully illustrated.

comprise iZ rf^^'^f\ ^^f exercisesto rest; how to stand; how to sit; how

'f'^.Iu?^'^'^^

required.

The book

is

adapted

Price 'lOce^T

.ii'H^i.all

on physical culture. The subject is thoroughly treated as a glance at the following small portion of the contents shows: An all-around athlete; muscular Christianity; eatingdiet- various opinions; bill of fare for brain-workers; bill of fare tor muscle-makers; what to eat and drink; a simple diet; an opinion on brain food; why is food required? drinking water; nutrition -how food nourishes the body; a day's food how used; constitutents of a day's ration-beefsteak, potatoes, bread, butter, water; germs of disease; diseases peculiar to children; digestion-time required; dieting; milk; alcohohc drinks; tobacco; should clergymen smoke? corsets; methods ot training; symmetrical development; the perfect man; the perfect woman; proper weight, height and measurement; the secret of not growing old; three rules for preventing wrinklesphysicians and drugs; Christian science; catching cold; bathing; the uses of salt; catarrh; a clear complexion; sleeping; insomnia; the care of the feet; color of the clothing; breathity

Body. who '*?~J'^ifu^^*'?,<><'t^^ follow its A book that value health should read and By Prot E. B. Warman, the well known lecturerinstructions. and author-

\J

ing; ventilation.

Price 10 cents.

Prnf%'
'

B.

culture. Issued.

Rw"^ \? Swing Indian Clubs. By Warman, the well known exponent of physical
The most complete work on
this special subject ever directions carefully anyone can be-

come an expert club swinger in a short time, as the diagrams are very plainly and intelligently drawn. Price I

By following the

ce n is.

No. 185-Health Hints. series of articles by Prof. E. B. Warman, the well known lecturer and authority on physical culture. Prof. Warman treats very interestingly of health influenced by insulation; health influenced by underwear ; health influenced by color; exercise, who needs it. PricelOcentS
^1

By Prof. e. B. Warman. Contents: Basic principles; longevity; hints on eating-the process of digestion food values, the uses of salt, medicinal value of certain foods nutrition, food values compared, the efficacy of sugar, sugar food for muscular work, eating for strength and endurance, fish as brain food, food for the children, digestibility, a word about condiments, bread, appendicitis due to flour why we eat some foods; hints on drinking-water, milk, buttermilk, tea coffee' how to remain young; hints on bathing-cold, hot, warm, tepid, salt. Russian' lurkish, cabinet, sun, air; hints on breathmg-breathlessness, heart strain second wind, correct breathing, yawning, the art of Yogi, breathing as applied to bicycling. Price lO cents.

No. 208-Physical Education and Hygiene.

AMERICAN SPORTS PUBLISHING COMPANY, New

York.

ANSWERS OX^ HEALTH warman ^V4f


by prof. e. b. SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY
No. 213

mmmrsema
"
altitude; eye exercises.

PRICE

10

CENTS
NEW YORK

WARREN STREET, AMERICAN SPORTS PllBUSHING COMPANY, 15

A SPECIAL AWARD ^r GRAND PRIZE


were won by A. G.

SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana

Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus, Base Ball and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair. =5 Cr-

"^

j<:j:rs

THE SPALDING OFFICIAL LEAGUE BALL


Used exclusively by the National Leag'ue, Minor Leagues, and by all Intercollegiate and other Associations for over a quarter of a century. Each ball wrapped in tinfoil and put in a separate box, and sealed in accordance with the regulations of the National League and American Association. Warranted to last a full game when used under ordinary conditions.

Each, $1.25
A. G.

SPALDING & BROS.


St. Louis Baltimore

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

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Pittsburg

San Francisco

(U.

New

Orleans

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ASPECIAUWARD^r GRAND PRIZE


were won by A. G. SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus, Base Ball and Athletic Su pplies show n at the World's Fair
=DC^

liTe

Spalding Official

Intercollegiate

Foot

Ball

WE

have spared no expense In making' this ball perfect in every detail, and offer it as the finest foot ball ever produced. Each ball is thoroughly tested, packed in a separate box and sealed, so that our customers are guaranteed a perfect ball inside when same is received with seal unbroken. polished and nickel-plated brass foot ball inflater and lacing needle will be packed with each Intercollegiate foot ball without extra charge. Used exclusively by all the leading' universities, colleges and athletic associations without exceptiouo

No. J5.

Complete, $4.00

A. G.

SPALDING & BROS.


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Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Denver Kansas City

San Francisco

(U,

New Orleans

Buffalo Philadelphia Washington Montreal, Can.

Pittsburg Syracuse Cincinnati London, England

A SPECIAL AWARD ': (RAND PRIZE

were won by A. G. SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus, Base B all and Athletic Su pplies shown at the World's Fair

THE SPALDING "OFFICIAL"


BASKET BALL
Officially

adopted and
in
all

must be used

match
cover
is

games.

The

made

in eight

sections,

with capless

ends and of the finest and most carefully selected


leather.
is

pebble

grain

The bladder
specially for

made

this ball, of extra qual-

Para rubber. Each packed complete, in sealed box, and guaranteed perfect in every
ity

ball

detail.

No. M.

"Official" Basket,

Ball.

Each, $5.00

Extracts from Official Rule Book

RULE IL-BALL
Sec. 3. The ball made by A. G. Spalding & Bros, shall be the official ball. Official balls will be stamped as herewith, and will be in sealed boxes.

RULE IIL-GOALS.
Sec. 3. The goal made by A. G. Spalding & Bros, shall be the official goal.

Sec.

4.

be used in

The official ball must all match games.

i)

Sec. 4. The official goal must be used in all match games.


ti'

A. G.

SPALDING & BROS.


St. Louis Baltimore

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Boston

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nPen riinutes' Exercise Dr. Luther Guiick for Busy fleH


Dr. Guiick says: "The experience of years has demonstrated the efficiency of the exercises contained in Ten Minutes' Exercise for Busy Men in securing the ends for vvhich they were devised. Many letters have been written by men, testifying to the great benefit which they have secured from these few minutes of simple but vigorous work. i> * * The correspondence schools of physical training have come into great activity. Their general aim is to build up big mus*
'

:ic

A somewhat careful investigation of them satisfies me that they are inferior to thr exercises in this drill for purposes of building up vigor and manliness. One of the most vigorous claims of some of these schools, namely, that the heart particularly is benecles.

fited by their work, is false, for I have had case after case of men whose hearts have been injured by taking the correspondence schools' work when they were not in condi-

tion for

it.

" The exercises in Ten Muiutes* Exercise for Busy Men are recommended with the confidence of long, The results secured successful use. are better than those possible from the correspondence school work in the specific directions mentioned."
'

PRICE BY
lo

MAIL CENTS

American
Sports
Publishing
Cj.
1

6-

Park

Place

New York

HOW TO BECOME A BOXER


For many years publications have been issued on the art of boxing that
to a certain extent did not enable the "ovice nor the youth to become proficient in the manly art. There is probably no man in America better qualified to teach boxing than Prof. William Elmer, and in his book on the subject he goes into it very exhaustively. The book contains about

seventy full page illustrations, showing how each blow is to be made, how to attack and how to defend yourself. It shows how the hands must be held and the positions to take, with descriptions that are so accurate that any boy can take them, open them up and with a young friend become proficient. Besides being a fully illustrated book on the art of self-defence, it contains nearly all the photographs of the leading American boxers and the positions they
take, which in itself is instructive ; the different rules under which all contests are held, and articles v/hich will interest anyone on the question of physical education. In order to make this publicaticn the most accurate one issued, Piof. Elmer had his sparring partner posed personally for all the illustrations.

PRICE BY MAIL
Atnericaa

lo

CENTS.
Co.

Sports

Publishini:

16-18 Park Place,

New

York.

4 SPECUL AWARD *r GRAND PRIZE

were won by A. G. SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana siana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete /^ 'r~ plete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatu ^~:^ atus, Base Ball and Athletic Supplies shown at the World 's Fair.
) l

Spalding

Boxing Gloves
oz.

No. 9. Regulation 5 glove, gambia tan


padded with best

leather,

curled hair, patent


lacing,

palm

padded wristband, ^ patent palm grip. Sub- 1"-"


stantially

made through-^
:

out for hard usage.

:ln

Per

set,

$4.50

Regulation 5 dark wine color, padded wristband, patent

No. 14.

oz. glove,

No.

23.

Regular Pattern

palm lacing and palm Per set, $3.25 grip.


.

Regular pattern, outer handpiece of olive tanned leather, grip and cuffs of darker shade, hair padded and Per set, $1.50 patent palm lacing

No. 23.

color tanned leather, grip and

Regular pattern, outer handpiece of dark wine cufifs of darker shade; hair Per set, $1.00 . padded, elastic wristband.

No. 24.

^
New York
Boston

A. C.

SPALDING & BROS.


St.

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Denver Kansas City

San Francisco

(U,

New Orleans

Buffalo Philadelphia Washington Montreal, Can.

Pittsburg Syracuse Cincinnati London, England

\ SPECIAL AWARD 'S (RAND PRIZE

were won by A. G. SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus, Base Ball and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair

a
=^

SPALDING
BOXINfi

GLOVES
No.

M.

Corbett pattern,

large 7 oz. glove,

gambia

tan leather, padded with best curled hair, patent palm lacing, padded wrist band, patent palm grip.

Substantially
usage.

made

throughout for har


Per
set,

!
[

$4.50V^

No. 13. Corbett pattern,


olive

tanned leather, welljj, padded with hair, patent palm lacing and patent palm grip. Perset,$4.00
No. 15. Corbett pattern,
soft tanned
leather, well
hair,

padded with
No.
No.
1

padded

wristband, patent
11.

lacing, patent palm


.

palm

Corbett Pattern

grip.

Per

set,

$3.00

Corbett pattern, craven tan leather, well padded with ha^r, patent palm lacing, patent palm grip, padded wristband. Per set, $3.00

7.

No. 19. Corbett pattern, craven tan leather, well padded with hair, Perset, $2.50 . . patent palm grip and patent palm lacing.

No. 2 . Corbett pattern, grip and cuffs of olive tanned leather, balance of glove finished in dark wine color tanned leather. Well padded Perset, $2. with hair and patent palm lacing
1

OO
-^

V.
S)

A. C.

SPALDING & BROS.


St.

New York
Boston

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Denver Kansas City

San Francisco

^^
_

New Orleans

Buffalo Philadelphia Washington Montreal, Can.

Pittsburg Syracuse London. England

Cmcmnati

ASPECIALAWARD^r GRAND PRIZE

S
/f^

were won by A. G. SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, 1904. for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus, Base Ball and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair,

Spaldmg
Patent Striking Bags
Are made
terials

of the best

ma-

in

their

respective

grades and finished carefully and substantially. The bladders used are
all fully

guaran-

teed. All bags equipped with

"ball and lace" fastening.

Single

End Bags

Prices: $i.oo, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $4.00, $5.00, $5.50, $7.00.

Double End Bags


Prices: $1.00, $1.50, $2.00, $2.50, $3.00, $3.50, $4.00, $5.00.
For complete description of Spalding- Striking Bags send for Spalding's Catalogue of all Athletic Sports; mailed free to any address.

"How
By Young

to Punch the

Bag"

Corbett. Illustrated from photos showing the author at his training quarters, with description Fancy bag punching also included. of all the blows. Price ID cents.

A. G.
I
I

SPALDING & BROS.


St.

New York

Bostoi Boston New Orleans Minneapolis Baltimore Kansas City Buffalo Buffa] Philadelphia Washington Pittsburg Syracuse Cincinnati

Chicago

Louis

Denver

San Francisco

Montreal, Can.

London, England

\ SPECIAL AWARD ^r GRAND PRIZE


^ Purchase Exposition. -^
i
were won by A. G. SPALDING & BROS, at the Louisiana 1904, for the best, most complete and most attractive installation of Gymnastic Apparatus, Base Ball and Athletic Supplies shown at the World's Fair.

^
The Spalding Patent Solid Striking Bag Disks
(Patented) 'T'HE solid disk for striking bags will * always hold a high place in the estimation of many on account of the variety of work it permits. The style which we originally introduced some yeais ago is the one which has been im,i tated most generally, but in all these substitutes the makers, while making

them lighter, have uniformly


neglected
tial

the

most esen-

point

and

have produced
u n sa
t
i

a n article flimsy and


s
-

factory t o a degree.

s triking

bag disk

must be
it IS

subtantial if

be of use, and in the various styles, both


to

adjustable and braced,

which we manufacture, this feature has not been neglected, while we have striven to put out a disk which is suitable for home use and moderate in price.
: :

Wall Braced Style


No.

F-R.

Complete, without bag.

Each,

$5.00

V
5\
Boston

Send for Spalding's handsomely illustrated catalogue. Mailed free to any address.

J
(U

A.

C.

SPALDINO & BROS.


St.

New York

Chicago Minneapolis

Louis Baltimore

Denver Kansas City

San Francisco

New Orleans

Buffalo Philadelphia Washington Montreal, Can.

Pittsburg Syracuse Cincinnati London. England

Spalding's Athletic Library

SPALDING'S ATHLETIC LIBRARY

devoted to all athletic sports and pasthe recognized American cyclopedia of sport. Each book is complete in itself; and those sports which are governed by National Associations always designate Spalding's Athletic Library as the official publication. This gives to each book the official authority to contain the rules. Each year the books are brought up to date, with the latest rules, new ideas, new pictures and valuable information, thus making the series the most valuable of its kind in the world.
times, indoor

Spalding's Athletic Library and outdoor, and

is

is

price, 10 cents per copy, places them in the reach of all, and no one's library can be complete unless all numbers are found therein.

The

No. I2-Association Foot Ball


Contains valuable information, diagrams of play, and rules for both the Gaelic and Association styles of play. Price 10 cents.

No. 13

Howto Play Hand Bali By the world's champion. Michael Egan,

of Jersey City. This book has been rewritten and brought up to date in every particular. Every play is thoroughly exThe plained by text and diagram. numerous illustrations consist of full pages made from photographs of Champion Egan, showing him in all his Price 10 cents. characteristic attitudes.

No. 14-Curling
History of the sport; diagram of curling rink; rules for curling; dia-

grams of

play.

Price 10 cents.

No.
By
and

23-Canoeing
Nc. 27-College Athletics

cruising and racing canoes' Paddling, sailin C. Bowj-er Vaux. their uses; canoeing and camping. Price 10 cents.

Llurphy, the well-known athletic with Yale University, the book, has written it especischoolboy and college man, ally lor the but it is invaluable for the athlete who wishes to excel in any branch of athletic sport. The subjects comprise the following articles: Training, starting, sprinting li^w to train for the quarter, half, mile and longer distances: walking: high and broad jumping; hurdling; pole vaulting; throwing the hammer. Illustrated. Price 10 cents.
LI. C.

triuiiLr, r.ow auLi.o.- of tnis

Spalding's Athletic Library

No. 29-Exercising With Pulley Weights


By
Dr.

Henry

S.

Anderson, instructor

in heavy gymnastics Yale gymnasium, Anderson Normal School, Chautauqua

University.

In conjunction with a chest

machine anyone with this book can become perfectly developed. Contains all the various movements necessary to be-

come

proficient

and of well-developed physique.

Price 10 cents.

No. 40-Archery
By J. S. Mitchel. An introductory chapter on the use of the bow and arrow; archery of the present day; the bow and how to use it, with practical illustrations on the right and wrong method of aiming.
Price 10 cents.

No. 55-OfIcial Sporting Rules


many
Contains rules not found in other publications for the government of sports; rules for wrestling, cross-country running, shuffleboard, skating, snowshoeing, quoits, potato racing, professional racing, racquets, pigeon flying, dog racing, pistol and revolver shooting. Price 10
cents.

No.87-Athletic Primer
Edited by James E. Sullivan, SecretaryTreasurer of the Amateur Athletic Union; tells how to organize an athletic club, how to conduct an athletic meeting, and gives rules for the government of athletic meetings; contents also include directions for building a track and laying out athletic grounds, and a very instructive article on training fully illustrated with pictures of
;

leading athletes in action.

Price 10 cents.

NOi l02-Cround Tumbling


By Prof. Henry Walter Worth, who was for years physical director of the Armour Institute of Technology. Any boy, by reading this book and following the instructions, which are drawn from life, can become a proficient tumbler; all the various tricks explained. Price 10 cents.

No. 104-The Grading of Gymnastic Exercises


By G. M. Martin, Physical Director of the Y. M. C. A. of Youngstown, Ohio. It is a book that should be in the hands of every physical director The contents comprise: of the Y. M. G. A., school, club, college, etc. The place of the class in physical training; grading of exercises and season schedules grading of men, grading of exercises, season schedules for various classes, elementary and advanced classes, leaders, optional exercises, examinations, college and school work; calisthenic exercises, graded apparatus exercises and general massed class exercises. Nearly 200 pages. Price 10 cents.

all athletic contests the implements and apparatus must conform to the official rules 1 ^^^ as laid down by the governing bodies of the enable all contestants to comvarious sports, the object being to pete under uniform conditions and with the same kind of an imple-

TN

%9b

ment, for a record in any sport will not be allowed unless the implement is used. That is why Spalding implements are always selected, because they never vary in weight or measurement, but invariably conform to the mles
official

nm-wtt

designed and equipped by A. G. Spalding' & Bros., was declared by experts to be the most perfect outdoor athletic plant ever built.

THE above illustration shows the Stadium at St. Louis, in which which was the Olympic Games of 1904 were held. The
field,

ciAL i;
reliability

officials of the Louisiana Purchase Exposition, recognizing the importance and the value of of the establishing authentic Olympic records, selected Spalding Athletic

HE

OLYMPIC GAMES
official

Implements for exclusive

use

in connection with the

Olympic Games (held in the Stadium of the Exposition, from May to November) because of their acknowledged superiority,
and
official

standing.

A. G.

Spalding

&

Bros.' implements

For over a quarter of a century have been officially used.

is the Mo^el Gymnasium, whi^h entirely equipped by A. G. Spalding & Bros, with an that was pronounced a model one by American and European experts and the International Jury of the Exposition. *

TTHE building in the background


was

exhibit

Spalding's Athletic Library

No.

124-How Gymnast

to

Become

By Robert StoU,
^he American

of the

New York A. C,

champion on the flying rings from 1885 to 1892. Any boy who frequents a gymnasium can easily follow the illustrations and instructions in this book and with a little practice become proficient on the horizontal and parallel bars, the trapeze or the "horse." Price
10 cents.

No.

128-How

to

Row
New York A.

By E.
C, one

J. Giannini, of the

of America's most famous amateur oarsmen and champions. This book will instruct any one who is a lover of rowing how to become an expert. It is fully illustrated, showing how to hold the oars, the finish of the stroke and other information that will prove valuable to the beginner. Contains also the official laws of boat racing of the National Association of Amateur Oarsmen. Price 10 cents.

No. 129-Water Polo


By Gus Sundstrom, instructor at the C. It treats of every detail, the individual work of the players, the practice of the team, how to throw the ball, with illustrations and many valuable hints. Price 10 cents.

New York A.

No. 135 -Official Handbook of the A. A. U. of the United States


The A. A. U.
is

the governing body of

athletes in the United States of America, and all games must be held under its rules, which are exclusively published in this

handbook, and a copy should be in the hands of every athlete and every club America. TJhis book contains the official rules for running, jumping, weight throwing, hurdling, pole vaulting, swimming, boxing, wrestling, etc., and is an encyclopedia in itself. Price 10 cents.
officer in

No. 136-OfriciaI Y. M. C. A.

Handbook

Edited by G. T. Hepbron, the well-known athletic authority. It contains the official rules governing all sports under the jurisdiction of the Y. M. C. A., a complete report of the physical directors' conference, official Y. M. C. A. scoring tables, pentathlon rules, many pictures of the leading Y. M. C. A. athletes of the country, oflficial Y. M. C. A. athletic rules, constitution and by-laws of the Athletic League of Y. M. C. A., all around indoor test, volley ball rules; illustrated. Price 10 cents.

No. l38-Of1cial Croquet Guide


Contains directions for playing, diagrams of important strokes, description of grounds, instructions for the beginner, terms used in the sanuiu and *^he official playing rules. Price 10 cents.

Spalding* s Athletic Library

No. 140-Wrestling
Catch as catch can style. By E. H. Hitchcock, M. D., of Cornell, and R. F. Nelligan, of Amherst College. The book contains nearly seventy illustrations of the different holds, photographed especially and so described that anybody who desires to become expert in wrestling can with little effort learn every one. Price 10 cents.

No. 142-Physical Training Simplified


By Prof. E. B. Warman, the well-known physical culture expert. Is a complete, thorough and practical book where the whole man is consideredbrain and body. By following the instructions no apparatus is required. The book is adapted for both sexes. The exercises comprise directions as follows: how to stand; how to sit; how to rest; breathing; exercises for the fingers, wrists, elbows, shoulders, neck, hips, knees, ankles; a word about the muscles; the arms and thighs; shoulders and chest; waist; sides; back and abdomen; bowing; bending; twisting; the liver squeezer, etc., 6tc, Fully illustrated. Price 10 cents.

No. 143 -Indian Clubs and Dunnb-Bells


Two of the most popular forms of home This book is or gymnasium exercise. written by America's amateur champion It is club swinger, J. H. Dougherty. clearly illustrated, by which any novice can become an expert. Price lOcents.

No. 149-The Care of the Body


book that all who value health should read and follow its instrucBy Prof. E. B. Warman, the well known lecturer and authority on physical culture. The subject is thoroughly treated, as a glance at the following small portion of the contents shows: An all-around athlete; muscular Christianity; eating; diet various opinions; bill of fare for brain workers; bill of fare for muscle-makers; what to eat and drink; a simple diet; an opinion on brain food; why is food required? drinking water; nutrition how food nourishes the body; a day's food, how used; constituents of a day's ration beefsteak, potatoes bread, butter, water; germs of disease; etc. Price 10 cents.
tions.

No. 154-Field Kockey


To those in need of vigorous and healthful out-of-doors exercise, this game is Its healthful atrecommend'^d highly. tributes are manifold and the interest of player and spectator alike is kept active

The game

throughout the progress of the game. is prominent in the sports at Vassar, Smith, Wellesley, Bryn Mawr and
Price 10 cents.

other leading colleges.

No. 156-The Athlete's Guide How to become an athlete. It contains


full instructions for the beginner, telling how to sprint, hurdle, jump and throw

comprise

many

weights, general hints on training; in fact, this book is one of the most complete on the subject that has ever appeared. Special chapters contain valuable advice to beginners and important A. A. U. rules and their explanations, while the ]4cture3 scenes showing champions in action. Price 10 cents.

Spalding's Athletic Library

No.

r57-How

to Play

Lawn

description of lawn tennis; a lesson for beginners and directions telling how to make the most important strokes; styles and skill of the experts; the American twist service; how to build and keep a court. Illustrated from photographs

Tennis A complete

of leading players in action. Price 10 cents.

No. 158-lndoor and Outdoor Gynnnastic

Games

Without question one of the best books of its kind ever published. Compiled by Prof. A. M. Chesley, the well-known Y. M. C. A. physical director. It is a book that will prove valuable to indoor and outdoor gymnasiums, schools, outings and gatherings where there are a number to be amused. The games described comprise a list of 120, divided into several
groups.
Price 10 cents.

No. 161-Ten Minutes' Exercise for Busy Men


By Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, superintendent of physical training in the New
York public
schools.

Anyone who

is

look-

ing for a concise and complete course of physical education at home would do well to procure a copy of this book. Ten minutes' work as directed is exercise anyone can follow. It already has had a large sale and has been highly commended by all who have followed its instructions.

Nearly 100 pages of illustrations and 100 of text. Price 10 cents.

No. 162

How

to

Become a

Boxer
For many years books have been issued on the art of boxing, but it has remained for us to arrange a book that we think is sure to fill all demands. It contains over 70 pages of illustrations showing all the latest blows, posed especially for this book under the supervision of one of the best instructors of boxing in the United States, who makes a specialty of teaching and who knows how to impart his knowledge. They are so arranged that anyone can easily become a proficient boxer. The book also contains pictures of all the well known boxers. A partial list of the 200 pages of
the book include: history of boxing; how to box; the correct position; the hands; clenching the fist; the art of gauging distance; the first principles of hitting; the elements of defence; feinting; knockout blows; the chin punch; the blow under the ear; the famous solar plexus knockout; the heart blow; famous blows and their originators: Fitzsimmons' contribution; the McCoy corkscrew; the kidney punch; the liver punch; the science of boxing; proper position of hand and arm; left hook to face; hook to the jaw; how to deliver the solar plexus; correct delivery of a right uppercut; blocking a right swing and sending a right uppercut to chin; blocking a left swing and sending a left uppercut to chin; the side step; hints on training, diet and breathing; how to train; rules for boxing. Price 10 cents.

Spalding* s Athletic Library

No. 165-The Art of Fencing


This is a new book by Regis and Louis Senac, of New York, famous instructors and leading authorities on the subject. Messrs. Senac give in detail how every move should be made, and tell it so clearly that anyone can follow the instructions.
It is illustrated

with sixty

full

page

pic-

tures, posed especially Price 10 cents.

for

this

book.

No. 166-How to Swing Indian Clubs


o^^^^^^^^B|

By Prof. E. B. Warman, the well-known exponent of physical culture. The most complete work on this special subject ever issued. By following the directions carefully anyone can become an expert. Price
10 cents.

No. 167-Quoits
on

many who wished

By M. W. Deshong. The need of a book this interesting game has been felt by to know the fine points

and tricks used by the experts. Mr. Deshong explains them, with illustrations,
so that a novice can readily understand. Price 10 cents.

Wo. i70-Push Ball


Played with an air-inflated ball 6 feet in diameter, weighing about side consists of eleven men. This book contains the official 50 pounds. rules and a sketch of the game; illustrated. Price 10 cents.

No.

Women

17 1-Basket

Bali

for

Edited by Miss Senda Berenson, of Smith College. Contains the rules for basket ball for women as adopted by the conference on physical training, held in June, 1899, at Springfield, Mass., and articles on the following subjects: Psychological effects of basket ball for women, by Dr. Luther H. Gulick, superintendent of physical training in the schools of Greater New York; physiological effects of Theodore Hough, Ph. D. ; significance of basket ball for basket ball, by women, by Senda Berenson; relative merit of the Y. M. C A. rules and women's rules, by Augusta Lane Patrick; practical side of basket ball, by Ellen Emerson, B. K., Agnes Childs, A. B., Fanny Garrison. A. B.; Plea for Basket Ball, by Julie EUsbee Sullivan, Teachers' College, New York; diagram of field, showing position of team; illustrated with many pictures of basket ball teams. Price 10 cents.

Spalding^ s Athletic Library

No. 174-Distance and Cross

Country Running
Orton, the famous University of Pennsylvania runner. Tells how to become proficient at the quarter, half, mile, the longer distances, and. cross-country running and steeplechasing, with instructions for training and schedules to be observed when preparing for a contest. Illustrated with numerous pictures of leading athletes In action, with comments by the editor on the good and bad points shown. Price 10 cents.

By George

No.

177-How

to

Swim

Sterrett, the leading authority on swimming in America. The instructions will interest the expert as well as the novice; the illustrations were made from photographs especially posed, showing the swimmer in clear water; a valuable feature is the series of "land drill" exercises for the beginner, which is illustrated by many

By J. H.

drawings. The contents comprise: plea . , . for education in swimming; swimming as an exercise and for development; land drill exercises; plain swimming; best methods of learning; the breast stroke; breathing; under-arm side stroke; scientific strokes over-arm side stroke: double over-arm or "trudgeon" stroke; touching and turning; training for racing; ornamental swimming; floating; divmg; running header; back dive; diving feet foremost; the propeller; marching on the water; swimming on the back; amateur swimming rules; amateur plunging rules.. Price 10 cents.

No. i78-How to Bicycling

Train

for

GD
A

Gives methods of the best riders when training for long or short distance races; hints on training. Revised and up-to-date in every particular. Price 10 cents.

No, 180-Ring Hockey


new game for the gymnasium, invented by Dr. J. M. Vorheea of Pratt Institute, Brooklyn, that has sprung into instant popularity ; as exciting as basket ball. This book contains official rules. Price 10 cents.

No. 182-AII-Around Athletics


Gives in full the method of scoring the All-Around Championship, giving percentage tables showing what each man receives for each performance in each of the ten events. It contains as well instructive articles on how to train for the All-Around Championship. Illustrated with many pictures of champions in action and scenes at all-around meetSo Price
10 cents.

Spalding's Athletic Library

No. 185-Health Hints


series of articles by Prof. E. B. Warman, the well known lecturer and authority on physical culture. Prof. Warman treats very interestingly of health influenced by insulation; health influenced by underwear; health influenced by color exercise, who needs it ? Price 10 cents.
;

No.

187-How
J. C.

to Play Roller Polo


;

Edited by

pictures of teams

Morse. A full description of the game official rules ; other articles of interest. Price 10 cents.

No. 188-Lawn Hockey, Tether Tennis, Coif Croquet, Volley Ball, Hand Tennis, Carden Hockey, Parlor Hockey, Badminton
Containing the rules for each game.
Illustrated.

Price 10 cents.

No. 189-Rules for


ment of education.

Cames

Compiled by Jessie H. Bancroft, director of physical training, departNew York City. These games are intended for use at recesses, and all but the team games have been adapted to large
classes. Suitable for children from three to eight years, and include a great variety, divided under the general heads of ball games, bean bag games, circle games, singing and miscellaneous games. Price 10 cents.

No. !9l-How to

Punch the

Bag
By W. H. Roth well ("Young Corbett"), champion featherweight of the world.
is undoubtedly the best treatise on bag punching that has ever been printed. Every variety of blow used in training is shown and explained. The pictures comprise thirty-three full page reproductions of Young Corbett as he appears while at work in his training quarters. The photographs were taken by our special artist and cannot be seen in any other publication than Spalding's Athletic Library No. 191. Fancy bag punching is treated by a well known theatrical bag puncher, who shows the latest tricks. Price 10 cents.

This book

No.

193-How

to Play Basket

T. Hepbron, editor of the Official Basket Ball Guide. Contains full instructions for players, both for the expert and the novice, duties of officials, and specially posed full page pictures showing the correct and incorrect methods of playing. The demand for abook of this character is fully satisfied in this publication, as

Ball By G.

many

points are Included which could not be incorporated in the annual publication of the Basket Ball Guide for want of room. Price 10 cents.

Spalding's Athletic Library

No. 194-Racquets, Squash-

Racquets and Court Tennis


The need of an authoritative handbook at a popular price on these games is filled by this book. How to play each game is thoroughly explained, and all the difficult strokes shown by special photographs taken especially for this book. Contains the official rules for each game, with courts. Price 10 cents.

photographs of well known

No.r95-Official

Roque Guide

The official publication of the National Roque Association of America. Edited by


Prof. Charles Jacobus, ex-champion. Con-, tains a description of the courts and their construction, diagrams of the field, illustrations, rules and valuable information concerning the game of roque. Price 10 cents.

No.

99-Equestrian Guide
1

Polo

New York Sun.

Compiled by H. L. FitzPatrick of the Illustrated with portraits

of leading players and contains most useful information for polo players in relation to playing the game, choosing of equipment and mounts; contains the official rules and handicaps of the National Association, Price 10 cents.

No. 200-Dumb-Bei!s
This is undoubtedly the best work on dumb-bells that has ever been offered. The author, Mr. G. Bojus, of New York City, was formerly superintendent of physical culture in the Elizabeth (N.J.) public
schools, instructor at Columbia University, instructor for four years at the Columbia summer school, and is now proprietor of the Liberty Street Gymnasium, at 121 Liberty Street, New York City. The book contains 200 photographs of all the various exercises, with the instructions in large, readable type. It should be in the hands of every teacher and pupil of physical culture, and is invaluable for home exercise as well. Price 10 cents.

No.

201-Lacrosse-From Candidate
;

to

Team

By William C. Schmeisser, captain intercollegiate lacrosse team of 1902


ner, rendering
it

Johns Hopkins University champion edited by Ronald T. Abercrombie, ex-captain and coach of Johns Hopkins University lacrosse team, 1900-1904. Every position is thoroughly explained in a most simple and concise manthe best manual of the

game ever

with numerous snapshots of important plays.

published. Illustrated Price 10 cents.

Spalding's Athletic Library

No.

202-How

to

Play Base

Ball
Edited by T. Ho Murnane. New and revised edition. Contents: How to become a
batter,

by Napoleon Lajoie, James Collins, Jesse Tannehill; how to run the bases, by Jack Doyle and Frank L, Chance; advice to base runners, by James E. Sullivan, Secretary-Treasurer A.A.U.; how to become a good pitcher,

Hugh Jennings and

by Cy Young, "Rube" Waddell and Bert Cunningham; on curve pitchincr, by Cy Young, James J. Callahan, Frank Donahue, Vic Willis, "William Dineen and Charley Nichols: how to become a good catcher, by Eddie Phelps, William Sullivan and M. J. Kittridge; how to play first base, by Hugh Jennings; how to play second base, by Napoleon Lajoie and William Gleason; how to play third base, by James Collins and Lave Cross; how to play shortstop, by Herman Long; how to play the infield, by Charles A. Comiskey; how to play the outfield, by Fred Clarke; the earmarks of a ball player, by John J. McGraw; good advice for players; how to organize a team; how to manage a team; how to score a game; how to umpire a game; base ball rules interpreted for boys. Price 10 cents.

No, 204-Oflcial Intercollegiate A. A. A.


athletics,

Handbook

one interested the book

is

Contains constitution, by-laws, laws of and rules to govern the awarding of the championship cup of the Inof Athletic Association tercollegiate Amateur Athletes of America, the governing body in college athletics. Contains official intercollegiate records from 1876 to 1904, with the winner's name and time in each event, list of points won by each college, and list of officers of the association from 1889 to 1904, inclusive. To anyinvaluable as a record. Price 10 cents.

No. 205-Ofncial Handbook of the Public Schools Athletic League


which embraces
the
official

official handbook of the Public Schools Athletic League, all the public schools of Greater New York. It contains rules that govern all the contests of the league, and constitution, by-laws and officers. Edited by Dr. Luther Halsey Gulick, superintendent of physical education in the New York public schools, and Wm. C. J. Kelly, secretary of the league. Illustrated. Price 10 cents.

This

is

the

No.
No

206-How

to Play Golf

golfer should miss having a copy of

this golf guide. Harry Vardon tells how to play game, with life-like illustrations showing the different strokes. The book also contains the revised official rules, official records, as well as pictures of many important players, and a directory giving name, address, membership and length of golf course of clubs in the United States. Price 10 centSo

Spalding's Athletic Library

207-Bowling on the Creen; or. Lawn Bowls How to construct a green necessary equip*
No,
;

ment; how to play the game, and the official rules as promulgated by the Scottish Bowling Association. Edited by Mr. James

W.

Greig.

Illustrated.

Price 10 cents.

No. 208-PhysIcal Education and Hygiene


This is the fifth of the Physical Training series, by Prof. E. B. Warman and 185). and a glance at the contents will show the variety of subjects Chapter I Basic principles ; longevity. Chapter II Hints on eating food values ; the uses of salt. Chapter III Medicinal value of certain foods. Chapter IV The efficacy of sugar sugar, food for muscular work eating for strength and endurance ; fish as brain food food for the children. appenChapter Digestibility bread dicitis due to flour. Chapter VI Hints on drinking Water, milk, buttermilk, tea, coffee how to remain young. Chapter VII Hints on bathing ; cold, hot, warm, tepid, salt, sun, air, Russian, Turkish, cabinet. Chapter VIII Hints on breathing; breathlessness, heart strain, second wind, yawning, the art of yogi. Price 10 cents.
(see Nos. 142, 149, 166
: ;

No.

209-How

to Beconne a Skater

Contains advice for beginners; how to become a figure skater thoroughly explained, with many diagrams showing how to do all the different tricks of the best figure skaters, including the Mohawk, with all its variations; Q's, forward and backward, inside and outside; the crosscuts, including the difficult Swedish style; inside and outside spins; the grapevine, with its numerous branches, and many other styles, which will be comparatively simple to any one who follows the directions given. Profusely illustrated with pictures of prominent skaters and numerous diagrams. Price 10 cents.

No.

210-How

to Play Foot Ball

Edited by Walter Camp. The contents embrace everything that a beginner wants to know and many points that an expert will be glad to learn. The pictures are made from snapshots of leading teams and individual players in action, with comments by Walter Camp. Price 10 cents.

No.
new

2M -Spalding's Official Foot Ball Guide

Edited by Walter Camp. Contains the rules, with diagram of field as newly

arranged; special chapters on the game, foot ball for the spectator, All-America teams, as selected by leading authorities Middle West, Southern, Canadian foot ball, records. ;;.nd pictures of all the prominent teams, embracing nearly 3,000 players. Price 10 cents.
;

No. 212-Official Basket Ball

Guide
Edited by George T. Hepbron. Contains the revised official rules, decisions on disputed points, records of prominent teams, reports on the game from various parts of the country, and pictures of hundreds of players. The standard basket ball annual of the country. Price 10 cents.

Spaldtng^s Athletic Library

No. 213-285 Health

Answers

Contents: Necessity for exercise in the summer; three rules for bicy. cling; when going up-hill; sitting out on summer nights; ventilating a bedroom; ventilating a house; how to obtain pure air; bathing; salt water baths at home; a substitute for ice water; drinking ice water; to cure insomnia; asleep in two minutes; for those who ride_ wheels; summer outdoor exercise; profuse perspiration; danger of checking perspiration? dress, kot weather, etc., etc. Price 10 cents.

No. 2r4-Graded Calisthenics and Dumb-Beii


Drills

By Albert B. Wegener, Physical Director Y. M. C. A., Rochester, N. Y. Ever since graded apparatus work has been used in gymnastics, the necessity of having a mass drill that would harmonize with it has been felt. For years it has been the established custom in most gymnasiums of memorizing a set drill, never varied from one year's end to the other. Consequently the beginner was given the same kind and amount as the older member. With a view to giving uniformity the present treatise ig
attempted.
Price 10 cents

No. 215-fndoor Base Bali


America's national game is now vieing w^ith other indoor games as 9. winter pastime. This book contains the playing rules, pictures of leadinjp teams, and interesting articles on the game. Price 10 cents.

No.
By

216-How
S.

to

Become a Bowier

Karpf, Secretary of the American Bowling Congress, and one of the best posted men on bowling in America. Contents: History of the sport; diagrams of effective deliveries; how to bowl; a few hints to beginners; American Bowling Congress; the national championships; how to build an alley; how to score; spares how they are made. Rules for cocked hat, cocked hat and feather, quintet, battle game, nine up and nine down, head pin and four back, ten pins head pin out, five back, the Newport game, ten pin head pin game, duckpin game, head pin game, Dayton candle (rubber neck) pin game. New England candle pin game. Illustrated with portraits of all the prominent bowlers. Price 10 cents.

No. 2l7-Of1ciai Athletic

Al^

manac
Compiled by J. E. Sullivan, Chief Depart*

ment Physical Culture, Louisiana Purchase


Exposition, and Director Olympic Games, 1904. The only annual pubHcation now issued that contains a complete list of amateur best-on-records; complete intercollegiate records; complete English records from 1866; swimming records; interrecords; reports of scholastic records; Irish, Scotch and Australasian skating records; important athletic events and leading athletic meets; numerous photos of individual athletes and leading athletic teams. This contains the only full year's issue is a special Olympic Games number and account of the Olympic Games of 1904. and a review of Anthropological stadium, being the first time on record where Days at the World's Fair exclusive parathletic events were contested in which savages were the a comparison ticipants, thus forming the first authoritative basis for between the abilities of the civilized athlete and the savage. Price 10 cents.

Spalding* s Athletic Library

No.2l8-lce Hockey and Ice Polo


Written by the most famous player in Canada, A. Farrell, of the Shamrock hockey team of Montreal. It contains a complete description of the game, its origin, points of a good player, and an instructive arIllusticle on how game is played, with diagrams and official rules.
trated with pictures of leading teams.

Price 10 cents.

No. 219 Base Ball

Percen-

tage Book
To supply a demand for a book which would show the percentage of clubs without recourse to the arduous work of figuring, the publishers of Spalding's Athletic

Library have had Mr. John B. Foster, Sporting Editor of the New York Evening Telegram, compile a book which answers every requirement, and which has- met with the greatest praise for its accuracy and simplicity. No follower of the game can afford to be without it. Price 10 cents.

No. 220-OfTlcial Base Ball

Guide
Edited by Henry Chadwick, the "Father of Base Ball," the official publication of base ball. It contains a complete record of all leagues in America, pictures of teams, official rules and reviews of the game. The standard base ball annual of the country. Price 10 cents.
'

No.

221-Spaldlng's Tennis Annual

Lawn

Contains official statistics, photographs of leading players, special articles on the game, review of important tournaments,
official rules, handicapping rules les; list of fixtures for the current

and tab-

year and other valuable information. Price 10 cents.

No. 222-Spalding's OfTlcial Cricket Guide


Edited by Jerome Flannery. The most complete year book of the game that has ever been published in America. It contains all the records of the previous year, reports of special matches, official rules and pictures of all the leading teams and individual players. Price 10 cents.

Spalding's Athletic Library

An
Attention

Encyclopedia of Base Ball

the following ten numbers of Spalding's Athletic Library, embracing the greatest collection of books of insti'uction for playing the various positions in the game that has ever been published. These books are entirely new and up-to-date, and contain the latest methods of play, as only last season's star players were consulted in their compilation. Each number is complete in itself and is profusely illustrated. Be sure and ask for Spalding's Athletic Library. Price 10 cents for each book. For detailed description see following numbers;
is called to

No.

223-How

to Bat
of ball playing

The most important part

nowadays, outside of pitching, is batting. The team that can bat and has some good pitchers can win base ball games therefore, every boy and young man who has, of
;

course, already learned to catch, should turn his attention to this department of the game, and there is no better way of becoming proficient than by reading this book and then constantly practising the little tricks explained therein. It is full of good advice to batsmen, and many good batters will be surprised to find contained in it so many points of which they were unaware. Edited by Jesse F. Matteson of the Chicago American, and profusely illustrated. Price 10 cents.

No.

224-How

to

Play the

.^^1
page pictures of leading

Outrield.
Compiled especially for the young player who would become an expert. The best book on playing the outfield that has ever been published. There are just as many tricks to be learned, before a player can be a competent fielder, as there are in any other position on a nine, and this book explains them all. Illustrated with numerous
Price 10 cents.

outfielders.

No.

225-How

to Play First

Base

other position on a ball team has shown such a change for the better in recent years as first base. Modifications in line with the betterment of the sport in every department have been made at intervals, but in no other department have they been so radical. No boy who plays the initial sack can afford to overlook the points and hints contained in this book. Entirely

No

new and up
page pictures of
all

to date.

the prominent

first

basemen.

Illustrated with full Price 10 cents.

Spalding's Athletic Library

No.

226-How

to Play

Second Base
There are so few men who can cover

by

J.

second base to perfection that their names can easily be called off by anyone who follows the game of base ball. Team owners who possess such players would not part with them for thousands of dollars. These men have been interviewed and their ideas incorporated in this book for the especial benefit of boys who want to know the fine points of play at this point of the diamond. Illustrated with full page pictures. Edited E. Wray, sporting editor Globe-Democrat, St. Louis. Price 10 cents.

No.

227-How

to Play Third

Base

Third base is, in some respects, the most important of the infield. No major league team has ever won a pennant without a great third baseman. Collins of the Boston Americans and Leach of Pittsburg are two
of the greatest third basemen the game has ever seen, and their teams owe much of the credit for pennants they have won to them. These men in this book describe just how they play the position. Everything a player should know is clearly set forth and any boy will surely increase his chances of success by k careful reading of this book. Illustrated. Price 10 cents.

No. 928 stop

How

to Play Short-

produced.
Illustrated.

Shortatop is one of the hardest positions on the infield to fill, and quick thought and quick action are necessary for a player who expepts to make good as a shortstop. The views of every well known player who covers thi^ position have been sought in compiling this book, and it is offered as being the most complete book of its class ever The boy who would excel at shojrt needs to study it thoroughly.
Price 10 cents.

No.

229-^ow

to

Catch

Undoubtedly the best book on catching that has yet l^een published. Every boy who has hopes of being a clever catcher

how well known players cover Among the more noted describe their methods of play in this book are Lou Criger of the Boston Americans, Johnnie Kling of the Chicago Nationals and Jack O'Connor of the St. Louis Browns. The numerous pictures in the book comprise those of all the noted catchers in the big leagues. Price 10 cents.
should read
their position.

ones

who

Spalding's Athletic Library

No.

230-How

to Pitch

new, up-to-date book. Published for the first time this year. No boy can afford to be without a copy of it. Edited by John B. Foster of the Evening Telegram (New York). The object of this book is to aid the beginners who aspire to become clever twirlers, and its contents are the practical teaching of men who have reached the top as pitchers, and who have had experience, both as members of the best clubs playing base ball and as contenders against teams that have enjoyed national reputations. Cy Young, the famous Boston American pitcher, whose steadiness in the box is proverbial, gives advice on control of the ball and tells what a boy should do to obtain it; Sam Lcever of the Pittsburgs shows how to pitch the outcurve; William Dineen of the Boston Americans tells how to pitch an inshoot; Thomas Hughes gives hints on pitching the drop; Joe McGinnity, the "iron man," of the New York Nationals, explains how he uses his successful raise ball and his famous "cross fire"; Christy Mathewson, the pride of the New York Polo Grounds, discusses the body swing; Frank Hahn, who is left-handed, has something of interest to those who use that member; John J. McGraw, New York Giants' brilliant manager, discourses on the pitcher as a fielder, and as he started in his base ball career as a twirler, his advice has grounds for attention; Al Orth, the "curveless wonder," tells how to make a batter do what you want him to do; John Powell explains how to act when runners are on bases; Charley Nichols, the former pitcher of the Boston Nationals and now manager of the St. Louis Nationals, describes the jump ball; Frank Sparks treats of change of pace, and Jack Chesbro, the star of the New York Americans' pitching corps, describes at length the "spit" ball, of which he is so famous an exponent. The book is profusely illustrated. Price 10 cents.

No.

How

to Organize a League.

231-How to Coach; How to Captain a Team; to Manage a Team; How to Umpire: How
A useful guide to all who are interested in the above subjects. Jimmy Collins, manager-captain of the Boston Americans, writes on coaching; M. J. Kelly of the St. Paul champions, on captaining; Al Buckenberger of the Boston Nationals, on managing; Frank Dwyer of the American League staff, on umpiring: Fred Lake on minor leagues, and the editor of the book, T. H. Murnane, President of the New to organize a league. Price 10 cents.
The importance of base running as a
scientific feature of

England League, on how

No.

232-How

to

Run the Bases


the national

becoming more and more recognized each


Besides being spectacular, feats of base stealing nearly always figure in the winning of a game. Many a close contest s decided on the winning of that little strip of 90 feet which lies between cushions. When hits are few and the enemy's pitchers steady, it becomes incumbent on the opposing team to get around the bases in Effective stealing not only increases the effectiveness of
year.
i

game

is

some manner.

JUN

13

1905
Spalding's Athletic Library

the team by advancing its runners without wasting hits, but it serves to materially disconcert the enemy and frequently has caused an entire opposing club to temporarily lose its poise and throw away the game. This book gives clear and concise directions for excelling as a base runner; tells when to run and when not to do so ; how and when to slide team work on the bases in fact, every point of the game is thoroughly explained. In addition such clever men as Harry Bay, the fleet footed Clevelander; Frank Chance, Bill Dahlen and Hans Wagner describe their methods of action. Illustrated with pictures of leading players. Price
;

10 cents.

No. 233-Jiu Jitsu

A complete description of this famous Japanese system of self-defence. Each move thoroughly explained and illustrated with numerous full page pictures of Messrs. A. Minami and K. Koyama, two of the most famous
exponents of the Jiu Jitsu in America, who posed especially for this book. Be sure and ask for the Spalding Athletic Library book on Jiu
Jitsu.

Price 10 cents.

Spaldii\g*s Athletic Library is for sale

by

oil

department stores, athletic and sporting goods dealers and newsdealers.

SPALDING'S
Devoted
to

HOME LIBRARY
for the

Games and Amusements

Home

Circle

1 Chess
2-Whist

16 -Piquet

3 Dominoes and Dice 4 Poker 5 Backgammon 6 Euchre 7 Billiards 8 Ecarte 9 Checkers


10 Bezique 11-Pool
12

- Pinochle

13-Lotto 14 Hearts 15 Reversi

17-Go-Bang 18 Games of Patience 19 Children's Games 20 Cribbage 21 Drawing Room Games 22 Group of Card Games 23 Children's Games 24 Group of Card Games 25 Drawing Room Games 26 Group of Card Games 27 - Children's Games 28-Skat 29 Drawing Room GameB 30 Baccarat

PRICE

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CENTS PER COPY

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